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Sample records for joint assembly final

  1. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  2. Wrist joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kersten, L.; Johnson, J. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A wrist joint assembly is provided for use with a mechanical manipulator arm for finely positioning an end-effector carried by the wrist joint on the terminal end of the manipulator arm. The wrist joint assembly is pivotable about a first axis to produce a yaw motion, a second axis is to produce a pitch motion, and a third axis to produce a roll motion. The wrist joint assembly includes a disk segment affixed to the terminal end of the manipulator arm and a first housing member, a second housing member, and a third housing member. The third housing member and the mechanical end-effector are moved in the yaw, pitch, and roll motion. Drive means are provided for rotating each of the housings about their respective axis which includes a cluster of miniature motors having spur gears carried on the output drive shaft which mesh with a center drive gear affixed on the housing to be rotated.

  3. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    DOEpatents

    Li, Jian

    2002-01-01

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  4. Rotational joint assembly for the prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.; Jones, W. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A rotational joint assembly for a prosthetic leg has been devised, which enables an artificial foot to rotate slightly when a person is walking, running or turning. The prosthetic leg includes upper and lower tubular members with the rotational joint assembly interposed between them. The assembly includes a restrainer mechanism which consists of a pivotably mounted paddle element. This device applies limiting force to control the rotation of the foot and also restores torque to return the foot back to its initial position.

  5. Parker Lecturers Gather at Joint Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooker, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    Present and past Parker Lecturers, who are Bowie Lecturers of AGU's Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) section, gathered at the Joint Assembly in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Eugene Parker's famous paper predicting the existence of the supersonic solar wind (see Figure 1).

  6. Modeling strategy for clinched joints in assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breda, A.; Coppieters, S.; Debruyne, D.

    2016-08-01

    Clinching is a mechanical joining technique which involves severe local plastic deformation of two or more metal sheet parts resulting in a permanent mechanical interlock. Today, it is a reliable joining technique used in automotive, HVAC and general steel constructions whilst still gaining interest. As it is not computationally feasible to include detailed sub models of these type of joints in FE simulations of real-life clinched assemblies, this paper proposes a methodology to represent these connections with simplified elements. In order to calibrate the parameters governing the equivalent model, a simple shear lap and pullout test is used. This methodology is applied to clinched configurations and validated using a modified Arcan test in which both shear and pull-out loads are considered.

  7. Development of assembly and joint concepts for erectable space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquemin, G. G.; Bluck, R. M.; Grotbeck, G. H.; Johnson, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    The technology associated with the on-orbit assembly of tetrahedral truss platforms erected of graphite epoxy tapered columns is examined. Associated with the assembly process is the design and fabrication of nine member node joints. Two such joints demonstrating somewhat different technology were designed and fabricated. Two methods of automatic assembly using the node designs were investigated, and the time of assembly of tetrahedral truss structures up to 1 square km in size was estimated. The effect of column and node joint packaging on the Space Shuttle cargo bay is examined. A brief discussion is included of operating cost considerations and the selection of energy sources. Consideration was given to the design assembly machines from 5 m to 20 m. The smaller machines, mounted on the Space Shuttle, are deployable and restowable. They provide a means of demonstrating the capabilities of the concept and of erecting small specialized platforms on relatively short notice.

  8. Heavily loaded joints for assembling aerobrake support trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandel, Hannskarl; Olsson, Nils; Levintov, Boris

    1990-01-01

    The major emphasis was to develop erectable joints for large aerobrake support trusses. The truss joints must be able to withstand the large forces experienced by the truss during the aero-pass, as well as be easily assembled and disassembled on orbit by astronauts or robots. Other important design considerations include; strength, stiffness, and allowable error in strut length. Six mechanical joint designs, as well as a seventh joint design, where a high strength epoxy is injected to make the connection rigid, are presented.

  9. Rotational joint assembly and method for constructing the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandera, Pablo (Inventor); Buchele, Paul (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A rotational joint assembly and a method for constructing a rotational joint assembly are provided. The rotational joint assembly includes a first rotational component, a second rotational component coupled to the first rotational component such that the second rotational component is rotatable relative to the first rotational component in first and second rotational directions about an axis, and a flexure member, being deflectable in first and second deflection directions, coupled to at least one of the first and second rotational components such that when the second rotational component is rotated relative to the first rotational component in each of the first and second rotational directions about the axis, the flexure member is deflected in the first deflection direction and exerts a force on the second rotational component opposing the rotation.

  10. 32 CFR 644.71 - Final Title Assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Final Title Assembly. 644.71 Section 644.71... ESTATE HANDBOOK Acquisition Procurement of Title Evidence, Title Clearance, and Closings § 644.71 Final Title Assembly. (a) Disposition of final title assemblies. The final title opinion and related...

  11. Automated solar module assembly line. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bycer, M.

    1980-08-01

    The solar module assembly machine which Kulicke and Soffa delivered under this contract is a cell tabbing and stringing machine, flexible in design, and capable of handling a variety of cells and assembling strings up to 4 feet long which then can be placed into a module array up to 2 feet by 4 feet in a series or parallel arrangement, and in a straight or interdigitated array format. The machine cycle is 5 seconds per solar cell. This machine is primarily adapted to 3 inch diameter round cells with two tabs between cells. Pulsed heat is used as the bond technique for solar cell interconnects. The solar module assembly machine unloads solar cells from a cassette, automatically orients them, applies flux and solders interconnect ribbons onto the cells. It then inverts the tabbed cells, connects them into cell strings, and delivers them into a module array format using a track mounted vacuum lance, from which they are taken to test and cleaning benches prior to final encapsulation into finished solar modules. Throughout the machine the solar cell is handled very carefully, and any contact with the collector side of the cell is avoided or minimized. A lamp simulator has been used to test bonded solar cells to determine if the bonding operation had any degrading effect on the cell. I-V profile curves taken of these sample cells, before and after the bonding operation indicate no apparent effect on the electrical characteristics of the solar cell by the bonding operation.

  12. Light Weight External Tanks in Final Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This photograph was taken during the final assembly phase of the Space Shuttle light weight external tanks (LWT) 5, 6, and 7 at the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, Louisiana. The giant cylinder, higher than a 15-story building, with a length of 154-feet (47-meters) and a diameter of 27.5-feet (8.4-meters), is the largest single piece of the Space Shuttle. During launch, the external tank (ET) acts as a backbone for the orbiter and solid rocket boosters. In separate, internal pressurized tank sections, the ET holds the liquid hydrogen fuel and liquid oxygen oxidizer for the Shuttle's three main engines. During launch, the ET feeds the fuel under pressure through 17-inch (43.2-centimeter) ducts which branch off into smaller lines that feed directly into the main engines. Some 64,000 gallons (242,260 liters) of fuel are consumed by the main engines each minute. Machined from aluminum alloys, the Space Shuttle's ET is the only part of the launch vehicle that currently is not reused. After its 526,000 gallons (1,991,071 liters) of propellants are consumed during the first 8.5 minutes of flight, it is jettisoned from the orbiter and breaks up in the upper atmosphere, its pieces falling into remote ocean waters. The Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for developing the ET

  13. Neutron activation of NIF Final Optics Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaraman, S.; Dauffy, L.; Khater, H.; Brereton, S.

    2010-08-01

    Analyses were performed to characterize the radiation field in the vicinity of the Final Optics Assemblies (FOAs) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) due to neutron activation following Deuterium-Deuterium (DD), Tritium-Hydrogen-Deuterium (THD), and Deuterium-Tritium (DT) shots associated with different phases of the NIF operations. The activation of the structural components of the FOAs produces one of the larger sources of gamma radiation and is a key factor in determining the stay out time between shots to ensure worker protection. This study provides estimates of effective dose rates in the vicinity of a single FOA and concludes that the DD and THD targets produce acceptable dose rates within10 minutes following a shot while about 6-days of stay out time is suggested following DT shots. Studies are ongoing to determine the combined effects of multiple FOAs and other components present in the Target Bay on stay-out time and worker dose.

  14. Algorithm for genome contig assembly. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    An algorithm was developed for genome contig assembly which extended the range of data types that could be included in assembly and which ran on the order of a hundred times faster than the algorithm it replaced. Maps of all existing cosmid clone and YAC data at the Human Genome Information Resource were assembled using ICA. The resulting maps are summarized.

  15. Spring Meeting Preview: Joint Assembly Sessions Focus on Urbanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-04-01

    The urban environment has grown to encompass not just the downtown area of a city but also the suburbs and rapidly growing exurban areas. This growth can affect a wide range of geological, physical, and biological processes. Several sessions at the 23-26 May 2006 Joint Assembly in Baltimore, Md., will explore this topic. Two union sessions on the ``Impact of Urbanization on Environmental Systems'' (U31A and U32A) will take place on Wednesday morning, 24 May, at 8:30 A.M. and 10:45 A.M. The sessions are designed to be a wide-ranging exploration of the different, multiple roles that urbanization, and the changes in the environment that accompany urbanization, have on biological and geophysical processes, said session co-convener Larry Band. Brand is Voit Gilmore distinguished professor and chair of the department of geography at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

  16. Jointly Sponsored Research Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) program funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Under this program, which has been in place since Fiscal Year 1990, DOE makes approximately $2.5 million available each year to the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to fund projects that are of current interest to industry but which still involve significant risk, thus requiring some government contribution to offset the risk if the research is to move forward. The program guidelines require that at least 50% of the project funds originate from nonfederal sources. Projects funded under the JSRP often originate under a complementary base program, which funds higher-risk projects. The projects funded in Fiscal Year 1996 addressed a wide range of Fossil Energy interests, including hot-gas filters for advanced power systems; development of cleaner, more efficient processing technologies; development of environmental control technologies; development of environmental remediation and reuse technologies; development of improved analytical techniques; and development of a beneficiation technique to broaden the use of high-sulfur coal. Descriptions and status for each of the projects funded during the past fiscal year are included in Section A of this document, Statement of Technical Progress.

  17. Smart sensor technology for joint test assembly flights.

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Nina M.; Sheaffer, Donald A.; Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Dimkoff, Jason L.; Walsh, Edward J.; Deyle, Travis Jay ); Marx, Kenneth D.; Pancerella, Carmen M.; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Armstrong, Robert C.

    2003-09-01

    The world relies on sensors to perform a variety of tasks from the mundane to sophisticated. Currently, processors associated with these sensors are sufficient only to handle rudimentary logic tasks. Though multiple sensors are often present in such devices, there is insufficient processing power for situational understanding. Until recently, no processors that met the electrical power constraints for embedded systems were powerful enough to perform sophisticated computations. Sandia performs many expensive tests using sensor arrays. Improving the efficacy, reliability and information content resulting from these sensor arrays is of critical importance. With the advent of powerful commodity processors for embedded use, a new opportunity to do just that has presented itself. This report describes work completed under Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project 26514, Task 1. The goal of the project was to demonstrate the feasibility of using embedded processors to increase the amount of useable information derived from sensor arrays while improving the believability of the data. The focus was on a system of importance to Sandia: Joint Test Assemblies for ICBM warheads. Topics discussed include: (1) two electromechanical systems to provide data, (2) sensors used to monitor those systems, (3) the processors that provide decision-making capability and data manipulation, (4) the use of artificial intelligence and other decision-making software, and (5) a computer model for the training of artificial intelligence software.

  18. Grinding assembly, grinding apparatus, weld joint defect repair system, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, Eric D.; Watkins, Arthur D.; Bitsoi, Rodney J.; Pace, David P.

    2005-09-27

    A grinding assembly for grinding a weld joint of a workpiece includes a grinder apparatus, a grinder apparatus includes a grinding wheel configured to grind the weld joint, a member configured to receive the grinding wheel, the member being configured to be removably attached to the grinder apparatus, and a sensor assembly configured to detect a contact between the grinding wheel and the workpiece. The grinding assembly also includes a processing circuitry in communication with the grinder apparatus and configured to control operations of the grinder apparatus, the processing circuitry configured to receive weld defect information of the weld joint from an inspection assembly to create a contour grinding profile to grind the weld joint in a predetermined shape based on the received weld defect information, and a manipulator having an end configured to carry the grinder apparatus, the manipulator further configured to operate in multiple dimensions.

  19. Joint Technical Architecture for Robotic Systems (JTARS)-Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Holloway, Sidney E., III

    2006-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the Joint Technical Architecture for Robotic Systems (JTARS) project, funded by the Office of Exploration as part of the Intramural Call for Proposals of 2005. The project was prematurely terminated, without review, as part of an agency-wide realignment towards the development of a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and meeting the near-term goals of lunar exploration.

  20. 32 CFR 644.71 - Final title assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final title assembly. 644.71 Section 644.71 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Acquisition Procurement of Title Evidence, Title Clearance, and Closings § 644.71...

  1. The proto-type wrist joint assembly TACPAW (Triple Axis Common Pivot Arm Wrist), phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kersten, L.

    1978-01-01

    A wrist joint assembly is described for use with a mechanical manipulator arm for finely positioning an end-effector carried by the wrist joint on the terminal end of the manipulator arm. The wrist joint assembly is pivotable about a first axis to produce a yaw motion, a second axis to produce a pitch motion, and a third axis to produce a roll motion. The performance of the wrist configuration is indicative of the capability to produce the 15 ft lb torque in either one of the three motions and the smoothness of operation is notable.

  2. Design of a welded joint for robotic, on-orbit assembly of space trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, W. K.; Thomas, F. P.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary design for a weldable truss joint for on-orbit assembly of large space structures is described. The joint was designed for ease of assembly, for structural efficiency, and to allow passage of fluid (for active cooling or other purposes) along the member through the joint. The truss members were assumed to consist of graphite/epoxy tubes to which were bonded 2219-T87 aluminum alloy end fittings for welding on-orbit to truss nodes of the same alloy. A modified form of gas tungsten arc welding was assumed to be the welding process. The joint was designed to withstand the thermal and structural loading associated with a 120-ft diameter tetrahedral truss intended as an aerobrake for a mission to Mars.

  3. Definition of large components assembled on-orbit and robot compatible mechanical joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamsen, J.; Thomas, F.; Finckenor, J.; Spiegel, B.

    1990-01-01

    One of four major areas of project Pathfinder is in-space assembly and construction. The task of in-space assembly and construction is to develop the requirements and the technology needed to build elements in space. A 120-ft diameter tetrahedral aerobrake truss is identified as the focus element. A heavily loaded mechanical joint is designed to robotically assemble the defined aerobrake element. Also, typical large components such as habitation modules, storage tanks, etc., are defined, and attachment concepts of these components to the tetrahedral truss are developed.

  4. Solder joint reliability in alternator power diode assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, T.Y.; White, S.C.; Lutz, E.L.; Blair, H.D.; Nicholson, J.M.

    1999-11-01

    Power diodes in an alternator convert alternating current, generated by the spinning magnetic field, to direct current to be used by the battery and all the automotive electrical/electronic components. The diodes are press-fit into aluminum heatsinks to quickly and efficiently dissipate the heat from the silicon dies in the diode body. The diodes are soldered to a rectifier circuit board through the diode leads by a wave soldering process using a Pb-free, eutectic Sn-3.5Ag solder. A set of positive diodes reside on a different substrate than the set of negative diodes, resulting in differences in the lengths of the diode leads. The distance from the diode body to the solder joint on the leads of the positive diodes is 7 mm less than those of the negative diodes. Solderability, cross-section micrographs, and thermal-cycling fatigue reliability studies were compared between the positive and negative diodes and between diode designs from different suppliers. Wetting balance testing showed significant differences in solderability between positive and negative diodes and between the two different diode designs. Combining the diode body and lead together had a more drastic effect on the solderability than the lead alone. It was discovered that, although the nature of the diode design is to dissipate the heat away from the diode quickly and efficiently, there is a large temperature gradient along the lead immediately above the solder bath which can be as much as 100 C just 2 mm from the bath. This large temperature gradient caused some leads to be too cold to form good solder fillets. The solder fillets obtained in the laboratory wetting tests matched those observed in the actual alternators. The inadequate solder fillets resulted in a 250% difference in the thermal cycling fatigue reliability between the two diode designs.

  5. X-ray microscope assemblies. Final report and metrology report

    SciTech Connect

    Zehnpfennig, T.F.

    1981-04-13

    This is the Final Report and Metrology Report prepared under Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Subcontract 9936205, X-ray Microscope Assemblies. The purpose of this program was to design, fabricate, and perform detailed metrology on an axisymmetric grazing-incidence x-ray microscope (XRMS) to be used as a diagnostic instrument in the Lawrence Livermore Laser Fusion Program. The optical configuration chosen for this device consists of two internally polished surfaces of revolution: an hyperboloid facing the object; and a confocal, co-axial elliposid facing the image. This arrangement is known as the Wolter Type-I configuration. The grazing angle of reflection for both surfaces is approximately 1/sup 0/. The general optical performance goals under this program were to achieve a spatial resolution in the object plane in the soft x-ray region of approximately 1 micron, and to achieve an effective solid collecting angle which is an appreciable fraction of the geometric solid collecting angle.

  6. U. S. -Soviet joint venture near final terms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-18

    This paper reports that U.S. and Russian partners expect late this moth to register their second oil and gas joint venture in western Siberia. If plans proceed on schedule following registration, Golden Mammoth partners about June 1992 will begin drilling joint venture wells in the Bakhilovsk region.

  7. Design of a welded joint for robotic, on-orbit assembly of space trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, William K.

    1992-01-01

    In the future, some spacecraft will be so large that they must be assembled on-orbit. These spacecraft will be used for such tasks as manned missions to Mars or used as orbiting platforms for monitoring the Earth or observing the universe. Some large spacecraft will probably consist of planar truss structures to which will be attached special purpose, self-contained modules. The modules will most likely be taken to orbit fully outfitted and ready for use in heavy-lift launch vehicles. The truss members will also similarly be taken to orbit, but most unassembled. The truss structures will need to be assembled robotically because of the high costs and risks of extra-vehicular activities. Some missions will involve very large loads. To date, very few structures of any kind have been constructed in space. Two relatively simple trusses were assembled in the Space Shuttle bay in late 1985. Here the development of a design of a welded joint for on-orbit, robotic truss assembly is described. Mechanical joints for this application have been considered previously. Welded joints have the advantage of allowing the truss members to carry fluids for active cooling or other purposes. In addition, welded joints can be made more efficient structurally than mechanical joints. Also, welded joints require little maintenance (will not shake loose), and have no slop which would cause the structure to shudder under load reversal. The disadvantages of welded joints are that a more sophisticated assembly robot is required, weld flaws may be difficult to detect on-orbit, the welding process is hazardous, and welding introduces contamination to the environment. In addition, welded joints provide less structural damping than do mechanical joints. Welding on-orbit was first investigated aboard a Soyuz-6 mission in 1969 and then during a Skylab electron beam welding experiment in 1973. A hand held electron beam welding apparatus is currently being prepared for use on the MIR space station

  8. Mechanical Properties of the Assembly Welded Joint of the Oil Transportation Tank After a Long-Term Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimnev, A. L.; Zemenkova, M. Yu; Zemenkov, Yu D.; Iljyashchenko, D. P.

    2016-04-01

    The paper provides results of studying a change in mechanical properties of the design elements metal and assembly welded joints of a vertical steel tank after a long-term service in oil transport facilities.

  9. Aqueous cleaning of flux residue from solder joints. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Krska, C.M.

    1992-08-01

    Solder joints have traditionally been cleaned using chlorinated or fluorinated solvents. This study addressed alternate processing. One process involved using a saponifier/water solution to remove rosin flux residues; the other process involved using a water-soluble flux and water to remove the residues. Although both processes were satisfactory, the water-soluble flux with water cleaning proved to be the best.

  10. Flexible Assembly Solar Technology (FAST) Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Toister, Elad

    2014-11-06

    The Flexible Assembly Solar Technology (FAST) project was initiated by BrightSource in an attempt to provide potential solar field EPC contractors with an effective set of tools to perform specific construction tasks. These tasks are mostly associated with heliostat assembly and installation, and require customized non-standard tools. The FAST concept focuses on low equipment cost, reduced setup time and increased assembly throughput as compared to the Ivanpah solar field construction tools.

  11. 40 CFR 1048.612 - What is the exemption for delegated final assembly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... following exceptions and clarifications: (a) The provisions related to reduced auditing rates in 40 CFR 1068... Compliance Provisions § 1048.612 What is the exemption for delegated final assembly? The provisions of 40 CFR... final assembly? 1048.612 Section 1048.612 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  12. 40 CFR 1048.612 - What is the exemption for delegated final assembly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... following exceptions and clarifications: (a) The provisions related to reduced auditing rates in 40 CFR 1068... Compliance Provisions § 1048.612 What is the exemption for delegated final assembly? The provisions of 40 CFR... final assembly? 1048.612 Section 1048.612 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  13. Development of a truss joint for robotic assembly of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parma, George F.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of a detailed study of mechanical fasteners which were designed to facilitate robotic assembly of structures. Design requirements for robotic structural assembly were developed, taking into account structural properties and overall system design, and four candidate fasteners were designed to meet them. These fasteners were built and evaluated in the laboratory, and the Hammer-Head joint was chosen as superior overall. It had a high reliability of fastening under misalignments of 2.54 mm (0.1 in) and 3 deg, the highest end fixity (2.18), the simplest end effector, an integral capture guide, good visual verification, and the lightest weight (782 g, 1.72 lb). The study found that a good design should incorporate chamfers sliding on chamfers, cylinders sliding on chamfers, and hard surface finishes on sliding surfaces. The study also comments on robot flexibility, sag, hysteresis, thermal expansion, and friction which were observed during the testing.

  14. Numerical design and test on an assembled structure of a bolted joint with viscoelastic damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, Chaima; Balmes, Etienne; Guskov, Mikhail

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical assemblies are subjected to many dynamic loads and modifications are often needed to achieve acceptable vibration levels. While modifications on mass and stiffness are well mastered, damping modifications are still considered difficult to design. The paper presents a case study on the design of a bolted connection containing a viscoelastic damping layer. The notion of junction coupling level is introduced to ensure that sufficient energy is present in the joints to allow damping. Static performance is then addressed and it is shown that localization of metallic contact can be used to meet objectives, while allowing the presence of viscoelastic materials. Numerical prediction of damping then illustrates difficulties in optimizing for robustness. Modal test results of three configurations of an assembled structure, inspired by aeronautic fuselages, are then compared to analyze the performance of the design. While validity of the approach is confirmed, the effect of geometric imperfections is shown and stresses the need for robust design.

  15. Final development report H1632 Adjustable Caster Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kibalo, E.F.

    1994-03-01

    The H1632 Adjustable Caster Assembly was developed for use on the H1501B Transportation Accident Resistant Container (TARC). The caster can be raised and lowered via its attached leveling jack or, by removing a locking pin, can be aligned horizontally or removed for transportational purposes. The H1632 is packaged as a single kit that contains two left and two right adjustable caster assemblies along with the required support plates and hardware.

  16. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Work Plan for Corrective Action Unit 461: Joint Test Assembly Sites and Corrective Action Unit 495: Unconfirmed Joint Test Assembly Sites Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Smith

    1998-08-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration plan addresses the action necessary for the clean closure of Corrective Action Unit 461 (Test Area Joint Test Assembly Sites) and Corrective Action Unit 495 (Unconfirmed Joint Test Assembly Sites). The Corrective Action Units are located at the Tonopah Test Range in south central Nevada. Closure for these sites will be completed by excavating and evaluating the condition of each artillery round (if found); detonating the rounds (if necessary); excavating the impacted soil and debris; collecting verification samples; backfilling the excavations; disposing of the impacted soil and debris at an approved low-level waste repository at the Nevada Test Site

  17. Aging of d-Limonene-cleaned assemblies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Somer, T.A.

    1995-08-01

    The performance of 1600 electronic circuit variables was monitored throughout an 8000-hour exposure to +160{degrees}F. The variables involve 36 electronic assemblies, cleaned with various solvents, including d-Limonene, as a replacement for trichloroethylene (TCE). The assemblies were divided into four groups, including a TCE-cleaned control group at room temperature. Of the three groups exposed at +160{degrees}F, one was cleaned in TCE, one was cleaned in d-Limonene, and one was kept in a saturated d-Limonene atmosphere. No performance degradation was observed with any of the groups, including the worst-case exposure in a saturated d-Limonene atmosphere.

  18. Hazardous material minimization for radar assembly. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Biggs, P.M.

    1997-03-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendment, enacted in November 1990, empowered the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to completely eliminate the production and usage of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) by January 2000. A reduction schedule for methyl chloroform beginning in 1993 with complete elimination by January 2002 was also mandated. In order to meet the mandates, the processes, equipment, and materials used to solder and clean electronic assemblies were investigated. A vapor-containing cleaning system was developed. The system can be used with trichloroethylene or d-Limonene. The solvent can be collected for recycling if desired. Fluxless and no-clean soldering were investigated, and the variables for a laser soldering process were identified.

  19. Electron beam weld development on a Filter Pack Assembly. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dereskiewicz, J.P.

    1994-06-01

    A continuous electron beam welding procedure was developed to replace the manual gas tungsten arc welding procedure on the Filter Pack Assembly. A statistical study was used to evaluate the feasibility of electron beam welding 6061-T6 aluminum covers to A356 cast weldments throughout the joint tolerance range specified on product drawings. Peak temperature exposures were not high enough to degrade the heat sensitive electrical components inside the cast weldment. Actual weldments with alodine coating on the weld joint area were successfully cleaned using a nonmetallic fiberglass brush cleaning method.

  20. Joint Planning Group for Quality Assurance in Higher Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals of the Universities of the United Kingdom, London.

    This is the final report of the Joint Planning Group for Quality Assurance in Higher Education, whose purpose was to detail proposals for a new agency to improve quality and standards for higher education in the United Kingdom. It proposes that a UK-wide single agency replace the existing Higher Education Quality Council by October 1998. The…

  1. Autonomous intelligent assembly systems LDRD 105746 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2013-04-01

    This report documents a three-year to develop technology that enables mobile robots to perform autonomous assembly tasks in unstructured outdoor environments. This is a multi-tier problem that requires an integration of a large number of different software technologies including: command and control, estimation and localization, distributed communications, object recognition, pose estimation, real-time scanning, and scene interpretation. Although ultimately unsuccessful in achieving a target brick stacking task autonomously, numerous important component technologies were nevertheless developed. Such technologies include: a patent-pending polygon snake algorithm for robust feature tracking, a color grid algorithm for uniquely identification and calibration, a command and control framework for abstracting robot commands, a scanning capability that utilizes a compact robot portable scanner, and more. This report describes this project and these developed technologies.

  2. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator: MSFC-Langley joint test of large space structures component assembly:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA and MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  3. Weld joint concepts for on-orbit repair of Space Station Freedom fluid system tube assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Steven D.

    1993-11-01

    Because Space Station Freedom (SSF) is an independent satellite, not depending upon another spacecraft for power, attitude control, or thermal regulation, it has a variety of tubular, fluid-carrying assemblies on-board. The systems of interest in this analysis provide breathing air (oxygen and nitrogen), a working fluid (two-phase anhydrous ammonia) for thermal control, and a monopropellant (hydrazine) for station reboost. The tube assemblies run both internally and externally with respect to the habitats. They are found in up to 50 ft. continuous lengths constructed of mostly AISI 316L stainless steel tubing, but also including some Inconel 625 nickel-iron and Monel 400 nickel-copper alloy tubing. The outer diameters (OD) of the tubes range from 0.25-1.25 inches, and the wall thickness between 0.028-.095 inches. The system operational pressures range from 377 psi (for the thermal control system) to 3400 psi (for the high pressure oxygen and nitrogen supply lines in the ECLSS). SSF is designed for a fifteen to thirty year mission. It is likely that the tubular assemblies (TA's) will sustain damage or fail during this lifetime such that they require repair or replacement. The nature of the damage will be combinations of punctures, chips, scratches, and creases and may be cosmetic or actually leaking. The causes of these hypothetical problems are postulated to be: (1) faulty or fatigued fluid joints--both QD's and butt-welds; (2) micro-meteoroid impacts; (3) collison with another man-made object; and (4) over-pressure strain or burst (system origin). While the current NASA baseline may be to temporarily patch the lines by clamping metal c-sections over the defect, and then perform high pressure injection of a sealing compound, it is clear that permanent repair of the line(s) is necessary. This permanent repair could be to replace the entire TA in the segment, or perhaps the segment itself, both alternatives being extremely expensive and risky. The former would likely

  4. Weld joint concepts for on-orbit repair of Space Station Freedom fluid system tube assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Steven D.

    1993-01-01

    Because Space Station Freedom (SSF) is an independent satellite, not depending upon another spacecraft for power, attitude control, or thermal regulation, it has a variety of tubular, fluid-carrying assemblies on-board. The systems of interest in this analysis provide breathing air (oxygen and nitrogen), a working fluid (two-phase anhydrous ammonia) for thermal control, and a monopropellant (hydrazine) for station reboost. The tube assemblies run both internally and externally with respect to the habitats. They are found in up to 50 ft. continuous lengths constructed of mostly AISI 316L stainless steel tubing, but also including some Inconel 625 nickel-iron and Monel 400 nickel-copper alloy tubing. The outer diameters (OD) of the tubes range from 0.25-1.25 inches, and the wall thickness between 0.028-.095 inches. The system operational pressures range from 377 psi (for the thermal control system) to 3400 psi (for the high pressure oxygen and nitrogen supply lines in the ECLSS). SSF is designed for a fifteen to thirty year mission. It is likely that the tubular assemblies (TA's) will sustain damage or fail during this lifetime such that they require repair or replacement. The nature of the damage will be combinations of punctures, chips, scratches, and creases and may be cosmetic or actually leaking. The causes of these hypothetical problems are postulated to be: (1) faulty or fatigued fluid joints--both QD's and butt-welds; (2) micro-meteoroid impacts; (3) collison with another man-made object; and (4) over-pressure strain or burst (system origin). While the current NASA baseline may be to temporarily patch the lines by clamping metal c-sections over the defect, and then perform high pressure injection of a sealing compound, it is clear that permanent repair of the line(s) is necessary. This permanent repair could be to replace the entire TA in the segment, or perhaps the segment itself, both alternatives being extremely expensive and risky. The former would likely

  5. The human genome: Some assembly required. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Human Genome Project promises to be one of the most rewarding endeavors in modern biology. The cost and the ethical and social implications, however, have made this project the source of considerable debate both in the scientific community and in the public at large. The 1994 Graduate Student Symposium addresses the scientific merits of the project, the technical issues involved in accomplishing the task, as well as the medical and social issues which stem from the wealth of knowledge which the Human Genome Project will help create. To this end, speakers were brought together who represent the diverse areas of expertise characteristic of this multidisciplinary project. The keynote speaker addresses the project`s motivations and goals in the larger context of biological and medical sciences. The first two sessions address relevant technical issues, data collection with a focus on high-throughput sequencing methods and data analysis with an emphasis on identification of coding sequences. The third session explores recent advances in the understanding of genetic diseases and possible routes to treatment. Finally, the last session addresses some of the ethical, social and legal issues which will undoubtedly arise from having a detailed knowledge of the human genome.

  6. Understanding the complex needs of automotive training at final assembly lines.

    PubMed

    Hermawati, Setia; Lawson, Glyn; D'Cruz, Mirabelle; Arlt, Frank; Apold, Judith; Andersson, Lina; Lövgren, Maria Gink; Malmsköld, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Automobile final assembly operators must be highly skilled to succeed in a low automation environment where multiple variants must be assembled in quick succession. This paper presents formal user studies conducted at OPEL and VOLVO Group to identify assembly training needs and a subset of requirements; and to explore potential features of a hypothetical game-based virtual training system. Stakeholder analysis, timeline analysis, link analysis, Hierarchical Task Analysis and thematic content analysis were used to analyse the results of interviews with various stakeholders (17 and 28 participants at OPEL and VOLVO, respectively). The results show that there is a strong case for the implementation of virtual training for assembly tasks. However, it was also revealed that stakeholders would prefer to use a virtual training to complement, rather than replace, training on pre-series vehicles.

  7. 40 CFR 1054.610 - What is the exemption for delegated final assembly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... following auditing rate instead of the provisions specified in 40 CFR 1068.261(d)(3)(i) and (ii): (1) If you... provisions of 40 CFR 1068.261 related to delegated final assembly do not apply for handheld engines certified under this part 1054. The provisions of 40 CFR 1068.261 apply for nonhandheld engines, with...

  8. 40 CFR 1054.610 - What is the exemption for delegated final assembly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... following auditing rate instead of the provisions specified in 40 CFR 1068.261(d)(3)(i) and (ii): (1) If you... provisions of 40 CFR 1068.261 related to delegated final assembly do not apply for handheld engines certified under this part 1054. The provisions of 40 CFR 1068.261 apply for nonhandheld engines, with...

  9. A microstructural analysis of solder joints from the electronic assemblies of dismantled nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    MC1814 Interconnection Boxes from dismantled B57 bombs, and MC2839 firing Sets from retired W70-1 warheads were obtained from the Pantex facility. Printed circuit boards were selected from these components for microstructural analysis of their solder joints. The analysis included a qualitative examination of the solder joints and quantitative assessments of (1) the thickness of the intermetallic compound layer that formed between the solder and circuit board Cu features, and (2) the Pb-rich phase particle distribution within the solder joint microstructure. The MC2839 solder joints had very good workmanship qualities. The intermetallic compound layer stoichiometry was determined to be that of Cu6Sn5. The mean intermetallic compound layer thickness for all solder joints was 0.885 mm. The magnitude of these values did not indicate significant growth over the weapon lifetime. The size distribution of the Pb-rich phase particles for each of the joints were represented by the mean of 9.85 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} mm{sup 2}. Assuming a spherical geometry, the mean particle diameter would be 3.54 mm. The joint-to-joint difference of intermetallic compound layer thickness and Pb-rich particle size distribution was not caused by varying thermal environments, but rather, was a result of natural variations in the joint microstructure that probably existed at the time of manufacture. The microstructural evaluation of the through-hole solder joints form the MC2839 and MC1814 components indicated that the environmental conditions to which these electronic units were exposed in the stockpile, were benign regarding solder joint aging. There was an absence of thermal fatigue damage in MC2839 circuit board, through-hole solder joints. The damage to the eyelet solder joints of the MC1814 more likely represented infant mortality failures at or very near the time of manufacture, resulting from a marginal design status of this type of solder joint design.

  10. Medicare Program; Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Payment Model for Acute Care Hospitals Furnishing Lower Extremity Joint Replacement Services. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-11-24

    This final rule implements a new Medicare Part A and B payment model under section 1115A of the Social Security Act, called the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model, in which acute care hospitals in certain selected geographic areas will receive retrospective bundled payments for episodes of care for lower extremity joint replacement (LEJR) or reattachment of a lower extremity. All related care within 90 days of hospital discharge from the joint replacement procedure will be included in the episode of care. We believe this model will further our goals in improving the efficiency and quality of care for Medicare beneficiaries with these common medical procedures. PMID:26606762

  11. Medicare Program; Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Payment Model for Acute Care Hospitals Furnishing Lower Extremity Joint Replacement Services. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-11-24

    This final rule implements a new Medicare Part A and B payment model under section 1115A of the Social Security Act, called the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model, in which acute care hospitals in certain selected geographic areas will receive retrospective bundled payments for episodes of care for lower extremity joint replacement (LEJR) or reattachment of a lower extremity. All related care within 90 days of hospital discharge from the joint replacement procedure will be included in the episode of care. We believe this model will further our goals in improving the efficiency and quality of care for Medicare beneficiaries with these common medical procedures.

  12. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Ordered Macromolecular Assemblies. Final report for May 1, 1988 - June 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.

    2005-02-11

    The final report describes studies over a 13 year period having to do with photoinduced electron transfer for active chromophores and redox agents, including assembly of the components in water soluble polymers or polypeptides. The findings include observation of long range charge separation and electron transport using laser phototransient spectroscopy. The systems targeted in these studies include peptide assemblies for which helical conformations and aggregation are documented. Oligomeric peptides modified with non-native redox active groups were also selected for investigation. Highly charged polymers or peptides were investigated as host agents that resemble proteins. The overall goal of these investigations focused on the design and characterization of systems capable of artificial photosynthesis.

  13. Virtual verification of the AIRBUS A400M final assembly line industrialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, J. L.; Mas, F.; Serván, J.; Ríos, J.

    2012-04-01

    This document describes the experience gained from the project of implementing the Digital Manufacturing methodology to validate the industrial design of the AIRBUS A400M Final Assembly Line (FAL) in a virtual environment using state of the art Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) tools. The project has generated a remarkable innovation in the industrialization methods and tools used in AIRBUS Military, contributing to the A400M program success. The document presents: the background and reasons motivating the project, the context and the main barriers identified, and the definition of a Final Assembly Line. An innovative concept of industrial Digital Mock-Up (iDMU) was coined, representing the interoperable grouping of product, processes and manufacturing resources data.

  14. Molecular design driving tetraporphyrin self-assembly on graphite: a joint STM, electrochemical and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Garah, M.; Santana Bonilla, A.; Ciesielski, A.; Gualandi, A.; Mengozzi, L.; Fiorani, A.; Iurlo, M.; Marcaccio, M.; Gutierrez, R.; Rapino, S.; Calvaresi, M.; Zerbetto, F.; Cuniberti, G.; Cozzi, P. G.; Paolucci, F.; Samorì, P.

    2016-07-01

    Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to control their organization at the supramolecular level. Such a tuning is particularly important when applied to sophisticated molecules combining functional units which possess specific electronic properties, such as electron/energy transfer, in order to develop multifunctional systems. Here we have synthesized two tetraferrocene-porphyrin derivatives that by design can selectively self-assemble at the graphite/liquid interface into either face-on or edge-on monolayer-thick architectures. The former supramolecular arrangement consists of two-dimensional planar networks based on hydrogen bonding among adjacent molecules whereas the latter relies on columnar assembly generated through intermolecular van der Waals interactions. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at the solid-liquid interface has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry measurements and assessed by theoretical calculations to gain multiscale insight into the arrangement of the molecule with respect to the basal plane of the surface. The STM analysis allowed the visualization of these assemblies with a sub-nanometer resolution, and cyclic voltammetry measurements provided direct evidence of the interactions of porphyrin and ferrocene with the graphite surface and offered also insight into the dynamics within the face-on and edge-on assemblies. The experimental findings were supported by theoretical calculations to shed light on the electronic and other physical properties of both assemblies. The capability to engineer the functional nanopatterns through self-assembly of porphyrins containing ferrocene units is a key step toward the bottom-up construction of multifunctional molecular nanostructures and nanodevices.Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to

  15. Molecular design driving tetraporphyrin self-assembly on graphite: a joint STM, electrochemical and computational study.

    PubMed

    El Garah, M; Santana Bonilla, A; Ciesielski, A; Gualandi, A; Mengozzi, L; Fiorani, A; Iurlo, M; Marcaccio, M; Gutierrez, R; Rapino, S; Calvaresi, M; Zerbetto, F; Cuniberti, G; Cozzi, P G; Paolucci, F; Samorì, P

    2016-07-14

    Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to control their organization at the supramolecular level. Such a tuning is particularly important when applied to sophisticated molecules combining functional units which possess specific electronic properties, such as electron/energy transfer, in order to develop multifunctional systems. Here we have synthesized two tetraferrocene-porphyrin derivatives that by design can selectively self-assemble at the graphite/liquid interface into either face-on or edge-on monolayer-thick architectures. The former supramolecular arrangement consists of two-dimensional planar networks based on hydrogen bonding among adjacent molecules whereas the latter relies on columnar assembly generated through intermolecular van der Waals interactions. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at the solid-liquid interface has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry measurements and assessed by theoretical calculations to gain multiscale insight into the arrangement of the molecule with respect to the basal plane of the surface. The STM analysis allowed the visualization of these assemblies with a sub-nanometer resolution, and cyclic voltammetry measurements provided direct evidence of the interactions of porphyrin and ferrocene with the graphite surface and offered also insight into the dynamics within the face-on and edge-on assemblies. The experimental findings were supported by theoretical calculations to shed light on the electronic and other physical properties of both assemblies. The capability to engineer the functional nanopatterns through self-assembly of porphyrins containing ferrocene units is a key step toward the bottom-up construction of multifunctional molecular nanostructures and nanodevices.

  16. Molecular design driving tetraporphyrin self-assembly on graphite: a joint STM, electrochemical and computational study.

    PubMed

    El Garah, M; Santana Bonilla, A; Ciesielski, A; Gualandi, A; Mengozzi, L; Fiorani, A; Iurlo, M; Marcaccio, M; Gutierrez, R; Rapino, S; Calvaresi, M; Zerbetto, F; Cuniberti, G; Cozzi, P G; Paolucci, F; Samorì, P

    2016-07-14

    Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to control their organization at the supramolecular level. Such a tuning is particularly important when applied to sophisticated molecules combining functional units which possess specific electronic properties, such as electron/energy transfer, in order to develop multifunctional systems. Here we have synthesized two tetraferrocene-porphyrin derivatives that by design can selectively self-assemble at the graphite/liquid interface into either face-on or edge-on monolayer-thick architectures. The former supramolecular arrangement consists of two-dimensional planar networks based on hydrogen bonding among adjacent molecules whereas the latter relies on columnar assembly generated through intermolecular van der Waals interactions. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at the solid-liquid interface has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry measurements and assessed by theoretical calculations to gain multiscale insight into the arrangement of the molecule with respect to the basal plane of the surface. The STM analysis allowed the visualization of these assemblies with a sub-nanometer resolution, and cyclic voltammetry measurements provided direct evidence of the interactions of porphyrin and ferrocene with the graphite surface and offered also insight into the dynamics within the face-on and edge-on assemblies. The experimental findings were supported by theoretical calculations to shed light on the electronic and other physical properties of both assemblies. The capability to engineer the functional nanopatterns through self-assembly of porphyrins containing ferrocene units is a key step toward the bottom-up construction of multifunctional molecular nanostructures and nanodevices. PMID:27376633

  17. The new design of final optics assembly on SG-III prototype facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Zhao, Runchang; Wang, Wei; Jia, Huaiting; Chen, Liangmin; Su, Jingqin

    2014-09-01

    To improve the performance of SG-III prototype facility (TIL-Technical Integration Line), final optics assembly (FOA) is re-designed. It contains that stray light and focusing ghosts are optimized, operational performance and environments are improved and the total thickness of optics is reduced. With the re-designed FOA, Some performance advantages are achieved. First, the optics damages are mitigated obviously, especially crystals and Focus lens; Second, stray light and focusing ghosts are controlled better that organic contamination sources inside FOA are eliminated; Third, maintenance and operation are more convenient for the atoms environment; Fourth, the focusable power on target is increased for lower B-integral.

  18. Diffusion welding of Cassegrainian concentrator cell stack assemblies. M.S. Thesis Final Report, Jun. 1983 - Sep. 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    Development of a procedure to join the components of the Cassegrainian concentrator photovoltaic cell stack assembly was studied. Diffusion welding was selected as the most promising process, and was concentrated on exclusively. All faying surfaces were coated with silver to promote welding. The first phase of the study consisted of developing the relationship between process parameters and joint strength using silver plated steel samples and an isostatic pressure system. In the second phase, mockups of the cell stack assembly were welded in a hot isostatic press. Excellent joint strength was achieved with parameters of 350 C and 10 ksi, but the delicate GaAs component could not survive the welding cycle without cracking. The tendency towards cracking was found to be affected by both temperature and pressure. Further work will be required in the future to solve this problem.

  19. Activation Analysis of the Final Optics Assemblies at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dauffy, L S; Khater, H Y; Sitaraman, S; Brereton, S J

    2008-10-14

    Commissioning shots have commenced at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Within a year, the 192 laser beam facility will be operational and the experimental phase will begin. At each shot, the emitted neutrons will interact in the facility's surroundings, activating them, especially inside the target bay where the neutron flux is the highest. We are calculating the dose from those activated structures and objects in order to plan and minimize worker exposures during maintenance and normal NIF operation. This study presents the results of the activation analysis of the optics of the Final Optics Assemblies (FOA), which are a key contributor to worker exposure. Indeed, there are 48 FOAs weighting three tons each, and routine change-out and maintenance of optics and optics modules is expected. The neutron field has been characterized using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNP with subsequent activation analysis performed using the activation code, ALARA.

  20. Design, Analysis and Testing of a PRSEUS Pressure Cube to Investigate Assembly Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yovanof, Nicolette; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Baraja, Jaime; Gould, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Due to its potential to significantly increase fuel efficiency, the current focus of NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Program is the hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft. Due to the complex load condition that exists in HWB structure, as compared to traditional aircraft configurations, light-weight, cost-effective and manufacturable structural concepts are required to enable the HWB. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept is one such structural concept. A building block approach for technology development of the PRSEUS concept is being conducted. As part of this approach, a PRSEUS pressure cube was developed as a risk reduction test article to examine a new integral cap joint concept. This paper describes the design, analysis and testing of the PRSEUS pressure cube test article. The pressure cube was required to withstand a 2P, 18.4 psi, overpressure load requirement. The pristine pressure cube was tested to 2.2P with no catastrophic failure. After the addition of barely visible impact damage, the cube was pressure loaded to 48 psi where catastrophic failure occurred, meeting the scale-up requirement. Comparison of pretest and posttest analyses with the cube test response agree well, and indicate that current analysis methods can be used to accurately analyze PRSEUS structure for initial failure response.

  1. Joint assembly and genetic mapping of the Atlantic horseshoe crab genome reveals ancient whole genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Horseshoe crabs are marine arthropods with a fossil record extending back approximately 450 million years. They exhibit remarkable morphological stability over their long evolutionary history, retaining a number of ancestral arthropod traits, and are often cited as examples of “living fossils.” As arthropods, they belong to the Ecdysozoa, an ancient super-phylum whose sequenced genomes (including insects and nematodes) have thus far shown more divergence from the ancestral pattern of eumetazoan genome organization than cnidarians, deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans. However, much of ecdysozoan diversity remains unrepresented in comparative genomic analyses. Results Here we apply a new strategy of combined de novo assembly and genetic mapping to examine the chromosome-scale genome organization of the Atlantic horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. We constructed a genetic linkage map of this 2.7 Gbp genome by sequencing the nuclear DNA of 34 wild-collected, full-sibling embryos and their parents at a mean redundancy of 1.1x per sample. The map includes 84,307 sequence markers grouped into 1,876 distinct genetic intervals and 5,775 candidate conserved protein coding genes. Conclusions Comparison with other metazoan genomes shows that the L. polyphemus genome preserves ancestral bilaterian linkage groups, and that a common ancestor of modern horseshoe crabs underwent one or more ancient whole genome duplications 300 million years ago, followed by extensive chromosome fusion. These results provide a counter-example to the often noted correlation between whole genome duplication and evolutionary radiations. The new, low-cost genetic mapping method for obtaining a chromosome-scale view of non-model organism genomes that we demonstrate here does not require laboratory culture, and is potentially applicable to a broad range of other species. PMID:24987520

  2. Wedge Joints for Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Kenneth E.

    1987-01-01

    Structure assembled rapidly with simple hand tools. Proposed locking wedge joints enable rapid assembly of lightweight beams, towers, scaffolds, and other truss-type structures. Lightweight structure assembled from tubular struts joined at nodes by wedge pins fitting into mating slots. Joint assembled rapidly by seating wedge pin in V-shaped slots and deforming end of strut until primary pawl engages it.

  3. Ghost analysis visualization techniques for complex systems: examples from the NIF final optics assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, James L.; Schweyen, John C.; Rowe, Jeffrey; Beer, Glenn

    1999-07-01

    The stray light or 'ghost' analysis of the NIF Final Optics Assembly (FOA) has proved to be one of the most complex ghost analyses ever attempted. The NIF FOA consists of a bundle of four beam lines that: 1) provides the vacuum seal to the target chamber, 2) converts 1 (omega) to 3 (omega) light, 3) focuses the light on the target, 4) separates a fraction of the 3 (omega) beam for energy diagnostics, 5) separates the three wavelengths to diffract unwanted 1 (omega) and 2 (omega) light away from the target, 6) provides spatial beam smoothing, and 7) provides a debris barrier between the target chamber and the switchyard mirrors. The three wavelengths of light and even optical elements with three diffractive optic surfaces generate three million ghosts through 4th order. Approximately 24,000 of these ghosts have peak fluence exceeding 1 J/cm2. The shear number of ghost paths requires a visualization method that allows overlapping ghosts on optics and mechanical components to be summoned and then mapped to the optical and mechanical component surfaces in 3D space. This paper addresses the following aspects of the NIF Final Optics Ghost analysis: 1) materials issues for stray light mitigation, 2) limitations of current software tools, 3) computer resource limitations affecting automated coherent raytracing, 4) folding the stray light analysis into the opto-mechanical design process, 5) analysis and visualization tools from simple hand calculations to specialized stray light analysis computer codes, and 6) attempts at visualizing these ghosts using a CAD model and another using a high end data visualization software approach.

  4. Ghost analysis visualization techniques for complex systems: examples from the NIF Final Optics Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, G K; Hendrix, J L; Rowe, J; Schweyen, J

    1998-06-26

    The stray light or "ghost" analysis of the National Ignition Facility's (NIP) Final Optics Assembly (FOA) has proved to be one of the most complex ghost analyses ever attempted. The NIF FOA consists of a bundle of four beam lines that: 1) provides the vacuum seal to the target chamber, 2) converts 1ω to 3ω light, 3) focuses the light on the target, 4) separates a fraction of the 3ω beam for energy diagnostics, 5) separates the three wavelengths to diffract unwanted 1ω & 2ω light away from the target, 6) provides spatial beam smoothing, and 7) provides a debris barrier between the target chamber and the switchyard mirrors. The three wavelengths of light and seven optical elements with three diffractive optic surfaces generate three million ghosts through 4th order. Approximately 24,000 of these ghosts have peak fluence exceeding 1 J/cm2. The shear number of ghost paths requires a visualization method that allows overlapping ghosts on optics and mechanical components to be summed and then mapped to the optical and mechanical component surfaces in 3D space. This paper addresses the following aspects of the NIF Final Optics Ghost analysis: 1) materials issues for stray light mitigation, 2) limitations of current software tools (especially in modeling diffractive optics), 3) computer resource limitations affecting automated coherent raytracing, 4) folding the stray light analysis into the opto-mechanical design process, 5) analysis and visualization tools from simple hand calculations to specialized stray light analysis computer codes, and 6) attempts at visualizing these ghosts using a CAD model and another using a high end data visualization software approach.

  5. National Ignition Facility final optics assembly thermal effects of maintenance operations

    SciTech Connect

    Parietti, L.; Martin, R.A.

    1998-04-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world`s most powerful laser system, is being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study inertial fusion and high-energy-density science. This billion-dollar facility consists of 192 beams focusing 1.8 MJ on a fusion target. The Final Optics Assembly (FOA), the last mechanical apparatus before the target chamber, converts the light from an incoming frequency of 1 {omega} to ia target-ready 3 {omega}, and focuses the laser beam. The performance of the frequency conversion crystals is very sensitive to temperature changes; crystal temperature must be maintained within a 0.1 C of a nominal temperature prior to a laser shot. Maximizing system availability requires minimizing thermal recovery times after thermal disturbances occurring in both normal and maintenance operations. To guide the design, it is important to have estimates of those recovery times. This report presents Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) design calculations to evaluate thermal effects of maintenance operations.

  6. Research on laser damage of final optics assembly on high-power laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongfeng; Wu, Rong; Lin, Zunqi; Zhu, Jianqiang; Wang, Li

    2014-10-01

    In order to improve laser damage resistance of the Final Optics Assembly (FOA), simulation analysis have been done for 1ω, 2ω and 3ω laser beam considering ghost images to the 4th order. The panels of ground glass scatter ghost laser around the FOA walls and the panels of architectural glass absorb the 1th order energy. The appearance of smoothing fused silica surface defect and the effect of wiping off etching contamination are researched on HF-based etching processes under ultrasonic. Now, 18 shots were executed using 310x310mm laser with 3ns pulse width. During the experiment, the third harmonic laser terminal output energy is 1500J~3500J, and the maximum laser energy flux is about 4J/cm2. This presentation addresses the optical configuration of the FOA, the simulation analysis of ghost, the way of ground glasses absorbing energy and the result of laser damage resistance of fused silica on HF-based etching processes under ultrasonic.

  7. Final Report: Photo-Directed Molecular Assembly of Multifunctional Inorganic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    B.G. Potter, Jr.

    2010-10-15

    This final report details results, conclusions, and opportunities for future effort derived from the study. The work involved combining the molecular engineering of photoactive Ti-alkoxide systems and the optical excitation of hydrolysis and condensation reactions to influence the development of the metal-oxygen-metal network at the onset of material formation. Selective excitation of the heteroleptic alkoxides, coupled with control of alkoxide local chemical environment, enabled network connectivity to be influenced and formed the basis for direct deposition and patterning of Ti-oxide-based materials. The research provided new insights into the intrinsic photoresponse and assembly of these complex, alkoxide molecules. Using a suite of electronic, vibrational, and nuclear spectroscopic probes, coupled with quantum chemical computation, the excitation wavelength and fluence dependence of molecular photoresponse and the nature of subsequent hydrolysis and condensation processes were probed in pyridine-carbinol-based Ti-alkoxides with varied counter ligand groups. Several methods for the patterning of oxide material formation were demonstrated, including the integration of this photoprocessing approach with conventional, dip-coating methodologies.

  8. LDRD final report: Automated planning and programming of assembly of fully 3D mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, S.G.; Wilson, R.H.; Jones, R.E.; Calton, T.L.; Ames, A.L.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes the results of assembly planning research under the LDRD. The assembly planning problem is that of finding a sequence of assembly operations, starting from individual parts, that will result in complete assembly of a device specified as a CAD model. The automated assembly programming problem is that of automatically producing a robot program that will carry out a given assembly sequence. Given solutions to both of these problems, it is possible to automatically program a robot to assemble a mechanical device given as a CAD data file. This report describes the current state of our solutions to both of these problems, and a software system called Archimedes 2 we have constructed to automate these solutions. Because Archimedes 2 can input CAD data in several standard formats, we have been able to test it on a number of industrial assembly models more complex than any before attempted by automated assembly planning systems, some having over 100 parts. A complete path from a CAD model to an automatically generated robot program for assembling the device represented by the CAD model has also been demonstrated.

  9. Minority Business Participation in Public/Private Partnerships: A Manual on Joint Development. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beltran, Celestino M.; And Others

    The Urban Mass Transportation Association promotes Commercial real estate development projects in and adjacent to transit facilities as a means of generating additional revenues to defray part of local transit agency operating cost. Transit-related real estate development, or joint development, provides unique financial benefits for investors and…

  10. Development of environmentally conscious cleaning process for leadless chip carrier assemblies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1995-04-01

    A cross-functional team of process, product, quality, material, and design lab engineers was assembled to develop an environmentally friendly cleaning process for leadless chip carrier assemblies (LCCAs). Using flush and filter testing, Auger surface analysis, GC-Mass spectrophotometry, production yield results, and electrical testing results over an extended testing period, the team developed an aqueous cleaning process for LCCAs. The aqueous process replaced the Freon vapor degreasing/ultrasonic rinse process.

  11. Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit 2 (ASRG EU2) Final Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has recently completed the assembly of a unique Stirling generator test article for laboratory experimentation. Under the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) flight development contract, NASA GRC initiated a task to design and fabricate a flight-like generator for in-house testing. This test article was given the name ASRG Engineering Unit 2 (EU2) as it was effectively the second engineering unit to be built within the ASRG project. The intent of the test article was to duplicate Lockheed Martin's qualification unit ASRG design as much as possible to enable system-level tests not previously possible at GRC. After the cancellation of the ASRG flight development project, the decision was made to continue the EU2 build, and make use of a portion of the hardware from the flight development project. GRC and Lockheed Martin engineers collaborated to develop assembly procedures, leveraging the valuable knowledge gathered by Lockheed Martin during the ASRG development contract. The ASRG EU2 was then assembled per these procedures at GRC with Lockheed Martin engineers on site. The assembly was completed in August 2014. This paper details the components that were used for the assembly, and the assembly process itself.

  12. Reliability of CGA/LGA/HDI Package Board/Assembly (Final Report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffaroam. Reza

    2014-01-01

    Package manufacturers are now offering commercial-off-the-shelf column grid array (COTS CGA) packaging technologies in high-reliability versions. Understanding the process and quality assurance (QA) indicators for reliability are important for low-risk insertion of these advanced electronics packages. The previous reports, released in January of 2012 and January of 2013, presented package test data, assembly information, and reliability evaluation by thermal cycling for CGA packages with 1752, 1517, 1509, and 1272 inputs/outputs (I/Os) and 1-mm pitch. It presented the thermal cycling (-55C either 100C or 125C) test results for up to 200 cycles. This report presents up to 500 thermal cycles with quality assurance and failure analysis evaluation represented by optical photomicrographs, 2D real time X-ray images, dye-and-pry photomicrographs, and optical/scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) cross-sectional images. The report also presents assembly challenge using reflowing by either vapor phase or rework station of CGA and land grid array (LGA) versions of three high I/O packages both ceramic and plastic configuration. A new test vehicle was designed having high density interconnect (HDI) printed circuit board (PCB) with microvia-in-pad to accommodate both LGA packages as well as a large number of fine pitch ball grid arrays (BGAs). The LGAs either were assembled onto HDI PCB as an LGA or were solder paste print and reflow first to form solder dome on pads before assembly. Both plastic BGAs with 1156 I/O and ceramic LGAs were assembled. It also presented the X-ray inspection results as well as failures due to 200 thermal cycles. Lessons learned on assembly of ceramic LGAs are also presented.

  13. All-in-one assembly based on 3D-intertangled and cross-jointed architectures of Si/Cu 1D-nanowires for lithium ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Chihyun; Kim, Tae-Hee; Cho, Yoon-Gyo; Kim, Jieun; Song, Hyun-Kon

    2015-01-01

    All-in-one assemblies of separator, electrode and current collector (SECA) for lithium ion batteries are presented by using 1D nanowires of Si and Cu (nwSi and nwCu). Even without binders, integrity of SECA is secured via structural joints based on ductility of Cu as well as entanglement of nwSi and nwCu. By controlling the ratio of the nanowires, the number of contact points and voids accommodating volume expansion of Si active material are tunable. Zero volume expansion and high energy density are simultaneously achievable by the architecture. PMID:25720334

  14. The Acquisition of a Complex Assembly Task by Retarded Adolescents. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Marc William

    Sixty-four moderately and severely retarded individuals enrolled in four sheltered workshops learned to assemble a 15 piece and a 24 piece bicycle brake. Training procedures utilized information obtained from the basic psychological research on discrimination learning. One-half of the subjects worked with the parts of the training task brake as…

  15. Final report [FASEB Summer Research Conference ''Virus Assembly''--agenda and attendee list

    SciTech Connect

    Feiss, Michael

    2001-01-31

    The conference brought together researchers working on virus structure and virus assembly in diverse systems. Information was integrated from many viral systems, including plant bacterial and eukaryotic viruses, and many techniques such as biophysical approaches of x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and spectroscopy, along with molecular biological and molecular genetic analysis.

  16. The Quest for Community in a National Republic: A Bicentennial Reappraisal. Final Report and Keynote Address, Virginia Assembly (Richmond, Virginia, April 8-10, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Univ., Charlottesville. Center for Public Service.

    This Virginia Assembly document focuses on the concept of community as defined by the Founding Fathers of the U.S. Constitution. The final report identifies and discusses problems related to the modern quest for community in a national republic. Recommendations by the Assembly are offered in eight areas: (1) civic responsibility; (2) corporate…

  17. Confined cooperative self-assembly and synthesis of optically and electrically active nanostructures : final LDRD report

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Eric Nicholas; Haddad, Raid Edward; Fan, Hongyou; Ta, Anh; Bai, Feng; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-10-01

    In this project, we developed a confined cooperative self-assembly process to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) j-aggregates including nanowires and nanorods with controlled diameters and aspect ratios. The facile and versatile aqueous solution process assimilates photo-active macrocyclic building blocks inside surfactant micelles, forming stable single-crystalline high surface area nanoporous frameworks with well-defined external morphology defined by the building block packing. Characterizations using TEM, SEM, XRD, N{sub 2} and NO sorption isotherms, TGA, UV-vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy indicate that the j-aggregate nanostructures are monodisperse and may further assemble into hierarchical arrays with multi-modal functional pores. The nanostructures exhibit enhanced and collective optical properties over the individual chromophores. This project was a small footprint research effort which, nonetheless, produced significant progress towards both the stated goal as well as unanticipated research directions.

  18. Designed supramolecular assemblies for biosensors and photoactive devices. LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Song, X.Z.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.; Cesarano, J.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a new class of supramolecular assemblies for applications in biosensors and biodevices. The supramolecular assemblies are based on membranes and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films composed of naturally-occurring or synthetic lipids, which contain electrically and/or photochemically active components. The LB films are deposited onto electrically-active materials (metal, semiconductors). The active components film components (lipo-porphyrins) at the surface function as molecular recognition sites for sensing proteins and other biomolecules, and the porphyrins and other components (e.g., fullerenes) incorporated into the films serve as photocatalysts and vectorial electron-transport agents. Computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) methods are used to tailor the structure of these film components to optimize function. Molecular modeling is also used to predict the location, orientation, and motion of these molecular components within the films. The result is a variety of extended, self-assembled molecular structures that serve as devices for sensing proteins and biochemicals or as other bioelectronic devices.

  19. Development, assembly, and validation of an SMA-actuated two-joint nozzle and six-channel power supply for use in a smart inhaler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Stephen J.; Hangekar, Rohan; Seelecke, Stefan

    2010-04-01

    The Smart Inhaler design concept recently developed at NC State University has the potential to target the delivery of inhaled aerosol medication to specified locations within the lung system. This targeted delivery could help patients with pulmonary ailments by reducing the exposure of healthy lung tissue to potentially harmful medications. However, controlled delivery can only be accomplished if medication is injected at a precise location in an inhaled stream of properly conditioned laminar flow. In particular, the medication must be injected into the inhaled flow using a small nozzle that can be positioned without disturbing the flow. This paper outlines the procedure used to assemble and control a key component of the smart inhaler: a shape memory alloy (SMA) based dual-joint flexible nozzle that exploits the sensing and actuating capabilities of thermally activated SMA wires. A novel 6-channel power-supply is used to control input power and measure the resistance across the SMA. Since a practical fabrication process may result in SMA wires with different contact resistances, the power supply employs an initialization procedure to self-calibrate and provide normalized power distribution 6 SMA wires simultaneously. Furthermore, a robust control scheme is used to ensure that a constant current is provided to the wires. In validation tests, a LabVIEW-based video positioning system was used to measure the deflection of the nozzle tip and joint rotation. Results show that the carefully controlled assembly of a stream-lined nozzle can produce a practical smart structure, and joint rotation is predictable and repeatable when power input is also controlled. Future work will assess the use of the SMA-resistance measurement as position feedback and PID position control power as a measurement of the convective cooling that results from the moving airflow.

  20. An evaluation of the spring finger solder joints on SA1358-10 and SA2052-4 connector assemblies (MC3617,W87).

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgo, Alice C.; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Hlava, Paul Frank; Zender, Gary L.

    2006-08-01

    The SA1358-10 and SA2052-4 circular JT Type plug connectors are used on a number of nuclear weapons and Joint Test Assembly (JTA) systems. Prototype units were evaluated for the following specific defects associated with the 95Sn-5Sb (Sn-Sb, wt.%) solder joint used to attach the beryllium-copper (BeCu) spring fingers to the aluminum (Al) connector shell: (1) extended cracking within the fillet; (2) remelting of the solder joint during the follow-on, soldering step that attached the EMR adapter ring to the connector shell (and/or soldering the EMR shell to the adapter ring) that used the lower melting temperature 63Sn-37Pb (Sn-Pb) alloy; and (3) spalling of the Cd (Cr) layer overplating layer from the fillet surface. Several pedigrees of connectors were evaluated, which represented older fielded units as well as those assemblies that were recently constructed at Kansas City Plant. The solder joints were evaluated that were in place on connectors made with the current soldering process as well as an alternative induction soldering process for attaching the EMR adapter ring to the shell. Very similar observations were made, which crossed the different pedigrees of parts and processes. The extent of cracking in the top side fillets varied between the different connector samples and likely the EMR adapter ring to the shell. Very similar observations were made, which crossed the different pedigrees of parts and processes. The extent of cracking in the top side fillets varied between the different connector samples and likely reflected the different extents to which the connector was mated to its counterpart assembly. In all cases, the spring finger solder joints on the SA1358-10 connectors were remelted as a result of the subsequent EMR adapter ring attachment process. Spalling of the Cd (Cr) overplating layer was also observed for these connectors, which was a consequence of the remelting activity. On the other hand, the SA2052-4 connector did not exhibit evidence of

  1. Environmental assessment for device assembly facility operations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-0971), to evaluate the impacts of consolidating all nuclear explosive operations at the newly constructed Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. These operations generally include assembly, disassembly or modification, staging, transportation, testing, maintenance, repair, retrofit, and surveillance. Such operations have previously been conducted at the Nevada Test Site in older facilities located in Area 27. The DAF will provide enhanced capabilities in a state-of-the-art facility for the safe, secure, and efficient handling of high explosives in combination with special nuclear materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium). Based on the information and analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  2. Fabrication, assembly, bench and drilling tests of two prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bookwalter, R.; Duettra, P.D.; Johnson, P.; Lyons, W.C.; Miska, S.

    1987-04-01

    The first and second prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors have been fabricated, assembled and tested. All bench tests showed that the motor will produce horsepower and bit speeds approximating the predicted values. Specifically, the downhole pneumatic turbine motor produced approximately 50 horsepower at 100 rpm, while being supplied with about 3600 SCFM of compressed air. The first prototype was used in a drilling test from a depth of 389 feet to a depth of 789 feet in the Kirtland formation. This first prototype motor drilled at a rate exceeding 180 ft/hr, utilizing only 3000 SCFM of compressed air. High temperature tests (at approximately 460/sup 0/F) were carried out on the thrust assembly and the gearboxes for the two prototypes. These components operated successfully at these temperatures. Although the bench and drilling tests were successful, the tests revealed design changes that should be made before drilling tests are carried out in geothermal boreholes at the Geysers area, near Santa Rosa, California.

  3. Effects of PCB Pad Metal Finishes on the Cu-Pillar/Sn-Ag Micro Bump Joint Reliability of Chip-on-Board (COB) Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngsoon; Lee, Seyong; Shin, Ji-won; Paik, Kyung-Wook

    2016-06-01

    While solder bumps have been used as the bump structure to form the interconnection during the last few decades, the continuing scaling down of devices has led to a change in the bump structure to Cu-pillar/Sn-Ag micro-bumps. Cu-pillar/Sn-Ag micro-bump interconnections differ from conventional solder bump interconnections in terms of their assembly processing and reliability. A thermo-compression bonding method with pre-applied b-stage non-conductive films has been adopted to form solder joints between Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bumps and printed circuit board vehicles, using various pad metal finishes. As a result, various interfacial inter-metallic compounds (IMCs) reactions and stress concentrations occur at the Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bumps joints. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the influence of pad metal finishes on the structural reliability of fine pitch Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bumps flip chip packaging. In this study, four different pad surface finishes (Thin Ni ENEPIG, OSP, ENEPIG, ENIG) were evaluated in terms of their interconnection reliability by thermal cycle (T/C) test up to 2000 cycles at temperatures ranging from -55°C to 125°C and high-temperature storage test up to 1000 h at 150°C. The contact resistances of the Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bump showed significant differences after the T/C reliability test in the following order: thin Ni ENEPIG > OSP > ENEPIG where the thin Ni ENEPIG pad metal finish provided the best Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bump interconnection in terms of bump joint reliability. Various IMCs formed between the bump joint areas can account for the main failure mechanism.

  4. Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Solvent Substitution Program/switch tube assemblies final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, E.P.; Ohlhausen, J.A.; Peebles, D.E.; Benkovich, M.G.

    1995-06-01

    As part of an Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing (ECM) Program, a study was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to identify an alternative cleaning process that would effectively replace trichloroethylene (TCE) for cleaning mechanical piece parts of Switch Tube assemblies. Eight aqueous alkaline cleaners, as well as an isopropyl alcohol and isopropyl alcohol/Cyclohexane cleaning process, were studied as potential replacements. Cleaning efficacy, materials compatibility, etch rate and corrosion studies were conducted and used to screen potential candidates. Cleaning efficacy was determined using visual examination, goniometer/contact angle measurements, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy and an evaporative rate analysis technique known as MESERAN Surface Analysis. Several cleaners were identified as potential replacements for TCE based solely on the cleaning efficacy results. Some of the cleaners, however, left undesirable residues studies were completed, Brulin 815GD (an aqueous alkaline cleaner) was selected as the replacement for TCE.

  5. Final LDRD report : infrared detection and power generation using self-assembled quantum dots.

    SciTech Connect

    Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Ellis, Robert; Shaner, Eric Arthur

    2008-02-01

    Alternative solutions are desired for mid-wavelength and long-wavelength infrared radiation detection and imaging arrays. We have investigated quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) as a possible solution for long-wavelength infrared (8 to 12 {mu}m) radiation sensing. This document provides a summary for work done under the LDRD 'Infrared Detection and Power Generation Using Self-Assembled Quantum Dots'. Under this LDRD, we have developed QDIP sensors and made efforts to improve these devices. While the sensors fabricated show good responsivity at 80 K, their detectivity is limited by high noise current. Following efforts concentrated on how to reduce or eliminate this problem, but with no clear path was identified to the desired performance improvements.

  6. Instantaneous engine frictional torque, its components and piston assembly friction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.A.; Henein, N.A.

    1992-05-01

    The overall goal of this report is to document the work done to determine the instantaneous frictional torque of internal combustion engine by using a new approach known as (P-{omega}) method developed at Wayne State University. The emphasis has been to improve the accuracy of the method, and apply it to both diesel and gasoline engines under different operating conditions. Also work included an investigation to determine the effect of using advanced materials and techniques to coat the piston rings on the instantaneous engine frictional torque and the piston assembly friction. The errors in measuring the angular velocity, {omega}, have been determined and found to be caused by variations in the divisions within one encoder, encoder-to-encoder variations, misalignment within the encoder itself and misalignment between the encoder and crankshaft. The errors in measuring the cylinder gas pressure, P, have been determined and found to be caused by transducer-to-transducer variations, zero drift, thermal stresses and lack of linearity. The ability of the (P-{omega}) method in determining the frictional torque of many engine components has been demonstrated. These components include valve train, fuel injection pump with and without fuel injection, and piston with and without different ring combinations. The emphasis in this part of the research program has been on the piston-ring assembly friction. The effects of load and other operating variables on IFT have been determined. The motoring test, which is widely used in industry to measure engine friction has been found to be inaccurate. The errors have been determined at different loads.

  7. RSRM Nozzle-to-Case Joint J-leg Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrechtsen, Kevin U.; Eddy, Norman F.; Ewing, Mark E.; McGuire, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) program, nozzle-to-case joint polysulfide adhesive gas paths have occurred on several flight motors. These gas paths have allowed hot motor gases to reach the wiper O-ring. Even though these motors continue to fly safely with this condition, a desire was to reduce such occurrences. The RSRM currently uses a J-leg joint configuration on case field joints and igniter inner and outer joints. The J-leg joint configuration has been successfully demonstrated on numerous RSRM flight and static test motors, eliminating hot gas intrusion to the critical O-ring seals on these joints. Using the proven technology demonstrated on the case field joints and igniter joints, a nozzle-to-case joint J-leg design was developed for implementation on RSRM flight motors. This configuration provides an interference fit with nozzle fixed housing phenolics at assembly, with a series of pressurization gaps incorporated outboard of the joint mating surface to aid in joint pressurization and to eliminate any circumferential flow in this region. The joint insulation is bonded to the nozzle phenolics using the same pressure sensitive adhesive used in the case field joints and igniter joints. An enhancement to the nozzle-to-case joint J-leg configuration is the implementation of a carbon rope thermal barrier. The thermal barrier is located downstream of the joint bondline and is positioned within the joint in a manner where any hot gas intrusion into the joint passes through the thermal barrier, reducing gas temperatures to a level that would not affect O-rings downstream of the thermal barrier. This paper discusses the processes used in reaching a final nozzle-to-case joint J-leg design, provides structural and thermal results in support of the design, and identifies fabrication techniques and demonstrations used in arriving at the final configuration.

  8. Truss Slip Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Truss slip joint has few parts, strong, and assembled and disassembled easily. Designed to carry axial loads as large as 100,000 lb and to accommodate slight initial axial-displacement and angular misalignments. Joint assembled or disassembled by astronaut in space suit or, on Earth, by technician in heavy protective clothing; simple enough to be operable by robot. Modified to accommodate welding.

  9. Automated array assembly. Phase II. Final report, October 1977-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aiello, R. V.

    1980-10-01

    The philosophy of this project was to establish an experimental process line starting with 3-in.-diameter silicon wafers and consisting of junction formation using POCl/sub 3/ gaseous diffusion, screen-printed thick-film metallization, reflow solder interconnect, and double-glass lamination panel assembly. This experimental production line produced a sufficient number of solar cells to demonstrate the technological readiness of each of those process steps. Variations (of each process) were made to set limits on the usable range of each process step and to determine the interaction with adjoining steps. Inspections, measurements, and tests were included to determine the output requirement characteristics of each step, obtain statistical variations, and evaluate the performance of the solar cells and panels. A description of this work, which was conducted from October 1977 through December 1978, is given. This was followed by an 18-month study in which three manufacturing sequences synthesized from the previous work and from studies conducted by other participants in the LSA program were exercised. The objectives were to assess the compatibility between process steps for each sequence, to generate sufficient data for comparative SAMICS cost analysis, and to make recommendations of the suitability of one or more of these sequences for the large-scale automated production of solar cells within the cost goal of $0.70/pW. The detailed experimental results of this study are described, followed by SAMICS cost analysis, recommendations, and conclusions.

  10. Self-Assembled Monolayers Get Their Final Finish via a Quasi-Langmuir-Blodgett Transfer.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Christian; Dietrich, Hanno; Zahn, Dirk; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2015-04-28

    The growth of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of octadecylphosphonic acid (ODPA) molecules on α-Al2O3(0001) and subsequent dewetting of the SAMs were studied with a combination of in situ sum-frequency generation (SFG) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Although SAM growth after deposition times >8 h reduces to nearly negligible values, the resultant ODPA SAMs in solution are still not in a well-ordered state with the alkyl chains in all-trans configurations. In fact, in situ SFG spectroscopy revealed a comparatively high concentration of gauche defects of the SAM in the ODPA 2-propanol solution even after a growth time of 16 h. Here, results of the MD simulations strongly suggest that defects can be caused by ODPA molecules which are not attached to the substrate but are incorporated into the SAM layer with the polar headgroup oriented into the 2-propanol solvent. This inverted adsorption geometry of additional ODPA molecules blocks adsorption sites and thus stabilizes the SAM without improving ordering to an extent that all molecules are in the all-trans configuration. While persistent in solution, the observed defects can be healed out when the SAMs are transferred from the solvent to a gas phase. During this process, a quasi-Langmuir-Blodgett transfer of molecules takes place which drives the SAM into a higher conformational state and significantly improves its quality.

  11. Ruminant methane reduction through livestock development in Tanzania. Final report for US Department of Energy and US Initiative on Joint Implementation--Activities Implemented Jointly

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, Roderick

    1999-07-01

    This project was designed to help develop the US Initiative on Joint Implementation activities in Eastern Africa. It has been communicated in meetings with representatives from the Ministry of Environment of Tanzania and the consultant group that developed Tanzania's National Climate Change Action Plan, the Centre for Energy, Environment, Science and Technology, that this project fits very well with the developmental and environmental goals of the Government of Tanzania. The goal of the Activities Implemented Jointly ruminant livestock project is to reduce ruminant methane emissions in Eastern Africa. The project plans a sustainable cattle multiplication unit (CMU) at Mabuki Ranch in the Mwanza Region of Tanzania. This CMU will focus on raising genetically improved animals to be purchased by farmers, developmental organizations, and other CMUs in Tanzania. Through the purchase of these animals farmers will raise their income generation potential and reduce ruminant methane emissions.

  12. Development of the bus joint for the ITER Central Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Irick, David Kim; Kenney, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    The terminations of the Central Solenoid (CS) modules are connected to the bus extensions by joints located outside the CS in the gap between the CS and Torodial Field (TF) assemblies. These joints have very strict space limitations. Low resistance is a common requirement for all ITER joints. In addition, the CS bus joints will experience and must be designed to withstand significant variation in the magnetic field of several tenths of a Tesla per second during initiation of plasma. The joint resistance is specified to be less than 4 nOhm. The joints also have to be soldered in the field and designed with the possibility to be installed and dismantled in order to allow cold testing in the cold test facility. We have developed coaxial joints that meet these requirements and have demonstrated the feasibility to fabricate and assemble them in the vertical configuration. We introduced a coupling cylinder with superconducting strands soldered to the surface of the cable that can be installed in the ITER assembly hall and at the Cold Test Facility. This cylinder serves as a transition area between the CS module and the bus extension. We made two racetrack samples and tested four bus joints in our Joint Test Apparatus. Resistance of the bus joints was measured by a decay method and by a microvoltmeter; the value of the current was measured by the Hall probes. This measurement method was verified in the previous tests. The resistance of the joints varied insignificantly from 1.5 to 2 nOhm. One of the challenges associated with a soldered joint is the inability to use corrosive chemicals that are difficult to clean. This paper describes our development work on cable preparation, chrome removal, compaction, soldering, and final assembly and presents the test results.

  13. Low Distortion Welded Joints for NCSX

    SciTech Connect

    M. Denault, M Viola, W. England

    2009-02-19

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) required precise positioning of the field coils in order to generate suitable magnetic fields. A set of three modular field coils were assembled to form the Half Field-Period Assemblies (HPA). Final assembly of the HPA required a welded shear plate to join individual coils in the nose region due to the geometric limitations and the strength constraints. Each of the modular coil windings was wound on a stainless steel alloy (Stellalloy) casting. The alloy is similar to austenitic 316 stainless steel. During the initial welding trials, severe distortion, of approximately 1/16", was observed in the joint caused by weld shrinkage. The distortion was well outside the requirements of the design. Solutions were attempted through several simultaneous routes. The joint design was modified, welding processes were changed, and specialized heat reduction techniques were utilized. A final joint design was selected to reduce the amount of weld material needed to be deposited, while maintaining adequate penetration and strength. Several welding processes and techniques using Miller Axcess equipment were utilized that significantly reduced heat input. The final assembly of the HPA was successful. Distortion was controlled to 0.012", well within the acceptable design tolerance range of 0.020" over a 3.5 foot length.

  14. Final report : LDRD project 79824 carbon nanotube sorting via DNA-directed self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, David B; Leung, Kevin; Rempe, Susan B.; Dossa, Paul D.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Martin, Marcus Gary

    2007-10-01

    large (on the order of electron volts) and may have important consequences for various SWNT applications. Finally, the adsorption of NMPs onto single-walled carbon nanotubes were studied experimentally. The nanotubes were sonicated in the presence of the nucleotides at various weight fractions and centrifuged before examining the ultraviolet absorbance of the resulting supernatant. A distinct Langmuir adsorption isotherm was obtained for each nucleotide. All of the nucleotides differ in their saturation value as well as their initial slope, which we attribute to differences both in nucleotide structure and in the binding ability of different types or clusters of tubes. Results from this simple system provide insights toward development of dispersion and separation methods for nanotubes: strongly binding nucleotides are likely to help disperse, whereas weaker ones may provide selectivity that may be beneficial to a separation process.

  15. Thermomechanical repository and shaft response analyses using the CAVS (Cracking And Void Strain) jointed rock model: Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dial, B.W.; Maxwell, D.E.

    1986-12-01

    Numerical studies of the far-field repository and near-field shaft response for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt have been performed with the STEALTH computer code using the CAVS model for jointed rock. CAVS is a constitutive model that can simulate the slip and dilatancy of fracture planes in a jointed rock mass. The initiation and/or propagation of fractures can also be modeled when stress intensity criteria are met. The CAVS models are based on the joint models proposed with appropriate modifications for numerical simulations. The STEALTH/CAVS model has been previously used to model (1) explosive fracturing of a wellbore, (2) earthquake effects on tunnels in a generic nuclear waste repository, (3) horizontal emplacement for a nuclear waste repository in jointed granite, and (4) tunnel response in jointed rock. The use of CAVS to model far-field repository and near-field shaft response was different from previous approaches because it represented a spatially oriented approach to rock response and failure, rather than the traditional stress invariant formulation for yielding. In addition, CAVS tracked the response of the joint apertures to the time-dependent stress changes in the far-field repository and near-field shaft regions. 28 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  17. High-resolution simulations of the final assembly of Earth-like planets. 2. Water delivery and planetary habitability.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Sean N; Quinn, Thomas; Lunine, Jonathan I

    2007-02-01

    The water content and habitability of terrestrial planets are determined during their final assembly, from perhaps 100 1,000-km "planetary embryos " and a swarm of billions of 1-10-km "planetesimals. " During this process, we assume that water-rich material is accreted by terrestrial planets via impacts of water-rich bodies that originate in the outer asteroid region. We present analysis of water delivery and planetary habitability in five high-resolution simulations containing about 10 times more particles than in previous simulations. These simulations formed 15 terrestrial planets from 0.4 to 2.6 Earth masses, including five planets in the habitable zone. Every planet from each simulation accreted at least the Earth's current water budget; most accreted several times that amount (assuming no impact depletion). Each planet accreted at least five water-rich embryos and planetesimals from the past 2.5 astronomical units; most accreted 10-20 water-rich bodies. We present a new model for water delivery to terrestrial planets in dynamically calm systems, with low-eccentricity or low-mass giant planets-such systems may be very common in the Galaxy. We suggest that water is accreted in comparable amounts from a few planetary embryos in a " hit or miss " way and from millions of planetesimals in a statistically robust process. Variations in water content are likely to be caused by fluctuations in the number of water-rich embryos accreted, as well as from systematic effects, such as planetary mass and location, and giant planet properties. PMID:17407404

  18. High-resolution simulations of the final assembly of Earth-like planets. 2. Water delivery and planetary habitability.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Sean N; Quinn, Thomas; Lunine, Jonathan I

    2007-02-01

    The water content and habitability of terrestrial planets are determined during their final assembly, from perhaps 100 1,000-km "planetary embryos " and a swarm of billions of 1-10-km "planetesimals. " During this process, we assume that water-rich material is accreted by terrestrial planets via impacts of water-rich bodies that originate in the outer asteroid region. We present analysis of water delivery and planetary habitability in five high-resolution simulations containing about 10 times more particles than in previous simulations. These simulations formed 15 terrestrial planets from 0.4 to 2.6 Earth masses, including five planets in the habitable zone. Every planet from each simulation accreted at least the Earth's current water budget; most accreted several times that amount (assuming no impact depletion). Each planet accreted at least five water-rich embryos and planetesimals from the past 2.5 astronomical units; most accreted 10-20 water-rich bodies. We present a new model for water delivery to terrestrial planets in dynamically calm systems, with low-eccentricity or low-mass giant planets-such systems may be very common in the Galaxy. We suggest that water is accreted in comparable amounts from a few planetary embryos in a " hit or miss " way and from millions of planetesimals in a statistically robust process. Variations in water content are likely to be caused by fluctuations in the number of water-rich embryos accreted, as well as from systematic effects, such as planetary mass and location, and giant planet properties.

  19. High-Resolution Simulations of The Final Assembly of Earth-Like Planets. 2. Water Delivery And Planetary Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Sean N.; Quinn, Thomas; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2007-03-01

    The water content and habitability of terrestrial planets are determined during their final assembly, from perhaps 100 1,000-km ``planetary embryos'' and a swarm of billions of 1-10-km ``planetesimals.'' During this process, we assume that water-rich material is accreted by terrestrial planets via impacts of water-rich bodies that originate in the outer asteroid region. We present analysis of water delivery and planetary habitability in five high-resolution simulations containing about 10 times more particles than in previous simulations. These simulations formed 15 terrestrial planets from 0.4 to 2.6 Earth masses, including five planets in the habitable zone. Every planet from each simulation accreted at least the Earth's current water budget; most accreted several times that amount (assuming no impact depletion). Each planet accreted at least five water-rich embryos and planetesimals from the past 2.5 astronomical units; most accreted 10-20 water-rich bodies. We present a new model for water delivery to terrestrial planets in dynamically calm systems, with low-eccentricity or low-mass giant planets-such systems may be very common in the Galaxy. We suggest that water is accreted in comparable amounts from a few planetary embryos in a ``hit or miss'' way and from millions of planetesimals in a statistically robust process. Variations in water content are likely to be caused by fluctuations in the number of water-rich embryos accreted, as well as from systematic effects, such as planetary mass and location, and giant planet properties. Key Words: Planetary formation-Water delivery-Extrasolar planets-Cosmochemistry. Astrobiology 7(1), 66-84.

  20. 76 FR 23221 - Joint Public Roundtable on Issues Related to the Schedule for Implementing Final Rules for Swaps...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ..., the ``Agencies''). ACTION: Notice of roundtable discussion; request for comment. SUMMARY: On Monday....shtml . All submissions will be reviewed jointly by the Agencies. All comments must be in English or be accompanied by an English translation. All submissions provided to either Agency in any electronic form or...

  1. Validation of the BERT Point Source Inversion Scheme Using the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Experiment Dataset - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brambilla, Sara; Brown, Michael J.

    2012-06-18

    zones. Due to a unique source inversion technique - called the upwind collector footprint approach - the tool runs fast and the source regions can be determined in a few minutes. In this report, we provide an overview of the BERT framework, followed by a description of the source inversion technique. The Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment held in Oklahoma City that was used to validate BERT is then described. Subsequent sections describe the metrics used for evaluation, the comparison of the experimental data and BERT output, and under what conditions the BERT tool succeeds and performs poorly. Results are aggregated in different ways (e.g., daytime vs. nighttime releases, 1 vs. 2 vs. 3 hit collectors) to determine if BERT shows any systematic errors. Finally, recommendations are given for how to improve the code and procedures for optimizing performance in operational mode.

  2. Joint application of AI techniques, PRA and disturbance analysis methodology to problems in the maintenance and design of nuclear power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Okrent, D.

    1989-03-01

    This final report summarizes the accomplishments of a two year research project entitled ``Joint Application of Artificial Intelligence Techniques, Probabilistic Risk Analysis, and Disturbance Analysis Methodology to Problems in the Maintenance and Design of Nuclear Power Plants. The objective of this project is to develop and apply appropriate combinations of techniques from artificial intelligence, (AI), reliability and risk analysis and disturbance analysis to well-defined programmatic problems of nuclear power plants. Reactor operations issues were added to those of design and maintenance as the project progressed.

  3. The Majorqaq Belt: A record of Neoarchaean orogenesis during final assembly of the North Atlantic Craton, southern West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, Brendan; Reno, Barry L.; Kokfelt, Thomas F.

    2015-04-01

    belt formed from the collision of the Maniitsoq block with the proto-North Atlantic Craton following closure of an oceanic basin with south-dipping subduction, providing a potential source of volatiles for the ca. 2.55 Ga Qôrqut granite complex situated ~ 150 km further southwards. These conditions necessitate orogenesis and indicate that plate tectonics was active by ca. 2.56 Ga during the final assembly of the North Atlantic Craton.

  4. Diagnostic development for determining the joint temperature/soot statistics in hydrocarbon-fueled pool fires : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Casteneda, Jaime N.; Frederickson, Kraig; Grasser, Thomas W.; Hewson, John C.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Luketa, Anay Josephine

    2009-09-01

    A joint temperature/soot laser-based optical diagnostic was developed for the determination of the joint temperature/soot probability density function (PDF) for hydrocarbon-fueled meter-scale turbulent pool fires. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort was in support of the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program which seeks to produce computational models for the simulation of fire environments for risk assessment and analysis. The development of this laser-based optical diagnostic is motivated by the need for highly-resolved spatio-temporal information for which traditional diagnostic probes, such as thermocouples, are ill-suited. The in-flame gas temperature is determined from the shape of the nitrogen Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signature and the soot volume fraction is extracted from the intensity of the Laser-Induced Incandescence (LII) image of the CARS probed region. The current state of the diagnostic will be discussed including the uncertainty and physical limits of the measurements as well as the future applications of this probe.

  5. Saving Lives on the Battlefield (Part II) ? One Year Later A Joint Theater Trauma System and Joint Trauma System Review of Prehospital Trauma Care in Combined Joint Operations Area?Afghanistan (CJOA-A) Final Report, 30 May 2014.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Samual W; Robinson, John B; Smith, Michael P; Gross, Kirby R; Kotwal, Russ S; Mabry, Robert L; Butler, Frank K; Stockinger, Zsolt T; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Mavity, Mark E; Gillies, Duncan A

    2015-01-01

    The United States has achieved unprecedented survival rates, as high as 98%, for casualties arriving alive at the combat hospital. Our military medical personnel are rightly proud of this achievement. Commanders and Servicemembers are confident that if wounded and moved to a Role II or III medical facility, their care will be the best in the world. Combat casualty care, however, begins at the point of injury and continues through evacuation to those facilities. With up to 25% of deaths on the battlefield being potentially preventable, the prehospital environment is the next frontier for making significant further improvements in battlefield trauma care. Strict adherence to the evidence-based Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) Guidelines has been proven to reduce morbidity and mortality on the battlefield. However, full implementation across the entire force and commitment from both line and medical leadership continue to face ongoing challenges. This report on prehospital trauma in the Combined Joint Operations Area?Afghanistan (CJOA-A) is a follow-on to the one previously conducted in November 2012 and published in January 2013. Both assessments were conducted by the US Central Command (USCENTCOM) Joint Theater Trauma System (JTTS). Observations for this report were collected from December 2013 to January 2014 and were obtained directly from deployed prehospital providers, medical leaders, and combatant leaders. Significant progress has been made between these two reports with the establishment of a Prehospital Care Division within the JTTS, development of a prehospital trauma registry and weekly prehospital trauma conferences, and CJOA-A theater guidance and enforcement of prehospital documentation. Specific prehospital trauma-care achievements include expansion of transfusion capabilities forward to the point of injury, junctional tourniquets, and universal approval of tranexamic acid.

  6. Rnnotator Assembly Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jeff

    2010-06-03

    Jeff Martin of the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses a de novo transcriptome assembly pipeline from short RNA-Seq reads on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  7. Survey of tracking systems and rotary joints for coolant piping. Final report, August 15, 1978-August 14, 1978. [Includes patents

    SciTech Connect

    Furaus, J P; Gruchalla, M E; Sower, G D

    1980-01-01

    Problems were surveyed and evaluated with respect to solar tracking mechanisms and rotary joints for coolant piping. An analytical development of celestial mechanics, one- and two-axis tracking configurations and the effect of tracking accuracy versus collector efficiency are reported. Daily operational requirements and tracking modes were defined and evaluated. A literature and patent search on solar tracking technology was performed. Tracking system and control system performance specifications were determined. Alternative conceptual tracking approaches were defined and a cost and performance evaluation of a mechanical tracking concept was performed. Fluid coupling service specifications were determined. The cost and performance of several types of actuators and error detectors were evaluated with respect to solar tracking mechanisms.

  8. A complexity science-based framework for global joint operations analysis to support force projection: LDRD Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    The military is undergoing a significant transformation as it modernizes for the information age and adapts to address an emerging asymmetric threat beyond traditional cold war era adversaries. Techniques such as traditional large-scale, joint services war gaming analysis are no longer adequate to support program evaluation activities and mission planning analysis at the enterprise level because the operating environment is evolving too quickly. New analytical capabilities are necessary to address modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD) enterprise. This presents significant opportunity to Sandia in supporting the nation at this transformational enterprise scale. Although Sandia has significant experience with engineering system of systems (SoS) and Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS), significant fundamental research is required to develop modeling, simulation and analysis capabilities at the enterprise scale. This report documents an enterprise modeling framework which will enable senior level decision makers to better understand their enterprise and required future investments.

  9. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  10. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E. J.; Park, J. -K.; Marmar, E. S.; Ahn, J. -W.; Berkery, J. W.; Burrell, K. H.; Canik, J. M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Ferraro, N. M.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gates, D. A.; Greenwald, M.; Kim, K.; King, J. D.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lazerson, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lore, J. D.; Menard, J. E.; Nazikian, R.; Shafer, M. W.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Reiman, A. H.; Rice, J. E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sugiyama, L.; Turnbull, A. D.; Volpe, F.; Wang, Z. R.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  11. Dose reconstruction for the Urals population. Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research, Project 1.1 -- Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M.O.; Drozhko, E.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Napier, B.A.; Bouville, A.C.; Miller, C.W.

    1996-02-01

    This work is being carried out as a feasibility study to determine if a long-term course of work can be implemented to assess the long-term risks of radiation exposure delivered at low to moderate dose rates to the populations living in the vicinity of the Mayak Industrial Association (MIA). This work was authorized and conducted under the auspices of the US-Russian Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) and its Executive Committee (EC). The MIA was the first Russian site for the production and separation of plutonium. This plant began operation in 1948, and during its early days there were technological failures that resulted in the release of large amounts of waste into the rather small Techa River. There were also gaseous releases of radioiodines and other radionuclides during the early days of operation. In addition, there was an accidental explosion in a waste storage tank in 1957 that resulted in a significant release. The Techa River Cohort has been studied for several years by scientists from the Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine and an increase in both leukemia and solid tumors has been noted.

  12. Development of ASTM Standard for SiC-SiC Joint Testing Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, George; Back, Christina

    2015-10-30

    As the nuclear industry moves to advanced ceramic based materials for cladding and core structural materials for a variety of advanced reactors, new standards and test methods are required for material development and licensing purposes. For example, General Atomics (GA) is actively developing silicon carbide (SiC) based composite cladding (SiC-SiC) for its Energy Multiplier Module (EM2), a high efficiency gas cooled fast reactor. Through DOE funding via the advanced reactor concept program, GA developed a new test method for the nominal joint strength of an endplug sealed to advanced ceramic tubes, Fig. 1-1, at ambient and elevated temperatures called the endplug pushout (EPPO) test. This test utilizes widely available universal mechanical testers coupled with clam shell heaters, and specimen size is relatively small, making it a viable post irradiation test method. The culmination of this effort was a draft of an ASTM test standard that will be submitted for approval to the ASTM C28 ceramic committee. Once the standard has been vetted by the ceramics test community, an industry wide standard methodology to test joined tubular ceramic components will be available for the entire nuclear materials community.

  13. Environmental Shortcourse Final report [Joint US-EC Short Course on Environmental Biotechnology: Microbial Catalysts for the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, Gerben; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2013-03-05

    The Joint US-EC Short Course on Environmental Biotechnology is designed for several purposes. One of the central tenets is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that will set the groundwork for future overseas collaborative interactions. The course is also designed to give the scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods for the analysis of microbes and their activities pertinent to the remediation of pollutants in the environment. The 2011 course covered multiple theoretical and practical topics in environmental biotechnology. The practical part was centered around a full concise experiment to demonstrate the possibility for targeted remediation of contaminated soil. Experiments included chemical, microbiological, and molecular analyses of sediments and/or waters, contaminant bioavailability assessment, seeded bioremediation, gene probing, PCR amplification, microbial community analysis based on 16S rRNA gene diversity, and microarray analyses. Each of these topics is explained in detail. The practical part of the course was complemented with two lectures per day, given by distinguished scientists from the US and from Europe, covering a research area related to what the students are doing in the course.

  14. RF window assembly comprising a ceramic disk disposed within a cylindrical waveguide which is connected to rectangular waveguides through elliptical joints

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Yeremian, Anahid D.

    2016-03-15

    A high-power microwave RF window is provided that includes a cylindrical waveguide, where the cylindrical waveguide includes a ceramic disk concentrically housed in a central region of the cylindrical waveguide, a first rectangular waveguide, where the first rectangular waveguide is connected by a first elliptical joint to a proximal end of the cylindrical waveguide, and a second rectangular waveguide, where the second rectangular waveguide is connected by a second elliptical joint to a distal end of the cylindrical waveguide.

  15. Experimental and numerical investigation of ADP square crystal with large aperture in the new Final Optics Assembly under the non-critical phase matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fuzhong; Zhang, Peng; Bai, Qingshun; Lu, Lihua; Xiang, Yong

    2016-04-01

    This paper presented a new Final Optics Assembly (FOA) of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) square crystal with large aperture under the non-critical phase matching (NCPM), which controlled by the constant temperature water, and the temperature distribution was analyzed by simulation and experiment. Firstly, thermal analysis was carried out, as well as the temperature distribution of the cavity only heated under different velocities was analyzed. Then, the temperature distributions of ADP square crystal in the cavity were achieved using the Finite Volume Method (FVM), and this prediction was validated by the experiment results when the velocity is 0.1 m/s and 0.5 m/s. Finally, the optimal FHG conversion efficiency was obtained and the comparison of different heating methods was also highlighted.

  16. Joint custody: preliminary impressions.

    PubMed

    Awad, G A

    1983-02-01

    Joint custody is currently a popular and debatable issue. It is felt that some of the controversy is due to the lack of agreement on a definition. Following some examples of the differences in personal and judicial definitions of joint custody, a classification of custody is offered. Four types of custody arrangements are described: Absolute Sole Custody, Sole Custody, Non-Alternating Joint Custody (disputed and undisputed) and Alternating Joint Custody (disputed and undisputed). A critical review of the literature follows. Finally, clinical impressions about the two types of joint custody are discussed. PMID:6839267

  17. Final Report for the Joint Urban 2003 Atmospheric Dispersion Study in Oklahoma City: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory participation

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M J

    2005-10-12

    The Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field study was designed to collect meteorological and tracer data resolving atmospheric dispersion at scales-of-motion ranging from flows in and around a single city block, in and around several blocks in the downtown Central Business District (CBD), and into the suburban Oklahoma City area a few km from the CBD. Indoor tracer and flow measurements within four downtown study buildings were also made in conjunction with detailed outdoor measurements investigating the outdoor-indoor exchange rates and mechanisms. The movement of tracer within the study buildings was also studied. The data from the field experiment is being used to evaluate models that are being developed for predicting dispersion of contaminants in urban areas. These models may be fast-response models based on semi-empirical algorithms that are used in real-time emergencies, or highly sophisticated computational fluid dynamics models that resolve individual building faces and crevices. The data from the field experiment, together with the models, can then be used to develop other advanced tools that are especially valuable in the efforts to thwart terrorists. These include tools for finding location and characteristics of a contaminant source; tools that can be used for real-time response or for forensic investigation. The tools will make use of monitoring networks for biological agents that are being established in several sensitive cities throughout the nation. This major urban study was conducted beginning June 28 and ending July 31, 2003. It included several integrated scientific components necessary to describe and understand the physical processes governing dispersion within and surrounding an urban area and into and within building environments. The components included characterizing: (1) the urban boundary layer and the development of the urban boundary layer within the atmospheric boundary layer, (2) the flows within and downwind of the tall-building core, (3

  18. 20 CFR 410.645 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint hearings. 410.645 Section 410.645..., Finality of Decisions, and Representation of Parties § 410.645 Joint hearings. When two or more hearings... joint hearing, a joint hearing may not be held. Where joint hearings are held, a single record of...

  19. 20 CFR 410.645 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Joint hearings. 410.645 Section 410.645..., Finality of Decisions, and Representation of Parties § 410.645 Joint hearings. When two or more hearings... joint hearing, a joint hearing may not be held. Where joint hearings are held, a single record of...

  20. Advanced industrial gas turbine technology readiness demonstration program. Phase II. Final report: compressor rig fabrication assembly and test

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, J. K.; Smith, J. D.

    1981-03-01

    The results of a component technology demonstration program to fabricate, assemble and test an advanced axial/centrifugal compressor are presented. This work was conducted to demonstrate the utilization of advanced aircraft gas turbine cooling and high pressure compressor technology to improve the performance and reliability of future industrial gas turbines. Specific objectives of the compressor component testing were to demonstrate 18:1 pressure ratio on a single spool at 90% polytropic efficiency with 80% fewer airfoils as compared to current industrial gas turbine compressors. The compressor design configuration utilizes low aspect ratio/highly-loaded axial compressor blading combined with a centrifugal backend stage to achieve the 18:1 design pressure ratio in only 7 stages and 281 axial compressor airfoils. Initial testing of the compressor test rig was conducted with a vaneless centrifugal stage diffuser to allow documentation of the axial compressor performance. Peak design speed axial compressor performance demonstrated was 91.8% polytropic efficiency at 6.5:1 pressure ratio. Subsequent documentation of the combined axial/centrifugal performance with a centrifugal stage pipe diffuser resulted in the demonstration of 91.5% polytropic efficiency and 14% stall margin at the 18:1 overall compressor design pressure ratio. The demonstrated performance not only exceeded the contract performance goals, but also represents the highest known demonstrated compressor performance in this pressure ratio and flow class. The performance demonstrated is particularly significant in that it was accomplished at airfoil loading levels approximately 15% higher than that of current production engine compressor designs. The test results provide conclusive verification of the advanced low aspect ratio axial compressor and centrifugal stage technologies utilized.

  1. Development of molded joints and terminals for 230-kV extruded cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) insulated cable. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bahder, G.; Bopp, L.A.; Eager, G.S. Jr.; Katz, C.; Knott, A.; Schmidt, G.A.

    1985-04-01

    The reliability of extruded-dielectric transmission systems depends to a great extent on the quality of joints and terminals. Detailed procedures developed in this study for field-molding high-stress 230-kV cable joints can ensure the stability of critical interfaces over many years.

  2. Chiral expression at the solid-liquid interface: a joint experimental and theoretical study of the self-assembly of chiral porphyrins on graphite.

    PubMed

    Linares, Mathieu; Iavicoli, Patrizia; Psychogyiopoulou, Krystallia; Beljonne, David; De Feyter, Steven; Amabilino, David B; Lazzaroni, Roberto

    2008-09-01

    The chiral organization of an enantiopure functional molecule on an achiral surface has been studied with the aim of understanding the influence of stereogenic centers on the self-assembly in two dimensions. A chiral tetra meso-amidophenyl-substituted porphyrin containing long hydrophobic tails at the periphery of the conjugated pi-electron system was prepared for this purpose. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of the compound at the graphite-heptanol interface reveal a chiral arrangement of the molecules, with the porphyrin rows tilted by 13 degrees with respect to the normal to the graphite axes. In terms of molecular modeling, a combination of molecular dynamics simulations on systems constrained by periodic boundary conditions and on unconstrained large molecular aggregates has been applied to reach a quantitative interpretation on both the density of the layer and its orientation with respect to the graphite surface. The results show clearly that (i) the methyl groups of the stereogenic point toward the graphite surface and (ii) the porphyrin molecules self-assemble into an interdigitated structure where the alkyl chains align along one of the graphite axes and the porphyrin cores are slightly shifted with respect to one another. The direction of this shift, which defines the chirality of the monolayer, is set by the chirality of the stereogenic centers. Such an arrangement results in the formation of a dense chiral monolayer that is further stabilized by hydrogen bonding with protic solvents.

  3. Accomplishments in Field Period Assembly for NCSX* This is how we did it

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Viola, J. Edwards, T. Brown, L. Dudek, R. Ellis, P. Heitzenroeder, R. Strykowsky and Michael Cole

    2009-09-14

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was a collaborative effort between ORNL and PPPL. PPPL provided the assembly techniques with guidance from ORNL to meet design criteria. The individual vacuum vessel segments, modular coils, trim coils, and toroidal field coils components were delivered to the Field Period Assembly (FPA) crew who then would complete the component assemblies and then assemble the final three field period assemblies, each consisting of two sets of three modular coils assembled over a 120o vacuum vessel segment with the trim coils and toroidal field coils providing the outer layer. The requirements for positioning the modular coils were found to be most demanding. The assembly tolerances required for accurate positioning of the field coil windings in order to generate sufficiently accurate magnetic fields strained state of the art techniques in metrology and alignment and required constant monitoring of assembly steps with laser trackers, measurement arms, and photogrammetry. The FPA activities were being performed concurrently while engineering challenges were being resolved. For example, it was determined that high friction electrically isolated shims were needed between the modular coil interface joints and low distortion welding was required in the nose region of those joints. This took months of analysis and development yet the assembly was not significantly impacted because other assembly tasks could be performed in parallel with ongoing assembly tasks as well as tasks such as advance tooling setup preparation for the eventual welding tasks. The crew technicians developed unique, accurate time saving techniques and tooling which provided significant cost and schedule savings. Project management displayed extraordinary foresight and every opportunity to gain advanced knowledge and develop techniques was taken advantage of. Despite many risk concerns, the cost and schedule performance index was maintained nearly 1.0 during the

  4. Experiments and numerical simulations of nonlinear vibration responses of an assembly with friction joints - Application on a test structure named "Harmony"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Sinou, J.-J.; Lambelin, J.-P.; Todeschini, R.

    2016-03-01

    In presence of friction, the frequency response function of a metallic assembly is strongly dependent on the excitation level. The local stick-slip behavior at the friction interfaces induces energy dissipation and local stiffness softening. These phenomena are studied both experimentally and numerically on a test structure named "Harmony". Concerning the numerical part, a classical complete methodology from the finite element and friction modeling to the prediction of the nonlinear vibrational response is implemented. The well-known Harmonic Balance Method with a specific condensation process on the nonlinear frictional elements is achieved. Also, vibration experiments are performed to validate not only the finite element model of the test structure named "Harmony" at low excitation levels but also to investigate the nonlinear behavior of the system on several excitation levels. A scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure the nonlinear behavior and the local stick-slip movement near the contacts.

  5. Final Report for Grant # DE-FG02-02ER46000 Simulations of Self-Assembly of Tethered Nanoparticle Shape Amphiphiles

    SciTech Connect

    Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2014-08-25

    Self-assembly of nanoparticle building blocks including nanospheres, nanorods, nanocubes, nano plates, nanoprisms, etc., may provide a promising means for manipulating these building blocks into functional and useful materials. One increasingly popular method for self-assembly involves functionalizing nanoparticles and nanostructured molecules with “tethers” of organic polymers or biomolecules with specific or nonspecific interactions to facilitate their assembly. However, there is little theory and little understanding of the general principles underlying self-assembly in these complex materials. Using computer simulation to elucidate the principles of self-assembly and develop a predictive theoretical framework was the central goal of this project.

  6. Walking boot assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Chambers, A. B.; Stjohn, R. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A walking boot assembly particularly suited for use with a positively pressurized spacesuit is presented. A bootie adapted to be secured to the foot of a wearer, an hermetically sealed boot for receiving the bootie having a walking sole, an inner sole, and an upper portion adapted to be attached to an ankle joint of a spacesuit, are also described.

  7. Assembly Test Article (ATA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Glen A.

    1988-01-01

    The assembly test article (ATA) consisted of two live loaded redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) segments which were assembled and disassembled to simulate the actual flight segment stacking process. The test assembly joint was flight RSRM design, which included the J-joint insulation design and metal capture feature. The ATA test was performed mid-November through 24 December 1987, at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. The purpose of the test was: certification that vertical RSRM segment mating and separation could be accomplished without any damage; verification and modification of the procedures in the segment stacking/destacking documents; and certification of various GSE to be used for flight assembly and inspection. The RSRM vertical segment assembly/disassembly is possible without any damage to the insulation, metal parts, or seals. The insulation J-joint contact area was very close to the predicted values. Numerous deviations and changes to the planning documents were made to ensure the flight segments are effectively and correctly stacked. Various GSE were also certified for use on flight segments, and are discussed in detail.

  8. Determination of Parachute Joint Factors using Seam and Joint Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollmann, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This paper details the methodology for determining the joint factor for all parachute components. This method has been successfully implemented on the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) for the NASA Orion crew module for use in determining the margin of safety for each component under peak loads. Also discussed are concepts behind the joint factor and what drives the loss of material strength at joints. The joint factor is defined as a "loss in joint strength...relative to the basic material strength" that occurs when "textiles are connected to each other or to metals." During the CPAS engineering development phase, a conservative joint factor of 0.80 was assumed for each parachute component. In order to refine this factor and eliminate excess conservatism, a seam and joint testing program was implemented as part of the structural validation. This method split each of the parachute structural joints into discrete tensile tests designed to duplicate the loading of each joint. Breaking strength data collected from destructive pull testing was then used to calculate the joint factor in the form of an efficiency. Joint efficiency is the percentage of the base material strength that remains after degradation due to sewing or interaction with other components; it is used interchangeably with joint factor in this paper. Parachute materials vary in type-mainly cord, tape, webbing, and cloth -which require different test fixtures and joint sample construction methods. This paper defines guidelines for designing and testing samples based on materials and test goals. Using the test methodology and analysis approach detailed in this paper, the minimum joint factor for each parachute component can be formulated. The joint factors can then be used to calculate the design factor and margin of safety for that component, a critical part of the design verification process.

  9. Joint Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  10. Prosthetic elbow joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An artificial, manually positionable elbow joint for use in an upper extremity, above-elbow, prosthetic is described. The prosthesis provides a locking feature that is easily controlled by the wearer. The instant elbow joint is very strong and durable enough to withstand the repeated heavy loadings encountered by a wearer who works in an industrial, construction, farming, or similar environment. The elbow joint of the present invention comprises a turntable, a frame, a forearm, and a locking assembly. The frame generally includes a housing for the locking assembly and two protruding ears. The forearm includes an elongated beam having a cup-shaped cylindrical member at one end and a locking wheel having a plurality of holes along a circular arc on its other end with a central bore for pivotal attachment to the protruding ears of the frame. The locking assembly includes a collar having a central opening with a plurality of internal grooves, a plurality of internal cam members each having a chamfered surface at one end and a V-shaped slot at its other end; an elongated locking pin having a crown wheel with cam surfaces and locking lugs secured thereto; two coiled compression springs; and a flexible filament attached to one end of the elongated locking pin and extending from the locking assembly for extending and retracting the locking pin into the holes in the locking wheel to permit selective adjustment of the forearm relative to the frame. In use, the turntable is affixed to the upper arm part of the prosthetic in the conventional manner, and the cup-shaped cylindrical member on one end of the forearm is affixed to the forearm piece of the prosthetic in the conventional manner. The elbow joint is easily adjusted and locked between maximum flex and extended positions.

  11. Mechanical testing and development of the helical field coil joint for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, B.E.; Bryan, W.E.; Goranson, P.L.; Warwick, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The helical field (HF) coil set for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is an M = 12, l = 2, constant-ratio torsatron winding consisting of 2 coils, each with 14 turns of heavy copper conductor. The coils are divided into 24 identical segments to facilitate fabrication and minimize the assembly schedule. The segments are connected across through-bolted lap joints that must carry up to 124,000 A per turn for 5 s or 62,500 A steady-state. In addition, the joints must carry the high magnetic and thermal loads induced in the conductor and still fit within the basic 140- by 30-mm copper envelope. Extensive testing and development were undertaken to verify and refine the basic joint design. Tests included assembly force and clamping force for various types of misalignment; joint resistance as a function of clamping force; clamp bolt relaxation due to thermal cycling; fatigue testing of full-size, multiturn joint prototypes; and low-cycle fatigue and tensile tests of annealed CDA102 copper. The required performance parameters and actual test results, as well as the final joint configuration, are presented. 2 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Final assembly of Gondwana along its northern margin: Revising the suture geometry based on evidence from the Iranian-Turkish Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali Ashtiani, Rezvaneh; Hassanzadeh, Jamshid; Schmitt, Axel K.; Rahgoshay, Mohammad; Sobel, Edward

    2016-04-01

    -day coordinates) that linked the Menderes Massif to the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone of Iran and then to the Afghan and Tibet blocks. We also examine another possible reconstruction through the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone onto the high-P terrain of south India. The ensuing results are expected to considerably revise plate tectonic and paleogeographic view of the final assembly of the Gondwana at its northern borders.

  13. Improved Assembly for Gas Shielding During Welding or Brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul; Baker, Kevin; Weeks, Jack

    2009-01-01

    An improved assembly for inert-gas shielding of a metallic joint is designed to be useable during any of a variety of both laser-based and traditional welding and brazing processes. The basic purpose of this assembly or of a typical prior related assembly is to channel the flow of a chemically inert gas to a joint to prevent environmental contamination of the joint during the welding or brazing process and, if required, to accelerate cooling upon completion of the process.

  14. Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imtiaz, Kauser

    2011-01-01

    Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool (comBAT) is an Excel/VB-based bolted joint analysis/optimization program that lays out a systematic foundation for an inexperienced or seasoned analyst to determine fastener size, material, and assembly torque for a given design. Analysts are able to perform numerous what-if scenarios within minutes to arrive at an optimal solution. The program evaluates input design parameters, performs joint assembly checks, and steps through numerous calculations to arrive at several key margins of safety for each member in a joint. It also checks for joint gapping, provides fatigue calculations, and generates joint diagrams for a visual reference. Optimum fastener size and material, as well as correct torque, can then be provided. Analysis methodology, equations, and guidelines are provided throughout the solution sequence so that this program does not become a "black box:" for the analyst. There are built-in databases that reduce the legwork required by the analyst. Each step is clearly identified and results are provided in number format, as well as color-coded spelled-out words to draw user attention. The three key features of the software are robust technical content, innovative and user friendly I/O, and a large database. The program addresses every aspect of bolted joint analysis and proves to be an instructional tool at the same time. It saves analysis time, has intelligent messaging features, and catches operator errors in real time.

  15. Variation simulation for compliant sheet metal assemblies with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yufeng

    Sheet metals are widely used in discrete products, such as automobiles, aircraft, furniture and electronics appliances, due to their good manufacturability and low cost. A typical automotive body assembly consists of more than 300 parts welded together in more than 200 assembly fixture stations. Such an assembly system is usually quite complex, and takes a long time to develop. As the automotive customer demands products of increasing quality in a shorter time, engineers in automotive industry turn to computer-aided engineering (CAE) tools for help. Computers are an invaluable resource for engineers, not only to simplify and automate the design process, but also to share design specifications with manufacturing groups so that production systems can be tooled up quickly and efficiently. Therefore, it is beneficial to develop computerized simulation and evaluation tools for development of automotive body assembly systems. It is a well-known fact that assembly architectures (joints, fixtures, and assembly lines) have a profound impact on dimensional quality of compliant sheet metal assemblies. To evaluate sheet metal assembly architectures, a special dimensional analysis tool need be developed for predicting dimensional variation of the assembly. Then, the corresponding systematic tools can be established to help engineers select the assembly architectures. In this dissertation, a unified variation model is developed to predict variation in compliant sheet metal assemblies by considering fixture-induced rigid-body motion, deformation and springback. Based on the unified variation model, variation propagation models in multiple assembly stations with various configurations are established. To evaluate the dimensional capability of assembly architectures, quantitative indices are proposed based on the sensitivity matrix, which are independent of the variation level of the process. Examples are given to demonstrate their applications in selecting robust assembly

  16. Ceramic joints

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Bradley J.; Patten, Jr., Donald O.

    1991-01-01

    Butt joints between materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion are prepared having a reduced probability of failure of stress facture. This is accomplished by narrowing/tapering the material having the lower coefficient of thermal expansion in a direction away from the joint interface and not joining the narrow-tapered surface to the material having the higher coefficient of thermal expansion.

  17. Dual Role of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 pUS9 in Virus Anterograde Axonal Transport and Final Assembly in Growth Cones in Distal Axons

    PubMed Central

    Boadle, Ross A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) envelope protein pUS9 plays an important role in virus anterograde axonal transport and spread from neuronal axons. In this study, we used both confocal microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to examine the role of pUS9 in the anterograde transport and assembly of HSV-1 in the distal axon of human and rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using US9 deletion (US9−), repair (US9R), and wild-type (strain F, 17, and KOS) viruses. Using confocal microscopy and single and trichamber culture systems, we observed a reduction but not complete block in the anterograde axonal transport of capsids to distal axons as well as a marked (∼90%) reduction in virus spread from axons to Vero cells with the US9 deletion viruses. Axonal transport of glycoproteins (gC, gD, and gE) was unaffected. Using TEM, there was a marked reduction or absence of enveloped capsids, in varicosities and growth cones, in KOS strain and US9 deletion viruses, respectively. Capsids (40 to 75%) in varicosities and growth cones infected with strain 17, F, and US9 repair viruses were fully enveloped compared to less than 5% of capsids found in distal axons infected with the KOS strain virus (which also lacks pUS9) and still lower (<2%) with the US9 deletion viruses. Hence, there was a secondary defect in virus assembly in distal axons in the absence of pUS9 despite the presence of key envelope proteins. Overall, our study supports a dual role for pUS9, first in anterograde axonal transport and second in virus assembly in growth cones in distal axons. IMPORTANCE HSV-1 has evolved mechanisms for its efficient transport along sensory axons and subsequent spread from axons to epithelial cells after reactivation. In this study, we show that deletion of the envelope protein pUS9 leads to defects in virus transport along axons (partial defect) and in virus assembly and egress from growth cones (marked defect). Virus assembly and exit in the neuronal

  18. Plating To Reinforce Welded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otousa, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Electrodeposition used to strengthen welded joints gouged, nicked, or suffered other mechanical damage. Plating cell, typically of acrylic plastic such as poly (Methylmetacrylate), is assembled around part to be plated. Areas not to be plated are masked with plater's tape. Weld area is plated in standard nickel-plating process.

  19. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health > The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Main Content Title: The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Description: The temporomandibular joint connects the lower ...

  20. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  1. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  2. VIII Asamblea Nacional Plenaria del Consejo Nacional Tecnico de la Educacion, Mexico, 29 julio-2 agosto 1969 (Informe Final) (Eighth National Plenary Assembly of the National Technical Council for Education, Mexico, July 29-August 2, 1969. Final Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consejo Nacional Tecnico de la Educacion (Mexico).

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1500 words) summarizing the work of the Plenary Assembly and its four work sessions: doctrine and legislation, educational system and national development, educational planning, and interrelations between home, school and community. Decentralization was the major theme of the first…

  3. Compliant joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Wayne D. (Inventor); Kerley, James J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A compliant joint is provided for prosthetic and robotic devices which permits rotation in three different planes. The joint provides for the controlled use of cable under motion. Perpendicular outer mounting frames are joined by swaged cables that interlock at a center block. Ball bearings allow for the free rotation of the second mounting frame relative to the first mounting frame within a predetermined angular rotation that is controlled by two stop devices. The cables allow for compliance at the stops and the cables allow for compliance in six degrees of freedom enabling the duplication or simulation of the rotational movement and flexibility of a natural hip or knee joint, as well as the simulation of a joint designed for a specific robotic component for predetermined design parameters.

  4. Joint Commission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sunday 1:00 CST, November 6, 2016 Workplace Violence Prevention Resources The Joint Commission has launched “Workplace Violence Prevention Resources,” an online resource center dedicated to ...

  5. Joint Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankles and toes. Other types of arthritis include gout or pseudogout. Sometimes, there is a mechanical problem ... for more information on osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and gout. How Common are Joint Problems? Osteoarthritis, which affects ...

  6. Feasibility Assessment of Thermal Barriers for RSRM Nozzle Joint Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Solid rockets, including the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor, are generally manufactured in large segments which are then shipped to their final destination where they are assembled. These large segments are sealed with a system of primary and secondary 0-rings to contain combustion gases inside the rocket which are at pressures of up to 900 psi and temperatures of up to 5500 F. The seals are protected from hot combustion gases by thick layers of phenolic insulation and by joint-filling compounds between these layers. Recently, though, routine inspections of nozzle-to-case joints in the Shuttle solid rocket motors during disassembly revealed erosion of the primary O-rings. Jets of hot gas leaked through gaps in the joint-filling compound between the layers of insulation and impinged on the O-rings. This is not supposed to take place, so NASA and Thiokol, the manufacturer of the rockets, initiated an investigation and found that design improvements could be made in this joint. One such improvement would involve using NASA Lewis braided thermal barriers as another level of protection for the O-ring seals against the hot combustion gases.

  7. Mechanical seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    2002-01-01

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transfering it to the mechanical diode.

  8. Mechanical seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    2001-01-01

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  9. Multivalent Protein Assembly Using Monovalent Self-Assembling Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Petkau-Milroy, Katja; Sonntag, Michael H.; Colditz, Alexander; Brunsveld, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Discotic molecules, which self-assemble in water into columnar supramolecular polymers, emerged as an alternative platform for the organization of proteins. Here, a monovalent discotic decorated with one single biotin was synthesized to study the self-assembling multivalency of this system in regard to streptavidin. Next to tetravalent streptavidin, monovalent streptavidin was used to study the protein assembly along the supramolecular polymer in detail without the interference of cross-linking. Upon self-assembly of the monovalent biotinylated discotics, multivalent proteins can be assembled along the supramolecular polymer. The concentration of discotics, which influences the length of the final polymers at the same time dictates the amount of assembled proteins. PMID:24152447

  10. Dynamic Nanoparticles Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LIBING; XU, LIGUANG; KUANG, HUA; XU, CHUANLAI; KOTOV, NICHOLAS A.

    2012-01-01

    in the field may include different size dimensionalities: discrete assemblies (artificial molecules), one-dimensional (spaced chains) and two-dimensional (sheets) and three-dimensional (superlattices, twisted structures) assemblies. Notably, these dimensional attributes must be regarded as primarily topological in nature because all of these superstructures can acquire complex three-dimensional shapes. Preparation We discuss three primary strategies used to prepare NP superstructures: (1) anisotropy-based assemblies utilizing either intrinsic force field anisotropy around NPs or external anisotropy associated with templates and/or applied fields; (2) assembly methods utilizing uniform NPs with isotropic interactions; and (3) methods based on mutual recognition of biomolecules, such as DNA and antigen-antibody interactions. Applications We consider optical, electronic, and magnetic properties of dynamic superstructures, focusing primarily on multiparticle effects in NP superstructures as represented by surface plasmon resonance, NP-NP charge transport, and multibody magnetization. Unique properties of NP superstructures are being applied to biosensing, drug delivery, and nanoelectronics. For both Class 1 and Class 2 dynamic assemblies, biosensing is the most dominant and well-developed area of dynamic nanostructures being successfully transitioned into practice. We can foresee the rapid development of dynamic NP assemblies toward applications in harvesting of dissipated energy, photonics, and electronics. The final part of the review is devoted to the fundamental questions facing dynamic assemblies of NPs in the future. PMID:22449243

  11. Study of joint designing on composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazushi, Haruna

    In this paper, strength design techniques of CFRP mechanical joints and adhesively bonded joints were examined. Remarkable stress concentration generates at the mechanical hole edge and the adhesive edge, therefore an unskillful design of joints often causes a reduction in the strength of composite structures. In mechanical joints, a study on predicting the joint strength has been performed, but bearing failure that is most important failure mode for designing joints can not be predicted. So in this paper, the strength prediction method in consideration with bearing failure was examined. On the other hand, the criterion using the intensity of stress singularity was suggested in adhesive joints, but it was clarified in this paper, that this method can not be applied the prediction of the final failure strength. So the critical stress distribution of single-lap adhesive bonded carbon/epoxy joints was examined to obtain the failure criterion of the final failure. Moreover the simulation method for an internal stress generated by cure shrinkage of adhesive was also examined. In the proposed method for mechanical joint, 2-parameter criterion, that is combined the characteristic length with the Yamada-Sun criterion, was applied and the characteristic length for compression was determined from "bearing failure test" that was newly conceived to take bearing failure into consideration. In case of adhesive joints, it was thought that 2-parameter criterion was effective. So the prediction method using 2-parameter criterion was applied to other adhesive joints. Good agreement was obtained between predicted and experimental results in both mechanical and adhesive joints. And it was cleared that an internal stress could be simulated by the proposed method. Moreover, in mechanical joints, the most suitable stacking sequence, the reduction technique of interlaminar stress, and the elevation of joint strength by application of high toughness matrix were also shown. Consequently

  12. Regulation and Provision of Child Day Care in Virginia. Report of the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission to the Governor and the General Assembly of Virginia. House Document No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission, Richmond, VA.

    Findings and recommendations regarding the regulation and provision of child day care in Virginia are reported. Most of the data in the report are based on recent Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission surveys of parents, child care providers, regulatory personnel, and child care programs in other states. In general, child day care in…

  13. State Oversight of Commercial Driver-Training Schools in Virginia. House Document No. 5. Report of the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission to the Governor and the General Assembly of Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State General Assembly, Richmond. Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission.

    In 1998, Virginia's Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission (JLARC) was directed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicle's (DMV's) oversight of commercial driver training schools (CDTS) in Virginia. The evaluation included the following research activities: mail surveys of DMV CDTS oversight staff and CDTS…

  14. Review of Regional Criminal Justice Training Academies. House Document No. 28. Report of the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission to the Governor and the General Assembly of Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State General Assembly, Richmond. Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission.

    Virginia has 36 criminal justice training academies, including 10 regional academies. The academies conduct entry-level, inservice, and specialized training for law enforcement officers, jailers, and other criminal justice personnel. In 1998, the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission (JLARC) was directed to review the quality, consistency,…

  15. Crew Assembly

    NASA Video Gallery

    Train to improve your dexterity and hand-eye coordination by assembling a puzzle.The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to challenge students to set goals, practice ...

  16. Porosity in collapsible Ball Grid Array solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.A. |

    1998-05-01

    Ball Grid Array (BGA) technology has taken off in recent years due to the increased need for high interconnect density. Opposite to all the advantages BGA packages offer, porosity in collapsible BGA solder joints is often a major concern in the reliability of such packages. The effect of pores on the strength of collapsible BGA solder-joints was studied by manufacturing samples with different degrees of porosity and testing them under a shear load. It was found that the shear strength of the solder joints decreased in a linear fashion with increasing porosity. Failure occurred by internal necking of the interpore matrix. It was confirmed that entrapment of flux residues leads to porosity by manufacturing fluxless samples in a specially made furnace, and comparing them with samples assembled using flux. Also, contamination of Au electrodeposits (in substrate metallization) was determined to cause significant porosity. It was found that hard-Au (Co hardened Au) electrodeposits produce high degrees of porosity even in the absence of flux. Finally, increasing the time the solder spends in the molten state was proven to successfully decrease porosity.

  17. Investigation of proposed process sequence for the array automated assembly task. Phase I and II. Final report, October 1, 1977-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Mardesich, N.; Garcia, A.; Eskenas, K.

    1980-08-01

    A selected process sequence for the low cost fabrication of photovoltaic modules was defined during this contract. Each part of the process sequence was looked at regarding its contribution to the overall dollars per watt cost. During the course of the research done, some of the initially included processes were dropped due to technological deficiencies. The printed dielectric diffusion mask, codiffusion of the n+ and p+ regions, wraparound front contacts and retention of the diffusion oxide for use as an AR coating were all the processes that were removed for this reason. Other process steps were retained to achieve the desired overall cost and efficiency. Square wafers, a polymeric spin-on PX-10 diffusion source, a p+ back surface field and silver front contacts are all processes that have been recommended for use in this program. The printed silver solderable pad for making contact to the aluminum back was replaced by an ultrasonically applied tin-zinc pad. Also, the texturized front surface was dropped as inappropriate for the sheet silicon likely to be available in 1986. Progress has also been made on the process sequence for module fabrication. A shift from bonding with a conformal coating to laminating with ethylene vinyl acetate and a glass superstrate is recommended for further module fabrication. The finalized process sequence is described.

  18. Seal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Roger Neal; Longfritz, William David

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that seals a gap formed by a groove comprises a seal body, a biasing element, and a connection that connects the seal body to the biasing element to form the seal assembly. The seal assembly further comprises a concave-shaped center section and convex-shaped contact portions at each end of the seal body. The biasing element is formed from an elastic material and comprises a convex-shaped center section and concave-shaped biasing zones that are opposed to the convex-shaped contact portions. The biasing element is adapted to be compressed to change a width of the seal assembly from a first width to a second width that is smaller than the first width. In the compressed state, the seal assembly can be disposed in the groove. After release of the compressing force, the seal assembly expands. The contact portions will move toward a surface of the groove and the biasing zones will move into contact with another surface of the groove. The biasing zones will bias the contact portions of the seal body against the surface of the groove.

  19. 2012 Joint Research Target (JRT) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Team, JRT

    2012-09-30

    The report summarizes: [1] Diagnostic upgrades and analysis improvements that support the JRT; [2] Descriptions of new experiments and a brief summary of findings; [3] New analysis of previous experiments; [4] Plans for further data analysis and recommendations for further work; [5] Scientific publications that are derived from or contributed directly to the JRT. The report is organized as follows: Section 1: Describes inter-machine comparisons that were facilitated by the JRT focus. Similarities and differences found on the different facilities are outlined, and plans for additional analysis of data and supporting simulations are described.Section 2: Reviews diagnostic development, experiments and results from C-Mod. C-Mod dedicated 13.1 run days to the JRT divided among 10 experimental proposals. These were organized into three general thrust areas that represent distinct experimental approaches to realizing the regimes called for in the JRT description. Initial comparisons with linear and nonlinear simulation have been carried out for these experiments, and plans for an extensive campaign of analysis have been outlined. Section 3: Reviews results from DIII-D including new experiments, detailed comparisons of simulations to previously collected data and connections between the new work and past research. Four experimental days were dedicated to the JRT in 2012. These included studies of L-modes, H-modes and QH-modes. Section 4: Summarizes new analysis of data collected before the NSTX shutdown. The work focuses on the roles of low and high-k turbulence; collisionality scans and impurity particle transport.

  20. 77 FR 39560 - International Joint Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

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  1. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  2. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  3. Synergistic self-assembly of scaffolds and building blocks for directed synthesis of organic nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Dergunov, Sergey; Richter, Andrew G; Kim, Mariya D.; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker S; Pinkhassik, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Surfactants and hydrophobic monomers spontaneously assemble into vesicles containing monomers within the bilayer. The joint action of monomers and surfactants is essential in this synergistic self-assembly. Polymerization in the bilayer formed hollow polymer nanocapsules.

  4. Geometric reasoning about assembly tools

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Planning for assembly requires reasoning about various tools used by humans, robots, or other automation to manipulate, attach, and test parts and subassemblies. This paper presents a general framework to represent and reason about geometric accessibility issues for a wide variety of such assembly tools. Central to the framework is a use volume encoding a minimum space that must be free in an assembly state to apply a given tool, and placement constraints on where that volume must be placed relative to the parts on which the tool acts. Determining whether a tool can be applied in a given assembly state is then reduced to an instance of the FINDPLACE problem. In addition, the author presents more efficient methods to integrate the framework into assembly planning. For tools that are applied either before or after their target parts are mated, one method pre-processes a single tool application for all possible states of assembly of a product in polynomial time, reducing all later state-tool queries to evaluations of a simple expression. For tools applied after their target parts are mated, a complementary method guarantees polynomial-time assembly planning. The author presents a wide variety of tools that can be described adequately using the approach, and surveys tool catalogs to determine coverage of standard tools. Finally, the author describes an implementation of the approach in an assembly planning system and experiments with a library of over one hundred manual and robotic tools and several complex assemblies.

  5. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, D.H.

    1999-08-31

    A hinge assembly is disclosed having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf. 8 figs.

  6. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, David Houston

    1999-01-01

    A hinge assembly having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf.

  7. Modular, security enclosure and method of assembly

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Moyer, John W.

    1995-01-01

    A transportable, reusable rapidly assembled and disassembled, resizable modular, security enclosure utilizes a stepped panel construction. Each panel has an inner portion and an outer portion which form joints. A plurality of channels can be affixed to selected joints of the panels. Panels can be affixed to a base member and then affixed to one another by the use of elongated pins extending through the channel joints. Alternatively, the base member can be omitted and the panels themselves can be used as the floor of the enclosure. The pins will extend generally parallel to the joint in which they are located. These elongated pins are readily inserted into and removable from the channels in a predetermined sequence to allow assembly and disassembly of the enclosure. A door constructed from panels is used to close the opening to the enclosure.

  8. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, James R.; Harper, William H.; Perez, Raymond

    1986-01-01

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing.

  9. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, J.R.; Harper, W.H.; Perez, R.

    1984-08-17

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing. 2 figs.

  10. Valve assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Marshala, D.L.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes a subsurface pump actuated by a reciprocatable sucker rod for producing well liquids from a subsurface reservoir involving a piston adapted to reciprocate within a cylinder immersed in the reservoir, the piston being provided with a traveling valve. The improvement described here comprises valve means connected to the sucker tod for lifting a body of fluid during upstrokes of the sucker rod, the valve means comprising: a barrel assembly having an internal bore and comprising: a lower barrel member; and an upper barrel assembly connected to the lower barrel and having a beveled seating surface with at least one fluid port therethrough.

  11. Self-assembling segmented coiled tubing

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, David W.

    2016-09-27

    Self-assembling segmented coiled tubing is a concept that allows the strength of thick-wall rigid pipe, and the flexibility of thin-wall tubing, to be realized in a single design. The primary use is for a drillstring tubular, but it has potential for other applications requiring transmission of mechanical loads (forces and torques) through an initially coiled tubular. The concept uses a spring-loaded spherical `ball-and-socket` type joint to interconnect two or more short, rigid segments of pipe. Use of an optional snap ring allows the joint to be permanently made, in a `self-assembling` manner.

  12. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  13. [Divorce and joint physical custody].

    PubMed

    Golse, B

    2014-04-01

    This work first recalls the definition of joint physical custody, as well as the current legal procedure for obtaining it, its practical implementation, the financial implications for parents, and finally some statistics. Some psychological and psychopathological reflections on the impact of divorce on children are then presented before considering the question of joint physically custody with regard to attachment theory and depending on the age of the child (a great caution seems to be required before three years). The article concludes with a brief discussion of parental alienation syndrome. PMID:24630624

  14. [Divorce and joint physical custody].

    PubMed

    Golse, B

    2014-04-01

    This work first recalls the definition of joint physical custody, as well as the current legal procedure for obtaining it, its practical implementation, the financial implications for parents, and finally some statistics. Some psychological and psychopathological reflections on the impact of divorce on children are then presented before considering the question of joint physically custody with regard to attachment theory and depending on the age of the child (a great caution seems to be required before three years). The article concludes with a brief discussion of parental alienation syndrome.

  15. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, N.F.; Green, D.R.; Price, L.S.

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  16. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, Nicholas F.; Green, Donald R.; Price, Larry S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  17. Spacesuit mobility knee joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure suit mobility joints are for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit in which low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are required. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics and includes linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and includes a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  18. Spacesuit mobility joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Joints for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit which have low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are described. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics. Linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli are featured. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  19. Thermal and electrical joint test for the helical field coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.L.; Johnson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Initial feasibility studies of a number of configurations for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) resulted in the selection of a resistive copper continuous-coil torsatron as the optimum device considering the physics program, cost, and schedule. Further conceptual design work was directed toward optimization of this configuration and, if possible, a shorter schedule. It soon became obvious that in order to shorten the schedule, a number of design and fabrication activities should proceed in parallel. This was most critical for the vacuum vessel and the helical field (HF) coils. If the HF coils were wound in place on a completed vacuum vessel, the overall schedule would be significantly (greater than or equal to12 months) longer. The approach of parallel scheduel paths requires that the HF coils be segmented into parts of less than or equal to180 of poloidal angle and that joints be made on a turn-by-turn basis when the segments are installed. It was obvious from the outset that the compact and complex geometry of the joint design presented a special challenge in the areas of reliability, assembly, maintenance, disassembly, and cost. Also, electrical, thermal, and force excursions are significant for these joints. A number of soldered, welded, brazed, electroplated, and bolted joints were evaluated. The evaluations examined fabrication feasibility and complexity, thermal-electrical performance at approximately two-thirds of the steady-state design conditions, and installation and assembly processes. Results of the thermal-electrical tests were analyzed and extrapolated to predict performance at peak design parameters. The final selection was a lap-type joint clamped with insulated bolts that pass through the winding packing. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  20. A spherical joint piston design for high speed diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Wiczynski, P.D.; Mielke, S.; Conrow, R.

    1996-09-01

    A spherical joint piston and connecting rod have been developed through design proof-of-concept. The spherical joint allows piston rotation. The benefits of a rotating, symmetrical piston are: mechanical and thermal load symmetry, improved ring sealing and lubrication, and reduced bearing loads, scuffing, clearances and oil consumption. The assembly includes a squeeze cast, fiber reinforced aluminum spherical joint piston. Reinforcement is located in the piston bowl and skirt. The connecting rod consists of a spherical small end positioned on an elliptical cross-sectioned shank blended into a conventional big end. The assembly has operated at cylinder pressures exceeding of 24 MPa.

  1. Development of a Enhanced Thermal Barrier for RSRM Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, P. H.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A carbon fiber rope is being considered as replacement for the RTV thermal barrier that is currently used to protect o-rings in RSRM nozzle joints, Performance requirements include its ability to cool propellant gases filter slag and particulates, and conform to various joint assembly conditions as well as dynamic flight motion. Testing has shown its superior heat resistance, even in oxidative and corrosive environments. Testing has also demonstrated excellent performance of this system in sub-scale motors. Cold flow testing, has demonstrated its ability to conform to motor dynamics. Manufacture and assembly testing have demonstrated the ease of gland machining as well as assembly in a full-scale nozzle.

  2. The Fast Changing Landscape of Sequencing Technologies and Their Impact on Microbial Genome Assemblies and Annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, K; Land, Miriam L; Brettin, Thomas S; Quest, Daniel J; Copeland, A; Clum, Alicia; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Lapidus, Alla L.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Cottingham, Robert W; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2012-01-01

    Background: The emergence of next generation sequencing (NGS) has provided the means for rapid and high throughput sequencing and data generation at low cost, while concomitantly creating a new set of challenges. The number of available assembled microbial genomes continues to grow rapidly and their quality reflects the quality of the sequencing technology used, but also of the analysis software employed for assembly and annotation. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this work, we have explored the quality of the microbial draft genomes across various sequencing technologies. We have compared the draft and finished assemblies of 133 microbial genomes sequenced at the Department of Energy-Joint Genome Institute and finished at the Los Alamos National Laboratory using a variety of combinations of sequencing technologies, reflecting the transition of the institute from Sanger-based sequencing platforms to NGS platforms. The quality of the public assemblies and of the associated gene annotations was evaluated using various metrics. Results obtained with the different sequencing technologies, as well as their effects on downstream processes, were analyzed. Our results demonstrate that the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system, the primary sequencing technology currently used for de novo genome sequencing and assembly at JGI, has various advantages in terms of total sequence throughput and cost, but it also introduces challenges for the downstream analyses. In all cases assembly results although on average are of high quality, need to be viewed critically and consider sources of errors in them prior to analysis. Conclusion: These data follow the evolution of microbial sequencing and downstream processing at the JGI from draft genome sequences with large gaps corresponding to missing genes of significant biological role to assemblies with multiple small gaps (Illumina) and finally to assemblies that generate almost complete genomes (Illumina+PacBio).

  3. Method of forming a ceramic to ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Hutchings, Kent Neal; Kleinlein, Brian Paul; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2010-04-13

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, includes: providing a joint material between joining surfaces of first and second sintered bodies; applying pressure from 1 kP to less than 5 MPa to provide an assembly; heating the assembly to a conforming temperature sufficient to allow the joint material to conform to the joining surfaces; and further heating the assembly to a joining temperature below a minimum sintering temperature of the first and second sintered bodies. The joint material includes organic component(s) and ceramic particles. The ceramic particles constitute 40-75 vol. % of the joint material, and include at least one element of the first and/or second sintered bodies. Composite structures produced by the method are also disclosed.

  4. Sensor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  5. The Planar Shape of Rock Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lianyang; Einstein, Herbert H.

    2010-02-01

    Knowing the planar shape of discontinuities is important when characterizing discontinuities in a rock mass. However, the real discontinuity shape is rarely known, since the rock mass is usually inaccessible in three dimensions. Information on discontinuity shape is limited and often open to more than one interpretation. This paper discusses the planar shape of rock joints, the most common discontinuities in rock. First, a brief literature review about the shape of joints is presented, including some information on joint-surface morphology, inferences from observed trace lengths on different sampling planes, information based on experimental studies, and joint shapes assumed by different researchers. This review shows that joints not affected by adjacent geological structures such as bedding boundaries or pre-existing fractures tend to be elliptical (or approximately circular but rarely). Joints affected by or intersecting such geological structures tend to be rectangular. Then, using the general stereological relationship between trace length distributions and joint size distributions developed by Zhang et al. (Geotechnique 52(6):419-433, 2002) for elliptical joints, the effect of sampling plane orientation on trace lengths is investigated. This study explains why the average trace lengths of non-equidimensional (elliptical or similar polygonal) joints on two sampling planes can be about equal and thus the conclusion that rock joints are equidimensional (circular) drawn from the fact that the average trace lengths on two sampling planes are approximately equal can be wrong. Finally, methods for characterizing the shape and size of joints (elliptical or rectangular) from trace length data are recommended, and the appropriateness of using elliptical joint shapes to represent polygonal, especially rectangular, joints is discussed.

  6. Modeling of joints for the dynamic analysis of truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    1987-01-01

    An experimentally-based method for determining the stiffness and damping of truss joints is described. The analytical models use springs and both viscous and friction dampers to simulate joint load-deflection behavior. A least-squares algorithm is developed to identify the stiffness and damping coefficients of the analytical joint models from test data. The effects of nonlinear joint stiffness such as joint dead band are also studied. Equations for predicting the sensitivity of beam deformations to changes in joint stiffness are derived and used to show the level of joint stiffness required for nearly rigid joint behavior. Finally, the global frequency sensitivity of a truss structure to random perturbations in joint stiffness is discussed.

  7. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2014-11-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  8. Pushrod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Potter, J.D.

    1984-03-30

    A pushrod assembly including a carriage mounted on a shaft for movement therealong and carrying a pushrod engageable with a load to be moved is described. A magnet is mounted on a supporting bracket for movement along such shaft. Means are provided for adjustably spacing magnet away from the carriage to obtain a selected magnetic attractive or coupling force therebetween. Movement of the supporting bracket and the magnet carried thereby pulls the carriage along with it until the selected magnetic force is exceeded by a resistance load acting on the carriage.

  9. Pushrod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Jerry D.

    1987-01-01

    A pushrod assembly including a carriage mounted on a shaft for movement therealong and carrying a pushrod engageable with a load to be moved. A magnet is mounted on a supporting bracket for movement along such shaft. Means are provided for adjustably spacing said magnet away from said carriage to obtain a selected magnetic attractive or coupling force therebetween. Movement of the supporting bracket and the magnet carried thereby pulls the carriage along with it until the selected magnetic force is exceeded by a resistance load acting on the carriage.

  10. Shingle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2007-02-20

    A barrier, such as a PV module, is secured to a base by a support to create a shingle assembly with a venting region defined between the barrier and base for temperature regulation. The first edge of one base may be interengageable with the second edge of an adjacent base to be capable of resisting first and second disengaging forces oriented perpendicular to the edges and along planes oriented parallel to and perpendicular to the base. A deflector may be used to help reduce wind uplift forces.

  11. Dump assembly

    DOEpatents

    Goldmann, L.H.

    1984-12-06

    This is a claim for a dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough. 4 figs.

  12. Butt Joint Tool Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-12-06

    ITER Central Solenoid uses butt joints for connecting the pancakes in the CS module. The principles of the butt joining of the CICC were developed by the JAPT during CSMC project. The difference between the CSMC butt joint and the CS butt joint is that the CS butt joint is an in-line joint, while the CSMC is a double joint through a hairpin jumper. The CS butt joint has to carry the hoop load. The straight length of the joint is only 320 mm, and the vacuum chamber around the joint has to have a split in the clamp shell. These requirements are challenging. Fig.1 presents a CSMC joint, and Fig.2 shows a CS butt joint. The butt joint procedure was verified and demonstrated. The tool is capable of achieving all specified parameters. The vacuum in the end was a little higher than the target, which is not critical and readily correctable. We consider, tentatively that the procedure is established. Unexpectedly, we discover significant temperature nonuniformity in the joint cross section, which is not formally a violation of the specs, but is a point of concern. All testing parameters are recorded for QA purposes. We plan to modify the butt joining tool to improve its convenience of operation and provide all features necessary for production of butt joints by qualified personnel.

  13. Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser Model Assembly

    NASA Video Gallery

    This time lapse video shows the assembly of a scale model of Sierra Nevada Space Systems' Dream Chaser vehicle. The Dream Chaser model is undergoing final preparations for buffet tests at the Trans...

  14. Pressure suit joint analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Webbon, B. W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A measurement system for simultaneously measuring torque and angular flexure in a pressure suit joint is described. One end of a joint under test is held rigid. A torque transducer is pivotably supported on the other movable end of a joint. A potentiometer is attached to the transducer by an arm. The wiper shaft of the potentiometer is gripped by a reference arm that rotates the wiper shaft the same angle as the flexure of joint. A signal is generated by the potentiometer which is representative of the joint flexure. A compensation circuit converts the output of the transducer to a signal representative of joint torque.

  15. Thermocouple assembly

    DOEpatents

    Thermos, Anthony Constantine; Rahal, Fadi Elias

    2002-01-01

    A thermocouple assembly includes a thermocouple; a plurality of lead wires extending from the thermocouple; an insulating jacket extending along and enclosing the plurality of leads; and at least one internally sealed area within the insulating jacket to prevent fluid leakage along and within the insulating jacket. The invention also provides a method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple including the steps of a) attaching a plurality of lead wires to a thermocouple; b) adding a heat sensitive pseudo-wire to extend along the plurality of lead wires; c) enclosing the lead wires and pseudo-wire inside an insulating jacket; d) locally heating axially spaced portions of the insulating jacket to a temperature which melts the pseudo-wire and fuses it with an interior surface of the jacket.

  16. Swivel assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael; Bradford, Kline; Rawle, Michael; Bartholomew, David B.; McPherson, James

    2007-03-20

    A swivel assembly for a downhole tool string comprises a first and second coaxial housing cooperatively arranged. The first housing comprises a first transmission element in communication with surface equipment. The second housing comprises a second transmission element in communication with the first transmission element. The second housing further comprises a third transmission element adapted for communication with a network integrated into the downhole tool string. The second housing may be rotational and adapted to transmit a signal between the downhole network and the first housing. Electronic circuitry is in communication with at least one of the transmission elements. The electronic circuitry may be externally mounted to the first or second housing. Further, the electronic circuitry may be internally mounted in the second housing. The electronic circuitry may be disposed in a recess in either first or second housing of the swivel.

  17. Thermal Barriers Developed for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Space shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed with conventional O-ring seals that are shielded from 5500 F combustion gases by thick layers of insulation and by special joint-fill compounds that fill assembly splitlines in the insulation. On a number of occasions, NASA has observed hot gas penetration through defects in the joint-fill compound of several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints. In the current nozzle-to-case joint, NASA has observed penetration of hot combustion gases through the joint-fill compound to the inboard wiper O-ring in one out of seven motors. Although this condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas penetration to the wiper O-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. The solid rocket motor manufacturer (Thiokol) approached the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field about the possibility of applying Glenn's braided fiber preform seal as a thermal barrier to protect the O-ring seals. Glenn and Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and by using a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier that would resist any hot gases that the J-leg does not block.

  18. Culture - joint fluid

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid culture ... fungi, or viruses grow. This is called a culture. If these germs are detected, other tests may ... is no special preparation needed for the lab culture. How to prepare for the removal of joint ...

  19. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  20. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  1. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002975.htm Hip joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hip joint replacement is surgery to replace all or part ...

  2. Mechanical end joint system for connecting structural column elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, Richard E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A mechanical end joint system is presented that eliminates the possibility of free movements between the joint halves during loading or vibration. Both node joint body (NJB) and column end joint body (CEJB) have cylindrical engaging ends. Each of these ends has an integral semicircular tongue and groove. The two joint halves are engaged transversely - the tongue of the NJB mating with the groove of the CEJB and vice versa. The joint system employs a spring loaded internal latch mechanism housed in the CEJB. During mating, this mechanism is pushed away from the NJB and enters the NJB when mating is completed. In order to lock the joint and add a preload across the tongue and groove faces, an operating ring collar is rotated through 45 deg causing an internal mechanism to compress a Belleville washer preload mechanism. This causes an equal and opposite force to be exerted on the latch bolt and the latch plunger. This force presses the two joint halves tightly together. In order to prevent inadvertent disassembly, a secondary lock is also engaged when the joint is closed. Plungers are carried in the operating ring collar. When the joint is closed, the plungers fall into tracks on the CEJB, which allows the joint to be opened only when the operating ring collar and plungers are pushed directly away from the joining end. One application of this invention is the rapid assembly and disassembly of diverse skeletal framework structures which is extremely important in many projects involving the exploration of space.

  3. Energy Consumption of Battery-Operated Screwdriver at Assembling Fixed Threaded Joints / Akumulatora Skrūvgrieža Elektroenerģijas Patēriņa Aprēķins, Veicot Nekustīga Vītņu Savienojuma Salikšanu Atkarībā No Operatora Reakcijas Laika

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinevich, I.; Mozga, N.; Rudzitis, J.

    2013-10-01

    The electrical energy consumption of battery-operated screwdrivers, which are widely used in many industries, e.g. automotive, heavy, chemical, etc., can be considerably reduced. This would allow increasing the service life of a battery and reducing the time of its charging, thus increasing the productivity and decreasing the prime cost of this battery. It is shown that up to 17.9% of electrical energy could be saved at assembling fixed threaded joints by removing power from the screwdriver immediately after reaching the required tightening torque. Dotajā rakstā uzmanība tiek pievērsta akumulatora skrūvgrieža elektroenerģijas patēriņa samazināšanas iespējām sakarā ar problēmas aktualitāti šīs grupas plaši pielietotajiem instrumentiem. Elektroenerģijas patēriņa samazināšana masveida ražošanā, kur tiek izmantoti akumulatora skrūvgrieži, ļautu paildzināt akumulatora baterijas kalpošanas mūžu un samazināt uzlādēšanas laiku, kas, savukārt, novestu pie ražības palielināšanas un produkcijas pašizmaksas samazināšanas.

  4. [Total temporomandibular joint prostheses].

    PubMed

    Zwetyenga, N; Amroun, S; Wajszczak, B-L; Moris, V

    2016-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is probably the most complex human joint. As in all joints, its prosthetic replacement may be indicated in selected cases. Significant advances have been made in the design of TMJ prostheses during the last three decades and the indications have been clarified. The aim of our work was to make an update on the current total TMJ total joint replacement. Indications, contraindications, prosthetic components, advantages, disadvantages, reasons for failure or reoperation, virtual planning and surgical protocol have been exposed.

  5. Joint Enrollment Report, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Iowa Department of Education collects information on joint enrollment in Iowa's 15 community colleges. Jointly enrolled students are high school students enrolled in community college credit coursework. Most jointly enrolled students enroll through Senior Year Plus (SYP) programs such as Postsecondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) and concurrent…

  6. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  7. Mechanically Induced g-Jitter from Space Station Rotary Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boucher, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    The mission of the International Space Station is to provide a working laboratory in orbit for research in engineering, life sciences, and microgravity. Among the microgravity disciplines that are preparing to utilize this international resource are materials processing, combustion, fluid dynamics, biotechnology, and fundamental physics. The Station promises to enable significant advances in each of these areas by making available a research facility in which gravitational and other accelerations, and their corresponding buoyancy and diffusion effects on various physical processes, are orders of magnitude lower than they are on Earth. In order to fulfill this promise, it is not enough for the Space Station to simply replicate a typical terrestrial scientific laboratory in orbit. Although an orbiting laboratory is free of most of the effects of gravitational acceleration by virtue of its free fall condition, it also produces structural vibration or jitter that can interfere with the processes under study. To ensure the quality of the acceleration environment and enable a successful mission, the Space Station Program has limited potential disturbances in two ways: first, by isolating the most sensitive payloads from the vehicle structure, and second, by quieting major disturbances at their sources. The first area, payload isolation, is implemented inside the pressurized modules at the rack level. Sub-rack level isolators have also been developed. This paper addresses the second area, disturbance source limits, for one of the major sources of mechanical noise on the Space Station: the Solar Alpha Rotary Joints. Due to the potential for large disturbances to the microgravity environment, an initial analytical prediction of rotary joint vibration output was made. Key components were identified and tested to validate the analytical predictions. Based on the component test results, the final vibration output of the joints was verified by a test on each fully assembled

  8. Preliminary High-Throughput Metagenome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Dusheyko, Serge; Furman, Craig; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank

    2007-03-26

    Metagenome data sets present a qualitatively different assembly problem than traditional single-organism whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The unique aspects of such projects include the presence of a potentially large number of distinct organisms and their representation in the data set at widely different fractions. In addition, multiple closely related strains could be present, which would be difficult to assemble separately. Failure to take these issues into account can result in poor assemblies that either jumble together different strains or which fail to yield useful results. The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced a number of metagenomic projects and plans to considerably increase this number in the coming year. As a result, the JGI has a need for high-throughput tools and techniques for handling metagenome projects. We present the techniques developed to handle metagenome assemblies in a high-throughput environment. This includes a streamlined assembly wrapper, based on the JGI?s in-house WGS assembler, Jazz. It also includes the selection of sensible defaults targeted for metagenome data sets, as well as quality control automation for cleaning up the raw results. While analysis is ongoing, we will discuss preliminary assessments of the quality of the assembly results (http://fames.jgi-psf.org).

  9. Automated solar panel assembly line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somberg, H.

    1981-01-01

    The initial stage of the automated solar panel assembly line program was devoted to concept development and proof of approach through simple experimental verification. In this phase, laboratory bench models were built to demonstrate and verify concepts. Following this phase was machine design and integration of the various machine elements. The third phase was machine assembly and debugging. In this phase, the various elements were operated as a unit and modifications were made as required. The final stage of development was the demonstration of the equipment in a pilot production operation.

  10. Bonus Organisms in High-Throughput Eukaryotic Whole-Genome Shorgun Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank; Platt, Darren

    2006-02-06

    The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced over 50 eukaryotic genomes, ranging in size from 15 MB to 1.6 GB, over a wide range of organism types. In the course of doing so, it has become clear that a substantial fraction of these data sets contains bonus organisms, usually prokaryotes, in addition to the desired genome. While some of these additional organisms are extraneous contamination, they are sometimes symbionts, and so can be of biological interest. Therefore, it is desirable to assemble the bonus organisms along with the main genome. This transforms the problem into one of metagenomic assembly, which is considerably more challenging than traditional whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The different organisms will usually be present at different sequence depths, which is difficult to handle in most WGS assemblers. In addition, with multiple distinct genomes present, chimerism can produce cross-organism combinations. Finally, there is no guarantee that only a single bonus organism will be present. For example, one JGI project contained at least two different prokaryotic contaminants, plus a 145 KB plasmid of unknown origin. We have developed techniques to routinely identify and handle such bonus organisms in a high-throughput sequencing environment. Approaches include screening and partitioning the unassembled data, and iterative subassemblies. These methods are applicable not only to bonus organisms, but also to desired components such as organelles. These procedures have the additional benefit of identifying, and allowing for the removal of, cloning artifacts such as E.coli and spurious vector inclusions.

  11. Ultrasonic Welding of Hybrid Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Guntram; Balle, Frank; Eifler, Dietmar

    2012-03-01

    A central research field of the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Kaiserslautern (WKK), Germany, is the realization of innovative hybrid joints by ultrasonic metal welding. This article gives an overview of suitable ultrasonic welding systems as well as of essential machine and material parameters, which influence the quality of the welds. Besides the ultrasonic welding of dissimilar metals such as Al to Cu or Al to steels, the welds between newly developed materials like aluminum foam sandwiches or flat flexible cables also can be realized. Moreover, the joining of glass and ceramic to sheet metals is a point of interest at the WKK. By using the ultrasonic metal welding process, it is possible to realize metal/glass welds with tensile shear strengths of 50 MPa. For metal/ceramic joints, the shear strengths values up to 150 MPa were measured. Finally, selected results about the occurring bonding mechanisms will be discussed.

  12. Pathways for virus assembly around nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Jason D; Perkett, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the pathways by which viral capsid proteins assemble around their genomes could identify key intermediates as potential drug targets. In this work we use computer simulations to characterize assembly over a wide range of capsid protein-protein interaction strengths and solution ionic strengths. We find that assembly pathways can be categorized into two classes, in which intermediates are either predominantly ordered or disordered. Our results suggest that estimating the protein-protein and the protein-genome binding affinities may be sufficient to predict which pathway occurs. Furthermore, the calculated phase diagrams suggest that knowledge of the dominant assembly pathway and its relationship to control parameters could identify optimal strategies to thwart or redirect assembly to block infection. Finally, analysis of simulation trajectories suggests that the two classes of assembly pathways can be distinguished in single molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy or bulk time resolved small angle x-ray scattering experiments. PMID:25036288

  13. 2ab assembly: a methodology for automatable, high-throughput assembly of standard biological parts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is growing demand for robust DNA assembly strategies to quickly and accurately fabricate genetic circuits for synthetic biology. One application of this technology is reconstitution of multi-gene assemblies. Here, we integrate a new software tool chain with 2ab assembly and show that it is robust enough to generate 528 distinct composite parts with an error-free success rate of 96%. Finally, we discuss our findings in the context of its implications for biosafety and biosecurity. PMID:23305072

  14. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis and temporomandibular joint hypermobility.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, P U; de Bont, L G; de Leeuw, R; Stegenga, B; Boering, G

    1993-10-01

    For studying the relationship between condylar hypermobility of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and osteoarthrosis (OA), 13 patients with bilateral condylar hypermobility were evaluated clinically and radiographically, 30 years after non-surgical treatment. The evaluation included range of motion, joint and muscle tenderness to palpation, joint sounds and masticatory function. Radiographs of the TMJs were evaluated for the absence or presence of degenerative changes. The hypermobile group (HG) was compared with a control group (CG) (n = 13). The CG was evaluated in the same way as the HG. Statistics included t-tests (to compare ranges of motion in the HG over time and to compare ranges of motion in HG and CG), non-parametric tests (to compare tenderness of muscles and joints, joint sounds, masticatory function and radiographic changes over time in the HG). The tests were also used to compare the same variables between the HG and CG group. The groups' only difference was the presence of radiographic signs of OA. In the HG the number of joints with radiographic degenerative changes increased significantly over time and was significantly higher than the CG. Clinically and functionally, the HG and CG did not differ. Therefore, it is concluded that TMJ hypermobility is a subsidiary factor in the development of TMJ OA. PMID:8118897

  15. Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

  16. Dynamics of branched tissue assembly

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The assembly of cells into tissues is a complex process controlled by numerous signaling pathways to ensure the fidelity of the final structure. Tissue assembly is also very dynamic, as exemplified by the formation of branched organs. Here we present two examples of tissue assembly in branched systems that highlight this dynamic nature: formation of the tracheal network in Drosophila melanogaster and the ducts of the mammary gland in mice. Extension of the branches during tracheal development is a stereotyped process that produces identical organ geometries across individuals, whereas elongation of the ducts of the pubertal mammary gland is a non-stereotyped process that produces unique patterns. By studying these two organs, we can begin to understand the dynamic nature of development of other stereotyped and non-stereotyped branching systems, including the lung, kidney, and salivary gland. PMID:23114096

  17. Integrated High-Speed Torque Control System for a Robotic Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Askew, R. Scott (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A control system for achieving high-speed torque for a joint of a robot includes a printed circuit board assembly (PCBA) having a collocated joint processor and high-speed communication bus. The PCBA may also include a power inverter module (PIM) and local sensor conditioning electronics (SCE) for processing sensor data from one or more motor position sensors. Torque control of a motor of the joint is provided via the PCBA as a high-speed torque loop. Each joint processor may be embedded within or collocated with the robotic joint being controlled. Collocation of the joint processor, PIM, and high-speed bus may increase noise immunity of the control system, and the localized processing of sensor data from the joint motor at the joint level may minimize bus cabling to and from each control node. The joint processor may include a field programmable gate array (FPGA).

  18. A study of sandwich T-joints and composite lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turaga, Umamaheswar V. R. S.

    In this study, new efficient designs for adhesive sandwich T-joint and single-lap joint were proposed and investigated. In the proposed new sandwich T-joint, called U-channel joint, the load transfer path at the web-flange interface was modified to include a U-shaped aluminum channel which provides strong path for load transfer. Experimental results show that the new design has 62% more strength than the conventional circular fillet joint. The new U-channel joint was tested in tension, compression and bending to investigate its characteristics. It is found to have good performance in bending also, even though in compression it performs same as the circular fillet joint. An extensive parametric study was carried out to investigate the effect of parameters like flange skin stiffener, foam density, foam thickness in the web, and aluminum attachments. A fracture mechanics criterion based on the strain energy release rate was used to explain the failure modes, apart from the stress analysis explanation. The failure loads of the joints in compression were predicted using a maximum principal stress failure criterion based on the sandwich beam theory. A new single lap joint with attachments was proposed in the second phase of the research. The design was verified using both aluminum and composite materials. The new design was found to have 59% more strength than the single-lap joint. A parametric study was performed to find out the influence of the angle of attachment, thickness of attachment and the length of attachment. By careful consideration of design parameters, the joint can be optimized. Finally, the failure loads of the single lap joints with and without attachments were predicted using different failure criteria.

  19. Valve stem and packing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wordin, John J.

    1991-01-01

    A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele's pivot. The Schiele's pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele's pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele's pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents overtightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing.

  20. Valve stem and packing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wordin, J.J.

    1991-09-03

    A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele's pivot. The Schiele's pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele's pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele's pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents over tightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing. 2 figures.

  1. Colloidosome like structures: self-assembly of silica microrods

    DOE PAGES

    Datskos, P.; Polizos, G.; Bhandari, M.; Cullen, D. A.; Sharma, J.

    2016-03-07

    Self-assembly of one-dimensional structures is attracting a great deal of interest because assembled structures can provide better properties compared to individual building blocks. We demonstrate silica microrod self-assembly by exploiting Pickering emulsion based strategy. Micron-sized silica rods were synthesized employing previously reported methods based on polyvinylpyrrolidone/ pentanol emulsion droplets. Moreover, rods self-assembled to make structures in the range of z10 40 mm. Smooth rods assembled better than segmented rods. Finally, the assembled structures were bonded by weak van der Waals forces.

  2. Wear analysis of revolute joints with clearance in multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, ZhengFeng; Zhao, Yang; Wang, XingGui

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the prediction of wear for revolute joint with clearance in multibody systems is investigated using a computational methodology. The contact model in clearance joint is established using a new hybrid nonlinear contact force model and the friction effect is considered by using a modified Coulomb friction model. The dynamics model of multibody system with clearance is established using dynamic segmentation modeling method and the computational process for wear analysis of clearance joint in multibody systems is presented. The main computational process for wear analysis of clearance joint includes two steps, which are dynamics analysis and wear analysis. The dynamics simulation of multibody system with revolute clearance joint is carried out and the contact forces are drawn and used to calculate the wear amount of revolute clearance joint based on the Archard's wear model. Finally, a four-bar multibody mechanical system with revolute clearance joint is used as numerical example application to perform the simulation and show the dynamics responses and wear characteristics of multibody systems with revolute clearance joint. The main results of this work indicate that the contact between the joint elements is wider and more frequent in some specific regions and the wear phenomenon is not regular around the joint surface, which causes the clearance size increase non-regularly after clearance joint wear. This work presents an effective method to predict wear of revolute joint with clearance in multibody systems.

  3. Seismic response of rock joints and jointed rock mass

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, A.; Hsiung, S.M.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1996-06-01

    Long-term stability of emplacement drifts and potential near-field fluid flow resulting from coupled effects are among the concerns for safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). A number of factors can induce drift instability or change the near-field flow patterns. Repetitive seismic loads from earthquakes and thermal loads generated by the decay of emplaced waste are two significant factors. One of two key technical uncertainties (KTU) that can potentially pose a high risk of noncompliance with the performance objectives of 10 CFR Part 60 is the prediction of thermal-mechanical (including repetitive seismic load) effects on stability of emplacement drifts and the engineered barrier system. The second KTU of concern is the prediction of thermal-mechanical-hydrological (including repetitive seismic load) effects on the host rock surrounding the engineered barrier system. The Rock Mechanics research project being conducted at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) is intended to address certain specific technical issues associated with these two KTUs. This research project has two major components: (i) seismic response of rock joints and a jointed rock mass and (ii) coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological (TMH) response of a jointed rock mass surrounding the engineered barrier system (EBS). This final report summarizes the research activities concerned with the repetitive seismic load aspect of both these KTUs.

  4. Failure analysis of beryllium tile assembles following high heat flux testing for the ITER program

    SciTech Connect

    B. C. Odegard, Jr.; C. H. Cadden; N. Y. C. Yang

    2000-05-01

    The following document describes the processing, testing and post-test analysis of two Be-Cu assemblies that have successfully met the heat load requirements for the first wall and dome sections for the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) fusion reactor. Several different joint assemblies were evaluated in support of a manufacturing technology investigation aimed at diffusion bonding or brazing a beryllium armor tile to a copper alloy heat sink for fusion reactor applications. Judicious selection of materials and coatings for these assemblies was essential to eliminate or minimize interactions with the highly reactive beryllium armor material. A thin titanium layer was used as a diffusion barrier to isolate the copper heat sink from the beryllium armor. To reduce residual stresses produced by differences in the expansion coefficients between the beryllium and copper, a compliant layer of aluminum or aluminum-beryllium (AlBeMet-150) was used. Aluminum was chosen because it does not chemically react with, and exhibits limited volubility in, beryllium. Two bonding processes were used to produce the assemblies. The primary process was a diffusion bonding technique. In this case, undesirable metallurgical reactions were minimized by keeping the materials in a solid state throughout the fabrication cycle. The other process employed an aluminum-silicon layer as a brazing filler material. In both cases, a hot isostatic press (HIP) furnace was used in conjunction with vacuum-canned assemblies in order to minimize oxidation and provide sufficient pressure on the assemblies for full metal-to-metal contact and subsequent bonding. The two final assemblies were subjected to a suite of tests including: tensile tests and electron and optical metallography. Finally, high heat flux testing was conducted at the electron beam testing system (EBTS) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. Here, test mockups were fabricated and subjected to normal heat loads to

  5. Modelling the Shear Behaviour of Rock Joints with Asperity Damage Under Constant Normal Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indraratna, Buddhima; Thirukumaran, Sivanathan; Brown, E. T.; Zhu, Song-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The shear behaviour of a rough rock joint depends largely on the surface properties of the joint, as well as the boundary conditions applied across the joint interface. This paper proposes a new analytical model to describe the complete shear behaviour of rough joints under constant normal stiffness (CNS) boundary conditions by incorporating the effect of damage to asperities. In particular, the effects of initial normal stress levels and joint surface roughness on the shear behaviour of joints under CNS conditions were studied, and the analytical model was validated through experimental results. Finally, the practical application of the model to a jointed rock slope stability analysis is presented.

  6. Utilization of Facet Joint and Sacroiliac Joint Interventions in Medicare Population from 2000 to 2014: Explosive Growth Continues!

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-10-01

    Increasing utilization of interventional techniques in managing chronic spinal pain, specifically facet joint interventions and sacroiliac joint injections, is a major concern of healthcare policy makers. We analyzed the patterns of utilization of facet and sacroiliac joint interventions in managing chronic spinal pain. The results showed significant increase of facet joint interventions and sacroiliac joint injections from 2000 to 2014 in Medicare FFS service beneficiaries. Overall, the Medicare population increased 35 %, whereas facet joint and sacroiliac joint interventions increased 313.3 % per 100,000 Medicare population with an annual increase of 10.7 %. While the increases were uniform from 2000 to 2014, there were some decreases noted for facet joint interventions in 2007, 2010, and 2013, whereas for sacroiliac joint injections, the decreases were noted in 2007 and 2013. The increases were for cervical and thoracic facet neurolysis at 911.5 % compared to lumbosacral facet neurolysis of 567.8 %, 362.9 % of cervical and thoracic facet joint blocks, 316.9 % of sacroiliac joints injections, and finally 227.3 % of lumbosacral facet joint blocks. PMID:27646014

  7. Latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  8. [Total temporomandibular joint prostheses].

    PubMed

    Zwetyenga, N; Amroun, S; Wajszczak, B-L; Moris, V

    2016-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is probably the most complex human joint. As in all joints, its prosthetic replacement may be indicated in selected cases. Significant advances have been made in the design of TMJ prostheses during the last three decades and the indications have been clarified. The aim of our work was to make an update on the current total TMJ total joint replacement. Indications, contraindications, prosthetic components, advantages, disadvantages, reasons for failure or reoperation, virtual planning and surgical protocol have been exposed. PMID:27554487

  9. 78 FR 49242 - Relief From Joint and Several Liability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... (TD 9003, 67 FR 47278). Sections 1.6015-2, 1.6015-3, and 1.6015-4 of the final regulations provide... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BK51 Relief From Joint and Several Liability AGENCY... contains proposed regulations relating to relief from joint and several tax liability under section 6015...

  10. Pull strength evaluation of Sn-Pb solder joints made to Au-Pt-Pd and Au thick film structures on low-temperature co-fired ceramic -final report for the MC4652 crypto-coded switch (W80).

    SciTech Connect

    Uribe, Fernando; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Zender, Gary L.

    2006-06-01

    A study was performed that examined the microstructure and mechanical properties of 63Sn-37Pb (wt.%, Sn-Pb) solder joints made to thick film layers on low-temperature co-fired (LTCC) substrates. The thick film layers were combinations of the Dupont{trademark} 4596 (Au-Pt-Pd) conductor and Dupont{trademark} 5742 (Au) conductor, the latter having been deposited between the 4596 layer and LTCC substrate. Single (1x) and triple (3x) thicknesses of the 4596 layer were evaluated. Three footprint sizes were evaluated of the 5742 thick film. The solder joints exhibited excellent solderability of both the copper (Cu) lead and thick film surface. In all test sample configurations, the 5742 thick film prevented side wall cracking of the vias. The pull strengths were in the range of 3.4-4.0 lbs, which were only slightly lower than historical values for alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrates. General (qualitative) observations: (a) The pull strength was maximized when the total number of thick film layers was between two and three. Fewer that two layers did not develop as strong of a bond at the thick film/LTCC interface; more than three layers and of increased footprint area, developed higher residual stresses at the thick film/LTCC interface and in the underlying LTCC material that weakened the joint. (b) Minimizing the area of the weaker 4596/LTCC interface (e.g., larger 5742 area) improved pull strength. Specific observations: (a) In the presence of vias and the need for the 3x 4596 thick film, the preferred 4596:5742 ratio was 1.0:0.5. (b) For those LTCC components that require the 3x 4596 layer, but do not have vias, it is preferred to refrain from using the 5742 layer. (c) In the absence of vias, the highest strength was realized with a 1x thick 5742 layer, a 1x thick 4596 layer, and a footprint ratio of 1.0:1.0.

  11. Temporomandibular joint diagnostics using CBCT.

    PubMed

    Larheim, T A; Abrahamsson, A-K; Kristensen, M; Arvidsson, L Z

    2015-01-01

    The present review will give an update on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imaging using CBCT. It will focus on diagnostic accuracy and the value of CBCT compared with other imaging modalities for the evaluation of TMJs in different categories of patients; osteoarthritis (OA), juvenile OA, rheumatoid arthritis and related joint diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other intra-articular conditions. Finally, sections on other aspects of CBCT research related to the TMJ, clinical decision-making and concluding remarks are added. CBCT has emerged as a cost- and dose-effective imaging modality for the diagnostic assessment of a variety of TMJ conditions. The imaging modality has been found to be superior to conventional radiographical examinations as well as MRI in assessment of the TMJ. However, it should be emphasized that the diagnostic information obtained is limited to the morphology of the osseous joint components, cortical bone integrity and subcortical bone destruction/production. For evaluation of soft-tissue abnormalities, MRI is mandatory. There is an obvious need for research on the impact of CBCT examinations on patient outcome.

  12. Temporomandibular joint diagnostics using CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, A-K; Kristensen, M; Arvidsson, L Z

    2015-01-01

    The present review will give an update on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imaging using CBCT. It will focus on diagnostic accuracy and the value of CBCT compared with other imaging modalities for the evaluation of TMJs in different categories of patients; osteoarthritis (OA), juvenile OA, rheumatoid arthritis and related joint diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other intra-articular conditions. Finally, sections on other aspects of CBCT research related to the TMJ, clinical decision-making and concluding remarks are added. CBCT has emerged as a cost- and dose-effective imaging modality for the diagnostic assessment of a variety of TMJ conditions. The imaging modality has been found to be superior to conventional radiographical examinations as well as MRI in assessment of the TMJ. However, it should be emphasized that the diagnostic information obtained is limited to the morphology of the osseous joint components, cortical bone integrity and subcortical bone destruction/production. For evaluation of soft-tissue abnormalities, MRI is mandatory. There is an obvious need for research on the impact of CBCT examinations on patient outcome. PMID:25369205

  13. Identifying wrong assemblies in de novo short read primary sequence assembly contigs.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Vandna; Kumar, Rajnish; Shankar, Ravi

    2016-09-01

    With the advent of short-reads-based genome sequencing approaches, large number of organisms are being sequenced all over the world. Most of these assemblies are done using some de novo short read assemblers and other related approaches. However, the contigs produced this way are prone to wrong assembly. So far, there is a conspicuous dearth of reliable tools to identify mis-assembled contigs. Mis-assemblies could result from incorrectly deleted or wrongly arranged genomic sequences. In the present work various factors related to sequence, sequencing and assembling have been assessed for their role in causing mis-assembly by using different genome sequencing data. Finally, some mis-assembly detecting tools have been evaluated for their ability to detect the wrongly assembled primary contigs, suggesting a lot of scope for improvement in this area. The present work also proposes a simple unsupervised learning-based novel approach to identify mis-assemblies in the contigs which was found performing reasonably well when compared to the already existing tools to report mis-assembled contigs. It was observed that the proposed methodology may work as a complementary system to the existing tools to enhance their accuracy. PMID:27581937

  14. Inlet nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Precechtel, Donald R.; Smith, Bob G.; Knight, Ronald C.

    1987-01-01

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  15. Inlet nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Knight, R.C.; Precechtel, D.R.; Smith, B.G.

    1985-09-09

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  16. Structural assembly in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. W.; Pruett, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    A cost algorithm for predicting assembly costs for large space structures is given. Assembly scenarios are summarized which describe the erection, deployment, and fabrication tasks for five large space structures. The major activities that impact total costs for structure assembly from launch through deployment and assembly to scientific instrument installation and checkout are described. Individual cost elements such as assembly fixtures, handrails, or remote minipulators are also presented.

  17. Integrated, proportionally controlled, and naturally compliant universal joint actuator with controllable stiffness

    DOEpatents

    Borenstein, Johann; Granosik, Grzegorz

    2005-03-22

    An apparatus for traversing obstacles having an elongated, round, flexible body that includes a plurality of segments interconnected by an integrated joint actuator assembly. The integrated joint actuator assembly includes a plurality of bellows-type actuators individually coupling adjacent segments to permit pivotal actuation of the apparatus therebetween. A controller is employed to maintain proper positional control and stiffness control while minimize air flow.

  18. Coronal joint spaces of the Temporomandibular joint: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Joana-Cristina; Pires, Carlos A.; Ponces-Ramalhão, Maria-João-Feio; Lopes, Jorge-Dias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The joint space measurements of the temporomandibular joint have been used to determine the condyle position variation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the coronal joint spaces measurements of the temporomandibular joint. Material and Methods An electronic database search was performed with the terms “condylar position”; “joint space”AND”TMJ”. Inclusionary criteria included: tomographic 3D imaging of the TMJ, presentation of at least two joint space measurements on the coronal plane. Exclusionary criteria were: mandibular fractures, animal studies, surgery, presence of genetic or chronic diseases, case reports, opinion or debate articles or unpublished material. The risk of bias of each study was judged as high, moderate or low according to the “Cochrane risk of bias tool”. The values used in the meta-analysis were the medial, superior and lateral joint space measurements and their differences between the right and left joint. Results From the initial search 2706 articles were retrieved. After excluding the duplicates and all the studies that did not match the eligibility criteria 4 articles classified for final review. All the retrieved articles were judged as low level of evidence. All of the reviewed studies were included in the meta-analysis concluding that the mean coronal joint space values were: medial joint space 2.94 mm, superior 2.55 mm and lateral 2.16 mm. Conclusions the analysis also showed high levels of heterogeneity. Right and left comparison did not show statistically significant differences. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, systematic review, meta-analysis. PMID:26330944

  19. Atlantis Rollover to the Vehicle Assembly Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis rolls over from Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 to the Vehicle Assembly Building April 20, 1995, atop the orbiter transporter for mating to its external tank and solid rocket boosters in preparation for the STS-71 mission. Atlantis will dock with the Russian Space Station Mir during the 11-day mission. Later, both Mir and STS-71 flight crew members will conduct joint medical investigations in the Spacelab-Mir module located in the orbiter's payload bay.

  20. Mechanics of Sheeting Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Physical breakdown of rock across a broad scale spectrum involves fracturing. In many areas large fractures develop near the topographic surface, with sheeting joints being among the most impressive. Sheeting joints share many geometric, textural, and kinematic features with other joints (opening-mode fractures) but differ in that they are (a) discernibly curved, (b) open near the topographic surface, and (c) form subparallel to the topographic surface. Where sheeting joints are geologically young, the surface-parallel compressive stresses are typically several MPa or greater. Sheeting joints are best developed beneath domes, ridges, and saddles; they also are reported, albeit rarely, beneath valleys or bowls. A mechanism that accounts for all these associations has been sought for more than a century: neither erosion of overburden nor high lateral compressive stresses alone suffices. Sheeting joints are not accounted for by Mohr-Coulomb shear failure criteria. Principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, together with the mechanical effect of a curved topographic surface, do provide a basis for understanding sheeting joint growth and the pattern sheeting joints form. Compressive stresses parallel to a singly or doubly convex topographic surface induce a tensile stress perpendicular to the surface at shallow depths; in some cases this alone could overcome the weight of overburden to open sheeting joints. If regional horizontal compressive stresses, augmented by thermal stresses, are an order of magnitude or so greater than a characteristic vertical stress that scales with topographic amplitude, then topographic stress perturbations can cause sheeting joints to open near the top of a ridge. This topographic effect can be augmented by pressure within sheeting joints arising from water, ice, or salt. Water pressure could be particularly important in helping drive sheeting joints downslope beneath valleys. Once sheeting joints have formed, the rock sheets between

  1. Tilt assembly for tracking solar collector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Almy, Charles; Peurach, John; Sandler, Reuben

    2012-01-24

    A tilt assembly is used with a solar collector assembly of the type comprising a frame, supporting a solar collector, for movement about a tilt axis by pivoting a drive element between first and second orientations. The tilt assembly comprises a drive element coupler connected to the drive element and a driver, the driver comprising a drive frame, a drive arm and a drive arm driver. The drive arm is mounted to the drive frame for pivotal movement about a drive arm axis. Movement on the drive arm mimics movement of the drive element. Drive element couplers can extend in opposite directions from the outer portion of the drive arm, whereby the assembly can be used between adjacent solar collector assemblies in a row of solar collector assemblies.

  2. Finishing bacterial genome assemblies with Mix

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Among challenges that hamper reaping the benefits of genome assembly are both unfinished assemblies and the ensuing experimental costs. First, numerous software solutions for genome de novo assembly are available, each having its advantages and drawbacks, without clear guidelines as to how to choose among them. Second, these solutions produce draft assemblies that often require a resource intensive finishing phase. Methods In this paper we address these two aspects by developing Mix , a tool that mixes two or more draft assemblies, without relying on a reference genome and having the goal to reduce contig fragmentation and thus speed-up genome finishing. The proposed algorithm builds an extension graph where vertices represent extremities of contigs and edges represent existing alignments between these extremities. These alignment edges are used for contig extension. The resulting output assembly corresponds to a set of paths in the extension graph that maximizes the cumulative contig length. Results We evaluate the performance of Mix on bacterial NGS data from the GAGE-B study and apply it to newly sequenced Mycoplasma genomes. Resulting final assemblies demonstrate a significant improvement in the overall assembly quality. In particular, Mix is consistent by providing better overall quality results even when the choice is guided solely by standard assembly statistics, as is the case for de novo projects. Availability Mix is implemented in Python and is available at https://github.com/cbib/MIX, novel data for our Mycoplasma study is available at http://services.cbib.u-bordeaux2.fr/mix/. PMID:24564706

  3. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  4. Laboratory experiments on columnar jointing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, L.; Morris, S. W.

    2003-12-01

    The mechanism causing columnar jointing has remained an enticing mystery since the basalt columns of the Giant's Causeway in N. Ireland were first reported to science in the 17th century. This phenomenon, in which shrinkage cracks form a quasi-hexagonal arrangement, has been shown to produce columns in starch, glass, coal, sandstone, and ice, as well as in a variety of lava flows. This suggests that this pattern-forming process is very general in nature. However, most studies of columnar jointing have been confined to field studies of basalt flows. Following Muller, we have experimented with desiccating corn starch in an effort to understand this pattern from a more general point of view. The diffusion and evaporation of water in starch is thought to be analogous to the diffusion and extraction of heat from a basalt flow. By combining direct sampling and x-ray tomography, fully 3D descriptions of columnar jointing were obtained with starch samples. We have characterized the pattern with several statistical indices, which describe its structure and relative disorder. These methods can resolve the ordering of the colonnade near the free surface. We identified two distinct mechanisms by which the mean column area increases during pattern evolution. We found both a slow, almost power-law increase in column area, as well as episodes of sudden catastrophic jumps in scale. The latter suggests that the column scale is not a simple single-valued function of drying rate, but rather a metastable state subject to hysteresis. Such metastable behaviour might explain a fundamental question about columnar jointing -- why the columns are so regular in the direction of their growth. Moreover, these experiments may help discriminate between the various theoretical models of this pattern forming process. Finally, our results lead to predictions that could be tested by field measurements on basaltic colonnades.

  5. Compound solder joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.; Simonson, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    Joining technique prevents contamination, may be used to join dissimilar metal tubes, minimizes fluid and gas entrapment, expedites repairs, and can yield joints having leakage rates less than 0.000001 standard cubic cm He/min. Components of joint are solder sleeve, two solder rings, Teflon sleeve, and tubing to be joined.

  6. Controlling and imaging biomimetic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Aliprandi, Alessandro; Mauro, Matteo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of chemical entities represents a very attractive way to create a large variety of ordered functional structures and complex matter. Although much effort has been devoted to the preparation of supramolecular nanostructures based on different chemical building blocks, an understanding of the mechanisms at play and the ability to monitor assembly processes and, in turn, control them are often elusive, which precludes a deep and comprehensive control of the final structures. Here the complex supramolecular landscape of a platinum(II) compound is characterized fully and controlled successfully through a combination of supramolecular and photochemical approaches. The supramolecular assemblies comprise two kinetic assemblies and their thermodynamic counterpart. The monitoring of the different emission properties of the aggregates, used as a fingerprint for each species, allows the real-time visualization of the evolving self-assemblies. The control of multiple supramolecular pathways will help the design of complex systems in and out of their thermodynamic equilibrium.

  7. Co-translational assembly of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan N; Bergendahl, L Therese; Marsh, Joseph A

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological macromolecules is a fundamental attribute of cellular life. Proteins, in particular, often form stable complexes with one another. Although the importance of protein complexes is widely recognized, we still have only a very limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying their assembly within cells. In this article, we review the available evidence for one such mechanism, namely the coupling of protein complex assembly to translation at the polysome. We discuss research showing that co-translational assembly can occur in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and can have important implications for the correct functioning of the complexes that result. Co-translational assembly can occur for both homomeric and heteromeric protein complexes and for both proteins that are translated directly into the cytoplasm and those that are translated into or across membranes. Finally, we discuss the properties of proteins that are most likely to be associated with co-translational assembly.

  8. Strategies for joint appointments.

    PubMed

    Royle, J; Crooks, D L

    1985-01-01

    The structure and policies governing joint appointments discussed above, are developed primarily through cooperation and collaboration between nursing service and education institutions. The joint appointee participates in the process of negotiation of salary, benefits and role responsibilities and exploration of the implications of the appointment for personal career development. Implementation and maintenance of the appointment requires the collaborative efforts of the joint appointee with both contracting agencies. Factors influencing the functioning of joint appointees have been identified and strategies to facilitate functioning presented. The joint appointee must be independent in thought and action yet adaptable to work within the boundaries of two social systems with differing values and expectations. Nursing management, peers and students can provide the support needed to overcome the frustrations and to achieve the rewards inherent in successful implementation of an exciting and innovative role. PMID:3852805

  9. [Approach to joint effusion].

    PubMed

    Henniger, M; Rehart, S

    2016-09-01

    The fundamental components of the differential diagnostics of joint effusions are the patient history and clinical examination. In the case of unclear findings, arthrosonography can provide information for the distinction between intra-articular and extra-articular pathologies. In atraumatic joint effusions inflammatory parameters in blood are determined in order to differentiate between systemic inflammatory and local inflammatory joint effusions. In the case of normal values further diagnostics are carried out using imaging. With elevated inflammatory parameters the main differential diagnoses are gouty arthritis, autoimmune joint processes and septic arthritis. When in doubt, a joint aspiration and synovial fluid analysis should be performed to rule out septic arthritis or if necessary confirmation of gouty arthritis. PMID:27562127

  10. Low-energy gamma ray inspection of brazed aluminum joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1967-01-01

    Americium 241 serves as a suitable radioisotope /gamma ray source/ and exposure probe for radiographic inspection of brazed aluminum joints in areas of limited accessibility. The powdered isotope is contained in a sealed capsule mounted at the end of a spring-loaded pushrod in the probe assembly.

  11. Evaluation and treatment of acromioclavicular joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Mazzocca, Augustus D; Arciero, Robert A; Bicos, James

    2007-02-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries and, more specifically, separations are commonplace both in general practice and during athletic participation. This article reviews the traditional classification as well as the clinical evaluation of patients with acute and chronic acromioclavicular joint separations. It also highlights many recent advances, principally in the anatomy and biomechanics of the acromioclavicular joint ligamentous complex. The concept of increases in superior translation as well as disturbances in horizontal translation with injuries to this joint and ligaments are discussed. This information, coupled with the unpredictable long-term results with the Weaver-Dunn procedure and its modifications, have prompted many recent biomechanical studies evaluating potential improvements in the surgical management of acute and chronic injuries. The authors present these recent works investigating cyclic loading and ultimate failure of traditional reconstructions, augmentations, use of free graft, and the more recent anatomic reconstruction of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments. The clinical results (largely retrospective), including acromioclavicular joint repair, reconstruction and augmentation with the coracoclavicular ligament, supplemental sutures, and the use of free autogenous grafts, are summarized. Finally, complications and the concept of the failed distal clavicle resection and reconstruction are addressed. The intent is to provide a current, in-depth treatise on all aspects of acromioclavicular joint complex injuries to include anatomy, biomechanics, benchmark studies on instability and reconstruction, clinical and radiographic evaluation, and to present the most recent clinical research on surgical outcomes.

  12. Nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesoro, S.; Göpfrich, K.; Kartanas, T.; Keyser, U. F.; Ahnert, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate general properties of nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions, using a computational model and DNA tile assembly experiments. By contrasting symmetric and asymmetric interactions we show that the latter can lead to self-limiting cluster growth. Furthermore, by adjusting the relative abundance of self-assembly particles in a two-particle mixture, we are able to tune the final sizes of these clusters. We show that this is a fundamental property of asymmetric interactions, which has potential applications in bioengineering, and provides insights into the study of diseases caused by protein aggregation.

  13. Nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions.

    PubMed

    Tesoro, S; Göpfrich, K; Kartanas, T; Keyser, U F; Ahnert, S E

    2016-08-01

    We investigate general properties of nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions, using a computational model and DNA tile assembly experiments. By contrasting symmetric and asymmetric interactions we show that the latter can lead to self-limiting cluster growth. Furthermore, by adjusting the relative abundance of self-assembly particles in a two-particle mixture, we are able to tune the final sizes of these clusters. We show that this is a fundamental property of asymmetric interactions, which has potential applications in bioengineering, and provides insights into the study of diseases caused by protein aggregation. PMID:27627332

  14. Nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions.

    PubMed

    Tesoro, S; Göpfrich, K; Kartanas, T; Keyser, U F; Ahnert, S E

    2016-08-01

    We investigate general properties of nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions, using a computational model and DNA tile assembly experiments. By contrasting symmetric and asymmetric interactions we show that the latter can lead to self-limiting cluster growth. Furthermore, by adjusting the relative abundance of self-assembly particles in a two-particle mixture, we are able to tune the final sizes of these clusters. We show that this is a fundamental property of asymmetric interactions, which has potential applications in bioengineering, and provides insights into the study of diseases caused by protein aggregation.

  15. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  16. Firearm trigger assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  17. Exploration of Metagenome Assemblies with an Interactive Visualization Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, Michael; Nordberg, Henrik; Smirnova, Tatyana; Andersen, Evan; Tringe, Susannah; Hess, Matthias; Dubchak, Inna

    2014-07-09

    Metagenomics, one of the fastest growing areas of modern genomic science, is the genetic profiling of the entire community of microbial organisms present in an environmental sample. Elviz is a web-based tool for the interactive exploration of metagenome assemblies. Elviz can be used with publicly available data sets from the Joint Genome Institute or with custom user-loaded assemblies. Elviz is available at genome.jgi.doe.gov/viz

  18. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 2 -- Jointly sponsored research program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  19. MISR JOINT_AS Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-07-21

    Joint Aerosol Product (JOINT_AS) The MISR Level 3 Products are global or regional ... field campaigns at daily and monthly time scales. The Joint Aerosol product provides a monthly global statistical summary of MISR ...

  20. Maximum aposteriori joint source/channel coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayood, Khalid; Gibson, Jerry D.

    1991-01-01

    A maximum aposteriori probability (MAP) approach to joint source/channel coder design is presented in this paper. This method attempts to explore a technique for designing joint source/channel codes, rather than ways of distributing bits between source coders and channel coders. For a nonideal source coder, MAP arguments are used to design a decoder which takes advantage of redundancy in the source coder output to perform error correction. Once the decoder is obtained, it is analyzed with the purpose of obtaining 'desirable properties' of the channel input sequence for improving overall system performance. Finally, an encoder design which incorporates these properties is proposed.

  1. Pressure vessel flex joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An airtight, flexible joint is disclosed for the interfacing of two pressure vessels such as between the Space Station docking tunnel and the Space Shuttle Orbiter bulkhead adapter. The joint provides for flexibility while still retaining a structural link between the two vessels required due to the loading created by the internal/external pressure differential. The joint design provides for limiting the axial load carried across the joint to a specific value, a function returned in the Orbiter/Station tunnel interface. The flex joint comprises a floating structural segment which is permanently attached to one of the pressure vessels through the use of an inflatable seal. The geometric configuration of the joint causes the tension between the vessels created by the internal gas pressure to compress the inflatable seal. The inflation pressure of the seal is kept at a value above the internal/external pressure differential of the vessels in order to maintain a controlled distance between the floating segment and pressure vessel. The inflatable seal consists of either a hollow torus-shaped flexible bladder or two rolling convoluted diaphragm seals which may be reinforced by a system of straps or fabric anchored to the hard structures. The joint acts as a flexible link to allow both angular motion and lateral displacement while it still contains the internal pressure and holds the axial tension between the vessels.

  2. Estimation of prevalence of Salmonella on pig carcasses and pork joints, using a quantitative risk assessment model aided by meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Barron, Ursula Gonzales; Soumpasis, Ilias; Butler, Francis; Prendergast, Deirdre; Duggan, Sharon; Duffy, Geraldine

    2009-02-01

    This risk assessment study aimed to estimate the prevalence of Salmonella on pig carcasses and pork joints produced in slaughterhouses, on the basis that within groups of slaughter there is a strong association between the proportion of Salmonella-positive animals entering the slaughter lines (x) and the resulting proportion of contaminated eviscerated pig carcasses (y). To this effect, the results of a number of published studies reporting estimates of x and y were assembled in order to model a stochastic weighted regression considering the sensitivities of the diverse Salmonella culture methods. Meta-analysis was used to assign weights to the regression and to estimate the overall effect of chilling on Salmonella incidence on pig carcasses. The model's ability to produce accurate estimates and the intrinsic effectiveness of the modeling capabilities of meta-analysis were appraised using Irish data for the input parameter of prevalence of Salmonella carrier slaughter pigs. The model approximated a Salmonella prevalence in pork joints from Irish boning halls of 4.0% (95% confidence interval, 0.3 to 12.0%) and was validated by the results of a large survey (n = 720) of Salmonella in pork joints (mean, 3.3%; 95% confidence interval, 2.0 to 4.6%) carried out in four commercial pork abattoirs as part of this research project. Sensitivity analysis reinforced the importance of final rinsing (r = -0.382) and chilling (r = -0.221) as stages that contribute to reducing considerably the occurrence of Salmonella on the final product, while hygiene practices during jointing seemed to moderate only marginally the amount of contaminated pork joints. Finally, the adequacy of meta-analysis for integrating different findings and producing distributions for use in stochastic modeling was demonstrated.

  3. Wormhole Formation in RSRM Nozzle Joint Backfill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J.

    2000-01-01

    The RSRM nozzle uses a barrier of RTV rubber upstream of the nozzle O-ring seals. Post flight inspection of the RSRM nozzle continues to reveal occurrence of "wormholes" into the RTV backfill. The term "wormholes", sometimes called "gas paths", indicates a gas flow path not caused by pre-existing voids, but by a little-understood internal failure mode of the material during motor operation. Fundamental understanding of the mechanics of the RSRM nozzle joints during motor operation, nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of the RTV backfill material, identification of the conditions that predispose the RTV to form wormholes, and screening of candidate replacement materials is being pursued by a joint effort between Thiokol Propulsion, NASA, and the Army Propulsion & Structures Directorate at Redstone Arsenal. The performance of the RTV backfill in the joint is controlled by the joint environment. Joint movement, which applies a tension and shear load on the material, coupled with the introduction of high pressure gas in combination create an environment that exceeds the capability of the material to withstand the wormhole effect. Little data exists to evaluate why the material fails under the modeled joint conditions, so an effort to characterize and evaluate the material under these conditions was undertaken. Viscoelastic property data from characterization testing will anchor structural analysis models. Data over a range of temperatures, environmental pressures, and strain rates was used to develop a nonlinear viscoelastic model to predict material performance, develop criteria for replacement materials, and quantify material properties influencing wormhole growth. Three joint simulation analogs were developed to analyze and validate joint thermal barrier (backfill) material performance. Two exploratory tests focus on detection of wormhole failure under specific motor operating conditions. A "validation" test system provides data to "validate" computer models and

  4. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert J., Jr. (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  5. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas M. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  6. NASA Research Announcement Phase 2 Final Report for the Development of a Power Assisted Space Suit Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingo, Robert; Cadogan, Dave; Sanner, Rob; Sorenson, Beth

    1997-01-01

    The main goal of this program was to develop an unobtrusive power-assisted EVA glove metacarpalphalangeal (MCP) joint that could provide the crew member with as close to nude body performance as possible, and to demonstrate the technology feasibility of power assisted space suit components in general. The MCP joint was selected due to its being representative of other space suit joints, such as the shoulder, hip and carpometacarpal joint, that would also greatly benefit from this technology. In order to meet this objective, a development team of highly skilled and experienced personnel was assembled. The team consisted of two main entities. The first was comprised of ILC's experienced EVA space suit glove designers, who had the responsibility of designing and fabricating a low torque MCP joint which would be compatible with power assisted technology. The second part of the team consisted of space robotics experts from the University of Maryland's Space Systems Laboratory. This team took on the responsibility of designing and building the robotics aspects of the power-assist system. Both parties addressed final system integration responsibilities.

  7. Protein-mediated assembly of succinate dehydrogenase and its cofactors.

    PubMed

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Na, Un; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (or complex II; SDH) is a heterotetrameric protein complex that links the tribarboxylic acid cycle with the electron transport chain. SDH is composed of four nuclear-encoded subunits that must translocate independently to the mitochondria and assemble into a mature protein complex embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Recently, it has become clear that failure to assemble functional SDH complexes can result in cancer and neurodegenerative syndromes. The effort to thoroughly elucidate the SDH assembly pathway has resulted in the discovery of four subunit-specific assembly factors that aid in the maturation of individual subunits and support the assembly of the intact complex. This review will focus on these assembly factors and assess the contribution of each factor to the assembly of SDH. Finally, we propose a model of the SDH assembly pathway that incorporates all extant data.

  8. Compliant Joints For Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Compliant joints devised to accommodate misalignments of tools and/or workpieces with respect to robotic manipulators. Has characteristics and appearance of both universal-joint and cable-spring-type flexible shaft coupling. Compliance derived from elastic properties of short pieces of cable. Compliance of joint determined by lengths, distances between, relative orientations, thickness of strands, number of strands, material, amount of pretwist, and number of short pieces of cable. Worm-drive mechanism used to adjust lengths to vary compliance as needed during operation.

  9. Total ankle joint replacement.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  10. Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel having the configuration of an assembly having a combustion chamber portion connected to a nozzle portion through a throat portion is wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The width of the tape is positioned at an angle of 30 to 50 deg. to the axis of the mandrel such that one edge of the tape contacts the mandrel while the other edge is spaced from the mandrel. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined to provide a frusto-conical surface extending at an angle of 15 to 30 deg. with respect to the axis of the mandrel for starting a second wrap on the mandrel to cover the throat portion. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape having its width positioned at a angle of 5 to 20 deg. from the axis of the mandrel. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined to provide a smooth outer surface. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

  11. Hydrothermal corrosion of silicon carbide joints without radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Koyanagi, Takaaki; Katoh, Yutai; Terrani, Kurt A.; Kim, Young-Jin; Kiggans, James O.; Hinoki, Tatsuya

    2016-09-28

    In this paper, hydrothermal corrosion of four types of the silicon carbide (SiC) to SiC plate joints were investigated under pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor relevant chemical conditions without irradiation. The joints were formed by metal diffusion bonding using molybdenum or titanium interlayer, reaction sintering using Ti—Si—C system, and SiC nanopowder sintering. Most of the joints withstood the corrosion tests for five weeks. The recession of the SiC substrates was limited. Based on the recession of the bonding layers, it was concluded that all the joints except for the molybdenum diffusion bond are promising under the reducing environmentsmore » without radiation. Finally, the SiC nanopowder sintered joint was the most corrosion tolerant under the oxidizing environment among the four joints.« less

  12. Multifunctional self-assembled monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T.; Bar, G.; Rubin, S.; Uribe, F.; Ferrais, J.

    1996-06-01

    This is the final report of at three year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The specific goals of this research project were threefold: to develop multifunctional self-assembled monolayers, to understand the role of monolayer structure on the functioning of such systems, and to apply this knowledge to the development of electrochemical enzyme sensors. An array of molecules that can be used to attach electrochemically active biomolecules to gold surfaces has been synthesized. Several members of a class of electroactive compounds have been characterized and the factors controlling surface modification are beginning to be characterized. Enzymes have been attached to self-assembled molecules arranged on the gold surface, a critical step toward the ultimate goal of this project. Several alternative enzyme attachment strategies to achieve robust enzyme- modified surfaces have been explored. Several means of juxtaposing enzymes and mediators, electroactive compounds through which the enzyme can exchange electrons with the electrode surface, have also been investigated. Finally, the development of sensitive biosensors based on films loaded with nanoscale-supported gold particles that have surface modified with the self-assembled enzyme and mediator have been explored.

  13. Robotic Joints Support Horses and Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A rehabilitative device first featured in Spinoff 2003 is not only helping human patients regain the ability to walk, but is now helping our four-legged friends as well. The late James Kerley, a prominent Goddard Space Flight Center researcher, developed cable-compliant mechanisms in the 1980s to enable sounding rocket assemblies and robots to grip or join objects. In cable-compliant joints (CCJs), short segments of cable connect structural elements, allowing for six directions of movement, twisting, alignment, and energy damping. Kerley later worked with Goddard s Wayne Eklund and Allen Crane to incorporate the cable-compliant mechanisms into a walker for human patients to support the pelvis and imitate hip joint movement.

  14. Programmed Nanomaterial Assemblies in Large Scales: Applications of Synthetic and Genetically- Engineered Peptides to Bridge Nano-Assemblies and Macro-Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Hiroshi

    2014-09-09

    Work is reported in these areas: Large-scale & reconfigurable 3D structures of precise nanoparticle assemblies in self-assembled collagen peptide grids; Binary QD-Au NP 3D superlattices assembled with collagen-like peptides and energy transfer between QD and Au NP in 3D peptide frameworks; Catalytic peptides discovered by new hydrogel-based combinatorial phage display approach and their enzyme-mimicking 2D assembly; New autonomous motors of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) powered by reorganization of self-assembled peptides at interfaces; Biomimetic assembly of proteins into microcapsules on oil-in-water droplets with structural reinforcement via biomolecular recognition-based cross-linking of surface peptides; and Biomimetic fabrication of strong freestanding genetically-engineered collagen peptide films reinforced by quantum dot joints. We gained the broad knowledge about biomimetic material assembly from nanoscale to microscale ranges by coassembling peptides and NPs via biomolecular recognition. We discovered: Genetically-engineered collagen-like peptides can be self-assembled with Au NPs to generate 3D superlattices in large volumes (> μm{sup 3}); The assembly of the 3D peptide-Au NP superstructures is dynamic and the interparticle distance changes with assembly time as the reconfiguration of structure is triggered by pH change; QDs/NPs can be assembled with the peptide frameworks to generate 3D superlattices and these QDs/NPs can be electronically coupled for the efficient energy transfer; The controlled assembly of catalytic peptides mimicking the catalytic pocket of enzymes can catalyze chemical reactions with high selectivity; and, For the bacteria-mimicking swimmer fabrication, peptide-MOF superlattices can power translational and propellant motions by the reconfiguration of peptide assembly at the MOF-liquid interface.

  15. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    A membrane module assembly adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation.

  16. Cage redesign explains assembly

    PubMed Central

    Theil, Elizabeth C; Turano, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Control of protein self-assembly and disassembly, which is central to metabolism and engineering applications, remains challenging. Here, a perspicacious redesign of interfaces in the multisubunit ferritin protein cage provides single, modifiable subunits that assemble with Cu2+ templating and give insights into the cage assembly code. PMID:23416399

  17. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, J.

    1994-03-15

    A membrane module assembly is described which is adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation. 2 figures.

  18. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to attach this part. Repair your muscles and tendons around the new joint and close the surgical cut. The surgery takes about 2 hours. Most artificial knees have both metal and plastic parts. Some ...

  19. Improved orthopedic arm joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dane, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Joint permits smooth and easy movement of disabled arm and is smaller, lighter and less expensive than previous models. Device is interchangeable and may be used on either arm at the shoulder or at the elbow.

  20. Joint fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    Gram stain of joint fluid ... result means no bacteria are present on the Gram stain. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among ... Abnormal results mean bacteria were seen on the Gram stain. This may be a sign of a ...

  1. Scaling in Columnar Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Stephen

    2007-03-01

    Columnar jointing is a fracture pattern common in igneous rocks in which cracks self-organize into a roughly hexagonal arrangement, leaving behind an ordered colonnade. We report observations of columnar jointing in a laboratory analog system, desiccated corn starch slurries. Using measurements of moisture density, evaporation rates, and fracture advance rates, we suggest an advective-diffusive system is responsible for the rough scaling behavior of columnar joints. This theory explains the order of magnitude difference in scales between jointing in lavas and in starches. We investigated the scaling of average columnar cross-sectional areas in experiments where the evaporation rate was fixed using feedback methods. Our results suggest that the column area at a particular depth is related to both the current conditions, and hysteretically to the geometry of the pattern at previous depths. We argue that there exists a range of stable column scales allowed for any particular evaporation rate.

  2. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injected so the provider can see where to place the medicine. The steroid medicine is slowly injected into the joint. After the injection, you will remain on the table for another 5 to 10 minutes or so. ...

  3. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008 Previous Next Related Articles: Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD) Are You Biting Off More Than You Can Chew? Equilibration May Lessen TMD Pain Fender-benders: Source of TMD? First Comes ...

  4. High temperature control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vollman, Russell E.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  5. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David H.

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  6. Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie Bar, & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Tie Bar, & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Medora Bridge, Spanning East Fork of White River at State Route 235, Medora, Jackson County, IN

  7. Nonequilibrium structure in sequential assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Alexander V.; Craven, Galen T.; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2015-11-01

    The assembly of monomeric constituents into molecular superstructures through sequential-arrival processes has been simulated and theoretically characterized. When the energetic interactions allow for complete overlap of the particles, the model is equivalent to that of the sequential absorption of soft particles on a surface. In the present work, we consider more general cases by including arbitrary aggregating geometries and varying prescriptions of the connectivity network. The resulting theory accounts for the evolution and final-state configurations through a system of equations governing structural generation. We find that particle geometries differ significantly from those in equilibrium. In particular, variations of structural rigidity and morphology tune particle energetics and result in significant variation in the nonequilibrium distributions of the assembly in comparison to the corresponding equilibrium case.

  8. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  9. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  10. Nonlinear characteristics of joints as elements of multi-body dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    As the connecting elements in multi-body structures, joints play a pivotal role in the overall dynamic response of these systems. Obviously, the linear stiffness of the joint strongly influences the system frequencies, but the joints are also likely to be the dominant sources of damping and nonlinearities, especially in aircraft and space structures. The general characteristics of such joints will be discussed. Then the state of the art in nonlinear joint characterization techniques will be surveyed. Finally, the impact that joints have on the overall response of structures will be evaluated.

  11. Magnetic self-assembly of small parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetye, Sheetal B.

    used to characterize part-to-substrate MSA. It is shown that the assembly rate and the yield are most dependent on the rotational symmetry of the magnet pattern. Simultaneous and sequential heterogeneous assembly of two types of parts with selective bonding is also demonstrated, with the average assembly yield of 93% in 60 s and 99% in 3.5 min respectively. Finally, MSA with functional electrical interconnects is also demonstrated with a yield of 90.5%.

  12. Remote controlled vacuum joint closure mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Doll, David W.; Hager, E. Randolph

    1986-01-01

    A remotely operable and maintainable vacuum joint closure mechanism for a noncircular aperture is disclosed. The closure mechanism includes an extendible bellows coupled at one end to a noncircular duct and at its other end to a flange assembly having sealed grooves for establishing a high vacuum seal with the abutting surface of a facing flange which includes an aperture forming part of the system to be evacuated. A plurality of generally linear arrangements of pivotally coupled linkages and piston combinations are mounted around the outer surface of the duct and aligned along the length thereof. Each of the piston/linkage assemblies is adapted to engage the flange assembly by means of a respective piston and is further coupled to a remote controlled piston drive shaft to permit each of the linkages positioned on a respective flat outer surface of the duct to simultaneously and uniformly displace a corresponding piston and the flange assembly with which it is in contact along the length of the duct in extending the bellows to provide a high vacuum seal between the movable flange and the facing flange. A plurality of latch mechanisms are also pivotally mounted on the outside of the duct. A first end of each of the latch mechanisms is coupled to a remotely controlled latch control shaft for displacing the latch mechanism about its pivot point. In response to the pivoting displacement of the latch mechanism, a second end thereof is displaced so as to securely engage the facing flange.

  13. Electrical characterization of a Space Station Freedom alpha utility transfer assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yenni, Edward J.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical power, command signals and data are transferred across the Space Station Freedom solar alpha rotary joint by roll rings, which are incorporated within the Utility Transfer Assembly (UTA) designed and manufactured by Honeywell Space Systems Operations. A developmental Model of the UTA was tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center using the Power Management and Distribution DC test bed. The objectives of these tests were to obtain data for calibrating system models and to support final design of qualification and flight units. This testing marked the first time the UTA was operated at high power levels and exposed to electrical conditions similar to that which it will encounter on the actual Space Station. Satisfactory UTA system performance was demonstrated within the scope of this testing.

  14. Interconnect assembly for an electronic assembly and assembly method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Gerbsch, Erich William

    2003-06-10

    An interconnect assembly and method for a semiconductor device, in which the interconnect assembly can be used in lieu of wirebond connections to form an electronic assembly. The interconnect assembly includes first and second interconnect members. The first interconnect member has a first surface with a first contact and a second surface with a second contact electrically connected to the first contact, while the second interconnect member has a flexible finger contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member. The first interconnect member is adapted to be aligned and registered with a semiconductor device having a contact on a first surface thereof, so that the first contact of the first interconnect member electrically contacts the contact of the semiconductor device. Consequently, the assembly method does not require any wirebonds, but instead merely entails aligning and registering the first interconnect member with the semiconductor device so that the contacts of the first interconnect member and the semiconductor device make electrically contact, and then contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member with the flexible finger of the second interconnect member.

  15. Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Testing and Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-08-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has completed an Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Test. Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action, the relocation of the Department's heat source and radioisotope power system operations, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  16. Telerobotic truss assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Philip L.

    1987-01-01

    The ACCESS truss was telerobotically assembled in order to gain experience with robotic assembly of hardware designed for astronaut extravehicular (EVA) assembly. Tight alignment constraints of the ACCESS hardware made telerobotic assembly difficult. A wider alignment envelope and a compliant end effector would have reduced the problem. The manipulator had no linear motion capability, but many of the assembly operations required straight line motion. The manipulator was attached to a motion table in order to provide the X, Y, and Z translations needed. A programmable robot with linear translation capability would have eliminated the need for the motion table and streamlined the assembly. Poor depth perception was a major problem. Shaded paint schemes and alignment lines were helpful in reducing this problem. The four cameras used worked well for only some operations. It was not possible to identify camera locations that worked well for all assembly steps. More cameras or movable cameras would have simplified some operations. The audio feedback system was useful.

  17. Experiment of low resistance joints for the ITER correction coil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huajun; Wu, Yu; Wu, Weiyue; Liu, Bo; Shi, Yi; Guo, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    A test method was designed and performed to measure joint resistance of the ITER correction coil (CC) in liquid helium (LHe) temperature. A 10 kA superconducting transformer was manufactured to provide the joints current. The transformer consisted of two concentric layer-wound superconducting solenoids. NbTi superconducting wire was wound in the primary coil and the ITER CC conductor was wound in the secondary coil. The primary and the secondary coils were both immersed in liquid helium of a 300 mm useful bore diameter cryostat. Two ITER CC joints were assembled in the secondary loop and tested. The current of the secondary loop was ramped to 9 kA in several steps. The two joint resistances were measured to be 1.2 nΩ and 1.65 nΩ, respectively.

  18. Ultra-precision positioning assembly

    DOEpatents

    Montesanti, Richard C.; Locke, Stanley F.; Thompson, Samuel L.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for ultra-precision positioning. A slide base provides a foundational support. A slide plate moves with respect to the slide base along a first geometric axis. Either a ball-screw or a piezoelectric actuator working separate or in conjunction displaces the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis. A linking device directs a primary force vector into a center-line of the ball-screw. The linking device consists of a first link which directs a first portion of the primary force vector to an apex point, located along the center-line of the ball-screw, and a second link for directing a second portion of the primary force vector to the apex point. A set of rails, oriented substantially parallel to the center-line of the ball-screw, direct movement of the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis and are positioned such that the apex point falls within a geometric plane formed by the rails. The slide base, the slide plate, the ball-screw, and the linking device together form a slide assembly. Multiple slide assemblies can be distributed about a platform. In such a configuration, the platform may be raised and lowered, or tipped and tilted by jointly or independently displacing the slide plates.

  19. Flaw Tolerance in Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Li-Qin

    2003-01-01

    Furnace brazing is a joining process used in the aerospace and other industries to produce strong permanent and hermetic structural joints. As in any joining process, brazed joints have various imperfections and defects. At the present time, our understanding of the influence of the internal defects on the strength of the brazed joints is not adequate. The goal of this 3-part investigation is to better understand the properties and failure mechanisms of the brazed joints containing defects. This study focuses on the behavior of the brazed lap shear joints because of their importance in manufacturing aerospace structures. In Part 1, an average shear strength capability and failure modes of the single lap joints are explored. Stainless steel specimens brazed with pure silver are tested in accordance with the AWS C3.2 standard. Comparison of the failure loads and the ultimate shear strength with the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the same specimens as a function of the overlap widths shows excellent correlation between the experimental and calculated values for the defect-free lap joints. A damage zone criterion is shown to work quite well in understanding the failure of the braze joints. In Part 2, the findings of the Part 1 will be verified on the larger test specimens. Also, various flaws will be introduced in the test specimens to simulate lack of braze coverage in the lap joints. Mechanical testing and FEA will be performed on these joints to verify that behavior of the flawed ductile lap joints is similar to joints with a reduced braze area. Finally, in Part 3, the results obtained in Parts 1 and 2 will be applied to the actual brazed structure to evaluate the load-carrying capability of a structural lap joint containing discontinuities. In addition, a simplified engineering procedure will be offered for the laboratory testing of the lap shear specimens.

  20. Controlling self assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yanhu

    2007-12-01

    rows containing 16. The combination of chain length matching and dipolar complementary provides a potentially powerful strategy for producing controllably self assembled monolayers from multiple components at the liquid solid surface. In monolayers formed from 1,5-substituted-anthracene derivatives, a number of monolayer defects were observed including isolated single and dimer defects, row defects and complicated interface defects. Packing models are proposed to explain the observed monolayer defects. We designed and synthesized a series of 1,5-substituted-triptycene derivatives. We investigated the variation of STM image contrast for monolayers prepared from triptycene and anthracene derivatives with the tip-sample distance (or setpoint current/bias voltage). A model for the STM image contrast was explored. Several triptycene diode molecules with long alkyl chains were designed and synthesized. Initial studies of their rectifying characteristics were performed on HOPG using scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Finally, we designed and synthesized a series of thioester prediode molecules for studies on gold surfaces. Initial studies of self-assembly on gold were performed using a series of related analogs.

  1. Flexible Foot Test Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-04-27

    A test model of the flexible foot support was constructed early in the design stages to check its reactions to applied loads. The prototype was made of SS 304 and contained four vertical plates as opposed to the fourteen Inconel 718 plates which comprise the actual structure. Due to the fact that the prototype was built before the design of the support was finalized, the plate dimensions are different from those of the actual proposed design (i.e. model plate thickness is approximately one-half that of the actual plates). See DWG. 3740.210-MC-222376 for assembly details of the test model and DWG. 3740.210-MB-222377 for plate dimensions. This stanchion will be required to not only support the load of the inner vessel of the cryostat and its contents, but it must also allow for the movement of the vessel due to thermal contraction. Assuming that each vertical plate acts as a column, then the following formula from the Manual of Steel Construction (American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc., Eigth edition, 1980) can be applied to determine whether or not such columns undergoing simultaneous axial compression and transverse loading are considered safe for the given loading. The first term is representative of the axially compressive stress, and the second term, the bending stress. If the actual compressive stress is greater than 15% of the allowable compressive stress, then there are additional considerations which must be accounted for in the bending stress term.

  2. [Biomechanics of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H

    1989-03-01

    According to Fick, the tree-dimensional patterns of foot motion are best characterized as jawlike movement. Anatomically and biomechanically, this process represents conjoined, synchronous motion within the three mobile segments of the hindfoot: the ankle joint, the posterior subtalar joint, and the anterior subtalar joint. Foot kinematics can be described more completely if the anterior subtalar joint is defined not only as the talocalcaneal navicular joint, but as including the calcaneocuboid joint, thus representing the transverse joint of the tarsus, i.e., the Chopart joint. The axes of these three joints can be defined precisely. In some parts they represent a screwlike motion, clockwise or counter-clockwise, around the central ligamentous structures (fibulotibial ligament, talocalcaneal interosseous ligament, bifurcate ligament). The individual anatomy and structure of these ligaments provide variations in the degree and direction of foot motion. A precise knowledge of foot kinematics is important in surgical ligament and joint reconstruction and in selective foot arthrodeses.

  3. Development of a machine vision guidance system for automated assembly of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Eric G.; Sydow, P. Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: automated structural assembly robot vision; machine vision requirements; vision targets and hardware; reflective efficiency; target identification; pose estimation algorithms; triangle constraints; truss node with joint receptacle targets; end-effector mounted camera and light assembly; vision system results from optical bench tests; and future work.

  4. Employee Training for Productivity: Report of a 1980 Assembly on Industry-Education Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarrington, Roger, Ed.

    Four background papers prepared for an assembly on industry/education cooperation and a summary of discussions and recommendations which came out of the assembly are contained in this report. After Henry Halsted's introduction to the report and to the theme of the relationship of industry and education, Herbert E. Striner's paper, "The Joint Role…

  5. Joint ventures in medical services.

    PubMed

    Rublee, D A

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an overview of joint-venture activity in healthcare, describing trends in joint ventures and raising issues for physicians. The purposes are to discuss the major current facets of joint-venture alliances in healthcare and to identify policy issues that arise from the trend to use joint ventures as an organizational tool. Speculation is made about the future role of joint ventures in the organization of healthcare.

  6. Low-Friction, High-Stiffness Joint for Uniaxial Load Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James L.; Le, Thang; Carroll, Monty B.

    2007-01-01

    A universal-joint assembly has been devised for transferring axial tension or compression to a load cell. To maximize measurement accuracy, the assembly is required to minimize any moments and non-axial forces on the load cell and to exhibit little or no hysteresis. The requirement to minimize hysteresis translates to a requirement to maximize axial stiffness (including minimizing backlash) and a simultaneous requirement to minimize friction. In practice, these are competing requirements, encountered repeatedly in efforts to design universal joints. Often, universal-joint designs represent compromises between these requirements. The improved universal-joint assembly contains two universal joints, each containing two adjustable pairs of angular-contact ball bearings. One might be tempted to ask why one could not use simple ball-and-socket joints rather than something as complex as universal joints containing adjustable pairs of angularcontact ball bearings. The answer is that ball-and-socket joints do not offer sufficient latitude to trade stiffness versus friction: the inevitable result of an attempt to make such a trade in a ball-and-socket joint is either too much backlash or too much friction. The universal joints are located at opposite ends of an axial subassembly that contains the load cell. The axial subassembly includes an axial shaft, an axial housing, and a fifth adjustable pair of angular-contact ball bearings that allows rotation of the axial housing relative to the shaft. The preload on each pair of angular-contact ball bearings can be adjusted to obtain the required stiffness with minimal friction, tailored for a specific application. The universal joint at each end affords two degrees of freedom, allowing only axial force to reach the load cell regardless of application of moments and non-axial forces. The rotational joint on the axial subassembly affords a fifth degree of freedom, preventing application of a torsion load to the load cell.

  7. Microfluidic device for the assembly and transport of microparticles

    DOEpatents

    James, Conrad D.; Kumar, Anil; Khusid, Boris; Acrivos, Andreas

    2010-06-29

    A microfluidic device comprising independently addressable arrays of interdigitated electrodes can be used to assembly and transport large-scale microparticle structures. The device and method uses collective phenomena in a negatively polarized suspension exposed to a high-gradient strong ac electric field to assemble the particles into predetermined locations and then transport them collectively to a work area for final assembly by sequentially energizing the electrode arrays.

  8. Programs for Assembling SBH Experiments

    1995-11-28

    DB EXP ASSEMBLY is a suite of programs that enable selection of bundles of data, which are referred to as experiments, from the DB SBH archival database. In other words, an experiment is a bundle of data which is analyzed as a unit. Program DBJ creates raw experiments based on initial specification. Program DBK then tests the experiments for a number of consistemcy and completeness criteria, reports bugs in the experiment and recommends solutions, andmore » performs the desired corrections. An experiment that has passed the final DBK test is ready for analysis by the DB DISCOVERY programs.« less

  9. Dissimilar metals joint evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, M. E.; Apodaca, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    Dissimilar metals tubular joints between 2219-T851 aluminum alloy and 304L stainless steel were fabricated and tested to evaluate bonding processes. Joints were fabricated by four processes: (1) inertia (friction) weldings, where the metals are spun and forced together to create the weld; (2) explosive welding, where the metals are impacted together at high velocity; (3) co-extrusion, where the metals are extruded in contact at high temperature to promote diffusion; and (4) swaging, where residual stresses in the metals after a stretching operation maintain forced contact in mutual shear areas. Fifteen joints of each type were prepared and evaluated in a 6.35 cm (2.50 in.) O.D. size, with 0.32 cm (0.13 in.) wall thickness, and 7.6 cm (3.0 in) total length. The joints were tested to evaluate their ability to withstand pressure cycle, thermal cycle, galvanic corrosion and burst tests. Leakage tests and other non-destructive test techniques were used to evaluate the behavior of the joints, and the microstructure of the bond areas was analyzed.

  10. Assembly design system based on engineering connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wensheng

    2016-05-01

    An assembly design system is an important part of computer-aided design systems, which are important tools for realizing product concept design. The traditional assembly design system does not record the connection information of production on the engineering layer; consequently, the upstream design idea cannot be fully used in the downstream design. An assembly design model based on the relationship of engineering connection is presented. In this model, all nodes are divided into two categories: The component and the connection. Moreover, the product is constructed on the basis of the connection relationship of the components. The model is an And/Or graph and has the ability to record all assembly schemes. This model records only the connection information that has engineering application value in the product design. In addition, this model can significantly reduce the number of combinations, and is very favorable for the assembly sequence planning in the downstream. The system contains a connection knowledge system that can be mapped to the connection node, and the connection knowledge obtained in practice can be returned to the knowledge system. Finally, VC++ 6.0 is used to develop a prototype system called Connect-based Assembly Planning (CAP). The relationship between the CAP system and the commercial assembly design system is also established.

  11. Whisker Formation on SAC305 Soldered Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschter, S.; Snugovsky, P.; Bagheri, Z.; Kosiba, E.; Romansky, M.; Kennedy, J.; Snugovsky, L.; Perovic, D.

    2014-11-01

    This article describes the results of a whisker formation study on SAC305 assemblies, evaluating the effects of lead-frame materials and cleanliness in different environments: low-stress simulated power cycling (50-85°C thermal cycling), thermal shock (-55°C to 85°C), and high temperature/high humidity (85°C/85% RH). Cleaned and contaminated small outline transistors, large leaded quad flat packs (QFP), plastic leaded chip carrier packages, and solder balls with and without rare earth elements (REE) were soldered to custom designed test boards with Sn3Ag0.5Cu (SAC305) solder. After assembly, all the boards were cleaned, and half of them were recontaminated (1.56 µg/cm2 Cl-). Whisker length, diameter, and density were measured. Detailed metallurgical analysis on components before assembly and on solder joints before and after testing was performed. It was found that whiskers grow from solder joint fillets, where the thickness is less than 25 µm, unless REE was present. The influence of lead-frame and solder ball material, microstructure, cleanliness, and environment on whisker characteristics is discussed. This article provides detailed metallurgical observations and select whisker length data obtained during this multiyear testing program.

  12. Equipment for removal of the TMI-2 plenum assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Ales, M W; Connell, J D; DeMars, R V; Nitti, D A

    1984-06-01

    Preliminary examinations have shown that the plenum assembly is distorted and possibly might bind against the dreactor vessel and core support shield as it is lifted. Further, fuel assembly components are stuck to the bottom of the plenum assembly and particulate fuel debris is deposited in the plenum assembly. These conditions require special equipment to free the plenum assembly from the reactor internals, to dislodge suspended fuel assembly remnants and to lift, transfer, and store the plenum assembly in the shallow end of the refueling canal. The special equipment to remove the plenum assembly is being designed and built. This equipment includes an integrated video/communication inspection system; a hydraulic jack system with a 240-ton capacity; specially designed tools to dislodge the end fuel assembly fittings from the plenum assembly; a portable work platform; and final lifting equipment and a transfer contamination barrier that will be used in conjunction with the polar crane to lift and transfer the plenum assembly. Test assemblies necessary to check out the performance of equipment and train personnel are also being provided.

  13. Genetic variation and the de novo assembly of human genomes

    PubMed Central

    Chaisson, Mark J. P.; Wilson, Richard K.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of genetic variation and the assembly of genome sequences are both inextricably linked to advances in DNA-sequencing technology. Short-read massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our ability to discover genetic variation but is insufficient to generate high-quality genome assemblies or resolve most structural variation. Full resolution of variation is only guaranteed by complete de novo assembly of a genome. Here, we review approaches to genome assembly, the nature of gaps or missing sequences, and biases in the assembly process. We describe the challenges of generating a complete de novo genome assembly using current technologies and the impact that being able to perfectly sequence the genome would have on understanding human disease and evolution. Finally, we summarize recent technological advances that improve both contiguity and accuracy and emphasize the importance of complete de novo assembly as opposed to read mapping as the primary means to understanding the full range of human genetic variation. PMID:26442640

  14. Tools and Equipment Modeling for Automobile Interactive Assembling Operating Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Dianliang; Zhu Hongmin

    2010-05-21

    Tools and equipment play an important role in the simulation of virtual assembly, especially in the assembly process simulation and plan. Because of variety in function and complexity in structure and manipulation, the simulation of tools and equipments remains to be a challenge for interactive assembly operation. Based on analysis of details and characteristics of interactive operations for automobile assembly, the functional requirement for tools and equipments of automobile assembly is given. Then, a unified modeling method for information expression and function realization of general tools and equipments is represented, and the handling methods of manual, semi-automatic, automatic tools and equipments are discussed. Finally, the application in assembly simulation of rear suspension and front suspension of Roewe 750 automobile is given. The result shows that the modeling and handling methods are applicable in the interactive simulation of various tools and equipments, and can also be used for supporting assembly process planning in virtual environment.

  15. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joint-4 Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2001-01-01

    This study provides for development and test verification of a thermal model used for prediction of joint heating environments, structural temperatures and seal erosions in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Nozzle Joint-4. The heating environments are a result of rapid pressurization of the joint free volume assuming a leak path has occurred in the filler material used for assembly gap close out. Combustion gases flow along the leak path from nozzle environment to joint O-ring gland resulting in local heating to the metal housing and erosion of seal materials. Analysis of this condition was based on usage of the NASA Joint Pressurization Routine (JPR) for environment determination and the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA) for structural temperature prediction. Model generated temperatures, pressures and seal erosions are compared to hot fire test data for several different leak path situations. Investigated in the hot fire test program were nozzle joint-4 O-ring erosion sensitivities to leak path width in both open and confined joint geometries. Model predictions were in generally good agreement with the test data for the confined leak path cases. Worst case flight predictions are provided using the test-calibrated model. Analysis issues are discussed based on model calibration procedures.

  16. Self-Assembly of Micromachining Systems Powered by Janus Micromotors.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Claudio; Simmchen, Juliane; Saglimbeni, Filippo; Katuri, Jaideep; Dipalo, Michele; De Angelis, Francesco; Sanchez, Samuel; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2016-01-27

    Janus particles can self-assemble around microfabricated gears in reproducible configurations with a high degree of spatial and orientational order. The final configuration maximizes the torque applied on the rotor leading to a unidirectional and steady rotating motion. The interplay between geometry and dynamical behavior leads to the self-assembly of Janus micromotors starting from randomly distributed particles. PMID:26649462

  17. Space Shuttle production verification motor 1 (PV-1) field joint protection system, volume 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of the field joint protection system (FJPS) of the Space Shuttle Production Verification Motor 1 (PV-1), as evaluated by postfire hardware inspection. Compliance with the specifications is shown for the FJPS assembly and components. The simplified FJPS and field joint heaters performed nominally, maintaining all joint seal temperatures within the required range. One anomally was noted on the igniter-to-case joint heater during postfire inspection. The heater buckled off the surface in two areas, resulting in two hot spots on the heater and darkened heater insulation. The condition did not affect heater performance during ignition countdown and all igniter seals were maintained within required temperature limits.

  18. Wind turbine rotor assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, H. W.

    1984-11-20

    A vertical axis wind turbine having a horizontal arm member which supports an upright blade assembly. Bearing structure coupling the blade assembly to the turbine arm permits blade movement about its longitudinal axis as well as flexing motion of the blade assembly about axes perpendicular to the longitudinal axis. A latching mechanism automatically locks the blade assembly to its supporting arm during normal turbine operation and automatically unlocks same when the turbine is at rest. For overspeed prevention, a centrifugally actuated arm functions to unlatch the blade assembly permitting same to slipstream or feather into the wind. Manually actuated means are also provided for unlatching the moving blade assembly. The turbine arm additionally carries a switching mechanism in circuit with a turbine generator with said mechanism functioning to open and hence protect the generator circuit in the event of an overspeed condition of the turbine.

  19. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  20. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tyler G; Garzon, Max H; Deaton, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are "strong" assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self-assembly systems

  1. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Tyler G.; Garzon, Max H.; Deaton, Russell J.

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are “strong” assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self-assembly

  2. Deprotecting thioacetyl-terminated terphenyldithiol for assembly on gallium arsenide.

    PubMed

    Krapchetov, Dmitry A; Ma, Hong; Jen, Alex K Y; Fischer, Daniel A; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2008-02-01

    We characterize the assembly of terphenyldithiol (TPDT) on gallium arsenide (GaAs) from ethanol (EtOH) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) as a function of ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) concentration. NH4OH facilitates the conversion of thioacetyl end groups of the TPDT precursor to thiolates in the assembly solution. The final structure of TPDT assembled on GaAs is sensitive not only to the assembly solvent but also to NH4OH concentration. In the presence of low concentrations of NH4OH (1 mM), TPDT assemblies from EtOH are oriented upright. The same assemblies are less upright when adsorption is carried out at higher NH4OH concentrations. In THF, TPDT does not adsorb significantly on GaAs at low NH4OH concentrations. The surface coverage and structural organization of these assemblies improve with increasing NH4OH concentrations, although these assemblies are never as organized as those from EtOH. The difference in the final structure of TPDT assemblies is attributed to differences in the thiolate fraction in the assembly solution at the point of substrate immersion.

  3. Automated solar module assembly line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bycer, M.

    1980-01-01

    The solar module assembly machine which Kulicke and Soffa delivered under this contract is a cell tabbing and stringing machine, and capable of handling a variety of cells and assembling strings up to 4 feet long which then can be placed into a module array up to 2 feet by 4 feet in a series of parallel arrangement, and in a straight or interdigitated array format. The machine cycle is 5 seconds per solar cell. This machine is primarily adapted to 3 inch diameter round cells with two tabs between cells. Pulsed heat is used as the bond technique for solar cell interconnects. The solar module assembly machine unloads solar cells from a cassette, automatically orients them, applies flux and solders interconnect ribbons onto the cells. It then inverts the tabbed cells, connects them into cell strings, and delivers them into a module array format using a track mounted vacuum lance, from which they are taken to test and cleaning benches prior to final encapsulation into finished solar modules. Throughout the machine the solar cell is handled very carefully, and any contact with the collector side of the cell is avoided or minimized.

  4. Reconstitutable control assembly having removable control rods with detachable split upper end plugs

    SciTech Connect

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Knott, R.P.; Sparrow, J.A.

    1989-12-19

    This patent describes, in a reconstitutable control assembly for use with a nuclear fuel assembly, the control assembly including a spider structure and at least one control rod, an attachment joint for detachable fastening the control rod to the spider structure. The attachment joint comprising: a hollow connecting finger on the spider structure; and an elongated detachable split upper end plug on the control rod having a pair of separate upper and lower plug portions, the upper plug portion having integrally-connected tandemly- arranged upper, middle and lower sections. The lower plug portion having integrally-connected tandemly-arranged upper, middle and lower segments.

  5. Remote controlled vacuum joint closure mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Doll, D.W.; Hager, E.R.

    1984-02-22

    A remotely operable and maintainable vacuum joint closure mechanism for a noncircular aperture is disclosed. The closure mechanism includes an extendible bellows coupled at one end to a noncircular duct and at its other end to a flange assembly having sealed grooves for establishing a high vacuum seal with the abutting surface of a facing flange which includes an aperture forming part of the system to be evacuated. A plurality of generally linear arrangements of pivotally coupled linkages and piston combinations are mounted around the outer surface of the duct and aligned along the length thereof. Each of the piston/linkage assemblies is adapted to engage the flange assembly by means of a respective piston and is further coupled to a remote controlled piston drive shaft to permit each of the linkages positioned on a respective flat outer surface of the duct to simultaneously and uniformly displace a corresponding piston and the flange assembly with which it is in contact along the length of the duct in extending the bellows to provide a high vacuum seal between the movable flange and the facing flange. A plurality of latch mechanisms are also pivotally mounted on the outside of the duct. A first end of each of the latch mechanisms is coupled to a remotely controlled latch control shaft for displacing the latch mechanism about its pivot point. In response to the pivoting displacement of the latch mechanism, a second end thereof is displaced so as to securely engage the facing flange and maintain the high vacuum seal established by the displacement of the flange assembly and extension of the bellows without displacing the entire duct.

  6. Controlling molecular assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dameron, Arrelaine A.

    Using molecules designed to have only specific differences in their functionality, we have explored the influence of molecular conformation on the structural, electronic, and physical properties of self-assembled monolayers using both scanning probe and ensemble techniques. In the former case, we used two structurally similar molecules that differ in the degrees of freedom afforded to each. We found that this influenced the degree of order and conductance of self-assembled monolayers of each molecule, but had little influence of conductance switching of individual molecules inserted in alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers. We further demonstrated how molecular structure influences phase separation, displace-ability, and molecular mobility of self-assembled monolayers by assembling 1-adamantanethiol on Au{111}. Molecular-resolution imaging of the self-assembled monolayers with the scanning tunneling microscopy confirmed a highly ordered hexagonally close-packed molecular lattice. We found that the 1-adamantanethiolate self-assembled monolayers were susceptible to replacement by the presence of another thiolated species, both from solution and vapor phases. Additionally, we determined that the displacement process is a nucleation and growth mechanism and the structure of the resulting self-assembled monolayers is dependent on the strength of the intermolecular interactions of the displacing molecules. It was hypothesized that 1-adamantanethiolate displacement was driven by a combination of energies gained from the exchange of one self-assembled monolayer for a denser self-assembled monolayer and from the increased stability due to intermolecular interaction forces. Exploiting the susceptibility of the 1-adamantanethiolate self-assembled monolayers to displacement, we have designed a novel patterning strategy, termed 'microdisplacement printing', by combining these sacrificial self-assembled monolayers with microcontact printing. During microdisplacement printing

  7. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    DOEpatents

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  8. Transverse Vibrations of Double Bellows Expansion Joint Restrained Against Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Kameswara, Rao C.; Radhakrishna, M.

    2002-07-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of transverse vibrations of double bellows expansion joint restrained against rotation on either end. A theoretical model is developed based on the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory and includes added mass of the fluid flowing inside the pipe-bellow-pipe assembly. Neglecting effect of shear, an exact frequency equation is derived for the transverse vibrations of double bellows expansion joint including the effects of end elastic restraints against rotation. Numerical results are presented for an example bellow showing the effects of variation of elastic restraints and internal pressure on the first two modes of vibration. (authors)

  9. Environmental and viscoelastic effects on stresses in adhesive joints

    SciTech Connect

    Palazotto, A.N.; Birman, V.

    1995-04-01

    This paper considers the state of the art in several important areas of research on adhesively bonded joints. The paper reviews the studies dealing with environmental and viscoelastic effects on stresses in adhesive joints. Environmental factors that affect stresses include temperature and moisture. These factors are analyzed and practical examples that illustrate their impact on adhesives are given for the solid-rocket motor, which is a structural component paramount to the U.S. space program. The paper deals with viscoelastic effects on adhesive joints, and a number of viscoelastic models used in the analysis of viscoelastic materials, including adhesives, are reviewed. The use of the solid-rocket motor as an example characterizes the circumstances where viscoelastic properties of adhesive layers are essential. Close attention is paid to the fractional derivative model of Bagley and Torvik, which may be a good candidate for an analytical study of adhesive joints. Finally, existing studies on viscoelastic adhesive joints are considered. 54 refs.

  10. Stud Reinforcement in Beam-Column Joints under Seismic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Hatem Hassan Ali

    Current codes recommend large amounts of shear reinforcement for reinforced concrete beam-column joints causing significant congestion. This research aims at investigating experimentally and numerically the efficiency of using studs with a head at each end in lieu of conventional closed hoops in reinforced concrete beam-column joints. The proposed reinforcement reduces congestion and ensures easier assembly of the reinforcing cage, saving labour cost and enhancing performance of the joint. Based on this research, a recommended arrangement and detailing of headed studs and their design for exterior beam-column joint are presented. The experimental investigation consisted of testing ten full-scale beam-column joint specimens under quasi-static cyclic loading. The specimens represented an exterior beam-column joint subassembly isolated at the points of contra-flexure from a typical multi-storey, multi-bay reinforced concrete frame. A test setup was developed to simulate the lateral inter-storey drift. The test parameters included: the type, arrangement and amount of shear reinforcement, the load history and rate of loading, and the amount of reinforcement for out-of-plane confinement of the joint. Envelopes of the hysteretic behaviour of the specimens and the joint deformation under shear stress are presented. The stiffness degradation, the strain levels in the joint reinforcement, the contribution of joint, beam, and column to the inter-storey drift, and the energy dissipation were compared. All the test specimens reinforced with headed studs in the joint achieved considerable enhancement in their behaviour under cyclic loads and exhibited a performance close to that of a joint reinforced with closed hoops and cross ties according to the code. All the specimens with adequate out-of-plane confinement had an equivalent behaviour compared with the code-based specimen and achieved a desirable mode of failure. Use of double-headed studs proved to be a viable option for

  11. Cooperative synchronized assemblies enhance orientation discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Samonds, Jason M.; Allison, John D.; Brown, Heather A.; Bonds, A. B.

    2004-01-01

    There is no clear link between the broad tuning of single neurons and the fine behavioral capabilities of orientation discrimination. We recorded from populations of cells in the cat visual cortex (area 17) to examine whether the joint activity of cells can support finer discrimination than found in individual responses. Analysis of joint firing yields a substantial advantage (i.e., cooperation) in fine-angle discrimination. This cooperation increases to more considerable levels as the population of an assembly is increased. The cooperation in a population of six cells provides encoding of orientation with an information advantage that is at least 2-fold in terms of requiring either fewer cells or less time than independent coding. This cooperation suggests that correlated or synchronized activity can increase information. PMID:15096595

  12. Joint Custody and Coparenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sell, Kenneth D.

    Results are presented of an intensive search of U.S. newspapers and periodicals on the joint custody of children after divorce, where both parents have continued responsibility for parenting and where the children spend part of each week, month, or year with both of the parents. Areas of concern addressed by these materials include the following:…

  13. Human temporomandibular joint morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carini, Francesco; Scardina, Giuseppe Alessandro; Caradonna, Carola; Messina, Pietro; Valenza, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint morphogenesis was studied. Ranging in age of fetuses examined was from 6 to14 weeks' gestation. Our results showed the condyle so first element that appear between 6 degrees and 8 degrees week (condylar blastema). After a week appear temporal elements. Disk appear at the same time of glenoid blastema and it reaches an advanced differentation before of the condyle and temporal element, so these don't effect machanical compression on mesenchyma where we find the disk. So we think that the disk result of genetic expression and it isn't the result of mechanical compression. The inferior joint cavity appear to 12 week. The superior joint cavity appear to 13-14 week. In conclusion, the appearance of the condyle is the first event during TMJ morphogenesis, with its initial bud, in form of a mesenchymal thickening, becoming detectable between the sixth and eight week of development, when all the large joints of the limbs are already well defined. PMID:18333411

  14. Clad metal joint closure

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, O.W.

    1985-04-09

    A plasma arc spray overlay of cladding metals is used over joints between clad metal pieces to provide a continuous cladding metal surface. The technique permits applying an overlay of a high melting point cladding metal to a cladding metal surface without excessive heating of the backing metal.

  15. New Joint Sealants. Criteria, Design and Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    Contents include--(1) sealing concrete joints, (2) sealing glass and metal joints, (3) metal and glass joint sealants from a fabricator's viewpoint, (4) a theory of adhesion for joint sealants, (5) geometry of simple joint seals under strain, (6) joint sealant specifications from a manufacturer's viewpoint, (7) joint sealant requirements from an…

  16. Study on changes in skin extensibility during the development of joint contracture due to joint immobilization in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tasaka, Atsushi; Ono, Takeya; Oki, Sadaaki; Umei, Namiko; Ishikura, Hideki; Aihara, Kazuki; Sato, Yuta; Matsumoto, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether skin extensibility decreases when a contracture develops as a result of joint immobilization. [Subjects] This study was conducted on six female Wistar rats. [Methods] The rats were divided into two experimental groups. In the immobilized group, the right ankle joints were immobilized in complete plantar flexion by plaster casts for two weeks. In the control group, the left ankle joints had no intervention. On the final day, skin extensibility was determined from a length-tension curve by collecting skin from the posterior aspect of the ankle joint and using a tensile strength tester. [Results] Compared with the control group, the immobilized group showed a significant decrease in skin extensibility. [Conclusion] The results demonstrated that the extensibility of the skin itself decreases when joint contracture develops. PMID:26504268

  17. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly

  18. Trailer shield assembly for a welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates generally to trailer shields for gas shielded arc welding torches, and more particularly to a trailer shield assembly provided with a shield gas manifold for providing an even dispersion of shield gas to the interior of the shield assembly, which generally encloses a joint being welded and a welding trailing portion of hot welded metal. The novelty of the invention lies in providing trailer shield with a manifold tube having a plurality of openings from which shield gas is distributed. A gas manifold region ahead of the torch is also provided with shield gas from a tube to protect metal preheated by the torch. Further novelty lies in constructing portions of sides and housing and portions of side walls of the guide of stainless steel screen having a tight mesh.

  19. Integrated automation for manufacturing of electronic assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampite, T. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Since 1985, the Naval Ocean Systems Center has been identifying and developing needed technology for flexible manufacturing of hybrid microelectronic assemblies. Specific projects have been accomplished through contracts with manufacturing companies, equipment suppliers, and joint efforts with other government agencies. The resulting technology has been shared through semi-annual meetings with government, industry, and academic representatives who form an ad hoc advisory panel. More than 70 major technical capabilities have been identified for which new development is needed. Several of these developments have been completed and are being shared with industry.

  20. Perspective: Geometrically frustrated assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grason, Gregory M.

    2016-09-01

    This perspective will overview an emerging paradigm for self-organized soft materials, geometrically frustrated assemblies, where interactions between self-assembling elements (e.g., particles, macromolecules, proteins) favor local packing motifs that are incompatible with uniform global order in the assembly. This classification applies to a broad range of material assemblies including self-twisting protein filament bundles, amyloid fibers, chiral smectics and membranes, particle-coated droplets, curved protein shells, and phase-separated lipid vesicles. In assemblies, geometric frustration leads to a host of anomalous structural and thermodynamic properties, including heterogeneous and internally stressed equilibrium structures, self-limiting assembly, and topological defects in the equilibrium assembly structures. The purpose of this perspective is to (1) highlight the unifying principles and consequences of geometric frustration in soft matter assemblies; (2) classify the known distinct modes of frustration and review corresponding experimental examples; and (3) describe outstanding questions not yet addressed about the unique properties and behaviors of this broad class of systems.

  1. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  2. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Carolyn

    1993-01-01

    A high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  3. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, C.

    1993-04-27

    A high speed door assembly is described, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  4. Permanent magnet assembly

    DOEpatents

    Chell, Jeremy; Zimm, Carl B.

    2006-12-12

    A permanent magnet assembly is disclosed that is adapted to provide a magnetic field across an arc-shaped gap. Such a permanent magnet assembly can be used, for example, to provide a time-varying magnetic field to an annular region for use in a magnetic refrigerator.

  5. Liquid rocket valve assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and operating characteristics of valve assemblies used in liquid propellant rocket engines are discussed. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) valve selection parameters, (2) major design aspects, (3) design integration of valve subassemblies, and (4) assembly of components and functional tests. Information is provided on engine, stage, and spacecraft checkout procedures.

  6. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  7. Assembly: a resource for assembled genomes at NCBI

    PubMed Central

    Kitts, Paul A.; Church, Deanna M.; Thibaud-Nissen, Françoise; Choi, Jinna; Hem, Vichet; Sapojnikov, Victor; Smith, Robert G.; Tatusova, Tatiana; Xiang, Charlie; Zherikov, Andrey; DiCuccio, Michael; Murphy, Terence D.; Pruitt, Kim D.; Kimchi, Avi

    2016-01-01

    The NCBI Assembly database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/) provides stable accessioning and data tracking for genome assembly data. The model underlying the database can accommodate a range of assembly structures, including sets of unordered contig or scaffold sequences, bacterial genomes consisting of a single complete chromosome, or complex structures such as a human genome with modeled allelic variation. The database provides an assembly accession and version to unambiguously identify the set of sequences that make up a particular version of an assembly, and tracks changes to updated genome assemblies. The Assembly database reports metadata such as assembly names, simple statistical reports of the assembly (number of contigs and scaffolds, contiguity metrics such as contig N50, total sequence length and total gap length) as well as the assembly update history. The Assembly database also tracks the relationship between an assembly submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Consortium (INSDC) and the assembly represented in the NCBI RefSeq project. Users can find assemblies of interest by querying the Assembly Resource directly or by browsing available assemblies for a particular organism. Links in the Assembly Resource allow users to easily download sequence and annotations for current versions of genome assemblies from the NCBI genomes FTP site. PMID:26578580

  8. Mechanisms of Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Jason D.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are nanoscale entities containing a nucleic acid genome encased in a protein shell called a capsid, and in some cases surrounded by a lipid bilayer membrane. This review summarizes the physics that govern the processes by which capsids assembles within their host cells and in vitro. We describe the thermodynamics and kinetics for assembly of protein subunits into icosahedral capsid shells, and how these are modified in cases where the capsid assembles around a nucleic acid or on a lipid bilayer. We present experimental and theoretical techniques that have been used to characterize capsid assembly, and we highlight aspects of virus assembly which are likely to receive significant attention in the near future. PMID:25532951

  9. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  10. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, Frank M.; Anderson, Erin K.; Robinson, Casandra W.; Haynes, Harriet B.

    1999-01-01

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

  11. Automated assembly in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Sandanand; Dwivedi, Suren N.; Soon, Toh Teck; Bandi, Reddy; Banerjee, Soumen; Hughes, Cecilia

    1989-01-01

    The installation of robots and their use of assembly in space will create an exciting and promising future for the U.S. Space Program. The concept of assembly in space is very complicated and error prone and it is not possible unless the various parts and modules are suitably designed for automation. Certain guidelines are developed for part designing and for an easy precision assembly. Major design problems associated with automated assembly are considered and solutions to resolve these problems are evaluated in the guidelines format. Methods for gripping and methods for part feeding are developed with regard to the absence of gravity in space. The guidelines for part orientation, adjustments, compliances and various assembly construction are discussed. Design modifications of various fasteners and fastening methods are also investigated.

  12. Shoulder Joint For Protective Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Smallcombe, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    Shoulder joint allows full range of natural motion: wearer senses little or no resisting force or torque. Developed for space suit, joint offers advantages in protective garments for underwater work, firefighting, or cleanup of hazardous materials.

  13. NIF Target Assembly Metrology Methodology and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, E. T.; Kroll, J.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Montesanti, R.; Hughes, J.; Swisher, M.; Taylor, J.; Segraves, K.; Lord, D. M.; Reynolds, J.; Castro, C.; Edwards, G.

    2011-01-01

    During our inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) we require cryogenic targets at the 1-cm scale to be fabricated, assembled, and metrologized to micron-level tolerances. During assembly of these ICF targets, there are physical dimensmetrology is completed using optical coordinate measurement machines that provide repeatable measurements with micron precision, while also allowing in-process data collection for absolute accuracy in assembly. To date, 51 targets have been assembled and metrologized, and 34 targets have been successfully fielded on NIF relying on these metrology data. In the near future, ignition experiments on NIF will require tighter tolerances and more demanding target assembly and metrology capability. Metrology methods, calculations, and uncertainty estimates will be discussed. Target diagnostic port alignment, target position, and capsule location results will be reviewed for the 2009 Energetics Campaign. The information is presented via control charts showing the effect of process improvements that were made during target production. Certain parameters, including capsule position, met the 2009 campaign specifications but will have much tighter requirements in the future. Finally, in order to meet these new requirements assembly process changes and metrology capability upgrades will be necessary.

  14. Special test equipment and fixturing for MSAT reflector assembly alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Jeffrey A.; Zinn, Michael R.; Mccarten, David R.

    1994-01-01

    The MSAT Reflector Assembly is a state of the art subsystem for Mobile Satellite (MSAT), a geosynchronous-based commercial mobile telecommunication satellite program serving North America. The Reflector Assembly consisted of a deployable, three-hinge, folding-segment Boom, deployable 5.7 x 5.3-meter 16-rib Wrap-Rib Reflector, and a Reflector Pointing Mechanism (RPM). The MSAT spacecraft was based on a Hughes HS601 spacecraft bus carrying two Reflector Assemblies independently dedicated for L-band transmit and receive operations. Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (LMSC) designed and built the Reflector Assembly for MSAT under contract to SPAR Aerospace Ltd. Two MSAT satellites were built jointly by SPAR Aerospace Ltd. and Hughes Space and Communications Co. for this program, the first scheduled for launch in 1994. When scaled for wavelength, the assembly and alignment requirements for the Reflector Assembly were in many instances equivalent to or exceeded that of a diffraction-limited visible light optical system. Combined with logistical constraints inherent to large, compliant, lightweight structures; 'bolt-on' alignment; and remote, indirect spacecraft access; the technical challenges were formidable. This document describes the alignment methods, the special test equipment, and fixturing for Reflector Assembly assembly and alignment.

  15. Simultaneous Volar Dislocation of Distal Interphalangeal Joint and Volar Fracture-Subluxation of Proximal Interphalangeal Joint of Little Finger: A New Mechanism of Injury.

    PubMed

    Mozaffarian, Kamran; Bayatpour, Abdollah; Vosoughi, Amir Reza

    2016-10-01

    Simultaneous volar dislocation of distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint and volar fracture-subluxation of proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint of the same finger has not been reported yet. A 19-year-old man was referred due to pain on the deformed left little finger after a ball injury. Radiographs showed volar dislocation of the DIP joint and dorsal lip fracture of the middle phalanx with volar subluxation of PIP joint of the little finger. This case was unique in terms of the mechanism of injury which was hyperflexion type in two adjacent joints of the same finger. The patient was treated by closed reduction of DIP joint dislocation and open reduction and internal fixation of the PIP joint fracture-subluxation and application of dorsal external fixator due to instability. Finally, full flexion of the PIP joint and full extension of the DIP joint were obtained but with 10 degree extension lag at the PIP joint and DIP joint flexion ranging from 0 degree to 30 degrees. Some loss of motion in small joints of the fingers after hyperflexion injuries should be expected. PMID:27595966

  16. Simultaneous Volar Dislocation of Distal Interphalangeal Joint and Volar Fracture-Subluxation of Proximal Interphalangeal Joint of Little Finger: A New Mechanism of Injury.

    PubMed

    Mozaffarian, Kamran; Bayatpour, Abdollah; Vosoughi, Amir Reza

    2016-10-01

    Simultaneous volar dislocation of distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint and volar fracture-subluxation of proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint of the same finger has not been reported yet. A 19-year-old man was referred due to pain on the deformed left little finger after a ball injury. Radiographs showed volar dislocation of the DIP joint and dorsal lip fracture of the middle phalanx with volar subluxation of PIP joint of the little finger. This case was unique in terms of the mechanism of injury which was hyperflexion type in two adjacent joints of the same finger. The patient was treated by closed reduction of DIP joint dislocation and open reduction and internal fixation of the PIP joint fracture-subluxation and application of dorsal external fixator due to instability. Finally, full flexion of the PIP joint and full extension of the DIP joint were obtained but with 10 degree extension lag at the PIP joint and DIP joint flexion ranging from 0 degree to 30 degrees. Some loss of motion in small joints of the fingers after hyperflexion injuries should be expected.

  17. Comparative study of de novo assembly and genome-guided assembly strategies for transcriptome reconstruction based on RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bingxin; Zeng, Zhenbing; Shi, Tieliu

    2013-02-01

    Transcriptome reconstruction is an important application of RNA-Seq, providing critical information for further analysis of transcriptome. Although RNA-Seq offers the potential to identify the whole picture of transcriptome, it still presents special challenges. To handle these difficulties and reconstruct transcriptome as completely as possible, current computational approaches mainly employ two strategies: de novo assembly and genome-guided assembly. In order to find the similarities and differences between them, we firstly chose five representative assemblers belonging to the two classes respectively, and then investigated and compared their algorithm features in theory and real performances in practice. We found that all the methods can be reduced to graph reduction problems, yet they have different conceptual and practical implementations, thus each assembly method has its specific advantages and disadvantages, performing worse than others in certain aspects while outperforming others in anther aspects at the same time. Finally we merged assemblies of the five assemblers and obtained a much better assembly. Additionally we evaluated an assembler using genome-guided de novo assembly approach, and achieved good performance. Based on these results, we suggest that to obtain a comprehensive set of recovered transcripts, it is better to use a combination of de novo assembly and genome-guided assembly. PMID:23393030

  18. Achieving joint benefits from joint implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Moomaw, W.R.

    1995-11-01

    Joint Implementation (JI) appears to have been born with Applied Energy Services Guatemala project in 1988. That project, to plant 52 million trees, protect existing forests from cutting and fire, and enhance rural development, is being implemented by CARE Guatemala to offset 120 per cent of the emissions of a small coal burning power plant that has been built in Connecticut. Since that time, several utilities and governments have initiated additional projects. Not all of these necessarily consist of tree planting in other countries, but may consist of energy efficiency or energy conservation programs designed to reduce carbon emissions by at least as much as the additional releases from a new facility. All JI projects share the characteristic of linking the release of greenhouse gases in an industrial country with an offset that reduces or absorbs a comparable amount in another country. The emitter in the industrial country is willing to pay for the reduction elsewhere because costs are less than they would be at home.

  19. Phase 1 Program Joint Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nield, George C. (Editor); Vorobiev, Pavel Mikhailovich (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This report consists of inputs from each of the Phase I Program Joint Working Groups. The Working Groups were tasked to describe the organizational structure and work processes that they used during the program, joint accomplishments, lessons learned, and applications to the International Space Station Program. This report is a top-level joint reference document that contains information of interest to both countries.

  20. Double slotted socket spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2001-05-22

    A new class of spherical joints is disclosed. These spherical joints are capable of extremely large angular displacements (full cone angles in excess of 270.degree.), while exhibiting no singularities or dead spots in their range of motion. These joints can improve or simplify a wide range of mechanical devices.

  1. Swivel Joint For Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, James F.

    1988-01-01

    Swivel joint allows liquid-nitrogen pipe to rotate through angle of 100 degree with respect to mating pipe. Functions without cracking hard foam insulation on lines. Pipe joint rotates on disks so mechanical stress not transmitted to thick insulation on pipes. Inner disks ride on fixed outer disks. Disks help to seal pressurized liquid nitrogen flowing through joint.

  2. Development of a machine vision system for automated structural assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydow, P. Daniel; Cooper, Eric G.

    1992-01-01

    Research is being conducted at the LaRC to develop a telerobotic assembly system designed to construct large space truss structures. This research program was initiated within the past several years, and a ground-based test-bed was developed to evaluate and expand the state of the art. Test-bed operations currently use predetermined ('taught') points for truss structural assembly. Total dependence on the use of taught points for joint receptacle capture and strut installation is neither robust nor reliable enough for space operations. Therefore, a machine vision sensor guidance system is being developed to locate and guide the robot to a passive target mounted on the truss joint receptacle. The vision system hardware includes a miniature video camera, passive targets mounted on the joint receptacles, target illumination hardware, and an image processing system. Discrimination of the target from background clutter is accomplished through standard digital processing techniques. Once the target is identified, a pose estimation algorithm is invoked to determine the location, in three-dimensional space, of the target relative to the robots end-effector. Preliminary test results of the vision system in the Automated Structural Assembly Laboratory with a range of lighting and background conditions indicate that it is fully capable of successfully identifying joint receptacle targets throughout the required operational range. Controlled optical bench test results indicate that the system can also provide the pose estimation accuracy to define the target position.

  3. Progressive Damage Modeling of Durable Bonded Joint Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Lin, Shih-Yung; Smeltzer, Stan; Girolamo, Donato; Ghose, Sayata; Guzman, Juan C.; McCarville, Duglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of durable bonded joint technology for assembling composite structures for launch vehicles is being pursued for the U.S. Space Launch System. The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology applicable to a wide range of sandwich structures for a Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented Durable Redundant Joint. Both designs involve a honeycomb sandwich with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined with adhesively bonded doublers. Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage. For structures that include multiple materials, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be considered increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The joints were modeled using Abaqus parametric finite element models, in which damage was modeled with user-written subroutines. Each ply was meshed discretely, and layers of cohesive elements were used to account for delaminations and to model the adhesive layers. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and predicted failure mechanisms.

  4. Structural testing of the North Wind 250 composite rotor joint

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W; Link, H; Coleman, C

    1994-05-01

    The North Wind 250 wind turbine is under development at Northern Power Systems (NPS) in Moretown, VT. The turbine uses a unique, flow-through, teetered-rotor design. This design eliminates structural discontinuities at the blade/hub interface by fabricating the rotor as one continuous structural element. To accomplish this, the two blade spars are joined at the center of the rotor using a proprietary bonding technique. Fatigue tests were conducted on the full-scale rotor joint at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Subsequent tests are now underway to test the full-scale rotor and hub assembly to verify the design assumptions. The test articles were mounted in dedicated test fixtures. For the joint test, a constant moment was generated across the joint and parent material. Hydraulic actuators applied sinusoidal loading to the test article at levels equivalent to 90% of the extreme wind load for over one million cycles. When the loading was increased to 112% of the extreme wind load, the joint failed by buckling. Strain levels were monitored at 14 locations inside and outside of the blade joint during the test. The tests were used to qualify this critical element of the rotor for field testing and to provide information needed to improve the structural design of the joint.

  5. Joint hypermobility syndrome pain.

    PubMed

    Grahame, Rodney

    2009-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) was initially defined as the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the presence of joint laxity and hypermobility in otherwise healthy individuals. It is now perceived as a commonly overlooked, underdiagnosed, multifaceted, and multisystemic heritable disorder of connective tissue (HDCT), which shares many of the phenotypic features of other HDCTs such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Whereas the additional flexibility can confer benefits in terms of mobility and agility, adverse effects of tissue laxity and fragility can give rise to clinical consequences that resonate far beyond the confines of the musculoskeletal system. There is hardly a clinical specialty to be found that is not touched in one way or another by JHS. Over the past decade, it has become evident that of all the complications that may arise in JHS, chronic pain is arguably the most menacing and difficult to treat. PMID:19889283

  6. Laundry joint venture.

    PubMed

    Giancola, D; Voyvodich, M

    1984-12-01

    Many hospitals are concerned about the loss of control which is associated with contracting for linen service. On the the hand, many laundries do not have the resources or experience to serve hospitals in a comprehensive and trouble-free manner. In many communities a joint venture, such as the one described here, can successfully combine the interests of the hospital and laundry communities without causing the hospitals to lose control of the service and without requiring the laundry operator to have detailed knowledge of hospital operations. As more hospitals opt for contract service, and if this service is to be provided at the lowest total cost, the hospitals and the laundries must come to grips with the problems surrounding the laundry-hospital interface. A joint venture, such as that described here, is one way to accomplish this.

  7. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriy Y. Anistratov; Marvin L. Adams; Todd S. Palmer; Kord S. Smith; Kevin Clarno; Hikaru Hiruta; Razvan Nes

    2003-08-04

    OAK B202 Final Technical Report. The present generation of reactor analysis methods uses few-group nodal diffusion approximations to calculate full-core eigenvalues and power distributions. The cross sections, diffusion coefficients, and discontinuity factors (collectively called ''group constants'') in the nodal diffusion equations are parameterized as functions of many variables, ranging from the obvious (temperature, boron concentration, etc.) to the more obscure (spectral index, moderator temperature history, etc.). These group constants, and their variations as functions of the many variables, are calculated by assembly-level transport codes. The current methodology has two main weaknesses that this project addressed. The first weakness is the diffusion approximation in the full-core calculation; this can be significantly inaccurate at interfaces between different assemblies. This project used the nodal diffusion framework to implement nodal quasidiffusion equations, which can capture transport effects to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The second weakness is in the parameterization of the group constants; current models do not always perform well, especially at interfaces between unlike assemblies. The project developed a theoretical foundation for parameterization and homogenization models and used that theory to devise improved models. The new models were extended to tabulate information that the nodal quasidiffusion equations can use to capture transport effects in full-core calculations.

  8. Analysis of minor fractures associated with joints and faulted joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, Kenneth M.; Zhao, Guozhu; Johnson, Arvid M.

    In this paper, we use fracture mechanics to interpret conditions responsible for secondary cracks that adorn joints and faulted joints in the Entrada Sandstone in Arches National Park, U.S.A. Because the joints in most places accommodated shearing offsets of a few mm to perhaps 1 dm, and thus became faulted joints, some of the minor cracks are due to faulting. However, in a few places where the shearing was zero, one can examine minor cracks due solely to interaction of joint segments at the time they formed. We recognize several types of minor cracks associated with subsequent faulting of the joints. One is the kink, a crack that occurs at the termination of a straight joint and whose trend is abruptly different from that of the joint. Kinks are common and should be studied because they contain a great deal of information about conditions during fracturing. The sense of kinking indicates the sense of shear during faulting: a kink that turns clockwise with respect to the direction of the main joint is a result of right-lateral shear, and a kink that turns counterclockwise is a result of left-lateral shear. Furthermore, the kink angle is related to the ratio of the shear stress responsible for the kinking to the normal stress responsible for the opening of the joint. The amount of opening of a joint at the time it faulted or even at the time the joint itself formed can be estimated by measuring the kink angle and the amount of strike-slip at some point along the faulted joint. Other fractures that form near terminations of pre-existing joints in response to shearing along the joint are horsetail fractures. Similar short fractures can occur anywhere along the length of the joints. The primary value in recognizing these fractures is that they indicate the sense of faulting accommodated by the host fracture and the direction of maximum tension. Even where there has been insignificant regional shearing in the Garden Area, the joints can have ornate terminations. Perhaps

  9. Temporomandibular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Arun; Verma, Vishal; Singh, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an uncommon but debilitating condition of the facial skeleton. The condition may be acute or chronic. Acute TMJ dislocation is common in clinical practice and can be managed easily with manual reduction. Chronic recurrent TMJ dislocation is a challenging situation to manage. In this article, we discuss the comprehensive review of the different treatment modalities in managing TMJ dislocation. PMID:26668447

  10. Acromioclavicular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, J R

    1998-04-01

    The acromioclavicular joint is commonly involved in athletic injuries. Most commonly, a sprain to the joint occurs with variability in the amount of ligamentous damage and displacement that occurs. In all but the most severe dislocations, treatment consists of initial sling immobilization and early functional rehabilitation. The outcome is usually excellent with full return of function following these injuries. The rarer types (IV, V, and VI) require operative reduction and fixation. Distal clavicle fractures are related injuries, which many times disrupt the stabilizing ligaments of the acromioclavicular joint. Many can be treated nonoperatively, but there are several subtypes that should be considered for early fixation to reduce complications of pain and shoulder dysfunction. An atraumatic, overuse condition, which is becoming more prevalent and seems related to weight training, is osteolysis of the distal clavicle. There is insidious onset of shoulder pain with symptoms and signs consistent with acromioclavicular pathology. Activity modification is the best method of controlling symptoms. Failure of the conservative approach necessitates operative excision of the distal clavicle.

  11. Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Jennifer E.; Aitchison, Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    A space suit s mobility is critical to an astronaut s ability to perform work efficiently. As mobility increases, the astronaut can perform tasks for longer durations with less fatigue. The term mobility, with respect to space suits, is defined in terms of two key components: joint range of motion and joint torque. Individually these measures describe the path which in which a joint travels and the force required to move it through that path. Previous space suits mobility requirements were defined as the collective result of these two measures and verified by the completion of discrete functional tasks. While a valid way to impose mobility requirements, such a method does necessitate a solid understanding of the operational scenarios in which the final suit will be performing. Because the Constellation space suit system requirements are being finalized with a relatively immature concept of operations, the Space Suit Element team elected to define mobility in terms of its constituent parts to increase the likelihood that the future pressure garment will be mobile enough to enable a broad scope of undefined exploration activities. The range of motion requirements were defined by measuring the ranges of motion test subjects achieved while performing a series of joint maximizing tasks in a variety of flight and prototype space suits. The definition of joint torque requirements has proved more elusive. NASA evaluated several different approaches to the problem before deciding to generate requirements based on unmanned joint torque evaluations of six different space suit configurations being articulated through 16 separate joint movements. This paper discusses the experiment design, data analysis and results, and the process used to determine the final values for the Constellation pressure garment joint torque requirements.

  12. Vancomycin assembly: nature's way.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Brian K; Walsh, Christopher T

    2003-02-17

    Antibiotics are precious resources in the fight to combat bacterial infections caused by pathogenic organisms. Vancomycin is one of the antibiotics of last resort in the treatment of life-threatening infections by gram-positive bacteria. The rules by which nature assembles the glycopeptide (vancomycin) and lipoglycopeptide (teicoplanin) antibiotics are becoming elucidated and verified: first amino acids are synthesized, then joined together and cross-linked. This knowledge opens up approaches for reprogramming strategies at the level of altered monomers, swapped assembly lines, and different post-assembly tailoring enzymes.

  13. Protective helmet assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, Frederic S. (Inventor); Weiss, Fred R. (Inventor); Eck, John D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a protective helmet assembly with improved safety and impact resistance, high resistance to ignition and combustion, and reduced offgassing. The assembly comprises a hard rigid ballistic outer shell with one or more impact absorbing pads fitted to the interior surface. The pads are made of open cell flexible polyimide foam material, each of which is attached to the inner surface of the ballistic outer shell by cooperative VELCRO fastener strips of hook-and-loop material affixed respectively to the rigid outer shell and the impact absorbing pads. The helmet assembly with shell and pads is sized to fit relatively close over a wearer's head.

  14. TPX assembly plan

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, D.

    1993-11-01

    The TPX machine will be assembled in the TFTR Test Cell at the Plasma Physics Laboratory, utilizing the existing TFTR machine foundation. Preparation of the area for assembly will begin after completion of the decontamination and decommissioning phase on TFTR and certification that the radiation levels remaining, if any, are consistent with the types of operations planned. Assembly operations begin with the arrival of the first components, and conclude, approximately 24 months later, with the successful completion of the integrated systems tests and the achievement of a first plasma.

  15. DC source assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  16. Dual resin bonded joints in polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenak, Steve; Radford, Donald W.; Dean, Michael W.

    1993-04-01

    The paper describes applications of the dual resin (miscible polymer) bonding technique (Smiley, 1989) developed as an alternative to traditional bonding approaches to joining thermoplastic matrix composite subassemblies into structures. In the experiments, the performance of joint geometries, such as those that could be used to assemble large truss structures in space, are investigated using truss joint models consisting of woven carbon fiber/PEEK tubes of about 1 mm wall thickness. Specific process conditions and hand-held hardware used to apply heat and pressure were chosen to simulate a field asembly technique. Results are presented on tube/cruciform double lap shear tests, pinned-pinned tube compression tests, and single lap shear bond tests of joints obtained using the dual resin bonding technique.

  17. JOINT RIGIDITY ASSESSMENT WITH PIEZOELECTRIC WAFERS AND ACOUSTIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, Angela C.; Maji, Arup K.

    2010-02-22

    There has been an interest in the development of rapid deployment satellites. In a modular satellite design, different panels of specific functions can be pre-manufactured. The satellite can then be assembled and tested just prior to deployment. Traditional vibration testing is time-consuming and expensive. An alternative test method to evaluate the connection between two plates will be proposed. The method investigated and described employs piezoelectric wafers to induce and sense lamb waves in two aluminum plates, which were joined by steel brackets to form an 'L-Style' joint. Lamb wave behavior and piezoelectric material properties will be discussed; the experimental setup and results will be presented. A set of 4 piezoelectric ceramic wafers were used alternately as source and sensor. The energy transmitted was shown to correlate with a mechanical assessment of the joint, demonstrating that this method of testing is a feasible and reliable way to inspect the rigidity of joints.

  18. Joint Workshops. Performance Based Apprentice and Technical Training. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oriel, Arthur E.

    A series of five workshops were held to disseminate, to 39 industrial and college and 61 Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training (BAT) personnel, information about the principles, methods, and effectiveness of Performance Based Training (PBT) in apprentice programs. Following the workshops, 90% of the industrial and 61% of the BAT personnel…

  19. GAViT: Genome Assembly Visualization Tool for Short Read Data

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Aijazuddin; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Trong, Stephan

    2008-03-14

    It is a challenging job for genome analysts to accurately debug, troubleshoot, and validate genome assembly results. Genome analysts rely on visualization tools to help validate and troubleshoot assembly results, including such problems as mis-assemblies, low-quality regions, and repeats. Short read data adds further complexity and makes it extremely challenging for the visualization tools to scale and to view all needed assembly information. As a result, there is a need for a visualization tool that can scale to display assembly data from the new sequencing technologies. We present Genome Assembly Visualization Tool (GAViT), a highly scalable and interactive assembly visualization tool developed at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  20. Adhesive joint and composites modeling in SIERRA.

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Yuki; Brown, Arthur A.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Chambers, Robert S.; Foulk, James W., III

    2005-11-01

    Polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites play an important role in many Defense Program applications. Recently an advanced nonlinear viscoelastic model for polymers has been developed and incorporated into ADAGIO, Sandia's SIERRA-based quasi-static analysis code. Standard linear elastic shell and continuum models for fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites have also been added to ADAGIO. This report details the use of these models for advanced adhesive joint and composites simulations carried out as part of an Advanced Simulation and Computing Advanced Deployment (ASC AD) project. More specifically, the thermo-mechanical response of an adhesive joint when loaded during repeated thermal cycling is simulated, the response of some composite rings under internal pressurization is calculated, and the performance of a composite container subjected to internal pressurization, thermal loading, and distributed mechanical loading is determined. Finally, general comparisons between the continuum and shell element approaches for modeling composites using ADAGIO are given.

  1. Magnetic assembly-mediated enhancement of differentiation of mouse bone marrow cells cultured on magnetic colloidal assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianfei; Liu, Xuan; Huang, Jiqing; Song, Lina; Chen, Zihao; Liu, Haoyu; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2014-05-01

    Here we reported an interesting phenomenon that the field-induced assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles can promote the differentiation of primary mouse bone marrow cells into osteoblasts. The reason was thought to lie in the remnant magnetic interaction inside the assemblies which resulted from the magnetic field-directed assembly. Influence of the assemblies on the cells was realized by means of interface effect rather than the internalization effect. We fabricated a stripe-like assemblies array on the glass plate and cultured cells on this surface. We characterized the morphology of assemblies and measured the mechanic property as well as the magnetic property. The cellular differentiation was measured by staining and quantitative PCR. Finally, Fe uptake was excluded as the reason to cause the phenomenon.

  2. Magnetic assembly-mediated enhancement of differentiation of mouse bone marrow cells cultured on magnetic colloidal assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianfei; Liu, Xuan; Huang, Jiqing; Song, Lina; Chen, Zihao; Liu, Haoyu; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Here we reported an interesting phenomenon that the field-induced assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles can promote the differentiation of primary mouse bone marrow cells into osteoblasts. The reason was thought to lie in the remnant magnetic interaction inside the assemblies which resulted from the magnetic field-directed assembly. Influence of the assemblies on the cells was realized by means of interface effect rather than the internalization effect. We fabricated a stripe-like assemblies array on the glass plate and cultured cells on this surface. We characterized the morphology of assemblies and measured the mechanic property as well as the magnetic property. The cellular differentiation was measured by staining and quantitative PCR. Finally, Fe uptake was excluded as the reason to cause the phenomenon. PMID:24874764

  3. Selecting Superior De Novo Transcriptome Assemblies: Lessons Learned by Leveraging the Best Plant Genome

    PubMed Central

    Honaas, Loren A.; Wafula, Eric K.; Wickett, Norman J.; Der, Joshua P.; Zhang, Yeting; Edger, Patrick P.; Altman, Naomi S.; Pires, J. Chris; Leebens-Mack, James H.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2016-01-01

    Whereas de novo assemblies of RNA-Seq data are being published for a growing number of species across the tree of life, there are currently no broadly accepted methods for evaluating such assemblies. Here we present a detailed comparison of 99 transcriptome assemblies, generated with 6 de novo assemblers including CLC, Trinity, SOAP, Oases, ABySS and NextGENe. Controlled analyses of de novo assemblies for Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa transcriptomes provide new insights into the strengths and limitations of transcriptome assembly strategies. We find that the leading assemblers generate reassuringly accurate assemblies for the majority of transcripts. At the same time, we find a propensity for assemblers to fail to fully assemble highly expressed genes. Surprisingly, the instance of true chimeric assemblies is very low for all assemblers. Normalized libraries are reduced in highly abundant transcripts, but they also lack 1000s of low abundance transcripts. We conclude that the quality of de novo transcriptome assemblies is best assessed through consideration of a combination of metrics: 1) proportion of reads mapping to an assembly 2) recovery of conserved, widely expressed genes, 3) N50 length statistics, and 4) the total number of unigenes. We provide benchmark Illumina transcriptome data and introduce SCERNA, a broadly applicable modular protocol for de novo assembly improvement. Finally, our de novo assembly of the Arabidopsis leaf transcriptome revealed ~20 putative Arabidopsis genes lacking in the current annotation. PMID:26731733

  4. Selecting Superior De Novo Transcriptome Assemblies: Lessons Learned by Leveraging the Best Plant Genome.

    PubMed

    Honaas, Loren A; Wafula, Eric K; Wickett, Norman J; Der, Joshua P; Zhang, Yeting; Edger, Patrick P; Altman, Naomi S; Pires, J Chris; Leebens-Mack, James H; dePamphilis, Claude W

    2016-01-01

    Whereas de novo assemblies of RNA-Seq data are being published for a growing number of species across the tree of life, there are currently no broadly accepted methods for evaluating such assemblies. Here we present a detailed comparison of 99 transcriptome assemblies, generated with 6 de novo assemblers including CLC, Trinity, SOAP, Oases, ABySS and NextGENe. Controlled analyses of de novo assemblies for Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa transcriptomes provide new insights into the strengths and limitations of transcriptome assembly strategies. We find that the leading assemblers generate reassuringly accurate assemblies for the majority of transcripts. At the same time, we find a propensity for assemblers to fail to fully assemble highly expressed genes. Surprisingly, the instance of true chimeric assemblies is very low for all assemblers. Normalized libraries are reduced in highly abundant transcripts, but they also lack 1000s of low abundance transcripts. We conclude that the quality of de novo transcriptome assemblies is best assessed through consideration of a combination of metrics: 1) proportion of reads mapping to an assembly 2) recovery of conserved, widely expressed genes, 3) N50 length statistics, and 4) the total number of unigenes. We provide benchmark Illumina transcriptome data and introduce SCERNA, a broadly applicable modular protocol for de novo assembly improvement. Finally, our de novo assembly of the Arabidopsis leaf transcriptome revealed ~20 putative Arabidopsis genes lacking in the current annotation.

  5. Selecting Superior De Novo Transcriptome Assemblies: Lessons Learned by Leveraging the Best Plant Genome.

    PubMed

    Honaas, Loren A; Wafula, Eric K; Wickett, Norman J; Der, Joshua P; Zhang, Yeting; Edger, Patrick P; Altman, Naomi S; Pires, J Chris; Leebens-Mack, James H; dePamphilis, Claude W

    2016-01-01

    Whereas de novo assemblies of RNA-Seq data are being published for a growing number of species across the tree of life, there are currently no broadly accepted methods for evaluating such assemblies. Here we present a detailed comparison of 99 transcriptome assemblies, generated with 6 de novo assemblers including CLC, Trinity, SOAP, Oases, ABySS and NextGENe. Controlled analyses of de novo assemblies for Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa transcriptomes provide new insights into the strengths and limitations of transcriptome assembly strategies. We find that the leading assemblers generate reassuringly accurate assemblies for the majority of transcripts. At the same time, we find a propensity for assemblers to fail to fully assemble highly expressed genes. Surprisingly, the instance of true chimeric assemblies is very low for all assemblers. Normalized libraries are reduced in highly abundant transcripts, but they also lack 1000s of low abundance transcripts. We conclude that the quality of de novo transcriptome assemblies is best assessed through consideration of a combination of metrics: 1) proportion of reads mapping to an assembly 2) recovery of conserved, widely expressed genes, 3) N50 length statistics, and 4) the total number of unigenes. We provide benchmark Illumina transcriptome data and introduce SCERNA, a broadly applicable modular protocol for de novo assembly improvement. Finally, our de novo assembly of the Arabidopsis leaf transcriptome revealed ~20 putative Arabidopsis genes lacking in the current annotation. PMID:26731733

  6. Advanced membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Pivovar, Bryan S

    2014-02-25

    A method of preparing advanced membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) for use in fuel cells. A base polymer is selected for a base membrane. An electrode composition is selected to optimize properties exhibited by the membrane electrode assembly based on the selection of the base polymer. A property-tuning coating layer composition is selected based on compatibility with the base polymer and the electrode composition. A solvent is selected based on the interaction of the solvent with the base polymer and the property-tuning coating layer composition. The MEA is assembled by preparing the base membrane and then applying the property-tuning coating layer to form a composite membrane. Finally, a catalyst is applied to the composite membrane.

  7. Advanced membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2012-07-24

    A method of preparing advanced membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) for use in fuel cells. A base polymer is selected for a base membrane. An electrode composition is selected to optimize properties exhibited by the membrane electrode assembly based on the selection of the base polymer. A property-tuning coating layer composition is selected based on compatibility with the base polymer and the electrode composition. A solvent is selected based on the interaction of the solvent with the base polymer and the property-tuning coating layer composition. The MEA is assembled by preparing the base membrane and then applying the property-tuning coating layer to form a composite membrane. Finally, a catalyst is applied to the composite membrane.

  8. Interlocked molecules: Aqueous assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Linyi; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-12-01

    The quantitative self-assembly of mechanically interlocked molecules in water, instead of organic solvents, opens up the possibility of such systems being used in a biological context where their functions can be interfaced with biomolecular systems.

  9. Integrated thruster assembly program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The program is reported which has provided technology for a long life, high performing, integrated ACPS thruster assembly suitable for use in 100 typical flights of a space shuttle vehicle over a ten year period. The four integrated thruster assemblies (ITA) fabricated consisted of: propellant injector; a capacitive discharge, air gap torch type igniter assembly; fast response igniter and main propellant valves; and a combined regen-dump film cooled chamber. These flightweight 6672 N (1500 lb) thruster assemblies employed GH2/GO2 as propellants at a chamber pressure of 207 N/sq cm (300 psia). Test data were obtained on thrusted performance, thermal and hydraulic characteristics, dynamic response in pulsing, and cycle life. One thruster was fired in excess of 42,000 times.

  10. External Tank Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This photograph shows the liquid hydrogen tank and liquid oxygen tank for the Space Shuttle external tank (ET) being assembled in the weld assembly area of the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF). The ET provides liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen to the Shuttle's three main engines during the first eight 8.5 minutes of flight. At 154-feet long and more than 27-feet in diameter, the ET is the largest component of the Space Shuttle, the structural backbone of the entire Shuttle system, and the only part of the vehicle that is not reusable. The ET is manufactured at the Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans, Louisiana, by the Martin Marietta Corporation under management of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  11. Microtubule Self- Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jho, Yongseok; Choi, M. C.; Farago, O.; Kim, Mahnwon; Pincus, P. A.

    2008-03-01

    Microtubules are important structural elements for neurons. Microtubles are cylindrical pipes that are self-assembled from tubulin dimers, These structures are intimately related to the neuron transport system. Abnormal microtubule disintegration contributes to neuro-disease. For several decades, experimentalists investigated the structure of the microtubules using TEM and Cryo-EM. However, the detailed structure at a molecular level remain incompletely understood. . In this presentation, we report numerically studies of the self-assembly process using a toy model for tubulin dimers. We investigate the nature of the interactions which are essential to stabilize such the cylindrical assembly of protofilaments. We use Monte Carlo simulations to suggest the pathways for assembly and disassembly of the microtubules.

  12. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Kobsa, I.R.

    1994-02-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof. 12 figures.

  13. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Kobsa, Irvin R.

    1994-01-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

  14. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  15. Station Assembly Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the assembly of the International Space Station since Nov. 20, 1998, with the delivery of the Zarya module, through May 16, 2011, with the delivery of the EXPRESS Logistics C...

  16. The proteasome assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Madura, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of the proteasome — the cellular machine that eliminates unwanted proteins — is a carefully choreographed affair, involving a complex sequence of steps overseen by dedicated protein chaperones. PMID:19516331

  17. Swipe transfer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, Robert M.; Mills, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The swipe transfer assembly is a mechanical assembly which is used in conjunction with glove boxes and other sealed containments. It is used to pass small samples into or out of glove boxes without an open breach of the containment, and includes a rotational cylinder inside a fixed cylinder, the inside cylinder being rotatable through an arc of approximately 240.degree. relative to the outer cylinder. An offset of 120.degree. from end to end allows only one port to be opened at a time. The assembly is made of stainless steel or aluminum and clear acrylic plastic to enable visual observation. The assembly allows transfer of swipes and smears from radiological and other specially controlled environments.

  18. Mesoscale Polymer Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Satyan; Pham, Jonathan; Crosby, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Materials encompassing structural hierarchy and multi-functionality allow for remarkable physical properties across different length scales. Mesoscale Polymer (MSP) assemblies provide a critical link, from nanometer to centimeter scales, in the definition of such hierarchical structures. Recent focus has been on exploiting these MSP assemblies for optical, electronic, photonics and biological applications. We demonstrate a novel fabrication method for MSP assemblies. Current fabrication methods restrict the length scale and volume of such assemblies. A new method developed uses a simple piezo-actuated motion for de-pinning of a polymer solution trapped by capillary forces between a flexible blade and a rigid substrate. The advantages of new method include ability to make MSP of monodisperse length and to fabricate sufficient volumes of MSP to study their physical properties and functionality in liquid dispersions. We demonstrate the application of MSP as filler for soft materials, providing rheological studies of the MSP with surrounding matrices.

  19. VIRUS instrument collimator assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jennifer L.; DePoy, Darren L.; Prochaska, Travis; Allen, Richard D.; Williams, Patrick; Rheault, Jean-Philippe; Li, Ting; Nagasawa, Daniel Q.; Akers, Christopher; Baker, David; Boster, Emily; Campbell, Caitlin; Cook, Erika; Elder, Alison; Gary, Alex; Glover, Joseph; James, Michael; Martin, Emily; Meador, Will; Mondrik, Nicholas; Rodriguez-Patino, Marisela; Villanueva, Steven; Hill, Gary J.; Tuttle, Sarah; Vattiat, Brian; Lee, Hanshin; Chonis, Taylor S.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Tacon, Mike

    2014-07-01

    The Visual Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument is a baseline array 150 identical fiber fed optical spectrographs designed to support observations for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). The collimator subassemblies of the instrument have been assembled in a production line and are now complete. Here we review the design choices and assembly practices used to produce a suite of identical low-cost spectrographs in a timely fashion using primarily unskilled labor.

  20. ASSEMBLY OF PARALLEL PLATES

    DOEpatents

    Groh, E.F.; Lennox, D.H.

    1963-04-23

    This invention is concerned with a rigid assembly of parallel plates in which keyways are stamped out along the edges of the plates and a self-retaining key is inserted into aligned keyways. Spacers having similar keyways are included between adjacent plates. The entire assembly is locked into a rigid structure by fastening only the outermost plates to the ends of the keys. (AEC)

  1. High speed door assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, C.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  2. Recuperator assembly and procedures

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Yungmo; McKeirnan, Jr., Robert D.

    2008-08-26

    A construction of recuperator core segments is provided which insures proper assembly of the components of the recuperator core segment, and of a plurality of recuperator core segments. Each recuperator core segment must be constructed so as to prevent nesting of fin folds of the adjacent heat exchanger foils of the recuperator core segment. A plurality of recuperator core segments must be assembled together so as to prevent nesting of adjacent fin folds of adjacent recuperator core segments.

  3. Recuperator assembly and procedures

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Yungmo; McKeirnan, Jr., Robert D.

    2006-06-27

    A construction of recuperator core segments is provided which insures proper assembly of the components of the recuperator core segment, and of a plurality of recuperator core segments. Each recuperator core segment must be constructed so as to prevent nesting of fin folds of the adjacent heat exchanger foils of the recuperator core segment. A plurality of recuperator core segments must be assembled together so as to prevent nesting of adjacent fin folds of adjacent recuperator core segments.

  4. SUMC reconfigurable micro-assembler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a reconfigurable micro-assembler to provide the micro-programmer the capability to specify micro-instructions in concise, meaningful terms is discussed. The implementation plan for the development of the micro-assembler was predicted on the existing capabilities of the SUMC Reconfigurable Assembler. Utilizing the reconfigurable assembler as a base, new directives and existing directive modifications were implemented to provide the micro-assembly as a new capability of the reconfigurable assembler. The micro-assembler language allows the specification of all micro-instruction control field settings in one concise assembler source statement. The language appears very similar to a conventional machine instruction assembler language. The machine instruction assembler language has the characteristic of one operation specification per statement whereas, the micro-instruction assembler language allows multiple operations to be designated per statement.

  5. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  6. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  7. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  8. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  9. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  10. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  11. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  12. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  13. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  14. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  15. An update on complex I assembly: the assembly of players

    PubMed Central

    Vartak, Rasika S.; Semwal, Manpreet Kaur; Bai, Yidong

    2015-01-01

    Defects in Complex I assembly is one of the emerging underlying causes of severe mitochondrial disorders. The assembly of Complex I has been difficult to understand due to its large size, dual genetic control and the number of proteins involved. Mutations in Complex I subunits as well as assembly factors have been reported to hinder its assembly and give rise to a range of mitochondria disorders. In this review, we summarize the recent progress made in understanding the Complex I assembly pathway. In particularly, we focus on the known as well as novel assembly factors and their role in assembly of Complex I and human disease. PMID:25030182

  16. Influence of joint topology on the formation of brazed joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekulic, Dusan P.; Zellmer, Benjamin P.; Nigro, Nicholas

    2001-09-01

    This paper discusses the influence of joint topology on the formation of brazed joints. For the purposes of this study, the joint topology is defined by dimensionless parameters that characterize: (i) the geometry of the mating surfaces (shape and configuration), (ii) the gap between bonded parts (clearance and tolerances), (iii) the joint orientation in the gravity field and (iv) the volume of the joint. The influence of these parameters is presented for several joints with a topology that is typically found in the manufacture of compact heat exchangers. The results were obtained by employing a method that is based on a variational principle and minimization of the potential energy of the molten aluminium liquid metal just prior to the onset of solidification. The method, which was verified by comparison with experimental data obtained from controlled atmosphere brazing of aluminium alloys, is discussed in an accompanying paper.

  17. Joint hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fikree, Asma; Aziz, Qasim; Grahame, Rodney

    2013-05-01

    Although perceived as a rare condition, joint hypermobility syndrome is common. Its prevalence in rheumatology clinics is extremely high. Early estimates suggest that it may be the most common of all rheumatologic conditions. The problem lies in the general lack of awareness of the syndrome, its means of recognition, and the resultant failure to diagnose it correctly when present. It is a worldwide problem. This article provides an overview of hypermobility and hypermobility syndrome, stressing its multisystemic nature and the negative impact that it may have on quality of life, with particular reference to gastrointestinal involvement. PMID:23597972

  18. Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Scillia, Anthony J; Cain, E Lyle

    2015-12-01

    Our technique for acromioclavicular joint reconstruction provides a variation on coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction to also include acromioclavicular ligament reconstruction. An oblique acromial tunnel is drilled, and the medial limb of the gracilis graft, after being crossed and passed beneath the coracoid and through the clavicle, is passed through this acromial tunnel and sutured to the trapezoid graft limb after appropriate tensioning. Tenodesis screws are not placed in the bone tunnels to avoid graft fraying, and initial forces on the graft are offloaded with braided absorbable sutures passed around the clavicle. PMID:27284528

  19. Arthroscopy and joint lavage.

    PubMed

    Ayral, Xavier

    2005-06-01

    Arthroscopy is used by rheumatologists for research purposes in cases with knee osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthritis. This chapter explains the technical characteristics of 'research arthroscopy' including the simplification of the procedure, video-recording, as well as risks and training. Lavage of the knee joint is proposed as a treatment procedure for osteoarthritis and inflammatory and septic arthritis. Tidal irrigation and the two-needle technique of lavage are described. In the absence of clear predictive factors for efficacy, the indications for these techniques are a matter of debate. PMID:15939366

  20. Joint bone radiobiology workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Joint Bone Radiobiology Workshop was held on July 12--13, 1991 in Toronto, Canada. This document contains the papers presented at the meeting. The five sections were: Dose-effects, Endogenous Cofactors, Tumorigenesis, New Methods and Medical Implications. The papers covered risk assessment, tissue distribution of radionuclides, lifetime studies, biological half-lifes, the influence of age at time of exposure, tumor induction by different radionuclides, microscopic localization of radionuclides, and nuclear medicine issues including tissue distribution in the skeleton and bone marrow transplantation. (MHB)

  1. Surgery center joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Zasa, R J

    1999-01-01

    Surgery centers have been accepted as a cost effective, patient friendly vehicle for delivery of quality ambulatory care. Hospitals and physician groups also have made them the vehicles for coming together. Surgery centers allow hospitals and physicians to align incentives and share benefits. It is one of the few types of health care businesses physicians can own without anti-fraud and abuse violation. As a result, many surgery center ventures are now jointly owned by hospitals and physician groups. This article outlines common structures that have been used successfully to allow both to own and govern surgery centers.

  2. Development of Thermal Barriers for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed using conventional 0-ring seals. The 5500+F combustion gases are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of insulation. Special joint-fill compounds are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flowpath to the seals. On a number of occasions. NASA has observed in several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints hot gas penetration through defects in the joint- fill compound. The current nozzle-to-case joint design incorporates primary, secondary and wiper (inner-most) 0-rings and polysulfide joint-fill compound. In the current design, 1 out of 7 motors experience hot gas to the wiper 0-ring. Though the condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas to the wiper 0-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. NASA and solid rocket motor manufacturer Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and a thermal barrier, This paper presents burn-resistance, temperature drop, flow and resiliency test results for several types of NASA braided carbon-fiber thermal barriers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the thermal barriers when exposed to the flame of an oxy-acetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Thermal barriers braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over 6 minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Tests were performed on two thermal barrier braid architectures, denoted Carbon-3 and Carbon-6, to measure the temperature drop across and along the barrier in a compressed state when subjected to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch. Carbon-3 and Carbon-6 thermal barriers were excellent insulators causing temperature drops through their diameter of up to a 2800 and 2560 F. respectively. Gas temperature 1/4" downstream of the thermal barrier were within the

  3. Lightweight, all-metal hose assembly has high flexibility and strength over wide range of temperature and pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessing, L. L.

    1966-01-01

    Lightweight flexible, metal braid reinforced hose assembly is used in high and low pressure oxygen, helium, and hydrogen systems. These hose assemblies have been successfully used on the Saturn-2 stage to provide joints of sufficient flexibility to absorb movement resulting from temperature variations.

  4. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  5. Self-assembly from milli- to nanoscales: methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Mastrangeli, M; Abbasi, S; Varel, C; Van Hoof, C; Celis, J-P; Böhringer, K F

    2009-01-01

    The design and fabrication techniques for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanodevices are progressing rapidly. However, due to material and process flow incompatibilities in the fabrication of sensors, actuators and electronic circuitry, a final packaging step is often necessary to integrate all components of a heterogeneous microsystem on a common substrate. Robotic pick-and-place, although accurate and reliable at larger scales, is a serial process that downscales unfavorably due to stiction problems, fragility and sheer number of components. Self-assembly, on the other hand, is parallel and can be used for device sizes ranging from millimeters to nanometers. In this review, the state-of-the-art in methods and applications for self-assembly is reviewed. Methods for assembling three-dimensional (3D) MEMS structures out of two-dimensional (2D) ones are described. The use of capillary forces for folding 2D plates into 3D structures, as well as assembling parts onto a common substrate or aggregating parts to each other into 2D or 3D structures, is discussed. Shape matching and guided assembly by magnetic forces and electric fields are also reviewed. Finally, colloidal self-assembly and DNA-based self-assembly, mainly used at the nanoscale, are surveyed, and aspects of theoretical modeling of stochastic assembly processes are discussed. PMID:20209016

  6. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    DeTar, Carleton

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  7. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney, Kevin R.

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  8. Efficient Synergistic Single-Cell Genome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Narjes S; Embree, Mallory; Nagarajan, Harish; Zengler, Karsten; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    As the vast majority of all microbes are unculturable, single-cell sequencing has become a significant method to gain insight into microbial physiology. Single-cell sequencing methods, currently powered by multiple displacement genome amplification (MDA), have passed important milestones such as finishing and closing the genome of a prokaryote. However, the quality and reliability of genome assemblies from single cells are still unsatisfactory due to uneven coverage depth and the absence of scattered chunks of the genome in the final collection of reads caused by MDA bias. In this work, our new algorithm Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) demonstrates the power of coassembly of multiple single-cell genomic data sets through significant improvement of the assembly quality in terms of predicted functional elements and length statistics. Coassemblies contain significantly more base pairs and protein coding genes, cover more subsystems, and consist of longer contigs compared to individual assemblies by the same algorithm as well as state-of-the-art single-cell assemblers SPAdes and IDBA-UD. Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) is also able to avoid chimeric assemblies by detecting and separating shared and exclusive pieces of sequence for input data sets. By replacing one deep single-cell sequencing experiment with a few single-cell sequencing experiments of lower depth, the coassembly method can hedge against the risk of failure and loss of the sample, without significantly increasing sequencing cost. Application of the single-cell coassembler HyDA to the study of three uncultured members of an alkane-degrading methanogenic community validated the usefulness of the coassembly concept. HyDA is open source and publicly available at http://chitsazlab.org/software.html, and the raw reads are available at http://chitsazlab.org/research.html. PMID:27243002

  9. Efficient Synergistic Single-Cell Genome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Movahedi, Narjes S.; Embree, Mallory; Nagarajan, Harish; Zengler, Karsten; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    As the vast majority of all microbes are unculturable, single-cell sequencing has become a significant method to gain insight into microbial physiology. Single-cell sequencing methods, currently powered by multiple displacement genome amplification (MDA), have passed important milestones such as finishing and closing the genome of a prokaryote. However, the quality and reliability of genome assemblies from single cells are still unsatisfactory due to uneven coverage depth and the absence of scattered chunks of the genome in the final collection of reads caused by MDA bias. In this work, our new algorithm Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) demonstrates the power of coassembly of multiple single-cell genomic data sets through significant improvement of the assembly quality in terms of predicted functional elements and length statistics. Coassemblies contain significantly more base pairs and protein coding genes, cover more subsystems, and consist of longer contigs compared to individual assemblies by the same algorithm as well as state-of-the-art single-cell assemblers SPAdes and IDBA-UD. Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) is also able to avoid chimeric assemblies by detecting and separating shared and exclusive pieces of sequence for input data sets. By replacing one deep single-cell sequencing experiment with a few single-cell sequencing experiments of lower depth, the coassembly method can hedge against the risk of failure and loss of the sample, without significantly increasing sequencing cost. Application of the single-cell coassembler HyDA to the study of three uncultured members of an alkane-degrading methanogenic community validated the usefulness of the coassembly concept. HyDA is open source and publicly available at http://chitsazlab.org/software.html, and the raw reads are available at http://chitsazlab.org/research.html. PMID:27243002

  10. Self-Assembly of Tetraphenylalanine Peptides.

    PubMed

    Mayans, Enric; Ballano, Gema; Casanovas, Jordi; Díaz, Angélica; Pérez-Madrigal, Maria M; Estrany, Francesc; Puiggalí, Jordi; Cativiela, Carlos; Alemán, Carlos

    2015-11-16

    Three different tetraphenylalanine (FFFF) based peptides that differ at the N- and C-termini have been synthesized by using standard procedures to study their ability to form different nanoassemblies under a variety of conditions. The FFFF peptide assembles into nanotubes that show more structural imperfections at the surface than those formed by the diphenylalanine (FF) peptide under the same conditions. Periodic DFT calculations (M06L functional) were used to propose a model that consists of three FFFF molecules defining a ring through head-to-tail NH3(+)⋅⋅⋅(-)OOC interactions, which in turn stack to produce deformed channels with internal diameters between 12 and 16 Å. Depending on the experimental conditions used for the peptide incubation, N-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) protected FFFF self-assembles into a variety of polymorphs: ultra-thin nanoplates, fibrils, and star-like submicrometric aggregates. DFT calculations indicate that Fmoc-FFFF prefers a parallel rather than an antiparallel β-sheet assembly. Finally, coexisting multiple assemblies (up to three) were observed for Fmoc-FFFF-OBzl (OBzl = benzyl ester), which incorporates aromatic protecting groups at the two peptide terminals. This unusual and noticeable feature is attributed to the fact that the assemblies obtained by combining the Fmoc and OBzl groups contained in the peptide are isoenergetic.

  11. Early assembly of the most massive galaxies.

    PubMed

    Collins, Chris A; Stott, John P; Hilton, Matt; Kay, Scott T; Stanford, S Adam; Davidson, Michael; Hosmer, Mark; Hoyle, Ben; Liddle, Andrew; Lloyd-Davies, Ed; Mann, Robert G; Mehrtens, Nicola; Miller, Christopher J; Nichol, Robert C; Romer, A Kathy; Sahlén, Martin; Viana, Pedro T P; West, Michael J

    2009-04-01

    The current consensus is that galaxies begin as small density fluctuations in the early Universe and grow by in situ star formation and hierarchical merging. Stars begin to form relatively quickly in sub-galactic-sized building blocks called haloes which are subsequently assembled into galaxies. However, exactly when this assembly takes place is a matter of some debate. Here we report that the stellar masses of brightest cluster galaxies, which are the most luminous objects emitting stellar light, some 9 billion years ago are not significantly different from their stellar masses today. Brightest cluster galaxies are almost fully assembled 4-5 billion years after the Big Bang, having grown to more than 90 per cent of their final stellar mass by this time. Our data conflict with the most recent galaxy formation models based on the largest simulations of dark-matter halo development. These models predict protracted formation of brightest cluster galaxies over a Hubble time, with only 22 per cent of the stellar mass assembled at the epoch probed by our sample. Our findings suggest a new picture in which brightest cluster galaxies experience an early period of rapid growth rather than prolonged hierarchical assembly.

  12. Dataglove measurement of joint angles in sign language handshapes

    PubMed Central

    Eccarius, Petra; Bour, Rebecca; Scheidt, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    In sign language research, we understand little about articulatory factors involved in shaping phonemic boundaries or the amount (and articulatory nature) of acceptable phonetic variation between handshapes. To date, there exists no comprehensive analysis of handshape based on the quantitative measurement of joint angles during sign production. The purpose of our work is to develop a methodology for collecting and visualizing quantitative handshape data in an attempt to better understand how handshapes are produced at a phonetic level. In this pursuit, we seek to quantify the flexion and abduction angles of the finger joints using a commercial data glove (CyberGlove; Immersion Inc.). We present calibration procedures used to convert raw glove signals into joint angles. We then implement those procedures and evaluate their ability to accurately predict joint angle. Finally, we provide examples of how our recording techniques might inform current research questions. PMID:23997644

  13. High performance low cost interconnections for flip chip attachment with electrically conductive adhesive. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This final report is a compilation of final reports from each of the groups participating in the program. The main three groups involved in this effort are the Thomas J. Watson Research Center of IBM Corporation in Yorktown Heights, New York, Assembly Process Design of IBM Corporation in Endicott, New York, and SMT Laboratory of Universal Instruments Corporation in Binghamton, New York. The group at the research center focused on the conductive adhesive materials development and characterization. The group in process development focused on processing of the Polymer-Metal-Solvent Paste (PMSP) to form conductive adhesive bumps, formation of the Polymer-Metal Composite (PMC) on semiconductor devices and study of the bonding process to circuitized organic carriers, and the long term durability and reliability of joints formed using the process. The group at Universal Instruments focused on development of an equipment set and bonding parameters for the equipment to produce bond assembly tooling. Reports of each of these individual groups are presented here reviewing their technical efforts and achievements.

  14. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Pulak

    2013-04-01

    The overall goal of this project was the exploration of new ways to make organic and hybrid (organic-inorganic) materials for energy-related applications. Towards this end, our research focused on the structure and behavior of molecular monolayers at interfaces (including floating monolayers, transferred Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers, and self-assembled monolayers), as well as the biomimetic nucleation of inorganic crystals at soft-hard interfaces. The project resulted in a number of 'firsts' and other notable achievements, which are described in the report.

  15. Assemblies of Conformal Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Assemblies of tanks having shapes that conform to each other and/or conform to other proximate objects have been investigated for use in storing fuels and oxidizers in small available spaces in upper stages of spacecraft. Such assemblies might also prove useful in aircraft, automobiles, boats, and other terrestrial vehicles in which space available for tanks is limited. The basic concept of using conformal tanks to maximize the utilization of limited space is not new in itself: for example, conformal tanks are used in some automobiles to store windshield -washer liquid and coolant that overflows from radiators. The novelty of the present development lies in the concept of an assembly of smaller conformal tanks, as distinguished from a single larger conformal tank. In an assembly of smaller tanks, it would be possible to store different liquids in different tanks. Even if the same liquid were stored in all the tanks, the assembly would offer an advantage by reducing the mechanical disturbance caused by sloshing of fuel in a single larger tank: indeed, the requirement to reduce sloshing is critical in some applications. The figure shows a prototype assembly of conformal tanks. Each tank was fabricated by (1) copper plating a wax tank mandrel to form a liner and (2) wrapping and curing layers of graphite/epoxy composite to form a shell supporting the liner. In this case, the conformal tank surfaces are flat ones where they come in contact with the adjacent tanks. A band of fibers around the outside binds the tanks together tightly in the assembly, which has a quasi-toroidal shape. For proper functioning, it would be necessary to maintain equal pressure in all the tanks.

  16. Analytical Study for Stress Wave Interaction with Rock Joints Having Unequally Close-Open Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Zhao, X. B.; Li, H. B.; Chai, S. B.; Zhao, Q. H.

    2016-08-01

    Stress wave interaction with rock joints during wave propagation is usually dependent on the dynamic response of the joints. During wave propagation, joints may be closed and open under the effects of the stress wave and the in situ stress. A joint in nature can only resist load during close process. In this paper, the close and open behaviors of rock joints are considered to be different. The joints are assumed to be linearly elastic in close status but turn into free surfaces in open status. Wave propagation equation across joints with unequally close-open behavior is first derived and expressed as a time-differential form based on the displacement discontinuity method. SHPB test recording is then adopted to verify the present approach, which is also compared with the results from existing methods for joints with equally close-open behavior. Next, analysis is conduced for wave propagation across a single joint and a set of parallel joints with unequally close-open behavior, respectively. From the analysis, effects of unequally close-open behavior of a joint on wave propagation and the dynamic response of the joint are studied finally.

  17. A mobile work station concept for mechanically aided astronaut assembly of large space trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, W. L., Jr.; Bush, H. G.; Wallson, R. E.; Jensen, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents results of a series of truss assembly tests conducted to evaluate a mobile work station concept intended to mechanically assist astronaut manual assembly of erectable space trusses. The tests involved assembly of a tetrahedral truss beam by a pair of test subjects with and without pressure (space) suits, both in Earth gravity and in simulated zero gravity (neutral buoyancy in water). The beam was assembled from 38 identical graphite-epoxy nestable struts, 5.4 m in length with aluminum quick-attachment structural joints. Struts and joints were designed to closely simulate flight hardware. The assembled beam was approximately 16.5 m long and 4.5 m on each of the four sides of its diamond-shaped cross section. The results show that average in-space assembly rates of approximately 38 seconds per strut can be expected for struts of comparable size. This result is virtually independent of the overall size of the structure being assembled. The mobile work station concept would improve astronaut efficiency for on-orbit manual assembly of truss structures, and also this assembly-line method is highly competitive with other construction methods being considered for large space structures.

  18. Glenohumeral Joint Injections

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christopher; Dhawan, Aman; Harwood, Daniel; Gochanour, Eric; Romeo, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Context: Intra-articular injections into the glenohumeral joint are commonly performed by musculoskeletal providers, including orthopaedic surgeons, family medicine physicians, rheumatologists, and physician assistants. Despite their frequent use, there is little guidance for injectable treatments to the glenohumeral joint for conditions such as osteoarthritis, adhesive capsulitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence Acquisition: We performed a comprehensive review of the available literature on glenohumeral injections to help clarify the current evidence-based practice and identify deficits in our understanding. We searched MEDLINE (1948 to December 2011 [week 1]) and EMBASE (1980 to 2011 [week 49]) using various permutations of intra-articular injections AND (corticosteroid OR hyaluronic acid) and (adhesive capsulitis OR arthritis). Results: We identified 1 and 7 studies that investigated intra-articular corticosteroid injections for the treatment of osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. Two and 3 studies investigated the use of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. One study compared corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and another discussed adhesive capsulitis. Conclusion: Based on existing studies and their level of evidence, there is only expert opinion to guide corticosteroid injection for osteoarthritis as well as hyaluronic acid injection for osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis. PMID:24427384

  19. The acromioclavicular joint.

    PubMed

    Montellese, Phyllis; Dancy, Timothy

    2004-12-01

    Acute injuries of the AC joint have a limited differential diagnosis. A thorough examination and appropriate radiographs can identify nearly all problems while ruling out tumors as a causal factor. AC injury frequently occurs with other fractures, dislocations, or soft tissue injury around the shoulder. The single unifying diagnosis one searches for in medical conditions is frequently absent in musculoskeletal injury. For effective management of AC separations, the primary care physician need only distinguish type I, II, and III injuries from surgically treated type IV, V, and VI injuries. Types I, II, and III injuries should be treated with pain control and progressive rehabilitation as described previously. Patients who have types IV, V, and VI injuries should be referred to an orthopedic surgeon. Chronic injuries of the AC joint are also clearly diagnosed by appropriate physical examination and radiographs. Steroid injections can aid in the diagnosis and management of these conditions. Injury to one shoulder component predisposes to other shoulder injuries. A thorough examination will reveal these other associated abnormalities that may not be part of the presenting complaint. With practice in the examination of the shoulder and intra-articular injections, the primary care physician can effectively treat most common AC conditions. Only after conservative measures fail is it necessary to refer the patient for surgical management.

  20. Jointly Sponsored Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Everett A. Sondreal; John G. Hendrikson; Thomas A. Erickson

    2009-03-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40321 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying highly efficient, nonpolluting energy systems that meet the nation's requirements for clean fuels, chemicals, and electricity in the 21st century. The EERC in partnership with its nonfederal partners jointly performed 131 JSRP projects for which the total DOE cost share was $22,716,634 (38%) and the nonfederal share was $36,776,573 (62%). Summaries of these projects are presented in this report for six program areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, and (6) advanced materials. The work performed under this agreement addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration; near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources.

  1. Dynamic characteristics of vibration isolation platforms considering the joints of the struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingrui; Guo, Zixi; Zhang, Yao

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the dynamic characteristics of the impacts and corresponding frictions generated by the clearances of joints of vibration isolation platforms for control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) on spacecraft. A contact force model is applied using a nonlinear contact force model, and the frictions in the joints are considered in the dynamic analysis. First, the dynamic characteristics of a single isolation strut with spherical joints were studied, and joints with different initial clearance sizes were separately analyzed. Then, dynamic models of the vibration isolation platform for a CMG cluster with both perfect joints and joints with clearances were established. During the numeral simulation, joints with different elastic moduli were used to study the nonlinear characteristics. Finally, the distributions of the collision points, which can serve as a reference for the reliability and lifetime of a platform, were given.

  2. Hybrid microcircuit board assembly with lead-free solders

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.; Hernandez, C.L.; Rejent, J.A.

    2000-01-11

    An assessment was made of the manufacturability of hybrid microcircuit test vehicles assembled using three Pb-free solder compositions 96.5Sn--3.5Ag (wt.%), 91.84Sn--3.33Ag--4.83Bi, and 86.85Sn--3.15Ag--5.0Bi--5.0Au. The test vehicle substrate was 96% alumina; the thick film conductor composition was 76Au--21Pt--3Pd. Excellent registration between the LCCC or chip capacitor packages and the thick film solder pads was observed. Reduced wetting of bare (Au-coated) LCCC castellations was eliminated by hot solder dipping the I/Os prior to assembly of the circuit card. The Pb-free solders were slightly more susceptible to void formation, but not to a degree that would significantly impact joint functionality. Microstructural damage, while noted in the Sn-Pb solder joints, was not observed in the Pb-free interconnects.

  3. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  4. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, John V.; Novak, Robert F.; McBride, James R.

    1991-01-01

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  5. Intraarticular osteoblastoma with subluxation of the hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kyoji; Nagasawa, Hiroyuki; Chida, Schuichi; Nanjo, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 5 Final Diagnosis: Osteoblastoma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: Osteoblastomas are relatively uncommon bone tumors that account for <1% of all bone tumors. They usually occur in the medullary region of the bone. As such, intraarticular osteoblastomas are quite rare. Case Report: In this report, we present the case of a 5-year-old boy who presented with vague pain and subluxation of the hip joint due to an intraarticular osteoblastoma. Radiological examinations showed an irregular calcified mass lesion in the hip joint. The final diagnosis of osteoblastoma was made by histological examination. The patient’s symptoms completely subsided following surgical removal of the tumor. Conclusions: Osteoblastomas can occur in the intraarticular region. Although quite rare, osteoblastoma should be considered among the differential diagnoses for patients with pain and subluxation of the hip joint. PMID:23901353

  6. Ball-joint grounding ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aperlo, P. J. A.; Buck, P. A.; Weldon, V. A.

    1981-01-01

    In ball and socket joint where electrical insulator such as polytetrafluoroethylene is used as line to minimize friction, good electrical contact across joint may be needed for lightning protection or to prevent static-charge build-up. Electrical contact is maintained by ring of spring-loaded fingers mounted in socket. It may be useful in industry for cranes, trailers, and other applications requiring ball and socket joint.

  7. OIG targets contractual joint ventures.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Patrick K

    2003-09-01

    A recent OIG Special Advisory Bulletin raises questions for providers involved in joint ventures. The Bulletin describes several characteristics that the OIG views as potentially suspect, including a referral stream controlled by the provider initiating the joint venture and the use of a wholly owned subsidiary of the provider to bill and collect for services. According to the OIG, profits paid by the subsidiary to the provider owner in such "suspect contractual joint ventures" could constitute illegal remuneration for referrals.

  8. Response of shrink fitted assemblies to the dynamic torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajakumar, D. Ramesh

    2012-05-01

    Product design is mostly centered around design of different contact pairs. Among contact pairs, interference fit pair is widely used. Design of interference fits, involves not only dimensional interference, but also condition of interface between mating surfaces. Factors such as texture of interface, hardness of interface material and also physical properties of contacting materials influence the functional characteristics of interference shrink fitted assemblies. In actual practice most of such joints are subjected to dynamic loading. Data on torsion response is only limited. So that, detailed investigation on the influence of dimensional interference, contact length and interfacial properties (electroless nickel coating) on torsion capacity of interference fitted assemblies has been carried out. The response of interference fitted assemblies to dynamic torsion load has been evaluated, using L-9 Orthogonal array of experimental conditions to bring down the number of experiments. The results are analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) to find out the individual effects of parameter on dynamic loading. The Torque load carrying capacity of the shrink fitted assemblies is improved by electroless nickel coating. This could be attributed to the increase in actual contact area and tenacity of Nickel plating and presence of strong molecular bonds between the mating parts chosen for the assemblies. But the selection of interference, contact length and hardness of mating parts play a vital role in deciding the performance of these joints. The results clearly indicate that the dynamic performance of the assemblies could be improved by suitably selecting the materials keeping in mind the above factors. It is also found from the ANOVA results that the assemblies with (hardness) coated interlayer performed better. Interference and contact length also has influence on the strength but in this case their influence is not very significant. An expression is obtained using

  9. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  10. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, F.M.; Anderson, E.K.; Robinson, C.W.; Haynes, H.B.

    1999-05-11

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity is disclosed. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras. 17 figs.

  11. Expression of joint moment in the joint coordinate system.

    PubMed

    Desroches, Guillaume; Chèze, Laurence; Dumas, Raphaël

    2010-11-01

    The question of using the nonorthogonal joint coordinate system (JCS) to report joint moments has risen in the literature. However, the expression of joint moments in a nonorthogonal system is still confusing. The purpose of this paper is to present a method to express any 3D vector in a nonorthogonal coordinate system. The interpretation of these expressions in the JCS is clarified and an example for the 3D joint moment vector at the shoulder and the knee is given. A nonorthogonal projection method is proposed based on the mixed product. These nonorthogonal projections represent, for a 3D joint moment vector, the net mechanical action on the JCS axes. Considering the net mechanical action on each axis seems important in order to assess joint resistance in the JCS. The orthogonal projections of the same 3D joint moment vector on the JCS axes can be characterized as "motor torque." However, this interpretation is dependent on the chosen kinematic model. The nonorthogonal and orthogonal projections of shoulder joint moment during wheelchair propulsion and knee joint moment during walking were compared using root mean squares (rmss). rmss showed differences ranging from 6 N m to 22.3 N m between both projections at the shoulder, while differences ranged from 0.8 N m to 3.0 N m at the knee. Generally, orthogonal projections were of lower amplitudes than nonorthogonal projections at both joints. The orthogonal projection on the proximal or distal coordinates systems represents the net mechanical actions on each axis, which is not the case for the orthogonal projection (i.e., motor torque) on JCS axes. In order to represent the net action at the joint in a JCS, the nonorthogonal projection should be used.

  12. Non destructive evaluation of adhesively bonded carbon fiber reinforced composite lap joints with varied bond quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, R. L.; Bhat, M. R.; Murthy, C. R. L.

    2012-05-01

    Structural adhesive bonding is widely used to execute assemblies in automobile and aerospace structures. The quality and reliability of these bonded joints must be ensured during service. In this context non destructive evaluation of these bonded structures play an important role. Evaluation of adhesively bonded composite single lap shear joints has been attempted through experimental approach. Series of tests, non-destructive as well as destructive were performed on different sets of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite lap joint specimens with varied bond quality. Details of the experimental investigations carried out and the outcome are presented in this paper.

  13. Task representation in individual and joint settings

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines a framework for task representation and discusses applications to interference tasks in individual and joint settings. The framework is derived from the Theory of Event Coding (TEC). This theory regards task sets as transient assemblies of event codes in which stimulus and response codes interact and shape each other in particular ways. On the one hand, stimulus and response codes compete with each other within their respective subsets (horizontal interactions). On the other hand, stimulus and response code cooperate with each other (vertical interactions). Code interactions instantiating competition and cooperation apply to two time scales: on-line performance (i.e., doing the task) and off-line implementation (i.e., setting the task). Interference arises when stimulus and response codes overlap in features that are irrelevant for stimulus identification, but relevant for response selection. To resolve this dilemma, the feature profiles of event codes may become restructured in various ways. The framework is applied to three kinds of interference paradigms. Special emphasis is given to joint settings where tasks are shared between two participants. Major conclusions derived from these applications include: (1) Response competition is the chief driver of interference. Likewise, different modes of response competition give rise to different patterns of interference; (2) The type of features in which stimulus and response codes overlap is also a crucial factor. Different types of such features give likewise rise to different patterns of interference; and (3) Task sets for joint settings conflate intraindividual conflicts between responses (what), with interindividual conflicts between responding agents (whom). Features of response codes may, therefore, not only address responses, but also responding agents (both physically and socially). PMID:26029085

  14. Rotary Joint for Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shauback, R.

    1986-01-01

    Rotary joint exchanges heat between two heat pipes - one rotating and one stationary. Joint accommodates varying heat loads with little temperature drop across interface. According to concept, heat pipe enters center of disklike stationary section of joint. There, wicks in central artery of heat pipe separate into multiple strands that lead to concentric channels on rotaryinterface side of stationary disk. Thin layer of liquid sodium/potassium alloy carries heat from one member of rotary joint to other. Liquid conducts heat efficiently while permitting relative motion between members. Polypropylene rings contain liquid without interfering with rotation.

  15. Variable Joint Elasticities in Running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Stephan; Grimmer, Sten; Lipfert, Susanne W.; Seyfarth, Andre

    In this paper we investigate how spring-like leg behavior in human running is represented at joint level. We assume linear torsion springs in the joints and between the knee and the ankle joint. Using experimental data of the leg dynamics we compute how the spring parameters (stiffness and rest angles) change during gait cycle. We found that during contact the joints reveal elasticity with strongly changing parameters and compare the changes of different parameters for different spring arrangements. The results may help to design and improve biologically inspired spring mechanisms with adjustable parameters.

  16. Minimal absent words in four human genome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Sara P; Pinho, Armando J

    2011-01-01

    Minimal absent words have been computed in genomes of organisms from all domains of life. Here, we aim to contribute to the catalogue of human genomic variation by investigating the variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species, using four human genome assemblies. We compare the reference human genome GRCh37 assembly, the HuRef assembly of the genome of Craig Venter, the NA12878 assembly from cell line GM12878, and the YH assembly of the genome of a Han Chinese individual. We find the variation in number and content of minimal absent words between assemblies more significant for large and very large minimal absent words, where the biases of sequencing and assembly methodologies become more pronounced. Moreover, we find generally greater similarity between the human genome assemblies sequenced with capillary-based technologies (GRCh37 and HuRef) than between the human genome assemblies sequenced with massively parallel technologies (NA12878 and YH). Finally, as expected, we find the overall variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species to be generally smaller than the variation between species.

  17. Assembly modeling for plan generation and DFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelamkavil, Joseph

    2000-10-01

    Assembly in the state when a product really comes to life and is able to function; a product achieves its functionality by the concerted efforts of its components. Assembling consists of the act of putting two or more components together; but behind the scenes work includes many activities necessary to realize a complete product, repair it, disassemble it for recycling or disposal and so on. During the past two decades or so, several methodologies- graph theory, matrix algebra, knowledge-based, object-oriented, etc. - have evolved for the modeling of assemblies. Each method has its own merit; but the suitability and practicality of a method often depends on the computer hardware capability and the state of available software language features (expression capability and libraries). Generally speaking, the modeling of assemblies involves a two step process: component relationship modeling and detailed CAD modeling. Product designers use the components relationship models, often informally, to complete their design. This paper describes the modeling techniques and implementation details pertaining to the component relations. Matrix algebra-based modeling framework that is used in this work is capable of representing product final assemblies, sub-assemblies and individual components. The framework has the required expression capability that may be used to perform bill of materials calculations, material requirements planning, the creation of assembly liaison or mating information, design for assembly (DFA) analysis and the generation of assembly plans/sequences.

  18. 77 FR 58204 - International Joint Commission Invites Public Comment on Upper Great Lakes Report via...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... International Joint Commission Invites Public Comment on Upper Great Lakes Report via Teleconference and Extends Public Comment Period The International Joint Commission (IJC) announced that it is holding a teleconference to invite public comment on the final report of its International Upper Great Lakes Study...

  19. Power module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Jeremy B.; Newson, Steve

    2011-11-15

    A power module assembly of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicular power inverter, wherein the power inverter has a grounded chassis, is provided. The power module assembly comprises a conductive base layer electrically coupled to the chassis, an insulating layer disposed on the conductive base layer, a first conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, a second conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, wherein the first and second conductive nodes are electrically isolated from each other. The power module assembly also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the first conductive node, and further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the second conductive node.

  20. Blade attachment assembly

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell; Miller, Diane Patricia

    2016-05-03

    An assembly and method for affixing a turbomachine rotor blade to a rotor wheel are disclosed. In an embodiment, an adaptor member is provided disposed between the blade and the rotor wheel, the adaptor member including an adaptor attachment slot that is complementary to the blade attachment member, and an adaptor attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot. A coverplate is provided, having a coverplate attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot, and a hook for engaging the adaptor member. When assembled, the coverplate member matingly engages with the adaptor member, and retains the blade in the adaptor member, and the assembly in the rotor wheel.

  1. Liaison based assembly design

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, A.; Kholwadwala, D.; Wilson, R.H.

    1996-12-01

    Liaison Based Assembly Design extends the current information infrastructure to support design in terms of kinematic relationships between parts, or liaisons. These liaisons capture information regarding contact, degrees-of-freedom constraints and containment relationships between parts in an assembly. The project involved defining a useful collection of liaison representations, investigating their properties, and providing for maximum use of the data in downstream applications. We tested our ideas by implementing a prototype system involving extensions to Pro/Engineer and the Archimedes assembly planner. With an expanded product model, the design system is more able to capture design intent. When a product update is attempted, increased knowledge availability improves our ability to understand the effect of design changes. Manufacturing and analysis disciplines benefit from having liaison information available, so less time is wasted arguing over incomplete design specifications and our enterprise can be more completely integrated.

  2. Optical interconnect assembly

    DOEpatents

    Laughlin, Daric; Abel, Philip

    2015-06-09

    An optical assembly includes a substrate with a first row of apertures and a second row of apertures. A first optical die includes a first plurality of optical transducer elements and is mounted on the substrate such that an optical signal interface of each transducer element is aligned with an aperture of the first row of optical apertures. A second optical die includes a second plurality of optical transducer elements and is mounted on the substrate such that an optical signal interface of each of the second plurality of optical transducer elements is aligned with an aperture of the second row of optical apertures. A connector configured to mate with the optical assembly supports a plurality of optical fibers. A terminal end of each optical fiber protrudes from the connector and extends into one of the apertures when the connector is coupled with the optical assembly.

  3. Supported PV module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Mascolo, Gianluigi; Taggart, David F.; Botkin, Jonathan D.; Edgett, Christopher S.

    2013-10-15

    A supported PV assembly may include a PV module comprising a PV panel and PV module supports including module supports having a support surface supporting the module, a module registration member engaging the PV module to properly position the PV module on the module support, and a mounting element. In some embodiments the PV module registration members engage only the external surfaces of the PV modules at the corners. In some embodiments the assembly includes a wind deflector with ballast secured to a least one of the PV module supports and the wind deflector. An array of the assemblies can be secured to one another at their corners to prevent horizontal separation of the adjacent corners while permitting the PV modules to flex relative to one another so to permit the array of PV modules to follow a contour of the support surface.

  4. In vitro kinetochore assembly

    PubMed Central

    Miell, Matthew D D; Straight, Aaron F

    2016-01-01

    The kinetochore is the primary site of interaction between chromosomes and microtubules of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation. The kinetochore is a complex of more than 100 proteins that transiently assemble during mitosis at a single defined region on each chromosome, known as the centromere. Kinetochore assembly and activity must be tightly regulated to ensure proper microtubule interaction and faithful chromosome segregation because perturbation of kinetochores often results in aneuploidy and cell lethality. As such, cell free and reconstituted systems to analyze kinetochore formation and function are invaluable in probing the biochemical activities of kinetochores. In vitro approaches to studying kinetochores have enabled the manipulation of kinetochore protein structure, function, interactions and regulation that are not possible in cells. Here we outline a cell-free approach for the assembly of centromeres and recruitment of functional kinetochores that enables their manipulation and analysis. PMID:27193846

  5. Nondestructive Evaluation of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Rossettos, J. N.

    1997-01-01

    The final report consists of 5 published papers in referred journals and a technical letter to the technical monitor. These papers include the following: (1) Comparison of the effects of debonds and voids in adhesive; (2) On the peak shear stresses in adhesive joints with voids; (3) Nondestructive evaluation of adhesively bonded joints by acousto-ultrasonic technique and acoustic emission; (4) Multiaxial fatigue life evaluation of tubular adhesively bonded joints; (5) Theoretical and experimental evaluation of the bond strength under peeling loads. The letter outlines the progress of the research. Also included is preliminary information on the study of nondestructive evaluation of composite materials subjected to localized heat damage. The investigators studied the effects of localized heat on unidirectional fiber glass epoxy composite panels. Specimens of the fiber glass epoxy composites were subjected to 400 C heat for varying lengths of time. The specimens were subjected to nondestructive tests. The specimens were then pulled to their failure and acoustic emission of these specimens were measured. The analysis of the data was continuing as of the writing of the letter, and includes a finite element stress analysis of the problem.

  6. Three-year-olds' understanding of the consequences of joint commitments.

    PubMed

    Gräfenhain, Maria; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Here we investigate the extent of children's understanding of the joint commitments inherent in joint activities. Three-year-old children either made a joint commitment to assemble a puzzle with a puppet partner, or else the child and puppet each assembled their own puzzle. Afterwards, children who had made the joint commitment were more likely to stop and wait for their partner on their way to fetch something, more likely to spontaneously help their partner when needed, and more likely to take over their partner's role when necessary. There was no clear difference in children's tendency to tattle on their partner's cheating behavior or their tendency to distribute rewards equally at the end. It thus appears that by 3 years of age making a joint commitment to act together with others is beginning to engender in children a "we"-intentionality which holds across at least most of the process of the joint activity until the shared goal is achieved, and which withstands at least some of the perturbations to the joint activity children experience. PMID:24023805

  7. Joint shape morphogenesis precedes cavitation of the developing hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Nowlan, Niamh C; Sharpe, James

    2014-01-01

    The biology and mechanobiology of joint cavitation have undergone extensive investigation, but we have almost no understanding of the development of joint shape. Joint morphogenesis, the development of shape, has been identified as the ‘least understood aspect of joint formation’ (2005, Birth Defects Res C Embryo Today 75, 237), despite the clinical relevance of shape morphogenesis to postnatal skeletal malformations such as developmental dysplasia of the hip. In this study, we characterise development of early hip joint shape in the embryonic chick using direct capture 3D imaging. Contrary to formerly held assumptions that cavitation precedes morphogenesis in joint development, we have found that the major anatomical features of the adult hip are present at Hamburger Hamilton (HH)32, a full day prior to cavitation of the joint at HH34. We also reveal that the pelvis undergoes significant changes in orientation with respect to the femur, despite the lack of a joint cavity between the rudiments. Furthermore, we have identified the appearance of the ischium and pubis several developmental stages earlier than was previously reported, illustrating the value and importance of direct capture 3D imaging. PMID:24266523

  8. Flight set 360T004 (STS-30) field joint protection system, volume 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Elgie

    1989-01-01

    The Redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM) of the Space Transportation System have three field joints that are protected by the Joint Protection Systems (JPS). The igniter heater was mounted on the igniter flange. This report documents the performance of the JPS and igniter heaters on the pad and the post-flight condition of the JPS components. All observations that were written up as Squawks and/or Problem Reports are also discussed. The primary heaters performed satisfactorily and maintained the field joint temperatures within the required temperature range. A secondary heater failed Dielectric Withstanding Voltage (DWV) test during the joint closeout prior to launch. This heater was not used, however, since the primary heater functioned properly. Post-test inspection revealed that pin A of the heater power cable was shorted to the connector shell. Design changes have been implemented to resolve the heater power cable problem. All field joint assemblies met all of the performance requirements.

  9. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglu, S.; Yu, C. H.; Gungordu, H. I.; Guven, S.; Vural, T.; Demirci, U.

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call ‘magnetoceptive’ materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents.

  10. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, S.; Yu, C.H.; Gungordu, H.I.; Guven, S.; Vural, T.; Demirci, U.

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call ‘magnetoceptive’ materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents. PMID:25175148

  11. Low inductance connector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Holbrook, Meghan Ann; Carlson, Douglas S

    2013-07-09

    A busbar connector assembly for coupling first and second terminals on a two-terminal device to first and second contacts on a power module is provided. The first terminal resides proximate the first contact and the second terminal resides proximate the second contact. The assembly comprises a first bridge having a first end configured to be electrically coupled to the first terminal, and a second end configured to be electrically coupled to the second contact, and a second bridge substantially overlapping the first bridge and having a first end electrically coupled to the first contact, and a second end electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  12. Lightweight reflector assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argoud, M. J.; Jolley, J.; Walker, W. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An inexpensive, lightweight reflective assembly member having good optical quality and particularly adaptable to accommodating temperature variations without providing destructive thermal stresses and reflective slope errors is described. The reflective assembly consists of a thin sheet of glass with appropriate reflective coating and a cellular glass block substrate bonded together. The method of fabrication includes abrading the cellular substrate with an abrasive master die to form an appropriate concave surface. An adhesive is applied to the abraded surface and a lamina reflective surface is placed under a uniform pressure to conform the reflective surface onto the desired abraded surface of the substrate.

  13. Hand Controller Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandera, Pablo (Inventor); Buchele, Paul (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A user input device for a vehicular electrical system is provided. The user input device includes a handle sized and shaped to be gripped by a human hand and a gimbal assembly within the handle. The gimbal assembly includes a first gimbal component, a second gimbal component coupled to the first gimbal component such that the second gimbal component is rotatable relative to the first gimbal component about a first axis, and a third gimbal component coupled to the second gimbal component such that the third gimbal component is rotatable relative to the second gimbal component about a second axis.

  14. Phylogenetic Comparative Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husemann, Peter; Stoye, Jens

    Recent high throughput sequencing technologies are capable of generating a huge amount of data for bacterial genome sequencing projects. Although current sequence assemblers successfully merge the overlapping reads, often several contigs remain which cannot be assembled any further. It is still costly and time consuming to close all the gaps in order to acquire the whole genomic sequence. Here we propose an algorithm that takes several related genomes and their phylogenetic relationships into account to create a contig adjacency graph. From this a layout graph can be computed which indicates putative adjacencies of the contigs in order to aid biologists in finishing the complete genomic sequence.

  15. Self assembling proteins

    DOEpatents

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  16. Passive Ball Capture Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloyd, Richard A. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A passive ball capture joint has a sleeve with a plurality of bores distributed about a circumference thereof and formed therethrough at an acute angle relative to the sleeve's longitudinal axis. A spring-loaded retainer is slidingly fitted in each bore and is biased such that, if allowed, will extend at least partially into the sleeve to retain a ball therein. A ring, rotatably mounted about the bores, has an interior wall defining a plurality of shaped races that bear against the spring-loaded retainers. A mechanized rotational force producer is coupled to the ring. The ring can be rotated from a first position (that presses the retainers into the sleeve to lock the ball in place) to a second position (that allows the retainers to springback out of the sleeve to release the ball).

  17. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  18. Corynebacterium Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cazanave, Charles; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Hanssen, Arlen D.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of Corynebacterium species may be challenging. Corynebacterium species are occasional causes of prosthetic joint infection (PJI), but few data are available on the subject. Based on the literature, C. amycolatum, C. aurimucosum, C. jeikeium, and C. striatum are the most common Corynebacterium species that cause PJI. We designed a rapid PCR assay to detect the most common human Corynebacterium species, with a specific focus on PJI. A polyphosphate kinase gene identified using whole-genome sequence was targeted. The assay differentiates the antibiotic-resistant species C. jeikeium and C. urealyticum from other species in a single assay. The assay was applied to a collection of human Corynebacterium isolates from multiple clinical sources, and clinically relevant species were detected. The assay was then tested on Corynebacterium isolates specifically associated with PJI; all were detected. We also describe the first case of C. simulans PJI. PMID:22337986

  19. Investigation Leads to Improved Understanding of Space Shuttle RSRM Internal Insulation Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWhorter, Bruce B.; Bolton, Doug E.; Hicken, Steve V.; Allred, Larry D.; Cook, Dave J.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) uses an internal insulation J-joint design for the mated insulation interface between two assembled RSRM segments. In this assembled (mated) segment configuration, this J-joint design serves as a thermal barrier to prevent hot gases from affecting the case field joint metal surfaces and O-rings. A pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) provides some adhesion between the two mated insulation surfaces. In 1995, after extensive testing, a new ODC-free PSA (free of ozone depleting chemicals) was selected for flight on RSRM-55 (STS-78). Post-flight inspection revealed that the J-joint, equipped with the new ODC-free PSA, did not perform well. Hot gas seeped inside the J-joint interface. Although not a flight safety threat, the J-joint hot gas intrusion on RSRM-55 was a mystery to the investigators since the PSA had previously worked well on a full-scale static test. A team was assembled to study the J-joint and PSA further. All J-joint design parameters, measured data, and historical performance data were re-reviewed and evaluated by subscale testing and analysis. Although both the ODC-free and old PSA were weakened by humidity, the ODC-free PSA strength was lower to start with. Another RSRM full-scale static test was conducted in 1998 and intentionally duplicated the gas intrusion. This test, along with many concurring tests, showed that if a J-joint was 1) mated with the new ODC-free PSA, 2) exposed to a history of high humidity (Kennedy Space Center levels), and 3) also a joint which experienced significant but normal joint motion (J-joint deformation resulting from motor pressurization dynamics) then that J-joint would open (allow gas intrusion) during motor operation. When all of the data from the analyses, subscale tests, and full-scale tests were considered together, a theory emerged. Most of the joint motion on the RSRM occurs early in motor operation at which point the J-joints are pulled into tension. If the new

  20. Toward a molecular programming language for algorithmic self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patitz, Matthew John

    Self-assembly is the process whereby relatively simple components autonomously combine to form more complex objects. Nature exhibits self-assembly to form everything from microscopic crystals to living cells to galaxies. With a desire to both form increasingly sophisticated products and to understand the basic components of living systems, scientists have developed and studied artificial self-assembling systems. One such framework is the Tile Assembly Model introduced by Erik Winfree in 1998. In this model, simple two-dimensional square 'tiles' are designed so that they self-assemble into desired shapes. The work in this thesis consists of a series of results which build toward the future goal of designing an abstracted, high-level programming language for designing the molecular components of self-assembling systems which can perform powerful computations and form into intricate structures. The first two sets of results demonstrate self-assembling systems which perform infinite series of computations that characterize computably enumerable and decidable languages, and exhibit tools for algorithmically generating the necessary sets of tiles. In the next chapter, methods for generating tile sets which self-assemble into complicated shapes, namely a class of discrete self-similar fractal structures, are presented. Next, a software package for graphically designing tile sets, simulating their self-assembly, and debugging designed systems is discussed. Finally, a high-level programming language which abstracts much of the complexity and tedium of designing such systems, while preventing many of the common errors, is presented. The summation of this body of work presents a broad coverage of the spectrum of desired outputs from artificial self-assembling systems and a progression in the sophistication of tools used to design them. By creating a broader and deeper set of modular tools for designing self-assembling systems, we hope to increase the complexity which is

  1. Lithographically-directed self-assembly of nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, J. Alexander; Cui, Yi; Alivisatos, Paul

    2004-09-21

    The combination of lithography and self-assembly provides apowerful means of organizing solution-synthesized nanostructures for awide variety of applications. We have developed a fluidic assembly methodthat relies on the local pinning of a moving liquid contact line bylithographically produced topographic features to concentratenanoparticles at those features. The final stages of the assembly processare controlled first by long-range immersion capillary forces and then bythe short-range electrostatic and Van der Waal's interactions. We havesuccessfully assembled nanoparticles from 50 nm to 2 nm in size usingthis technique and have also demonstrated the controlled positioning ofmore complex nanotetrapod structures. We have used this process toassemble Au nanoparticles into pre-patterned electrode structures andhave performed preliminary electrical characterization of the devices soformed. The fluidic assembly method is capable of very high yield, interms of positioning nanostructures at each lithographically-definedlocation, and of excellent specificity, with essentially no particledeposition between features.

  2. Minimum accommodation for aerobrake assembly. Phase 2: Structural concepts for a lunar transfer vehicle aerobrake which can be assembled on orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Watson, Judith J.; Tutterow, Robin D.

    1993-01-01

    A multidisciplinary conceptual study was conducted to define a reusable lunar transfer vehicle (LTV) aerobrake which could be launched on a Space Shuttle of Titan 4 and assembled on orbit at Space Station Freedom. A major objective was to design an aerobrake, with integrated structure and thermal protection systems, which has a mass less than 20 percent (9040 lb) of the LTV lunar return mass. The aerobrake segmentation concepts, the structural concepts, a joint concept for assembly, and a structural design with analysis of the aerobrake are described. Results show that a 50-foot diameter LTV aerobrake can be designed for on-orbit assembly which will achieve the 20 percent mass budget.

  3. Use of high and low frequency dielectric measurements in the NDE of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethrick, R. A.; Hayward, D.; McConnell, B. K.; Crane, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy has been developed as a non-destructive technique for assessment of moisture content and structural integrity of adhesively bonded joints. Knowledge of these parameters is particularly crucial for the aerospace industry, since environmental degradation of adhesive joints presents a major limit on their utilization. High and low frequency measurements have been carried out on joints assembled from CFRP adherend, and a commercially available adhesive (AF 163-2K). The samples have been aged in deionised water at 75oC to chart the effect water ingress has on bond durability. In addition, some joints have been exposed to cryogenic temperatures to mimic the conditions joints experience whilst an aircraft is in flight. In this way it has been possible to determine the extent of degradation caused by freezing of water within the joint structure. Dielectric behaviour of the joints was studied in both the frequency and in the time domain. Frequency domain analysis allows the amount and effects of moisture ingress in the bondline to be assessed, whereas the time domain highlights the onset of joint defects with increasing exposure time. Mechanical testing of the joints has been carried out to enable correlation between changes in strength and failure mechanism due to moisture ingress, with changes in the dielectric data. In addition, dielectric studies of the neat adhesive have been undertaken, as have gravimetric and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. These have helped reveal the effects of ageing upon the adhesive layer itself.

  4. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  5. Process characterization and control of hand-soldered printed wiring assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Cheray, D.L.; Mandl, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    A designed experiment was conducted to characterize the hand soldering process parameters for manufacturing printed wiring assemblies (PWAs). Component tinning was identified as the most important parameter in hand soldering. After tinning, the soldering iron tip temperature of 700{degrees}F and the choice of operators influence solder joint quality more than any other parameters. Cleaning and flux/flux core have little impact on the quality of the solder joint. The need for component cleaning prior to assembly must be evaluated for each component.

  6. 75 FR 42820 - Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Assessment (Final EA) and a Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... Aeronautics (WisDOT BOA) jointly prepared the Final EA, pursuant to the requirements of the National... actions. Actions for the proposed airport development would be taken by the FAA or WisDOT BOA....

  7. Final Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    This final chapter provides observations about institutional research in community colleges derived from the preceding chapters and the issue editors' own experiences. Taken as a whole, the chapters in this issue, as well as the editors' experiences, suggest several observations about institutional research in community colleges. These include the…

  8. Cassini's Grand Finale: The Final Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda; Edgington, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission, a joint collaboration between NASA, ESA and the Italian Space Agency, is approaching its last year of operations after nearly 12 years in orbit around Saturn. Cassini will send back its final bits of unique data on September 15th, 2017 as it plunges into Saturn's atmosphere, vaporizing and satisfying planetary protection requirements. Before that time Cassini will continue its legacy of exploration and discovery with 12 close flybys of Titan in 2016 and 2017 that will return new science data as well as sculpt the inclinations and periods of the final orbits. Even though all of our close icy satellite flybys, including those of Enceladus, are now completed, numerous Voyager-class flybys (<100,000 km) of Mimas and Enceladus remain as well as some of our best flybys of the tiny ring moons. Cassini will also continue to study seasonal and temporal changes in the system as northern summer solstice approaches. In November 2016 Cassini will transition to a series of orbits with peripases just outside Saturn's F ring. These 20 orbits will include close flybys of some tiny ring moons and excellent views of the F ring and outer A ring. The 126th and final close flyby of Titan will propel Cassini across Saturn's main rings and into its final orbits. Cassini's Grand Finale, starting in April 2017, is comprised of 22 orbits at an inclination of 63 degrees. Cassini will repeatedly dive between the innermost rings and the upper atmosphere of the planet providing insights into fundamental questions unattainable during the rest of the mission. Cassini will be the first spacecraft to explore this region. These close orbits provide the highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and direct in situ sampling of the ring particles, composition, plasma, Saturn's exosphere and the innermost radiation belts. Saturn's gravitational field will be measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on the interior structure of the planet

  9. Temporomandibular joint vibration in bruxers.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueling; Lin, Xuefeng; Wang, Yan

    2009-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint vibration is considered an important physical sign of joint dysfunction and/or joint pathology. The aim of this study was to compare the difference of joint vibration between bruxers and asymptomatic individuals, evaluate the effect of bruxism on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the association between bruxism and temporomandibular disorders. Twenty-four (24) bruxers and 16 asymptomatic subjects were included in the study. Bilateral joint vibrations with jaw tracking were recorded using a TMJ detecting instrument during rhythmic jaw opening and closing movement. The results showed that the vibratory energy and amplitude of the moderate to severe bruxers were significantly higher than that of the mild bruxers and asymptomatic subjects. The percentage of joint vibration occurrence in asymptomatic subjects, mild bruxers, and moderate to severe bruxers was 75.0%, 77.8%, and 100%, respectively. It was concluded that bruxism might induce abnormal joint vibrations, and that the energy of abnormal vibrations might increase with the degree of bruxism.

  10. Review of Rock Joint Models

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J P

    2003-06-06

    This report discusses several constitutive models for joint behavior with emphasis upon the experimental data which motivates them. Particular emphasis is placed upon data available for granite. The LDEC joint model is presented in detail and LDEC simulations using this model are compared against data from constant normal stiffness and constant normal load tests.

  11. Robotic joint experiments under ultravacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borrien, A.; Petitjean, L.

    1988-01-01

    First, various aspects of a robotic joint development program, including gearbox technology, electromechanical components, lubrication, and test results, are discussed. Secondly, a test prototype of the joint allowing simulation of robotic arm dynamic effects is presented. This prototype is tested under vacuum with different types of motors and sensors to characterize the functional parameters: angular position error, mechanical backlash, gearbox efficiency, and lifetime.

  12. Joint Attention and Early Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael; Farrar, Michael Jeffrey

    1986-01-01

    Findings from studies exploring role of joint attentional focus in children's acquisition of language indicated that language of 24 mothers and their 15- to 21-month-olds inside episodes of joint attentional focus involved more utterances, shorter sentences, more comments, and longer conversations than outside of episodes. Also, object references…

  13. Exercise and the Knee Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This report by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports examines the effects of various forms of physical exercise on the knee joint which, because of its vulnerability, is especially subject to injury. Discussion centers around the physical characteristics of the joint, commonly used measurements for determining knee stability,…

  14. Structuring managed care joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Williams, L

    1995-08-01

    Providers that undertake joint ventures to secure managed care contracts must understand the important governance, operational, legal, and political issues involved. Careful planning in all these areas can help ensure that the joint venture will meet its goals and avoid problems such as inappropriately negotiated contracts and legal violations.

  15. The ALMA assembly, integration, and verification project: a retrospective analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, B.; Knee, L. B. G.; Jager, H.; Whyborn, N.; McMullin, J.; Murowinski, R.; Peck, A.; Corder, S.

    2014-08-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a joint project between astronomical organizations in Europe, North America, and East Asia, in collaboration with the Republic of Chile. ALMA consists of 54 twelve-meter antennas and 12 seven-meter antennas operating as an aperture synthesis array in the (sub)millimeter wavelength range. Assembly, Integration, and Verification (AIV) of the antennas was completed at the end of the year 2013, while the final optimization and complete expansion to validate all planned observing modes will continue. This paper compares the actually obtained results of the period 2008-2013 with the baselines that had been laid out in the early project-planning phase (2005-2007). First plans made for ALMA AIV had already established a two-phased project life-cycle: phase 1 for setting up necessary infrastructure and common facilities, and taking the first three antennas to the start of commissioning; and phase 2 focused on the steady state processing of the remaining units. Throughout the execution of the project this lifecycle was refined and two additional phases were added, namely a transition phase between phases 1 and 2, and a closing phase to address the project ramp-down. A sub-project called Accelerated Commissioning and Science Verification (ACSV) was carried out during the year 2009 in order to provide focus to the whole ALMA organization, and to accomplish the start-of-commissioning milestone. Early phases of CSV focused on validating the basic performance and calibration. Over time additional observing modes have been validated as capabilities expanded both in hardware and software. This retrospective analysis describes the originally presented project staffing plans and schedules, the underlying assumptions, identified risks and operational models, among others. For comparison actual data on staffing levels, the resultant schedule, additional risks identified and those that actually materialized, are presented. The

  16. Payload spin assembly for the commercial Titan launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Wilf; Pech, Greg

    1991-01-01

    A contract was completed to design, build, and test a Payload Spin Assembly (PSA) for installation onto the Martin Marietta Titan 3 Commercial launch vehicle. This assembly provides launch support for satellite payloads up to 5783 kilograms (6.37 tons) and controls release, spin-up, and final separation of the satellite from the second stage. Once separated, the satellite's Perigee Kick Motor (PKM) boosts the satellite into its transfer orbit. The first successful flight occurred December 31, 1989. Requirements, design, test, and problems associated with this mechanical assembly are discussed.

  17. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  18. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  19. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  20. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...