Science.gov

Sample records for joint geophysical imaging

  1. Joint interpretation of geophysical data using Image Fusion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamitrou, A.; Tsokas, G.; Petrou, M.

    2013-12-01

    Joint interpretation of geophysical data produced from different methods is a challenging area of research in a wide range of applications. In this work we apply several image fusion approaches to combine maps of electrical resistivity, electromagnetic conductivity, vertical gradient of the magnetic field, magnetic susceptibility, and ground penetrating radar reflections, in order to detect archaeological relics. We utilize data gathered from Arkansas University, with the support of the U.S. Department of Defense, through the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP-CS1263). The area of investigation is the Army City, situated in Riley Country of Kansas, USA. The depth of the relics is estimated about 30 cm from the surface, yet the surface indications of its existence are limited. We initially register the images from the different methods to correct from random offsets due to the use of hand-held devices during the measurement procedure. Next, we apply four different image fusion approaches to create combined images, using fusion with mean values, wavelet decomposition, curvelet transform, and curvelet transform enhancing the images along specific angles. We create seven combinations of pairs between the available geophysical datasets. The combinations are such that for every pair at least one high-resolution method (resistivity or magnetic gradiometry) is included. Our results indicate that in almost every case the method of mean values produces satisfactory fused images that corporate the majority of the features of the initial images. However, the contrast of the final image is reduced, and in some cases the averaging process nearly eliminated features that are fade in the original images. Wavelet based fusion outputs also good results, providing additional control in selecting the feature wavelength. Curvelet based fusion is proved the most effective method in most of the cases. The ability of curvelet domain to unfold the image in

  2. Strategies for joint geophysical survey design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakas, Alexis; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the use of multiple geophysical techniques to image the subsurface has become a popular option. Joint inversions of geophysical datasets are based on the assumption that the spatial variations of the different physical subsurface parameters exhibit structural similarities. In this work, we combine the benefits of joint inversions of geophysical datasets with recent innovations in optimized experimental design. These techniques maximize the data information content while minimizing the data acquisition costs. Experimental design has been used in geophysics over the last twenty years, but it has never been attempted to combine various geophysical imaging methods. We combine direct current geoelectrics, magnetotellurics and seismic refraction travel time tomography data to resolve synthetic 1D layered Earth models. An initial model for the subsurface structure can be taken from a priori geological information and an optimal joint geophysical survey can be designed around the initial model. Another typical scenario includes an existing data set from a past survey and a subsequent survey that is planned to optimally complement the existing data. Our results demonstrate that the joint design methodology provides optimized combinations of data sets that include only a few data points. Nevertheless, they allow constraining the subsurface models equally well as data from a densely sampled survey. Furthermore, we examine the dependency of optimized survey design on the a priori model assumptions. Finally, we apply the methodology to geoelectric and seismic field data collected along 2D profiles.

  3. Joint Hydrological-Geophysical Inversion for Soil StructureIdentification

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, Stefan; Kowalsky, Michael B.

    2006-05-01

    Reliable prediction of subsurface flow and contaminant transport depends on the accuracy with which the values and spatial distribution of process-relevant model parameters can be identified. Successful characterization methods for complex soil systems are based on (1) an adequate parameterization of the subsurface, capable of capturing both random and structured aspects of the heterogeneous system, and (2) site-specific data that are sufficiently sensitive to the processes of interest. We present a stochastic approach where the high-resolution imaging capability of geophysical methods is combined with the process-specific information obtained from the inversion of hydrological data. Geostatistical concepts are employed as a flexible means to describe and characterize subsurface structures. The key features of the proposed approach are (1) the joint inversion of geophysical and hydrological raw data, avoiding the intermediate step of creating a (non-unique and potentially biased) tomogram of geophysical properties, (2) the concurrent estimation of hydrological and petrophysical parameters in addition to (3) the determination of geostatistical parameters from the joint inversion of hydrological and geophysical data; this approach is fundamentally different from inference of geostatistical parameters from an analysis of spatially distributed property data. The approach has been implemented into the iTOUGH2 inversion code and is demonstrated for the joint use of synthetic time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) travel times and hydrological data collected during a simulated ponded infiltration experiment at a highly heterogeneous site.

  4. Joint inversion of geophysical data for site characterization and restoration monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P. A.

    1998-05-28

    The purpose of this project is to develop a computer code for joint inversion of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation monitoring. The computer code developed in this project will invert geophysical data to obtain direct estimates of porosity and saturation underground, rather than inverting for seismic velocity and electrical resistivity or other geophysical properties. This is intended to be a significant improvement in the state-of-the-art of underground imaging, since interpretation of data collected at a contaminated site would become much less subjective. Potential users include DOE scientists and engineers responsible for characterizing contaminated sites and monitoring remediation of contaminated sites. In this three-year project, we use a multi-phase approach consisting of theoretical and numerical code development, laboratory investigations, testing on available laboratory and borehole geophysics data sets, and a controlled field experiment, to develop practical tools for joint electrical and seismic data interpretation.

  5. Geophysical subsurface imaging for ecological applications.

    PubMed

    Jayawickreme, Dushmantha H; Jobbágy, Esteban G; Jackson, Robert B

    2014-03-01

    Ecologists, ecohydrologists, and biogeochemists need detailed insights into belowground properties and processes, including changes in water, salts, and other elements that can influence ecosystem productivity and functioning. Relying on traditional sampling and observation techniques for such insights can be costly, time consuming, and infeasible, especially if the spatial scales involved are large. Geophysical imaging provides an alternative or complement to traditional methods to gather subsurface variables across time and space. In this paper, we review aspects of geophysical imaging, particularly electrical and electromagnetic imaging, that may benefit ecologists seeking clearer understanding of the shallow subsurface. Using electrical resistivity imaging, for example, we have been able to successfully show the effect of land-use conversions to agriculture on salt mobilization and leaching across kilometer-long transects and to depths of tens of meters. Recent advances in ground-penetrating radar and other geophysical imaging methods currently provide opportunities for subsurface imaging with sufficient detail to locate small (≥5 cm diameter) animal burrows and plant roots, observe soil-water and vegetation spatial correlations in small watersheds, estuaries, and marshes, and quantify changes in groundwater storage at local to regional scales using geophysical data from ground- and space-based platforms. Ecologists should benefit from adopting these minimally invasive, scalable imaging technologies to explore the subsurface and advance our collective research.

  6. Time-lapse joint inversion of geophysical data with automatic joint constraints and dynamic attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittgers, J. B.; Revil, A.; Mooney, M. A.; Karaoulis, M.; Wodajo, L.; Hickey, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Joint inversion and time-lapse inversion techniques of geophysical data are often implemented in an attempt to improve imaging of complex subsurface structures and dynamic processes by minimizing negative effects of random and uncorrelated spatial and temporal noise in the data. We focus on the structural cross-gradient (SCG) approach (enforcing recovered models to exhibit similar spatial structures) in combination with time-lapse inversion constraints applied to surface-based electrical resistivity and seismic traveltime refraction data. The combination of both techniques is justified by the underlying petrophysical models. We investigate the benefits and trade-offs of SCG and time-lapse constraints. Using a synthetic case study, we show that a combined joint time-lapse inversion approach provides an overall improvement in final recovered models. Additionally, we introduce a new approach to reweighting SCG constraints based on an iteratively updated normalized ratio of model sensitivity distributions at each time-step. We refer to the new technique as the Automatic Joint Constraints (AJC) approach. The relevance of the new joint time-lapse inversion process is demonstrated on the synthetic example. Then, these approaches are applied to real time-lapse monitoring field data collected during a quarter-scale earthen embankment induced-piping failure test. The use of time-lapse joint inversion is justified by the fact that a change of porosity drives concomitant changes in seismic velocities (through its effect on the bulk and shear moduli) and resistivities (through its influence upon the formation factor). Combined with the definition of attributes (i.e. specific characteristics) of the evolving target associated with piping, our approach allows localizing the position of the preferential flow path associated with internal erosion. This is not the case using other approaches.

  7. Imaging the temporomandibular joint

    SciTech Connect

    Katzberg, R.W.; Manzione, J.V.; Westesson, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book encompasses all imaging modalities as they apply to the Temporomandibular Joint and its disorders. The volume employs correlative line drawings to elaborate on diagnostic images. It helps teach methods of TMJ imaging and describes findings identified by different imaging modalities to both radiologists and dental clinicians.

  8. Geophysical Technologies to Image Old Mine Works

    SciTech Connect

    Kanaan Hanna; Jim Pfeiffer

    2007-01-15

    ZapataEngineering, Blackhawk Division performed geophysical void detection demonstrations for the US Department of Labor Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA). The objective was to advance current state-of-practices of geophysical technologies for detecting underground mine voids. The presence of old mine works above, adjacent, or below an active mine presents major health and safety hazards to miners who have inadvertently cut into locations with such features. In addition, the presence of abandoned mines or voids beneath roadways and highway structures may greatly impact the performance of the transportation infrastructure in terms of cost and public safety. Roads constructed over abandoned mines are subject to potential differential settlement, subsidence, sinkholes, and/or catastrophic collapse. Thus, there is a need to utilize geophysical imaging technologies to accurately locate old mine works. Several surface and borehole geophysical imaging methods and mapping techniques were employed at a known abandoned coal mine in eastern Illinois to investigate which method best map the location and extent of old works. These methods included: 1) high-resolution seismic (HRS) using compressional P-wave (HRPW) and S-wave (HRSW) reflection collected with 3-D techniques; 2) crosshole seismic tomography (XHT); 3) guided waves; 4) reverse vertical seismic profiling (RVSP); and 5) borehole sonar mapping. In addition, several exploration borings were drilled to confirm the presence of the imaged mine voids. The results indicated that the RVSP is the most viable method to accurately detect the subsurface voids with horizontal accuracy of two to five feet. This method was then applied at several other locations in Colorado with various topographic, geologic, and cultural settings for the same purpose. This paper presents the significant results obtained from the geophysical investigations in Illinois.

  9. Geophysical imaging of subsalt geology

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, D.W.; Weber, D.J. )

    1996-01-01

    Exploration and production of huge subsalt hydrocarbon accumulations in the Gulf of Mexico has been an ambitious challenge for many explorationists throughout the industry. The complexities associated with the three dimensional nature of salt structures, as well as the highly deformed tops and bottoms of salt, demand 3-D Prestack Depth Migration (3-D PreSDM) technology in order to correctly stack and position reflectivity below salt. Application of [open quotes]large-volume[close quote] 3-D PreSDM techniques has been, and will continue to be, instrumental in unraveling the structural and stratigraphic complexities of the subsalt environment. [open quote]Large-volume[close quote] 3-D PreSDM technology allows the explorationist to better assess subsalt exploration and development risk, as well as improve subsalt exploration success. In this paper, we discuss a full-volume 3-D PreSDM case study that, to our knowledge, is the largest prestack depth imaging project ever attempted, to date. The 3-D PreSDM case study is centered over the Mahogany Discovery in the Gulf of Mexico's Ship Shoal South Addition Block 349 area. Information about input and output data coverage, computer run times and 3-D depth imaging strategies will be discussed. Numerous examples of closely spaced 3-D prestack depth migrated seismic data will also be shown in order to demonstrate how [open quote]large-volume[close quote] 3-D PreSDM technology improves subsalt imaging, (both structural and stratigraphic), as well as subsalt prospecting.

  10. Joint inversion of geophysical data for site characterization and restoration monitoring. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P.A.; Roberts, J.J.; Berryman, J.G.; Wildenschild, D.

    1998-06-01

    'The purpose of this project is to develop a computer code for joint inversion of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation monitoring. The computer code developed in this project will invert geophysical data to obtain direct estimates of porosity and saturation underground, rather than inverting for seismic velocity and electrical resistivity or other geophysical properties. This is intended to be a significant improvement in the state-of-the-art of underground imaging, since interpretation of data collected at a contaminated site would become much less subjective. Potential users include DOE scientists and engineers responsible for characterizing contaminated sites and monitoring remediation of contaminated sites. In this three-year project, the authors use a multi-phase approach consisting of theoretical and numerical code development, laboratory investigations, testing on available laboratory and borehole geophysics data sets, and a controlled field experiment, to develop practical tools for joint electrical and seismic data interpretation. This report summarizes work after about 1.7 years of a 3-year project. Progress on laboratory measurements is described first, followed by progress on developing algorithms for the inversion code to relate geophysical data to porosity and saturation.'

  11. Geophysical Imaging of Stimulated Microbial Biomineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Slater, Lee D.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hubbard, Susan S.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2005-10-01

    Understanding how microorganisms influence the physical and chemical properties of the subsurface is hindered by our inability to observe microbial dynamics in real time and with high spatial resolution. Here, we investigate the use of noninvasive geophysical methods to monitor biomineralization at the laboratory scale during stimulated sulfate reduction under dynamic flow conditions. Alterations in sediment characteristics resulting from microbe-mediated sulfide mineral precipitation were concomitant with changes in complex resistivity and acoustic wave propagation signatures. The sequestration of zinc and iron in insoluble sulfides led to alterations in the ability of the pore fluid to conduct electrical charge and of the saturated sediments to dissipate acoustic energy. These changes resulted directly from the nucleation, growth, and development of nanoparticulate precipitates along grain surfaces and within the pore space. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) confirmed the sulfides to be associated with cell surfaces, with precipitates ranging from aggregates of individual 3-5 nm nanocrystals to larger assemblages of up to 10-20 ím in diameter. Anomalies in the geophysical data reflected the distribution of mineral precipitates and biomass over space and time, with temporal variations in the signals corresponding to changes in the aggregation state of the nanocrystalline sulfides. These results suggest the potential for using geophysical techniques to image certain subsurface biogeochemical processes, such as those accompanying the bioremediation of metalcontaminated aquifers.

  12. 1994 Geophysical images contest entries sought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    As part of AGU's 75th Anniversary year, entries are sought for the 1994 Geophysical Images Contest. Over ninety photographs, computer graphics, posters, maps, slides, and videos were submitted in 1993. The winning images were displayed at the AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore, and again at the Fall Meeting in San Francisco, along with the other images submitted.First place winner in the computer graphics section was “Western Mediterranean Sea Salinity Field,” submitted by Jacques Haus. Honorable Mentions went to Wei-jia Su for “A View of Whole Mantle Heterogeneity” and Toshiro Tanimoto, Paul Morin, David Yuen, and Yu-Shen Zhang for “Visualization of the Earth's Upper Mantle.”

  13. Pitfalls and Limitations in the Interpretation of Geophysical Images for Hydrologic Properties and Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical imaging (e.g., electrical, radar, seismic) can provide valuable information for the characterization of hydrologic properties and monitoring of hydrologic processes, as evidenced in the rapid growth of literature on the subject. Geophysical imaging has been used for monitoring tracer migration and infiltration, mapping zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange, and verifying emplacement of amendments for bioremediation. Despite the enormous potential for extraction of hydrologic information from geophysical images, there also is potential for misinterpretation and over-interpretation. These concerns are particularly relevant when geophysical results are used within quantitative frameworks, e.g., conversion to hydrologic properties through petrophysical relations, geostatistical estimation and simulation conditioned to geophysical inversions, and joint inversion. We review pitfalls to interpretation associated with limited image resolution, spatially variable image resolution, incorrect data weighting, errors in the timing of measurements, temporal smearing resulting from changes during data acquisition, support-volume/scale effects, and incorrect assumptions or approximations involved in modeling geophysical or other jointly inverted data. A series of numerical and field-based examples illustrate these potential problems. Our goal in this talk is to raise awareness of common pitfalls and present strategies for recognizing and avoiding them.

  14. Numerical Inversion of Integral Equations for Medical Imaging and Geophysics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-13

    Equations for Medical Imaging and Geophysics (Unclassified) 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Frank Stenger 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT...9r~S NUMERICAL INVERSION OF INTEGRAL EQUATIONS FOR MEDICAL IMAGING AND GEOPHYSICS FINAL REPORT AUTHOR OF REPORT: Frank Stenger December 13, 1988

  15. Multiscale geophysical imaging of the critical zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsekian, Andy; Singha, Kamini; Minsley, Burke J.; Holbrook, W. Steven; Slater, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Details of Earth's shallow subsurface—a key component of the critical zone (CZ)—are largely obscured because making direct observations with sufficient density to capture natural characteristic spatial variability in physical properties is difficult. Yet this inaccessible region of the CZ is fundamental to processes that support ecosystems, society, and the environment. Geophysical methods provide a means for remotely examining CZ form and function over length scales that span centimeters to kilometers. Here we present a review highlighting the application of geophysical methods to CZ science research questions. In particular, we consider the application of geophysical methods to map the geometry of structural features such as regolith thickness, lithological boundaries, permafrost extent, snow thickness, or shallow root zones. Combined with knowledge of structure, we discuss how geophysical observations are used to understand CZ processes. Fluxes between snow, surface water, and groundwater affect weathering, groundwater resources, and chemical and nutrient exports to rivers. The exchange of gas between soil and the atmosphere have been studied using geophysical methods in wetland areas. Indirect geophysical methods are a natural and necessary complement to direct observations obtained by drilling or field mapping. Direct measurements should be used to calibrate geophysical estimates, which can then be used to extrapolate interpretations over larger areas or to monitor changing processes over time. Advances in geophysical instrumentation and computational approaches for integrating different types of data have great potential to fill gaps in our understanding of the shallow subsurface portion of the CZ and should be integrated where possible in future CZ research.

  16. Multiscale geophysical imaging of the critical zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsekian, A. D.; Singha, K.; Minsley, B. J.; Holbrook, W. S.; Slater, L.

    2015-03-01

    Details of Earth's shallow subsurface—a key component of the critical zone (CZ)—are largely obscured because making direct observations with sufficient density to capture natural characteristic spatial variability in physical properties is difficult. Yet this inaccessible region of the CZ is fundamental to processes that support ecosystems, society, and the environment. Geophysical methods provide a means for remotely examining CZ form and function over length scales that span centimeters to kilometers. Here we present a review highlighting the application of geophysical methods to CZ science research questions. In particular, we consider the application of geophysical methods to map the geometry of structural features such as regolith thickness, lithological boundaries, permafrost extent, snow thickness, or shallow root zones. Combined with knowledge of structure, we discuss how geophysical observations are used to understand CZ processes. Fluxes between snow, surface water, and groundwater affect weathering, groundwater resources, and chemical and nutrient exports to rivers. The exchange of gas between soil and the atmosphere have been studied using geophysical methods in wetland areas. Indirect geophysical methods are a natural and necessary complement to direct observations obtained by drilling or field mapping. Direct measurements should be used to calibrate geophysical estimates, which can then be used to extrapolate interpretations over larger areas or to monitor changing processes over time. Advances in geophysical instrumentation and computational approaches for integrating different types of data have great potential to fill gaps in our understanding of the shallow subsurface portion of the CZ and should be integrated where possible in future CZ research.

  17. Joint geophysical data analysis for geothermal energy exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamalwa, Antony Munika

    Geophysical data modelling often yields non-unique results and hence the interpretation of the resulting models in terms of underlying geological units and structures is not a straightforward problem. However, if multiple datasets are available for a region of study, an integrated interpretation of models for each of the geophysical data may results to a more realistic geological description. This study not only demonstrates the strength of resistivity analysis for geothermal fields but also the gains from interpreting resistivity data together with other geophysical data such as gravity and seismic data. Various geothermal fields have been examined in this study which includes Silali and Menengai geothermal fields in Kenya and Coso geothermal field in California, USA.

  18. Imaging of the patellofemoral joint.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stephen; Rupiper, David; Stacy, G Scott

    2014-07-01

    The patellofemoral (PF) joint is a complex articulation, with interplay between the osseous and soft tissue structures to maintain the balance between knee mobility and stability. Disorders of the PF joint can be a source of anterior knee pain (AKP). In this article, radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging of the PF joint are reviewed, including normal anatomy, imaging techniques, and imaging-based measurements. Common imaging findings associated with AKP are reviewed, including symptomatic normal variants, tendinopathy, apophysitis, osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella, trochlear dysplasia, excessive lateralization of tibial tuberosity, patellar maltracking, patellar dislocation and fractures, anterior bursitis, Morel-Lavallée effusions, and fat pad edema.

  19. Geophysical imaging of karst features in Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obi, Jeremiah Chukwunonso

    Automated electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) supported with multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and boring data were used to map karst related features in Missouri in order to understand karst processes better in Missouri. Previous works on karst in Missouri were mostly surficial mapping of bedrock outcrops and joints, which are not enough to define the internal structure of karst system, since most critical processes in karst occur underground. To understand these processes better, the density, placement and pattern of karst related features like solution-widened joints and voids, as well as top of bedrock were mapped. In the course of the study, six study sites were visited in Missouri. The sites were in Nixa, Gasconade River Bridge in Lebanon, Battlefield, Aurora, Protem and Richland. The case studies reflect to a large extent some of the problems inherent in karst terrain, ranging from environmental problems to structural problems especially sinkhole collapses. The result of the study showed that karst in Missouri is mostly formed as a result of piping of sediments through solution-widened joints, with a pattern showing that the joints/fractures are mostly filled with moist clay-sized materials of low resistivity values. The highest density of mapped solution-widened joints was one in every one hundred and fifty feet, and these areas are where intense dissolution is taking place, and bedrock pervasively fractured. The study also showed that interpreted solution-widened joints trend in different directions, and often times conform with known structural lineaments in the area. About 40% of sinkhole collapses in the study areas are anthropogenic. Karst in Missouri varies, and can be classified as a combination of kI (juvenile), kIII (mature) and kIV (complex) karsts.

  20. Geophysical subsurface imaging and interface identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Pendley, Kevin; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Day, David Minot; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Weiss, Chester Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Electromagnetic induction is a classic geophysical exploration method designed for subsurface characterization--in particular, sensing the presence of geologic heterogeneities and fluids such as groundwater and hydrocarbons. Several approaches to the computational problems associated with predicting and interpreting electromagnetic phenomena in and around the earth are addressed herein. Publications resulting from the project include [31]. To obtain accurate and physically meaningful numerical simulations of natural phenomena, computational algorithms should operate in discrete settings that reflect the structure of governing mathematical models. In section 2, the extension of algebraic multigrid methods for the time domain eddy current equations to the frequency domain problem is discussed. Software was developed and is available in Trilinos ML package. In section 3 we consider finite element approximations of De Rham's complex. We describe how to develop a family of finite element spaces that forms an exact sequence on hexahedral grids. The ensuing family of non-affine finite elements is called a van Welij complex, after the work [37] of van Welij who first proposed a general method for developing tangentially and normally continuous vector fields on hexahedral elements. The use of this complex is illustrated for the eddy current equations and a conservation law problem. Software was developed and is available in the Ptenos finite element package. The more popular methods of geophysical inversion seek solutions to an unconstrained optimization problem by imposing stabilizing constraints in the form of smoothing operators on some enormous set of model parameters (i.e. ''over-parametrize and regularize''). In contrast we investigate an alternative approach whereby sharp jumps in material properties are preserved in the solution by choosing as model parameters a modest set of variables which describe an interface between adjacent regions in physical space. While

  1. Fusion of Geophysical Images in the Study of Archaeological Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamitrou, A. A.; Petrou, M.; Tsokas, G. N.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents results from different fusion techniques between geophysical images from different modalities in order to combine them into one image with higher information content than the two original images independently. The resultant image will be useful for the detection and mapping of buried archaeological relics. The examined archaeological area is situated in Kampana site (NE Greece) near the ancient theater of Maronia city. Archaeological excavations revealed an ancient theater, an aristocratic house and the temple of the ancient Greek God Dionysus. Numerous ceramic objects found in the broader area indicated the probability of the existence of buried urban structure. In order to accurately locate and map the latter, geophysical measurements performed with the use of the magnetic method (vertical gradient of the magnetic field) and of the electrical method (apparent resistivity). We performed a semi-stochastic pixel based registration method between the geophysical images in order to fine register them by correcting their local spatial offsets produced by the use of hand held devices. After this procedure we applied to the registered images three different fusion approaches. Image fusion is a relatively new technique that not only allows integration of different information sources, but also takes advantage of the spatial and spectral resolution as well as the orientation characteristics of each image. We have used three different fusion techniques, fusion with mean values, with wavelets by enhancing selected frequency bands and curvelets giving emphasis at specific bands and angles (according the expecting orientation of the relics). In all three cases the fused images gave significantly better results than each of the original geophysical images separately. The comparison of the results of the three different approaches showed that the fusion with the use of curvelets, giving emphasis at the features' orientation, seems to give the best fused image

  2. Geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.; Cassen, P.

    1976-01-01

    Four areas of investigation, each dealing with the measurement of a particular geophysical property, are discussed. These properties are the gravity field, seismicity, magnetism, and heat flow. All are strongly affected by conditions, past or present, in the planetary interior; their measurement is the primary source of information about planetary interiors.

  3. Structure-constrained image-guided inversion of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jieyi

    The regularization term in the objective function of an inverse problem is equivalent to the "model covariance" in Tarantola's wording. It is not entirely reasonable to consider the model covariance to be isotropic and homogenous, as done in classical Tikhonov regularization, because the correlation relationships among model cells are likely to change with different directions and locations. The structure-constrained image-guided inversion method, presented in this thesis, aims to solve this problem, and can be used to integrate different types of geophysical data and geological information. The method is first theoretically developed and successfully tested with electrical resistivity data. Then it is applied to hydraulic tomography, and promising hydraulic conductivity models are obtained as well. With a correct guiding image, the image-guided inversion results not only follow the correct structure patterns, but also are closer to the true model in terms of parameter values, when compared with the conventional inversion results. To further account for the uncertainty in the guiding image, a Bayesian inversion scheme is added to the image-guided inversion algorithm. Each geophysical model parameter and geological (structure) model parameter is described by a probability density. Using the data misfit of image-guided inversion of the geophysical data as criterion, a stochastic (image-guided) inversion algorithm allows one to optimize both the geophysical model and the geological model at the same time. The last problem discussed in this thesis is, image-guided inversion and interpolation can help reduce non-uniqueness and improve resolution when utilizing spectral induced polarization data and petrophysical relationships to estimate permeability.

  4. Geophysical tomography imaging system. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.J.; Won, I.J.

    1998-05-20

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., and Geophex, Ltd., was established to investigate high-resolution, shallow acoustic imaging of the subsurface. The primary objectives of the CRADA were accomplished, including the evaluation of a new tomographic imaging algorithm and the testing and comparison of two different acoustic sources, the hammer/plate source and an electromagnetic vibratory source. The imaging system was composed essentially of a linear array of geophones, a digital seismograph, and imaging software installed on a personal computer. Imaging was most successful using the hammer source, which was found to be less susceptible to ground roll (surface wave) interference. It is conjectured that the vibratory source will perform better for deeper targets for which ground roll is less troublesome. Potential applications of shallow acoustic imaging are numerous, including the detection and characterization of buried solid waste, unexploded ordnance, and clandestine man-made underground structures associated with treaty verification (e.g., tunnels, underground storage facilities, hidden bunkers).

  5. Structure-coupled multiphysics imaging in geophysical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Luis A.; Meju, Max A.

    2011-03-01

    Multiphysics imaging or data inversion is of growing importance in many branches of science and engineering. In geophysical sciences, there is a need for combining information from multiple images acquired using different imaging devices and/or modalities because of the potential for accurate predictions. The major challenges are how to combine disparate data from unrelated physical phenomena, taking into account the different spatial scales of the measurement devices, model complexities, and how to quantify the associated uncertainties. This review paper summarizes the role played by the structural gradients-based approach for coupling fundamentally different physical fields in (mainly) geophysical inversion, develops further understanding of this approach to guide newcomers to the field, and defines the main challenges and directions for future research that may be useful in other fields of science and engineering.

  6. Joint inversion of geophysical data for site characterization and restoration monitoring. FY97 annual progress report for EMSP

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P.A.; Berryman, J.G.; Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Wildenschild, D.

    1997-01-01

    'The purpose of this project is to develop a computer code for joint in-version of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation monitoring. The computer code developed in this project will invert geophysical data to obtain direct estimates of porosity and saturation underground, rather than inverting for seismic velocity and electrical resistivity or other geophysical properties. This is intended to be a significant improvement in the state-of-the-art of under-ground imaging, since interpretation of data collected at a contaminated site would become much less subjective. The schedule of this project is as follows: In the first year, investigators perform laboratory measurements of elastic and electrical properties of sand-clay mixtures containing various fluids. Investigators also develop methods of relating measurable geophysical properties to porosity and saturation by using rock physics theories, geostatistical, and empirical techniques together with available laboratory measurements. In the second year, investigators finish any necessary laboratory measurements and apply the methods de-veloped in the first year to invert available borehole log data to predict measured properties of cores and sediments from a borehole. Investigators refine the inversion code in the third year and carry out a field experiment to collect seismic and electrical data. Investigators then use the inversion code to invert the field data to produce estimates of porosity and saturation in the field area where the data were collected. This report describes progress made in the first year of this three-year project.'

  7. Application of Laser Imaging for Bio/geophysical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, J. R.; Goltz, S. M.; Depiero, N. L.; Degloria, D. P.; Pagliughi, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    SPARTA, Inc. has developed a low-cost, portable laser imager that, among other applications, can be used in bio/geophysical applications. In the application to be discussed here, the system was utilized as an imaging system for background features in a forested locale. The SPARTA mini-ladar system was used at the International Paper Northern Experimental Forest near Howland, Maine to assist in a project designed to study the thermal and radiometric phenomenology at forest edges. The imager was used to obtain data from three complex sites, a 'seed' orchard, a forest edge, and a building. The goal of the study was to demonstrate the usefulness of the laser imager as a tool to obtain geometric and internal structure data about complex 3-D objects in a natural background. The data from these images have been analyzed to obtain information about the distributions of the objects in a scene. A range detection algorithm has been used to identify individual objects in a laser image and an edge detection algorithm then applied to highlight the outlines of discrete objects. An example of an image processed in such a manner is shown. Described here are the results from the study. In addition, results are presented outlining how the laser imaging system could be used to obtain other important information about bio/geophysical systems, such as the distribution of woody material in forests.

  8. Application of Laser Imaging for Bio/geophysical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, J. R.; Goltz, S. M.; Depiero, N. L.; Degloria, D. P.; Pagliughi, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    SPARTA, Inc. has developed a low-cost, portable laser imager that, among other applications, can be used in bio/geophysical applications. In the application to be discussed here, the system was utilized as an imaging system for background features in a forested locale. The SPARTA mini-ladar system was used at the International Paper Northern Experimental Forest near Howland, Maine to assist in a project designed to study the thermal and radiometric phenomenology at forest edges. The imager was used to obtain data from three complex sites, a 'seed' orchard, a forest edge, and a building. The goal of the study was to demonstrate the usefulness of the laser imager as a tool to obtain geometric and internal structure data about complex 3-D objects in a natural background. The data from these images have been analyzed to obtain information about the distributions of the objects in a scene. A range detection algorithm has been used to identify individual objects in a laser image and an edge detection algorithm then applied to highlight the outlines of discrete objects. An example of an image processed in such a manner is shown. Described here are the results from the study. In addition, results are presented outlining how the laser imaging system could be used to obtain other important information about bio/geophysical systems, such as the distribution of woody material in forests.

  9. Joint Inversion of Hydrological and Geophysical Data for Enhanced Reservoir Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commer, M.; Finsterle, S.; Zhang, Y.; Hoversten, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present two hydrogeophysical joint inver sion studies that target the enhanced prediction of fluid saturations in CO2-induced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations as well as sequestration. Considered are two geophysical data types. The first study involves the combination of production data with time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) data. The second combines production with seismic amplitude-versus-angle (AVA) data. The pilot point method combined with geostatistical simulation is used to generate a spatially correlated, heterogeneous permeability field that is flexibly adjustable during the joint inversion process. Both geophysical data types promise an improved prediction of the CO2-saturation, indicating potential benefits in both EOR as well as CO2-sequestration monitoring operations.

  10. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.; Vandergraft, J.; Blohm, M.; Porter, D.

    1993-08-01

    A geophysical data fusion methodology is under development to combine data from complementary geophysical sensors and incorporate geophysical understanding to obtain three dimensional images of the subsurface. The research reported here is the first phase of a three phase project. The project focuses on the characterization of thin clay lenses (aquitards) in a highly stratified sand and clay coastal geology to depths of up to 300 feet. The sensor suite used in this work includes time-domain electromagnetic induction (TDEM) and near surface seismic techniques. During this first phase of the project, enhancements to the acquisition and processing of TDEM data were studied, by use of simulated data, to assess improvements for the detection of thin clay layers. Secondly, studies were made of the use of compressional wave and shear wave seismic reflection data by using state-of-the-art high frequency vibrator technology. Finally, a newly developed processing technique, called ``data fusion,`` was implemented to process the geophysical data, and to incorporate a mathematical model of the subsurface strata. Examples are given of the results when applied to real seismic data collected at Hanford, WA, and for simulated data based on the geology of the Savannah River Site.

  11. Joint Geophysical Inversion With Multi-Objective Global Optimization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelievre, P. G.; Bijani, R.; Farquharson, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    Pareto multi-objective global optimization (PMOGO) methods generate a suite of solutions that minimize multiple objectives (e.g. data misfits and regularization terms) in a Pareto-optimal sense. Providing a suite of models, as opposed to a single model that minimizes a weighted sum of objectives, allows a more complete assessment of the possibilities and avoids the often difficult choice of how to weight each objective. We are applying PMOGO methods to three classes of inverse problems. The first class are standard mesh-based problems where the physical property values in each cell are treated as continuous variables. The second class of problems are also mesh-based but cells can only take discrete physical property values corresponding to known or assumed rock units. In the third class we consider a fundamentally different type of inversion in which a model comprises wireframe surfaces representing contacts between rock units; the physical properties of each rock unit remain fixed while the inversion controls the position of the contact surfaces via control nodes. This third class of problem is essentially a geometry inversion, which can be used to recover the unknown geometry of a target body or to investigate the viability of a proposed Earth model. Joint inversion is greatly simplified for the latter two problem classes because no additional mathematical coupling measure is required in the objective function. PMOGO methods can solve numerically complicated problems that could not be solved with standard descent-based local minimization methods. This includes the latter two classes of problems mentioned above. There are significant increases in the computational requirements when PMOGO methods are used but these can be ameliorated using parallelization and problem dimension reduction strategies.

  12. Thermoacoustic imaging of rabbit knee joints.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zihui; Zhao, Yuan; Huang, Lin; Zheng, Zhu; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-12-01

    Knee joint is one of the largest and most complex joints of the body. Knee joint diseases are common, and current clinical imaging technologies such as x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound imaging have limitations in the diagnosis of knee joint diseases. Emerging imaging technologies such as diffuse optical tomography and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) have been applied to the detection of osteoarthritis (OA). However, they are limited to small joints such as the finger and difficult to be used for large joints such as the knee. Thermoacoustic imaging (TAI), also an emerging modality, provides high contrast and deep tissue penetration. Here, the authors apply TAI to the knee joint and demonstrate the potential of TAI for imaging large joints. Adult New Zealand male rabbits (average weight = 2 kg) were chosen for this study. In a TAI experiment, a rabbit was placed in a holder to keep in a genuflex position after being injected with pentobarbital through its ear margin intravenous (30 mg/kg). The holder and the rabbit were then positioned under the horn antenna of the TAI system for signal acquisition and image reconstruction. After the experiment, the imaged knee joint was dissected and photographed. Identical procedures were performed for several rabbits (n = 4). Finally, detailed comparative analyses between TAI images and anatomical pictures of the knee joint were conducted. There were high similarities between the reconstructed TAI images and anatomical pictures of the knee joint, in terms of the shape and size of various knee joint tissues. TAI could clearly image ligament, fat pad, and other joint tissues. The differences in appearance of TAI images due to motion effect of the knee joint were also discussed. TAI could reveal details of rabbit knee joint in high resolution. As the recovered TAI images represent the dielectric property distributions of joint tissues, TAI may offer a new tool for noninvasive detection of joint

  13. Joint inversion of multiple geophysical and petrophysical data using generalized fuzzy clustering algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiajia; Li, Yaoguo

    2016-11-01

    Joint inversion that simultaneously inverts multiple geophysical data sets to recover a common Earth model is increasingly being applied to exploration problems. Petrophysical data can serve as an effective constraint to link different physical property models in such inversions. There are two challenges, among others, associated with the petrophysical approach to joint inversion. One is related to the multi-modality of petrophysical data because there often exist more than one relationship between different physical properties in a region of study. The other challenge arises from the fact that petrophysical relationships have different characteristics and can exhibit point, linear, quadratic, or exponential forms in a crossplot. The fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering technique is effective in tackling the first challenge and has been applied successfully. We focus on the second challenge in this paper and develop a joint inversion method based on variations of the FCM clustering technique. To account for the specific shapes of petrophysical relationships, we introduce several different fuzzy clustering algorithms that are capable of handling different shapes of petrophysical relationships. We present two synthetic and one field data examples and demonstrate that, by choosing appropriate distance measures for the clustering component in the joint inversion algorithm, the proposed joint inversion method provides an effective means of handling common petrophysical situations we encounter in practice. The jointly inverted models have both enhanced structural similarity and increased petrophysical correlation, and better represent the subsurface in the spatial domain and the parameter domain of physical properties.

  14. Joint inversion of multiple geophysical and petrophysical data using generalized fuzzy clustering algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiajia; Li, Yaoguo

    2017-02-01

    Joint inversion that simultaneously inverts multiple geophysical data sets to recover a common Earth model is increasingly being applied to exploration problems. Petrophysical data can serve as an effective constraint to link different physical property models in such inversions. There are two challenges, among others, associated with the petrophysical approach to joint inversion. One is related to the multimodality of petrophysical data because there often exist more than one relationship between different physical properties in a region of study. The other challenge arises from the fact that petrophysical relationships have different characteristics and can exhibit point, linear, quadratic, or exponential forms in a crossplot. The fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering technique is effective in tackling the first challenge and has been applied successfully. We focus on the second challenge in this paper and develop a joint inversion method based on variations of the FCM clustering technique. To account for the specific shapes of petrophysical relationships, we introduce several different fuzzy clustering algorithms that are capable of handling different shapes of petrophysical relationships. We present two synthetic and one field data examples and demonstrate that, by choosing appropriate distance measures for the clustering component in the joint inversion algorithm, the proposed joint inversion method provides an effective means of handling common petrophysical situations we encounter in practice. The jointly inverted models have both enhanced structural similarity and increased petrophysical correlation, and better represent the subsurface in the spatial domain and the parameter domain of physical properties.

  15. Joint inversion of geophysical data using petrophysical clustering and facies deformation wth the level set technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.

    2015-12-01

    Geological expertise and petrophysical relationships can be brought together to provide prior information while inverting multiple geophysical datasets. The merging of such information can result in more realistic solution in the distribution of the model parameters, reducing ipse facto the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem. We consider two level of heterogeneities: facies, described by facies boundaries and heteroegenities inside each facies determined by a correlogram. In this presentation, we pose the geophysical inverse problem in terms of Gaussian random fields with mean functions controlled by petrophysical relationships and covariance functions controlled by a prior geological cross-section, including the definition of spatial boundaries for the geological facies. The petrophysical relationship problem is formulated as a regression problem upon each facies. The inversion of the geophysical data is performed in a Bayesian framework. We demonstrate the usefulness of this strategy using a first synthetic case for which we perform a joint inversion of gravity and galvanometric resistivity data with the stations located at the ground surface. The joint inversion is used to recover the density and resistivity distributions of the subsurface. In a second step, we consider the possibility that the facies boundaries are deformable and their shapes are inverted as well. We use the level set approach to perform such deformation preserving prior topological properties of the facies throughout the inversion. With the help of prior facies petrophysical relationships and topological characteristic of each facies, we make posterior inference about multiple geophysical tomograms based on their corresponding geophysical data misfits. The method is applied to a second synthetic case showing that we can recover the heterogeneities inside the facies, the mean values for the petrophysical properties, and, to some extent, the facies boundaries using the 2D joint inversion of

  16. Efficiency of Pareto joint inversion of 2D geophysical data using global optimization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, Katarzyna; Bogacz, Adrian; Kozubal, Adam; Danek, Tomasz; Wojdyła, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Pareto joint inversion of two or more sets of data is a promising new tool of modern geophysical exploration. In the first stage of our investigation we created software enabling execution of forward solvers of two geophysical methods (2D magnetotelluric and gravity) as well as inversion with possibility of constraining solution with seismic data. In the algorithm solving MT forward solver Helmholtz's equations, finite element method and Dirichlet's boundary conditions were applied. Gravity forward solver was based on Talwani's algorithm. To limit dimensionality of solution space we decided to describe model as sets of polygons, using Sharp Boundary Interface (SBI) approach. The main inversion engine was created using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm adapted to handle two or more target functions and to prevent acceptance of solutions which are non - realistic or incompatible with Pareto scheme. Each inversion run generates single Pareto solution, which can be added to Pareto Front. The PSO inversion engine was parallelized using OpenMP standard, what enabled execution code for practically unlimited amount of threads at once. Thereby computing time of inversion process was significantly decreased. Furthermore, computing efficiency increases with number of PSO iterations. In this contribution we analyze the efficiency of created software solution taking under consideration details of chosen global optimization engine used as a main joint minimization engine. Additionally we study the scale of possible decrease of computational time caused by different methods of parallelization applied for both forward solvers and inversion algorithm. All tests were done for 2D magnetotelluric and gravity data based on real geological media. Obtained results show that even for relatively simple mid end computational infrastructure proposed solution of inversion problem can be applied in practice and used for real life problems of geophysical inversion and interpretation.

  17. MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vijay M; Bacelar, Maria Teresa

    2002-11-01

    Technologic advances in MR imaging have had a decisive effect on the capacity of investigators to image the TMJ. This article provides a description of the normal anatomy and function of this joint. emphasizing the key imaging findings of internal derangement. A reading algorithm is given to achieve a systematic approach to the interpretation of a temporomandibular MR imaging study. Finally, a summary of key imaging findings of other miscellaneous pathologic processes involving this joint is provided.

  18. Joint inversion : Exploring the different ways of coupling geophysical and groundwater data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steklova, Klara; Haber, Eldad

    2015-04-01

    given by, (bsig,bom,{y}) =&& frac 12 |de - Qe ŭ(bsig)|2Sigmae-1+ hf |df - Qf bom|2Sigmaf-1 +βeR(bsig) + βfR(bom) && + {y}top(bsig- p(bom)) + {{ρ}2}/|bsig - p(bom)) |2, where {y} is the Lagrange multiplier and ρ is a parameter that can be chosen somewhat arbitrarily. At each iteration L(bsig,bom,{y}) is minimized with respect to bsig or bom and {y} is updated. This method provides a huge computational advantage since at each iteration we solve only a subproblem with one data misfit term, regularization term, and coupling terms where one of the variables is fixed. However, all the involved terms need to be differentiable in order to proceed with a Gauss - Newton type minimization method. The second approach can be followed if the empirical relationship between bom and bsig is unknown. In this case, the unknown relationship is replaced by some structure similarity mapping, e.g. joint total variation (JTV), JTV(bsig,bom) = int √{|nabla bsig)|2 + |nabla bom)|2} ds. JTV is differential w.r.t both bsig and bom and has also advantage of being convex. The objective function (Eq.1) then contains additional JTV term instead of the constraint and can be minimized by block coordinate descent method. Both geophysical and groundwater models were developed in Matlab, including sensitivities of data w.r.t bsig and bom based on a discretized system of equations. The joint inversion outlined above was tested on the synthetic case of seawater intrusion and a solute tracer test with promising results.

  19. Geophysical imaging of shallow degassing in a Yellowstone hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquet, S.; Holbrook, W. S.; Carr, B. J.; Sims, K. W. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field, which hosts over 10,000 thermal features, is the world's largest active continental hydrothermal system, yet very little is known about the shallow "plumbing" system connecting hydrothermal reservoirs to surface features. Here we present the results of geophysical investigations of shallow hydrothermal degassing in Yellowstone. We measured electrical resistivity, compressional-wave velocity from refraction data, and shear wave velocity from surface-wave analysis to image shallow hydrothermal degassing to depths of 15-30 m. We find that resistivity helps identify fluid pathways and that Poisson's ratio shows good sensitivity to saturation variations, highlighting gas-saturated areas and the local water table. Porosity and saturation predicted from rock physics modeling provide critical insight to estimate the fluid phase separation depth and understand the structure of hydrothermal systems. Finally, our results show that Poisson's ratio can effectively discriminate gas- from water-saturated zones in hydrothermal systems.

  20. Escript: Open Source Environment For Solving Large-Scale Geophysical Joint Inversion Problems in Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Lutz; Altinay, Cihan; Fenwick, Joel; Smith, Troy

    2014-05-01

    The program package escript has been designed for solving mathematical modeling problems using python, see Gross et al. (2013). Its development and maintenance has been funded by the Australian Commonwealth to provide open source software infrastructure for the Australian Earth Science community (recent funding by the Australian Geophysical Observing System EIF (AGOS) and the AuScope Collaborative Research Infrastructure Scheme (CRIS)). The key concepts of escript are based on the terminology of spatial functions and partial differential equations (PDEs) - an approach providing abstraction from the underlying spatial discretization method (i.e. the finite element method (FEM)). This feature presents a programming environment to the user which is easy to use even for complex models. Due to the fact that implementations are independent from data structures simulations are easily portable across desktop computers and scalable compute clusters without modifications to the program code. escript has been successfully applied in a variety of applications including modeling mantel convection, melting processes, volcanic flow, earthquakes, faulting, multi-phase flow, block caving and mineralization (see Poulet et al. 2013). The recent escript release (see Gross et al. (2013)) provides an open framework for solving joint inversion problems for geophysical data sets (potential field, seismic and electro-magnetic). The strategy bases on the idea to formulate the inversion problem as an optimization problem with PDE constraints where the cost function is defined by the data defect and the regularization term for the rock properties, see Gross & Kemp (2013). This approach of first-optimize-then-discretize avoids the assemblage of the - in general- dense sensitivity matrix as used in conventional approaches where discrete programming techniques are applied to the discretized problem (first-discretize-then-optimize). In this paper we will discuss the mathematical framework for

  1. 3-D object-oriented image analysis of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; Kerle, N.; van der Meijde, M.

    2014-07-01

    Geophysical data are the main source of information about the subsurface. Geophysical techniques are, however, highly non-unique in determining specific physical parameters and boundaries of subsurface objects. To obtain actual physical information, an inversion process is often applied, in which measurements at or above the Earth surface are inverted into a 2- or 3-D subsurface spatial distribution of the physical property. Interpreting these models into structural objects, related to physical processes, requires a priori knowledge and expert analysis which is susceptible to subjective choices and is therefore often non-repeatable. In this research, we implemented a recently introduced object-based approach to interpret the 3-D inversion results of a single geophysical technique using the available a priori information and the physical and geometrical characteristics of the interpreted objects. The introduced methodology is semi-automatic and repeatable, and allows the extraction of subsurface structures using 3-D object-oriented image analysis (3-D OOA) in an objective knowledge-based classification scheme. The approach allows for a semi-objective setting of thresholds that can be tested and, if necessary, changed in a very fast and efficient way. These changes require only changing the thresholds used in a so-called ruleset, which is composed of algorithms that extract objects from a 3-D data cube. The approach is tested on a synthetic model, which is based on a priori knowledge on objects present in the study area (Tanzania). Object characteristics and thresholds were well defined in a 3-D histogram of velocity versus depth, and objects were fully retrieved. The real model results showed how 3-D OOA can deal with realistic 3-D subsurface conditions in which the boundaries become fuzzy, the object extensions become unclear and the model characteristics vary with depth due to the different physical conditions. As expected, the 3-D histogram of the real data was

  2. A joint inversion approach to characterize subsurface fracture networks based on geophysical and hydrological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karra, S.; Mudunuru, M.; Chen, T.; Makedonska, N.

    2016-12-01

    Fracture networks form critical pathways for fluid flow and transport of chemical species. Their characterization is crucial for applications involving storage and extraction of fluids in the subsurface such as unconventional oil and gas, CO2 sequestration, geothermal, nuclear waste storage, etc. Due to the extreme heterogeneity, anisotropy and uncertainties in the subsurface, characterizing fracture networks is a challenge. Just geophysical data (e.g., microseismic information) is insufficient to properly characterize the fracture networks, leading to a lot of uncertainty. One needs to incorporate multiple data streams such as geophysical, flow and tracer data, in order to constrain the fracture networks. In this work, we present a joint inversion framework to characterize subsurface fracture networks using multiple data streams. We first estimate the stochastics of the fracture orientations through a combination of focal mechanisms and clustering analysis of microseismic events. Flow and tracer observation datasets are then used to constrain the fracture lengths/size. The outcome of the proposed methodology is a discrete fracture network (DFN) that models the fracture network in the subsurface as a network of two-dimensional planar fractures in three-dimensional space. The DFN can then be used to predict flow, reactive transport or the state-of-stress in the subsurface.

  3. Fusion between Satellite and Geophysical images in the study of Archaeological Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamitrou, A. A.; Tsokas, G. N.; Petrou, M.; Maggidis, C.

    2012-12-01

    In this work various image fusion techniques are used between one satellite (Quickbird) and one geophysical (electric resistivity) image to create various combinations with higher information content than the two original images independently. The resultant images provide more information about possible buried archaeological relics. The examined archaeological area is located in mainland Greece near the city of Boetia at the acropolis of Gla. The acropolis was built on a flat-topped bedrock outcrop at the north-eastern edge of the Kopais basin. When Kopais was filled with water, Glas was emerging as an island. At the end of 14th century the two palaces of Thebes and Orchomenos jointly utilized a large scale engineering project in order to transform the Kopais basin into a fertile plain. They used the acropolis to monitor the project, and as a warehouse to storage the harvest. To examine the Acropolis for potential archaeological remnants we use one Quickbird satellite image that covers the surrounding area of Gla. The satellite image includes one panchromatic (8532x8528 pixels) and one multispectral (2133x2132 pixels) image, collected on 30th of August 2011, covering an area of 20 square kilometers. On the other hand, geophysical measurements were performed using the electric resistivity method to the south west part of the Acropolis. To combine these images we investigate mean-value fusion, wavelets fusion, and curvelet fusion. In the cases of wavelet and curvelet fusion we apply as the fusion criterion the maximum frequency rule. Furthermore, the two original images, and excavations near the area suggest that the dominant orientations of the buried features are north-south and east-west. Therefore, in curvelet fusion method, in curvelet domain we enhance the image details along these specific orientations, additionally to the fusion. The resultant fused images succeed to map linear and rectangular features that were not easily visible in the original images

  4. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bag, Asim K; Gaddikeri, Santhosh; Singhal, Aparna; Hardin, Simms; Tran, Benson D; Medina, Josue A; Curé, Joel K

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is continuously evolving with advancement of imaging technologies. Many different imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used for evaluation of the TMJ due to its superior contrast resolution and its ability to acquire dynamic imaging for demonstration of the functionality of the joint. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging have specific indication in imaging of the TMJ. This article focuses on state of the art imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Relevant normal anatomy and biomechanics of movement of the TMJ are discussed for better understanding of many TMJ pathologies. Imaging of internal derangements is discussed in detail. Different arthropathies and common tumors are also discussed in this article. PMID:25170394

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hayt, M W; Abrahams, J J; Blair, J

    2000-04-01

    The spectrum of disease that affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can be varied. To differentiate among the diseases that cause pain and dysfunction, an intimate knowledge of the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of this region is necessary. Due to the joint's complex anatomy and relationship to the skin, it has been difficult to image in the past. Magnetic resonance imaging is ideally suited for visualizing TMJ because of its superb contrast resolution when imaging soft tissues. Magnetic resonance imaging allows simultaneous bilateral visualization of both joints. The ability to noninvasively resolve anatomic detail can be performed easily and quickly using magnetic resonance imaging. The development of magnetic resonance imaging has greatly aided the diagnosis of TMJ disorders. An understanding of TMJ anatomy and pathogenesis of TMJ pain is crucial for interpretation of magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent treatment.

  6. Final Report DOE Contract No. DE-FG36-04G014294 ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP P.E. Malin, S.A. Onacha, E. Shalev Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences Nicholas School of the Environment Duke University Durham, NC 27708

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, Peter E.; Shalev, Eylon; Onacha, Stepthen A.

    2006-12-15

    In this final report, we discuss both theoretical and applied research resulting from our DOE project, ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP. The abstract below begins with a general discussion of the problem we addressed: the location and characterization of “blind” geothermal resources using microearthquake and magnetotelluric measurements. The abstract then describes the scientific results and their application to the Krafla geothermal area in Iceland. The text following this abstract presents the full discussion of this work, in the form of the PhD thesis of Stephen A. Onacha. The work presented here was awarded the “Best Geophysics Paper” at the 2005 Geothermal Resources Council meeting, Reno. This study presents the modeling of buried fault zones using microearthquake and electrical resistivity data based on the assumptions that fluid-filled fractures cause electrical and seismic anisotropy and polarization. In this study, joint imaging of electrical and seismic data is used to characterize the fracture porosity of the fracture zones. P-wave velocity models are generated from resistivity data and used in locating microearthquakes. Fracture porosity controls fluid circulation in the hydrothermal systems and the intersections of fracture zones close to the heat source form important upwelling zones for hydrothermal fluids. High fracture porosity sites occur along fault terminations, fault-intersection areas and fault traces. Hydrothermal fault zone imaging using resistivity and microearthquake data combines high-resolution multi-station seismic and electromagnetic data to locate rock fractures and the likely presence fluids in high temperature hydrothermal systems. The depths and locations of structural features and fracture porosity common in both the MT and MEQ data is incorporated into a joint imaging scheme to constrain resistivity, seismic velocities, and locations of fracture systems. The imaging of the

  7. Joint Geophysical Characterization of Geothermal System in Menengai, Kenya Using Magnetotelluric and Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamalwa, A. M.; Serpa, L. F.

    2010-12-01

    Geothermal exploration typically focuses on the identification of the heat source and defining the plumbing system that allows fluid flow at depths of 1-5 km where production of geothermal energy is feasible. The faults and fracture systems that make up the plumbing systems for hydrothermal fluids are often offset from their source and may be entirely hidden beneath basin fill or volcanic flows. Thus, a variety of different geophysical methods are used to detect the fracture zones and heat sources, including electrical, electromagnetic, seismic, and potential field techniques, each not giving a unique interpretation. Therefore a careful qualitative and quantitative joint analysis of these data based on common/shared geology may improve the overall understanding of the study area. To determine the extent of geothermal system as the target for development around Menengai volcano in the southern region of the Kenya rift valley, Magnetotelluric (MT) and gravity data were analysed. Subsurface conductivity and density distribution were used to infer the possible geological structures that relate to permeability and the heat source. Density gradient in the NW and NE north of the Menengai caldera defines the rift faults. A low resistivity layer at about 500 m and 1 km is interpreted as alteration clay minerals and overlays a relatively resistive zone. A low resistivity region at a depth of about 5-6 km is inferred to be a cooling magmatic body.

  8. Subtalar joint stress imaging with tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kota; Takashima, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform stress imaging of hindfoot inversion and eversion using tomosynthesis and to assess the subtalar joint range of motion (ROM) of healthy subjects. The subjects were 15 healthy volunteers with a mean age of 29.1 years. Coronal tomosynthesis stress imaging of the subtalar joint was performed in a total of 30 left and right ankles. A Telos stress device was used for the stress load, and the load was 150 N for both inversion and eversion. Tomographic images in which the posterior talocalcaneal joint could be confirmed on the neutral position images were used in measurements. The angle of the intersection formed by a line through the lateral articular facet of the posterior talocalcaneal joint and a line through the surface of the trochlea of the talus was measured. The mean change in the angle of the calcaneus with respect to the talus was 10.3 ± 4.8° with inversion stress and 5.0 ± 3.8° with eversion stress from the neutral position. The result was a clearer depiction of the subtalar joint, and inversion and eversion ROM of the subtalar joint was shown to be about 15° in healthy subjects. Diagnostic, Level IV.

  9. Composite SAR imaging using sequential joint sparsity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Toby; Gelb, Anne; Platte, Rodrigo B.

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigates accurate and efficient ℓ1 regularization methods for generating synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Although ℓ1 regularization algorithms are already employed in SAR imaging, practical and efficient implementation in terms of real time imaging remain a challenge. Here we demonstrate that fast numerical operators can be used to robustly implement ℓ1 regularization methods that are as or more efficient than traditional approaches such as back projection, while providing superior image quality. In particular, we develop a sequential joint sparsity model for composite SAR imaging which naturally combines the joint sparsity methodology with composite SAR. Our technique, which can be implemented using standard, fractional, or higher order total variation regularization, is able to reduce the effects of speckle and other noisy artifacts with little additional computational cost. Finally we show that generalizing total variation regularization to non-integer and higher orders provides improved flexibility and robustness for SAR imaging.

  10. Imaging Approach to Temporomandibular Joint Disorders.

    PubMed

    Morales, H; Cornelius, R

    2016-03-01

    Internal derangement is the most common temporomandibular joint disorder. Degenerative osteoarthritis and trauma are next in frequency. Less common pathology includes rheumatoid arthritis, synovial chondromatosis, calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate deposition disease, pigmented villonodular synovitis, tumors, infection, and osteonecrosis. We provide a systematic approach to facilitate interpretation based on major anatomic structures: disc-attachments, joint space, condyle, and lateral pterygoid muscle. Relevant graphic anatomy and state of the art imaging are discussed in correlation with current clinical and therapeutic highlights of pathologic entities affecting the joint.

  11. Dynamic joint transform correlator of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angervaks, A. E.; Malyi, A. F.; Fedorov, I. U.; Shcheulin, A. S.

    2008-03-01

    In this article principles of operation of a coherent optical image correlator based on a well know optical joint transform correlator are examined. Theoretical predictions and experimental data for of the optical image correlator with a holographic filter recorded on a thin holographic photographic plates PFG - 01 are analyzed. Results of the operation of the dynamic joint transform correlator on the basis of cadmium fluoride crystal, CdF2, with bistable impurity centers are demonstrated. Calculated and experimental correlation peak intensity dependencies with the scale and angular mismatch between an observed and reference objects for static and dynamic joint transform correlators are compared. Tangram figures were used as a test images. In the paper all computations were performed by use of MATLAB 7.0.1 mathematical program.

  12. Final Report U.S. Department of Energy Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data for Site Characterization and Restoration Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P.A.; Berryman, J.G.; Bertete-Aguirre, H.; Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Wildenschild, D.

    2000-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to conduct basic research leading to significant improvements in the state-of-the-art of geophysical imaging of the shallow subsurface. Geophysical techniques are commonly used for underground imaging for site characterization and restoration monitoring. in order to improve subsurface imaging, the objective was to develop improved methods for interpreting geophysical data collected in the field, by developing better methods for relating measured geophysical properties, such as seismic velocity and electrical conductivity, to hydrogeology parameters of interest such as porosity, saturation, and soil composition. They met the objectives using an approach that combined laboratory experiments, comparison to available field data, rock physics theories, and modeling, to find relationships between geophysical measurements, hydrogeological parameters and soil composition. The primary accomplishments of this project in the last year (FY99) were that they completed the laboratory measurements of ultrasonic velocities in soils at low pressures and the measurements of complex electrical conductivity in those same soils; they used x-ray computed microtomography to image the microstructure of several soil samples; they used rock physics theories and modeling to relate the geophysical measurements to the microstructure and hydrological properties; they developed a theoretical technique for relating compressional and shear wave velocities to fluid distribution in porous media; they showed how electrical conductivity is related to clay content and microstructure; they developed an inversion algorithm for inferring soil composition given compressional and shear wave velocities and tested the algorithm on synthetic field seismic data; they completed two patent applications; they wrote three journal papers; and they made 15 presentations of their results at eight scientific meetings.

  13. [Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Ros Mendoza, L H; Cañete Celestino, E; Velilla Marco, O

    2008-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small joint with complex anatomy and function. Diverse pathologies with very different symptoms can affect the TMJ. While various imaging techniques such as plain-film radiography and computed tomography can be useful, magnetic resonance imaging's superior contrast resolution reveals additional structures like the articular disk, making this technique essential for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. We analyze the MRI signs of the different pathologies that can affect the TMJ from the structural and functional points of view.

  14. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This report contains the results of a three year, three-phase project whose long-range goal has been to create a means for the more detailed and accurate definition of the near-surface (0--300 ft) geology beneath a site that had been subjected to environmental pollution. The two major areas of research and development have been: improved geophysical field data acquisition techniques; and analytical tools for providing the total integration (fusion) of all site data. The long-range goal of this project has been to mathematically, integrate the geophysical data that could be derived from multiple sensors with site geologic information and any other type of available site data, to provide a detailed characterization of thin clay layers and geological discontinuities at hazardous waste sites.

  15. Geophysical Imaging of Root Architecture and Root-soil Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Dafflon, B.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Roots play a critical role in controlling water and nutrient uptake, soil biogeochemical processes, as well as the physical anchorage for plants. While important processes, such as root hydraulic redistribution for optimal growth and survival have been recognized, representation of roots in climate models, e.g. its carbon storage, carbon resilience, root biomass, and role in regulating water and carbon fluxes across the rhizosphere and atmosphere interface is still challenging. Such a challenge is exacerbated because of the large variations of root architecture and function across species and locations due to both genetic and environmental controls and the lack of methods for quantifying root mass, distribution, dynamics and interaction with soils at field scales. The scale, complexity and the dynamic nature of plant roots call for minimally invasive methods capable of providing quantitative estimation of root architecture, dynamics over time and interactions with the soils. We present a study on root architecture and root-soil interactions using geophysical methods. Parameters and processes of interests include (1) moisture dynamics around root zone and its interaction with plant transpiration and environmental controls and (2) estimation of root structure and properties based on geophysical signals. Both pot and field scale studies were conducted. The pot scale experiments were conducted under controlled conditions and were monitored with cross-well electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), TDR moisture sensors and temperature probes. Pots with and without a tree were compared and the moisture conditions were controlled via a self regulated pumping system. Geophysical monitoring revealed interactions between roots and soils under dynamic soil moisture conditions and the role of roots in regulating the response of the soil system to changes of environmental conditions, e.g. drought and precipitation events. Field scale studies were conducted on natural trees using

  16. Statistical pattern recognition for rock joint images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weixing; Bin, Cui

    2005-10-01

    As a cooperation project between Sweden and China, we sampled a number of rock specimens for analyze rock fracture network by optical image technique. The samples are resin injected, in which way; opened fractures can be seen clearly by means of UV (Ultraviolet) light illumination. In the study period, Recognition of rock fractures is crucial in many rock engineering applications. In order to successfully applying automatic image processing techniques for the problem of automatic (or semi-automatic) rock fracture detection and description, the key (and hardest task) is the automatic detection of fractures robustly in images. When statistical pattern recognition is used to segment a rock joint color image, features of different samples can be learned first, then, each pixel of the image is classified by these features. As the testing result showing, an attribute rock fracture image is segmented satisfactorily by using this way. The method can be widely used for other complicated images too. In this paper, Kernel Fisher discrimination (KFD) is employed to construct a statistical pattern recognition classifier. KFD can transform nonlinear discrimination in an attribute space with high dimension, into linear discrimination in a feature space with low dimension. While one needs not know the detailed mapping form from attribute space to feature space in the process of transformation. It is proved that this method performs well by segmenting complicated rock joint color images.

  17. MRF-based Stochastic Joint Inversion of Hydrological and Geophysical Datasets to Evaluate Aquifer Heterogeneities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oware, E. K.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogeophysical assessment of aquifer parameters typically involve sparse noisy measurements coupled with incomplete understanding of the underlying physical process. Thus, recovering a single deterministic solution in light of the largely uncertain inputs is unrealistic. Stochastic imaging (SI) allows the retrieval of multiple equiprobable outcomes that facilitate probabilistic assessment of aquifer properties in a realistic fashion. Representation of prior models is a key aspect of the formulation of SI frameworks. However, higher-order (HO) statistics for representing complex priors in SI are usually borrowed from training images (TIs), which may bias outcomes if the prior hypotheses are inaccurate. A data-driven HO simulation alternative based on Markov random field (MRF) modeling is presented. Here, the modeling of spatial features is guided by potential (Gibbs) energy (PE) minimization. The estimation of the PE encompasses local neighborhood configuration (LNC) and prior statistical constraints. The lower the estimated PE the higher the likelihood of that particular local structure and vice versa. Hence, the LNC component of the PE estimation is designed to promote the recovery of some desired structures while penalizing the retrieval of patterns that are inconsistent with prior expectation. The statistical structure is adaptively inferred from the joint conditional datasets. The reconstruction proceeds in two-steps with the estimation of the lithological structure of the aquifer followed by the simulation of attributes within the identified lithologies. This two-step approach permits the delineation of physically realistic crisp lithological boundaries. The algorithm is demonstrated with a joint inversion of time-lapse concentration and electrical resistivity measurements, in a hypothetical trinary hydrofacies aquifer characterization problem.

  18. A Resolution Analysis of Two Geophysical Imaging Methods for Characterizing and Monitoring Hydrologic Conditions in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, David L.

    2003-06-01

    This project has been designed to analyze the resolution of two different geophysical imaging techniques (electrical resistivity tomography and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar) for monitoring subsurface flow and transport processes within the vadose zone. This is to be accomplished through a coupled approach involving large scale unsaturated flow modeling, petrophysical conversion of the resulting 2 and 3 Dimensional water content and solute concentration fields to geophysical property models and generation of synthetic geophysical data, followed by the inversion of the synthetic geophysical data. The resolution, strengths, and limitations of the geophysical techniques will then be ascertained through an analysis involving comparisons between the original hydrologic modeling results and inverted geophysical images. Increasing levels of complexity will be added to the models as the project progresses through the addition of heterogeneity in the original hydrologic property model, and by adding uncertainty to the petrophysical relationship that couples the geophysical model to the hydrologic modeling results.

  19. Geophysical imaging of hydrothermal shallow degassing in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquet, S.; Holbrook, W. S.; Carr, B.; Sims, K. W. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field is the world's largest active hydrothermal system, with over 10,000 thermal features. Yet very little is known about the shallow "plumbing" system connecting hydrothermal reservoirs with the surface features. Here we present the results of geophysical investigations of shallow hydrothermal degassing in Yellowstone. In addition to electrical methods, we combined seismic refraction and surface-wave profiling to estimate pressure and shear wave velocities together with the Poisson's ratio. We find that resistivity data helps identifying hydrothermal areas and fluids flowpaths. Poisson's ratio shows a good sensitivity to saturation variations, highlighting gas saturated areas. Porosity and saturation predicted from rock physics modeling provide critical insight to estimate the depth of fluid phase separation and understand the evolution of hydrothermal systems. Finally, the consistency between Poisson's ratio and predicted saturation illustrates its ability to map shallow "plumbing" systems in hydrothermal areas and constrain gas saturation in depth.

  20. Radar image interpretation techniques applied to sea ice geophysical problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carsey, F. D.

    1983-01-01

    The geophysical science problems in the sea ice area which at present concern understanding the ice budget, where ice is formed, how thick it grows and where it melts, and the processes which control the interaction of air-sea and ice at the ice margins is discussed. The science problems relate to basic questions of sea ice: how much is there, thickness, drift rate, production rate, determination of the morphology of the ice margin, storms feeling for the ice, storms and influence at the margin to alter the pack, and ocean response to a storm at the margin. Some of these questions are descriptive and some require complex modeling of interactions between the ice, the ocean, the atmosphere and the radiation fields. All involve measurements of the character of the ice pack, and SAR plays a significant role in the measurements.

  1. Image-guided facet joint injection

    PubMed Central

    Peh, WCG

    2011-01-01

    Chronic spine pain poses a peculiar diagnostic and therapeutic challenge due to multiple pain sources, overlapping clinical features and nonspecific radiological findings. Facet joint injection is an interventional pain management tool for facet-related spinal pain that can be effectively administered by a radiologist. This technique is the gold standard for identifying facet joints as the source of spinal pain. The major indications for facet injections include strong clinical suspicion of the facet syndrome, focal tenderness over the facet joints, low back pain with normal radiological findings, post-laminectomy syndrome with no evidence of arachnoiditis or recurrent disc disease, and persistent low back pain after spinal fusion. The contraindications are more ancillary, with none being absolute. Like any synovial joint degeneration, inflammation and injury can lead to pain on motion, initiating a vicious cycle of physical deconditioning, irritation of facet innervations and muscle spasm. Image-guided injection of local anesthetic and steroid into or around the facet joint aims to break this vicious cycle and thereby provide pain relief. This outpatient procedure has high diagnostic accuracy, safety and reproducibility but the therapeutic outcome is variable. PMID:21655113

  2. Imaging of Ground Ice with Surface-Based Geophysics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    blue line) overlaid on a visible spectra satellite image. Red lines are T1 and T2, and yellow dashed lines outline the mixed tussock and dwarf ...permafrost in most regions of the planet is associated with quantities of ground ice, often to great extents, and most often with massive ice features...permafrost (thermokarst) and intermittent standing surface water. At ap- proximately 80 m, the vegetation changed to a poorly drained mixed tus- sock and dwarf

  3. Constraining 3D Process Sedimentological Models to Geophysical Data Using Image Quilting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, P.; Da Pra, A.; Pontiggia, M.; Caers, J.

    2014-12-01

    3D process geological models, whether for carbonate or sedimentological systems, have been proposed for modeling realistic subsurface heterogeneity. The problem with such forward process models is that they are not constrained to any subsurface data whether to wells or geophysical surveys. We propose a new method for realistic geological modeling of complex heterogeneity by hybridizing 3D process modeling of geological deposition with conditioning by means of a novel multiple-point geostatistics (MPS) technique termed image quilting (IQ). Image quilting is a pattern-based techniques that stiches together patterns extracted from training images to generate stochastic realizations that look like the training image. In this paper, we illustrate how 3D process model realizations can be used as training images in image quilting. To constrain the realization to seismic data we first interpret each facies in the geophysical data. These interpretation, while overly smooth and not reflecting finer scale variation are used as auxiliary variables in the generation of the image quilting realizations. To condition to well data, we first perform a kriging of the well data to generate a kriging map and kriging variance. The kriging map is used as additional auxiliary variable while the kriging variance is used as a weight given to the kriging derived auxiliary variable. We present an application to a giant offshore reservoir. Starting from seismic advanced attribute analysis and sedimentological interpretation, we build the 3D sedimentological process based model and use it as non-stationary training image for conditional image quilting.

  4. River embankment characterization: The joint use of geophysical and geotechnical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Maria Teresa; Boaga, Jacopo; Bersan, Silvia; Cassiani, Giorgio; Cola, Simonetta; Deiana, Rita; Simonini, Paolo; Patti, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    Recent flood events in Northern Italy (particularly in the Veneto Region) have brought river embankments into the focus of public attention. Many of these embankments are more than 100 years old and have been repeatedly repaired, so that detailed information on their current structure is generally missing. The monitoring of these structures is currently based, for the most part, on visual inspection and localized measurements of the embankment material parameters. However, this monitoring is generally insufficient to ensure an adequate safety level against floods. For these reasons there is an increasing demand for fast and accurate investigation methods, such as geophysical techniques. These techniques can provide detailed information on the subsurface structures, are non-invasive, cost-effective, and faster than traditional methods. However, they need verification in order to provide reliable results, particularly in complex and reworked man-made structures such as embankments. In this paper we present a case study in which three different geophysical techniques have been applied: electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), frequency domain electromagnetic induction (FDEM) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). Two test sites have been selected, both located in the Province of Venice (NE Italy) where the Tagliamento River has large embankments. The results obtained with these techniques have been calibrated against evidence resolving from geotechnical investigations. The pros and cons of each technique, as well as their relative merit at identifying the specific features of the embankments in this area, are highlighted. The results demonstrate that geophysical techniques can provide very valuable information for embankment characterization, provided that the data interpretation is constrained via direct evidence, albeit limited in space.

  5. A Resolution Analysis of Two Geophysical Imaging Methods For Characterizing and Monitoring Hydrologic Conditions in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, D.; LaBreque, D.; Brainard, J.; Hammond, G.

    2006-08-02

    The objective of this research project was to analyze the resolution of two geophysical imaging techniques: electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) for monitoring subsurface flow and transport processes within the vadose zone. This was accomplished through a coupled approach involving very fine-scale unsaturated flow forward modeling, conversion of the resultant flow and solute fields to geophysical property models, forward geophysical modeling using the property model obtained from the last step to obtain synthetic geophysical data, and finally inversion of this synthetic data. These geophysical property models were then compared to those derived from the conversion of the hydrologic forward modeling to provide an understanding of the resolution and limitations of the geophysical techniques.

  6. Geophysical tomography for imaging water movement in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.

    1986-09-01

    Alterant tomography has been evaluated for its ability to delineate in-situ water flow paths in a fractured welded-tuff rock mass. The evaluation involved a field experiment in which tomographs of electromagnetic attenuation factor (or attenuation rate) at 300 MHz were made before, during, and after the introduction to the rock of two different water-based tracers: a plain water and dye solution, and salt water and dye. Alterant tomographs were constructed by subtracting, cell by cell, the attenuation factors derived from measurements before each tracer was added to the rock mass from the attenuation factors derived after each tracer was added. The alterant tomographs were compared with other evidence of water movement in the rock: borescope logs of fractures, and post experiment cores used to locate the dye tracer on the fractured surfaces. These comparisons indicate that alterant tomography is suitable for mapping water flow through fractures and that it may be useful in inferring which of the fractures are hydrologically connected in the image plane. The technique appears to be sensitive enough to delineate flow through a single fracture and to define fractures with a spatial resolution of about 10 cm on an imaging scale of a few meters. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Geophysical tomography for imaging water movement in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.

    1986-09-01

    Alterant tomography has been evaluated for its ability to delineate in-situ water flow paths in a fractured welded-tuff rock mass. The evaluation involved a field experiment in which tomographs of electromagnetic attenuation factor (or attenuation rate) at 300 MHZ were made before, during, and after the introduction to the rock of two different water-based tracers: a plain water and dye solution, and salt water and dye. Alterant tomographs were constructed by subtracting, cell by cell, the attenuation factors derived from measurements before each tracer was added to the rock mass from the attenuation factors derived after each tracer was added. The alterant tomographs were compared with other evidence of water movement in the rock: borescope logs of fractures, and postexperiment cores used to locate the dye tracer on the fractured surfaces. These comparisons indicate that alterant tomography is suitable for mapping water flow through fractures and that it may be useful in inferring which of the fractures are hydrologically connected in the image plane. The technique appears to be sensitive enough to delineate flow through a single fracture and to define fractures with a spatial resolution of about 10 cm on an imaging scale of a few meters. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  8. The use and abuse of image analysis in geophysical potential field interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Andrew J. W.

    1991-11-01

    Images of geophysical potential field data are becoming more common as a result of the increased availability of image analysis systems. These data are processed using techniques originally developed for remotely sensed satellite imagery. In general, geophysicists are not familiar with such techniques and may apply them without due consideration. This can lead to abuses of the geophysical data and reduce the validity of the interpretation. This paper describes some critical processes which can introduce errors to the data. The production of a regular grid from scattered data is fundamental to image processing. The choice of cell size is paramount and must balance the spatial distribution of the data. The necessary scaling of data from real values into a byte format for display purposes can result in small anomalies being masked. Contrast stretching of grey level images is often applied but can alter the shape of anomalies by varying degrees and should be avoided. Filters are often used to produce shaded relief images but without due regard to their frequency response and the effect on images expanded to fill the display space. The generation of spurious numerical artefacts can be reduced by ensuring that the filter is applied at real precision to the original data grid. The resultant images can then be processed for display. The use of image analysis systems for data integration requires careful consideration of the sampling strategy and information content of each dataset. It is proposed that such procedures are more appropriately conducted on a geographic information system.

  9. Geophysical imaging of near-surface structure using electromagnetic and seismic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongping

    This thesis includes three different studies of geophysical imaging: (1) inference of plume moments from tomograms with cross-hole radar; (2) simulated annealing inversion for near-surface shear-wave velocity structure with microtremor measurements; and (3) time-lapse GPR imaging of water movement in the vadose zone. Although these studies involve different geophysical approaches, they are linked by a common theme---using geophysical imaging to understand hydrologic phenomena or subsurface structure. My first study in this thesis is concerned with the identification of plume moments from geophysical tomograms. Previously geophysical imaging has been applied to characterize contaminant plume migration in groundwater, and to determine plume mass, extent, velocity, and shape. Although tomograms have been used for quantitative inference of plume moments, the reliability of these inferred moments is poorly understood. In general, tomograms represent blurry and blunted images of subsurface properties, as a consequence of limited data acquisition geometry, measurement error, and the effects of regularization. In this thesis, I investigated the effect of tomographic resolution on the inference of plume moments from tomograms. I presented a new approach to quantify the resolution of inferred moments, drawing on concepts from conventional geophysical image appraisal, and also image reconstruction from orthogonal moments. This new approach is demonstrated by synthetic examples in radar tomography. My results indicated that moments calculated from tomograms are subject to substantial error and bias. For example, for many practical survey geometries, crosshole radar tomography (1) is incapable of resolving the lateral center of mass, and (2) severely underpredicts total mass. The degree of bias and error varies spatially over the tomogram, in a complicated manner, as a result of spatially variable resolution. These findings have important implications for the quantitative use

  10. Geophysical image of the hydrothermal system of Merapi volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrdina, S.; Friedel, S.; Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Budi-Santoso, A.; Suhari; Suryanto, W.; Rizal, M. H.; Winata, E.; Kusdaryanto

    2017-01-01

    We present an image of the hydrothermal system of Merapi volcano based on results from electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), self-potential, and CO2 flux mappings. The ERT models identify two distinct low-resistivity bodies interpreted as two parts of a probably interconnected hydrothermal system: at the base of the south flank and in the summit area. In the summit area, a sharp resistivity contrast at ancient crater rim Pasar-Bubar separates a conductive hydrothermal system (20-50 Ω m) from the resistive andesite lava flows and pyroclastic deposits (2000-50,000 Ω m). The existence of preferential fluid circulation along this ancient crater rim is also evidenced by self-potential data. The significative diffuse CO2 degassing (with a median value of 400 g m-2 d-1) is observed in a narrow vicinity of the active crater rim and close to the ancient rim of Pasar-Bubar. The total CO2 degassing across the accessible summital area with a surface of 1.4 ṡ 105 m2 is around 20 t d-1. Before the 2010 eruption, Toutain et al. (2009) estimated a higher value of the total diffuse degassing from the summit area (about 200-230 t d-1). This drop in the diffuse degassing from the summit area can be related to the decrease in the magmatic activity, to the change of the summit morphology, to the approximations used by Toutain et al. (2009), or, more likely, to a combination of these factors. On the south flank of Merapi, the resistivity model shows spectacular stratification. While surficial recent andesite lava flows are characterized by resistivity exceeding 100,000 Ω m, resistivity as low as 10 Ω m has been encountered at a depth of 200 m at the base of the south flank and was interpreted as a presence of the hydrothermal system. No evidence of the hydrothermal system is found on the basis of the north flank at the same depth. This asymmetry might be caused by the asymmetry of the heat supply source of Merapi whose activity is moving south or/and to the asymmetry in

  11. Asymmetrical hydrothermal system below Merapi volcano imaged by geophysical data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrdina, Svetlana; Friedel, Sven; Budi-Santoso, Agus; Suryanto, Wiwit; Suhari, Aldjarishy; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Rizal, Mohhamed H.; Grandis, Hendra

    2017-04-01

    A high-resolution image of the hydrothermal system of Merapi volcano is obtained using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), self-potential, and CO2 flux mappings. The ERT inversions identify two distinct low-resistivity bodies, at the base of the south flank and in the summit area, that represent likely two parts of an interconnected hydrothermal system. In the summit area, the extension of the hydrothermal system is clearly limited by the main geological structures which are actual and ancient craters. A sharp resistivity contrast at ancient crater rim Pasar-Bubar separates a conductive hydrothermal system (20 - 50 Ωm) from the resistive andesite lava flows and pyroclastic deposits (2000 - 50 000 Ωm). High diffuse CO2 degassing (with a median value of 400g m -2 d -1) is observed in a narrow vicinity of the active crater rim and close to the Pasar-Bubar. The existence of preferential fluid circulation along this ancient crater rim is also evidenced by self-potential data. The total CO2 degassing across the accessible summit area with a surface of 1.4 · 10 5 m 2 is around 20 td -1. Before the 2010 eruption, Toutain et al. (2009) estimated a higher value of the total diffuse degassing from the summit area (about 200 - 230 td -1). This drop in the diffuse degassing can be related to the decrease in the magmatic activity, to the change of the summit morphology or to a combination of these factors. On the south flank of Merapi, the resistivity model shows spectacular stratification. While surficial recent andesite lava flows are characterized by resistivity exceeding 100 000 Ωm, resistivity as low as 10 Ωm has been encountered at a depth of 200 m at the base of the south flank and was interpreted as a presence of the hydrothermal system. We suggest that a sandwich-like structure of stratified pyroclastic deposits on the flanks of Merapi screen and separate the flow of hydrothermal fluids with the degassing occurring mostly through the fractured crater rims

  12. Case studies of geophysical imaging for road foundation design on soft soils and embankment risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, Robert J.; Kelly, Richard B.; Stewart, Simon B.

    2015-12-01

    Population growth along the coast of eastern Australia has increased demand for new and upgraded transport infrastructure within intervening coastal floodplains and steeper hinterland areas. This has created additional challenges for road foundation design. The floodplain areas in this region are underlain by considerable thicknesses of recently deposited alluvial and clayey marine sediments. If characterisation of these deposits is inadequate they can increase road construction costs and affect long-term road stability and serviceability. Case studies from a major coastal highway upgrade demonstrate how combining surface wave seismic and electrical geophysical imaging with conventional geotechnical testing enhances characterisation of these very soft and soft soils. The geophysical results also provide initial foundation design parameters such as void ratio and pre-consolidation pressure. A further significant risk issue for roads is potential embankment instability. This can occur during new road construction or when upgrades of existing embankments are required. Assessing the causes of instability of existing steeper embankments with drilling and probing is often difficult and costly due to access and safety problems. In these situations combinations of electrical, ground penetrating radar and P-wave seismic imaging technologies can rapidly provide information on the likely conditions below both the roadway and embankment. Case studies show the application of these technologies on two unstable road embankments. It is concluded that the application of both geophysical imaging and geotechnical testing is a cost-effective enhancement for site characterisation of soft soils and for risk assessment of potentially unstable embankments. This approach overcomes many of the current limitations of conventional methods of site investigation that provide point location data only. The incorporation of geophysics into a well crafted site investigation allows concentration on

  13. Geophysical Imaging of Natural Free Convection in a Sabkha Aquifer near Abu Dhabi, UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyndman, D. W.; van Dam, R. L.; Simmons, C. T.; Wood, W. W.

    2008-12-01

    Natural free convection is important for a wide range of disciplines including hydrogeology. Recent studies have examined brine movement below salt lakes, contaminant plumes, carbon sequestration, nuclear waste disposal, and hydrothermal deposits. Despite its importance and the increase of research in this area, free convection has not yet been conclusively detected in natural groundwater field settings. Here, we present recent geophysical measurements in a sabkha aquifer approximately 60 km west of Abu Dhabi, UAE. The sabkha material consists of uncemented and uniform fine sand with a nearly uniform porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Potential drivers for instabilities in this system include (1) sabkha waters of high total dissolved solids (TDS) and density overlying Miocene formation water with lower TDS, and (2) episodic downward infiltration of higher density water that forms after significant rainfall events due to dissolution of a halite crust. We characterized the system in March 2008, about 2 months after two unusually large rain events, using electrical resistivity (ER) and frequency-domain electromagnetic methods. Geophysical sounding data are consistent with a model of lower TDS water entering the sabkha from deeper (Miocene) formations. ER imaging data show a low resistivity zone just below the water table, from which distinct fingers protrude into a higher resistivity background. These geophysical images provide clear evidence of complex fingering likely associated with natural free convection.

  14. Sentinel-1 TOPS interferometry for geophysical applications: Dyke intrusion imaged during 2014 Pico do Fogo eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Pablo J.; Marinkovic, Petar; Samsonov, Sergey; Hooper, Andrew; Larsen, Yngvar; Wright, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Since the inception of the European Space Agency ERS Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission in the 1990s, radar interferometry has become an indispensable geophysical tool for measuring surface ground deformation over wide areas with high precision. Ground deformation is a key observation to study and monitoring multiple applications in geophysics such as earthquake and tectonics, volcano, land subsidence and landslides study and monitoring. Therefore, the frequent acquisition of SAR data to compute differential interferograms is a long standing goal in observational geodesy. A new mission designed by ESA, the Sentinel-1 mission would provide routinely frequent acquisitions (every 12 days) over larger areas (250-350 km). In April 2014, the first of expected four successive and overlapping similar spacecrafts was launched to start a total 20-year continuous operational mission. Terrain observation by progressive scans (TOPS) is a new radar acquisition mode, which provides with high quality radiometric radar amplitude images. TOPS mode allows us to acquire radar data over much wider areas than previous classical stripmap mode, and it is the default mode of acquisition of ESA Sentinel-1 satellite. However, due to a variable steering (ground scanning) of the antenna pattern, the corregistration of TOPSAR images result in a much higher demanding processing step. The higher precision azimuth SAR image corregistration and variable line-of-sight along azimuth direction intersect with the fact that image disparities on the order to a thousand of a pixel size also characterizes multiple geophysical phenomena (such as landslide dynamics, coseismic earthquake, fault creep or volcanic intrusions). In this paper, we present the first results using Sentinel-1 TOPS interferometry to measure an important deformation event. We successfully compute Sentinel-1 TOPS-InSAR and tested the effect of variable line-of-sight in azimuth, during the estimation of geophysical parameters. We

  15. Joint Inversion of Geochemical Data and Geophysical Logs for Lithology Identification in CCSD Main Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chengxiang; Pan, Heping; Luo, Miao

    2017-08-01

    The Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling (CCSD) main hole is located in the Sulu ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic (UHPM) belt, providing significant opportunities for studying the metamorphic strata structure, kinetics process and tectonic evolution. Lithology identification is the primary and crucial stage for above geoscientific researches. To release the burden of log analyst and improve the efficiency of lithology interpretation, many algorithms have been developed to automate the process of lithology prediction. While traditional statistical techniques, such as discriminant analysis and K-nearest neighbors classifier, are incompetent in extracting nonlinear features of metamorphic rocks from complex geophysical log data; artificial intelligence algorithms are capable of solving nonlinear problems, but most of the algorithms suffer from tuning parameters to be global optimum to establish model rather than local optimum, and also encounter challenges in making the balance between training accuracy and generalization ability. Optimization methods have been applied extensively in the inversion of reservoir parameters of sedimentary formations using well logs. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate solution from the logging response equations of optimization method because of the strong overlapping of nonstationary log signals when applied in metamorphic formations. As oxide contents of each kinds of metamorphic rocks are relatively less overlapping, this study explores an approach, set in a metamorphic formation model and using the Broyden Fletcher Goldfarb Shanno (BFGS) optimization algorithm to identify lithology from oxide data. We first incorporate 11 geophysical logs and lab-collected geochemical data of 47 core samples to construct oxide profile of CCSD main hole by using backwards stepwise multiple regression method, which eliminates irrelevant input logs step by step for higher statistical significance and accuracy. Then we establish oxide response

  16. Calculating Robot-Joint Coordinates From Image Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of robot joints not required. Algorithm generates approximate mathematical models of coordinates of joints of robot as functions of coordinates of points in images of work region viewed by television cameras. Joint coordinates necessary to position and orient end effector calculated by mathematical models fitted to experimentally determined data on positions, orientations, and joint coordinates. Generates models as functions of desired location of end effector of robot. Does not require priori knowledge of kinematic equations of robot.

  17. Evaluation of geophysical logs, Phase II, at Willow Grove Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conger, Randall W.

    1999-01-01

    Between March and April 1998, the U.S. Navy contracted Tetra Tech NUS Inc., to drill two monitor wells in the Stockton Formation at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base, Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pa. The wells MG-1634 and MG-1635 were installed to monitor water levels and sample contaminants in the shallow, intermediate, and deep water-producing zones of the fractured bedrock. Chemical analyses of the samples will help determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of any contaminated ground water migrating from known contaminant sources. Wells were drilled near the Fire Training Area (Site 5). Depths of all boreholes range from 69 to 149 feet below land surface. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted borehole geophysical logging and video surveys to identify water-producing zones in newly drilled monitor wells MG-1634 and MG-1635 and in wells MG-1675 and MG-1676. The logging was conducted from March 5, 1998, to April 16, 1998. This work is a continuation of the Phase I work. Caliper logs and video surveys were used to locate fractures; inflections on fluid-temperature and fluid-resistivity logs were used to locate possible water-producing fractures. Heatpulse-flowmeter measurements were used to verify the locations of water-producing or water-receiving zones and to measure rates of flow between water-bearing fractures. Single-point-resistance and natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, video surveys, and driller's notes, wells MG-1634 and MG-1635 were screened such that water-levels fluctuations could be monitored and discrete water samples collected from one or more water-producing zones in each borehole.

  18. Temporomandibular Joint Anatomy Assessed by CBCT Images

    PubMed Central

    Storti, Ennio; Nota, Alessandro; Ehsani, Shideh; Gatto, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Since cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been used for the study of craniofacial morphology, the attention of orthodontists has also focused on the mandibular condyle. The purpose of this brief review is to summarize the recent 3D CBCT images of mandibular condyle. Material and Methods. The eligibility criteria for the studies are (a) studies aimed at evaluating the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint; (b) studies performed with CBCT images; (c) studies on human subjects; (d) studies that were not clinical case-reports and clinical series; (e) studies reporting data on children, adolescents, or young adults (data from individuals with age ≤ 30 years). Sources included PubMed from June 2008 to June 2016. Results. 43 full-text articles were initially screened for eligibility. 13 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. 11 articles were finally included in qualitative synthesis. The main topics treated in the studies are the volume and surface of the mandibular condyle, the bone changes on cortical surface, the facial asymmetry, and the optimum position of the condyle in the glenoid fossa. Conclusion. Additional studies will be necessary in the future, constructed with longitudinal methodology, especially in growing subjects. The limits of CBCT acquisitions are also highlighted. PMID:28261607

  19. On the joint inversion of geophysical data for models of the coupled core-mantle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1991-01-01

    Joint inversion of magnetic, earth rotation, geoid, and seismic data for a unified model of the coupled core-mantle system is proposed and shown to be possible. A sample objective function is offered and simplified by targeting results from independent inversions and summary travel time residuals instead of original observations. These data are parameterized in terms of a very simple, closed model of the topographically coupled core-mantle system. Minimization of the simplified objective function leads to a nonlinear inverse problem; an iterative method for solution is presented. Parameterization and method are emphasized; numerical results are not presented.

  20. Quasi-3D Resistivity Imaging - Results from Geophysical Mapping and Forward Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, D.; Kneisel, C.

    2009-04-01

    2D resistivity tomography has proven to be a reliable tool in detecting, characterizing and mapping of permafrost, especially in joint application with other geophysical methods, e.g. seismic refraction. For many permafrost related problems a 3D image of the subsurface is of interest. Possibilities of quasi-3D imaging by collating several 2D ERT files into one quasi-3D file were tested. Data acquisition took place on a vegetated scree slope with isolated permafrost lenses in the Bever Valley, Swiss Alps. 21 2D-electrical arrays were applied with an electrode spacing of 5 m and a parallel spacing of 20 and 30 m using the Wenner electrode configuration. Refraction seismic was applied parallel to every second ERT array, with a geophone spacing of 5 m for validation. Results of quasi-3D imaging indicate that the most important factors influencing data quality are parallel spacing and number of right-angled crossing profiles. While the quasi-3D images generated of 2D-files with a parallel spacing of 20 m provide an interpretable image, 30 m spacing results in a blurred illustration of resistivity structures. To test the influence of crossing profiles quasi-3D images were inverted using only parallel measured data files as well as images containing right-angled crossing transects. Application of crossing profiles is of great importance, because the number of model blocks with interpolated resistivity values between parallel profiles is minimized. In case of two adjacent high resistivity anomalies a quasi-3D image consisting of parallel measured transects only illustrates one anomaly. A crossing profile provides information to differentiate the anomalies. Forward modeling was used to prove these assumptions and to improve the application of 2D ERT with regard to quasi-3D imaging. Main focus was on electrode and parallel spacing, the influence of crossing transects and the applicability of different array types. A number of 2D ERT profiles were generated, using the forward

  1. Can symptomatic acromioclavicular joints be differentiated from asymptomatic acromioclavicular joints on 3-T MR imaging?

    PubMed

    Choo, Hye Jung; Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Jung Han; Cha, Seong Sook; Park, Young Mi; Park, Ji Sung; Lee, Jun Woo; Oh, Minkyung

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate retrospectively whether symptomatic acromioclavicular joints can be differentiated from asymptomatic acromioclavicular joints on 3-T MR imaging. This study included 146 patients who underwent physical examination of acromioclavicular joints and 3-T MR imaging of the shoulder. Among them, 67 patients showing positive results on physical examination were assigned to the symptomatic group, whereas 79 showing negative results were assigned to the asymptomatic group. The following MR findings were compared between the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups: presence of osteophytes, articular surface irregularity, subchondral cysts, acromioclavicular joint fluid, subacromial fluid, subacromial bony spurs, joint capsular distension, bone edema, intraarticular enhancement, periarticular enhancement, superior and inferior joint capsular distension degree, and joint capsular thickness. The patients were subsequently divided into groups based on age (younger, older) and the method of MR arthrography (direct MR arthrography, indirect MR arthrography), and all the MR findings in each subgroup were reanalyzed. The meaningful cutoff value of each significant continuous variable was calculated using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The degree of superior capsular distension was the only significant MR finding of symptomatic acromioclavicular joints and its meaningful cutoff value was 2.1mm. After subgroup analyses, this variable was significant in the older age group and indirect MR arthrography group. On 3-T MR imaging, the degree of superior joint capsular distension might be a predictable MR finding in the diagnosis of symptomatic acromioclavicular joints. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Documenting Bronze Age Akrotiri on Thera Using Laser Scanning, Image-Based Modelling and Geophysical Prospection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinks, I.; Wallner, M.; Kucera, M.; Verhoeven, G.; Torrejón Valdelomar, J.; Löcker, K.; Nau, E.; Sevara, C.; Aldrian, L.; Neubauer, E.; Klein, M.

    2017-02-01

    The excavated architecture of the exceptional prehistoric site of Akrotiri on the Greek island of Thera/Santorini is endangered by gradual decay, damage due to accidents, and seismic shocks, being located on an active volcano in an earthquake-prone area. Therefore, in 2013 and 2014 a digital documentation project has been conducted with support of the National Geographic Society in order to generate a detailed digital model of Akrotiri's architecture using terrestrial laser scanning and image-based modeling. Additionally, non-invasive geophysical prospection has been tested in order to investigate its potential to explore and map yet buried archaeological remains. This article describes the project and the generated results.

  3. A robust method for estimating the multifractal wavelet spectrum in geophysical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolis, Orietta; Porro, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    The description of natural phenomena by an analysis of the statistical scaling laws is always a popular topic. Many studies aim to identify the fractal feature by estimating the self-similar parameter H, considered constant at different scales of observation. However, most real world data exhibit a multifractal structure, that is, the self-similarity parameter varies erratically with time. The multifractal spectrum provide an efficient tool for characterizing the scaling and singularity structures in signals and images, proving useful in numerous applications such as fluid dynamics, internet network traffic, finance, image analysis, texture synthesis, meteorology, and geophysics. In recent years, the multifractal formalism has been implemented with wavelets. The advantages of using the wavelet-based multifractal spectrum are: the availability of fast algorithms for wavelet transform, the locality of wavelet representations in both time and scale, and intrinsic dyadic self-similarity of basis functions. In this work we propose a robust Wavelet-based Multifractal Spectrum Estimator for the analysis of geophysical signals and satellite images. Finally, a simulation study and examples are considered to test the performances of the estimator.

  4. Digital image processing applied to analysis of geophysical and geochemical data for southern Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinness, E. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Leff, C. E.; Edwards, M. H.; Bindschadler, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Digital image-processing techniques have been used to analyze a variety of geophysical and geochemical map data covering southern Missouri, a region with important basement and strata-bound mineral deposits. Gravity and magnetic anomaly patterns, which have been reformatted to image displays, indicate a deep crustal structure cutting northwest-southeast through southern Missouri. In addition, geologic map data, topography, and Landsat multispectral scanner images have been used as base maps for the digital overlay of aerial gamma-ray and stream sediment chemical data for the 1 x 2-deg Rolla quadrangle. Results indicate enrichment of a variety of elements within the clay-rich alluvium covering many of the interfluvial plains, as well as a complicated pattern of enrichment for the sedimentary units close to the Precambrian rhyolites and granites of the St. Francois Mountains.

  5. New Joint Geochemical-Geophysical Record of Time-Dependent Mantle Convection South of Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. M.; Murton, B. J.; Fitton, J. G.; White, N. J.; Scientific Team Of Rv Celtic Explorer Cruise Ce0806

    2010-12-01

    Upper mantle convection is expected to be time-dependent because the mantle Rayleigh number is super-critical by at least 3 orders of magnitude. The North Atlantic V-Shaped Ridges (VSRs) provide a long, spatially extensive and clear record of unsteady mantle convection over time periods of 0.1 to 10 million years. VSRs are diachronous ridges of thick crust formed at the Mid Atlantic Ridge to the north and south of Iceland. Ever since their discovery, it has been generally agreed that this diachronous geometry results from melting anomalies that propagate outward from Iceland within the asthenosphere. The solid earth cycles that generate the VSRs also appear to modulate Atlantic oceanic circulation, since the VSR record correlates well with the % Northern Component Water proxy. Knowledge of geochemical variability associated with the VSRs is lacking in comparison with available geophysical and oceanographic records. Here we report dredged basalt samples obtained during RV Celtic Explorer cruise CE0806 (April-May 2008). Together with an earlier dredged dataset, we now have a record of basalt geochemistry covering intersections of 2 V-Shaped Ridge/Trough pairs with the Mid Atlantic Ridge, as well as a transect along a VSR crest. (1) Along the Mid Atlantic Ridge, spatial variations in trace element concentrations and ratios correlate very well with VSR records from bathymetry and gravity. Minima in incompatible trace element concentrations and in ratios such as La/Sm and Zr/Y correlate with maxima in crustal thickness. There is no associated systematic variation in Nd or Sr isotopes. Observations suggest that VSR melting anomalies are caused by variations in temperature rather than composition of the mantle source. (2) VSR melting anomalies propagate out to at least 1400 km from Iceland, well into the region where fracture zones obscure the topographic and gravitational expressions of the VSRs. A value of >1400 km for the radius of plume head measured at the mid

  6. A resolution analysis of two geophysical imaging methods for characterizing and monitoring hydrologic conditions in the Vadose zone.

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, James Robert; Hammond, Gary.; Alumbaugh, David L.; La Brecque, D.J.

    2007-06-01

    This research project analyzed the resolution of two geophysical imaging techniques, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR), for monitoring subsurface flow and transport processes within the vadose zone. The study was based on petrophysical conversion of moisture contents and solute distributions obtained from unsaturated flow forward modeling. This modeling incorporated boundary conditions from a potable water and a salt tracer infiltration experiment performed at the Sandia-Tech Vadose Zone (STVZ) facility, and high-resolution spatial grids (6.25-cm spacing over a 1700-m domain) and incorporated hydraulic properties measured on samples collected from the STVZ. The analysis process involved petrophysical conversion of moisture content and solute concentration fields to geophysical property fields, forward geophysical modeling using the geophysical property fields to obtain synthetic geophysical data, and finally, inversion of this synthetic data. These geophysical property models were then compared to those derived from the conversion of the hydrologic forward modeling to provide an understanding of the resolution and limitations of the geophysical techniques.

  7. Developing Training Image-Based Priors for Inversion of Subsurface Geophysical and Flow Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caers, J.

    2014-12-01

    Forecasting in subsurface formations, whether for groundwater, storage or oil & gas production, can rely on a wealth of geological information. Currently, most of this information remains underused in both the theory and practice of forecasting based on inverse models which heavily relies on spatial covariances and multi-Gaussian theory. By means of real field studies, I will provide an outline of how such geological information can be accounted through the construction and validation of a large set of training images and the generation of model realizations with MPS (multiple-point geostatistics). Often most critical in solving such inverse problems is the development of prior models that are later used for posterior sampling or stochastic search. I propose therefore a two-stage approach where the first stage consists of a validation of the training image-based prior with the geophysical and flow data. This stage will require only the generation of a few (100s) geological models and the forward modeling of the data response on these models. For geophysical data, the validation consists of comparing histograms of multi-scale wavelet transforms between the forward models and the field data. For flow data, the validation is based on a reduction of dimensionality of the forward response and the data using multi-dimensional scaling. The outcome of this validation is an estimate of the prior probability assigned to each training image, with several training images getting assigned zero probability (incompatible with field data). These prior probabilities are used in the second stage to actually invert for the data using stochastic search. In such stochastic search, I avoid parameterizing the model space and present methods that efficiently perform a direct search in the space of the validated training image-based prior model realizations.

  8. Measurement of knee joint motion using digital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hanratty, Brian; Thompson, Neville; Beverland, David

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of joint motion is common practice in many aspects of orthopaedic surgery. A number of techniques and instruments have been developed for this purpose. We describe a method of recording and measuring knee joint motion using digital imaging which demonstrated high inter-observer reliability (r > 0.948) and intra-observer repeatability (r > 0.906). This technique may offer some practical advantages over other methods of measuring joint motion. PMID:19037641

  9. Measurement of knee joint motion using digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Damien; Hanratty, Brian; Thompson, Neville; Beverland, David

    2009-12-01

    The measurement of joint motion is common practice in many aspects of orthopaedic surgery. A number of techniques and instruments have been developed for this purpose. We describe a method of recording and measuring knee joint motion using digital imaging which demonstrated high inter-observer reliability (r > 0.948) and intra-observer repeatability (r > 0.906). This technique may offer some practical advantages over other methods of measuring joint motion.

  10. Joint Geophysical and Hydrologic Constraints on Shallow Groundwater Flow Systems in Clastic Salt Marshes of the South Atlantic Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppel, C.; Fulton, P.; Schultz, G. M.; Castillo, L.; Bartlett, J.; Sibley, S.

    2005-12-01

    Salt marsh systems play a critical role in buffering upland coastal areas from the influence of open saltwater bodies and in filtering contaminants that originate offshore or are flushed from uplands. For these reasons, it is important to understand the salt marsh hydrologic cycle, especially the interaction of groundwater and surface water across low-lying coastal fringes and the changes in physical, chemical, and ecological parameters across salinity gradients extending from upland to tidal creek to open water. For the past 5 years, we have conducted hydrogeophysical surveys (inductive EM and DC resistivity) and collected limited, coincident groundwater hydrologic data in clastic salt marshes throughout the South Atlantic Bight (SAB), stretching from South Carolina on the north to the Georgia-Florida border on the south. All of the marshes are dominated by Spartina and Juncus grasses and are cut by tidally-influenced creeks, but both the lithology and age of the marshes vary widely. For example, one highly homogeneous marsh study site has formed only within the past century, while most sites have existed for thousands of years and have laterally and vertically heterogeneous lithology. Geophysical images of the marsh subsurface and coincident monitoring of groundwater temperature, water level, and/or chemistry consistently show that marshes in the mixed energy environment of the middle part of the SAB (GCE LTER) tend to be dominated by submarsh discharge of freshwater to adjacent tidal creeks. In the South Carolina part of the SAB, we have greater evidence for seepage, particularly through biologically-created macropore networks and permeable sediment bodies that intersect tidal creeks. It is possible though that the South Carolina results are not so much 'universal' as reflective of local lithology. In a very young marsh near the Florida border, geophysical imaging implies a mixture of seepage and submarsh flow, and hydrologic data provide unequivocal proof that

  11. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F. Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space. PMID:26981483

  12. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis.

    PubMed

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space.

  13. An overview of joint inversion in earthquake source imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koketsu, Kazuki

    2016-10-01

    We reviewed joint inversion studies of the rupture processes of significant earthquakes, using the definition of a joint inversion in earthquake source imaging as a source inversion of multiple kinds of datasets (waveform, geodetic, or tsunami). Yoshida and Koketsu (Geophys J Int 103:355-362, 1990), and Wald and Heaton (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:668-691, 1994) independently initiated joint inversion methods, finding that joint inversion provides more reliable rupture process models than single-dataset inversion, leading to an increase of joint inversion studies. A list of these studies was made using the finite-source rupture model database (Mai and Thingbaijam in Seismol Res Lett 85:1348-1357, 2014). Outstanding issues regarding joint inversion were also discussed.

  14. Compressive optical image watermarking using joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhong, Ting; Dai, Xiaofang; Yang, Chanxia; Li, Rong; Tang, Zhilie

    2017-02-01

    A new optical image watermarking technique based on compressive sensing using joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture has been presented. A secret scene or image is first embedded into a host image to perform optical image watermarking by use of joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture. Then, the watermarked image is compressed to much smaller signal data using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in optical domain. At the received terminal, the watermarked image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory and a specified holographic reconstruction algorithm. The preliminary numerical simulations show that it is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in the coming absolutely optical network for the reason of the completely optical implementation and largely decreased holograms data volume.

  15. Application of joint orthogonal bases in compressive sensing ghost image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Chen, Yi; Cheng, Zheng-dong; Liang, Zheng-yu; Zhu, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Sparse decomposition is one of the core issue of compressive sensing ghost image. At this stage, traditional methods still have the problems of poor sparsity and low reconstruction accuracy, such as discrete fourier transform and discrete cosine transform. In order to solve these problems, joint orthogonal bases transform is proposed to optimize ghost imaging. First, introduce the principle of compressive sensing ghost imaging and point out that sparsity is related to the minimum sample data required for imaging. Then, analyze the development and principle of joint orthogonal bases in detail and find out it can use less nonzero coefficients to reach the same identification effect as other methods. So, joint orthogonal bases transform is able to provide the sparsest representation. Finally, the experimental setup is built in order to verify simulation results. Experimental results indicate that the PSNR of joint orthogonal bases is much higher than traditional methods by using same sample data in compressive sensing ghost image.Therefore, joint orthogonal bases transform can realize better imaging quality under less sample data, which can satisfy the system requirements of convenience and rapid speed in ghost image.

  16. Diffuse optical imaging of brain activation to joint attention experience.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Banghe; Yadav, Nitin; Rey, Gustavo; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2009-08-24

    In the early development of social cognition and language, infants tend to participate in face-to-face interactions engaging in joint attention exchanges. Joint attention is vital to social competence at all ages, lacking which is a primary feature to distinguish autistic from non-autistic population. In this study, diffuse optical imaging is used for the first time to investigate the joint attention experience in normal adults. Imaging studies were performed in the frontal regions of the brain (BA9 and BA10) in order to study the differences in the brain activation in response to video clips corresponding to joint attention based skills. The frontal regions of the brain were non-invasively imaged using a novel optical cap coupled to a frequency-domain optical imaging system. The statistical analysis from 11 normal adult subjects, with three repetitions from each subject, indicated that the averaged changes in the cerebral blood oxygenation levels were different under the joint and non-joint attention based stimulus. The preliminary studies demonstrate the feasibility of implementing diffuse optical imaging towards autism-related research to study the brain activation in response to socio-communication skills.

  17. Environmental Geophysics

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Geophysics website features geophysical methods, terms and references; forward and inverse geophysical models for download; and a decision support tool to guide geophysical method selection for a variety of environmental applications.

  18. Identification of inflammation sites in arthritic joints using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Milanic, Matija; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Grandaunet, Berit; Dhainaut, Alvilde; Hoff, Mari; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory arthritic diseases have prevalence between 2 and 3% and may lead to joint destruction and deformation resulting in a loss of function. Patient's quality of life is often severely affected as the disease attacks hands and finger joints. Pathology involved in arthritis includes angiogenesis, hyper-vascularization, hyper-metabolism and relative hypoxia. We have employed hyperspectral imaging to study the hemodynamics of affected- and non-affected joints and tissue. Two hyperspectral, push-broom cameras were used (VNIR-1600, SWIR-320i, Norsk Elektro Optikk AS, Norway). Optical spectra (400nm - 1700nm) of high spectral resolution were collected from 15 patients with visible symptoms of arthritic rheumatic diseases in at least one joint. The control group consisted of 10 healthy individuals. Concentrations of dominant chromophores were calculated based on analytical calculations of light transport in tissue. Image processing was used to analyze hyperspectral data and retrieve information, e.g. blood concentration and tissue oxygenation maps. The obtained results indicate that hyperspectral imaging can be used to quantify changes within affected joints and surrounding tissue. Further improvement of this method will have positive impact on diagnosis of arthritic joints at an early stage. Moreover it will enable development of fast, noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic tool of arthritic joints

  19. Joint transform correlator using JPEG-compressed reference images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widjaja, Joewono

    2013-06-01

    Pattern recognition by using joint transform correlator with JPEG-compressed reference images is studied. Human face and fingerprint images are used as test scenes with different spatial frequency contents. Recognition performance is quantitatively measured by taking into account effect of imbalance illumination and noise presence. The feasibility of implementing the proposed JTC is verified by using computer simulations and experiments.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint: value of pseudodynamic images.

    PubMed

    Ren, Y F; Westesson, P L; Isberg, A

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance fast scanning technique (gradient recalled acquisition at steady state) has been reported to be useful when evaluating the dynamics of the temporomandibular joint and also to be accurate for determining the disk position. Yet in our clinical experience gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images have frequently been inferior to proton density images for diagnosis of temporomandibular joint internal derangement. The first aim of this study was to compare gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images with proton density images for diagnosis of disk position. The second aim was to identify what additional information could be gathered from gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images when compared with static proton density images. We obtained unilateral images from 20 patients with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint internal derangement and from 20 asymptomatic volunteers. Multiple gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images were obtained during mouth opening and closing and proton density images were obtained at the closed and open mouth positions. The results showed that the gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images were in accordance with the proton density images in 32 joints (80%) and were false negative in 8 joints (20%). Six of the joints with false-negative gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images showed sideways disk displacement, and two showed partial anterior disk displacement. Gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images, on the other hand, provided information about movement pattern and also demonstrated impingement of the joint structures on the muscles anterior to the joint at maximal mouth opening. It was concluded that gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images cannot replace proton density images for diagnosis of disk position but they can provide supplementary information for evaluation of joint function.

  1. A geophysical potential field study to image the Makran subduction zone in SE of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Maysam; Bahroudi, Abbas

    2016-10-01

    The Makran subduction wedge as one of the largest subduction complexes has been forming due to the Arabian oceanic lithosphere subducting beneath the Lut and the Afghan rigid block microplates. To better visualize the subducting oceanic crust in this region, a geophysical model of magnetic susceptibility from an airborne magnetic survey (line spacing about 7.5 km) over the Makran zone located at southeast of Iran is created to image various structural units in Iran plate. The constructed geophysical model from the 3D inverse modeling of the airborne magnetic data indicates a thin subducting slab to the north of the Makran structural zone. It is demonstrated that the thickness of sedimentary units varies approximately at an interval of 7.5-11 km from north to south of this zone in the Iranian plate, meanwhile the curie depth is also estimated approximately < 26 km. It is also shown the Jazmurian depression zone adjacent to the north of the Makran indicates high intensity magnetic anomalies due to being underlain by an ophiolite oceanic basement, while such intensity reduces over the Makran. The directional derivatives of the magnetic field data have subtle changes in the Makran, but strongly increase in the Jazmurian by enhancing and separating different structural boundaries in this region. In addition, the density variations of the subsurface geological layers were determined by 3D inversion of the ground-based gravity data over the whole study area, where the constructed density model was in good agreement with the magnetic one. According to the outputs of the magnetic susceptibility and the density contrast, the Arabian plate subducts to the north under the Eurasia with a very low dip angle in the Makran structural zone.

  2. Subband Image Coding with Jointly Optimized Quantizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kossentini, Faouzi; Chung, Wilson C.; Smith Mark J. T.

    1995-01-01

    An iterative design algorithm for the joint design of complexity- and entropy-constrained subband quantizers and associated entropy coders is proposed. Unlike conventional subband design algorithms, the proposed algorithm does not require the use of various bit allocation algorithms. Multistage residual quantizers are employed here because they provide greater control of the complexity-performance tradeoffs, and also because they allow efficient and effective high-order statistical modeling. The resulting subband coder exploits statistical dependencies within subbands, across subbands, and across stages, mainly through complexity-constrained high-order entropy coding. Experimental results demonstrate that the complexity-rate-distortion performance of the new subband coder is exceptional.

  3. Sagittal laser optical tomography for imaging of rheumatoid finger joints.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Andreas H; Klose, Alexander D; Scheel, Alexander K; Moa-Anderson, Bryte; Backhaus, Marina; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Jürgen

    2004-04-07

    We present a novel optical tomographic imaging system that was designed to determine two-dimensional spatial distribution of optical properties in a sagittal plane through finger joints. The system incorporates a single laser diode and a single silicon photodetector into a scanning device that records spatially resolved light intensities as they are transmitted through a finger. These data are input to a model-based iterative image reconstruction (MOBIIR) scheme, which uses the equation of radiative transfer (ERT) as a forward model for light propagation through tissue. We have used this system to obtain tomographic images of six proximal interphalangeal finger joints from two patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The optical images were compared to clinical symptoms and ultrasound images.

  4. Photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis in human joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Marquardt, April; Francis, Sheeja; Yuan, Jie; Girish, Dhanuj; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2016-02-01

    The ducal imaging with photoacoustic imaging (PAI) that is an emerging technology and clinical ultrasound imaging that is an established modality is developed for the imaging of early inflammatory arthritis. PAI is sensitive to blood volume, not limited by flow like ultrasound, holding great promise for the earliest detection of increase in blood volume and angiogenesis - a key early finding inflammation PAI has the capability of assessing inflammation in superficial human soft tissues, offering potential benefits in diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. PAI combined with ultrasonography (US), is a real time dual-modality system developed and tested to identify active synovitis in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of 10 arthritis patients and 10 normal volunteers. Photoacoustic images of the joints were acquired at 580-nm laser wavelength, which provided the desired balance between the optical contrast of hemoglobin over bone cortex and the imaging depth. Confirmed by US Doppler imaging, the results from ten patients and ten normal volunteers demonstrated satisfactory sensitivity of PAI in assessing enhanced blood flow due to active synovitis. This preliminary study suggests that photoacoustic imaging, by identifying early increase in blood volume, related to increased vascularity, a hallmark of joint inflammation, could be a valuable supplement to musculoskeletal US.

  5. Imaging of Temporomandibular Joint: Approach by Direct Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Bruschetta, Daniele; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a morphological analysis of the temporomandibular joint, a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mandible. Materials and Methods: We have studied the temporom-andibular joint anatomy, directly on the living, from 3D images obtained by medical imaging Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance acquisition, and subsequent re-engineering techniques 3D Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering. Data were analysed with the goal of being able to isolate, identify and distinguish the anatomical structures of the joint, and get the largest possible number of information utilizing software for post-processing work. Results: It was possible to reproduce anatomy of the skeletal structures, as well as through acquisitions of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; it was also possible to visualize the vascular, muscular, ligamentous and tendinous components of the articular complex, and also the capsule and the fibrous cartilaginous disc. We managed the Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering, not only to obtain three-dimensional images for colour and for resolution comparable to the usual anatomical preparations, but also a considerable number of anatomical, minuter details, zooming, rotating and cutting the same images with linking, graduating the colour, transparency and opacity from time to time. Conclusion: These results are encouraging to stimulate further studies in other anatomical districts. PMID:25664280

  6. Phase-Sensitive X-ray Imaging of Synovial Joints

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhong, Zhong; Connor, Dean; Mollenhauer, Jorgen; Muehleman, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test the efficacy of phase-sensitive x-ray imaging for intact synovial joints, whereby refraction effects, along with the attenuation of conventional radiography, can be exploited. Design Intact cadaveric human knee joints were imaged, in the computed tomographic mode, using an analyzer based x-ray system at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. A collimated fan beam of 51 keV X-rays was prepared by a silicon [1,1,1 reflection] double-crystal monochromator. The x-ray beam transmitted through the specimen was imaged after diffraction in the vertical plane by means of the analyzer crystal with the analyzer crystal tuned to its half-reflectivity point (6.5 microradians). A two-dimensional filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used for reconstructing transverse slices of images. Results The resulting images demonstrate simultaneous soft-tissue and bone contrast at a level that has not been achieved previously. Identifiable structures include articular cartilage, cruciate ligaments, loose connective tissue, menisci, and chondrocalcinosis. Conclusion Phase-sensitive x-ray imaging using an analyzer-based system renders exceptionally high quality images of soft and hard tissues within synovial joints, with high contrast and resolution, and thus holds promise for the eventual clinical utility. PMID:19328880

  7. Directional Joint Bilateral Filter for Depth Images

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anh Vu; Jung, Seung-Won; Won, Chee Sun

    2014-01-01

    Depth maps taken by the low cost Kinect sensor are often noisy and incomplete. Thus, post-processing for obtaining reliable depth maps is necessary for advanced image and video applications such as object recognition and multi-view rendering. In this paper, we propose adaptive directional filters that fill the holes and suppress the noise in depth maps. Specifically, novel filters whose window shapes are adaptively adjusted based on the edge direction of the color image are presented. Experimental results show that our method yields higher quality filtered depth maps than other existing methods, especially at the edge boundaries. PMID:24971470

  8. Joint Lung CT Image Segmentation: A Hierarchical Bayesian Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wenjun; Ma, Luyao; Yang, Tiejun; Liang, Jiali

    2016-01-01

    Accurate lung CT image segmentation is of great clinical value, especially when it comes to delineate pathological regions including lung tumor. In this paper, we present a novel framework that jointly segments multiple lung computed tomography (CT) images via hierarchical Dirichlet process (HDP). In specifics, based on the assumption that lung CT images from different patients share similar image structure (organ sets and relative positioning), we derive a mathematical model to segment them simultaneously so that shared information across patients could be utilized to regularize each individual segmentation. Moreover, compared to many conventional models, the algorithm requires little manual involvement due to the nonparametric nature of Dirichlet process (DP). We validated proposed model upon clinical data consisting of healthy and abnormal (lung cancer) patients. We demonstrate that, because of the joint segmentation fashion, more accurate and consistent segmentations could be obtained. PMID:27611188

  9. On different techniques for the calculation of Bouguer gravity anomalies for joint inversion and model fusion of geophysical data in the Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Azucena

    Density variations in the Earth result from different material properties, which reflect the tectonic processes attributed to a region. Density variations can be identified through measurable material properties, such as seismic velocities, gravity field, magnetic field, etc. Gravity anomaly inversions are particularly sensitive to density variations but suffer from significant non-uniqueness. However, using inverse models with gravity Bouguer anomalies and other geophysical data, we can determine three dimensional structural and geological properties of the given area. We explore different techniques for the calculation of Bouguer gravity anomalies for their use in joint inversion of multiple geophysical data sets and a model fusion scheme to integrate complementary geophysical models. Various 2- and 3- dimensional gravity profile forward modeling programs have been developed as variations of existing algorithms in the last decades. The purpose of this study is to determine the most effective gravity forward modeling method that can be used to combine the information provided by complementary datasets, such as gravity and seismic information, to improve the accuracy and resolution of Earth models obtained for the underlying structure of the Rio Grande Rift. In an effort to determine the most appropriate method to use in a joint inversion algorithm and a model fusion approach currently in development, we test each approach by using a model of the Rio Grande Rift obtained from seismic surface wave dispersion and receiver functions. We find that there are different uncertainties associated with each methodology that affect the accuracy achieved by including gravity profile forward modeling. Moreover, there exists an important amount of assumptions about the regions under study that must be taken into account in order to obtain an accurate model of the gravitational acceleration caused by changes in the density of the material in the substructure of the Earth.

  10. Automatic finger joint synovitis localization in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurzynska, Karolina; Smolka, Bogdan

    2016-04-01

    A long-lasting inflammation of joints results between others in many arthritis diseases. When not cured, it may influence other organs and general patients' health. Therefore, early detection and running proper medical treatment are of big value. The patients' organs are scanned with high frequency acoustic waves, which enable visualization of interior body structures through an ultrasound sonography (USG) image. However, the procedure is standardized, different projections result in a variety of possible data, which should be analyzed in short period of time by a physician, who is using medical atlases as a guidance. This work introduces an efficient framework based on statistical approach to the finger joint USG image, which enables automatic localization of skin and bone regions, which are then used for localization of the finger joint synovitis area. The processing pipeline realizes the task in real-time and proves high accuracy when compared to annotation prepared by the expert.

  11. Geophysical imaging of subsurface structures in volcanic area by seismic attenuation profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuru, Tetsuro; No, Tetsuo; Fujie, Gou

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical imaging by using attenuation property of multichannel seismic reflection data was tested to map spatial variation of physical properties of rocks in a volcanic area. The study area is located around Miyakejima volcanic island, where an intensive earthquake swarm was observed associated with 2000 Miyakejima eruption. Seismic reflection survey was conducted five months after the swarm initiation in order to clarify crustal structure around the hypocenters of the swarm activity. However, the resulting seismic reflection profiles were unable to provide significant information of deep structures around the hypocenters. The authors newly applied a seismic attribute method that focused seismic attenuation instead of reflectivity to the volcanic area, and designed this paper to assess the applicability of this method to subsurface structural studies in poorly reflective volcanic areas. Resulting seismic attenuation profiles successfully figured out attenuation structures around the Miyakejima volcanic island. Interestingly, a remarkable high-attenuation zone was detected between Miyakejima and Kozushima islands, being well correlated with the hypocenter distribution of the earthquake swarm in 2000. The high-attenuation zone is interpreted as a fractured area that was developed by magma activity responsible for the earthquake swarms that have been repeatedly occurring there. The present study can be one example showing the applicability of seismic attenuation profiling in a volcanic area. [Figure not available: see fulltext. Caption: .

  12. [Imaging examinations of the patellofemoral joint].

    PubMed

    Kramer, J; Scheurecker, G; Scheurecker, A; Stöger, A; Huber, H; Hofmann, S

    2008-09-01

    Lesions in the patellofemoral region can be caused by trauma, chronic overloading, and especially regarding cartilage alterations by normal aging or pathologic processes. Very commonly these lesions lead to early arthrosis. An accurate clinical evaluation in all these patients is recommended. The combination of clinical information and radiological examinations should end up with an exact diagnosis.As part of the radiological evaluation of complaints of the patellofemoral region MR imaging is of special value since this method allows direct visualization of all intra- and extra-articular structures and their alterations, ultimately aiding in planning sufficient therapy. Moreover, is it possible to exclude pathology by MR imaging, which helps to prevent useless treatment and surgical procedures.

  13. Joint water-fat separation and deblurring for spiral imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dinghui; Zwart, Nicholas R; Pipe, James G

    2017-10-05

    Most previous approaches to spiral Dixon water-fat imaging perform the water-fat separation and deblurring sequentially based on the assumption that the phase accumulation and blurring as a result of off-resonance are separable. This condition can easily be violated in regions where the B0 inhomogeneity varies rapidly. The goal of this work is to present a novel joint water-fat separation and deblurring method for spiral imaging. The proposed approach is based on a more accurate signal model that takes into account the phase accumulation and blurring simultaneously. A conjugate gradient method is used in the image domain to reconstruct the deblurred water and fat iteratively. Spatially varying convolutions with a local convergence criterion are used to reduce the computational demand. Both simulation and high-resolution brain imaging have demonstrated that the proposed joint method consistently improves the quality of reconstructed water and fat images compared with the sequential approach, especially in regions where the field inhomogeneity changes rapidly in space. The loss of signal-to-noise-ratio as a result of deblurring is minor at optimal echo times. High-quality water-fat spiral imaging can be achieved with the proposed joint approach, provided that an accurate field map of B0 inhomogeneity is available. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Compressive SAR imaging with joint sparsity and local similarity exploitation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fangfang; Zhao, Guanghui; Shi, Guangming; Dong, Weisheng; Wang, Chenglong; Niu, Yi

    2015-02-12

    Compressive sensing-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging has shown its superior capability in high-resolution image formation. However, most of those works focus on the scenes that can be sparsely represented in fixed spaces. When dealing with complicated scenes, these fixed spaces lack adaptivity in characterizing varied image contents. To solve this problem, a new compressive sensing-based radar imaging approach with adaptive sparse representation is proposed. Specifically, an autoregressive model is introduced to adaptively exploit the structural sparsity of an image. In addition, similarity among pixels is integrated into the autoregressive model to further promote the capability and thus an adaptive sparse representation facilitated by a weighted autoregressive model is derived. Since the weighted autoregressive model is inherently determined by the unknown image, we propose a joint optimization scheme by iterative SAR imaging and updating of the weighted autoregressive model to solve this problem. Eventually, experimental results demonstrated the validity and generality of the proposed approach.

  15. Compressive SAR Imaging with Joint Sparsity and Local Similarity Exploitation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fangfang; Zhao, Guanghui; Shi, Guangming; Dong, Weisheng; Wang, Chenglong; Niu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Compressive sensing-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging has shown its superior capability in high-resolution image formation. However, most of those works focus on the scenes that can be sparsely represented in fixed spaces. When dealing with complicated scenes, these fixed spaces lack adaptivity in characterizing varied image contents. To solve this problem, a new compressive sensing-based radar imaging approach with adaptive sparse representation is proposed. Specifically, an autoregressive model is introduced to adaptively exploit the structural sparsity of an image. In addition, similarity among pixels is integrated into the autoregressive model to further promote the capability and thus an adaptive sparse representation facilitated by a weighted autoregressive model is derived. Since the weighted autoregressive model is inherently determined by the unknown image, we propose a joint optimization scheme by iterative SAR imaging and updating of the weighted autoregressive model to solve this problem. Eventually, experimental results demonstrated the validity and generality of the proposed approach. PMID:25686307

  16. Integrated geophysical imaging of the Aluto-Langano geothermal field (Ethiopia).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzello, Daniele; Armadillo, Egidio; Verdoya, Massimo; Pasqua, Claudio; Kebede, Solomon; Mengiste, Andarge; Hailegiorgis, Getenesh; Abera, Fitsum; Mengesha, Kebede; Meqbel, Naser

    2017-04-01

    The Aluto-Langano geothermal system is located in the central part of the Main Ethiopian Rift, one of the world's most tectonically active areas, where continental rifting has been occurring since several Ma and has yielded widespread volcanism and enhanced geothermal gradient. The geothermal system is associated to the Mt Aluto Volcanic Complex, located along the eastern margin of the rift and related to the Wonji Fault Belt, constituted by Quaternary NNE-SSW en-echelon faults. These structures are younger than the NE-SW border faults of the central Main Ethiopian Rift and were originated by a stress field oblique to the rift direction. This peculiar tectonism yielded local intense rock fracturing that may favour the development of geothermal reservoirs. In this paper, we present the results of an integrated geophysical survey carried out in 2015 over an area of about 200 km2 covering the Mt Aluto Volcanic Complex. The geophysical campaign included 162 coincident magnetotelluric and time domain electromagnetic soundings, and 207 gravity stations, partially located in the sedimentary plain surrounding the volcanic complex. Three-dimensional inversion of the full MT static-corrected tensor and geomagnetic tipper was performed in the 338-0.001 Hz band. Gravity data processing comprised digital enhancement of the residual Bouguer anomaly and 2D-3D inverse modelling. The geophysical results were compared to direct observations of stratigraphy, rock alteration and temperature available from the several deep wells drilled in the area. The magnetotelluric results imaged a low-resistivity layer which appears well correlated with the mixed alteration layer found in the wells and can be interpreted as a low-temperature clay cap. The clay-cap bottom depth is well corresponds to a change of thermal gradient. The clay cap is discontinuous, and in the central area of the volcanic complex is characterised by a dome-shape structure likely related to isotherm rising. The propilitic

  17. Geophysical logging and thermal imaging at the Hemphill Road TCE NPL Superfund site near Gastonia, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antolino, Dominick J.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2017-01-01

    The collection of borehole geophysical logs and thermal imaging data was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center in the vicinity of the Hemphill Road TCE National Priorities List Superfund site near Gastonia, North Carolina, during August 2014 through February 2015. In an effort to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the development of a conceptual groundwater model for the assessment of current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants, surface geological mapping and borehole geophysical log and image data collection, which included the delineation of more than 600 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations) was conducted in 5 open borehole wells and 2 private supply bedrock wells. In addition, areas of potential groundwater discharge within a down-gradient, nearby creek were determined using thermal imagery to calculate temperature differences between the stream and bank seepage.

  18. Geophysical logging and thermal imaging near the Hemphill Road TCE National Priorities List Superfund site near Gastonia, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antolino, Dominick J.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2017-03-27

    Borehole geophysical logs and thermal imaging data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey near the Hemphill Road TCE (trichloroethylene) National Priorities List Superfund site near Gastonia, North Carolina, during August 2014 through February 2015. In an effort to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the development of a conceptual groundwater model for the assessment of current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants, surface geological mapping and borehole geophysical log and thermal imaging data collection, which included the delineation of more than 600 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations), was completed in five open borehole wells and two private supply bedrock wells. In addition, areas of possible groundwater discharge within a nearby creek downgradient of the study site were determined based on temperature differences between the stream and bank seepage using thermal imagery.

  19. Imaging of sternocostoclavicular joint in spondyloarthropaties and other rheumatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, G; Cascavilla, A; Scalzo, G; Salaffi, F; Grassi, W

    2009-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the role of the various imaging techniques in the study of the sternocostoclavicular joint, in patients with spondyloarthropathies and other rheumatic conditions and to assess potential pitfalls in the radiological diagnosis. Thirty patients, 11 male and 19 female, mean age 45 years, with involvement of the sternocostoclavicular joint as part of rheumatologic disorders (psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Tietze syndrome, SAPHO syndrome, and condensing osteitis of the clavicle) were studied. Conventional radiography, CT, MRI and bone scintigraphy were performed. The following imaging findings were evaluated: soft tissue swelling, bone sclerosis, cortical bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, periosteal new bone formation, synovial reaction and intrarticular effusion. All the images were independently reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Conventional radiography demonstrated only sclerosis of the clavicula in 8 pts (26%) and the sternum in 3 pts (10%), cortical bone erosions in 7 pts (23%), joint space narrowing in 6 pts (23%) and periosteal bone formation in 2 pts (10%). At the CT examination sclerosis of the clavicula and the sternum was observed in 13 pts (44%), cortical bone erosions in 22 pts (76%), joint space narrowing in 10 pts (34%), ligament ossification in 12 pts (41%), subchondral sclerosis in 9 pts (34%) and periosteal bone formation in 10 pts (34%). The MRI was the most sensitive technique in the evaluation of the soft tissue swelling in 9 pts (56%), intrarticular effusion in 13 pts (81%) and synovial reaction in 13 pts (81%). Finally, bone scintigraphy showed an increased uptake at the sterno-costoclavicular joint in all patients who underwent the examination. The radiological evaluation of the anterior chest wall in patients with different rheumatic disorders represents a problem of difficult diagnostic evaluation both for the anatomic region complexity and for the variability of

  20. Automated thresholding in radiographic image for welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazid, Haniza; Arof, Hamzah; Yazid, Hafizal

    2012-03-01

    Automated detection of welding defects in radiographic images becomes non-trivial when uneven illumination, contrast and noise are present. In this paper, a new surface thresholding method is introduced to detect defects in radiographic images of welding joints. In the first stage, several image processing techniques namely fuzzy c means clustering, region filling, mean filtering, edge detection, Otsu's thresholding and morphological operations method are utilised to locate the area in which defects might exist. This is followed by the implementation of inverse surface thresholding with partial differential equation to locate isolated areas that represent the defects in the second stage. The proposed method obtained a promising result with high precision.

  1. Imaging technologies for preclinical models of bone and joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Tremoleda, Jordi L; Khalil, Magdy; Gompels, Luke L; Wylezinska-Arridge, Marzena; Vincent, Tonia; Gsell, Willy

    2011-07-29

    Preclinical models for musculoskeletal disorders are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of bone and joint disorders in humans and the development of effective therapies. The assessment of these models primarily relies on morphological analysis which remains time consuming and costly, requiring large numbers of animals to be tested through different stages of the disease. The implementation of preclinical imaging represents a keystone in the refinement of animal models allowing longitudinal studies and enabling a powerful, non-invasive and clinically translatable way for monitoring disease progression in real time. Our aim is to highlight examples that demonstrate the advantages and limitations of different imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and optical imaging. All of which are in current use in preclinical skeletal research. MRI can provide high resolution of soft tissue structures, but imaging requires comparatively long acquisition times; hence, animals require long-term anaesthesia. CT is extensively used in bone and joint disorders providing excellent spatial resolution and good contrast for bone imaging. Despite its excellent structural assessment of mineralized structures, CT does not provide in vivo functional information of ongoing biological processes. Nuclear medicine is a very promising tool for investigating functional and molecular processes in vivo with new tracers becoming available as biomarkers. The combined use of imaging modalities also holds significant potential for the assessment of disease pathogenesis in animal models of musculoskeletal disorders, minimising the use of conventional invasive methods and animal redundancy.

  2. Multinuclide digital subtraction imaging in symptomatic prostnetic joints

    SciTech Connect

    Chafetz, N.; Hattner, R.S.; Ruarke, W.C.; Helms, C.A.; Genant, H.K.; Murray, W.R.

    1985-06-01

    One hundred eleven patients with symptomatic prosthetic joints (86 hips, 23 knees, and two shoulders) were evaluated for prosthetic loosening and infection by combined technetium-99m-MDP/gallium-67 digital subtraction imaging. Clinical correlation was based on the assessment of loosening and bacterial cultures obtained at the time of surgery in 54 patients, joint aspiration cultures obtained in 37 patients, and long-term clinical follow-up for greater than 1.5 years in an additional 15 patients. Results revealed an 80-90% predictive value of a positive test for loosening, and a 95% predictive value of a negative test for infection. However, because of the low sensitivities and specificities observed, this approach to the evaluation of symptomatic prosthetic joints does not seem cost effective.

  3. Geophysical imaging of metacratonizaton in the northern edge of the Congo craton in Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goussi Ngalamo, Jeannot F.; Bisso, D.; Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Atekwana, Estella A.; Katumwehe, Andrew B.; Ekodeck, G. E.

    2017-05-01

    We used the World Gravity Map (WGM 2012) data to investigate the Archean Congo craton and the Oubanguides orogenic belt in Cameroon. The Oubanguides orogenic belt constitutes, from northwest to southeast, the Neoproterozoic West Cameroon domain, the Paleoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic Adamawa-Yade domain, and the dominantly Neoproterozoic Yaoundé domain (the crustal expression of the suture zone between the Congo craton and the orogenic terranes). We analyzed the WGM 2012 data to identify different gravity anomalies. We also applied the two-dimensional (2D) radially-averaged power spectral analysis to the WGM 2012 data to estimate the Moho depth. Additionally, we developed a 2D forward gravity model along a Nsbnd S profile to image the lithospheric structure of the Precambrian entities. We found that: (1) the Congo craton, the Yaoundé domain, the southeastern part of the West Cameroon domain, and the northern part of the Adamawa-Yade domain are characterized by low gravity anomaly. (2) the southern part of the Adamawa-Yade domain is marked by a pronounced E-W trending high gravity anomaly. (3) the crust is thicker beneath the Congo craton, the Yaoundé domain and the southern part of the Adamawa-Yade domain. (4) the presence of a denser lower crust material beneath the southern part of the Adamawa-Yade domain. We propose that this denser crustal material is an under-thrusted portion of the Congo craton that has been densified through metacratonization processes that accompanied collision between the craton and the orogenic terranes. This is in good agreement with geological and geochemical observations indicating that the northern edge of the Congo craton and the Adamawa-Yade domain had undergone metacratonization during the Neoproterozoic. Our suggestion is also in good agreement with observations which show that the margins of many cratons worldwide have been decratonized due to subduction processes. Our work highlights the importance of potential field geophysical

  4. Prosthetic joint infections: radionuclide state-of-the-art imaging.

    PubMed

    Gemmel, Filip; Van den Wyngaert, Hans; Love, Charito; Welling, M M; Gemmel, Paul; Palestro, Christopher J

    2012-05-01

    Prosthetic joint replacement surgery is performed with increasing frequency. Overall the incidence of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) and subsequently prosthesis revision failure is estimated to be between 1 and 3%. Differentiating infection from aseptic mechanical loosening, which is the most common cause of prosthetic failure, is especially important because of different types of therapeutic management. Despite a thorough patient history, physical examination, multiple diagnostic tests and complex algorithms, differentiating PJI from aseptic loosening remains challenging. Among imaging modalities, radiographs are neither sensitive nor specific and cross-sectional imaging techniques, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are limited by hardware-induced artefacts. Radionuclide imaging reflects functional rather than anatomical changes and is not hampered by the presence of a metallic joint prosthesis. As a result scintigraphy is currently the modality of choice in the investigation of suspected PJI. Unfortunately, there is no true consensus about the gold standard technique since there are several drawbacks and limitations inherent to each modality. Bone scintigraphy (BS) is sensitive for identifying the failed joint replacement, but cannot differentiate between infection and aseptic loosening. Combined bone/gallium scintigraphy (BS/GS) offers modest improvement over BS alone for diagnosing PJI. However, due to a number of drawbacks, BS/GS has generally been superseded by other techniques but it still may have a role in neutropenic patients. Radiolabelled leucocyte scintigraphy remains the gold standard technique for diagnosing neutrophil-mediated processes. It seems to be that combined in vitro labelled leucocyte/bone marrow scintigraphy (LS/BMS), with an accuracy of about 90%, is currently the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing PJI. There are, however, significant limitations using in vitro labelled leucocytes and considerable effort

  5. On Earth's Mantle Constitution and Structure from Joint Analysis of Geophysical and Laboratory-Based Data: An Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Determining Earth's structure is a fundamental goal of Earth science, and geophysical methods play a prominent role in investigating Earth's interior. Geochemical, cosmochemical, and petrological analyses of terrestrial samples and meteoritic material provide equally important insights. Complementary information comes from high-pressure mineral physics and chemistry, i.e., use of sophisticated experimental techniques and numerical methods that are capable of attaining or simulating physical properties at very high pressures and temperatures, thereby allowing recovered samples from Earth's crust and mantle to be analyzed in the laboratory or simulated computationally at the conditions that prevail in Earth's mantle and core. This is particularly important given that the vast bulk of Earth's interior is geochemically unsampled. This paper describes a quantitative approach that combines data and results from mineral physics, petrological analyses of mantle minerals, and geophysical inverse calculations, in order to map geophysical data directly for mantle composition (major element chemistry and water content) and thermal state. We illustrate the methodology by inverting a set of long-period electromagnetic response functions beneath six geomagnetic stations that cover a range of geological settings for major element chemistry, water content, and thermal state of the mantle. The results indicate that interior structure and constitution of the mantle can be well-retrieved given a specific set of measurements describing (1) the conductivity of mantle minerals, (2) the partitioning behavior of water between major upper mantle and transition-zone minerals, and (3) the ability of nominally anhydrous minerals to store water in their crystal structures. Specifically, upper mantle water contents determined here bracket the ranges obtained from analyses of natural samples, whereas transition-zone water concentration is an order-of-magnitude greater than that of the upper

  6. Geophysical Imaging of Active Tectonics: A Case Study From the Inter Andean Valley, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Call, C.; Meltzer, A.; Alvardo, A.

    2004-12-01

    and 350ns (9 and 26m assuming a dielectric permittivity of 16). Combination of GPR and near-surface seismic techniques compliment each other by providing varying vertical resolutions and depths of penetrations. This case study provides valuable information that is relevant to future studies utilizing near-surface geophysics to identify and image active structures in the Inter Andean Valley or other geologically similar areas.

  7. Rapid Tools for Joint Inversion and Imaging. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, D.M.; Dougherty, D.E.

    2000-08-02

    The activities and results of a Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project entitled ''Rapid Tools for Joint Inversion and Imaging'' are presented. Research and development on three-dimensional methods to recover distributions of material property values from sparse data are reported. Innovations using artificial neural networks and extended Kalman filtering are described. The report also covers investigations on upscaling and downscaling, segmentation for data processing, and applications to ground penetrating radar and geohydraulic tomography.

  8. On Different Techniques for the Calculation of Bougher Gravity Anomalies for Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data in the Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, A.; Hussein, M. J.; Velasco, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Density variations in the Earth result from different material properties, which reflect the tectonic processess attributed to a region. Density variations can be identified through measurable material properties, such as seismic velocities, gravity field, magnetic field, etc. Gravity anomaly inversions are particularly sensitive to density variations but suffer from significant non-uniqueness. However, using inverse models with gravity Bougher anomalies and other geophysical data, we can determine three dimensional structural and geological properties of the given area. We explore different techniques for the calculation of Bougher gravity anomalies for their use in joint inversion of multiple geophysical data sets. Various 2- and 3-Dimensional (3-D) gravity profile forward modeling programs have been developed as variations of existing algorithms; these variations have similarities, differences, and strengths and weaknesses. The purpose of this study is to determine the most effective gravity forward modeling method that can be used to combine the information provided by complementary datasets, such as gravity and seismic information, to improve the accuracy and resolution of Earth models obtained for the underlying structure of the Rio Grande Rift. In an effort to determine the most appropriate method to use in a joint inversion algorithm and a data fusion approach currently in development, we test each approach by using a model of the Rio Grande Rift obtained from seismic surface wave dispersion and receiver functions. We find that there are different uncertainties associated with each methodology that affect the accuracy achieved by including gravity profile forward modeling. Moreover, there exists a bigger margin of error associated to the 2-D methods due to the simplification of calculations that do not take into account the 3-D characteristics of the Earth's structure.

  9. Hillslope characterization in terms of geophysical units based on the joint interpretation of electrical resistivity and seismic velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feskova, Tatiana; Dietrich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Hydrological conditions in a catchment depend on many factors such as climatic, geological, geomorphological, biological and human, which interact with each other and influence water balance in a catchment. This interaction leads to the subordination in the landscape structure, namely the weak elements subordinate to the powerful elements. Thereby, geological and geomorphological factors play an essential role in catchment development and organization. A hillslope consequently can be allocated to one class of the representative units because the important flow processes run at the hillslope. Moreover, a hillslope can be subdivided into stratigraphic subsurface units and significant hillslope areas based on the lithological change of contrasting interfaces. The knowledge of subsurface structures is necessary to understand and predicate complex hydrological processes in a catchment. Geophysical techniques provide a good opportunity to explore the subsurface. A complete geophysical investigation of subsurface in a catchment with difficult environmental conditions never will be achieved because of large time effort in the field, equipment logistic, and ambiguity in the data interpretation. The case study demonstrates how a catchment can be investigated using geophysical methods in an effective manner in terms of characterization of representative units with respect to a functional role in the catchment. This case study aims to develop combined resistivity and seismic velocity hillslope subsurface models for the distinction of representative functional units. In order to identify the contrasting interfaces of the hillslope, to localize significant hillslope areas, and to address the ambiguity in the geophysical data interpretation, the case study combined resistivity surveys (vertical electrical soundings and electrical resistivity tomography) with refraction seismic method, and conducted these measurements at one single profile along the hillslope transect and

  10. Geophysical Imaging of Discontinuous Permafrost: Effects of Sub-grid Landcover Variability and Linear Disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Bentley, L. R.; McClymont, A. F.; Quinton, W. L.

    2009-12-01

    -sectional images of permafrost at several locations in Scotty Creek. The images show that the depth of permafrost is generally 7-10 m. The edges of permafrost are defined by sharp, nearly vertical boundaries. The permafrost is absent under small (< 15-m-wide), isolated bogs within permafrost plateaus, implying that once a small “hole” is punched through, it becomes a permanent feature. We also surveyed a linear bog along a winter road constructed several decades ago. This feature is representative of numerous linear disturbances along roads and seismic cutlines in the region, which form as the permafrost thaws along lines where energy input has increased due to canopy removal. The active layer under the linear bog was much deeper (2-3 m) than under the surrounding permafrost plateau (0.5-1 m), and the permafrost under the linear bog appears to have a higher liquid water content than the permafrost surrounding it. Using remote sensing, ground-based measurement, and geophysical data, we will highlight the challenges and opportunities in modeling discontinuous permafrost and suggest directions for future modeling efforts.

  11. Geophysical Imaging of Near Surface Hydrostratigraphy in Arid Ephemeral Stream Systems Near Yuma, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harry, D. L.; Sutfin, N. A.; Shaw, J. R.; Faulconer, J.; Genco, A. J.; Wohl, E.; Kampf, S. K.; Cooper, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar and DC electrical resistivity profiles image the upper 4 m of the subsurface beneath ephemeral streams in Yuma and Mohave Washes in the Sonoran Desert, 30 km northeast of Yuma, Arizona. The geophysical data are tied to trenches to establish a lithostratigraphic interpretation. Archie's Law, calibrated to resistivity measurements on soil samples from each site, is used to estimate in-situ soil pore saturation. Three different stream types are surveyed. Increasing in stream order, these are incised bedrock with alluvium fill, incised alluvium, and braided streams. Three radar facies are identified on the basis of reflection amplitude, continuity, and dip. Near the surface, RF1 (0.5-1.5 m thick) contains laterally continuous sheetlike deposits interpreted to be active channel gravel, sand, and cobble deposits reworked during floods. Below, RF2 contains moderately continuous downlapping and onlapping reflections interpreted to be partially lithified Pleistocene gravel and cobble valley fill deposits. The underlying facies RF3 is nearly reflection free, but at the larger washes contains weak reflection similar in character to RF2. In the smaller washes, RF3 contains abundant diffractions. Two electrofacies are identified. The shallowest, EF1, extends from the surface to ~2.5 m deep. EF1 encompasses radar facies RF1 and RF2, with resistivity ranging from 250-1500 ohm-m. Estimated soil moisture in this facies ranges from 2-40%, and varies up to 20% laterally over 2-5 m distances in the smallest washes. Facies EF2 coincides with radar facies RF3, with resistivity ranging from 10-300 ohm-m and estimated pore saturation is estimated to exceed 70%. Electrofacies EF1 is inferred to represent a relatively dry surficial layer that includes the modern channel deposits and the upper ~1 m of the Pleistocene strata. At the larger washes, EF2 is interpreted to be Pleistocene valley fill, distinguishable from the overlying lithologically equivalent Pleistocene

  12. Pseudodynamic imaging of the temporomandibular joint: SE versus GE sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Masui, Takayuki; Isoda, Haruo; Mochizuki, Takao

    1996-05-01

    Pseudodynamic MR imaging of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) has been used for the evaluation of the functional aspects of the TMJs. To evaluate the value of T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GE) techniques, both techniques were performed in 9 asymptomatic (mean 25.7 years, 22-32 years), and 25 symptomatic (mean 44.9 years, 20-71 years) subjects with signs and symptoms of internal derangement or osteoarthrosis of the TMJs. The imaging time for the SE (180 ms / 15 ms / 110{degrees} repetition time / echo time /flip angle) and GE (fast low angle shot; FLASH, 90 ms / 12 ms / 40{degrees}) sequences was 27 and 28 s, respectively. In asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects, the confidence of the identification of the meniscal position was better on SE than GE images (3.6 {+-} 0.6 vs. 2.9 {+-} 0.9, p < 0.01, 3.2 {+-} 0.8 vs. 2.8 {+-} 0.8, p < 0.05), respectively and the sizes of the menisci were bigger on SE than GE images. The delineation of the condylar cortex was better on GE than SE images. For pseudodynamic imaging display of the TMJs, the SE images might be better than GE images to provide the stable recognition of the menisci. 17 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Joint alignment of multispectral images via semidefinite programming

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanjie; Wang, Yu; Jiao, Wanzhen; Hou, Sujuan; Ren, Yanju; Qin, Maoling; Hou, Dewen; Luo, Chao; Wang, Hong; Gee, James; Zhao, Bojun

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel feature-point-matching based framework for achieving an optimized joint-alignment of sequential images from multispectral imaging (MSI). It solves a low-rank and semidefinite matrix that stores all pairwise-image feature-mappings by minimizing the total amount of point-to-point matching cost via a convex optimization of a semidefinite programming formulation. This unique strategy takes a complete consideration of the information aggregated by all point-matching costs and enables the entire set of pairwise-image feature-mappings to be solved simultaneously and near-optimally. Our framework is capable of running in an automatic or interactive fashion, offering an effective tool for eliminating spatial misalignments introduced into sequential MSI images during the imaging process. Our experimental results obtained from a database of 28 sequences of MSI images of human eye demonstrate the superior performances of our approach to the state-of-the-art techniques. Our framework is potentially invaluable in a large variety of practical applications of MSI images. PMID:28270991

  14. Joint geophysical measurements to investigate the Rossano of Vaglio archaeological site affected by landslide phenomena (Basilicata region, Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, A.; Chianese, D.; Lapenna, V.; Lorenzo, P.; Piscitelli, S.; Rizzo, E.; Sdao, F.

    2003-04-01

    In the frame of a project supported by the Italian Ministry of Research: "Geomorphological study and landslides control in some areas of the Basilicata region characterized by historical-cultural heritage", the I.M.A.A. of the CNR (Tito Scalo, Potenza) and the Di.S.G.G. of the Basilicata University, developed a research activity focussed on the realization of combined geophysical measurements for the study of archaeological areas affected by landslide phenomena in Basilicata region (Southern Italy). Since IV century b.C., the birth and the evolution of many religious places is observed in the Basilicata region. Location and construction of these sanctuaries were influenced by the geological and geomorphological setting: many of them were built near important springs; others on morphological terraces, representing the main effect of the large and ancient landslides, often reactivated during the years. In this work we report the results regarding the application of 2D electrical resistivity tomographies, electromagnetic and magnetic measurements carried out in the Rossano of Vaglio (Potenza, Italy), where in the late IV century b.C. raised a sanctuary devoted to the Mephitis goddess (Adamasteanu and Dilthey, 1992; Masseria and D'Anisi, 2001). The sacred area was affected by a multiple and retrogressive rototranslational slide, historically and actually subject to reactivation. The geophysical results, obtained combining advanced technologies for data acquisition and new methods for data inversion (Loke and Barker, 1996; Ciminale and Loddo, 2001; Nuzzo et al, 2002), allowed us to define the geometrical characteristics of the landslide body, to outline the sliding surfaces and to individuate the buried structures of the sanctuary.

  15. Frequency-domain optical tomographic imaging of arthritic finger joints.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Andreas H; Kim, Hyun Keol; Montejo, Ludguier D; Blaschke, Sabine; Netz, Uwe J; Zwaka, Paul A; Illing, Gerd; Muller, Gerhard A; Beuthan, Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    We are presenting data from the largest clinical trial on optical tomographic imaging of finger joints to date. Overall we evaluated 99 fingers of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 120 fingers from healthy volunteers. Using frequency-domain imaging techniques we show that sensitivities and specificities of 0.85 and higher can be achieved in detecting RA. This is accomplished by deriving multiple optical parameters from the optical tomographic images and combining them for the statistical analysis. Parameters derived from the scattering coefficient perform slightly better than absorption derived parameters. Furthermore we found that data obtained at 600 MHz leads to better classification results than data obtained at 0 or 300 MHz.

  16. Diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorders: indication of imaging exams.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Grossmann, Eduardo; Januzzi, Eduardo; de Paula, Marcos Vinicius Queiroz; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the different imaging tests and their appropriate indications is crucial to establish the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders, especially in patients with overlapping signs and symptoms. To present and assess the main diagnostic imaging tests for temporomandibular disorders and rationally discuss their indication criteria, advantages, and disadvantages. Literature review in the Web of Knowledge, PubMed and SciELO databases, as well as manual search for relevant publications in reference lists of the selected articles. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were considered the gold standard assessments for the temporomandibular joint to evaluate hard and soft tissues, respectively. Each diagnostic method exhibited distinct sensitivity and specificity for the different subtypes of joint dysfunction. Selecting an evaluation examination based on its accuracy, safety, and clinical relevance is a rational decision that can help lead to an accurate diagnosis and an optimum treatment plan. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Geophysical experiments to image the shallow internal structure and the moisture distribution of a mine waste rock pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Jérôme; Chouteau, Michel; Aubertin, Michel; Campos, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Several field surveys of a waste rock pile were carried out during the summers of 2002 and 2003 using ground-penetrating radar, electromagnetic conductivity and DC resistivity imaging. The waste rock deposit is prone to generate acid mine drainage (AMD) due to the oxidation of sulphidic minerals. One of the most critical factors that lead to the production of AMD is unsaturated water flow and the ensuing moisture distribution in the waste rock. This geophysical characterization study, performed over a 30 m × 30 m test zone, was designed to image the internal structure controlling the water flux at shallow depth. The subsurface was found to consist of three zones for the first 6 m of the pile, mainly based on electrical resistivities: a thin superficial conductive material, an intermediate 2 to 3 m thick highly resistive zone, and a lower, more conductive medium. With the help of hydrogeological tests, chemical analyses and two 2.5 m-deep trenches, it is shown that the two conductive zones are correlated with fine-grained waste rock and the resistive zone correlates with a coarser material. In the two deeper zones, the contact between the two types of waste rock is typically highlighted by a sharp resistive/conductive boundary. An increase of conductance in the relatively thin upper layer towards the edge of the pile appears to be caused by an increase in thickness of the fine-grained material. Additional geophysical surveys carried out on a profile along the flank of the upper bench of the pile show that the main features of the internal structure are sub-parallel to the slope, at least for the first 3 m in depth. The data also show an increase in resistivity from the top to bottom of the slope, in accordance with expected particle segregation, from fine-grained material at the top to coarser material at the bottom. Wide-angle reflection GPR monitoring during large scale infiltration tests seems to indicate preferential flow paths towards the direction of coarser

  18. Near real-time imaging of molasses injections using time-lapse electrical geophysics at the Brandywine DRMO, Brandywine, Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteeg, R. J.; Johnson, T.; Major, B.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Lane, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Enhanced bioremediation, which involves introduction of amendments to promote biodegradation, increasingly is used to accelerate cleanup of recalcitrant compounds and has been identified as the preferred remedial treatment at many contaminated sites. Although blind introduction of amendments can lead to sub-optimal or ineffective remediation, the distribution of amendment throughout the treatment zone is difficult to measure using conventional sampling. Because amendments and their degradation products commonly have electrical properties that differ from those of ambient soil, time-lapse electrical geophysical monitoring has the potential to verify amendment emplacement and distribution. In order for geophysical monitoring to be useful, however, results of the injection ideally should be accessible in near real time. In August 2010, we demonstrated the feasibility of near real-time, autonomous electrical geophysical monitoring of amendment injections at the former Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) in Brandywine, Maryland. Two injections of about 1000 gallons each of molasses, a widely used amendment for enhanced bioremediation, were monitored using measurements taken with borehole and surface electrodes. During the injections, multi-channel resistance data were recorded; data were transmitted to a server and processed using a parallel resistivity inversion code; and results in the form of time-lapse imagery subsequently were posted to a website. This process occurred automatically without human intervention. The resulting time-lapse imagery clearly showed the evolution of the molasses plume. The delay between measurements and online delivery of images was between 45 and 60 minutes, thus providing actionable information that could support decisions about field procedures and a check on whether amendment reached target zones. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of using electrical imaging as a monitoring tool both during amendment emplacement

  19. Geological modeling and infiltration pattern of a karstic system based upon crossed geophysical methods and image-guided inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Lea; Jardani, Abderrahim; Fournier, Matthieu; Massei, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Karstic aquifers represent an important part of the water resources worldwide. Though they have been widely studied on many aspects, their geological and hydrogeological modeling is still complex. Geophysical methods can provide useful subsurface information for the characterization and mapping of karstic systems, especially when not accessible by speleology. The site investigated in this study is a sinkhole-spring system, with small diameter conduits that run within a chalk aquifer (Norville, in Upper Normandy, France). This site was investigated using several geophysical methods: electrical tomography, self-potential, mise-à-la-masse methods, and electromagnetic method (EM34). Coupling those results with boreholes data, a 3D geological model of the hydrogeological basin was established, including tectonic features as well as infiltration structures (sinkhole, covered dolines). The direction of the karstic conduits near the main sinkhole could be established, and the major fault was shown to be a hydraulic barrier. Also the average concentration of dolines on the basin could be estimated, as well as their depth. At last, several hypotheses could be made concerning the location of the main conduit network between the sinkhole and the spring, using previous hydrodynamic study of the site along with geophysical data. In order to validate the 3D geological model, an image-guided inversion of the apparent resistivity data was used. With this approach it is possible to use geological cross sections to constrain the inversion of apparent resistivity data, preserving both discontinuities and coherences in the inversion of the resistivity data. This method was used on the major fault, enabling to choose one geological interpretation over another (fault block structure near the fault, rather than important folding). The constrained inversion was also applied on covered dolines, to validate the interpretation of their shape and depth. Key words: Magnetic and electrical

  20. Finger joint imaging by laser transillumination computed tomography based on coherent detection imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanosaki, Shinji; Sasaki, Yoshiaki; Takagi, Michiaki; Ishikawa, Akira; Suzuki, Jota; Emori, Ryota; Inage, Hiroki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Devaraj, Balasigamani; Akatsuka, Takao

    2003-07-01

    In this research, we investigate the imaging properties of tansillumination laser CT system based on the coherent detection imaging (CDI) method, for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, from the viewpoints of morphological and quantitative imaging. First, to investigate the morphological imaging ability, the index finger PIP joint of a healthy volunteer was imaged with the laser CT, X-ray CT, and MRI. By comparison of these images, we present that the laser CT delineates the bone region with high spatial resolution of sub-millimeters. Next, to investigate the quantitative imaging, three kinds of the physical phantoms simulating bone, made from polyurethane including different concentrations of CaCO3, were imaged. We present that quantitative measurement is possible by demonstrating a satisfactory linear relationship between the averaged pixel value of the reconstructed images and the actual concentrations. These results demonstrate the feasibility of early diagnosis for rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Basin characterisation by means of joint inversion of electromagnetic geophysical data: A case study from the Loop Head Peninsula, western Ireland, and the implications for onshore carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanyà, Joan; Ogaya, Xènia; Jones, Alan G.; Rath, Volker; McConnell, Brian; Haughton, Peter D. W.; Ledo, Juanjo

    2016-04-01

    The Science Foundation Ireland funded IRECCSEM project (www.ireccsem.ie) aims to evaluate Ireland's potential for onshore carbon sequestration in saline aquifers by integrating new electromagnetic geophysical data with existing geophysical and geological data. The main goal of this investigation is to characterise the subsurface beneath the Loop Head Peninsula (part of the Clare Basin, Co. Clare, Ireland) and in particular to identify the main geoelectrical structures that can guide an interpretation of the carbon sequestration potential of this area. During the summer of 2014, a magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out on the Loop Head Peninsula. Data from a total of 140 sites were acquired, including audio-magnetotelluric (AMT), broadband magnetotelluric (BBMT) and long period magnetotelluric (LMT) data. The dataset was used to generate four shallow three-dimensional (3-D) electrical resistivity models to constrain the subsurface to depths of up to 3 km, and an additional deep study to constrain the electrical resistivity values to depths of up to 30 km. Three-dimensional (3-D) joint inversion process was performed using three different types of electromagnetic data to improve the resolution of the electrical resistivity models: MT impedance tensor (Z), geomagnetic transfer functions (T) and inter-station horizontal magnetic transfer-functions (H). The interpretations of the resulting models were based on the geoelectrical results and compared with independent geological and geophysical data for a high-quality interpretation (i.e., deep borehole data from the peninsula, 2-D seismic reflection profiles, gravity data and geological structural information). Second-derivative models of the resulting MT models were used to define the main interfaces between the geoelectrical structures, facilitating superior comparison with geological and seismic results, and also reducing the influence of the colour scale on the interpretation of the results. Specific analysis was

  2. A study of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis using computed tomographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Massilla Mani, F; Sivasubramanian, S Satha

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the various bony changes in osteoarthritis (OA) of elderly patients who are suffering from temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) and to find if all the changes manifesting in generalized OA were presented in temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Thirty TMJs of fifteen elderly patients who were diagnosed with TMD were selected for the study. Patient with TMD were subjected to computerized tomographic (CT) imaging, and the various bony changes in the TMJ were recorded. CT study of TMJ showed that there is a positive evidence of joint involvement in 80% of the cases. In this study, female patients were more commonly affected by OA than the males. The condylar changes (69.93%) are more common than the changes in the articular eminence (6.6%) and condylar fossa (10%). About 56.6% of TMJ in the study was affected by the early manifestations of the OA. CT study showed that there is a positive evidence of TMJ involvement in the elderly patients with TMD. The results show that condylar changes are more common than the changes in the articular eminence and condylar fossa. The study also shows that most of the patients are affected by early TMJ OA; hence, initiating treatment at early stages may prevent the disease progression. Copyright © 2016 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental and Engineering Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prem V.

    1997-12-01

    Geophysical imaging methods provide solutions to a wide variety of environmental and engineering problems: protection of soil and groundwater from contamination; disposal of chemical and nuclear waste; geotechnical site testing; landslide and ground subsidence hazard detection; location of archaeological artifacts. This book comprehensively describes the theory, data acquisition and interpretation of all of the principal techniques of geophysical surveying: gravity, magnetic, seismic, self-potential, resistivity, induced polarization, electromagnetic, ground-probing radar, radioactivity, geothermal, and geophysical borehole logging. Each chapter is supported by a large number of richly illustrated case histories. This book will prove to be a valuable textbook for senior undergraduates and postgraduates in environmental and applied geophysics, a supplementary course book for students of geology, engineering geophysics, civil and mining engineering, and a reference work for professional earth scientists, engineers and town planners.

  4. Joint image reconstruction and segmentation using the Potts model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storath, Martin; Weinmann, Andreas; Frikel, Jürgen; Unser, Michael

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new algorithmic approach to the non-smooth and non-convex Potts problem (also called piecewise-constant Mumford-Shah problem) for inverse imaging problems. We derive a suitable splitting into specific subproblems that can all be solved efficiently. Our method does not require a priori knowledge on the gray levels nor on the number of segments of the reconstruction. Further, it avoids anisotropic artifacts such as geometric staircasing. We demonstrate the suitability of our method for joint image reconstruction and segmentation. We focus on Radon data, where we in particular consider limited data situations. For instance, our method is able to recover all segments of the Shepp-Logan phantom from seven angular views only. We illustrate the practical applicability on a real positron emission tomography dataset. As further applications, we consider spherical Radon data as well as blurred data.

  5. Geophysics benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An agreement signed May 6 between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. creates new opportunities for joint geophysical research programs. Dallas Peck, director of the U.S. Geological Survey, and Erich Bloch, director of the National Science Foundation signed two agreements for basic scientific research with the Soviets to establish links between between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Soviet Ministry of Geology and between the National Science Foundation and the Soviet Academy of Sciences. The USGS agreement also establishes a connection with the Soviet Academy of Sciences.The Memoranda of Understanding are the first to be developed under the Agreement on Cooperation in the Field of Basic Scientific Research signed in January, by then Secretary of State George Shultz and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze. The agreements address cooperation in basic rather than applied science and establish a formal mechanism for access to research facilities and support involving NSF, universities, the Soviet Academy of Sciences, USGS, and the Soviet Ministry of Geology.

  6. Imaging of multi-geophysical parameters in the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake (MJ7.3) in Kyushu of southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Fukao, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic waveform study reveals where the rupture began and how it expanded for the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake. We here focus on the investigation of the rupture initiation and their interactions of the earthquake generating and volcanic magmatism. To address these issues, detailed 3D seismic velocity and Poisson's ratio images are determined using 368,340 P-wave and S-wave source-receiver pairs from 6,018 aftershocks and 6,114 background earthquakes. We also estimated the crack density, saturate fracture and bulk-sound velocity under the Kumamoto source and its nearby volcanoes from the inverted seismic models. Our study offers geophysical evidence for that the Kumamoto earthquake was more likely to be triggered by the fluids penetration ascending from the Unzen volcanic magma which intrudes into the Futagawa and Hinagu fault zones. Such a fluids intrusion would decrease Vp and Vs whilst increase Poisson's ratio and saturate fracture in the seismogenic layer, and then lead to high pore pressure there. The multiple geophysical parameter imaging indicate that a strong low-velocity zone with high crack density and high saturate fracture, extending into the 2016 Kumamoto hypocenter, is imaged in the Unzen volcano. This suggests that the mechanical strength in the hypocenter could be vulnerability compared with the normal seismogenic layer, whilst the pore pressure of the fluids in the hypocenter could be high due to fluids accumulation. Our study implies closely relationship between the Unzen volcanic magmatism and the Kumamoto earthquake generation. On the contrary, high-velocity and low-Poisson's ratio zone is clearly imaged under the Aso volcano with low-crack density and low-saturate fracture anomalies in the upper crust. This contrasted feature underneath the Unzen and Aso volcanoes suggests the inequable contributions to earthquake generating and different interactions of the earthquake generating and volcanic magmatism.

  7. Geophysical imaging of the inner structure of a lava dome and its environment through gravimetry and magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, A.; Gailler, L.-S.; Labazuy, P.; Lénat, J.-F.

    2016-06-01

    Volcanic lava domes are compound edifices resulting from complex growth processes including intrusion and extrusion phases, explosions and collapses. Here, we present the study of a complex volcanic system, located in the Chaîne des Puys volcanic field (French Massif Central, France) and centred on the Puy de Dôme volcano, an 11,000 years old volcano. Our approach is based on a morpho-structural analysis of a high resolution DTM (0.5 m) and geophysical imaging methods. Both gravity and magnetic high resolution surveys have been carried out on the lava dome and the nearby volcanic structures. We computed 3D inverse and 2D forwards models. Based on our current knowledges about volcanic dome structure, the geophysical models allow us to propose a synthetic geological model of the inner structure of the Puy de Dôme and surrounding areas. This model suggests a scenario for the formation of the lava dome and the inferred intrusions located on both sides. The Puy de Dôme could possibly be the southern tip of the northern intrusion.

  8. Imaging quadrupolar geophysical anomaly sources by 3D probability tomography: application to near-surface geoelectrical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaia, Raffaele; Patella, Domenico; Mauriello, Paolo

    2008-12-01

    We present the theory of the source quadrupole occurrence probability tomography method within a general approach including the source pole and source dipole occurrence probability tomographies, developed and amply discussed and tested in previous papers. In this new formulation, poles and dipoles still have the original meaning to represent centres and boundaries, respectively, of elementary bodies with constant constitutive parameters, while quadrupoles are assumed to simulate sharp corner elements. The purpose of quadrupole analysis is to improve the resolution power of geophysical methods, using once more probability as a suitable paradigm allowing all possible equivalent solutions to be included into a unique 3D tomography image. The new approach is described by first assuming that any geophysical field dataset can be hypothesized to be caused by a discrete number of source poles, dipoles and quadrupoles. Then, the previously published theory of the source pole and dipole occurrence probability tomography is symbolically extended to include source quadrupoles. Finally, the new formalism is explicitly written for the geoelectrical method, for which a few simple synthetic examples are discussed in order to demonstrate how the combined pole, dipole and quadrupole tomographies can provide a complete resolution of the most probable buried sources of the anomalies detected within a datum domain. A field example related to a geoelectrical survey carried out in the archaeological park of Pompei is presented, aiming at detecting remains of ancient Roman urbanization.

  9. Nonparametric Joint Shape and Feature Priors for Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Erdil, Ertunc; Ghani, Muhammad Usman; Rada, Lavdie; Argunsah, Ali Ozgur; Unay, Devrim; Tasdizen, Tolga; Cetin, Mujdat

    2017-11-01

    In many image segmentation problems involving limited and low-quality data, employing statistical prior information about the shapes of the objects to be segmented can significantly improve the segmentation result. However, defining probability densities in the space of shapes is an open and challenging problem, especially if the object to be segmented comes from a shape density involving multiple modes (classes). Existing techniques in the literature estimate the underlying shape distribution by extending Parzen density estimator to the space of shapes. In these methods, the evolving curve may converge to a shape from a wrong mode of the posterior density when the observed intensities provide very little information about the object boundaries. In such scenarios, employing both shape- and class-dependent discriminative feature priors can aid the segmentation process. Such features may involve, e.g., intensity-based, textural, or geometric information about the objects to be segmented. In this paper, we propose a segmentation algorithm that uses nonparametric joint shape and feature priors constructed by Parzen density estimation. We incorporate the learned joint shape and feature prior distribution into a maximum a posteriori estimation framework for segmentation. The resulting optimization problem is solved using active contours. We present experimental results on a variety of synthetic and real data sets from several fields involving multimodal shape densities. Experimental results demonstrate the potential of the proposed method.

  10. In Vivo Dual Fluorescence Imaging to Detect Joint Destruction.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hongsik; Bhatti, Fazal-Ur-Rehman; Lee, Sangmin; Brand, David D; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Hasty, Karen A

    2016-10-01

    Diagnosis of cartilage damage in early stages of arthritis is vital to impede the progression of disease. In this regard, considerable progress has been made in near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) optical imaging technique. Arthritis can develop due to various mechanisms but one of the main contributors is the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), enzymes that can degrade components of the extracellular matrix. Especially, MMP-1 and MMP-13 have main roles in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis because they enhance collagen degradation in the process of arthritis. We present here a novel NIRF imaging strategy that can be used to determine the activity of MMPs and cartilage damage simultaneously by detection of exposed type II collagen in cartilage tissue. In this study, retro-orbital injection of mixed fluorescent dyes, MMPSense 750 FAST (MMP750) dye and Alexa Fluor 680 conjugated monoclonal mouse antibody immune-reactive to type II collagen, was administered in the arthritic mice. Both dyes were detected with different intensity according to degree of joint destruction in the animal. Thus, our dual fluorescence imaging method can be used to detect cartilage damage as well as MMP activity simultaneously in early stage arthritis. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A Joint Acquisition-Estimation Framework for MR Phase Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dagher, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the phase of the MR signal is faced with fundamental challenges such as phase aliasing, noise and unknown offsets of the coil array. There is a paucity of acquisition, reconstruction and estimation methods that rigorously address these challenges. This reduces the reliability of information processing in phase domain. We propose a joint acquisition-processing framework that addresses the challenges of MR phase imaging using a rigorous theoretical treatment. Our proposed solution acquires the multi-coil complex data without any increase in acquisition time. Our corresponding estimation algorithm is applied optimally voxel-per-voxel. Results show that our framework achieves performance gains up to an order of magnitude compared to existing methods. PMID:26221666

  12. Geophysical methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Near-surface geophysical methods have become have become important tools for agriculture. Geophysics employed for agriculture tends to be heavily focused on a 2 m zone directly beneath the ground surface, which includes the crop root zone and all, or at least most, of the soil profile. Resistivity...

  13. Diffraction-Enhanced Computed Tomographic Imaging of Growing Piglet Joints by Using a Synchrotron Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Glendon W; Belev, George S; Chapman, L Dean; Wiebe, Sheldon P; Cooper, David M; Wong, Adelaine TF; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and test a new technology for imaging growing joints by means of diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) combined with CT and using a synchrotron radiation source. DEI–CT images of an explanted 4-wk-old piglet stifle joint were acquired by using a 40-keV beam. The series of scanned slices was later ‘stitched’ together, forming a 3D dataset. High-resolution DEI-CT images demonstrated fine detail within all joint structures and tissues. Striking detail of vasculature traversing between bone and cartilage, a characteristic of growing but not mature joints, was demonstrated. This report documents for the first time that DEI combined with CT and a synchrotron radiation source can generate more detailed images of intact, growing joints than can currently available conventional imaging modalities. PMID:26310464

  14. Assessment and interpretation of radiopharmaceutical joint imaging in an animal model of arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenspire, K.L.; Blau, M.; Kennedy, A.C.; Green, F.A.

    1981-05-01

    An animal model of arthritis in the rabbit was employed to assess the radioactivity contribution of joint tissues to externally monitored scintigram positivity. Bone contained the greatest total amount of radioactivity whether the imaging agent was technetium pertechnetate or pyrophosphate, although the greatest percent increase in the arthritis joints over control joints was seen in synovium. Mid-shaft bone in the same region as the arthritic joint also showed increased radioactivity compared with control.

  15. Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-02-01

    In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially when DOT is combined with x-ray tomosynthesis where the 3D image of the bones from x-ray is incorporated into the DOT reconstruction as spatial a priori structural information. This study demonstrates that NIR light can image large joints such as the knee in addition to finger joints, which will drastically broaden the clinical utility of our x-ray guided DOT technique for OA diagnosis.

  16. Imaging of the hip joint. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H. K.; Jergesen, H. E.; Murray, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors reviewed the applications and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the most common hip disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in detecting osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance reflects the histologic changes associated with osteonecrosis very well, which may ultimately help to improve staging. Computed tomography can more accurately identify subchondral fractures than MR imaging and thus remains important for staging. In congenital dysplasia of the hip, the position of the nonossified femoral head in children less than six months of age can only be inferred by indirect signs on CT. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates the cartilaginous femoral head directly without ionizing radiation. Computed tomography remains the imaging modality of choice for evaluating fractures of the hip joint. In some patients, MR imaging demonstrates the fracture even when it is not apparent on radiography. In neoplasm, CT provides better assessment of calcification, ossification, and periosteal reaction than MR imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, represents the most accurate imaging modality for evaluating intramedullary and soft-tissue extent of the tumor and identifying involvement of neurovascular bundles. Magnetic resonance imaging can also be used to monitor response to chemotherapy. In osteoarthrosis and rheumatoid arthritis of the hip, both CT and MR provide more detailed assessment of the severity of disease than conventional radiography because of their tomographic nature. Magnetic resonance imaging is unique in evaluating cartilage degeneration and loss, and in demonstrating soft-tissue alterations such as inflammatory synovial proliferation.

  17. Imaging of the hip joint. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H. K.; Jergesen, H. E.; Murray, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors reviewed the applications and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the most common hip disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in detecting osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance reflects the histologic changes associated with osteonecrosis very well, which may ultimately help to improve staging. Computed tomography can more accurately identify subchondral fractures than MR imaging and thus remains important for staging. In congenital dysplasia of the hip, the position of the nonossified femoral head in children less than six months of age can only be inferred by indirect signs on CT. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates the cartilaginous femoral head directly without ionizing radiation. Computed tomography remains the imaging modality of choice for evaluating fractures of the hip joint. In some patients, MR imaging demonstrates the fracture even when it is not apparent on radiography. In neoplasm, CT provides better assessment of calcification, ossification, and periosteal reaction than MR imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, represents the most accurate imaging modality for evaluating intramedullary and soft-tissue extent of the tumor and identifying involvement of neurovascular bundles. Magnetic resonance imaging can also be used to monitor response to chemotherapy. In osteoarthrosis and rheumatoid arthritis of the hip, both CT and MR provide more detailed assessment of the severity of disease than conventional radiography because of their tomographic nature. Magnetic resonance imaging is unique in evaluating cartilage degeneration and loss, and in demonstrating soft-tissue alterations such as inflammatory synovial proliferation.

  18. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  19. Geochemical mapping in polluted floodplains using handheld XRF, geophysical imaging, and geostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hošek, Michal; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Popelka, Jan; Kiss, Timea; Elznicová, Jitka; Faměra, Martin

    2017-04-01

    In the recent years researchers have enjoyed noticeable improvements of portable analytical and geophysical methods, which allow studying floodplain architecture and deciphering pollutant distribution more easily than ever before. Our area of interest was floodplain of the Ploučnice River, particularly a pollution hotspot in Boreček, severely impacted by U mining between the 1970s and late 1980s, in particular a "radioactive flood" in 1981. In the area, we used hand drill coring and in situ (field) analysis of so acquired sediments by handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF), which gave us information about depth profiles of pollutants (Ba, U, Zn) and the Al/Si and Zr/Rb ratios, i.e., proxies for sediment lithology. We found that spatial distribution of pollutants (control by depth and position in the floodplain) is apparently complex and discontinuous. In some places, contamination is buried by a couple decimetres of less polluted sediments, while in other places the peak pollution is near surface, apparently without a straightforward connection with the surface topography and the distance to the river channel. We thus examined the floodplain architecture, the internal structure of the floodplain using two geophysical methods. First of them, dipole electromagnetic profiling (DEMP, also denoted EMP, MP, or Slingram) quickly acquires average electric resistivity in top strata in selected areas, which was actually top 3 m with our particular instrument. Second, electric resistivity tomography (ERT) produces much more detailed information on resistivity with depth resolution of ca 0.5 m to the depth of ca 5 m in selected lines. ERT thus allows identifying boundaries of electric resistivity domains (sediment bodies) and DEMP their spatial distribution. Based on the obtained data, we divided the floodplain to five segments with specific topography, pollution characteristics, and electric resistivity. We suppose that those segments are lithogenetic floodplain

  20. [Standardizing a protocol of magnetic resonance imaging of temporomandibular joints. Part I].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, T V

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the standard of a procedure for magnetic resonance imaging of temporomandibular joints, which has been used to examine 275 patients. It describes the study projections, that are most significant for visualization, and scanning protocols. Illustrations of magnetic resonance imaging of the structures of the intact temporomandibular joint are presented.

  1. Geophysical imaging of a vapor dominated hydrothermal system in Yellowstone National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouligand, C.; Byrdina, S.; Kass, A.; Irons, T. P.; Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Ball, J. L.; Ritzinger, B. T.; McConville, E. G.; Hurwitz, S.

    2016-12-01

    Yellowstone National Park (YNP) hosts several vapor-dominated, acid-sulfate thermal areas that are typically located in topographically high areas along the boundary of the Yellowstone caldera. In these systems, steam and heat rise from deep boiling waters and either condense beneath a low permeability cap layer and then descend down fractures (heat pipes), or discharge through fumaroles either to the atmosphere or into pools. To better understand the geometry of the ascending vapor plumes and their relation to geologic structures and hydrothermal alteration, we carried a geophysical study in the Solfatara Plateau thermal area along the northern boundary of the Yellowstone caldera. This ˜600 m × 600 m area has a small mud pool and several small fumaroles with visible native sulfur deposits. Previous studies in the thermal area have mapped the spatial distributions of heat and CO2 flux. In June 2016 we collected detailed electric resistivity, magnetic, TEM and NMR data. Rock samples were collected to measure the electric resistivity and magnetization properties of the altered and unaltered sub-surface in the laboratory. Initial results suggest that there is a strong electric resistivity contrast between the center and periphery of the thermal area, which suggests that fluid pathways are strongly focused. Magnetic anomalies are subdued in the center of the thermal area, indicating low-magnetization of the shallow subsurface.

  2. Geophysical imaging reveals brine system beneath an ice-sealed Antarctic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, H.; Doran, P. T.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Mikucki, J.; Arcone, S. A.; Auken, E.; Schamper, C.; Virginia, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The habitability of polar desert environments on Earth, and other neighboring planets, is dependent on the availability of liquid water. In areas where the surface is frozen, lenses of water present in the subsurface may act as microbial refugia. In the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, the presence of highly saline brine in valley lakes raises the potential for the existence of a deep groundwater network. We report on a geophysical study that shows Lake Vida, in Victoria Valley, is nearly frozen, and the remaining brine is confined beneath thick ice. Near surface, bathymetric mapping of grounded lake ice was accomplished from a series of ground penetrating radar surveys. Radar penetration was limited to 20 m. An airborne transient electromagnetic survey (AEM) revealed a low resistivity zone at 30-100 m depth beneath the surface of the lake. Based on previous knowledge of brine chemistry and local geology, this zone is interpreted as brine saturated unconsolidated sediments with a porosity of 23-42%. Brine volume is calculated at 15 to 32 million cubic meters, which is of similar magnitude to the brine volume in nearby saline lakes. The AEM survey provided a means of quantifying the spatial extent of deep subsurface brine in this remote environment, and has provided a new perspective on the potential for subsurface habitats in areas often considered devoid of life.

  3. Geophysical evaluation of solute plume spatial moments using an adaptive POD algorithm for electrical resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oware, E. K.; Moysey, S. M. J.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the potential for characterizing spatial moments of subsurface solute plumes from surface-based electrical resistivity images produced within a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) inversion framework. The existing POD algorithm is improved here to allow for adaptive conditioning of the POD training images on resistivity measurements. The efficacy of the suggested technique is evaluated with two hypothetical transport scenarios: synthetic #1 is based on the case where the target plume and POD training images follow the same (unimodal) plume morphology, whereas a second source location in synthetic #2 makes the target plume bimodal and inconsistent with the POD training images. The resistivity imaging results indicate that the adaptive algorithm efficiently and robustly updates the POD training images to obtain good quality resistivity images of the target plumes, both in the presence of data noise and when conceptual model inaccuracies exist in the training simulations. Spatial moments of the solute plumes recovered from the resistivity images are also favorable, with relative mass recovery errors in the range of 0.6-4.4%, center of mass errors in the range of 0.6-9.6%, and spatial variance errors in the range of 3.4-45% for cases where the voltage data had 0-10% noise. These results are consistent with or improved upon those reported in the literature. Comparison of the resistivity-based moment estimates to those obtained from direct concentration sampling suggests that for cases with good quality resistivity data (i.e., <3% noise), the imaging results provide more accurate moments until 6-10 multi-level sampling wells are installed. While the specific number of wells will depend on the actual field scenario, we suggest that this finding illustrates the general value of POD-based resistivity imaging techniques for non-invasively estimating the spatial moments of a solute plume.

  4. Registration of knee joint surfaces for the in vivo study of joint injuries based on magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Rita W. T.; Habib, Ayman F.; Frayne, Richard; Ronsky, Janet L.

    2006-03-01

    In-vivo quantitative assessments of joint conditions and health status can help to increase understanding of the pathology of osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease that affects a large population each year. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a non-invasive and accurate means to assess and monitor joint properties, and has become widely used for diagnosis and biomechanics studies. Quantitative analyses and comparisons of MR datasets require accurate alignment of anatomical structures, thus image registration becomes a necessary procedure for these applications. This research focuses on developing a registration technique for MR knee joint surfaces to allow quantitative study of joint injuries and health status. It introduces a novel idea of translating techniques originally developed for geographic data in the field of photogrammetry and remote sensing to register 3D MR data. The proposed algorithm works with surfaces that are represented by randomly distributed points with no requirement of known correspondences. The algorithm performs matching locally by identifying corresponding surface elements, and solves for the transformation parameters relating the surfaces by minimizing normal distances between them. This technique was used in three applications to: 1) register temporal MR data to verify the feasibility of the algorithm to help monitor diseases, 2) quantify patellar movement with respect to the femur based on the transformation parameters, and 3) quantify changes in contact area locations between the patellar and femoral cartilage at different knee flexion angles. The results indicate accurate registration and the proposed algorithm can be applied for in-vivo study of joint injuries with MRI.

  5. Geophysical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    Geophysical measurements involve no magic or mystery but straightforward applications of physical principles. This book is both a geophysical survey and a reference guide. It explains the physical principles involved in geophysical methods. Over one-third of the text is devoted to seismic methods. Comprehensive topics in the volume include: the measurement of different physical properties and their geological significance; how different kinds of measurements are combined to draw geological conclusions; surface, borehole, airborne, and satellite measurements; computer processing and interactive methods; geodetic, gravity, magnetic, radioactive, heat flow, and electrical methods; interpretation of natural processes such as earthquakes and heat flow; and a summation of present knowledge of the earth.

  6. Integrated Geophysical Studies to Image the Remains of Amenemeht II Pyramid's Complex in Dahshour Necropolis, Giza, Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Abbas Mohamed; Atya, Magdy; El-Emam, Ahmed; Ghazala, Hosny, ,, Prof.; Shaaban, Fathy, ,, Dr; Odah, Hatem, ,, Prof; Ibrahim, El-Khedr, ,, Prof; Lethy, Ahmed, ,, Dr

    2009-04-01

    Dahshour archaeological site is located adjacent to Giza necropolis at about 25 km south of Cairo. The site itself is an imperative necropolis that attracts the attention of the archaeologists. This location is a spectator of several historical episodes that start with the pyramidal complexes from the early dynasties (the mud brick tombs, the mastabas, and the Bent Pyramid) passing through the phase of the Step Pyramid of Zoser at Saqqara to the first complete pyramid in the history (the Red pyramid of Senefro "Khofo's father"). In 2002, the local archaeological supervisors suggested an area around the debris of the White pyramid (of Amenemeht II) for reconnaissance magnetic survey. The survey had been completed using the gradiometer FM36. More than 98 survey grids (20 x 20 m) of a surface area of 39200 m2 have been measured. The results reported the recognition of some parts of the mortuary temple, the causeway, and some other anomalies that could not be attributed to specific archaeological aspect. Therefore, an integrated geophysical survey was proposed, in the present work, to get more details help to identify these objects. The ground penetrating radar (GPR, SIR2000), the electrical resistance meter (Geoscan RM15), and the electromagnetic profiler (GEM300) have been utilized to acquire the data. They have been applied to selected zones to investigate specific objects and oriented to solve the problems questioned by the local archaeological inspectors. The study conveyed an superior image of the whole measured site and helped to identify most of the detected artifacts. Furthermore, the margins of the causeway and its infrastructure have been perfectly delineated. However, the possible place of the eastern entrance and the Valley temple have been tentatively located. Keywords: Archaeo-geophysics, Dahshour, White Pyramid

  7. Automated extraction of absorption features from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Fred A.; Calvin, Wendy M.; Seznec, Olivier

    1988-01-01

    Automated techniques were developed for the extraction and characterization of absorption features from reflectance spectra. The absorption feature extraction algorithms were successfully tested on laboratory, field, and aircraft imaging spectrometer data. A suite of laboratory spectra of the most common minerals was analyzed and absorption band characteristics tabulated. A prototype expert system was designed, implemented, and successfully tested to allow identification of minerals based on the extracted absorption band characteristics. AVIRIS spectra for a site in the northern Grapevine Mountains, Nevada, have been characterized and the minerals sericite (fine grained muscovite) and dolomite were identified. The minerals kaolinite, alunite, and buddingtonite were identified and mapped for a site at Cuprite, Nevada, using the feature extraction algorithms on the new Geophysical and Environmental Research 64 channel imaging spectrometer (GERIS) data. The feature extraction routines (written in FORTRAN and C) were interfaced to the expert system (written in PROLOG) to allow both efficient processing of numerical data and logical spectrum analysis.

  8. Imaging findings of sacroiliac joints in spondyloarthropathies and other rheumatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, G; Cascavilla, A; Scalzo, G; Carotti, M; Salaffi, F; Grassi, W

    2011-03-01

    The authors sought to evaluate the role of the different imaging techniques in the study of sacroiliac joints in patients with spondyloarthropathies (SpA) and other rheumatic conditions and to assess potential pitfalls in the radiological diagnosis. Forty-three consecutive patients with sacroiliitis as the predominant symptom of a rheumatic disorder were retrospectively studied. Radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were performed. The following imaging findings were evaluated: bone marrow oedema, intra-articular effusion, synovial reaction, joint-space widening, bone sclerosis or hyperostosis, subchondral erosions and, in final stages, joint-space narrowing and ankylosis. All images were independently reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Radiography demonstrated bone sclerosis in 10 patients (23%), subchondral erosions in 15 (34%), jointspace widening in 8 (18%), joint-space narrowing in 17 (39%) and ankylosis in 3 (6%). CT examination showed sclerosis of the sacroiliac joint in 17 patients (41%), subchondral erosions in 21 (53%), joint-space widening in 22 (53%), joint-space narrowing in 18 (43%) and ankylosis in 7 (17%). At MR, we found bone marrow oedema in 25 patients (92%), intra-articular effusion in 26 (96%), synovial reaction in 21 (77%) and joint-space widening in 5 (18%). Radiological study of the sacroiliac joints in patients with different rheumatic disorders represents a problem of difficult diagnostic evaluation due to the complexity of the anatomical region and the variability of radiographic findings. The integrated use of conventional radiography, CT and MR imaging is suggested to avoid misdiagnosis.

  9. Agricultural Geophysics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The four geophysical methods predominantly used for agricultural purposes are resistivity, electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and time domain reflectometry (TDR). Resistivity and electromagnetic induction methods are typically employed to map lateral variations of apparent so...

  10. Exploration Geophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espey, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Describes geophysical techniques such as seismic, gravity, and magnetic surveys of offshare acreage, and land-data gathering from a three-dimensional representation made from closely spaced seismic lines. (MLH)

  11. Exploration Geophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savit, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    Expansion of activity and confirmation of new technological directions characterized several fields of exploration geophysics in 1977. Advances in seismic-reflection exploration have been especially important. (Author/MA)

  12. Exploration Geophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savit, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    Expansion of activity and confirmation of new technological directions characterized several fields of exploration geophysics in 1977. Advances in seismic-reflection exploration have been especially important. (Author/MA)

  13. Exploration Geophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espey, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Describes geophysical techniques such as seismic, gravity, and magnetic surveys of offshare acreage, and land-data gathering from a three-dimensional representation made from closely spaced seismic lines. (MLH)

  14. High resolution three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging of human finger joints in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-08-01

    We present a method for noninvasively imaging the hand joints using a three-dimensional (3D) photoacoustic imaging (PAI) system. This 3D PAI system utilizes cylindrical scanning in data collection and virtual-detector concept in image reconstruction. The maximum lateral and axial resolutions of the PAI system are 70 μm and 240 μm. The cross-sectional photoacoustic images of a healthy joint clearly exhibited major internal structures including phalanx and tendons, which are not available from the current photoacoustic imaging methods. The in vivo PAI results obtained are comparable with the corresponding 3.0 T MRI images of the finger joint. This study suggests that the proposed method has the potential to be used in early detection of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis.

  15. Temporomandibular joint: a methodology of magnetic resonance imaging 3-D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chirani, Reza Arbab; Jacq, Jean-José; Meriot, Philippe; Roux, Christian

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new method for the 3-dimensional reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) images by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In a preliminary study, this modality of 3-D representation was tested to evaluate the joint motion. Sagittal MRI slices were obtained from a healthy subject. Acquisitions were realized by a spin-echo sequence, with a proton-density weighting and a 2-mm slice thickness. A 3-D reconstruction of the TMJ images was performed. Three-dimensional representations of the temporomandibular joint were obtained. The depiction of the principal anatomical elements of this joint was realized. A study of TMJ dynamics was also carried out. In this case, movements of the right and left disks and condyles were measured. This 3-D reconstruction methodology allowed a more understandable anatomical description than 2-D images of the TMJ and offered possibilities for joint functional analysis. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  16. Axial traction magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the glenohumeral joint in healthy volunteers: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Garwood, Elisabeth R; Souza, Richard B; Zhang, Amy; Zhang, Alan L; Ma, C Benjamin; Link, Thomas M; Motamedi, Daria

    Evaluate technical feasibility and potential applications of glenohumeral (GH) joint axial traction magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in healthy volunteers. Eleven shoulders were imaged in neutral and with 4kg axial traction at 3T. Quantitative measurements were assessed. Axial traction was well tolerated. There was statistically significant widening of the superior GH joint space (p=0.002) and acromial angle (p=0.017) with traction. Inter-rater agreement was high. GH joint axial traction MRI is technically feasible and well tolerated in volunteers. Traction of the capsule, widening of the superior GH joint space and acromial angle were observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Yoginder N; Dunnavant, F Daniel; Royal, Stuart A; Beukelman, Timothy; Stoll, Matthew L; Cron, Randy Q

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is extremely common but frequently asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast remains the gold standard for identifying TMJ arthritis in JIA. A reliable scoring system with published MRI examples of typical acute and chronic TMJ arthritis changes will be invaluable for future prospective treatment trials of TMJ arthritis in JIA. MRIs were collected from routine clinical studies assessing TMJ arthritis in JIA. Representative images were selected for publication to depict acute (synovial fluid, bone marrow edema, and synovial enhancement) and chronic (pannus, disc derangement, and condylar head flattening and erosions) TMJ arthritis findings. A preliminary MRI-based scoring system for assessing degrees of acute and chronic TMJ arthritis was developed and tested for inter- and intrareader reliability. TMJ MRIs representative of acute and chronic TMJ arthritis in JIA were selected from among thousands taken (>500 TMJ MRI studies annually at Children's of Alabama) since September 2007. Moreover, computed tomography scans depicting select bony changes (osteophyte formation, micrognathia) were chosen for publication. A description of the MRI protocol for assessing TMJ arthritis is included. A preliminary scoring system weighted for degree of acute and chronic TMJ arthritis MRI findings was found to have substantial inter- and intrareader reliability. A published set of MRIs depicting representative acute and chronic changes will help establish a standardized scoring system to assess TMJ arthritis in children with JIA. Future validation will aid in assessing improvement during treatment trials of TMJ arthritis. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage and labrum

    PubMed Central

    Zilkens, Christoph; Miese, Falk; Jäger, Marcus; Bittersohl, Bernd; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    Hip joint instability and impingement are the most common biomechanical risk factors that put the hip joint at risk to develop premature osteoarthritis. Several surgical procedures like periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia or hip arthroscopy or safe surgical hip dislocation for femoroacetabular impingement aim at restoring the hip anatomy. However, the success of joint preserving surgical procedures is limited by the amount of pre-existing cartilage damage. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques like delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) might help to monitor the effect of surgical or non-surgical procedures in the effort to halt or even reverse joint damage. PMID:22053256

  19. Radionuclide imaging: Past, present and future outlook in the diagnosis of infected prosthetic joints.

    PubMed

    Brammen, Lindsay; Palestro, Christopher; Sinzinger, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    A serious complication of joint replacement surgery is infection, which results in prolonged invalidity as well as removal and subsequent re-implantation after lengthy antibiotic therapy. In terms of diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine has presented several tracers and imaging modalities over the years to be used in prosthetic joint infection. The PubMed/MEDLINE literature database was systematically examined for publications on infection, arthroplasty, joint replacement, prosthetic joint, gallium, labeled leukocytes, sulfur colloid, antimicrobial peptides, Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG), positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT), and single-photon emission (SPET-CT). This was determined to be a comprehensive review, not a meta-analysis of prosthetic joint infection and diagnostic imaging in the field of nuclear medicine. Prosthetic joint replacement is more frequently being employed as a way of improving the quality of life in an ever-ageing population. Complications following joint replacement surgery include aseptic or mechanical loosening, as well as polyethylene wear and prosthetic joint infection. The rate of infection is estimated to be between 1%-3%. The therapeutic management of these complications lies in the ability to differentiate between infection and aseptic mechanical loosening. Given that plain radiographs are neither sensitive nor specific to infection and computer tomography, as well as magnetic resonance imaging are limited due to metal-induced artifacts, radionuclide imaging has come to aid in the diagnostic imaging in the failed joint replacement. However, each modality has its advantages and disadvantages, thus there is no gold standard technique of radionuclide imaging. Nevertheless, radiolabelled leukocyte scintigraphy has proven itself to be the gold standard in neutrophil-based infection processes. Several studies have examined the role of PET using radiotracers such as (18)F-FDG, gallium-67 and (18)F, as well

  20. Temporomandibular joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Yuka; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Souhei

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the pathogenic duration of rheumatoid arthritis in joints other than the temporomandibular joint and bone and soft tissue involvement of the temporomandibular joint using magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-six symptomatic patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis were enrolled in this study. All patients were classified according to the duration of rheumatoid arthritis in joints other than the temporomandibular joint. The relationships between the duration of rheumatoid arthritis in these various joints and magnetic resonance findings in the temporomandibular joint were analyzed using the chi-square test. Bony changes in the mandibular condyle were observed in 43 of 52 (82.7 %) temporomandibular joints, but the frequency of such changes was not significantly correlated with the duration of rheumatoid arthritis in other joints. We found a significant correlation between the duration of rheumatoid arthritis in other joints and the type and number of bony changes in the mandibular condyle (P < 0.05). Superior disc positions were observed in 27 of 52 (51.9 %) temporomandibular joints. T2-weighted images demonstrated effusion in the joint space in 38 of 52 (73.1 %) temporomandibular joints. A biplanar disc configuration was the most frequent configuration in all groups. The duration of rheumatoid arthritis in other joints was significantly correlated with the mobility of the mandibular condyle (P < 0.05). The type and number of bony changes and mobility of the mandibular condyle showed significant relationships with the duration of rheumatoid arthritis in other joints in the body (P < 0.05).

  1. Geostatistical noise filtering of geophysical images : application to unexploded ordnance (UXO) sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Hirotaka; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Coburn, Timothy C.

    2004-07-01

    Geostatistical and non-geostatistical noise filtering methodologies, factorial kriging and a low-pass filter, and a region growing method are applied to analytic signal magnetometer images at two UXO contaminated sites to delineate UXO target areas. Overall delineation performance is improved by removing background noise. Factorial kriging slightly outperforms the low-pass filter but there is no distinct difference between them in terms of finding anomalies of interest.

  2. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Rajian, Justin R.; Girish, Gandikota; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual modality system, for imaging human peripheral joints, is introduced. The system utilizes a commercial US unit for both US control imaging and PA signal acquisition. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of the system, on normal volunteers, revealed that this system can recover both the structural and functional information of intra- and extra-articular tissues. Confirmed by the control US images, the system, on the PA mode, can differentiate tendon from surrounding soft tissue based on the endogenous optical contrast. Presenting both morphological and pathological information in joint, this system holds promise for diagnosis and characterization of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Optical tomographic imaging of vascular and metabolic reactivity in rheumatoid joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasker, Joseph M.; Dwyer, Edward; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2005-04-01

    Our group has recently established that joints affected by Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) can be distinguished from healthy joints through measurements of the scattering coefficient. We showed that a high scattering coefficient in the center of the joint is indicative of a joint with RA. While these results were encouraging, data to date still suffers from low sensitivity and specificity. Possibly higher specificities and sensitivities can be achieved if dynamic measurements of hemodynamic and metabolic processes in the synovium are considered. Using our dual-wavelength imaging system together with previously implemented model-based iterative image reconstruction schemes, we have performed initial dynamic imaging studies involving healthy human volunteers and patients affected by RA. These case studies seem to confirm our hypothesis that differences in the vascular reactivity exist between affected and unaffected joints.

  4. Novel joint source-channel coding for wireless transmission of radiography images.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Katsuhiro; Takizawa, Kenichi; Ikegami, Tetsushi

    2010-01-01

    A wireless technology is required to realize robust transmission of medical images like a radiography image over noisy environment. The use of error correction technique is essential for realizing such a reliable communication, in which a suitable channel coding is introduced to correct erroneous bits caused by passing through a noisy channel. However, the use of a channel code decreases its efficiency because redundancy bits are also transmitted with information bits. This paper presents a joint source-channel coding which maintains the channel efficiency during transmission of medical images like a radiography image. As medical images under the test, we use typical radiography images in this paper. The joint coding technique enjoys correlations between pixels of the radiography image. The results show that the proposed joint coding provides capability to correcting erroneous bits without increasing the redundancy of the codeword.

  5. ERS-1 Investigations of Southern Ocean Sea Ice Geophysics Using Combined Scatterometer and SAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, M.; Early, D.; Long, D.

    1994-01-01

    Coregistered ERS-1 SAR and Scatterometer data are presented for the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Calibrated image backscatter statistics are extracted from data acquired in regions where surface measurements were made during two extensive international Weddell Sea experiments in 1992. Changes in summer ice-surface conditions, due to temperature and wind, are shown to have a large impact on observed microwave backscatter values. Winter calibrated backscatter distributions are also investigated as a way of describing ice thickness conditions in different location during winter. Coregistered SAR and EScat data over a manned drifting ice station are used to illustrate the seasonal signature changes occurring during the fall freeze-up transition.

  6. ERS-1 Investigations of Southern Ocean Sea Ice Geophysics Using Combined Scatterometer and SAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, M.; Early, D.; Long, D.

    1994-01-01

    Coregistered ERS-1 SAR and Scatterometer data are presented for the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Calibrated image backscatter statistics are extracted from data acquired in regions where surface measurements were made during two extensive international Weddell Sea experiments in 1992. Changes in summer ice-surface conditions, due to temperature and wind, are shown to have a large impact on observed microwave backscatter values. Winter calibrated backscatter distributions are also investigated as a way of describing ice thickness conditions in different location during winter. Coregistered SAR and EScat data over a manned drifting ice station are used to illustrate the seasonal signature changes occurring during the fall freeze-up transition.

  7. Particle Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki K. M.

    2014-05-01

    Geophysics research has long been dominated by classical mechanics, largely disregarding the potential of particle physics to augment existing techniques. The purpose of this article is to review recent progress in probing Earth's interior with muons and neutrinos. Existing results for various volcanological targets are reviewed. Geoneutrinos are also highlighted as examples in which the neutrino probes elucidate the composition of Earth's deep interior. Particle geophysics has the potential to serve as a useful paradigm to transform our understanding of Earth as dramatically as the X-ray transformed our understanding of medicine and the body.

  8. Geophysical Images of the Shallow Hydrothermal Degassing at Solfatara (Phlegrean Fields, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrdina, S.; Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Legaz, A.; Camerlynck, C.; Lebourg, T.

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of an electric resistivity tomography (ERT) survey, combined with mappings of diffuse carbon dioxide flux, ground temperature and self-potential (SP) at Solfatara, the most active crater of Phlegrean Fields. Solfatara is characterized by an intense carbon dioxide degassing, fumarole activity, and ground deformation. This ensemble of methods is applied to image the hydrothermal system of Solfatara, to understand the geometry of the fluid circulation, and to define the extension of the hydrothermal plume at a high enough resolution for a quantitative modeling. ERT inversion results show Solfatara as a globally conductive structure, with resistivity in the range 1-200 Ohmm. Broad negative anomaly of self-potential in the inner part of Solfatara with a minimum in the area of Bocca Grande suggests a significant downward flow of condensing liquid water. Comparison between spatial variations of resistivity and gas flux indicates that resistivity changes at depth are related to gas saturation and fluid temperature. These variations delineate two plume structures: a liquid-dominated conductive plume below Fangaia mud-pool and a gas-dominated plume below Bocca Grande fumarole. The geometry of the Fangaia liquid-saturated plume is also imaged by a high resolution 3-D resistivity model. In order to estimate the permeability, we propose a 2-D axis-symmetric numerical model coupling Richards's equation for fluid flow in conditions of partial saturation with the resistivity calculation as function of saturation only. Alternatively, we apply the Dupuit equation to estimate the permeability of the shallow layer. Using these two approaches, we obtain the permeability of the shallow layer below Fangaia which ranges between (2 - 4) 10-14 m 2.

  9. A nonstationary geophysical inversion approach with an approximation error method for imaging fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehikoinen, A.; Finsterle, S.; Voutilainen, A.; Kowalsky, M.; Kaipio, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present a new methodology for imaging the evolution of electrically conductive fluids in porous media. The state estimation problem is formulated in terms of an evolution-observation model, and the estimates are obtained via Bayesian filtering. The approach is based on an extended Kalman filter algorithm and includes an approximation error method to model uncertainties in the evolution and observation models. The example we consider involves the imaging of time-varying distributions of water saturation in porous media using time-lapse electrical resistance tomography (ERT). The evolution model we employ is a simplified model for simulating flow through partially saturated porous media. The complete electrode model (with Archie's law relating saturations to electrical conductivity) is used as the observation model. We propose to account for approximation errors in the evolution and observation models by constructing a statistical model of the differences between the "accurate" and "approximate" representations of fluid flow, and by including this information in the calculation of the posterior probability density of the estimated system state. The proposed method provides improved estimates of water saturation distribution relative to traditional reconstruction schemes that rely on conventional stabilization methods (e.g., using a smoothness prior) and relative to the extended Kalman filter without the approximation error method incorporated. Finally, the approximation error method allows for the use of a simplified and computationally efficient evolution model in the state estimation scheme. This work was supported, in part, by the Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation (TEKES), projects 40285/05 and 40347/05, and by the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231.

  10. Joint Applied Optics and Chinese Optics Letters feature introduction: digital holography and three-dimensional imaging.

    PubMed

    Poon, Ting-Chung

    2011-12-01

    This feature issue serves as a pilot issue promoting the joint issue of Applied Optics and Chinese Optics Letters. It focuses upon topics of current relevance to the community working in the area of digital holography and 3-D imaging.

  11. Analysis of in-situ rock joint strength using digital borehole scanner images

    SciTech Connect

    Thapa, Bhaskar Bahadur

    1994-09-01

    The availability of high resolution digital images of borehole walls using the Borehole Scanner System has made it possible to develop new methods of in-situ rock characterization. This thesis addresses particularly new approaches to the characterization of in-situ joint strength arising from surface roughness. An image processing technique is used to extract the roughness profile from joints in the unrolled image of the borehole wall. A method for estimating in-situ Rengers envelopes using this data is presented along with results from using the method on joints in a borehole in porphyritic granite. Next, an analysis of the joint dilation angle anisotropy is described and applied to the porphyritic granite joints. The results indicate that the dilation angle of the joints studied are anisotropic at small scales and tend to reflect joint waviness as scale increases. A procedure to unroll the opposing roughness profiles to obtain a two dimensional sample is presented. The measurement of apertures during this process is shown to produce an error which increases with the dip of the joint. The two dimensional sample of opposing profiles is used in a new kinematic analysis of the joint shear stress-shear deformation behavior. Examples of applying these methods on the porphyritic granite joints are presented. The unrolled opposing profiles were used in a numerical simulation of a direct shear test using Discontinuous Deformation Analysis. Results were compared to laboratory test results using core samples containing the same joints. The simulated dilatancy and shear stress-shear deformation curves were close to the laboratory curves in the case of a joint in porphyritic granite.

  12. Geophysical Imaging for Investigating the Delivery and Distribution of Amendments in the Heterogeneous Subsurface of the F.E. Warren AFB

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    project. This page left blank intentionally. 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Engineered in situ treatment processes, such as in situ bioremediation ...to develop conceptual amendment delivery models for in situ bioremediation and is based on the premise that geophysical imaging of amendment...remedial action (RA) involving hydraulic fracturing and in situ bioremediation was conducted at SS7 in 2009. A particular benefit of using SS7 as a

  13. Geophysical Imaging for Investigating the Delivery and Distribution of Amendments in the Heterogeneous Subsurface of the F.E. Warren AFB

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Unlimited This study focused on improving our ability to develop conceptual amendment delivery models for in situ bioremediation and is based on the...for this demonstration project. 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Engineered in situ treatment processes, such as in situ bioremediation , are being employed...conceptual amendment delivery models for in situ bioremediation and is based on the premise that geophysical imaging of amendment emplacement via hydraulic

  14. Integrating multidisciplinary, multiscale geological and geophysical data to image the Castrovillari fault (Northern Calabria, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinti, F. R.; Pauselli, C.; Livio, F.; Ercoli, M.; Brunori, C. A.; Ferrario, M. F.; Volpe, R.; Civico, R.; Pantosti, D.; Pinzi, S.; De Martini, P. M.; Ventura, G.; Alfonsi, L.; Gambillara, R.; Michetti, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Castrovillari scarps (Cfs) are located in northern Calabria (Italy) and consist of three main WSW-dipping fault scarps resulting from multiple rupture events. At the surface, these scarps are defined by multiple breaks in slope. Despite its near-surface complexity, the faults likely merge to form a single normal fault at about 200 m depth, which we refer to as the Castrovillari fault. We present the results of a multidisciplinary and multiscale study at a selected site of the Cfs with the aim to (i) characterize the geometry at the surface and at depth and (ii) obtain constraints on the fault slip history. We investigate the site by merging data from quantitative geomorphological analyses, electrical resistivity and ground penetrating radar surveys, and palaeoseismological trenching along a ˜40 m high scarp. The closely spaced investigations allow us to reconstruct the shallow stratigraphy, define the fault locations, and measure the faulted stratigraphic offsets down to 20 m depth. Despite the varying resolutions, each of the adopted approaches suggests the presence of sub-parallel fault planes below the scarps at approximately the same location. The merged datasets permit the evaluation of the fault array (along strike for 220 m within a 370-m-wide zone). The main fault zone consists of two closely spaced NW-SE striking fault planes in the upper portion of the scarp slope and another fault at the scarp foot. The 3-D image of the fault surfaces shows west to southwest dipping planes with values between 70° and 80°; the two closely spaced planes join at about 200 m below the surface. The 8-to-12-m-high upper fault, which shows the higher vertical displacements, accommodated most of the deformation during the Holocene. Results from the trenching analysis indicate a minimum slip per event of 0.6 m and a maximum short-term slip rate of 0.6 mm yr-1 for the Cf. The shallow subsurface imaging techniques are particularly helpful in evaluating the possible field

  15. Inspection of ball grid array (BGA) solder joints using x-ray cross-sectional images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Young Jun; Ko, Kuk Won; Cho, Hyungsuck; Kim, Hyung C.; Joo, Hyonam; Kim, Sung K.

    1999-08-01

    The ball grid array (BGA) chip is widely used in high density printed circuit board (PCB). However, inspection of defects in the solder joints is difficult by visual or a normal x-ray imaging method, because unlike conventional packages, solder joints of the BGA are located underneath its own package and ball type leads. Therefore, x-ray digital tomosynthesis (DT), which form a cross-sectional image of 3D objects, is needed to image and inspect the solder joints of BGA. In this paper, we propose a series of algorithms for inspecting the solder joints of BGA by using x-ray cross-sectional images that are acquired from the developed DT system. BGA solder joints are examined to check the alignment between the chip and pad on a PCB, bridge, adequate solder volume. The volume of the solder joint is represented by a gray level in the x-ray images: thus solder joints can be examined by use of the gray-level profiles of each joint. To inspect and classify various defects, pattern classification method using a learning vector quantization neural network and a look up table is proposed. The clusters into which a gray-level profile is classified are generated by the learning process of the network by using a number of sampled gray-level profiles. A series of these developed algorithms for inspecting and classifying defects were tested on a number of BGA solder joints. The experimental results show that the proposed method yields satisfactory solutions for inspection based on x-ray cross-sectional images.

  16. Modern Radiological Imaging of Osteoarthritis of The Hip Joint With Consideration of Predisposing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Weber, M-A; Merle, C; Rehnitz, C; Gotterbarm, T

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common disease of the hip joint in adults and has a high socioeconomic impact. This review article discusses the value of three imaging modalities in the diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the hip joint: projection radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Besides established imaging diagnostics of osteoarthritis, this review also outlines new MRI techniques that enable the biochemical analysis of hip joint cartilage and discusses predisposing deformities of the hip joint including femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) with labral pathologies, hip joint dysplasia, malrotation, and, finally, femoral head necrosis, for which early detection and an exact description of the extent and localization of the necrotic area are extremely important. Conventional X-rays remain indispensable for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis, while MRI is able to depict additional early symptoms and signs of activity of the disease. With the increasing number of joint-preserving interventions such as surgical hip luxation and hip joint arthroscopy for treating FAI, high-resolution imaging is gaining further importance for both pre- and postoperative diagnostics because it can accurately recognize early stages of joint damage. With high-resolution MR sequences and MR arthrography, the detailed depiction of the thin cartilaginous coating of the hip joint has become quite possible. • Projection radiography is the method of choice for the diagnostic work-up of osteoarthritis of the hip joint.• Using computed tomography, the amount of acetabular bone stock prior to total hip arthroplasty is assessed in selected patients.• Magnetic resonance imaging can substantiate the indication of surgery in case of discrepancy between clinical symptoms and radiological findings of the hip joint.• If distinct and left untreated, predisposing conditions (such as femoroacetabular impingement) may lead to early development of osteoarthritis of the

  17. [Value of magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Loría Chami, Alberto; Balcázar Vázquez, Ricardo; Sánchez Vargas, Karla

    2014-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint affection is a frequent problem in the adult population, the most common form being a series of functional alterations known as temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging has emerged as the most appropriate test in the assessment of the joint, primarily as a non-invasive test that allows the acquisition of images in different planes. The study aims to reaffirm the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging study in the evaluation of the temporomandibular joints and to demonstrate differences in age and sex of more frequently associated alterations and side effects. A prospective, observational, descriptive study in which we evaluated the presence of joint dislocations and degenerative bone changes, degeneration and/or disc perforation and inflammatory disorders. In 35 patients studied, all of whom had some symptoms of joint dysfunction, with ages ranging between 37 and 65 years, and with an average of 52 years, eight were normal, in 26 patients we found associated alterations with joint dysfunction, and in 14 patients the affected side was the right and the left in 10 patients. MRI should be the study of choice for a patient with temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms, as it has demonstrated excellent visualization of the joint in different acquisition planes.

  18. A photoacoustic tomography and ultrasound combined system for proximal interphalangeal joint imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Rajian, Justin R.; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual modality system for imaging human peripheral joints is introduced. The system utilizes a commercial US unit for both US control imaging and PA signal acquisition. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of the system on normal volunteers revealed that this system can recover both the structural and functional information of intra- and extra-articular tissues. Presenting both morphological and pathological information in joint, this system holds promise for diagnosis and characterization of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Comparison of two and three-dimensional optical tomographic image reconstructions of human finger joints.

    PubMed

    Song, Rong; Klose, Alexander D; Scheel, Alexander K; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Jurgen; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an images reconstruction algorithm to recover spatial distribution of optical properties in human finger joints for early diagnosis and monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). An optimization method iteratively employs a light propagation and scattering coefficients distribution for near-infrared (NIR) light inside the joint tissue. We developed the differences in cross-sectional images obtained by using the reconstruction algorithms with 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional light propagation models. In particular we examined how these different approaches affect the discrimination between healthy and RA joints.

  20. Generating High resolution surfaces from images: when photogrammetry and applied geophysics meets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretar, F.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.; Schelstraete, D.; Martin, O.; Quernet, P.

    2012-04-01

    Airborne digital photogrammetry has been used for some years to create digital models of the Earth's topography from calibrated cameras. But, in the recent years, the use of non-professionnal digital cameras has become valuable to reconstruct topographic surfaces. Today, the multi megapixel resolution of non-professionnal digital cameras, either used in a close range configuration or from low altitude flights, provide a ground pixel size of respectively a fraction of millimeters to couple of centimeters. Such advances turned into reality because the data processing chain made a tremendous break through during the last five years. This study investigates the potential of the open source software MICMAC developed by the French National Survey IGN (http://www.micmac.ign.fr) to calibrate unoriented digital images and calculate surface models of extremely high resolution for Earth Science purpose. We would like to report two experiences performed in 2011. The first has been performed in the context of risk assessment of rock falls and landslides along the cliffs of Normandy seashore. The acquisition protocol for the first site of "Criel-sur-Mer" has been very simple: a walk along the chalk vertical cliffs taking photos with a focal of 18mm every approx. 50m with an overlap of 80% allowed to generate 2.5km of digital surface at centimeter resolution. The site of "Les Vaches Noires" has been more complicated to acquire because of both the geology (dark clays) and the geometry (the landslide direction is parallel to the seashore and has a high field depth from the shore). We therefore developed an innovative device mounted on board of an autogyre (in-between ultralight power driven aircraft and helicopter). The entire area has been surveyed with a focal of 70mm at 400m asl with a ground pixel of 3cm. MICMAC gives the possibility to directly georeference digital Model. Here, it has been performed by a net of wireless GPS called Geocubes, also developed at IGN. The second

  1. 4D rotational x-ray imaging of wrist joint dynamic motion

    SciTech Connect

    Carelsen, Bart; Bakker, Niels H.; Strackee, Simon D.; Boon, Sjirk N.; Maas, Mario; Sabczynski, Joerg; Grimbergen, Cornelis A.; Streekstra, Geert J.

    2005-09-15

    Current methods for imaging joint motion are limited to either two-dimensional (2D) video fluoroscopy, or to animated motions from a series of static three-dimensional (3D) images. 3D movement patterns can be detected from biplane fluoroscopy images matched with computed tomography images. This involves several x-ray modalities and sophisticated 2D to 3D matching for the complex wrist joint. We present a method for the acquisition of dynamic 3D images of a moving joint. In our method a 3D-rotational x-ray (3D-RX) system is used to image a cyclically moving joint. The cyclic motion is synchronized to the x-ray acquisition to yield multiple sets of projection images, which are reconstructed to a series of time resolved 3D images, i.e., four-dimensional rotational x ray (4D-RX). To investigate the obtained image quality parameters the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function (PSF) via the edge spread function and the contrast to noise ratio between air and phantom were determined on reconstructions of a bullet and rod phantom, using 4D-RX as well as stationary 3D-RX images. The CNR in volume reconstructions based on 251 projection images in the static situation and on 41 and 34 projection images of a moving phantom were 6.9, 3.0, and 2.9, respectively. The average FWHM of the PSF of these same images was, respectively, 1.1, 1.7, and 2.2 mm orthogonal to the motion and parallel to direction of motion 0.6, 0.7, and 1.0 mm. The main deterioration of 4D-RX images compared to 3D-RX images is due to the low number of projection images used and not to the motion of the object. Using 41 projection images seems the best setting for the current system. Experiments on a postmortem wrist show the feasibility of the method for imaging 3D dynamic joint motion. We expect that 4D-RX will pave the way to improved assessment of joint disorders by detection of 3D dynamic motion patterns in joints.

  2. Joint Probability Models of Radiology Images and Clinical Annotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Corey Wells

    2009-01-01

    Radiology data, in the form of images and reports, is growing at a high rate due to the introduction of new imaging modalities, new uses of existing modalities, and the growing importance of objective image information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. This increase has resulted in an enormous set of image data that is richly annotated…

  3. Joint Probability Models of Radiology Images and Clinical Annotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Corey Wells

    2009-01-01

    Radiology data, in the form of images and reports, is growing at a high rate due to the introduction of new imaging modalities, new uses of existing modalities, and the growing importance of objective image information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. This increase has resulted in an enormous set of image data that is richly annotated…

  4. Dynamic optical imaging of vascular and metabolic reactivity in rheumatoid joints.

    PubMed

    Lasker, Joseph M; Fong, Christopher J; Ginat, Daniel T; Dwyer, Edward; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic optical imaging is increasingly applied to clinically relevant areas such as brain and cancer imaging. In this approach, some external stimulus is applied and changes in relevant physiological parameters (e.g., oxy- or deoxyhemoglobin concentrations) are determined. The advantage of this approach is that the prestimulus state can be used as a reference or baseline against which the changes can be calibrated. Here we present the first application of this method to the problem of characterizing joint diseases, especially effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the proximal interphalangeal finger joints. Using a dual-wavelength tomographic imaging system together with previously implemented model-based iterative image reconstruction schemes, we have performed initial dynamic imaging case studies on a limited number of healthy volunteers and patients diagnosed with RA. Focusing on three cases studies, we illustrated our major finds. These studies support our hypothesis that differences in the vascular reactivity exist between affected and unaffected joints.

  5. Time-lapse integrated geophysical imaging of magmatic injections and fluid-induced fracturing causing Campi Flegrei 1983-84 Unrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Siena, Luca; Crescentini, Luca; Amoruso, Antonella; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Castellano, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Geophysical precursors measured during Unrest episodes are a primary source of geophysical information to forecast eruptions at the largest and most potentially destructive volcanic calderas. Despite their importance and uniqueness, these precursors are also considered difficult to interpret and unrepresentative of larger eruptive events. Here, we show how novel geophysical imaging and monitoring techniques are instead able to represent the dynamic evolution of magmatic- and fluid-induced fracturing during the largest period of Unrest at Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy (1983-1984). The time-dependent patterns drawn by microseismic locations and deformation, once integrated by 3D attenuation tomography and absorption/scattering mapping, model injections of magma- and fluid-related materials in the form of spatially punctual microseismic bursts at a depth of 3.5 km, west and offshore the city of Pozzuoli. The shallowest four kilometres of the crust work as a deformation-based dipolar system before and after each microseismic shock. Seismicity and deformation contemporaneously focus on the point of injection; patterns then progressively crack the medium directed towards the second focus, a region at depths 1-1.5 km south of Solfatara. A single high-absorption and high-scattering aseismic anomaly marks zones of fluid storage overlying the first dipolar centre. These results provide the first direct geophysical signature of the processes of aseismic fluid release at the top of the basaltic basement, producing pozzolanic activity and recently observed via rock-physics and well-rock experiments. The microseismicity caused by fluids and gasses rises to surface via high-absorption north-east rising paths connecting the two dipolar centres, finally beingq being generally expelled from the maar diatreme Solfatara structure. Geophysical precursors during Unrest depict how volcanic stress was released at the Campi Flegrei caldera during its period of highest recorded seismicity

  6. Joint sparse representation based automatic target recognition in SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haichao; Nasrabadi, Nasser M.; Huang, Thomas S.; Zhang, Yanning

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel joint sparse representation based automatic target recognition (ATR) method using multiple views, which can not only handle multi-view ATR without knowing the pose but also has the advantage of exploiting the correlations among the multiple views for a single joint recognition decision. We cast the problem as a multi-variate regression model and recover the sparse representations for the multiple views simultaneously. The recognition is accomplished via classifying the target to the class which gives the minimum total reconstruction error accumulated across all the views. Extensive experiments have been carried out on Moving and Stationary Target Acquisition and Recognition (MSTAR) public database to evaluate the proposed method compared with several state-of-the-art methods such as linear Support Vector Machine (SVM), kernel SVM as well as a sparse representation based classifier. Experimental results demonstrate that the effectiveness as well as robustness of the proposed joint sparse representation ATR method.

  7. Cluster analysis applied to multiparameter geophysical dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giuseppe, M. G.; Troiano, A.; Troise, C.; De Natale, G.

    2012-04-01

    Multi-parameter acquisition is a common geophysical field practice nowadays. Regularly seismic velocity and attenuation, gravity and electromagnetic dataset are acquired in a certain area, to obtain a complete characterization of the some investigate feature of the subsoil. Such a richness of information is often underestimated, although an integration of the analysis could provide a notable improving in the imaging of the investigated structures, mostly because the handling of distinct parameters and their joint inversion still presents several and severe problems. Post-inversion statistical techniques represent a promising approach to these questions, providing a quick, simple and elegant way to obtain this advantageous but complex integration. We present an approach based on the partition of the analyzed multi parameter dataset in a number of different classes, identified as localized regions of high correlation. These classes, or 'Cluster', are structured in such a way that the observations pertaining to a certain group are more similar to each other than the observations belonging to a different one, according to an optimal logical criterion. Regions of the subsoil sharing the same physical characteristic are so identified, without a-priori or empirical relationship linking the distinct measured parameters. The retrieved imaging results highly affordable in a statistical sense, specifically due to this lack of external hypothesis that are, instead, indispensable in a full joint inversion, were works, as matter of fact, just a real constrain for the inversion process, not seldom of relative consistence. We apply our procedure to a certain number of experimental dataset, related to several structures at very different scales presents in the Campanian district (southern Italy). These structures goes from the shallows evidence of the active fault zone originating the M 7.9 Irpinia earthquake to the main feature characterizing the Campi Flegrei Caldera and the Mt

  8. Model-based 3D segmentation of the bones of joints in medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiamin; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Saha, Punam K.; Odhner, Dewey; Hirsch, Bruce E.; Siegler, Sorin; Simon, Scott; Winkelstein, Beth A.

    2005-04-01

    There are several medical application areas that require the segmentation and separation of the component bones of joints in a sequence of acquired images of the joint under various loading conditions, our own target area being joint motion analysis. This is a challenging problem due to the proximity of bones at the joint, partial volume effects, and other imaging modality-specific factors that confound boundary contrast. A model-based strategy is proposed in this paper wherein a rigid model of the bone is generated from a segmentation of the bone in the image corresponding to one position of the joint by using the live wire method. In other images of the joint, this model is used to search for the same bone by minimizing an energy functional that utilizes both boundary- and region-based information. An evaluation of the method by utilizing a total of 60 data sets on MR and CT images of the ankle complex and cervical spine indicates that the segmentations agree very closely with the live wire segmentations yielding true positive and false positive volume fractions in the range 89-97% and 0.2-0.7%. The method requires 1-2 minutes of operator time and 6-7 minutes of computer time, which makes it significantly more efficient than live wire - the only method currently available for the task.

  9. Comparative study of the detection of joint injury in early-stage rheumatoid arthritis by magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist and finger joints and physical examination.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Mami; Kawakami, Atsushi; Iwamoto, Naoki; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Fujikawa, Keita; Aramaki, Toshiyuki; Kita, Junko; Okada, Akitomo; Koga, Tomohiro; Arima, Kazuhiko; Kamachi, Makoto; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Hideki; Ida, Hiroaki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Takao, Shoichiro; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Uetani, Masataka; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2011-03-01

    To verify whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-proven joint injury is sensitive as compared with joint injury determined by physical examination. MRI of the wrist and finger joints of both hands was examined in 51 early-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients by both plain and gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-enhanced MRI. Synovitis, bone edema, and bone erosion (the latter two included as bone lesions at the wrist joints); metacarpophalangeal joints; and proximal interphalangeal joints were considered as MRI-proven joint injury. Japan College of Rheumatology-certified rheumatologists had given a physical examination just before the MRI study. The presence of tender and/or swollen joints in the same fields as MRI was considered as joint injury on physical examination. The association of MRI-proven joint injury with physical examination-proven joint injury was examined. A total of 1,110 sites were available to be examined. MRI-proven joint injury was found in 521 sites, whereas the other 589 sites were normal. Physical examination-proven joint injury was found in 305 sites, which was significantly low as compared with MRI-proven joint injury (P = 1.1 × 10(-12) versus MRI). Joint injury on physical examination was not found in 81.5% of the sites where MRI findings were normal. Furthermore, an association of the severity of MRI-proven joint injury with that of joint injury on physical examination was clearly demonstrated (P = 1.6 × 10(-15), r(s) = 0.469). Our present data suggest that MRI is not only sensitive but accurately reflects the joint injury in patients with early-stage RA. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Applied Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, W. M.; Geldart, L. P.; Sheriff, R. E.

    1990-10-01

    Completely revised and updated, this new edition of the popular and highly regarded textbook, Applied Geophysics, describes the physical methods involved in exploration for hydrocarbons and minerals. These tools include gravity, magnetic, seismic, electrical, electromagnetic, and radioactivity studies. All aspects of these methods are described, including theoretical considerations, data acquisition, and data processing and interpretation, with the objective of locating concentrations of natural resources and defining their extent. In the past fourteen years or so since the writing of Applied Geophysics, there have been many changes in the field of exploration geophysics. The authors give full treatment to changes in this field, which include improved techniques for calculating gravity fields, the use of proton-precession and optically-pumped magnetometers, improved quality of seismic data, magnetotelluric as a practical exploration method, new electromagnetic exploration methods, the use of gamma-ray spectrometers in radioactive exploration, and improved well-logging techniques. The intent is to be practical, and thus many actual examples and problems are given. Moreover, wherever possible in this edition the authors adopt the use of Système Internationale (SI) units, which were not in standared use at the time of the first edition. The reader needs only a general background knowledge of geology, physics, and mathematics. Most of the math can be skipped by those interested only in the results. Advanced mathematical concepts are explained in the appendix.

  11. Joint demosaicking and integer-ratio downsampling algorithm for color filter array image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangyoon; Kang, Moon Gi

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a joint demosacking and integer-ratio downsampling algorithm for color filter array (CFA) images. Color demosaicking is a necessary part of image signal processing to obtain full color image for digital image recording system using single sensor. Also, such as mobile devices, the obtained image from sensor has to be downsampled to be display because the resolution of display is smaller than that of image. The conventional method is "Demosaicking first and downsampling later". However, this procedure requires a significant hardware resources and computational cost. In this paper, we proposed a method in which demosaicking and downsampling are working simultaneously. We analyze the Bayer CFA image in frequency domain, and then joint demosaicking and downsampling with integer-ratio scheme based on signal decomposition of luma and chrominance components. Experimental results show that the proposed method produces the high quality performance with much lower com putational cost and less hardware resources.

  12. Preserving the Illustrated Text. Report of the Joint Task Force on Text and Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Preservation and Access, Washington, DC.

    The mission of the Joint Task Force on Text and Image was to inquire into the problems, needs, and methods for preserving images in text that are important for scholarship in a wide range of disciplines and to draw from that exploration a set of principles, guidelines, and recommendations for a comprehensive national strategy for image…

  13. 3D kinematics of the tarsal joints from magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Bruce E.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Okereke, Enyi; Hillstrom, Howard J.; Siegler, Sorin; Ringleb, Stacie I.; Imhauser, Carl W.

    2001-09-01

    We have developed a method for analyzing motion at skeletal joints based on the 3D reconstruction of magnetic resonance (MR) image data. Since the information about each voxel in MR images includes its location in the scanner, it follows that information is available for each organ whose 3D surface is computed from a series of MR slices. In addition, there is information on the shape and orientation of each organ, and the contact areas of adjacent bones. By collecting image data in different positions we can calculate the motion of the individual bones. We have used this method to study human foot bones, in order to understand normal and abnormal foot function. It has been used to evaluate patients with tarsal coalitions, various forms of pes planus, ankle sprains, and several other conditions. A newly described feature of this system is the ability to visualize the contact area at a joint, as determined by the region of minimum distance. The display of contact area helps understand abnormal joint function. Also, the use of 3D imaging reveals motions in joints which cannot otherwise be visualized, such as the subtalar joint, for more accurate diagnosis of joint injury.

  14. Bayesian Gibbs Markov chain: MRF-based Stochastic Joint Inversion of Hydrological and Geophysical Datasets for Improved Characterization of Aquifer Heterogeneities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oware, E. K.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling aquifer heterogeneities (AH) is a complex, multidimensional problem that mostly requires stochastic imaging strategies for tractability. While the traditional Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) provides a powerful framework to model AH, the generic McMC is computationally prohibitive and, thus, unappealing for large-scale problems. An innovative variant of the McMC scheme that imposes priori spatial statistical constraints on model parameter updates, for improved characterization in a computationally efficient manner is proposed. The proposed algorithm (PA) is based on Markov random field (MRF) modeling, which is an image processing technique that infers the global behavior of a random field from its local properties, making the MRF approach well suited for imaging AH. MRF-based modeling leverages the equivalence of Gibbs (or Boltzmann) distribution (GD) and MRF to identify the local properties of an MRF in terms of the easily quantifiable Gibbs energy. The PA employs the two-step approach to model the lithological structure of the aquifer and the hydraulic properties within the identified lithologies simultaneously. It performs local Gibbs energy minimizations along a random path, which requires parameters of the GD (spatial statistics) to be specified. A PA that implicitly infers site-specific GD parameters within a Bayesian framework is also presented. The PA is illustrated with a synthetic binary facies aquifer with a lognormal heterogeneity simulated within each facies. GD parameters of 2.6, 1.2, -0.4, and -0.2 were estimated for the horizontal, vertical, NESW, and NWSE directions, respectively. Most of the high hydraulic conductivity zones (facies 2) were fairly resolved (see results below) with facies identification accuracy rate of 81%, 89%, and 90% for the inversions conditioned on concentration (R1), resistivity (R2), and joint (R3), respectively. The incorporation of the conditioning datasets improved on the root mean square error (RMSE

  15. MO-C-BRE-01: The WMIS-AAPM Joint Symposium: Advances in Molecular Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Contag, C; Pogue, B; Lewis, J

    2014-06-15

    This joint symposium of the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS) and the AAPM includes three luminary speakers discussing work in new paradigms of molecular imaging in cancer (Contag), applications of optical imaging technologies to radiation therapy (Pogue) and an update on PET imaging as a surrogate biomarker for cancer progression and response to therapy. Learning Objectives: Appreciate the current trends in molecular and systems imaging. Understand how optical imaging technologies, and particularly Cerenkov detectors, can be used in advancing radiation oncology. Stay current on new PET tracers - and targets - of interest in cancer treatment.

  16. A framework for joint image-and-shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Tannenbaum, Allen; Bouix, Sylvain

    2014-03-01

    Techniques in medical image analysis are many times used for the comparison or regression on the intensities of images. In general, the domain of the image is a given Cartesian grids. Shape analysis, on the other hand, studies the similarities and differences among spatial objects of arbitrary geometry and topology. Usually, there is no function defined on the domain of shapes. Recently, there has been a growing needs for defining and analyzing functions defined on the shape space, and a coupled analysis on both the shapes and the functions defined on them. Following this direction, in this work we present a coupled analysis for both images and shapes. As a result, the statistically significant discrepancies in both the image intensities as well as on the underlying shapes are detected. The method is applied on both brain images for the schizophrenia and heart images for atrial fibrillation patients.

  17. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint: CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Le, Wei-Jie; Li, Ming-Hua; Yu, Qiang; Shi, Hui-Min

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Eight subjects with PVNS were examined with both pre and post contrast CT scans. All lesions were histopathologically confirmed through surgery. CT appearances of the lesions were reviewed. Among the eight subjects, 8 (100%) demonstrated soft tissue mass and enhancement after contrast administration, 6 (75%) appeared as all or focal areas of noncontrast hyperdensity, 6 (75%) had widening of the joint spaces. Bony erosion of the mandibular condyles and articular surfaces were found in 7 (87.5%) and 6 (75%) subjects, respectively. Based on the CT findings, PVNS of the TMJ is characterized by hyperdensity soft tissue mass and further increase in density after contrast administration, bony destruction of the mandibular condyles and skull base, and intracranial extension. © 2014.

  18. High resolution surface coil magnetic resonance imaging of the joints: anatomic correlation.

    PubMed

    Middleton, W D; Macrander, S; Lawson, T L; Kneeland, J B; Cates, J D; Kellman, G M; Carrera, G F; Foley, W D; Jesmanowicz, A; Hyde, J S

    1987-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging appears to be a particularly promising approach to the evaluation of articular and periarticular abnormalities. Its ability to produce images in multiple planes directly (without reconstruction) provides a unique advantage over CT for the radiologist when he attempts to interpret the complex three dimensional anatomy of most joints. The inherent contrast resolution of MR is excellent, and with the use of surface coils, spatial resolution is sufficient to permit the identification of the small soft tissue structures in and around joints. Artifacts generated by respiratory and cardiac motion are not a problem in MRI of the joints as they are in MR scanning of the body. Based on all these qualities, we believe that MRI will play an important role in the diagnosis of joint abnormalities.

  19. Weld joints inspection using multisource data and image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chady, T.; Sikora, R.; Szwagiel, M.; Szydłowski, M.; Waszczuk, P.; Grochowalska, B.; Grzywacz, B.; Misztal, L.

    2017-02-01

    The novel concept of comprehensive weld inspection with use of three sources of data (radiogram image, image composed of laser profilometer 3D data, CCD camera image) and weld images fusion is presented in the paper. The algorithms of data processing aimed at detection and visualization of weld flaws are roughly described. The special attention was paid at presentation and explanation of algorithm for aligning and spatial correction of images composed of data delivered by three independent sources. The results yielded by proposed algorithms for preprocessing of weld images, weld detection, feature extraction, shape extraction, shape matching, filtering, distortion correction, etc. are illustrated with several figures included in the paper. The concise description of designed and implemented laboratory stands is included in the paper too.

  20. Three-dimensional reconstruction of subject-specific knee joint using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging image data fusions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuefu; Mou, Zhifang; Huang, Zhenyu; Hu, Guanghong; Dong, Yinghai; Xu, Qingrong

    2013-10-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of human body from a living subject can be considered as the first step toward promoting virtual human project as a tool in clinical applications. This study proposes a detailed protocol for building subject-specific three-dimensional model of knee joint from a living subject. The computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging image data of knee joint were used to reconstruct knee structures, including bones, skin, muscles, cartilages, menisci, and ligaments. They were fused to assemble the complete three-dimensional knee joint. The procedure was repeated three times with respect to three different methods of reference landmarks. The accuracy of image fusion in accordance with different landmarks was evaluated and compared with each other. The complete three-dimensional knee joint, which included 21 knee structures, was accurately developed. The choice of external or anatomical landmarks was not crucial to improve image fusion accuracy for three-dimensional reconstruction. Further work needs to be done to explore the value of the reconstructed three-dimensional knee joint for its biomechanics and kinematics.

  1. Joint contrast optimization and object segmentation in active polarimetric images.

    PubMed

    Anna, Guillaume; Bertaux, Nicolas; Galland, Frédéric; Goudail, François; Dolfi, Daniel

    2012-08-15

    We present a method for automatic target detection based on the iterative interplay between an active polarimetric imager with adaptive capabilities and a snake-based image segmentation algorithm. It successfully addresses the difficult situations where the target and the background differ only by their polarimetric properties. This method illustrates the benefits of integrating digital processing algorithms at the heart of the image acquisition process rather than using them only for postprocessing.

  2. Image super-resolution reconstruction via RBM-based joint dictionary learning and sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Liu, Anran; Lei, Qian

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for single image super-resolution(SR). Given the training set produced from large amount of high-low resolution image patches, an over-complete joint dictionary is firstly learned from a pair of high-low resolution image feature space based on Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBM). Then for each low resolution image patch densely extracted from an up-scaled low resolution input image , its high resolution image patch can be reconstructed based on sparse representation. Finally, the reconstructed image patches are overlapped to form a large image, and a high resolution image can be achieved by means of iterated residual image compensation. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Synergistic PET and SENSE MR image reconstruction using joint sparsity regularization.

    PubMed

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Belzunce, Martin; Prieto, Claudia; Hammers, Alexander; Reader, Andrew

    2017-04-18

    In this work we propose a generalized joint sparsity regularization prior and reconstruction framework for the syner-gistic reconstruction of PET and undersampled sensitivity en-coded (SENSE) MRI data with the aim of improving image quality beyond that obtained through conventional independent recon-structions. The proposed prior improves upon the joint total vari-ation (TV) using a non-convex potential function that assigns a rel-atively lower penalty for the PET and MR gradients whose mag-nitudes are jointly large, thus permitting the preservation and for-mation of common boundaries irrespective of their relative orien-tation. The alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) optimization framework was exploited for the joint PET-MR im-age reconstruction. In this framework, the joint maximum a pos-teriori objective function was effectively optimized by alternating between well-established regularized PET and MR image recon-structions. Moreover, the dependency of the joint prior on the PET and MR signal intensities was addressed by a novel alternating scaling of the distribution of the gradient vectors. The proposed prior was compared with the separate TV and joint TV regulari-zation methods using extensive simulation and real clinical data. In addition, the proposed joint prior was compared to the recently proposed linear parallel level sets (PLS) method using a bench-mark simulation dataset. Our simulation and clinical data results demonstrated the improved quality of the synergistically recon-structed PET-MR images compared to unregularized and conven-tional separately regularized methods. It was also found that the proposed prior can outperform both joint TV and linear PLS reg-ularization methods in assisting edge preservation and recovery of details which are otherwise impaired by noise and aliasing arti-facts. In conclusion, the proposed joint sparsity regularization within the presented ADMM reconstruction framework is a prom-ising technique

  4. A joint encryption/watermarking algorithm for verifying the reliability of medical images: application to echographic images.

    PubMed

    Bouslimi, Dalel; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Roux, Christian

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we propose a joint encryption/watermarking algorithm for the purpose of protecting medical images. The proposed solution gives access to the outcomes of the image integrity and of its origins as its attachment to one patient even if the image is stored encrypted. In this study, the given solution combines the RC4 stream cipher and two substitutive watermarking modulations: the Least Significant Bit Method and the Quantization Index Modulation. If watermarking and encryption are conducted jointly at the protection stage, watermark extraction and decryption can be applied independently. Experimental results achieved on 8 bits encoded echographic images illustrate the overall performances of the proposed scheme. At least, a capacity rate of 1 and 0.5 bits of message per pixel of image can be embedded in the spatial and the encrypted domains respectively, with a peak signal to noise ratio greater than 49 dB.

  5. Joint analysis of histopathology image features and gene expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Popovici, Vlad; Budinská, Eva; Čápková, Lenka; Schwarz, Daniel; Dušek, Ladislav; Feit, Josef; Jaggi, Rolf

    2016-05-11

    Genomics and proteomics are nowadays the dominant techniques for novel biomarker discovery. However, histopathology images contain a wealth of information related to the tumor histology, morphology and tumor-host interactions that is not accessible through these techniques. Thus, integrating the histopathology images in the biomarker discovery workflow could potentially lead to the identification of new image-based biomarkers and the refinement or even replacement of the existing genomic and proteomic signatures. However, extracting meaningful and robust image features to be mined jointly with genomic (and clinical, etc.) data represents a real challenge due to the complexity of the images. We developed a framework for integrating the histopathology images in the biomarker discovery workflow based on the bag-of-features approach - a method that has the advantage of being assumption-free and data-driven. The images were reduced to a set of salient patterns and additional measurements of their spatial distribution, with the resulting features being directly used in a standard biomarker discovery application. We demonstrated this framework in a search for prognostic biomarkers in breast cancer which resulted in the identification of several prognostic image features and a promising multimodal (imaging and genomic) prognostic signature. The source code for the image analysis procedures is freely available. The framework proposed allows for a joint analysis of images and gene expression data. Its application to a set of breast cancer cases resulted in image-based and combined (image and genomic) prognostic scores for relapse-free survival.

  6. Near infrared fluorescence imaging for early detection, monitoring and improved intervention of diseases involving the joint.

    PubMed

    Slooter, M D; Bierau, K; Chan, A B; Löwik, C W G M

    2015-04-01

    Joints consist of different tissues, such as bone, cartilage and synovium, which are at risk for multiple diseases. The current imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, Doppler ultrasound, X-ray, computed tomography and arthroscopy, lack the ability to detect disease activity before the onset of anatomical and significant irreversible damage. Optical in vivo imaging has recently been introduced as a novel imaging tool to study the joint and has the potential to image all kinds of biological processes. This tool is already exploited in (pre)clinical studies of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and cancer. The technique uses fluorescent dyes conjugated to targeting moieties that recognize biomarkers of the disease. This review will focus on these new imaging techniques and especially where Near Infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has been used to visualize diseases of the joint. NIR fluorescent imaging is a promising technique which will soon complement established radiological, ultrasound and MRI imaging in the clinical management of patients with respect to early disease detection, monitoring and improved intervention.

  7. Radiological and Radionuclide Imaging of Degenerative Disease of the Facet Joints

    PubMed Central

    Shur, Natalie; Corrigan, Alexis; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Desai, Amidevi; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    The facet joint has been increasingly implicated as a potential source of lower back pain. Diagnosis can be challenging as there is not a direct correlation between facet joint disease and clinical or radiological features. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnosis, treatment, and current imaging modality options in the context of degenerative facet joint disease. We describe each modality in turn with a pictorial review using current evidence. Newer hybrid imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) provide additional information relative to the historic gold standard magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnostic benefits of SPECT/CT include precise localization and characterization of spinal lesions and improved diagnosis for lower back pain. It may have a role in selecting patients for local therapeutic injections, as well as guiding their location with increased precision. PMID:26170560

  8. Radiological and Radionuclide Imaging of Degenerative Disease of the Facet Joints.

    PubMed

    Shur, Natalie; Corrigan, Alexis; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Desai, Amidevi; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    The facet joint has been increasingly implicated as a potential source of lower back pain. Diagnosis can be challenging as there is not a direct correlation between facet joint disease and clinical or radiological features. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnosis, treatment, and current imaging modality options in the context of degenerative facet joint disease. We describe each modality in turn with a pictorial review using current evidence. Newer hybrid imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) provide additional information relative to the historic gold standard magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnostic benefits of SPECT/CT include precise localization and characterization of spinal lesions and improved diagnosis for lower back pain. It may have a role in selecting patients for local therapeutic injections, as well as guiding their location with increased precision.

  9. Joint sparse coding based spatial pyramid matching for classification of color medical image.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun; Li, Yi; Zhu, Jie; Sun, Haojie; Cai, Yin

    2015-04-01

    Although color medical images are important in clinical practice, they are usually converted to grayscale for further processing in pattern recognition, resulting in loss of rich color information. The sparse coding based linear spatial pyramid matching (ScSPM) and its variants are popular for grayscale image classification, but cannot extract color information. In this paper, we propose a joint sparse coding based SPM (JScSPM) method for the classification of color medical images. A joint dictionary can represent both the color information in each color channel and the correlation between channels. Consequently, the joint sparse codes calculated from a joint dictionary can carry color information, and therefore this method can easily transform a feature descriptor originally designed for grayscale images to a color descriptor. A color hepatocellular carcinoma histological image dataset was used to evaluate the performance of the proposed JScSPM algorithm. Experimental results show that JScSPM provides significant improvements as compared with the majority voting based ScSPM and the original ScSPM for color medical image classification.

  10. Joint digital-optical design of imaging systems for grayscale objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. Dirk; Stork, David G.

    2008-09-01

    In many imaging applications, the objects of interest have broad range of strongly correlated spectral components. For example, the spectral components of grayscale objects such as media printed with black ink or toner are nearly perfectly correlated spatially. We describe how to exploit such correlation during the design of electro-optical imaging systems to achieve greater imaging performance and lower optical component cost. These advantages are achieved by jointly optimizing optical, detector, and digital image processing subsystems using a unified statistical imaging performance measure. The resulting optical systems have lower F# and greater depth-of-field than systems that do not exploit spectral correlations.

  11. Advanced imaging findings and computer-assisted surgery of suspected synovial chondromatosis in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hohlweg-Majert, Bettina; Metzger, Marc C; Böhm, Joachim; Muecke, Thomas; Schulze, Dirk

    2008-11-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the joint occurs mainly in teenagers and young adults. Only 3% of these neoplasms are located in the head and neck region. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint is therefore a very rare disorder. Therefore, developing a working, histological confirmation is required for differential diagnosis. In this case series, the outcome of histological investigation and imaging techniques are compared. Based on clinical symptoms, five cases of suspected synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint are presented. In each of the subjects, the diagnosis was confirmed by histology. Specific imaging features for each case are described. The tomography images were compared with the histological findings. All patients demonstrated preauricular swelling, dental midline deviation, and limited mouth opening. Computer-assisted surgery was performed. Histology disclosed synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint in four cases. The other case was found to be a developmental disorder of the tympanic bone. The diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint can only be based on histology. Clinical symptoms are too general and the available imaging techniques only show nonspecific tumorous destruction, infiltration, and/or residual calcified bodies, they are only for advanced cases. A rare developmental disorder of the tympanic bone--persistence of foramen of Huschke--has to be differentiated.

  12. Holographic security system based on image domain joint transform correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Michael; Odinokov, Sergey B.; Bondarev, Leonid A.; Kurakin, Sergey V.; Matveyev, Sergey V.; Belyaev, V. S.

    2002-04-01

    We describe holographic security system providing machine reading of the holographic information and matching it with the reference one by optical means. The security holographic mark includes several test holograms and should be applied to a carrier: ID-card, paper seal etc. Each of the holograms stores a part of entire image, stored in the reference hologram. Image domain JTC is used to match the images retrieved from the holograms. Being recorded and retrieved, the images provides correlation peaks with special positions, with a strict dependence on the tested and reference holograms mutual shifts. The system proposed works like usual JTC with a few useful differences. The image domain recognizing is a result of Fresnel holographic technique of the images recording. It provides more effective usage of the light addressed SLM (LASLM) work pupil and resolution in more simple and compact device. Few correlation peaks enhances the device recognizing probability. We describe the real-time experimental arrangement based on LASLM. The experimental results are in a good correspondence with computer simulations. We also show in practice that good results may be obtained while using the image domain JTC technique in despite of the low LASLM resolution and the device compact size.

  13. dPIRPLE: A Joint Estimation Framework for Deformable Registration and Penalized-Likelihood CT Image Reconstruction using Prior Images

    PubMed Central

    Dang, H.; Wang, A. S.; Sussman, Marc S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Stayman, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Sequential imaging studies are conducted in many clinical scenarios. Prior images from previous studies contain a great deal of patient-specific anatomical information and can be used in conjunction with subsequent imaging acquisitions to maintain image quality while enabling radiation dose reduction (e.g., through sparse angular sampling, reduction in fluence, etc.). However, patient motion between images in such sequences results in misregistration between the prior image and current anatomy. Existing prior-image-based approaches often include only a simple rigid registration step that can be insufficient for capturing complex anatomical motion, introducing detrimental effects in subsequent image reconstruction. In this work, we propose a joint framework that estimates the 3D deformation between an unregistered prior image and the current anatomy (based on a subsequent data acquisition) and reconstructs the current anatomical image using a model-based reconstruction approach that includes regularization based on the deformed prior image. This framework is referred to as deformable prior image registration, penalized-likelihood estimation (dPIRPLE). Central to this framework is the inclusion of a 3D B-spline-based free-form-deformation model into the joint registration-reconstruction objective function. The proposed framework is solved using a maximization strategy whereby alternating updates to the registration parameters and image estimates are applied allowing for improvements in both the registration and reconstruction throughout the optimization process. Cadaver experiments were conducted on a cone-beam CT testbench emulating a lung nodule surveillance scenario. Superior reconstruction accuracy and image quality were demonstrated using the dPIRPLE algorithm as compared to more traditional reconstruction methods including filtered backprojection, penalized-likelihood estimation (PLE), prior image penalized-likelihood estimation (PIPLE) without registration

  14. dPIRPLE: a joint estimation framework for deformable registration and penalized-likelihood CT image reconstruction using prior images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H.; Wang, A. S.; Sussman, Marc S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Stayman, J. W.

    2014-09-01

    Sequential imaging studies are conducted in many clinical scenarios. Prior images from previous studies contain a great deal of patient-specific anatomical information and can be used in conjunction with subsequent imaging acquisitions to maintain image quality while enabling radiation dose reduction (e.g., through sparse angular sampling, reduction in fluence, etc). However, patient motion between images in such sequences results in misregistration between the prior image and current anatomy. Existing prior-image-based approaches often include only a simple rigid registration step that can be insufficient for capturing complex anatomical motion, introducing detrimental effects in subsequent image reconstruction. In this work, we propose a joint framework that estimates the 3D deformation between an unregistered prior image and the current anatomy (based on a subsequent data acquisition) and reconstructs the current anatomical image using a model-based reconstruction approach that includes regularization based on the deformed prior image. This framework is referred to as deformable prior image registration, penalized-likelihood estimation (dPIRPLE). Central to this framework is the inclusion of a 3D B-spline-based free-form-deformation model into the joint registration-reconstruction objective function. The proposed framework is solved using a maximization strategy whereby alternating updates to the registration parameters and image estimates are applied allowing for improvements in both the registration and reconstruction throughout the optimization process. Cadaver experiments were conducted on a cone-beam CT testbench emulating a lung nodule surveillance scenario. Superior reconstruction accuracy and image quality were demonstrated using the dPIRPLE algorithm as compared to more traditional reconstruction methods including filtered backprojection, penalized-likelihood estimation (PLE), prior image penalized-likelihood estimation (PIPLE) without registration, and

  15. Terrestrial Planet Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Terrestrial planet geophysics beyond our home sphere had its start arguably in the early 1960s, with Keith Runcorn contending that the second-degree shape of the Moon is due to convection and Mariner 2 flying past Venus and detecting no planetary magnetic field. Within a decade, in situ surface geophysical measurements were carried out on the Moon with the Apollo program, portions of the lunar magnetic and gravity fields were mapped, and Jack Lorell and his colleagues at JPL were producing spherical harmonic gravity field models for Mars using tracking data from Mariner 9, the first spacecraft to orbit another planet. Moreover, Mariner 10 discovered a planetary magnetic field at Mercury, and a young Sean Solomon was using geological evidence of surface contraction to constrain the thermal evolution of the innermost planet. In situ geophysical experiments (such as seismic networks) were essentially never carried out after Apollo, although they were sometimes planned just beyond the believability horizon in planetary mission queues. Over the last three decades, the discipline of terrestrial planet geophysics has matured, making the most out of orbital magnetic and gravity field data, altimetric measurements of surface topography, and the integration of geochemical information. Powerful constraints are provided by tectonic and volcanic information gleaned from surface images, and the engagement of geologists in geophysical exercises is actually quite useful. Accompanying these endeavors, modeling techniques, largely adopted from the Earth Science community, have become increasingly sophisticated and have been greatly enhanced by the dramatic increase in computing power over the last two decades. The future looks bright with exciting new data sets emerging from the MESSENGER mission to Mercury, the promise of the GRAIL gravity mission to the Moon, and the re-emergence of Venus as a worthy target for exploration. Who knows? With the unflagging optimism and persistence

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound evaluation of "healthy" joints in young subjects with severe haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Di Minno, M N D; Iervolino, S; Soscia, E; Tosetto, A; Coppola, A; Schiavulli, M; Marrone, E; Ruosi, C; Salvatore, M; Di Minno, G

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US) are increasingly used in haemophilia A (HA) to detect early joint changes. A total of 40 clinically asymptomatic joints, never involved by bleeding events ["healthy joints" (HJ)], were evaluated by MRI and, in parallel, by US in 20 young subjects with severe HA (22.45 ± 2.72 years old; no history of arthritides, of viral infections or of inhibitors against factor VIII). The same joints were evaluated in 20 matched non-haemophilic (no-HA) subjects (mean age 23.90 ± 2.31 years, P = 0.078 vs. HA subjects). US images were obtained with specific probe positions according to validated procedures. A validated US score and progressive (P-MRI) and additive (A-MRI) MRI scores were employed for data collection and analysis. The US score was higher in HA than in no-HA subjects (3.40 ± 1.72 vs. 0.80 ± 1.10, P < 0.001). Taking into account only moderate/severe alterations, joint effusion was found in 55% of HA and in 5% of no-HA joints (P < 0.001); synovial hypertrophy was found in 20% of HA and in none of the no-HA joints; cartilage erosion was found in 30% of HA and in none of no-HA joints. MRI examinations confirmed these findings and the US score correlated with the A-MRI (r = 0.732, P < 0.001) and with the P-MRI (r = 0.598, P < 0.001) scores. MRI and US data significantly correlated as to effusion (r = 0.819, P = 0.002), synovial hypertrophy (r = 0.633, P = 0.036) and cartilage erosion (r = 0.734, P = 0.010). Despite inherent limitations, joint US examination identified subclinical abnormalities of HJ in young subjects with severe HA.

  17. Adaptation of DICOM 3.0 to jaw joint movement images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negishi, Tohru; Katoh, Tsuguhisa; Fukushi, Masahiro; Senoo, Atsushi; Nomura, Yukihiro; Shimanishi, Satoshi

    2000-05-01

    Kinetic MRI images has been developed and often applied to the diagnosis of soft tissues. The diagnosis of the temporomandibular joint seemed to be one of the typical application fields and has been already clinically performed in some hospitals. Kinetic MRI images cannot be dealt with by DICOM systems, since the information elements and transfer syntax has not been defined yet. We tried to define them and examined its performances. Several objects of temporomandibular joint kinetic MRI images in Quick TIME format were created using the newly defined information elements. The objects were transferred and stored to a DICOM image server using CTN software. The stored images were successfully reconstructed and replayed. The outline of the newly defined information elements, the procedures for making and reconstruction of the objects were discussed in this paper.

  18. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint using FLASH sequences.

    PubMed

    Conway, W F; Hayes, C W; Campbell, R L

    1988-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable modality for the visualization of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in both normal and pathologic conditions. Until recently, MRI had been unable to provide diagnostic dynamic images of the TMJ during opening. A series of 30 TMJ MRI examinations of 17 symptomatic patients and two normal volunteers (15 to 43 years old; 14 men and five women) was performed. Fast low angle shot (FLASH) sequences were used to provide a series of dynamic images of the TMJ in various phases of opening. In 30% of the joint examined, FLASH sequences contributed clinically significant information not available with standard T1-weighted sequences. These results suggest that FLASH images are particularly useful in distinguishing normal disc variants from pathologic conditions in which the disc is displaced anteriorly to a mild extent. The short imaging time of FLASH sequences decreases motion artifact in patients who have difficulty remaining still during the examination.

  19. Joint Multiframe Blind Deconvolution and Spectral Unmixing of Hyperspectral Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Pauca, V. P.; Plemmons, R. J.

    2013-09-01

    Our interest here is spectral imaging for space object identification based upon imaging using simultaneous measurements at different wavelengths. AMOS sensors can collect simultaneous images ranging from visible to LWIR. On the other hand, multiframe blind deconvolution (MFBD) has demonstrated success by acquiring near-simultaneous multiple images for reconstructing space objects, and another success has been shown through adding phase diversity (PD) by splitting the light beam in channels with different phase functions. So far, most MFBD and PD applications have been focused on monochromatic images, with a few MFBD studies on multispectral images, also called the wavelength diversity. In particular, B. Calef has shown that wavelength-diverse MFBD is a promising technique for combining data from multiple sensors to yield a higher-quality reconstructed image. Here, we present optimization algorithms to blindly deconvolve observed blurred and noisy hyperspectral images with phase diversity at each wavelength channel. We use the facts that at longer wavelengths, turbulence effects on the phase are less severe, while diffraction effects at shorter wavelengths are less severe. Moreover, because the blurring kernels of all wavelength channels essentially share the same optimal path difference (OPD) function, we have greatly reduced the number of parameters in the blurring kernel. We model the true hyperspectral object by a linear spectral unmixing model, which reduces the number of pixels to be recovered. Because the number of known parameters is far greater than the number of unknowns, the method enjoys an enhanced capability of successful reconstruction. We simultaneously reconstruct the true object, estimate the blurring kernels, and separate the object into spectrally homogeneous segments, each characterized by its support and spectral signature, an important step for analyzing the material compositions of space objects.

  20. Talbot phase-contrast x-ray imaging for the small joints of the hand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, Dan; Beck, Thomas J.; Carrino, John A.; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2011-09-01

    A high-resolution radiographic method for soft tissues in the small joints of the hand would aid in the study and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), which often attacks these joints. Of particular interest would be imaging with <100 µm resolution the joint cartilage, whose integrity is a main indicator of disease. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) or refraction-based x-ray imaging with Talbot grating interferometers could provide such a method, since it enhances soft tissue contrast and can be implemented with conventional x-ray tubes. A numerical joint phantom was first developed to assess the angular sensitivity and spectrum needed for a hand DPC system. The model predicts that, due to quite similar refraction indexes for joint soft tissues, the refraction effects are very small, requiring high angular resolution. To compare our model to experiment we built a high-resolution bench-top interferometer using 10 µm period gratings, a W anode tube and a CCD-based detector. Imaging experiments on animal cartilage and on a human finger support the model predictions. For instance, the estimated difference between the index of refraction of cartilage and water is of only several percent at ~25 keV mean energy, comparable to that between the linear attenuation coefficients. The potential advantage of DPC imaging thus comes mainly from the edge enhancement at the soft tissue interfaces. Experiments using a cadaveric human finger are also qualitatively consistent with the joint model, showing that refraction contrast is dominated by tendon embedded in muscle, with the cartilage layer difficult to observe in our conditions. Nevertheless, the model predicts that a DPC radiographic system for the small hand joints of the hand could be feasible using a low energy quasi-monochromatic source, such as a K-edge filtered Rh or Mo tube, in conjunction with a ~2 m long 'symmetric' interferometer operated in a high Talbot order.

  1. Joint Segmentation of Image Ensembles via Latent Atlases

    PubMed Central

    Raviv, Tammy Riklin; Van Leemput, Koen; Wells, William M.; Golland, Polina

    2010-01-01

    Spatial priors, such as probabilistic atlases, play an important role in MRI segmentation. However, the availability of comprehensive, reliable and suitable manual segmentations for atlas construction is limited. We therefore propose a joint segmentation of corresponding, aligned structures in the entire population that does not require a probability atlas. Instead, a latent atlas, initialized by a single manual segmentation, is inferred from the evolving segmentations of the ensemble. The proposed method is based on probabilistic principles but is solved using partial differential equations (PDEs) and energy minimization criteria. We evaluate the method by segmenting 50 brain MR volumes. Segmentation accuracy for cortical and subcortical structures approaches the quality of state-of-the-art atlas-based segmentation results, suggesting that the latent atlas method is a reasonable alternative when existing atlases are not compatible with the data to be processed. PMID:20425997

  2. Imaging 4-D hydrogeologic processes with geophysics: an example using crosswell electrical measurements to characterize a tracer plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, K.; Gorelick, S. M.

    2005-05-01

    Geophysical methods provide an inexpensive way to collect spatially exhaustive data about hydrogeologic, mechanical or geochemical parameters. In the presence of heterogeneity over multiple scales of these parameters at most field sites, geophysical data can contribute greatly to our understanding about the subsurface by providing important data we would otherwise lack without extensive, and often expensive, direct sampling. Recent work has highlighted the use of time-lapse geophysical data to help characterize hydrogeologic processes. We investigate the potential for making quantitative assessments of sodium-chloride tracer transport using 4-D crosswell electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a sand and gravel aquifer at the Massachusetts Military Reservation on Cape Cod. Given information about the relation between electrical conductivity and tracer concentration, we can estimate spatial moments from the 3-D ERT inversions, which give us information about tracer mass, center of mass, and dispersivity through time. The accuracy of these integrated measurements of tracer plume behavior is dependent on spatially variable resolution. The ERT inversions display greater apparent dispersion than tracer plumes estimated by 3D advective-dispersive simulation. This behavior is attributed to reduced measurement sensitivity to electrical conductivity values with distance from the electrodes and differential smoothing from tomographic inversion. The latter is a problem common to overparameterized inverse problems, which often occur when real-world budget limitations preclude extensive well-drilling or additional data collection. These results prompt future work on intelligent methods for reparameterizing the inverse problem and coupling additional disparate data sets.

  3. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of the Temporomandibular Joint in Two Normal Camels

    PubMed Central

    Arencibia, Alberto; Blanco, Diego; González, Nelson; Rivero, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) image features of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and associated structures in two mature dromedary camels were obtained with a third-generation equipment CT and a superconducting magnet RM at 1.5 Tesla. Images were acquired in sagittal and transverse planes. Medical imaging processing with imaging software was applied to obtain postprocessing CT and MR images. Relevant anatomic structures were identified and labelled. The resulting images provided excellent anatomic detail of the TMJ and associated structures. Annotated CT and MR images from this study are intended as an anatomical reference useful in the interpretation for clinical CT and MR imaging studies of the TMJ of the dromedary camels. PMID:22567308

  4. Comparison and evaluation of joint histogram estimation methods for mutual information based image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yongfang; Chen, Hua-mei

    2005-04-01

    Joint histogram is the only quantity required to calculate the mutual information (MI) between two images. For MI based image registration, joint histograms are often estimated through linear interpolation or partial volume interpolation (PVI). It has been pointed out that both methods may result in a phenomenon known as interpolation induced artifacts. In this paper, we implemented a wide range of interpolation/approximation kernels for joint histogram estimation. Some kernels are nonnegative. In this case, these kernels are applied in two ways as the linear kernel is applied in linear interpolation and PVI. In addition, we implemented two other joint histogram estimation methods devised to overcome the interpolation artifact problem. They are nearest neighbor interpolation with jittered sampling with/without histogram blurring and data resampling. We used the clinical data obtained from Vanderbilt University for all of the experiments. The objective of this study is to perform a comprehensive comparison and evaluation of different joint histogram estimation methods for MI based image registration in terms of artifacts reduction and registration accuracy.

  5. Normal and abnormal temporomandibular joints as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, D L; Conces, D J; Sondhi, A; Lappas, J C; Augustyn, G T

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was performed on two normal volunteer subjects and two symptomatic subjects using a 0.15 T resistive magnet. A spin echo pulse sequence with a TE of 38 ms and a TR of 500 ms was employed. The TMJ meniscus is a low signal structure, and the bilaminar zone behind it is a relatively high signal structure. In normal closed mouths, the demarcation between meniscus and bilaminar zone is located at the vertex position above the mandibular condyle. When the condyle translates, the posterior portion of the meniscus bulges into the joint space. Dislocated meniscus can be identified by a gray mass anterior to the condylar head. The joint space is filled with the higher signal of the bilaminar zone. In non-reducible dislocations, the meniscus remains anterior to the condylar head with opening of the mouth. Reduced dislocations appear similar to normal joints in the open mouth.

  6. Time-Lapse Joint Inversion of Cross-Well DC Resistivity and Seismic Data: A Numerical Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time-lapse joint inversion of geophysical data is required to image the evolution of oil reservoirs during production and enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration, geothermal fields during production, and to monitor the evolution of contaminant plumes. Joint inversion schemes red...

  7. Time-Lapse Joint Inversion of Cross-Well DC Resistivity and Seismic Data: A Numerical Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time-lapse joint inversion of geophysical data is required to image the evolution of oil reservoirs during production and enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration, geothermal fields during production, and to monitor the evolution of contaminant plumes. Joint inversion schemes red...

  8. Imaging 3D geological structure of the Mygdonian basin (Northern Greece) with geological numerical modeling and geophysical methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cédric, Guyonnet-Benaize; Fabrice, Hollender; Maria, Manakou; Alexandros, Savvaidis; Elena, Zargli; Cécile, Cornou; Nikolaos, Veranis; Dimitrios, Raptakis; Artemios, Atzemoglou; Pierre-Yves, Bard; Nikolaos, Theodulidis; Kyriazis, Pitilakis; Emmanuelle, Chaljub

    2013-04-01

    The Mygdonian basin, located 30 km E-NE close to Thessaloniki, is a typical active tectonic basin, trending E-NW, filled by sediments 200 to 400 m thick. This basin has been chosen as a European experimental site since 1993 (European Commission research projects - EUROSEISTEST). It has been investigated for experimental and theoretical studies on site effects. The Mygdonian basin is currently covered by a permanent seismological network and has been mainly characterized in 2D and 3D with geophysical and geotechnical studies (Bastani et al, 2011; Cadet and Savvaidis, 2011; Gurk et al, 2007; Manakou et al, 2007; Manakou et al, 2010; Pitilakis et al, 1999; Raptakis et al, 2000; Raptakis et al, 2005). All these studies allowed understanding the influence of geological structures and local site conditions on seismic site response. For these reasons, this site has been chosen for a verification exercise for numerical simulations in the framework of an ongoing international collaborative research project (Euroseistest Verification and Validation Project - E2VP). The verification phase has been made using a first 3D geophysical and geotechnical model (Manakou, 2007) about 5 km wide and 15 km long, centered on the Euroseistest site. After this verification phase, it has been decided to update, optimize and extend this model in order to obtain a more detailed model of the 3D geometry of the entire basin, especially the bedrock 3D geometry which can affect drastically the results of numerical simulations for site effect studies. In our study, we build a 3D geological model of the present-day structure of the entire Mygdonian basin. This "precise" model is 12 km wide, 65 km long and is 400 m deep in average. It has been built using geophysical, geotechnical and geological data. The database is heterogeneous and composed of hydrogeological boreholes, seismic refraction surveys, array microtremor measurements, electrical and geotechnical surveys. We propose an integrated

  9. Joint graph cut and relative fuzzy connectedness image segmentation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Krzysztof Chris; Miranda, Paulo A V; Falcão, Alexandre X; Udupa, Jayaram K

    2013-12-01

    We introduce an image segmentation algorithm, called GC(sum)(max), which combines, in novel manner, the strengths of two popular algorithms: Relative Fuzzy Connectedness (RFC) and (standard) Graph Cut (GC). We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that GC(sum)(max) preserves robustness of RFC with respect to the seed choice (thus, avoiding "shrinking problem" of GC), while keeping GC's stronger control over the problem of "leaking though poorly defined boundary segments." The analysis of GC(sum)(max) is greatly facilitated by our recent theoretical results that RFC can be described within the framework of Generalized GC (GGC) segmentation algorithms. In our implementation of GC(sum)(max) we use, as a subroutine, a version of RFC algorithm (based on Image Forest Transform) that runs (provably) in linear time with respect to the image size. This results in GC(sum)(max) running in a time close to linear. Experimental comparison of GC(sum)(max) to GC, an iterative version of RFC (IRFC), and power watershed (PW), based on a variety medical and non-medical images, indicates superior accuracy performance of GC(sum)(max) over these other methods, resulting in a rank ordering of GC(sum)(max)>PW∼IRFC>GC.

  10. Theoretical foundations for joint digital-optical analysis of electro-optical imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Stork, David G; Robinson, M Dirk

    2008-04-01

    We describe the mathematical and conceptual foundations for a novel methodology for jointly optimizing the design and analysis of the optics, detector, and digital image processing for imaging systems. Our methodology is based on the end-to-end merit function of predicted average pixel sum-squared error to find the optical and image processing parameters that minimize this merit function. Our approach offers several advantages over the traditional principles of optical design, such as improved imaging performance, expanded operating capabilities, and improved as-built performance.

  11. Joint MR-PET Reconstruction Using a Multi-Channel Image Regularizer.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Florian; Holler, Martin; Koesters, Thomas; Otazo, Ricardo; Bredies, Kristian; Sodickson, Daniel K

    2017-01-01

    While current state of the art MR-PET scanners enable simultaneous MR and PET measurements, the acquired data sets are still usually reconstructed separately. We propose a new multi-modality reconstruction framework using second order Total Generalized Variation (TGV) as a dedicated multi-channel regularization functional that jointly reconstructs images from both modalities. In this way, information about the underlying anatomy is shared during the image reconstruction process while unique differences are preserved. Results from numerical simulations and in-vivo experiments using a range of accelerated MR acquisitions and different MR image contrasts demonstrate improved PET image quality, resolution, and quantitative accuracy.

  12. Imaging of hemodynamic effects in arthritic joints with dynamic optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Lasker, Joseph M.; Fong, Christopher J.; Dwyer, Edward

    2007-07-01

    Optical probing of hemodynamics is often employed in areas such as brain, muscular, and breast-cancer imaging. In these studies an external stimulus is applied and changes in relevant physiological parameters, e.g. oxy or deoxyhemoglobin concentrations, are determined. In this work we present the first application of this method for characterizing joint diseases, especially effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the proximal-interphalangeal (PIP) finger joints. Using a dual-wavelength tomographic imaging system together with previously implemented model-based iterative image reconstruction schemes, we have performed dynamic imaging case studies on a limited number of healthy volunteers and patients diagnosed with RA. Inflating a sphygmomanometer cuff placed around the forearm we elicited a controlled vascular response. We observed pronounced differences between the hemodynamic effect occurring in healthy volunteers and patients affected by RA.

  13. [Computed tomography imaging of the temporomandibular joint in dogs and cats. Effects of different scan parameters on image quality].

    PubMed

    Gäbler, K; Brühschwein, A; Kiefer, I; Loderstedt, S; Oechtering, G; Ludewig, E

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of dogs and cats were examined with multislice computed tomography (MSCT) using different technical scan parameters in order to investigate their impact on image quality. Another aspect was to analyze whether size differences of the TMJ affect the display of small joint structures. The TMJs of two dogs and two cats were examined using MSCT. Scan parameters were varied including tube current, scan matrix, resolution mode, slice thickness, and reconstruction increment. Three observers being blinded with respect to the used scan parameters independently assessed the image quality in terms of "contrast resolution", "bone structure", "spatial resolution", "evaluation of the joint space", and "artefacts" according to a 4-point scale. The criteria "spatial resolution" and "evaluation of the joint space" emphasize the influence of the size of the TMJ. The image quality of the TMJ of the dogs was evaluated superior (by 0.5 to 1.5 points higher graded) compared to the smaller ones of the cats. In terms of "spatial resolution" and "bone structure" the images of an ultra high resolution technique achieved a higher evaluation level (scoring one point superior) compared to the images created by a high resolution protocol. The tube current did not significantly influence the image quality in any of the pictures. The display quality of small structures of the TMJ is dependent on the spatial resolution of the CT images. Therefore, a thin slice collimation, a small field of view, and a high resolution reconstruction matrix should be used. Under those aspects subtle alterations of bone structure of the TMJ can be reliably detected. The soft tissue structures of the TMJ can not be visualized with MSCT in small animals. In principle, the results can be applied to any other MSCT-scanner. However, adjustments of the technical parameters may be still necessary.

  14. Association of Temporomandibular Joint Pain According to Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Temporomandibular Disorder Patients.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Namiaki; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Sumikura, Kanako; Kabasawa, Yuji; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Harada, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the associations between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The study included 646 TMJs of 323 consecutive patients with temporomandibular disorders; of these, 222 (34.4%) had TMJ pain whereas 424 (65.6%) had no TMJ pain. MRIs were used to evaluate disc position, osteoarthritis, joint fluid, and bone marrow edema. Internal derangement was classified as normal, anterior disc displacement with reduction, and anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWOR); condylar morphology was classified as normal, moderate bony change, and severe bony change. The odds ratio (OR) for each MRI variable for nonpainful versus painful TMJs was computed using logistic regression analysis. Compared with joints with normal disc position, the OR of those with ADDWOR was 2.74 (P < .001) for TMJ pain. Similarly, compared with joints with normal condylar morphology, the OR of those with severe bony change was 4.62 (P = .02) for TMJ pain. In addition, the risk of TMJ pain increased by 2.37 in joints with joint fluid (P < .001) and by 2.34 in joints with bone marrow edema (P = .006). The risk of TMJ pain increased significantly with ADDWOR in combination with severe bony change, joint fluid, and bone marrow edema. These results suggest an association between TMJ pain and ADDWOR, severe bony change, joint fluid, and bone marrow edema. Thus, combining various MRI variables may improve the diagnostic accuracy of TMJ pain. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Joint calibration of 3D resist image and CDSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. S.; He, Y. Y.; Tang, Y. P.; Chang, Y. T.; Huang, W. C.; Liu, R. G.; Gau, T. S.

    2013-04-01

    Traditionally, an optical proximity correction model is to evaluate the resist image at a specific depth within the photoresist and then extract the resist contours from the image. Calibration is generally implemented by comparing resist contours with the critical dimensions (CD). The wafer CD is usually collected by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), which evaluates the CD based on some criterion that is a function of gray level, differential signal, threshold or other parameters set by the SEM. However, the criterion does not reveal which depth the CD is obtained at. This depth inconsistency between modeling and SEM makes the model calibration difficult for low k1 images. In this paper, the vertical resist profile is obtained by modifying the model from planar (2D) to quasi-3D approach and comparing the CD from this new model with SEM CD. For this quasi-3D model, the photoresist diffusion along the depth of the resist is considered and the 3D photoresist contours are evaluated. The performance of this new model is studied and is better than the 2D model.

  16. A novel joint data-hiding and compression scheme based on SMVQ and image inpainting.

    PubMed

    Chuan Qin; Chin-Chen Chang; Yi-Ping Chiu

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel joint data-hiding and compression scheme for digital images using side match vector quantization (SMVQ) and image inpainting. The two functions of data hiding and image compression can be integrated into one single module seamlessly. On the sender side, except for the blocks in the leftmost and topmost of the image, each of the other residual blocks in raster-scanning order can be embedded with secret data and compressed simultaneously by SMVQ or image inpainting adaptively according to the current embedding bit. Vector quantization is also utilized for some complex blocks to control the visual distortion and error diffusion caused by the progressive compression. After segmenting the image compressed codes into a series of sections by the indicator bits, the receiver can achieve the extraction of secret bits and image decompression successfully according to the index values in the segmented sections. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  17. Groupwise registration of multimodal images by an efficient joint entropy minimization scheme.

    PubMed

    Spiclin, Ziga; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2012-05-01

    Groupwise registration is concerned with bringing a group of images into the best spatial alignment. If images in the group are from different modalities, then the intensity correspondences across the images can be modeled by the joint density function (JDF) of the cooccurring image intensities. We propose a so-called treecode registration method for groupwise alignment of multimodal images that uses a hierarchical intensity-space subdivision scheme through which an efficient yet sufficiently accurate estimation of the (high-dimensional) JDF based on the Parzen kernel method is computed. To simultaneously align a group of images, a gradient-based joint entropy minimization was employed that also uses the same hierarchical intensity-space subdivision scheme. If the Hilbert kernel is used for the JDF estimation, then the treecode method requires no data-dependent bandwidth selection and is thus fully automatic. The treecode method was compared with the ensemble clustering (EC) method on four different publicly available multimodal image data sets and on a synthetic monomodal image data set. The obtained results indicate that the treecode method has similar and, for two data sets, even superior performances compared to the EC method in terms of registration error and success rate. The obtained good registration performances can be mostly attributed to the sufficiently accurate estimation of the JDF, which is computed through the hierarchical intensity-space subdivision scheme, that captures all the important features needed to detect the correct intensity correspondences across a multimodal group of images undergoing registration.

  18. A wrapper-based strategy to jointly combine remote sensing image segmentation and object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Xie, Baoguo; Zhang, Meng; Yin, Wenjun; Du, Hui; Tang, Yujia

    2017-04-01

    Geospatial Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) has emerged as a new paradigm for remote sensing image classification and interpretation over the last two decades. However, due to the different sensor spatial characteristics, image timing, viewing geometry, etc., the object-based assumption was challenged across a whole scene when dealing with those targets with highly heterogeneous internal characteristics. In this paper we go one step further and address the problem of object detection using a wrapper-based strategy to jointly combine image segmentation and object detection. It offers an insight into full exploitation of the available remotely sensed data. Object detection and image interpretation not only rely on information from raw images, but also depend on knowledge of the target even knowledge from the outside world beyond the image. Regarding this issue, we used high-level object constraint knowledge to refine the image segmentation, going beyond bottom-up models and considering higher order cliques behind the image contexts. As segmentation helps recognition and recognized or delineated objects constrain segmentation, meanwhile, the "correct" segmentation is somehow a compromise between Top-Down & Bottom-Up segmentation. The framework of the proposed approach suggested that the high resolution satellite image was preprocessed, and then the wrapper-based strategy that jointly combined image segmentation and object detection was conducted to represent and interpreted the total scene. In fact, if image objects are badly constructed, objects cannot be accurately identified and recognized. The key idea of this study is to adopt the wrapper-based strategy for remote sensing image analysis, which enables hierarchically representation and recognition of remote sensing images. This kind of representation is determined by the physical properties of the geospatial objects and implemented based on the multi-scale scheme of real world geospatial objects. The method

  19. A quantitative assessment of methane cycling in Hikurangi Margin sediments (New Zealand) using geophysical imaging and biogeochemical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Min; Dale, Andrew W.; Haffert, Laura; Haeckel, Matthias; Koch, Stephanie; Crutchley, Gareth; De Stigter, Henko; Chen, Duofu; Greinert, Jens

    2016-12-01

    Takahe seep, located on the Opouawe Bank, Hikurangi Margin, is characterized by a well-defined subsurface seismic chimney structure ˜80,500 m2 in area. Subseafloor geophysical data based on acoustic anomaly layers indicated the presence of gas hydrate and free gas layers within the chimney structure. Reaction-transport modeling was applied to porewater data from 11 gravity cores to constrain methane turnover rates and benthic methane fluxes in the upper 10 m. Model results show that methane dynamics were highly variable due to transport and dissolution of ascending gas. The dissolution of gas (up to 3761 mmol m-2 yr-1) dwarfed the rate of methanogenesis within the simulated sediment column (2.6 mmol m-2 yr-1). Dissolved methane is mainly consumed by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) at the base of the sulfate reduction zone and trapped by methane hydrate formation below it, with maximum rates in the central part of the chimney (946 and 2420 mmol m-2 yr-1, respectively). A seep-wide methane budget was constrained by combining the biogeochemical model results with geophysical data and led to estimates of AOM rates, gas hydrate formation, and benthic dissolved methane fluxes of 3.68 × 104 mol yr-1, 73.85 × 104 mol yr-1, and 1.19 × 104 mol yr-1, respectively. A much larger flux of methane probably escapes in gaseous form through focused bubble vents. The approach of linking geochemical model results with spatial geophysical data put forward here can be applied elsewhere to improve benthic methane turnover rates from limited single spot measurements to larger spatial scales.

  20. Autofluorescence imaging for improved visualization of joint structures during arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy Tan; van Horssen, Pepijn; Derriks, Hans; van de Giessen, Martijn; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of our study is to develop the arthroscopic autofluorescence imaging (AFI) system to improve the visualization during arthroscopic surgery by real-time enhancing the contrast between joint structures with autofluorescence imaging. Its validity was evaluated around the arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, specifically improving the contrast between the femoral insertion site and its background. The feasibility of the AFI system was validated with bovine and human knees. The spectral responses of the femoral insertion site and its surrounding bone and cartilage were measured with a fluorospectrometer. A prototype of the AFI system was developed based on the spectral responses (SR) and test images of the insertion site. The accuracy was validated by evaluating the overlap between manually segmented insertion sites on the white light color images and on the corresponding spectral unmixed autofluorescence images. The final prototype of the AFI system was tested during arthroscopy in cadaveric knees. The results showed that the joint structures have different SRs. Spectral unmixing enabled separation of the SRs and improved the contrast between the joint structures. The agreement between visible light and autofluorescence ligament insertions had a mean Dice coefficient of 0.84 and the mean Dice coefficient of the interobserver variability for visible light imaging was 0.85. We have shown that the femoral insertion site can be accurately visualized with autofluorescence imaging combined with spectral unmixing. The AFI system demonstrates the feasibility of real-time and subject-specific visualization of the femoral insertion site which can facilitate anatomic ACL reconstruction. In addition, the AFI system can facilitate arthroscopic procedures in other joints and can also be used as a diagnostic tool.

  1. Hyporheic Geophysics: D.C. Resistivity Imaging of Valley-bottom Alluvium in a 3rd-order Mountain Stream, HJ Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnetske, J. P.; Haggerty, R.; Crook, N.; Robinson, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) can serve as either a source or a sink for nutrients (e.g., nitrogen) and moderates biogeochemical and temperature signals in stream ecosystems. Understanding of the HZ is hampered by lack of subsurface images, particularly ones that are non-invasive and fast. Geophysical imaging, combined with extant empirical methods and hydrodynamic models provides an opportunity to improve precision in modeling HZ transport and nutrient retention. With the aid of CUAHSI HMF, we completed a d.c. resistivity survey of an existing stream denitrification study site (Mack Creek, H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, OR, a Long-term Ecological Research site) to quantify the geometry of the valley bottom alluvial aquifer and HZ. The non- invasive d.c. resistivity survey successfully produced a quantitative 3-dimensional image of the variable alluvial aquifer thickness below and adjacent to the stream channel. We extensively imaged one area, 50 m x 28 m with 10 transects, in an old growth Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) stand which incorporated a large woody debris log jam, to determine that alluvial thickness averages 4.1 m and varies between 0 m and 8 m. We completed a single 50 m longitudinal section in an adjacent downstream logged block (harvested 1964-65) to determine that alluvial thickness averages 0.3 m and varies between 0 m and 1 m. The presence of valley- bottom bedrock exposures at the study site helped to constrain and verify the d.c. resistivity interpretation of the bedrock-alluvium interface. Some d.c. survey challenges were encountered, including the confinement of electrode lines to the channel or near channel because dry organic layers or fallen trees across much of the forest floor prevented good electrode contact with the ground. Ultimately, this geophysics-enhanced knowledge of the stream-adjacent aquifer will allow for more accurate interpretation of hyporheic observations and parameterization of hyporheic hydraulic and denitrification

  2. Muon tomography of the Soufrière of Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles): Comparison with other geophysical imaging methods and assessment of volcanic risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, D.; Lesparre, N.; Marteau, J.; Taisne, B.; Nicollin, F.; Coutant, O.

    2011-12-01

    Density tomography of rock with muons of cosmic origin measures the attenuation of the flux of particles crossing the object of interest to derive its opacity, i.e. the quantity of matter encountered by the particles along their trajectories. Recent progress in micro-electronics and particle detectors make field measurement possible and muon density tomography is gaining a growing interest (e.g. Tanaka et al., 2010; Gibert et al., 2010). We have constructed field telescopes based on the detectors of the OPERA experiment devoted to study neutrino oscillation (Lesparre et al., 2011a). Each telescope may be equipped with a variable number of detection matrices with 256 pixels. The spatial resolution is adaptable and is typically of about 20 meters (Lesparre et al., 2010). The telescopes are portable autonomous devices able to operate in harsh field conditions encountered on tropical volcanoes. The total power consumption is less than 40W, and an Ethernet link allows data downloading and remote control of the electronic devices and on-board computers. Larger high-resolution telescopes are under construction. The instruments have been successfully tested on the Etna and Soufrière of Guadeloupe volcanoes were a telescope is operating continuously since Summer 2010. Muon radiographies of the Soufrière lava dome reveal its very heterogeneous density structure produced by an intense hydrothermal circulation of acid fluids which alters its mechanical integrity leading to a high risk level of destabilisation. Small-size features are visible on the images and provide precious informations on the structure of the upper hydrothermal systems. Joined interpretation with other geophysical data available on the Soufrière - seismic tomography, electrical resistivity tomography, gravity data - is presented and discussed. Density muon tomography of the internal structure of volcanoes like the Soufrière brings important informations for the hazard evaluation an is particularly

  3. Three-dimensional reconstruction of rat knee joint using episcopic fluorescence image capture.

    PubMed

    Takaishi, R; Aoyama, T; Zhang, X; Higuchi, S; Yamada, S; Takakuwa, T

    2014-10-01

    Development of the knee joint was morphologically investigated, and the process of cavitation was analyzed by using episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC) to create spatial and temporal three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions. Knee joints of Wister rat embryos between embryonic day (E)14 and E20 were investigated. Samples were sectioned and visualized using an EFIC. Then, two-dimensional image stacks were reconstructed using OsiriX software, and 3D reconstructions were generated using Amira software. Cavitations of the knee joint were constructed from five divided portions. Cavity formation initiated at multiple sites at E17; among them, the femoropatellar cavity (FPC) was the first. Cavitations of the medial side preceded those of the lateral side. Each cavity connected at E20 when cavitations around the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) were completed. Cavity formation initiated from six portions. In each portion, development proceeded asymmetrically. These results concerning anatomical development of the knee joint using EFIC contribute to a better understanding of the structural feature of the knee joint. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The temporomandibular joint in video motion--noninvasive image techniques to present the functional anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kordass, B

    1999-01-01

    The presentation of the functional anatomy of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is involved with difficulties if dynamic aspects are to be of prime interest, and it should be demonstrated with the highest resolution. Usually noninvasive techniques like MRI and sonography are available for presenting functionality of the temporomandibular joint in video motion. Such images reflect the functional anatomy much better than single pictures of figures could do. In combination with computer aided records of the condyle movements the video motion of MR and sonographical images represent tools for better understanding the relationships between functional or dysfunctional patterns and the morphological or dysmorphological shape and structure of the temporomandibular joint. The possibilities of such tools will be explained and discussed in detail relating, in addition, to loading effects caused by transmitted occlusal pressure onto the joint compartments. If pressure occurs the condyle slides mainly more or less retrocranially whereas the articular disc takes up a more displaced position and a deformed shape. In a few extreme cases the disc prolapses out of the joint space. These video pictures offer new aspects for the diagnosis of the disc-condyle stability and can also be used for explicit educational programs on the complex dysfunction-dysmorphology-relationship of temporomandibular diseases.

  5. Figures of merit for optimizing imaging systems on joint estimation/detection tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Previously published work on joint estimation/detection tasks has focused on the area under the Estimation Receiver Operating Characteristic (EROC) curve as a figure of merit for these tasks in imaging. A brief discussion of this concept and the corresponding ideal observer is included here, but the main focus is on three new approaches for system optimization on these joint tasks. One of these approaches is a generalization of Shannon Task Specific Information (TSI) to this setting. The form of this TSI is used to show that a system optimized for the joint task will not in general be optimized for the detection task alone. Another figure of merit for these joint tasks is the Bayesian Risk, where a cost is assigned to all detection outcomes and to the estimation errors, and then averaged over all sources of randomness in the object ensemble and the imaging system. The ideal observer in this setting, which minimizes the risk, is shown to be the same as the ideal EROC observer, which maximizes the area under the EROC curve. It is also shown that scaling the estimation cost function upwards, i.e making the estimation task more important, degrades the performance of this ideal observer on the detection component of the joint task. Finally we generalize these concepts to the idea of Estimation/Detection Information Tradeoff (EDIT) curves which can be used to quantify the tradeof between estimation performance and detection performance in system design.

  6. Broadband rotary joint for high speed ultrahigh resolution endoscopic OCT imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemohammad, Milad; Yuan, Wu; Mavadia-Shukla, Jessica; Liang, Wenxuan; Yu, Xiaoyun; Yu, Shaoyong; Li, Xingde

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic OCT is a promising technology enabling noninvasive in vivo imaging of internal organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract and airways. The past few years have witnessed continued efforts to achieve ultrahigh resolution and speed. It is well-known that the axial resolution in OCT imaging has a quadratic dependence on the central wavelength. While conventional OCT endoscopes operate in 1300 nm wavelength, the second-generation endoscopes are designed for operation around 800 nm where turn-key, broadband sources are becoming readily available. Traditionally 1300 nm OCT endoscopes are scanned at the proximal end, and a broadband fiber-optic rotary joint as a key component in scanning endoscopic OCT is commercially available. Bandwidths in commercial 800 nm rotary joints are unfortunately compromised due to severe chromatic aberration, which limits the resolution afforded by the broadband light source. In the past we remedied this limitation by using a home-made capillary-tube-based rotary joint where the maximum reliable speed is ~10 revolutions/second. In this submission we report our second-generation, home-built high-speed and broadband rotary joint for 800 nm wavelength, which uses achromatic doublets in order achieve broadband achromatic operation. The measured one-way throughput of the rotary joint is >67 % while the fluctuation of the double-pass coupling efficiency during 360° rotation is less than +/-5 % at a speed of 70 revolutions/second. We demonstrate the operation of this rotary joint in conjunction with our ultrahigh-resolution (2.4 µm in air) diffractive catheter by three-dimensional full-circumferential endoscopic imaging of guinea pig esophagus at 70 frames per second in vivo.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging features of the temporomandibular joint in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Macready, Dawn M; Hecht, Silke; Craig, Linden E; Conklin, Gordon A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the canine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is important in the clinical diagnosis of animals presenting with dysphagia, malocclusion and jaw pain. In humans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for evaluation of the TMJ. The objectives of this study were to establish a technical protocol for performing MRI of the canine TMJ and describe the MRI anatomy and appearance of the normal canine TMJ. Ten dogs (one fresh cadaver and nine healthy live dogs) were imaged. MRIs were compared with cadaveric tissue sections. T1-weighted (T1-W) transverse closed-mouth, T1-W sagittal closed-mouth, T1-W sagittal open-mouth, and T2-W sagittal open-mouth sequences were obtained. The condylar process of the mandible and the mandibular fossa of the temporal bone were hyperintense to muscle and isointense to hypointense to fat on T1-W images, mildly hyperintense to muscle on T2-W images, and were frequently heterogeneous. The articular disc was visible in 14/20 (70%) TMJs on T1-W images and 13/20 (65%) TMJs on T2-W images. The articular disc was isointense to hyperintense to muscle on T1-W images and varied from hypointense to hyperintense to muscle on T2-W images. The lateral collateral ligament was not identified in any joint. MRI allows evaluation of the osseous and certain soft tissue structures of the TMJ in dogs.

  8. Brain connectivity study of joint attention using frequency-domain optical imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Ujwal; Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-02-01

    Autism is a socio-communication brain development disorder. It is marked by degeneration in the ability to respond to joint attention skill task, from as early as 12 to 18 months of age. This trait is used to distinguish autistic from nonautistic populations. In this study, diffuse optical imaging is being used to study brain connectivity for the first time in response to joint attention experience in normal adults. The prefrontal region of the brain was non-invasively imaged using a frequency-domain based optical imager. The imaging studies were performed on 11 normal right-handed adults and optical measurements were acquired in response to joint-attention based video clips. While the intensity-based optical data provides information about the hemodynamic response of the underlying neural process, the time-dependent phase-based optical data has the potential to explicate the directional information on the activation of the brain. Thus brain connectivity studies are performed by computing covariance/correlations between spatial units using this frequency-domain based optical measurements. The preliminary results indicate that the extent of synchrony and directional variation in the pattern of activation varies in the left and right frontal cortex. The results have significant implication for research in neural pathways associated with autism that can be mapped using diffuse optical imaging tools in the future.

  9. Optical joint correlator for real-time image tracking and retinal surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method for tracking an object in a sequence of images is described. Such sequence of images may, for example, be a sequence of television frames. The object in the current frame is correlated with the object in the previous frame to obtain the relative location of the object in the two frames. An optical joint transform correlator apparatus is provided to carry out the process. Such joint transform correlator apparatus forms the basis for laser eye surgical apparatus where an image of the fundus of an eyeball is stabilized and forms the basis for the correlator apparatus to track the position of the eyeball caused by involuntary movement. With knowledge of the eyeball position, a surgical laser can be precisely pointed toward a position on the retina.

  10. Joint image encryption and compression scheme based on a new hyperchaotic system and curvelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Miao; Tong, Xiaojun

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a joint image encryption and compression scheme based on a new hyperchaotic system and curvelet transform. A new five-dimensional hyperchaotic system based on the Rabinovich system is presented. By means of the proposed hyperchaotic system, a new pseudorandom key stream generator is constructed. The algorithm adopts diffusion and confusion structure to perform encryption, which is based on the key stream generator and the proposed hyperchaotic system. The key sequence used for image encryption is relation to plain text. By means of the second generation curvelet transform, run-length coding, and Huffman coding, the image data are compressed. The joint operation of compression and encryption in a single process is performed. The security test results indicate the proposed methods have high security and good compression effect.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging applied to the diagnosis of perforation of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pei; Huo, Liang; Zhang, Shan Yong; Yang, Chi; Cai, Xie Yi; Liu, Xiu Ming

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for perforation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Consecutive 1845 patients (2524 joints) diagnosed as internal derangement (ID) of TMJ were collected from April 2003 to March 2010 in our department. All the patients were examined by MRI and treated by arthroscopy or open surgeries. The findings of interpreting MRI were recorded as positive, suspicious and negative according to the MRI radiographic criteria. After comparing the findings of MRI with those of arthroscopy or open surgeries, the numbers of true positive, true negative, false positive and false negative were obtained. Through SPSS16.0, receiver operator characteristic curve (ROC curve) was made with 1-specificity as abscissa and the sensitivity as ordinate, and the area under the ROC curve was calculated. According to the area, the diagnostic value of MRI was evaluated. Arthroscopic or open surgeries findings confirmed that 207 joints had disc perforation among all joints. MRI findings showed 189 joints were positive, 197 joints suspicious, and 2138 joints negative. The true positive accuracy of MRI findings was 102/189 while true negative accuracy was 2075/2138. 42 of the 197 suspicious joints had perforation. The area under the ROC curve was 0.808 (0.77, 0.85), P < 0.05. We concluded that MRI proved to be a good modality to diagnose disc perforation of TMJ, and the diagnostic result of disc perforation by MRI had certain guiding significance in our clinical work. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Image-Guided Surgical Robotic System for Percutaneous Reduction of Joint Fractures.

    PubMed

    Dagnino, Giulio; Georgilas, Ioannis; Morad, Samir; Gibbons, Peter; Tarassoli, Payam; Atkins, Roger; Dogramadzi, Sanja

    2017-08-16

    Complex joint fractures often require an open surgical procedure, which is associated with extensive soft tissue damages and longer hospitalization and rehabilitation time. Percutaneous techniques can potentially mitigate these risks but their application to joint fractures is limited by the current sub-optimal 2D intra-operative imaging (fluoroscopy) and by the high forces involved in the fragment manipulation (due to the presence of soft tissue, e.g., muscles) which might result in fracture malreduction. Integration of robotic assistance and 3D image guidance can potentially overcome these issues. The authors propose an image-guided surgical robotic system for the percutaneous treatment of knee joint fractures, i.e., the robot-assisted fracture surgery (RAFS) system. It allows simultaneous manipulation of two bone fragments, safer robot-bone fixation system, and a traction performing robotic manipulator. This system has led to a novel clinical workflow and has been tested both in laboratory and in clinically relevant cadaveric trials. The RAFS system was tested on 9 cadaver specimens and was able to reduce 7 out of 9 distal femur fractures (T- and Y-shape 33-C1) with acceptable accuracy (≈1 mm, ≈5°), demonstrating its applicability to fix knee joint fractures. This study paved the way to develop novel technologies for percutaneous treatment of complex fractures including hip, ankle, and shoulder, thus representing a step toward minimally-invasive fracture surgeries.

  13. [Value of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of sequels of shoulder joint injuries].

    PubMed

    Murashina, I V; Egorova, E A

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results of examining 45 persons with sequels of shoulder joint injuries, by applying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (100%) and arthroscopy (95.6%). The data of arthroscopy were compared with those of MRI; thereafter the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI were calculated. The findings suggested that there was no statistically significant difference in the capacities of the two comparable techniques MRI and arthroscopy to diagnose labral tears with degenerative changes, synovitis, bursitis and tendinitis (McNemar's test; p > 0.05). The capacities of MRI are greater than those of arthroscopy only to detect the structural disintegrity of the joint shoulder.

  14. Diagnostic imaging modalities and surgical anatomy of the temporomandibular joint in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kyllar, Michal; Putnová, Barbora; Jekl, Vladimír; Stehlík, Ladislav; Buchtová, Marcela; Štembírek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a condylar synovial joint that, together with the masticatory muscles, controls mandibular movement during mastication. The rabbit is often used as a model species for studying the mechanisms of TMJ diseases, and in regenerative research. However, there are significant differences between rabbit and human TMJs that should be taken into account before using this model for experimental research. Here, we use several analytical approaches (radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) to enable a detailed description and analysis of the rabbit TMJ morphology. Moreover, possible surgical approaches have been introduced with a focus on available access into the rabbit TMJ cavity, which relate our findings to clinical usage.

  15. Joint source-channel coding: secured and progressive transmission of compressed medical images on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Babel, Marie; Parrein, Benoît; Déforges, Olivier; Normand, Nicolas; Guédon, Jean-Pierre; Coat, Véronique

    2008-06-01

    The joint source-channel coding system proposed in this paper has two aims: lossless compression with a progressive mode and the integrity of medical data, which takes into account the priorities of the image and the properties of a network with no guaranteed quality of service. In this context, the use of scalable coding, locally adapted resolution (LAR) and a discrete and exact Radon transform, known as the Mojette transform, meets this twofold requirement. In this paper, details of this joint coding implementation are provided as well as a performance evaluation with respect to the reference CALIC coding and to unequal error protection using Reed-Solomon codes.

  16. Image registration of interferometric inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging system based on joint respective window sampling and modified motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Biao; Shi, Si; Liu, Yang; Xu, Shiyou; Chen, Zengping

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new image registration method based on joint respective window sampling (RWS) and modified motion compensation (MMC) in an interferometric inverse synthetic aperture radar (InISAR) imaging system using two antennas. The causation and quantitative analysis of the offset between two ISAR images of different antennas along the baseline are analyzed. In the proposed method, the RWS method, according to the measured distance between the target and different antennas, compensates the offset in the range direction. The MMC method is adopted to eliminate the offset in the Doppler direction. Simulation results demonstrate that the offset between the two ISAR images can be compensated effectively, consequently achieving a high-quality three-dimensional InISAR image.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging study in a normal Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) stifle joint.

    PubMed

    Arencibia, Alberto; Encinoso, Mario; Jáber, José R; Morales, Daniel; Blanco, Diego; Artiles, Alejandro; Vázquez, José M

    2015-08-11

    The purpose of this study was to describe the normal appearance of the bony and soft tissue structures of the stifle joint of a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) by low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the use of gross anatomical dissections performed as anatomical reference. A cadaver of a mature female was imaged by MRI using specific sequences as the Spin-echo (SE) T1-weighting and Gradient-echo (GE) STIR T2-weighting sequences in sagittal, dorsal and transverse planes, with a magnet of 0.2 Tesla. The bony and articular structures were identified and labelled on anatomical dissections, as well as on the magnetic resonance (MR) images. MR images showed the bone, articular cartilage, menisci and ligaments of the normal tiger stifle. SE T1-weighted sequence provided excellent resolution of the subchondral bones of the femur, tibia and patella compared with the GE STIR T2-weighted MR images. Articular cartilage and synovial fluid were visualised with high signal intensity in GE STIR T2-weighted sequence, compared with SE T1-weighted sequence where they appeared with intermediate intensity signal. Menisci and ligaments of the stifle joint were visible with low signal intensity in both sequences. The infrapatellar fat pad was hyperintense on SE T1-weighted images and showed low signal intensity on GE STIR T2-weighted images. MRI provided adequate information of the bony and soft tissues structures of Bengal tiger stifle joints. This information can be used as initial anatomic reference for interpretation of MR stifle images and to assist in the diagnosis of diseases of this region.

  18. Segmentation of 3D holographic images using bivariate jointly distributed region snake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshpanah, Mehdi; Javidi, Bahram

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the bivariate jointly distributed region snake method in segmentation of microorganisms in Single Exposure On- Line (SEOL) holographic microscopy images. 3D images of the microorganisms are digitally reconstructed and numerically focused from any arbitrary depth from a single recorded digital hologram without mechanical scanning. Living organisms are non-rigid and they vary in shape and size. Moreover, they often do not exhibit clear edges in digitally reconstructed SEOL holographic images. Thus, conventional segmentation techniques based on the edge map may fail to segment these images. However, SEOL holographic microscopy provides both magnitude and phase information of the sample specimen, which could be helpful in the segmentation process. In this paper, we present a statistical framework based on the joint probability distribution of magnitude and phase information of SEOL holographic microscopy images and maximum likelihood estimation of image probability density function parameters. An optimization criterion is computed by maximizing the likelihood function of the target support hypothesis. In addition, a simple stochastic algorithm has been adapted for carrying out the optimization, while several boosting techniques have been employed to enhance its performance. Finally, the proposed method is applied for segmentation of biological microorganisms in SEOL holographic images and the experimental results are presented.

  19. Forest Walk Methods for Localizing Body Joints from Single Depth Image

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ho Yub; Lee, Soochahn; Heo, Yong Seok; Yun, Il Dong

    2015-01-01

    We present multiple random forest methods for human pose estimation from single depth images that can operate in very high frame rate. We introduce four algorithms: random forest walk, greedy forest walk, random forest jumps, and greedy forest jumps. The proposed approaches can accurately infer the 3D positions of body joints without additional information such as temporal prior. A regression forest is trained to estimate the probability distribution to the direction or offset toward the particular joint, relative to the adjacent position. During pose estimation, the new position is chosen from a set of representative directions or offsets. The distribution for next position is found from traversing the regression tree from new position. The continual position sampling through 3D space will eventually produce an expectation of sample positions, which we estimate as the joint position. The experiments show that the accuracy is higher than current state-of-the-art pose estimation methods with additional advantage in computation time. PMID:26402029

  20. Joint Audio-Magnetotelluric and Passive Seismic Imaging of the Cerdanya Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabàs, A.; Macau, A.; Benjumea, B.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J.; Figueras, S.; Marcuello, A.

    2016-09-01

    The structure of Cerdanya Basin (north-east of Iberian Peninsula) is partly known from geological cross sections, geological maps and vintage geophysical data. However, these data do not have the necessary resolution to characterize some parts of Cerdanya Basin such as the thickness of soft soil, geometry of bedrock or geometry of geological units and associated faults. For all these reasons, the main objective of this work is to improve this deficiency carrying out a detailed study in this Neogene basin applying jointly the combination of passive seismic methods ( H/V spectral ratio and seismic array) and electromagnetic methods (audio-magnetotelluric and magnetotelluric method). The passive seismic techniques provide valuable information of geometry of basement along the profile. The maximum depth is located near Alp village with a bedrock depth of 500 m. The bedrock is located in surface at both sites of profile. The Neogene sediments present a shear-wave velocity between 400 and 1000 m/s, and the bedrock basement presents a shear-wave velocity values between 1700 and 2200 m/s. These results are used as a priori information to create a 2D resistivity initial model which constraints the inversion process of electromagnetic data. We have obtained a 2D resistivity model which is characterized by (1) a heterogeneous conductivity zone (<40 Ohm m) that corresponds to shallow part of the model up to 500 m depth in the centre of the profile. These values have been associated with Quaternary and Neogene sediments formed by silts, clays, conglomerates, sandstones and gravels, and (2) a deeper resistive zone (1000-3000 Ohm m) interpreted as Palaeozoic basement (sandstones, limestones and slates at NW and conglomerates and microconglomerates at SE). The resistive zone is truncated by a discontinuity at the south-east of the profile which is interpreted as the Alp-La Tet Fault. This discontinuity is represented by a more conductive zone (600 Ohm m approx.) and is explained

  1. Infrared laser transillumination CT imaging system using parallel fiber arrays and optical switches for finger joint imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yoshiaki; Emori, Ryota; Inage, Hiroki; Goto, Masaki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Devaraj, Balasigamani; Akatsuka, Takao

    2004-05-01

    The heterodyne detection technique, on which the coherent detection imaging (CDI) method founds, can discriminate and select very weak, highly directional forward scattered, and coherence retaining photons that emerge from scattering media in spite of their complex and highly scattering nature. That property enables us to reconstruct tomographic images using the same reconstruction technique as that of X-Ray CT, i.e., the filtered backprojection method. Our group had so far developed a transillumination laser CT imaging method based on the CDI method in the visible and near-infrared regions and reconstruction from projections, and reported a variety of tomographic images both in vitro and in vivo of biological objects to demonstrate the effectiveness to biomedical use. Since the previous system was not optimized, it took several hours to obtain a single image. For a practical use, we developed a prototype CDI-based imaging system using parallel fiber array and optical switches to reduce the measurement time significantly. Here, we describe a prototype transillumination laser CT imaging system using fiber-optic based on optical heterodyne detection for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), by demonstrating the tomographic imaging of acrylic phantom as well as the fundamental imaging properties. We expect that further refinements of the fiber-optic-based laser CT imaging system could lead to a novel and practical diagnostic tool for rheumatoid arthritis and other joint- and bone-related diseases in human finger.

  2. Optical clearing of human skin for the enhancement of optical imaging of proximal interphalangeal joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikova, Ekaterina A.; Kolesnikov, Aleksandr S.; Zabarylo, Urszula; Minet, Olaf; Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2014-01-01

    We are proposing a new method for enhancement of optical imaging of proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints in humans at skin using optical clearing technique. A set of illuminating laser diodes with the wavelengths 670, 820, and 904 nm were used as a light source. The laser diodes, monochromatic digital CCD camera and specific software allowed for detection of the finger joint image in a transillumination mode. The experiments were carried out in vivo with human fingers. Dehydrated glycerol and hand cream with urea (5%) were used as optical clearing agents (OCAs). The contrast of the obtained images was analyzed to determine the effect of the OCA. It was found that glycerol application to the human skin during 60 min caused the decrease of contrast in 1.4 folds for 670 nm and the increase of contrast in 1.5 and 1.7 folds for 820 nm and 904 nm, respectively. At the same time, the hand cream application to the human skin during 60 min caused the decrease of contrast in 1.1 folds for 670 nm and the increase of contrast in 1.3 and 1.1 folds for 820 nm and 904 nm, respectively. The results have shown that glycerol and the hand cream with 5% urea allow for obtaining of more distinct image of finger joint in the NIR. Obtained data can be used for development of optical diagnostic methods of rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging of the knee joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Fabian; Holl-Wieden, Annette; Sauer, Alexander; Köstler, Herbert; Neubauer, Henning

    2017-05-01

    MRI of synovitis relies on use of a gadolinium-based contrast agent. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) visualises thickened synovium but is of limited use in the presence of joint effusion. To investigate the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted MRI with intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) for diagnosing synovitis in the knee joint of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Twelve consecutive children with confirmed or suspected juvenile idiopathic arthritis (10 girls, median age 11 years) underwent MRI with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging and DWI at 1.5 T. Read-out segmented multi-shot DWI was acquired at b values of 0 s/mm(2), 200 s/mm(2), 400 s/mm(2) and 800 s/mm(2). We calculated the IVIM parameters perfusion fraction (f) and tissue diffusion coefficient (D). Diffusion-weighted images at b=800 s/mm(2), f parameter maps and post-contrast T1-weighted images were retrospectively assessed by two independent readers for synovitis using the Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system. Seven (58%) children showed synovial hypertrophy on contrast-enhanced imaging. Diagnostic ratings for synovitis on DWI and on f maps were fully consistent with contrast-enhanced imaging, the diagnostic reference. Two children had equivocal low-confidence assessments on DWI. Median f was 6.7±2.0% for synovitis, 2.1±1.2% for effusion, 5.0±1.0% for muscle and 10.6±5.7% for popliteal lymph nodes. Diagnostic confidence was higher based on f maps in three (25%) children and lower in one child (8%), as compared to DWI. DWI with IVIM reliably visualises synovitis of the knee joint. Perfusion fraction maps differentiate thickened synovium from joint effusion and hence increase diagnostic confidence.

  4. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain revisited with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI).

    PubMed

    Tasali, N; Cubuk, R; Aricak, M; Ozarar, M; Saydam, B; Nur, H; Tuncbilek, N

    2012-03-01

    We aimed to assess the contrast enhancement patterns of the retrodiscal tissue with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) with respect to different temporomandibular joint disc pathologies. Additionally, we questioned the relationship between the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the contrast enhancement pattern of the retrodiscal tissue regardless of the TMJ disc position. 52 joints of 26 patients (4 males and 22 females) who have pain in at least at one of their TMJ were included in this study. For the qualitative analysis, the joints were divided into four groups in terms of their disc positions: normal (1), partially displaced with or without reduction (2), totally dislocated with reduction (3) and totally dislocated without reduction (4). Besides, two different joint groups were constituted, namely the painful group and painless group according to the clinical findings without taking the TMJ disc positions into account. Quantitative analyses were made by means of measuring signal intensity ratios (SI) ratio at the retrodiscal tissue (from internal side and external side of the each joint) using DCE-MRI and these measurements were analyzed with paired samples t test to define the difference between the measurements. At the second stage, the time-dependent arithmetical mean values of the SI ratios were calculated for each joint group and significant differences between the groups were questioned using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Besides, painful and painless groups which were classified on the basis of the clinical data were compared according to the mean SI ratios found for each joint and the significant differences between these two groups were assessed by means of Student's T test. The results were assessed in 95% confidence interval where the significance level was p<0.05. A significant difference was observed between the internal and external contrast enhancement of the joints with partial displacement. Another significant difference

  5. High-Resolution Dynamic Speech Imaging with Joint Low-Rank and Sparsity Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Maojing; Zhao, Bo; Carignan, Christopher; Shosted, Ryan K.; Perry, Jamie L.; Kuehn, David P.; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To enable dynamic speech imaging with high spatiotemporal resolution and full-vocal-tract spatial coverage, leveraging recent advances in sparse sampling. Methods An imaging method is developed to enable high-speed dynamic speech imaging exploiting low-rank and sparsity of the dynamic images of articulatory motion during speech. The proposed method includes: a) a novel data acquisition strategy that collects navigators with high temporal frame rate, and b) an image reconstruction method that derives temporal subspaces from navigators and reconstructs high-resolution images from sparsely sampled data with joint low-rank and sparsity constraints. Results The proposed method has been systematically evaluated and validated through several dynamic speech experiments. A nominal imaging speed of 102 frames per second (fps) was achieved for a single-slice imaging protocol with a spatial resolution of 2.2 × 2.2 × 6.5 mm3. An eight-slice imaging protocol covering the entire vocal tract achieved a nominal imaging speed of 12.8 fps with the identical spatial resolution. The effectiveness of the proposed method and its practical utility was also demonstrated in a phonetic investigation. Conclusion High spatiotemporal resolution with full-vocal-tract spatial coverage can be achieved for dynamic speech imaging experiments with low-rank and sparsity constraints. PMID:24912452

  6. Relevance of adjacent joint imaging in the evaluation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Antoci, Valentin; Patel, Shaun P; Weaver, Michael J; Kwon, John Y

    2016-10-01

    Routinely obtaining adjacent joint radiographs when evaluating patients with ankle fractures may be of limited clinical utility and an unnecessary burden, particularly in the absence of clinical suspicion for concomitant injuries. One thousand, three hundred and seventy patients who sustained ankle fractures over a 5-year period presenting to two level 1 trauma centers were identified. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for demographics, physical examination findings, and radiographic information. Analyses included descriptive statistics along with sensitivity and predictive value calculations for the presence of adjacent joint fracture. Adjacent joint imaging (n=1045 radiographs) of either the knee or foot was obtained in 873 patients (63.7%). Of those, 75/761 patients (9.9%) demonstrated additional fractures proximal to the ankle joint, most commonly of the proximal fibula. Twenty-two of 284 (7.7%) demonstrated additional fractures distal to the ankle joint, most commonly of the metatarsals. Tenderness to palpation demonstrated sensitivities of 0.92 and 0.77 and positive predictive values of 0.94 and 0.89 for the presence of proximal and distal fractures, respectively. Additionally, 19/22 (86.4%) of patients sustaining foot fractures had their injury detectable on initial ankle X-rays. Overall, only 5.5% (75/1370) of patients sustained fractures proximal to the ankle and only 0.2% (3/1370) of patients had additional foot fractures not evident on initial ankle X-rays. The addition of adjacent joint imaging for the evaluation of patients sustaining ankle fractures is low yield. As such, patient history, physical examination, and clinical suspicion should direct the need for additional X-rays. Level IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Imaging the plate boundary between Greenland and North America within the Kane Basin by means of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Axel; Schnabel, Michael; Damm, Volkmar; Piepjohn, Karsten

    2016-08-01

    The Nares Strait is a waterway separating NW Greenland and North America. The nature of the Nares Strait has been subject of discussion for decades, especially if it represents a transform fault that compensated the opening of the Baffin Bay in the Paleogene as Alfred Wegener supposed in 1912. The Kane Basin in the central part of Nares Strait provides an opportunity to cross the proposed fault. Geophysical data were acquired in 2001 and 2010, including among others multichannel and wide-angle seismic data. The eastern part of the Kane Basin is characterized by a solid platform most likely representing a continuation of the Paleoproterozoic Inglefield-Mobile-Belt (Greenland). In the western part, a sedimentary basin with northwestward tilted and eroded layers of Cretaceous age can be resolved. The transition between those two units shows the plate boundary between Greenland and North America and can be considered as a relic of the Wegener Fault.

  8. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Berryman, J.G.; Borcea, L.; Dennis, J.; de Groot-Hedlin, C.; Gilbert, F.; Gill, P.; Heinkenschloss, M.; Johnson, L.; McEvilly, T.; More, J.; Newman, G.; Oldenburg, D.; Parker, P.; Porto, B.; Sen, M.; Torczon, V.; Vasco, D.; Woodward, N.B.

    2000-10-01

    or distance from a prior model. Various other constraints may also be imposed upon the process. Inverse problems are not restricted to geophysics, but can be found in a wide variety of disciplines where inferences must be made on the basis of indirect measurements. For instance, most imaging problems, whether in the field of medicine or non-destructive evaluation, require the solution of an inverse problem. In this report, however, the examples used for illustration are taken exclusively from the field of geophysics. The generalization of these examples to other disciplines should be straightforward, as all are based on standard second-order partial differential equations of physics. In fact, sometimes the non-geophysical inverse problems are significantly easier to treat (as in medical imaging) because the limitations on data collection, and in particular on multiple views, are not so severe as they generally are in geophysics. This report begins with an introduction to geophysical inverse problems by briefly describing four canonical problems that are typical of those commonly encountered in geophysics. Next the connection with optimization methods is made by presenting a general formulation of geophysical inverse problems. This leads into the main subject of this report, a discussion of methods for solving such problems with an emphasis upon newer approaches that have not yet become prominent in geophysics. A separate section is devoted to a subject that is not encountered in all optimization problems but is particularly important in geophysics, the need for a careful appraisal of the results in terms of their resolution and uncertainty. The impact on geophysical inverse problems of continuously improving computational resources is then discussed. The main results are then brought together in a final summary and conclusions section.

  9. Geophysical Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, E.

    1998-01-01

    Of the many geophysical remote-sensing techniques available today, a few are suitable for the water ice-rich, layered material expected at the north martian ice cap. Radio echo sounding has been used for several decades to determine ice thickness and internal structure. Selection of operating frequency is a tradeoff between signal attenuation (which typically increases with frequency and ice temperature) and resolution (which is proportional to wavelength). Antenna configuration and size will be additional considerations for a mission to Mars. Several configurations for ice-penetrating radar systems are discussed: these include orbiter-borne sounders, sounding antennas trailed by balloons and penetrators, and lander-borne systems. Lander-borne systems could include short-wave systems capable of resolving fine structure and layering in the upper meters beneath the lander. Spread-spectrum and deconvolution techniques can be used to increase the depth capability of a radar system. If soundings over several locations are available (e.g., with balloons, rovers, or panning short-wave systems), then it will be easier to resolve internal layering, variations in basal reflection coefficient (from which material properties may be inferred), and the geometry of nonhorizontal features. Sonic sounding has a long history in oil and gas exploration. It is, however, unlikely that large explosive charges, or even swept-frequency techniques such as Vibroseis, would be suitable for a Polar lander -- these systems are capable of penetrating several kilometers of material at frequencies of 10-200 Hz, but the energy required to generate the sound waves is large and potentially destructive. The use of audio-frequency and ultrasonic sound generated by piezoelectric crystals is discussed as a possible method to explore layering and fine features in the upper meters of the ice cap. Appropriate choice of transducer(s) will permit operation over a range of fixed or modulated frequencies

  10. Joint Segmentation and Recognition of Categorized Objects from Noisy Web Image Collection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Hua, Gang; Xue, Jianru; Gao, Zhanning; Zheng, Nanning

    2014-07-14

    The segmentation of categorized objects addresses the problem of joint segmentation of a single category of object across a collection of images, where categorized objects are referred to objects in the same category. Most existing methods of segmentation of categorized objects made the assumption that all images in the given image collection contain the target object. In other words, the given image collection is noise free. Therefore, they may not work well when there are some noisy images which are not in the same category, such as those image collections gathered by a text query from modern image search engines. To overcome this limitation, we propose a method for automatic segmentation and recognition of categorized objects from noisy Web image collections. This is achieved by cotraining an automatic object segmentation algorithm that operates directly on a collection of images, and an object category recognition algorithm that identifies which images contain the target object. The object segmentation algorithm is trained on a subset of images from the given image collection which are recognized to contain the target object with high confidence, while training the object category recognition model is guided by the intermediate segmentation results obtained from the object segmentation algorithm. This way, our co-training algorithm automatically identifies the set of true positives in the noisy Web image collection, and simultaneously extracts the target objects from all the identified images. Extensive experiments validated the efficacy of our proposed approach on four datasets: 1) the Weizmann horse dataset, 2) the MSRC object category dataset, 3) the iCoseg dataset, and 4) a new 30-categories dataset including 15,634 Web images with both hand-annotated category labels and ground truth segmentation labels. It is shown that our method compares favorably with the state-of-the-art, and has the ability to deal with noisy image collections.

  11. Nonrigid Registration of Brain Tumor Resection MR Images Based on Joint Saliency Map and Keypoint Clustering.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhijun; Qin, Binjie

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel global-to-local nonrigid brain MR image registration to compensate for the brain shift and the unmatchable outliers caused by the tumor resection. The mutual information between the corresponding salient structures, which are enhanced by the joint saliency map (JSM), is maximized to achieve a global rigid registration of the two images. Being detected and clustered at the paired contiguous matching areas in the globally registered images, the paired pools of DoG keypoints in combination with the JSM provide a useful cluster-to-cluster correspondence to guide the local control-point correspondence detection and the outlier keypoint rejection. Lastly, a quasi-inverse consistent deformation is smoothly approximated to locally register brain images through the mapping the clustered control points by compact support radial basis functions. The 2D implementation of the method can model the brain shift in brain tumor resection MR images, though the theory holds for the 3D case.

  12. Comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer data for the Cuprite mining district, Esmeralda, and Nye counties, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1989-01-01

    Landsat TM images and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data were analyzed for the Cuprite mining district and compared to available geologic and alteration maps of the area. The TM data, with 30 m resolution and 6 broadbands, allowed discrimination of general mineral groups. Clay minerals, playa deposits, and unaltered rocks were mapped as discrete spectral units using the TM data, but specific minerals were not determined, and definition of the individual alteration zones was not possible. The GERIS, with 15 m spatial resolution and 63 spectral bands, permitted construction of complete spectra and identification of specific minerals. Detailed spectra extracted from the images provided the ability to identify the minerals alunite, kaolinite, hematite, and buddingtonite by their spectral characteristics. The GERIS data show a roughly concentrically zoned hydrothermal system. The mineralogy mapped with the aircraft system conforms to previous field and multispectral image mapping. However, identification of individual minerals and spatial display of the dominant mineralogy add information that can be used to help determine the morphology and genetic origin of the hydrothermal system.

  13. Comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer data for the Cuprite mining district, Esmeralda, and Nye counties, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1989-01-01

    Landsat TM images and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data were analyzed for the Cuprite mining district and compared to available geologic and alteration maps of the area. The TM data, with 30 m resolution and 6 broadbands, allowed discrimination of general mineral groups. Clay minerals, playa deposits, and unaltered rocks were mapped as discrete spectral units using the TM data, but specific minerals were not determined, and definition of the individual alteration zones was not possible. The GERIS, with 15 m spatial resolution and 63 spectral bands, permitted construction of complete spectra and identification of specific minerals. Detailed spectra extracted from the images provided the ability to identify the minerals alunite, kaolinite, hematite, and buddingtonite by their spectral characteristics. The GERIS data show a roughly concentrically zoned hydrothermal system. The mineralogy mapped with the aircraft system conforms to previous field and multispectral image mapping. However, identification of individual minerals and spatial display of the dominant mineralogy add information that can be used to help determine the morphology and genetic origin of the hydrothermal system.

  14. Comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer data for the Cuprite mining district, Esmeralda, and Nye counties, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Kruse, Fred A.

    Landsat TM images and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data were analyzed for the Cuprite mining district and compared to available geologic and alteration maps of the area. The TM data, with 30 m resolution and 6 broadbands, allowed discrimination of general mineral groups. Clay minerals, playa deposits, and unaltered rocks were mapped as discrete spectral units using the TM data, but specific minerals were not determined, and definition of the individual alteration zones was not possible. The GERIS, with 15 m spatial resolution and 63 spectral bands, permitted construction of complete spectra and identification of specific minerals. Detailed spectra extracted from the images provided the ability to identify the minerals alunite, kaolinite, hematite, and buddingtonite by their spectral characteristics. The GERIS data show a roughly concentrically zoned hydrothermal system. The mineralogy mapped with the aircraft system conforms to previous field and multispectral image mapping. However, identification of individual minerals and spatial display of the dominant mineralogy add information that can be used to help determine the morphology and genetic origin of the hydrothermal system.

  15. A joint encryption/watermarking system for verifying the reliability of medical images.

    PubMed

    Bouslimi, Dalel; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Cozic, Michel; Roux, Christian

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a joint encryption/water-marking system for the purpose of protecting medical images. This system is based on an approach which combines a substitutive watermarking algorithm, the quantization index modulation, with an encryption algorithm: a stream cipher algorithm (e.g., the RC4) or a block cipher algorithm (e.g., the AES in cipher block chaining (CBC) mode of operation). Our objective is to give access to the outcomes of the image integrity and of its origin even though the image is stored encrypted. If watermarking and encryption are conducted jointly at the protection stage, watermark extraction and decryption can be applied independently. The security analysis of our scheme and experimental results achieved on 8-bit depth ultrasound images as well as on 16-bit encoded positron emission tomography images demonstrate the capability of our system to securely make available security attributes in both spatial and encrypted domains while minimizing image distortion. Furthermore, by making use of the AES block cipher in CBC mode, the proposed system is compliant with or transparent to the DICOM standard.

  16. Joint Prior Learning for Visual Sensor Network Noisy Image Super-Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Bo; Wang, Shuang; Liang, Xuefeng; Jiao, Licheng; Xu, Caijin

    2016-01-01

    The visual sensor network (VSN), a new type of wireless sensor network composed of low-cost wireless camera nodes, is being applied for numerous complex visual analyses in wild environments, such as visual surveillance, object recognition, etc. However, the captured images/videos are often low resolution with noise. Such visual data cannot be directly delivered to the advanced visual analysis. In this paper, we propose a joint-prior image super-resolution (JPISR) method using expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to improve VSN image quality. Unlike conventional methods that only focus on upscaling images, JPISR alternatively solves upscaling mapping and denoising in the E-step and M-step. To meet the requirement of the M-step, we introduce a novel non-local group-sparsity image filtering method to learn the explicit prior and induce the geometric duality between images to learn the implicit prior. The EM algorithm inherently combines the explicit prior and implicit prior by joint learning. Moreover, JPISR does not rely on large external datasets for training, which is much more practical in a VSN. Extensive experiments show that JPISR outperforms five state-of-the-art methods in terms of both PSNR, SSIM and visual perception. PMID:26927114

  17. Joint Prior Learning for Visual Sensor Network Noisy Image Super-Resolution.

    PubMed

    Yue, Bo; Wang, Shuang; Liang, Xuefeng; Jiao, Licheng; Xu, Caijin

    2016-02-26

    The visual sensor network (VSN), a new type of wireless sensor network composed of low-cost wireless camera nodes, is being applied for numerous complex visual analyses in wild environments, such as visual surveillance, object recognition, etc. However, the captured images/videos are often low resolution with noise. Such visual data cannot be directly delivered to the advanced visual analysis. In this paper, we propose a joint-prior image super-resolution (JPISR) method using expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to improve VSN image quality. Unlike conventional methods that only focus on upscaling images, JPISR alternatively solves upscaling mapping and denoising in the E-step and M-step. To meet the requirement of the M-step, we introduce a novel non-local group-sparsity image filtering method to learn the explicit prior and induce the geometric duality between images to learn the implicit prior. The EM algorithm inherently combines the explicit prior and implicit prior by joint learning. Moreover, JPISR does not rely on large external datasets for training, which is much more practical in a VSN. Extensive experiments show that JPISR outperforms five state-of-the-art methods in terms of both PSNR, SSIM and visual perception.

  18. A joint inter- and intrascale statistical model for Bayesian wavelet based image denoising.

    PubMed

    Pizurica, Aleksandra; Philips, Wilfried; Lemahieu, Ignace; Acheroy, Marc

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new wavelet-based image denoising method, which extends a "geometrical" Bayesian framework. The new method combines three criteria for distinguishing supposedly useful coefficients from noise: coefficient magnitudes, their evolution across scales and spatial clustering of large coefficients near image edges. These three criteria are combined in a Bayesian framework. The spatial clustering properties are expressed in a prior model. The statistical properties concerning coefficient magnitudes and their evolution across scales are expressed in a joint conditional model. The three main novelties with respect to related approaches are (1) the interscale-ratios of wavelet coefficients are statistically characterized and different local criteria for distinguishing useful coefficients from noise are evaluated, (2) a joint conditional model is introduced, and (3) a novel anisotropic Markov random field prior model is proposed. The results demonstrate an improved denoising performance over related earlier techniques.

  19. Evaluation of the marsh deer stifle joint by imaging studies and gross anatomy.

    PubMed

    Shigue, D A; Rahal, S C; Schimming, B C; Santos, R R; Vulcano, L C; Linardi, J L; Teixeira, C R

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the stifle joint of marsh deer using imaging studies and in comparison with gross anatomy. Ten hindlimbs from 5 marsh deer (Blastocerus dichotomus) were used. Radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in each stifle joint. Two hindlimbs were dissected to describe stifle gross anatomy. The other limbs were sectioned in sagittal, dorsal or transverse planes. In the craniocaudal radiographic view, the lateral femoral condyle was broader than the medial femoral condyle. The femoral trochlea was asymmetrical. Subsequent multiplanar reconstruction revealed in the cranial view that the external surface of the patella was roughened, the medial trochlea ridge was larger than the lateral one, and the extensor fossa at the lateral condyle was next to the lateral ridge. The popliteal fossa was better visualized via the lateral view. Sagittal MRI images identified lateral and medial menisci, caudolateral and craniomedial bundles of cranial cruciate ligament, caudal cruciate ligament, patellar ligament and common extensor tendon. In conclusion, the marsh deer stifle presents some anatomical characteristics of the ovine stifle joint. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Joint prediction of multiple scores captures better individual traits from brain images.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Mehdi; Thirion, Bertrand; Bzdok, Danilo; Buvat, Irène; Varoquaux, Gaël

    2017-09-01

    To probe individual variations in brain organization, population imaging relates features of brain images to rich descriptions of the subjects such as genetic information or behavioral and clinical assessments. Capturing common trends across these measurements is important: they jointly characterize the disease status of patient groups. In particular, mapping imaging features to behavioral scores with predictive models opens the way toward more precise diagnosis. Here we propose to jointly predict all the dimensions (behavioral scores) that make up the individual profiles, using so-called multi-output models. This approach often boosts prediction accuracy by capturing latent shared information across scores. We demonstrate the efficiency of multi-output models on two independent resting-state fMRI datasets targeting different brain disorders (Alzheimer's Disease and schizophrenia). Furthermore, the model with joint prediction generalizes much better to a new cohort: a model learned on one study is more accurately transferred to an independent one. Finally, we show how multi-output models can easily be extended to multi-modal settings, combining heterogeneous data sources for a better overall accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Joint image encryption and compression scheme based on IWT and SPIHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Miao; Tong, Xiaojun

    2017-03-01

    A joint lossless image encryption and compression scheme based on integer wavelet transform (IWT) and set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT) is proposed to achieve lossless image encryption and compression simultaneously. Making use of the properties of IWT and SPIHT, encryption and compression are combined. Moreover, the proposed secure set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SSPIHT) via the addition of encryption in the SPIHT coding process has no effect on compression performance. A hyper-chaotic system, nonlinear inverse operation, Secure Hash Algorithm-256(SHA-256), and plaintext-based keystream are all used to enhance the security. The test results indicate that the proposed methods have high security and good lossless compression performance.

  2. Heat flow's propagation within porous media as a function of saturation degree: analogical and numerical modeling and geophysical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comina, Cesare; Dietrich, Peter; Firmbach, Linda; Giordano, Nicolò; Kolditz, Olaf; Mandrone, Giuseppe; Vienken, Thomas; Watanabe, Norihiro

    2013-04-01

    Determining the thermal characteristics of geologic media has numerous applications for low enthalpy geothermal systems design and monitoring. Despite the interest in the topic, there appears to be a scarcity of experimental data in this respect, most of the thermal properties evaluations being based on numerical simulations and back analysis. Therefore analogical and numerical modeling of heat flows in a on proper designed thermal box are presented here. In a box full of a known porous medium under constant moisture conditions, a thermal flow is generated with a single heat source and monitored using 4 temperature sensors located, at definite distances from the source. Two distinct materials have been analyzed in order to evaluate changes in heat flow propagation due to differences in porosity and grain size distribution. Tests performed under different saturation degrees and under induced water fluxes have been moreover analyzed to evaluate the effect of moisture content on the heat propagation and the relative amounts of conductive and convective phenomena into each medium. Cumulative tests on the finer medium have been also performed in order to evaluate the heat storage capacity of the material. Furthermore, during the experiments, the variation of electric resistivity as function of time and temperature has been also performed with indirect geophysical measurements at the laboratory scale to provide an indirect verification of the propagation. Analogical data processing confirms that the heat induced propagates faster from dry to saturated conditions but is less dependent on intermediate water contents. A stronger increase in the heat propagation velocity has been obtained introducing a water flow effect, observing also a dependence on the grain size distribution. Data have been moreover used for a quantitative determination of thermal properties by the use of empirical derived laws. Numerical simulations performed with OpenGeoSys code reached a good

  3. Image deblurring using a joint entropy prior in x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chang; Dutta, Joyita; Zhang, Hui; El Fakhri, Georges; Li, Quanzheng

    2017-03-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality that can provide functional and anatomical images at the same time. Traditional narrow beam XLCT can achieve high spatial resolution as well as high sensitivity. However, by treating the CCD camera as a single pixel detector, this kind of scheme resembles the first generation of CT scanner which results in a long scanning time and a high radiation dose. Although cone beam or fan beam XLCT has the ability to mitigate this problem with an optical propagation model introduced, image quality is affected because the inverse problem is ill-conditioned. Much effort has been done to improve the image quality through hardware improvements or by developing new reconstruction techniques for XLCT. The objective of this work is to further enhance the already reconstructed image by introducing anatomical information through retrospective processing. The deblurring process used a spatially variant point spread function (PSF) model and a joint entropy based anatomical prior derived from a CT image acquired using the same XLCT system. A numerical experiment was conducted with a real mouse CT image from the Digimouse phantom used as the anatomical prior. The resultant images of bone and lung regions showed sharp edges and good consistency with the CT image. Activity error was reduced by 52.3% even for nanophosphor lesion size as small as 0.8mm.

  4. Minimum joint space width (mJSW) of patellofemoral joint on standing "skyline" radiographs: test-retest reproducibility and comparison with quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI).

    PubMed

    Simoni, Paolo; Jamali, Sanaa; Albert, Adelin; Totterman, Saara; Schreyer, Edward; Tamez-Peña, Jose G; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Miezentseva, Victoria Alvarez; Gillet, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    To assess the intraobserver, interobserver, and test-retest reproducibility of minimum joint space width (mJSW) measurement of medial and lateral patellofemoral joints on standing "skyline" radiographs and to compare the mJSW of the patellofemoral joint to the mean cartilage thickness calculated by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI). A couple of standing "skyline" radiographs of the patellofemoral joints and MRI of 55 knees of 28 volunteers (18 females, ten males, mean age, 48.5 ± 16.2 years) were obtained on the same day. The mJSW of the patellofemoral joint was manually measured and Kellgren and Lawrence grade (KLG) was independently assessed by two observers. The mJSW was compared to the mean cartilage thickness of patellofemoral joint calculated by qMRI. mJSW of the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint showed an excellent intraobserver agreement (interclass correlation (ICC) = 0.94 and 0.96), interobserver agreement (ICC = 0.90 and 0.95) and test-retest agreement (ICC = 0.92 and 0.96). The mJSW measured on radiographs was correlated to mean cartilage thickness calculated by qMRI (r = 0.71, p < 0.0001 for the medial PFJ and r = 0.81, p < 0.0001 for the lateral PFJ). However, there was a lack of concordance between radiographs and qMRI for extreme values of joint width and KLG. Radiographs yielded higher joint space measures than qMRI in knees with a normal joint space, while qMRI yielded higher joint space measures than radiographs in knees with joint space narrowing and higher KLG. Standing "skyline" radiographs are a reproducible tool for measuring the mJSW of the patellofemoral joint. The mJSW of the patellofemoral joint on radiographs are correlated with, but not concordant with, qMRI measurements.

  5. Anatomy-guided brain PET imaging incorporating a joint prior model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lijun; Ma, Jianhua; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-03-01

    We proposed a maximum a posterior (MAP) framework for incorporating information from co-registered anatomical images into PET image reconstruction through a novel anato-functional joint prior. The characteristic of the utilized hyperbolic potential function is determinate by the voxel intensity differences within the anatomical image, while the penalization is computed based on voxel intensity differences in reconstructed PET images. Using realistic simulated 18FDG PET scan data, we optimized the performance of the proposed MAP reconstruction with the joint prior (JP-MAP) and compared its performance with conventional 3D MLEM and 3D MAP reconstructions. The proposed JP-MAP reconstruction algorithm resulted in quantitatively enhanced reconstructed images, as demonstrated in extensive FDG PET simulation study. The proposed method was also tested on a 20 min Florbetapir patient study performed on the high-resolution research tomograph. It was shown to outperform conventional methods in visual as well as quantitative accuracy assessment (in terms of regional noise versus activity value performance). The JP-MAP method was also compared with another MR-guided MAP reconstruction method, utilizing the Bowsher prior and was seen to result in some quantitative enhancements, especially in the case of MR-PET mis-registrations, and a definitive improvement in computational performance.

  6. Parallel encryption for multi-channel images based on an optical joint transform correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Bai, Tingzhu; Shen, Xueju; Dou, Shuaifeng; Lin, Chao; Cai, Jianjun

    2017-08-01

    We propose an optical encryption method allowing the parallel encryption for multi-channel images based on a joint transform correlator (JTC). Distinguished from the conventional multi-image encryption methods, our proposed cryptosystem can encrypt multi-channel images simultaneously into a single ciphertext, which also can be used to recover arbitrary original images with corresponding keys. This method can achieve the compressed storage of ciphertext. In order to avoid the cross talk between multi-channel images, we restrict the respective joint power spectrum (JPS) into a specific area with optimized phase masks and split the multiple JPS by controlling the position of single JPS using the linear phase shifts. All of these operations are realized by optimizing and designing the phase masks which can be flexibly reconfigured on the spatial light modulator (SLM), leading to a feasible optical implementation with no increase of optical hardware and complexity. Computer simulations provide the validation for it. Experimental implementation is performed in a JTC-based cryptosystem to further verify the feasibility of our proposed method.

  7. Infrared image detail enhancement approach based on improved joint bilateral filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Chen, Xiaohong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we proposed a new infrared image detail enhancement approach. This approach could not only achieve the goal of enhancing the digital detail, but also make the processed image much closer to the real situation. Inspired by the joint-bilateral filter, two adjacent images were utilized to calculate the kernel functions in order to distinguish the detail information from the raw image. We also designed a new kernel function to modify the joint-bilateral filter and to eliminate the gradient reversal artifacts caused by the non-linear filtering. The new kernel is based on an adaptive emerge coefficient to realize the detail layer determination. The detail information was modified by the adaptive emerge coefficient along with two key parameters to realize the detail enhancement. Finally, we combined the processed detail layer with the base layer and rearrange the high dynamic image into monitor-suited low dynamic range to achieve better visual effect. Numerical calculation showed that this new technology has the best value compare to the previous research in detail enhancement. Figures and data flowcharts were demonstrated in the paper.

  8. An anatomically based imaging sign to detect adventitial cyst derived from the superior tibiofibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hébert-Blouin, Marie-Noëlle; Pirola, Elena; Amrami, Kimberly K; Wang, Huan; Desy, Nicholas M; Spinner, Robert J

    2011-10-01

    The origin for complex intraneural cysts remains controversial despite recent emerging evidence to support their articular origin. The coexistence of intraneural and adventitial cysts has been described due to the proximate neurovascular bundle, i.e., the articular (neural) branch and vessels at the joint capsule. To clarify the pathogenesis, anatomically based imaging patterns can be identified. This paper characterizes a common finding identified on MRI describing the adventitial component originating from the superior tibiofibular joint (STFJ). MRIs of patients with fibular (peroneal) (n = 24) and tibial (n = 7) intraneural ganglion cysts were reviewed. Eleven patients with fibular intraneural ganglion cysts were identified as having a coexisting adventitial component. In all cases, the adventitial cyst extended from the anterior portion of the STFJ, within the capsular vessels, and along the anterior tibial vessels. The reproducible anatomy permitted the identification of an imaging pattern: the "vascular U" sign, consisting of cystic anterior tibial vessels running through the interosseous membrane between the proximal tibia and fibula. This sign was seen on axial MR image(s) obtained at the level of the fibular neck in all cases. To generalize these findings, the rare tibial intraneural ganglion cysts (derived from the posterior aspect of the STFJ) were examined; two cases had coexisting adventitial cysts with visualization of the vascular U sign. This new imaging pattern can improve the identification of adventitial cysts at the level of the STFJ.

  9. Correlation-based imaging technique for fatigue monitoring of riveted lap-joint structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaegebeur, N.; Ostiguy, P. C.; Masson, P.

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, a correlation-based imaging technique called Excitelet is assessed to monitor fatigue crack propagation in a riveted aluminum lap-joint, representative of an aircraft component. For this purpose, a micro-machined piezoceramic array is used to generate guided waves into the structure and measure the reflections induced by potential damage. The method uses a propagation model to correlate measured signals with a bank of signals and imaging is performed using a round-robin procedure (full-matrix capture). This allows taking into account the transducer dynamics and finite dimensions, multi-modal and dispersive characteristics of the guided wave propagation and complex interaction between with damage. Experimental validation has been conducted on an aluminum lap-joint instrumented with a compact linear piezoceramic array of 8 circular elements of 3 mm diameter each. The imaging technique is applied to detect crack propagation after fatigue cycling. Imaging results obtained using A0 mode at 300 and 450 kHz are presented for different crack sizes. It is demonstrated that crack detection and localization can be achieved, while the correlation level indicates the level of reflected energy, and thus damage severity. An accuracy below 5 mm on damage location can be achieved, demonstrating the potential of the correlation-based imaging technique for damage monitoring of complex aerospace structures.

  10. Estimating the joint statistics of images using nonparametric windows with application to registration using mutual information.

    PubMed

    Dowson, Nicholas; Kadir, Timor; Bowden, Richard

    2008-10-01

    Recently, the Nonparametric (NP) Windows has been proposed to estimate the statistics of real 1D and 2D signals. NP Windows is accurate, because it is equivalent to sampling images at a high (infinite) resolution for an assumed interpolation model. This paper extends the proposed approach to consider joint distributions of image-pairs. Second, Green's Theorem is used to simplify the previous NP Windows algorithm. Finally, a resolution-aware NP Windows algorithm is proposed to improve robustness to relative scaling between an image pair. Comparative testing of 2D image registration was performed using translation-only and affine transformations. Although more expensive than other methods, NP Windows frequently demonstrated superior performance for bias (distance between ground truth and global maximum) and frequency of convergence. Unlike other methods, the number of samples and the number of bins have little effect on NP Windows and the prior selection of a kernel is not required.

  11. The Relationship between Knee Joint Loading Rate During Walking and Degenerative Changes on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Morgenroth, David C.; Medverd, Jonathan R.; Seyedali, Mahyo; Czerniecki, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Background While animal study and cadaveric study have demonstrated an association between knee joint loading rate and joint degeneration, the relationship between knee joint loading rate during walking and osteoarthritis has not yet been sufficiently studied in humans. Methods Twenty-eight participants (14 transfemoral amputees and 14 age and body mass matched controls) underwent knee MRI with subsequent assessment using the semiquantitative Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Image Score. Each subject also underwent gait analysis in order to determine knee adduction moment loading rate, peak, and impulse and an exploratory measure, knee adduction moment rate*magnitude. Findings Significant correlations were found between medial tibiofemoral joint degeneration and knee adduction moment peak (slope = 0.42 [SE 0.20]; P=.037), loading rate (slope = 12.3 [SE 3.2]; P=.0004), and rate*magnitude (slope = 437 [SE 100]; P<.0001). These relationships continued to be significant after adjusting for body mass or subject type. The relationship between medial knee semiquantitative MRI score and knee adduction moment loading rate and rate*magnitude continued to be significant even after adjusting for peak moment (P<.0001), however, the relationship between medial knee semiquantitative MRI score and peak moment was no longer significant after adjusting for either loading rate or rate*magnitude (P>.2 in both cases). Interpretation This study suggests an independent relationship between knee adduction moment loading rate and medial tibiofemoral joint degeneration. Our results support the hypothesis that rate of loading, represented by the knee adduction moment loading rate, is strongly associated with medial tibiofemoral joint degeneration independent of knee adduction moment peak and impulse. PMID:24820134

  12. Identification and long-term observation of early joint damage by magnetic resonance imaging in clinically asymptomatic joints in patients with haemophilia A or B despite prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, M; Kurnik, K; Pfluger, T; Bidlingmaier, C

    2012-05-01

    Severe haemophilia is associated with recurrent joint bleeds, which can lead to haemophilic arthropathy. Subclinical joint bleeds have also been associated with joint damage detected using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We investigated the development of early changes in clinically asymptomatic joints using MRI in haemophilia A or B patients receiving prophylactic therapy. In this single-centre retrospective cohort study, patients with clinical evidence of joint damage in one ankle and one clinically asymptomatic ankle, in which we performed an MRI scan of both ankles in one session, were enrolled. MRI findings were graded using a 4-point scoring system (0 = normal findings and III = severe joint damage). Since 2000, 38 MRIs in 26 patients have been performed. Starting at a median age of 4 years, 23 patients received prophylaxis 2-3 times weekly. On-demand treatment was performed in three patients. Eight patients (31%) presented with an MRI score of 0, 12 (46%) had a score of I, four (15%) had a score of II, and two (8%) had a score of III in the clinically unaffected ankle. The six patients with MRI scores of II and III had started regular prophylaxis between the ages of 2 years and 15 years; none had developed an inhibitor or experienced a clinically evident bleed in the asymptomatic ankle. During our study, five of 26 patients had a worsening of MRI findings without experiencing a joint bleed. Early morphological changes in clinically asymptomatic ankles can be detected using MRI, despite adequate prophylaxis.

  13. A digital-signal-processor-based optical tomographic system for dynamic imaging of joint diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasker, Joseph M.

    joint diseases, especially effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the proximal interphalangeal finger joints. Using a dual-wavelength tomographic imaging system and previously implemented reconstruction scheme, I have performed initial dynamic imaging case studies on healthy volunteers and patients diagnosed with RA. These studies support our hypothesis that differences in the vascular and metabolic reactivity exist between affected and unaffected joints and can be used for diagnostic purposes.

  14. A joint source-channel distortion model for JPEG compressed images.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Muhammad F; Sheikh, Hamid Rahim; Heath, Robert W; Bovik, Alan C

    2006-06-01

    The need for efficient joint source-channel coding (JSCC) is growing as new multimedia services are introduced in commercial wireless communication systems. An important component of practical JSCC schemes is a distortion model that can predict the quality of compressed digital multimedia such as images and videos. The usual approach in the JSCC literature for quantifying the distortion due to quantization and channel errors is to estimate it for each image using the statistics of the image for a given signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This is not an efficient approach in the design of real-time systems because of the computational complexity. A more useful and practical approach would be to design JSCC techniques that minimize average distortion for a large set of images based on some distortion model rather than carrying out per-image optimizations. However, models for estimating average distortion due to quantization and channel bit errors in a combined fashion for a large set of images are not available for practical image or video coding standards employing entropy coding and differential coding. This paper presents a statistical model for estimating the distortion introduced in progressive JPEG compressed images due to quantization and channel bit errors in a joint manner. Statistical modeling of important compression techniques such as Huffman coding, differential pulse-coding modulation, and run-length coding are included in the model. Examples show that the distortion in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) can be predicted within a 2-dB maximum error over a variety of compression ratios and bit-error rates. To illustrate the utility of the proposed model, we present an unequal power allocation scheme as a simple application of our model. Results show that it gives a PSNR gain of around 6.5 dB at low SNRs, as compared to equal power allocation.

  15. MR Imaging with Metal-suppression Sequences for Evaluation of Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Brett S; Weinberg, Eric P

    2016-01-01

    Metallic artifact at orthopedic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging continues to be an important problem, particularly in the realm of total joint arthroplasty. Complications often follow total joint arthroplasty and can be expected for a small percentage of all implanted devices. Postoperative complications involve not only osseous structures but also adjacent soft tissues-a highly problematic area at MR imaging because of artifacts from metallic prostheses. Without special considerations, susceptibility artifacts from ferromagnetic implants can unacceptably degrade image quality. Common artifacts include in-plane distortions (signal loss and signal pileup), poor or absent fat suppression, geometric distortion, and through-section distortion. Basic methods to reduce metallic artifacts include use of spin-echo or fast spin-echo sequences with long echo train lengths, short inversion time inversion-recovery (STIR) sequences for fat suppression, a high bandwidth, thin section selection, and an increased matrix. With care and attention to the alloy type (eg, titanium, cobalt-chromium, stainless steel), orientation of the implant, and magnetic field strength, as well as use of proprietary and nonproprietary metal-suppression techniques, previously nondiagnostic studies can yield key diagnostic information. Specifically, sequences such as the metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS), WARP (Siemens Healthcare, Munich, Germany), slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), and multiacquisition with variable-resonance image combination (MAVRIC) can be optimized to reveal pathologic conditions previously hidden by periprosthetic artifacts. Complications of total joint arthroplasty that can be evaluated by using MR imaging with metal-suppression sequences include pseudotumoral conditions such as metallosis and particle disease, infection, aseptic prosthesis loosening, tendon injury, and muscle injury. ©RSNA, 2015.

  16. A sparsity-driven approach for joint SAR imaging and phase error correction.

    PubMed

    Önhon, N Özben; Cetin, Müjdat

    2012-04-01

    Image formation algorithms in a variety of applications have explicit or implicit dependence on a mathematical model of the observation process. Inaccuracies in the observation model may cause various degradations and artifacts in the reconstructed images. The application of interest in this paper is synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging, which particularly suffers from motion-induced model errors. These types of errors result in phase errors in SAR data, which cause defocusing of the reconstructed images. Particularly focusing on imaging of fields that admit a sparse representation, we propose a sparsity-driven method for joint SAR imaging and phase error correction. Phase error correction is performed during the image formation process. The problem is set up as an optimization problem in a nonquadratic regularization-based framework. The method involves an iterative algorithm, where each iteration of which consists of consecutive steps of image formation and model error correction. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the approach for various types of phase errors, as well as the improvements that it provides over existing techniques for model error compensation in SAR.

  17. Correlation Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Arthroscopic Findings in the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hayat Ahmad; Ahad, Humayun; Sharma, Pradeep; Bajaj, Pankaj; Hassan, Nazia; Kamal, Younis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The knee joint is the largest and the most complex joint of the human body. It is not covered by any thick muscular covering anteriorly. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the diagnostic capabilities of clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and arthroscopy in traumatic disorders of the knee joint, to seek correlation between clinical findings, MRI findings and arthroscopic. Patients and Methods: A total of 26 patients with a presentation suggestive of traumatic knee pathology were studied prospectively. A detailed history was taken and relevant clinical examination was done, which was followed by MRI of the knee. The patients were scheduled for arthroscopy under general/spinal anesthesia, whenever indicated. Results: Keeping arthroscopic examination as standard, the correlation between clinical and arthroscopy showed a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 86%, accuracy of 63.16%, negative predictive value of 93.48%; whereas MRI vs. arthroscopy showed a sensitivity of 74.42%, specificity of 93.10%, accuracy of 84.21%, and negative predictive value of 88.04%. Conclusions: The clinical examination is an important and accurate diagnostic modality for evaluation of traumatic derangement of the knee joint. It is noninvasive, easy, available, and valuable diagnostic modality. The MRI is an accurate diagnostic modality. It can be used whenever there is an uncertain indication for arthroscopy. However, costs have to be kept in mind, especially in patients with low socio-economic status. PMID:25825695

  18. Multipixel system for gigahertz frequency-domain optical imaging of finger joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netz, Uwe J.; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2008-03-01

    Frequency-domain optical imaging systems have shown great promise for characterizing blood oxygenation, hemodynamics, and other physiological parameters in human and animal tissues. However, most of the frequency domain systems presented so far operate with source modulation frequencies below 150MHz. At these low frequencies, their ability to provide accurate data for small tissue geometries such as encountered in imaging of finger joints or rodents is limited. Here, we present a new system that can provide data up to 1GHz using an intensity modulated charged coupled device camera. After data processing, the images show the two-dimensional distribution of amplitude and phase of the light modulation on the finger surface. The system performance was investigated and test measurements on optical tissue phantoms were taken to investigate whether higher frequencies yield better signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). It could be shown that local changes in optical tissue properties, as they appear in the initial stages of rheumatoid arthritis in a finger joint, are detectable by simple image evaluation, with the range of modulation frequency around 500MHz proving to yield the highest SNR.

  19. Multipixel system for gigahertz frequency-domain optical imaging of finger joints.

    PubMed

    Netz, Uwe J; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2008-03-01

    Frequency-domain optical imaging systems have shown great promise for characterizing blood oxygenation, hemodynamics, and other physiological parameters in human and animal tissues. However, most of the frequency domain systems presented so far operate with source modulation frequencies below 150 MHz. At these low frequencies, their ability to provide accurate data for small tissue geometries such as encountered in imaging of finger joints or rodents is limited. Here, we present a new system that can provide data up to 1 GHz using an intensity modulated charged coupled device camera. After data processing, the images show the two-dimensional distribution of amplitude and phase of the light modulation on the finger surface. The system performance was investigated and test measurements on optical tissue phantoms were taken to investigate whether higher frequencies yield better signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). It could be shown that local changes in optical tissue properties, as they appear in the initial stages of rheumatoid arthritis in a finger joint, are detectable by simple image evaluation, with the range of modulation frequency around 500 MHz proving to yield the highest SNR.

  20. A joint shape evolution approach to medical image segmentation using expectation-maximization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Farzinfar, Mahshid; Teoh, Eam Khwang; Xue, Zhong

    2011-11-01

    This study proposes an expectation-maximization (EM)-based curve evolution algorithm for segmentation of magnetic resonance brain images. In the proposed algorithm, the evolution curve is constrained not only by a shape-based statistical model but also by a hidden variable model from image observation. The hidden variable model herein is defined by the local voxel labeling, which is unknown and estimated by the expected likelihood function derived from the image data and prior anatomical knowledge. In the M-step, the shapes of the structures are estimated jointly by encoding the hidden variable model and the statistical prior model obtained from the training stage. In the E-step, the expected observation likelihood and the prior distribution of the hidden variables are estimated. In experiments, the proposed automatic segmentation algorithm is applied to multiple gray nuclei structures such as caudate, putamens and thalamus of three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging in volunteers and patients. As for the robustness and accuracy of the segmentation algorithm, the results of the proposed EM-joint shape-based algorithm outperformed those obtained using the statistical shape model-based techniques in the same framework and a current state-of-the-art region competition level set method.

  1. Wavelet-based SAR images despeckling using joint hidden Markov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiaoliang; Wang, Guoyou; Liu, Jianguo; Chen, Shaobo

    2007-11-01

    In the past few years, wavelet-domain hidden Markov models have proven to be useful tools for statistical signal and image processing. The hidden Markov tree (HMT) model captures the key features of the joint probability density of the wavelet coefficients of real-world data. One potential drawback to the HMT framework is the deficiency for taking account of intrascale correlations that exist among neighboring wavelet coefficients. In this paper, we propose to develop a joint hidden Markov model by fusing the wavelet Bayesian denoising technique with an image regularization procedure based on HMT and Markov random field (MRF). The Expectation Maximization algorithm is used to estimate hyperparameters and specify the mixture model. The noise-free wavelet coefficients are finally estimated by a shrinkage function based on local weighted averaging of the Bayesian estimator. It is shown that the joint method outperforms lee filter and standard HMT techniques in terms of the integrative measure of the equivalent number of looks (ENL) and Pratt's figure of merit(FOM), especially when dealing with speckle noise in large variance.

  2. Imaging of normal and pathologic joint synovium using nonlinear optical microscopy as a potential diagnostic tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Nivedan; Chabra, Sanjay; Mehdi, Sheherbano; Sweet, Paula; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Pool, Roy; Andrews, Brian; Peavy, George M.

    2010-09-01

    An estimated 1.3 million people in the United States suffer from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA causes profound changes in the synovial membrane of joints, and without early diagnosis and intervention, progresses to permanent alterations in joint structure and function. The purpose of this study is to determine if nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) can utilize the natural intrinsic fluorescence properties of tissue to generate images that would allow visualization of the structural and cellular composition of fresh, unfixed normal and pathologic synovial tissue. NLOM is performed on rabbit knee joint synovial samples using 730- and 800-nm excitation wavelengths. Less than 30 mW of excitation power delivered with a 40×, 0.8-NA water immersion objective is sufficient for the visualization of synovial structures to a maximum depth of 70 μm without tissue damage. NLOM imaging of normal and pathologic synovial tissue reveals the cellular structure, synoviocytes, adipocytes, collagen, vascular structures, and differential characteristics of inflammatory infiltrates without requiring tissue processing or staining. Further study to evaluate the ability of NLOM to assess the characteristics of pathologic synovial tissue and its potential role for the management of disease is warranted.

  3. Image segmentation and registration for the analysis of joint motion from 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Haynor, David R.; Fassbind, Michael; Rohr, Eric; Ledoux, William

    2006-03-01

    We report an image segmentation and registration method for studying joint morphology and kinematics from in vivo MRI scans and its application to the analysis of ankle joint motion. Using an MR-compatible loading device, a foot was scanned in a single neutral and seven dynamic positions including maximal flexion, rotation and inversion/eversion. A segmentation method combining graph cuts and level sets was developed which allows a user to interactively delineate 14 bones in the neutral position volume in less than 30 minutes total, including less than 10 minutes of user interaction. In the subsequent registration step, a separate rigid body transformation for each bone is obtained by registering the neutral position dataset to each of the dynamic ones, which produces an accurate description of the motion between them. We have processed six datasets, including 3 normal and 3 pathological feet. For validation our results were compared with those obtained from 3DViewnix, a semi-automatic segmentation program, and achieved good agreement in volume overlap ratios (mean: 91.57%, standard deviation: 3.58%) for all bones. Our tool requires only 1/50 and 1/150 of the user interaction time required by 3DViewnix and NIH Image Plus, respectively, an improvement that has the potential to make joint motion analysis from MRI practical in research and clinical applications.

  4. Application of near surface geophysical methods to image water table response in an Alpine Meadow, Northern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, M.; Blacic, T. M.; Craig, M. S.; Yarnell, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Meadows are recognized for their value to the ecological, hydrologic, and aesthetic functions of a watershed. As natural water retention sinks, meadows attenuate floods, improve water quality and support herbaceous vegetation that stabilize streambanks and promote high biodiversity. Alpine meadows are especially vital, serving as freshwater sources and distributing to lower lying provinces through ground and surface water interaction. These complexes are highly vulnerable to drought conditions, altered seasonal precipitation patterns, and mismanaged land use. One such location, Van Norden meadow located in the Donner Summit area west of Lake Tahoe, is one of the largest sub-alpine meadows in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of Northern California. Van Norden meadow offers a natural hydrologic laboratory. Ownership transfer of the area from a local land trust to the Forestry Service requires restoration toward natural meadow conditions, and involves notching the dam in 2016 to reduce currently impounded water volumes from 250 to less than 50 acre-feet. To monitor the effects of notching the dam on the upstream meadow conditions, better understanding of the surface and groundwater hydrology both pre-and post-base level alteration is required. Comprehensive understanding of groundwater flux that supports meadow reaches relies on knowledge of their often complex stratigraphic and structural subsurface framework. In recent years hydrogeophysics has emphasized the combination of near surface geophysical techniques, collaborated with well and borehole measures, to qualitatively define these parameters. Building on a preliminary GPR investigation conducted in 2014, in which 44 270 MHz transect lines were collected, we returned to Van Norden meadow in late summer 2015 to collect lower frequency GPR (50 and 100 MHz) and electrical resistivity profiles to better define the groundwater table, sedimentary, and structural features of the meadow.

  5. Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Geophysical methods continue to show great promise for use in agriculture. The term “agricultural geophysics” denotes a subdiscipline of geophysics that is focused only on agricultural applications. The Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics was compiled to include a comprehensive overview of the geoph...

  6. Assessing the reliability of MRI-CBCT image registration to visualize temporomandibular joints

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, J L; Alsufyani, N; Jibri, Z; Lai, H; Major, P W

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate image quality of two methods of registering MRI and CBCT images of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), particularly regarding TMJ articular disc–condyle relationship and osseous abnormality. Methods: MR and CBCT images for 10 patients (20 TMJs) were obtained and co-registered using two methods (non-guided and marker guided) using Mirada XD software (Mirada Medical Ltd, Oxford, UK). Three radiologists independently and blindly evaluated three types of images (MRI, CBCT and registered MRI-CBCT) at two times (T1 and T2) on two criteria: (1) quality of MRI-CBCT registrations (excellent, fair or poor) and (2) TMJ disc–condylar position and articular osseous abnormalities (osteophytes, erosions and subcortical cyst, surface flattening, sclerosis). Results: 75% of the non-guided registered images showed excellent quality, and 95% of the marker-guided registered images showed poor quality. Significant difference was found between the non-guided and marker-guided registration (χ2 = 108.5; p < 0.01). The interexaminer variability of the disc position in MRI [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.50 at T1, 0.56 at T2] was lower than that in MRI-CBCT registered images [ICC = 0.80 (0.52–0.92) at T1, 0.84 (0.62–0.93) at T2]. Erosions and subcortical cysts were noticed less frequently in the MRI-CBCT images than in CBCT images. Conclusions: Non-guided registration proved superior to marker-guided registration. Although MRI-CBCT fused images were slightly more limited than CBCT alone to detect osseous abnormalities, use of the fused images improved the consistency among examiners in detecting disc position in relation to the condyle. PMID:25734241

  7. Joint inversion of 3-D seismic, gravimetric and magnetotelluric data for sub-basalt imaging in the Faroe-Shetland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heincke, B.; Moorkamp, M.; Jegen, M.; Hobbs, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    collected along parallel lines by a shipborne gradiometer and the marine MT data set is composed of 41 stations that are distributed over the whole investigation area. Logging results from a borehole located in the central part of the investigation area enable us to derive parameter relationships between seismic velocities, resistivities and densities that are adequately describe the rock property behaviors of both the basaltic lava flows and sedimentary layers in this region. In addition, a 3-D reflection seismic survey covering the central part allows us to incorporate the top of basalt and other features as constraints in the joint inversions and to evaluate the quality of the final results. Literature: D. Colombo, M. Mantovani, S. Hallinan, M. Virgilio, 2008. Sub-basalt depth imaging using simultaneous joint inversion of seismic and electromagnetic (MT) data: a CRB field study. SEG Expanded Abstract, Las Vegas, USA, 2674-2678. M. Jordan, J. Ebbing, M. Brönner, J. Kamm , Z. Du, P. Eliasson, 2012. Joint Inversion for Improved Sub-salt and Sub-basalt Imaging with Application to the More Margin. EAGE Expanded Abstracts, Copenhagen, DK. M. Moorkamp, B. Heincke, M. Jegen, A.W.Roberts, R.W. Hobbs, 2011. A framework for 3-D joint inversion of MT, gravity and seismic refraction data. Geophysical Journal International, 184, 477-493.

  8. Optical image encryption based on a joint Fresnel transform correlator with double optical wedges.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xueju; Dou, Shuaifeng; Lei, Ming; Chen, Yudan

    2016-10-20

    An optical cryptosystem based on the joint Fresnel transform correlator (JFTC) with double optical wedges is designed. The designed cryptosystem retains the two major advantages of JTC-based optical cryptosystems. First, the encrypted image is real-valued and therefore is easier to record and transmit. Second, the encryption process is simplified, since it doesn't require accurate alignment of optical elements or the generation of the complex conjugate of the key. Also, the designed optical cryptosystem can produce a decrypted image with higher quality than a JTC-based optical cryptosystem, because the original encrypted image is divided by the Fresnel transform power distribution of the key mask to generate the new encrypted image, which significantly reduces the noise during the decryption process. Simulation results showed that the correlation coefficient of the decrypted image and the original image can reach as large as 0.9819 after denoising and adequately selecting half-central interval a and encrypted image width w. Another improvement relative to JTC-based optical cryptosystems is that the attack resistibility gets enhanced due to the nonlinearity of the encryption process as well as the additional key parameter a, which enlarges the key space.

  9. Practical implementation of the image domain joint transform correlator for holographic security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Michael V.; Odinokov, Sergey B.; Bondarev, Leonid A.; Kurakin, Sergey V.

    2003-05-01

    We describe the experimental setup of the image domain joint transform correlator intended for holographic security application. The security verification routine demands two channels. The first one corresponds to the reference hologram stored in the security device. The other is a security holographic mark with several test sub-holograms, applied to a carrier: ID-card, paper seal etc. Each of the holograms stores a part of entire image, stored in the reference hologram. Image domain JTC is used to match the images retrieved from the holograms. The images are recorded by a light addressed spatial light modulator (LASLM). Being recorded and retrieved, the images provides correlation peaks with special positions, with a strict dependence on the tested and reference holograms mutual shifts. We prove experimentally that the image domain recognizing provides as more effective usage of the LASLM work pupil and resolution as a less device size. The system also has a good tolerance to shift and rotation of the security holographic mark. Few correlation peaks respected to test holograms enhances the device recognizing probability. We provide computer simulations based on the mathematical analysis of the optical signal transforming. The real-time experimental results corresponded with computer simulations are presented.

  10. A Description for Rock Joint Roughness Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yunfeng; Tang, Huiming; Eldin, M. A. M Ez; Chen, Pengyu; Wang, Liangqing; Wang, Jinge

    2015-01-01

    Shear behavior of rock mass greatly depends upon the rock joint roughness which is generally characterized by anisotropy, scale effect and interval effect. A new index enabling to capture all the three features, namely brightness area percentage (BAP), is presented to express the roughness based on synthetic illumination of a digital terrain model derived from terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). Since only tiny planes facing opposite to shear direction make contribution to resistance during shear failure, therefore these planes are recognized through the image processing technique by taking advantage of the fact that they appear brighter than other ones under the same light source. Comparison with existing roughness indexes and two case studies were illustrated to test the performance of BAP description. The results reveal that the rock joint roughness estimated by the presented description has a good match with existing roughness methods and displays a wider applicability. PMID:26585247

  11. Prediction of radiographic progression in synovitis-positive joints on maximum intensity projection of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Akai, Takanori; Taniguchi, Daigo; Oda, Ryo; Asada, Maki; Toyama, Shogo; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Seno, Takahiro; Kawahito, Yutaka; Fujii, Yosuke; Ito, Hirotoshi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-04-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with maximum intensity projection (MRI-MIP) is an easy, useful imaging method to evaluate synovitis in rheumatoid hands. However, the prognosis of synovitis-positive joints on MRI-MIP has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between synovitis visualized by MRI-MIP and joint destruction on X-rays in rheumatoid hands. The wrists, metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints, and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints of both hands (500 joints in total) were evaluated in 25 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Synovitis was scored from grade 0 to 2 on the MRI-MIP images. The Sharp/van der Heijde score and Larsen grade were used for radiographic evaluation. The relationships between the MIP score and the progression of radiographic scores and between the MIP score and bone marrow edema on MRI were analyzed using the trend test. As the MIP score increased, the Sharp/van der Heijde score and Larsen grade progressed severely. The rate of bone marrow edema-positive joints also increased with higher MIP scores. MRI-MIP imaging of RA hands is a clinically useful method that allows semi-quantitative evaluation of synovitis with ease and can be used to predict joint destruction.

  12. Interpretation of Borehole Geophysical Logs, Aquifer-Isolation Tests, and Water-Quality Data for Sites 1, 3, and 5 at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base, Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania: 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.

    2007-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logging, heatpulse-flowmeter measurements, borehole television surveys, and aquifer-isolation tests were conducted in 2005 at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base (NAS/JRB) in Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pa. This study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Navy in support of hydrogeological investigations to address ground-water contamination. Data collected for this study are valuable for understanding ground-water flow in the Stockton Formation at the local and regional scale. The Willow Grove NAS/JRB is underlain by the Stockton Formation, which consists of sedimentary rocks of Triassic age. The rocks of the Stockton Formation form a complex, heterogeneous aquifer with partially connected zones of high permeability. Borehole geophysical logs, heatpulse-flowmeter measurements, and borehole television surveys made in seven boreholes ranging from 70 to 350 ft deep were used to identify potential water-producing fractures and fracture zones and to select intervals for aquifer-isolation tests. An upward vertical hydraulic gradient was measured in one borehole, a downward vertical hydraulic gradient was measured in four boreholes, both an upward and a downward vertical hydraulic gradient were measured in one borehole, and no flow was measurable in one borehole. The aquifer-isolation tests isolated 30 discrete fractures in the seven boreholes for collection of depth-discrete hydraulic and water-quality data. Of the 30 fractures identified as potentially water producing, 26 fractures (87 percent) produced more than 1 gallon per minute of water. The specific capacity of the isolated intervals producing more than 1 gallon per minute ranged from 0.02 to 5.2 gallons per minute per foot. There was no relation between specific capacity and depth of the fracture. Samples for analysis for volatile organic compounds were collected from each isolated zone. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was the most

  13. Computed Tomographic Image Analysis Based on FEM Performance Comparison of Segmentation on Knee Joint Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seong-Wook; Seo, Young-Jin; Yoo, Yon-Sik

    2014-01-01

    The demand for an accurate and accessible image segmentation to generate 3D models from CT scan data has been increasing as such models are required in many areas of orthopedics. In this paper, to find the optimal image segmentation to create a 3D model of the knee CT data, we compared and validated segmentation algorithms based on both objective comparisons and finite element (FE) analysis. For comparison purposes, we used 1 model reconstructed in accordance with the instructions of a clinical professional and 3 models reconstructed using image processing algorithms (Sobel operator, Laplacian of Gaussian operator, and Canny edge detection). Comparison was performed by inspecting intermodel morphological deviations with the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, and FE analysis was performed to examine the effects of the segmentation algorithm on the results of the knee joint movement analysis. PMID:25538950

  14. Computed tomographic image analysis based on FEM performance comparison of segmentation on knee joint reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seong-Wook; Seo, Young-Jin; Yoo, Yon-Sik; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2014-01-01

    The demand for an accurate and accessible image segmentation to generate 3D models from CT scan data has been increasing as such models are required in many areas of orthopedics. In this paper, to find the optimal image segmentation to create a 3D model of the knee CT data, we compared and validated segmentation algorithms based on both objective comparisons and finite element (FE) analysis. For comparison purposes, we used 1 model reconstructed in accordance with the instructions of a clinical professional and 3 models reconstructed using image processing algorithms (Sobel operator, Laplacian of Gaussian operator, and Canny edge detection). Comparison was performed by inspecting intermodel morphological deviations with the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, and FE analysis was performed to examine the effects of the segmentation algorithm on the results of the knee joint movement analysis.

  15. Analysis of Two-Dimensional Ultrasound Cardiac Strain Imaging using Joint Probability Density Functions

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chi; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound frame rates play a key role for accurate cardiac deformation tracking. Insufficient frame rates lead to an increase in signal decorrelation artifacts; resulting in erroneous displacement and strain estimation. Joint probability density distributions generated from estimated axial strain and its associated signal-to-noise ratio provide a useful approach to assess the minimum frame rate requirements. Previous reports have demonstrated that bimodal distributions in the joint probability density indicate inaccurate strain estimation over a cardiac cycle. In this study, we utilize similar analysis to evaluate a two-dimensional multi-level displacement tracking and strain estimation algorithm for cardiac strain imaging. The impact of different frame rates, final kernel dimensions, and a comparison of radiofrequency and envelope based processing are evaluated using echo signals derived from a three-dimensional finite element cardiac model and 5 healthy volunteers. Cardiac simulation model analysis demonstrate that the minimum frame rates required to obtain accurate joint probability distributions for the signal to noise ratio and strain, for a final kernel dimension of 1 λ by 3 A-lines, was around 42 Hz for radiofrequency signals. On the other hand, even a frame rate of 250Hz with envelope signals did not replicate the ideal joint probability distribution. For the volunteer study, clinical data was acquired only at a 34 Hz frame rate which appears to be sufficient for radiofrequency analysis. We also show that an increase in the final kernel dimensions significantly impact the strain probability distribution and joint probability density function generated; with a smaller impact on the variation in the accumulated mean strain estimated over a cardiac cycle. Our results demonstrate that radiofrequency frame rates currently achievable on clinical cardiac ultrasound systems are sufficient for accurate analysis of the strain probability distribution, when a multi

  16. Ultrasonographic imaging of the temporomandibular joint in healthy cattle and pathological findings in one clinical case.

    PubMed

    Borges, N C; Weissengruber, G E; Huber, J; Kofler, J

    2016-11-01

    To describe the normal ultrasonographic appearance of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in cattle, and to describe the ultrasonographic pathology of the TMJ as assessed in one cow with TMJ disease. The TMJ of 12 healthy Holstein-Friesian cows were examined using a portable ultrasonographic unit with a 7.5 MHz linear probe and a 6.0 MHz convex probe. Each TMJ was scanned in a rostrolateral, lateral and caudolateral plane. In addition, the TMJ of one 2-year-old cow with clinical signs of food retention in the mouth, head tilt, swelling and pain in the right TMJ region and an infected horn fracture was examined ultrasonographically. The bone surfaces of the temporal process, the zygomatic process and the temporal bone, the larger muscles of the TMJ region, the superficial temporal vein, and the parotid salivary gland could be imaged in all normal healthy cattle. Using the linear probe, the joint capsule was visible in 17/24 (71%) cases in the caudolateral plane, but the articular disc could not be visualised. With the convex probe, the joint capsule could be imaged in all cases in the caudolateral plane, and the articular disc in 13/24 (54%) cases in the caudolateral plane. It was never possible to see the synovial pouch in healthy cattle using either probe. By contrast, in the cow diagnosed with septic arthritis of the right TMJ, a marked anechoic and heterogeneous hypoechoic effusion of the TMJ with distension of the joint capsule was visualised. The results of this descriptive study serve to provide a reference for ultrasonography of pathological conditions of the TMJ region in cattle. As many veterinarians are equipped with ultrasound machines with 5-8 MHz linear rectal probes, the authors recommend using these probes for further investigation of clinical cases with swelling of the TMJ region and/or masticatory problems of unclear origin to exclude or diagnose TMJ disorders.

  17. Geophysics, Oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Wentz, F.

    1993-01-01

    Development of decade-long time series of global surface wind measurements for studies ofseasonal-to-interannual climate variability presents unique challenges for space- borne instrumentationbecause of the necessity to combine data sets of 3- to 5-year lifetimes. Before the first Special SensorMicrowave Imager (SSMI), which was launched on the Defence Meteorological Satellite Program(DMSP) F8 spacecraft in July 1987, stopped recording wind speed in December 1991, another SSMIwas launched on DMSP F10 in December 1991. Interpretation of the 1987 - 1993 composite timeseries is dependent upon the space and time characteristics of the differences between concurrent F8and F10 SSMI measurements. This paper emphasizes large geographical regions and 1-month timescale. The F8-F10 area-weighted difference between 60 degrees S and 60 degrees S during 305 daysof 1991 (-0.12 m s^(-1)) was comparable to the year-to-year wind speed variations during 1988-1991. The 10 degree-zonal averaged monthly mean F8-F10 difference was negative (positive) forwind speeds less (greater) than 7.9 m s^(-1), reaching - 0.43(0.32) m s^(-1) at 5(10) m s^(-1). The10 degree-zonal averaged monthly mean F8-F10 bias had considerable variations throughout the yearand between 60 degrees S - 60 degrees N, with the largest temporal variation (1.4 m s^(-1)) in the 50degrees - 60 degrees N region from February to April. The 1991 average value of the monthly meanroot-mean-square (rms) difference between F8 and F10 daily wind speeds in 10 degree-longitudinalbands was 2.0 m s^(-1) over 60 degrees S - 60 degrees N, the amplitude of the annual cycle of therms difference was largest in the northern hemisphere middle latitudes, and the rms difference wasrelated to the wind speed (e.g., at 6 and 10 m s^(-1), the rms difference was 1.7 and 2.7 m s^(-1),respectively). The relationship between monthly mean 1/3 degrees x 1/3 degrees F8-F10 SSMI windspeed differences and integrated water vapor and liquid water content in

  18. Geophysics, Oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Wentz, F.

    1993-01-01

    Development of decade-long time series of global surface wind measurements for studies ofseasonal-to-interannual climate variability presents unique challenges for space- borne instrumentationbecause of the necessity to combine data sets of 3- to 5-year lifetimes. Before the first Special SensorMicrowave Imager (SSMI), which was launched on the Defence Meteorological Satellite Program(DMSP) F8 spacecraft in July 1987, stopped recording wind speed in December 1991, another SSMIwas launched on DMSP F10 in December 1991. Interpretation of the 1987 - 1993 composite timeseries is dependent upon the space and time characteristics of the differences between concurrent F8and F10 SSMI measurements. This paper emphasizes large geographical regions and 1-month timescale. The F8-F10 area-weighted difference between 60 degrees S and 60 degrees S during 305 daysof 1991 (-0.12 m s^(-1)) was comparable to the year-to-year wind speed variations during 1988-1991. The 10 degree-zonal averaged monthly mean F8-F10 difference was negative (positive) forwind speeds less (greater) than 7.9 m s^(-1), reaching - 0.43(0.32) m s^(-1) at 5(10) m s^(-1). The10 degree-zonal averaged monthly mean F8-F10 bias had considerable variations throughout the yearand between 60 degrees S - 60 degrees N, with the largest temporal variation (1.4 m s^(-1)) in the 50degrees - 60 degrees N region from February to April. The 1991 average value of the monthly meanroot-mean-square (rms) difference between F8 and F10 daily wind speeds in 10 degree-longitudinalbands was 2.0 m s^(-1) over 60 degrees S - 60 degrees N, the amplitude of the annual cycle of therms difference was largest in the northern hemisphere middle latitudes, and the rms difference wasrelated to the wind speed (e.g., at 6 and 10 m s^(-1), the rms difference was 1.7 and 2.7 m s^(-1),respectively). The relationship between monthly mean 1/3 degrees x 1/3 degrees F8-F10 SSMI windspeed differences and integrated water vapor and liquid water content in

  19. A Robust Image Watermarking in the Joint Time-Frequency Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Mahmut; Akan, Aydın; Çekiç, Yalçın

    2010-12-01

    With the rapid development of computers and internet applications, copyright protection of multimedia data has become an important problem. Watermarking techniques are proposed as a solution to copyright protection of digital media files. In this paper, a new, robust, and high-capacity watermarking method that is based on spatiofrequency (SF) representation is presented. We use the discrete evolutionary transform (DET) calculated by the Gabor expansion to represent an image in the joint SF domain. The watermark is embedded onto selected coefficients in the joint SF domain. Hence, by combining the advantages of spatial and spectral domain watermarking methods, a robust, invisible, secure, and high-capacity watermarking method is presented. A correlation-based detector is also proposed to detect and extract any possible watermarks on an image. The proposed watermarking method was tested on some commonly used test images under different signal processing attacks like additive noise, Wiener and Median filtering, JPEG compression, rotation, and cropping. Simulation results show that our method is robust against all of the attacks.

  20. Interpretation of borehole geophysical logs, aquifer-isolation tests, and water quality, supply wells 1 and 2, Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base, Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Goode, Daniel J.; Frasch, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    Ground water pumped from supply wells 1 and 2 on the Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base (NAS/JRB) provides water for use at the base, including potable water for drinking. The supply wells have been contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOC?s), particularly trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and the water is treated to remove the VOC?s. The Willow Grove NAS/JRB and surrounding area are underlain by sedimentary rocks of the Triassic-age Stockton Formation, which form a complex, heterogeneous aquifer. The ground-water-flow system for the supply wells was characterized by use of borehole geophysical logs and heatpulse-flowmeter measurements. The heatpulse-flowmeter measurements showed upward and downward borehole flow under nonpumping conditions in both wells. The hydraulic and chemical properties of discrete water-bearing fractures in the supply wells were characterized by isolating each water-bearing fracture with straddle packers. Eight fractures in supply well 1 and five fractures in supply well 2 were selected for testing on the basis of the borehole geophysical logs and borehole television surveys. Water samples were collected from each isolated fracture and analyzed for VOC?s and inorganic constituents. Fractures at 50?59, 79?80, 196, 124?152, 182, 241, 256, and 350?354 ft btoc (feet below top of casing) were isolated in supply well 1. Specific capacities ranged from 0.26 to 5.7 (gal/min)/ft (gallons per minute per foot) of drawdown. The highest specific capacity was for the fracture isolated at 179.8?188 ft btoc. Specific capacity and depth of fracture were not related in either supply well. The highest concentrations of PCE were in water samples collected from fractures isolated at 236.8?245 and 249.8?258 ft btoc, which are hydraulically connected. The concentration of PCE generally increased with depth to a maximum of 39 mg/L (micrograms per liter) at a depth of 249.8? 258 ft btoc and then decreased to 21 mg/L at a

  1. Magnetic Resonance Image Evaluation of Temporomandibular Joint Osteophytes: Influence of Clinical Factors and Artrogenics Changes.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Eduardo; Remedi, Marcelo Pereira; Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2016-03-01

    This research aims to examine the presence of osteophyte in patients with arthrogenic temporomandibular disorders through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); to investigate the influence of sex and clinical symptoms in its prevalence; and the position of the osteophytes in the condyle. The study was based on 100 MRI and on reports of patients, which corresponded to the evaluation of 200 joints. Patients of both sexes were aged from 18 to 82 years (average = 49.48) and were subjected to the aforementioned examination from January 2006 to March 2009. The assessment considered the type of disc displacement, the presence of effusion, bone marrow edema, condyle changes, joint noise and pain. The MRI machine used was the GE Signa HDX (General Electric, Milwaukee, WI), with T1 and T2-weighted, 1.5 T magnetic field, sagittal oblique (mouth closed, mouth open) and coronal (mouth closed) imaging, with spherical surface coil and an asymmetric matrix. All images were interpreted by an experienced radiologist. A total of 28% (n = 56) of the temporomandibular joints showed osteophytes on the anterior surface of the mandible. No relationship was found between sex and osteophytes. The authors found a statistically significant difference between osteophytes and disc displacement without reduction (P < 0.001). The presence of osteophytes suggested a possible cause and effect relationship between osteoarthritis and disc displacement without reduction; the osteophyte was always located in the anterior surface of condyle, regardless of the sex variable; no significant difference was found between osteophytes and the main complaints of the patient.

  2. A joint image encryption and watermarking algorithm based on compressive sensing and chaotic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Cai, Hong-Kun; Zheng, Hong-Ying

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a compressive sensing (CS) and chaotic map-based joint image encryption and watermarking algorithm is proposed. The transform domain coefficients of the original image are scrambled by Arnold map firstly. Then the watermark is adhered to the scrambled data. By compressive sensing, a set of watermarked measurements is obtained as the watermarked cipher image. In this algorithm, watermark embedding and data compression can be performed without knowing the original image; similarly, watermark extraction will not interfere with decryption. Due to the characteristics of CS, this algorithm features compressible cipher image size, flexible watermark capacity, and lossless watermark extraction from the compressed cipher image as well as robustness against packet loss. Simulation results and analyses show that the algorithm achieves good performance in the sense of security, watermark capacity, extraction accuracy, reconstruction, robustness, etc. Project supported by the Open Research Fund of Chongqing Key Laboratory of Emergency Communications, China (Grant No. CQKLEC, 20140504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61173178, 61302161, and 61472464), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 106112013CDJZR180005 and 106112014CDJZR185501).

  3. The orientation imaging microscopy of lead-free Sn-Ag solder joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telang, A. U.; Bieler, T. R.

    2005-06-01

    Orientation imaging microscopy was used to identify solidification microstructures and early stages of damage evolution in tin-silver eutectic solder joints on copper and nickel substrates after aging, creep, and thermomechanical fatigue. A visco-plastic self-consistent plasticity model was able to simulate texture changes when work hardening occurred at higher strain rates, but not with lower rates, where grain boundary sliding dominated the deformation and slip occurred predominantly on one or two slip systems that could be predicted using a Schmid (Sachs) analysis.

  4. Alterations of the Temporomandibular Joint on Magnetic Resonance Imaging according to Growth and Development in Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tatsurou; Konoo, Tetsuro; Habu, Manabu; Oda, Masafumi; Kito, Shinji; Kodama, Masaaki; Kokuryo, Shinya; Wakasugi-Sato, Nao; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Nishida, Ikuko; Morikawa, Kazumasa; Saeki, Katsura; Maki, Kenshi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Terashita, Masamichi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The paper explains the alterations of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the growth and development of schoolchildren. Appearance and disappearance of a “double contour-like structure” (DCLS) of the mandibular condyle on MRI according to the growth and development of schoolchildren were demonstrated. In addition, possible constituents of DCLS and the significance of detection of DCLS on MRI were also speculated. The relationship between red marrow and yellow marrow in the articular eminence of temporal bone, the disappearance of DCLS, and alterations of the mandibular condyle have been elucidated. PMID:23316233

  5. Image feature extraction with various wavelet functions in a photorefractive joint transform correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Cartwright, C. M.; Ding, M. S.; Gillespie, W. A.

    2000-11-01

    The wavelet transform has found a lot of uses in the field of optics. We present an experimental realization of employing variant wavelet filters into the object space of a photorefractive joint transform correlator to realize image feature extraction. The Haar's wavelet, Roberts gradient and Mexican-hat wavelet are employed in the experiment. Because of its good optical properties, the photorefractive crystal Bi 12SiO 20 is used as the dynamic holographic medium in the Fourier plane. Both scene and reference have been detour-phase encoded in a liquid crystal television in the input plane. Computer simulations, experimental results and analysis are presented.

  6. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Chen, Z Y; Jin, W; Huang, D W; Ding, Y H; Li, J C; Zhang, X Q; Lee, S G; Shi, Y J; Zhuang, G

    2014-11-01

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase.

  7. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y. Jin, W.; Huang, D. W.; Ding, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Zhang, X. Q.; Zhuang, G.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-11-15

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase.

  8. In vivo feasibility of real-time MR-US fusion imaging lumbar facet joint injections.

    PubMed

    Sartoris, Riccardo; Orlandi, Davide; Corazza, Angelo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Arcidiacono, Alice; Bernardi, Silvia Perugin; Schiaffino, Simone; Turtulici, Giovanni; Caruso, Pietro; Silvestri, Enzo

    2017-03-01

    Traditionally, facet joint injections (FJI) are performed under fluoroscopic or computed tomography (CT) guidance, mainly due to the deep anatomical location and the presence of bony landmarks. Fusion imaging technology, which couples the ultrasound scan with the corresponding CT or magnetic resonance (MR) image obtained from the diagnostic examination and reformatted in real time according to the ultrasound scanning plane, allows to combine the panoramic view and the elevated anatomical detail of MR or CT with the ease of use of ultrasound without patient exposure to ionizing radiation. Thirty eight patients (24 females; mean age ± SD: 64 ± 9 years) received MR fusion-assisted ultrasound-guided FJI of 1 ml of a mixture of local anaesthetic and corticosteroid using a ultrasound machine (Logiq E9, GE Healthcare) equipped with a GPS-enhanced fusion imaging technology which couples real-time B-mode images with those of the previous recent diagnostic MR examination. Low-dose CT needle positioning confirmation was performed in the first 28 patients. Patients' pain was recorded using a visual analogue scale (VAS), at baseline and at 2, 4 and 8 weeks. All fusion imaging-guided injections were performed successfully. Out of 112, 96 FJI had optimal intra-articular needle positioning (accuracy: 85.7%). Patients VAS significantly decreases after the procedure with no differences among who received CT needle positioning control and who did not receive it. No major complications were observed. Ultrasound needle guidance with MR fusion assistance allows for safe and effective injection of degenerative facet joint disease.

  9. Geophysical imaging of the lacustrine sediments deposited in the La Calderilla Volcanic Caldera (Gran Canaria Island, Spain) for paleoclimate research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himi, Mahjoub; Rodríguez-González, Alejandro; Criado, Constantino; Tapias, Josefina C.; Ravazzi, Cesare; Pérez-Torrado, Francisco; Casas, Albert

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of well-preserved maar structures is important not only for studying the eruptive activity and formation of volcanoes, but also for paleoclimate research, since laminated maar lake sediments may contain very detailed archives of climate and environmental history. Maars are a singular type of volcanic structure generated by explosive phreatomagmatic eruptions as a result of interaction between rising magma and groundwater. This kind of structures are characterised by circular craters, often filled with water and/or lacustrine sediments and surrounded by a ring of pyroclastic deposits.Recently a borehole was drilled at the bottom of La Calderilla volcanic complex which penetrated about 8.7 m in its sedimentary sequence and paleobotanical study has supplied the first evidence of paleoenvironmental evolution during the Holocene on the Gran Canaria Island. This survey, however, did not penetrate into the substrate because the total thickness of the sedimentary fill was unknown. Since the age of formation of La Calderilla volcanic complex based on K/Ar dating is about 85,000 years (Upper Pleistocene), the possibility of its sedimentary fill extends beyond of the Holocene is extremely attractive, since, for example, there are few paleoenvironmental data regarding how much the last glaciation that affected the Canary Islands. In these circumstances, the knowledge of the total thickness of the lacustrine sediments is crucial to design a deeper borehole in the next future. Therefore, the subsurface characterisation provided by geophysics is essential for determining thickness and geometry of the sedimentary filling. Multielectrode ERT method was used to obtain five 2-D resistivity cross-sections into La Calderilla volcanic caldera. An Iris Syscal Pro resistivity system with 48 electrodes connected to a 94 m long cable (2m electrode spacing) in Wenner-Schlumberger configuration for an investigation depth of about 20 m. Data quality (q <2 %).was assessed by

  10. Joint seismic-geodynamic-mineral physical modelling of African geodynamics: A reconciliation of deep-mantle convection with surface geophysical constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Quere, S; Moucha, R; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P; Mitrovica, J X; Rowley, D B

    2008-08-22

    Recent progress in seismic tomography provides the first complete 3-D images of the combined thermal and chemical anomalies that characterise the unique deep mantle structure below the African continent. With these latest tomography results we predict flow patterns under Africa that reveal a large-scale, active hot upwelling, or superplume, below the western margin of Africa under the Cape Verde Islands. The scale and dynamical intensity of this West African superplume (WASP) is comparable to that of the south African superplume (SASP) that has long been assumed to dominate the flow dynamics under Africa. On the basis of this new tomography model, we find the dynamics of the SASP is strongly controlled by chemical contributions to deep mantle buoyancy that significantly compensate its thermal buoyancy. In contrast, the WASP appears to be entirely dominated by thermal buoyancy. New calculations of mantle convection incorporating these two superplumes reveal that the plate-driving forces due to the flow generated by the WASP is as strong as that due to the SASP. We find that the chemical buoyancy of the SASP exerts a strong stabilising control on the pattern and amplitude of shallow mantle flow in the asthenosphere below the southern half of the African plate. The asthenospheric flow predictions provide the first high resolution maps of focussed upwellings that lie below the major centres of Late Cenozoic volcanism, including the Kenya domes and Hoggar massif that lies above a remnant plume head in the upper mantle. Inferences of sublithospheric deformation from seismic anisotropy data are shown to be sensitive to the contributions of chemical buoyancy in the SASP.

  11. Evaluation of the reproducibility in the interpretation of magnetic resonance images of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Butzke, K W; Batista Chaves, K D; Dias da Silveira, H E; Dias da Silveira, H L

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to determine the intra- and interexaminer reproducibility in the interpretation of MRI of the temporomandibular joint among independent observers, with respect to six specific articular characteristics, and to discover which of these had greater and lesser agreement. Methods 30 magnetic resonance examinations of temporomandibular joints of adults were independently interpreted by 9 experienced and trained observers at 2 different times. Observers were divided into three groups according to their specialties: surgeon dentists specialized in temporomandibular dysfunction and orofacial pain, surgeon dentists specialized in radiology and medical doctors specialized in radiology. The reproducibility analysis was carried out using Cohen's kappa coefficient. Results The interexaminer reproducibility ranged from slight to fair. The intraexaminer reproducibility ranged from slight to no agreement. In the interexaminer evaluation, anterior disc displacement without reduction presented greater agreement, whereas change in condylar head shape showed the poorest agreement. In the intraexaminer evaluation, anterior disc displacement without reduction presented slight agreement, whereas, for the other characteristics, no agreement was observed. Conclusion Examiners do not demonstrate reproducibility in the interpretation of MRI of temporomandibular joints. Therefore, more efforts are necessary with respect to understanding the changes that may be detected in these images in terms of diagnosis and appropriate treatment approaches. PMID:20203277

  12. [Proposal for a dynamic study of the temporo-mandibular joint, using a computerized image analyzer].

    PubMed

    Tedde, G; Mazzanti, V; Devilla, L; Chessa, G

    1990-04-01

    With the aim to go deep into the knowledge of the morpho-functional anatomical characteristics of the temporo-mandibular joint in humans, a dynamic method of study by means of a computerized analyzer of images is suggested. The acquired advantages are the following: a) the accuracy of evaluation of the chosen morphometric parameters; b) the working speed, from which results: c) the possibility to increase adequately the number of cases and d) the possibility to easily investigate many parameters with a very high accuracy of the quantitative results. Both right and left temporo-mandibular joints of adult individuals aged from 18 to 53 have been studied utilizing lateral tomographies focused at 3.3 mm to the lateral surface of the condylar head. The evaluations were done both in the position of completely closed mouth and in extreme opening. From the barycentre of the condyle several straight lines were drawn according to the figure 2. The length of the segment a-b (distance of profiles of the condyle and mandibular fossa) were evaluated in all the lines counter-clockwise and the results submitted to a statistical analysis. The results furnish very good information on the normal or pathological anatomical characteristics, of the joint.

  13. [Morphological analysis for kinetic X-ray images of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Bandai, Natsuko; Sanada, Shigeru; Ueki, Kouichiro; Funabasama, Shintaro; Tsuduki, Shinji; Matsui, Takeshi

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a screening technique for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and assist dentists in objectively observing and evaluating pre/post-treatment status. Dynamic images of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) from one healthy volunteer were obtained by digital fluoroscopy in the lateral view on both right and left sides. Outlines of the glenoid fossa and the condyle were extracted, respectively, by using sobel operator (7x7) thresholding and labeling. Morphological parameters in time-sequence, such as fossa ratio, area, and distance of the joint space, were then analyzed. There were no differences between manual and computer analysis in extracting the outline of the glenoid fossa and the condyle. Deformity of the outline of the glenoid fossa and the condyle was not identified in this subject. The fossa ratio was 0.30+/-0.01 on the right and 0.29+/-0.02 on the left. The area and distance of the joint space in the post-glenoid fossa were slightly larger than those in the articular eminence on both sides. These morphological parameters were useful for screening and pre- and post-treatment evaluation of TMD patients.

  14. High-resolution seismic imaging in deep sea from a joint deep-towed/OBH reflection experiment: application to a Mass Transport Complex offshore Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ker, S.; Marsset, B.; Garziglia, S.; Le Gonidec, Y.; Gibert, D.; Voisset, M.; Adamy, J.

    2010-09-01

    We assess the feasibility of high-resolution seismic depth imaging in deep water based on a new geophysical approach involving the joint use of a deep-towed seismic device (SYSIF) and ocean bottom hydrophones (OBHs). Source signature measurement enables signature deconvolution to be used to improve the vertical resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. The source signature was also used to precisely determine direct traveltimes that were inverted to relocate source and receiver positions. The very high accuracy of the positioning that was obtained enabled depth imaging and a stack of the OBH data to be performed. The determination of the P-wave velocity distribution was realized by the adaptation of an iterative focusing approach to the specific acquisition geometry. This innovative experiment combined with advanced processing succeeded in reaching lateral and vertical resolution (2.5 and 1 m) in accordance with the objectives of imaging fine scale structures and correlation with in situ measurements. To illustrate the technological and processing advances of the approach, we present a first application performed during the ERIG3D cruise offshore Nigeria with the seismic data acquired over NG1, a buried Mass Transport Complex (MTC) interpreted as a debris flow by conventional data. Evidence for a slide nature of a part of the MTC was provided by the high resolution of the OBH depth images. Rigid behaviour may be inferred from movement of coherent material inside the MTC and thrust structures at the base of the MTC. Furthermore, a silt layer that was disrupted during emplacement but has maintained its stratigraphic position supports a short transport distance.

  15. Dynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint: an initial assessment with fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition sequence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Dong, Min-jun; Tao, Xiao-feng; Yu, Qiang; Li, Kai-cheng; Yang, Chi

    2015-04-01

    The study was aimed to determine and optimize the parameters for the MR fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequence, which was to obtain an acceptable image to evaluate the value of the movement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this investigation, 20 volunteers were examined to determine and optimize the parameters of the FIESTA sequence. Then, 160 TMJs from 80 patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) of clinical suspicion were consecutively performed by both static MRI and dynamic FIESTA MRI on the oblique sagittal position. The FIESTA MR images of TMJs were obtained from a slow, consecutive, free and open-closed movement. Based on the cycles of TMJ movements during the process of FIESTA MRI (90seconds), we classified all TMJs into 2 groups: cycles of open-closed mouths less than or equal to 3 (group 1) and more than 3 (group 2). Each image was marked level 1-3 by its quality. Meanwhile, the location of articular disc, mandibular condyle, motive artifact, "jumping sign" and the joint effusion in each TMJ were assessed respectively. By dynamic FIESTA MRI among 160 TMJs, 92 TMJs (57.50%) were in group 1, and 68 TMJs were (42.50%) in group 2. There were statistically significant differences between group 1 and group 2(p<0.05). It was shown that the number of "level 3" in group 1 was greater than group 2, and the number of "level 1" in group 1 was less than group 2. The phenomenon of motion artifact and "jumping sign" were much significantly higher in group 2 than those in group 1 (p<0.01). Furthermore, in all of the "jumping sign" cases, the phenomenon of "jumping sign" was significantly higher in group ADDwR than in group ADDw/oR (p<0.01). There was a statistically significant correlation between disc-condyle complex in "jumping sign" phenomenon and group ADDwR (r=0.621, p<0.05). The data with the false matching rate of 31.52% showed that the maximum motion range on the dynamic imaging was greater than the static imaging

  16. Furthering Chemical and Geophysical Computations: Analysis of SACROC SEM and CT images to obtain pore percentage, size, and connectivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mur, A. J.; Purcell, C. C.; Harbert, W. P.; Soong, Y.; Kutchko, B. G.; Kennedy, S.; McIntryre, D.

    2009-12-01

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory of the United States Department of Energy, in collaboration with the Bureau of Economic Geology in Austin, Texas has been involved in an extensive study of the many aspects involved in the injection of CO2 into the 2042 meter deep Permian reef structure at the SACROC field. Subsamples of reef limestone cores used for seismic velocity measurements were obtained. XRD determined the sample to be ~99% Calcite and ~1% Dolomite with a small amount of impurities. Preliminary petrographic slides revealed a vuggy porosity. We acquired CT scans of a SACROC limestone core at the Morgantown NETL site. We also acquired a high pixel resolution (112 MB) SEM secondary electron image of the reef limestone at RJ Lee Group. By using ArcMap , we created a tool that groups grayscale ranges into three categories, cleans boundaries between groups, and produces a polygon map of the macropores, micropores, and matrix. The darkest areas in the SEM image were cavern-like pores and were thus called macropores. Micropores, the brightest regions, are textured micrite faces that create many, small pore spaces. Using ImageJ, the CT and Arc pore maps were analyzed to reveal pore shape statistics. Average pore perimeter, average pore area, and pore connectivity is essential for chemistry experiments that will emulate time exposure of CO2 to limestone. Further, ImageJ allows us to obtain pore orientation information. This is important in understanding the anisotropic conditions that may or may not affect seismic data. The image is 10240x11264 pixels which correspond to ~ 8890.00x9780.00 micrometers. Micro- and macropores combined, there were 613744 pores mapped. Differing statistical methods revealed differing results. For example, the average pore perimeter was ~28 microns while the average pore area was <1 square micron. This inconsistency is due to pores sharing boundaries, being contained by one another, or being lighter colored crystals. We used two

  17. Saposin C Coupled Lipid Nanovesicles Specifically Target Arthritic Mouse Joints for Optical Imaging of Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaoyang; Flick, Matthew J.; Frederick, Malinda; Chu, Zhengtao; Mason, Rachel; DeLay, Monica; Thornton, Sherry

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting approximately 1% of the population and is characterized by cartilage and bone destruction ultimately leading to loss of joint function. Early detection and intervention of disease provides the best hope for successful treatment and preservation of joint mobility and function. Reliable and non-invasive techniques that accurately measure arthritic disease onset and progression are lacking. We recently developed a novel agent, SapC-DOPS, which is composed of the membrane-associated lysosomal protein saposin C (SapC) incorporated into 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (DOPS) lipid nanovesicles. SapC-DOPS has a high fusogenic affinity for phosphatidylserine-enriched microdomains on surfaces of target cell membranes. Incorporation of a far-red fluorophore, CellVue Maroon (CVM), into the nanovesicles allows for in vivo non-invasive visualization of the agent in targeted tissue. Given that phosphatidylserine is present only on the inner leaflet of healthy plasma membranes but is “flipped” to the outer leaflet upon cell damage, we hypothesized that SapC-DOPS would target tissue damage associated with inflammatory arthritis due to local surface-exposure of phosphatidylserine. Optical imaging with SapC-DOPS-CVM in two distinct models of arthritis, serum-transfer arthritis (e.g., K/BxN) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) revealed robust SapC-DOPS-CVM specific localization to arthritic paws and joints in live animals. Importantly, intensity of localized fluorescent signal correlated with macroscopic arthritic disease severity and increased with disease progression. Flow cytometry of cells extracted from arthritic joints demonstrated that SapC-DOPS-CVM localized to an average of 7–8% of total joint cells and primarily to CD11b+Gr-1+ cells. Results from the current studies strongly support the application of SapC-DOPS-CVM for advanced clinical and research applications including: detecting early

  18. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-02-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed.

  19. The role of imaging in the evaluation of joint involvement in 102 consecutive patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Marta; Tani, Chiara; Carli, Linda; Vagnani, Sabrina; Possemato, Niccolò; Delle Sedie, Andrea; Cagnoni, Massimo; D'Aniello, Dario; Riente, Lucrezia; Caramella, Davide; Bombardieri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of joint involvement in consecutive patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by means of clinical assessment, joint US and MRI and to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of physician evaluation of joint involvement. At enrollment, patients underwent a complete physical examination including a 44-joint count, and hand deformities were scored. On the day of enrollment, each patient underwent a non-dominant hand-wrist ultrasound (US) examination and a non-dominant hand-wrist MRI study without contrast injection. One hundred and two patients (F 95, M 7) were enrolled. By physician examination hand or wrist involvement was diagnosed in 23.5%. At least one pathological finding was revealed by US examination at wrist and/or hand joints in 55%. We found a low sensitivity (46.5%) with high specificity (93.2%) of the physician assessment for the evaluation of joint involvement. The MRI imaging showed at least one erosion in 47.3% patients at the hand and in 98.9% at the wrist; in healthy subjects erosions were found in 19.6% and 97.8% at the hand and wrist, respectively. In conclusion, (i) physicians tend to underestimate the severity of joint involvement in SLE; (ii) US assessment shows a high prevalence of joint and tendon involvement; and (iii) the MRI evaluation shows a high prevalence of damage, suggesting that joint involvement in SLE could be more severe than expected. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Computer-aided three dimensional assessment of knee-joint cartilage with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Muensterer, O J; Eckstein, F; Hahn, D; Putz, R

    1996-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: An MRI-based technique for non-invasive assessment of the quantitative distribution of articular cartilage in the knee-joint was to be developed, and its accuracy and reproducibility tested. DESIGN: Three cadaveric specimens and one patient were studied and MRI measurements compared with anatomical sections or arthroscopy. BACKGROUND: Data on articular cartilage thickness is needed for the design of computer models, determination of cartilage material properties from arthroscopy and staging of osteoarthrosis. METHODS: The knees were imaged using strongly T2-weighted spin-echo and FISP-3D sequences. After digital subtraction and automatic segmentation, three-dimensional reconstruction of the cartilages was performed. Surface areas, volumes and the mean cartilage thickness were calculated, and the regional distribution displayed after trigonometric correction. RESULTS: The difference between MRI volumes and those obtained from the sections ranged from 4 to 21% with a reproducibility of +/-4 to +/-12% after repositioning. The thickness maps obtained with MRI were very similar to those from the sections. In the patient, a full-thickness defect demonstrated with MRI was verified by arthroscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Using the technique presented, the quantitative distribution of knee-joint cartilage may be analysed non-invasively, accurately, and in a very time-effective manner, in cadavers and in living subjects. RELEVANCE: To date there exists no accepted method for the accurate, fast and non-invasive assessment of articular cartilage thickness. Such a technique is, however, very helpful for generating computer models of diarthrodial joints, determination of cartilage material properties during arthroscopy, staging of joint disease, and objective control of chondroprotective treatment.

  1. Dictionary learning method for joint sparse representation-based image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiheng; Fu, Yuli; Li, Haifeng; Zou, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Recently, sparse representation (SR) and joint sparse representation (JSR) have attracted a lot of interest in image fusion. The SR models signals by sparse linear combinations of prototype signal atoms that make a dictionary. The JSR indicates that different signals from the various sensors of the same scene form an ensemble. These signals have a common sparse component and each individual signal owns an innovation sparse component. The JSR offers lower computational complexity compared with SR. First, for JSR-based image fusion, we give a new fusion rule. Then, motivated by the method of optimal directions (MOD), for JSR, we propose a novel dictionary learning method (MODJSR) whose dictionary updating procedure is derived by employing the JSR structure one time with singular value decomposition (SVD). MODJSR has lower complexity than the K-SVD algorithm which is often used in previous JSR-based fusion algorithms. To capture the image details more efficiently, we proposed the generalized JSR in which the signals ensemble depends on two dictionaries. MODJSR is extended to MODGJSR in this case. MODJSR/MODGJSR can simultaneously carry out dictionary learning, denoising, and fusion of noisy source images. Some experiments are given to demonstrate the validity of the MODJSR/MODGJSR for image fusion.

  2. Nonrigid Registration of Brain Tumor Resection MR Images Based on Joint Saliency Map and Keypoint Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhijun; Qin, Binjie

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel global-to-local nonrigid brain MR image registration to compensate for the brain shift and the unmatchable outliers caused by the tumor resection. The mutual information between the corresponding salient structures, which are enhanced by the joint saliency map (JSM), is maximized to achieve a global rigid registration of the two images. Being detected and clustered at the paired contiguous matching areas in the globally registered images, the paired pools of DoG keypoints in combination with the JSM provide a useful cluster-to-cluster correspondence to guide the local control-point correspondence detection and the outlier keypoint rejection. Lastly, a quasi-inverse consistent deformation is smoothly approximated to locally register brain images through the mapping the clustered control points by compact support radial basis functions. The 2D implementation of the method can model the brain shift in brain tumor resection MR images, though the theory holds for the 3D case. PMID:22303173

  3. Joint detection and segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT images by sparse representation error minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korez, Robert; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    Automated detection and segmentation of vertebral bodies from spinal computed tomography (CT) images is usually a prerequisite step for numerous spine-related medical applications, such as diagnosis, surgical planning and follow-up assessment of spinal pathologies. However, automated detection and segmentation are challenging tasks due to a relatively high degree of anatomical complexity, presence of unclear boundaries and articulation of vertebrae with each other. In this paper, we describe a sparse representation error minimization (SEM) framework for joint detection and segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT images. By minimizing the sparse representation error of sampled intensity values, we are able to recover the oriented bounding box (OBB) and segmentation binary mask for each vertebral body in the CT image. The performance of the proposed SEM framework was evaluated on five CT images of the thoracolumbar spine. The resulting Euclidean distance of 1:75+/-1:02 mm, computed between the center points of recovered and corresponding reference OBBs, and Dice coefficient of 92:3+/-2:7%, computed between the resulting and corresponding reference segmentation binary masks, indicate that the proposed framework can successfully detect and segment vertebral bodies in CT images of the thoracolumbar spine.

  4. Joint denoising and distortion correction of atomic scale scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Wirth, Benedikt

    2017-09-01

    Nowadays, modern electron microscopes deliver images at atomic scale. The precise atomic structure encodes information about material properties. Thus, an important ingredient in the image analysis is to locate the centers of the atoms shown in micrographs as precisely as possible. Here, we consider scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), which acquires data in a rastering pattern, pixel by pixel. Due to this rastering combined with the magnification to atomic scale, movements of the specimen even at the nanometer scale lead to random image distortions that make precise atom localization difficult. Given a series of STEM images, we derive a Bayesian method that jointly estimates the distortion in each image and reconstructs the underlying atomic grid of the material by fitting the atom bumps with suitable bump functions. The resulting highly non-convex minimization problems are solved numerically with a trust region approach. Existence of minimizers and the model behavior for faster and faster rastering are investigated using variational techniques. The performance of the method is finally evaluated on both synthetic and real experimental data.

  5. Improvement of image deblurring for opto-electronic joint transform correlator under projective motion vector estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiao; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Yang

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we propose an efficient algorithm to improve the performance of image deblurring based on opto-electronic joint transform correlator (JTC) that is capable of detecting the motion vector of a space camera. Firstly, the motion vector obtained from JTC is divided into many sub-motion vectors according to the projective motion path, which represents the degraded image as an integration of the clear scene under a sequence of planar projective transforms. Secondly, these sub-motion vectors are incorporated into the projective motion Richardson-Lucy (RL) algorithm to improve deblurred results. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm and the influence of noise on the algorithm performance is also statically analyzed.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in the shoulder and wrist joints of asymptomatic elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Fredericson, Michael; Ho, Charles; Waite, Brandee; Jennings, Fabio; Peterson, Jeffrey; Williams, Christina; Mathesonn, Gordon O

    2009-02-01

    To characterize abnormalities on magnetic resonance images (MRI) in the shoulder and wrist joints of asymptomatic elite athletes to better define the range of "normal" findings in this population. Cohort study. Academic medical center. Division IA collegiate volleyball players (n=12), swimmers (n=6), and gymnasts (n=15) with no history of injury or pain and normal physical examination results. None. Grade of severity of MRI changes of the shoulder and wrist joints. A 3- to 4-year follow-up questionnaire was administered to determine the clinical significance of the asymptomatic findings. All athletes demonstrated at least mild imaging abnormalities in the joints evaluated. Shoulder: Volleyball players had moderate and severe changes primarily in the labrum (50% moderate, 8% severe), rotator cuff (25% moderate, 17% severe), bony structures (33% moderate), and tendon/muscle (25% moderate, 8% severe). Swimmers had moderate changes primarily in the labrum (83% moderate) and ligament (67% moderate). Wrist: All gymnasts had changes in the wrist ligaments (40% mild, 60% moderate), tendons (53% mild, 47% moderate), and cartilage (60% mild, 33% moderate, 7% severe). Most gymnasts exhibited bony changes (20% normal, 47% mild, 26% moderate, 7% severe), the presence of cysts/fluid collections (80%), and carpal tunnel changes (53%). Swimmers had no wrist abnormalities. At follow-up interview, only 1 swimmer and 1 volleyball player reported shoulder problems during the study. Additionally, only 1 gymnast reported a wrist injury during their career. Asymptomatic elite athletes demonstrate MRI changes of the shoulder (swimmers and volleyball players) and wrist (gymnasts) similar to those associated with abnormalities for which medical treatment and sometimes surgery are advised. Given the somewhat high frequency of these asymptomatic findings, care must be taken to correlate clinical history and physical examination with MRI findings in these patients with symptoms.

  7. Body Parts Dependent Joint Regressors for Human Pose Estimation in Still Images.

    PubMed

    Dantone, Matthias; Gall, Juergen; Leistner, Christian; Van Gool, Luc

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we address the problem of estimating 2d human pose from still images. Articulated body pose estimation is challenging due to the large variation in body poses and appearances of the different body parts. Recent methods that rely on the pictorial structure framework have shown to be very successful in solving this task. They model the body part appearances using discriminatively trained, independent part templates and the spatial relations of the body parts using a tree model. Within such a framework, we address the problem of obtaining better part templates which are able to handle a very high variation in appearance. To this end, we introduce parts dependent body joint regressors which are random forests that operate over two layers. While the first layer acts as an independent body part classifier, the second layer takes the estimated class distributions of the first one into account and is thereby able to predict joint locations by modeling the interdependence and co-occurrence of the parts. This helps to overcome typical ambiguities of tree structures, such as self-similarities of legs and arms. In addition, we introduce a novel data set termed FashionPose that contains over 7,000 images with a challenging variation of body part appearances due to a large variation of dressing styles. In the experiments, we demonstrate that the proposed parts dependent joint regressors outperform independent classifiers or regressors. The method also performs better or similar to the state-of-the-art in terms of accuracy, while running with a couple of frames per second.

  8. Imaging the magmatic system of Newberry Volcano using Joint active source and teleseismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Benjamin A.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Bezada, Maximiliano J.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we combine active and passive source P wave seismic data to tomographically image the magmatic system beneath Newberry Volcano, located east of the Cascade arc. By using both travel times from local active sources and delay times from teleseismic earthquakes recorded on closely spaced seismometers (300-800 m), we significantly improve recovery of upper crustal velocity structure (<10 km depth). The tomographic model reveals a low-velocity feature between 3 and 5 km depth that lies beneath the caldera, consistent with a magma body. In contrast to earlier tomographic studies, where elevated temperatures were sufficient to explain the recovered low velocities, the larger amplitude low-velocity anomalies in our joint tomography model require low degrees of partial melt (˜10%), and a minimum melt volume of ˜2.5 km3. Furthermore, synthetic tests suggest that even greater magnitude low-velocity anomalies, and by inference larger volumes of magma (up to 8 km3), are needed to explain the observed waveform variability. The lateral extent and shape of the inferred magma body indicates that the extensional tectonic regime at Newberry influences the emplacement of magmatic intrusions. Our study shows that jointly inverting active source and passive source seismic data improves tomographic imaging of the shallow crustal seismic structure of volcanic systems and that active source experiments would benefit from longer deployment times to also record teleseismic sources.

  9. In-vitro and in-vivo imaging of MMP activity in cartilage and joint injury.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Tomoaki; Tenborg, Elizabeth; Yik, Jasper H N; Haudenschild, Dominik R

    2015-05-08

    Non-destructive detection of cartilage-degrading activities represents an advance in osteoarthritis (OA) research, with implications in studies of OA pathogenesis, progression, and intervention strategies. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are principal cartilage degrading enzymes that contribute to OA pathogenesis. MMPSense750 is an in-vivo fluorimetric imaging probe with the potential to continuously and non-invasively trace real-time MMP activities, but its use in OA-related research has not been reported. Our objective is to detect and characterize the early degradation activities shortly after cartilage or joint injury with MMPSense750. We determined the appropriate concentration, assay time, and linear range using various concentrations of recombinant MMPs as standards. We then quantified MMP activity from cartilage explants subjected to either mechanical injury or inflammatory cytokine treatment in-vitro. Finally, we performed in-vivo MMP imaging of a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. Our in-vitro results showed that the optimal assay time was highly dependent on the MMP enzyme. In cartilage explant culture media, mechanical impact or cytokine treatment increased MMP activity. Injured knees of mice showed significantly higher fluorescent signal than uninjured knees. We conclude that MMPSense750 detects human MMP activities and can be used for in-vitro study with cartilage, as well as in-vivo studies of knee injury, and can offering real-time insight into the degradative processes that occurring within the joint before structural changes become evident radiographically.

  10. Focused shape models for hip joint segmentation in 3D magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Shekhar S; Xia, Ying; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart; Schwarz, Raphael; Fripp, Jurgen

    2014-04-01

    Deformable models incorporating shape priors have proved to be a successful approach in segmenting anatomical regions and specific structures in medical images. This paper introduces weighted shape priors for deformable models in the context of 3D magnetic resonance (MR) image segmentation of the bony elements of the human hip joint. The fully automated approach allows the focusing of the shape model energy to a priori selected anatomical structures or regions of clinical interest by preferentially ordering the shape representation (or eigen-modes) within this type of model to the highly weighted areas. This focused shape model improves accuracy of the shape constraints in those regions compared to standard approaches. The proposed method achieved femoral head and acetabular bone segmentation mean absolute surface distance errors of 0.55±0.18mm and 0.75±0.20mm respectively in 35 3D unilateral MR datasets from 25 subjects acquired at 3T with different limited field of views for individual bony components of the hip joint.

  11. High-resolution geophysical imaging of shallow-water, contaminated wetlands: A novel application to Kearny freshwater marsh, New Jersey Meadowlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansoor, Nasser M.

    The study investigated the transfer of state-of-the-art, geophysical technologies to permit effective characterization and monitoring of shallow-water wetlands. The innovative application was implemented in Kearney Marsh, NJ Meadowlands through three phases. Phase I (chapter 2) included laboratory-scale, induced polarization (IP) measurements conducted on marsh soils that were subsequently analyzed for heavy metal and physical properties. Phase II (chapter 3) included reconnaissance geophysical survey using terrain conductivity, magnetic gradiometry and surface water chemistry data from a shallow-draft paddleboat. Phase III (chapter 4) included continuous marine, electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) supported with rainfall and surface water data. Phase I revealed a linear relationship between the normalized chargeability and the estimated surface area to pore volume when the iron content is accounted for as a polarizable element of the soil. As the Fe concentration of soils is a critical biogeochemical parameter, IP measurements may provide a hitherto unrecognized approach to probing soil geochemistry, iron cycling and anaerobic microbial activity. The inverted sediment conductivity obtained from phase II resolved a contamination pattern probably attributable to leachate from adjacent landfills and/or salt water ingress from a partial tidal connection that is not obvious in the surface water data. Magnetic gradiometry and the in-phase component of the EM31 response both primarily reflect the distribution of junk metal associated with a legacy of illegal dumping. Historic aerial photographs suggest that this distribution reflects land-use history, defining the maximum previous extent of an adjacent landfill and a pattern of dumping correlated with historic roadways. The continuous ERI conducted during phase III is found to be an effective method for determining the resistivity structure of wetland sediments due to the shallow surface water layer. Temperature

  12. An integrated geological/geophysical study of Upper Pennsylvanian strata in northeast Kansas: Uses of ground-penetrating radar for stratigraphic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Alexander

    The goals of this dissertation were to: (1) evaluate the utility of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) for high-resolution imaging of near-surface sandstone and carbonate reservoir analogs; (2) develop GPR data collection, processing, and interpretation methodologies for stratigraphic studies; (3) improve understanding of interrelationships between petrophysical properties and GPR response; and (4) develop methodologies for improved integration of GPR data with stratigraphic and petrophysical data. Near-surface sandstone and limestone deposits of the Upper Pennsylvanian Douglas, Lansing and Kansas City groups in eastern Kansas were the focus for developing collection techniques and improving the utility of GPR methods for stratigraphic studies. Common-offset and common-midpoint GPR data with center-frequencies of 110, 225, 450, and 500 MHz were collected at the study sites. Dielectric constant measurements, petrophysical measurements (e.g., porosity and hydraulic permeability), lithological analysis (X-ray diffraction and petrographic), dielectric constant modeling, finite-difference time-domain waveform modeling, geophysical wireline conductivity and gamma-ray logs, and outcrop photomosaics were used to enhance GPR interpretation. Dielectric constant and hydraulic permeability values are functions of porosity and lithology. Lithologic and dielectric complexity, and petrophysical heterogeneity show a progressive increase from fluvial sandstones, to estuarine sandstones, to massively-bedded carbonates, to argillaceous carbonates. Fluvial sandstones exhibit a bimodal lithologic and dielectric character, with quartz and mica amounts being the main controls. Estuarine sandstones exhibit greater lithologic and dielectric heterogeneity, with quartz, shale, and mica amounts as the main controls. Argillaceous limestones exhibit the greatest lithologic and dielectric heterogeneity, with calcite, shale, and quartz amounts being the main controls. The dielectric constant values

  13. Imaging and Analysis of Void-defects in Solder Joints Formed in Reduced Gravity using High-Resolution Computed Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, John W.; Struk, Peter M.; Rotella, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    As a part of efforts to develop an electronics repair capability for long duration space missions, techniques and materials for soldering components on a circuit board in reduced gravity must be developed. This paper presents results from testing solder joint formation in low gravity on a NASA Reduced Gravity Research Aircraft. The results presented include joints formed using eutectic tin-lead solder and one of the following fluxes: (1) a no-clean flux core, (2) a rosin flux core, and (3) a solid solder wire with external liquid no-clean flux. The solder joints are analyzed with a computed tomography (CT) technique which imaged the interior of the entire solder joint. This replaced an earlier technique that required the solder joint to be destructively ground down revealing a single plane which was subsequently analyzed. The CT analysis technique is described and results presented with implications for future testing as well as implications for the overall electronics repair effort discussed.

  14. A novel dual gating approach using joint inertial sensors: implications for cardiac PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Jafari Tadi, Mojtaba; Teuho, Jarmo; Lehtonen, Eero Lennart; Saraste, Antti; Pänkäälä, Mikko; Koivisto, Tero; Teras, Mika

    2017-09-07

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive imaging technique which may be considered as the state of art for the examination of cardiac inflammation due to atherosclerosis. A fundamental limitation of PET is that cardiac and respiratory motions reduce the quality of the achieved images. Current approaches for motion compensation involve gating the PET data based on the timing of quiescent periods of cardiac and respiratory cycles. In this study, we present a novel gating method called microelectromechanical (MEMS) dual gating which relies on joint non-electrical sensors, i.e. tri-axial accelerometer and gyroscope. This approach can be used for optimized selection of quiescent phases of cardiac and respiratory cycles. Cardiomechanical activity according to echocardiography observations was investigated to confirm whether this dual sensor solution can provide accurate trigger timings for cardiac gating. Additionally, longitudinal chest motions originating from breathing were measured by accelerometric- and gyroscopic-derived respiratory (ADR and GDR) tracking. The ADR and GDR signals were evaluated against Varian Real-time position management (RPM) signals in terms of amplitude and phase. Accordingly, high linear correlation and agreement were achieved between the reference electrocardiography (ECG), RPM, and measured MEMS signals. We also performed a Ge-68 phantom study to evaluate possible metal artifacts caused by the integrated read-out electronics including mechanical sensors and semiconductors. The reconstructed phantom images did not reveal any image artifacts. Thus, it was concluded that MEMS-driven dual gating can be used in PET studies without an effect on the quantitative or visual accuracy of the PET images. Finally, the applicability of MEMS dual gating for cardiac PET imaging was investigated with two atherosclerosis patients. Dual gated PET images were successfully reconstructed using only MEMS signals and both qualitative and quantitative

  15. Detailed Geophysical Imaging in San Pablo Bay Reveals a New Strand of the Hayward-Rodgers Creek Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, J. T.; Ponce, D. A.; Hart, P. E.; Denton, K. M.; Parsons, T.; Graymer, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution chirp seismic-reflection and marine magnetic data collected in San Pablo Bay reveal a new strand of the Hayward fault that helps constrain the geometry and connectivity of the Hayward-Rodgers Creek fault zone, one of the most hazardous faults in California. Over 1,200 km of marine magnetic data were collected in San Pablo Bay along NE-trending traverses spaced 200-m apart, and approximately 200 km of chirp data were collected along similarly oriented profiles spaced 1-km apart. Data were acquired using a 0.7-12 kHz sweep with a 20 ms length fired at 6 times per second. Due to attenuation of the acoustic signal by bay muds and persistent natural gas layers in San Pablo Bay, chirp data are only able to image the upper 2 to 5 meters of the sub-seafloor. Offset and warping of near-surface reflections delineates a previously unrecognized NW-trending strand of the Hayward fault that extends across San Pablo Bay, from Point Pinole to Lower Tubbs Island. Vertical offset along the fault varies in both direction and magnitude, with some indication of increasing offset with depth. The fault imaged in the chirp data corresponds to gravity, magnetic, and tomographic gradients in the bay. Relocated seismicity is aligned with the surface trace of the fault and repeating earthquakes along this trend suggest this strand of the Hayward fault is creeping. A northwestward onshore projection of this fault is coincident with gravity and topographic gradients that align with a SSE-trending splay of the Rodgers Creek Fault, suggesting the Hayward and Rodgers Creek faults may connect directly rather than through a wide step-over zone. Even if the faults do not directly connect, these new data indicate that the faults are much closer together (2 km vs 4 km) than previously thought, making a through-going rupture more plausible.

  16. Geophysical Structure Along and off Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokat, W.; Ritzmann, O.; Schmidt-Aursch, M.; Schmidt, T.

    2001-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge located in the Eurasian Basin documents the opening history between the Lomonosov Ridge and its conjugate margins off the Barents and Siberian shelves. Extensive aerogeophysical surveys provided a widely accepted spreading history for this ridge. The interpretation of these data indicates that Gakkel Ridge is a super slow spreading ridge with spreading velocities well below 1.0 cm/yr full rate. The complete lack of marine geophysical and petrological data along this ridge prevented any detailed understanding of the processes along this feature. In August/September 2001, the joint US-German AMORE expedition with the two research icebreakers Healy and Polarstern enabled for the first time to gather critical geophysical information on the crustal structure along and off Gakkel Ridge. From the ships gravity, magnetic, seismic reflection and bathymetric data were acquired. Temporarily, geophysical instruments were deployed on ice floes to monitor local and teleseismic events as well as wide-angle information along the seismic profiles. The seismological array consisting out of 3-4 instruments was supplemented by up to 2 magnetotelluric stations to determine the electrical conductivity of the crust/mantle. Detailed helicopter magnetic data were acquired across specific geological features along the ridge to better understand their tectonic significance. A 500 km long seismic reflection transect across the Nansen Basin from Northern Svalbard to Gakkel Ridge provide a first view on this unexplored basin. Sediment thickness up to 3 km and a rough topography of the oceanic basement are clearly imaged with the data. In addition, seismic refraction data were acquired to map the crustal thickness beneath the rift valley during most of the transits between petrological stations. For this seismic recording instruments were placed on ice floes and airguns were used from the ships while they jointly operated during the transit. In total 15 refraction lines with one

  17. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  18. MRI alone versus MRI-CBCT registered images to evaluate temporomandibular joint internal derangement.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed A Q; Alsufyani, Noura A; Lagravere, Manuel; Nebbe, Brian; Lai, Hollis; Jaremko, Jacob L; Major, Paul W

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of magnetic resonance imaging-cone beam computed tomography (MRI-CBCT) image registration on inter- and intraexaminer consistency when evaluating temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement compared to MRI alone. MRI and CBCT images of 25 patients (50 TMJs) were obtained and coregistered using mutual-information rigid image registration via Mirada XD software. Two experienced radiologists independently and blindly evaluated two types of images (MRI alone and MRI-CBCT registered images) at two different times (T1 and T2) for TMJ internal derangement, based on sagittal and coronal articular disc position in relation to the head of the condyle and the posterior slope of the articular eminence. The intraexaminer consistency with MRI alone (examiner 1 = 0.85 [0.74-0.92]; examiner 2 = 0.91 [0.84-0.95]) was lower than for the MRI-CBCT registered images (examiner 1 = 0.95 [0.91-0.97]; examiner 2 = 0.97 [0.96-0.99]). The interexaminer consistency of evaluating internal derangement with MRI alone (0.52 [0.18-0.73] at T1; 0.71 [0.45-0.84] at T2) was lower than for the MRI-CBCT registered images (0.97 [0.95-0.98] at T1; 0.98 [0.96-0.99] at T2). When disc position classification was dichotomized to normal versus anteriorly displaced, intraexaminer agreement for the two examiners was 0.52 and 0.63 for MRI alone, but was 0.91 and 0.92 for MRI-CBCT registered images. Interexaminer agreement for MRI alone was 0.29 at T1 and 0.42 at T2, but was 0.96 at both examination times for MRI-CBCT registered images. The MRI-CBCT registered images improved intra- and interexaminer consistency in the evaluation of internal derangement of TMJ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pilot Study to Show the Feasibility of High-Resolution Sagittal Ultrasound Imaging of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Katzberg, Richard W; Conway, William F; Ackerman, Susan J; Gonzales, Theresa S; Kheyfits, Valeriy; Cronan, Michael S

    2017-06-01

    To show the feasibility of acquiring high-resolution sagittal ultrasound (US) images of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We used commercially available US probes to assess the TMJ via a transoral soft tissue window to acquire sagittal images. Magnetic resonance imaging and clinical correlation were compared with the US findings by the consensus assessment of 2 of the senior investigators. The sample was composed of 10 TMJs (6 participants) with an age range of 34 to 71 years and a male-female ratio of 3:1. The condyle and subcondylar surface were visible in 10 of 10 joints (100%), the disc in 7 of 10 joints (70%), and the pterygoid muscles in 6 of 10 joints (60%). In the 5 joints with magnetic resonance correlation, disc position and configuration were confirmed in all cases. We show the first sagittal transoral sonograms of the TMJ disc and associated joint components. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Validation of radiocarpal joint contact models based on images from a clinical MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joshua E; McIff, Terence E; Lee, Phil; Toby, E Bruce; Fischer, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based radiocarpal surface contact models of functional loading in a clinical MRI scanner for future in vivo studies, by comparison with experimental measures from three cadaver forearm specimens. Experimental data were acquired using a Tekscan sensor during simulated light grasp. Magnetic resonance (MR) images were used to obtain model geometry and kinematics (image registration). Peak contact pressures (PPs) and average contact pressures (APs), contact forces and contact areas were determined in the radiolunate and radioscaphoid joints. Contact area was also measured directly from MR images acquired with load and compared with model data. Based on the validation criteria (within 25% of experimental data), out of the six articulations (three specimens with two articulations each), two met the criterion for AP (0%, 14%); one for peak pressure (20%); one for contact force (5%); four for contact area with respect to experiment (8%, 13%, 19% and 23%), and three contact areas met the criterion with respect to direct measurements (14%, 21% and 21%). Absolute differences between model and experimental PPs were reasonably low (within 2.5 MPa). Overall, the results indicate that MRI-based models generated from 3T clinical MR scanner appear sufficient to obtain clinically relevant data.

  1. Implementation of digital stereo imaging for analysis of metaphyses and joints in skeletal collections.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, K J; Juang, R J; Marzke, M W

    1993-03-01

    The surface structure of the growing portion of bones, called the metaphysis, contains clues about the locomotor characteristics of various species. Present methods of capturing this anthropologically interesting surface are time-consuming and subject to human error. The research implements a digital stereo imaging technique for bone metaphyses and joints in skeletal collections. The corresponding points in two images collected from different angles are determined using an area-based correlation matching method. The depths of matched points are computed from the difference in location of the points in the two images. The paper presents a practical implementation of computer vision for anthropology using an 80286-based personal computer, a camera and a video digitiser. The stereo matching algorithm, a practical implementation of classical stereo imaging methods, takes less than 1 min and produces reasonable representations of mammal bones. The accuracy of the depth measurements ranged from 0.7 to 12 per cent for 45-150 cm object-camera distances. False matches occurred in approximately 6 per cent of the total matched points.

  2. Image intensity normalisation by maximising the Siddon line integral in the joint intensity distribution space.

    PubMed

    Kalemis, A; Binnie, D M; Flower, M A; Ott, R J

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a novel data-driven method for image intensity normalisation, which is a prerequisite step for any kind of image comparison. The method involves a novel application of the Siddon algorithm that was developed initially for fast reconstruction of tomographic images and is based on a linear normalisation model with either one or two parameters. The latter are estimated by maximising the line integral, computed using the Siddon algorithm, in the 2D joint intensity distribution space of image pairs. The proposed normalisation method, referred to as Siddon Line Integral Maximisation (SLIM), was compared with three other methodologies, namely background ratio (BAR) scaling, linear fitting and proportional scaling, using a large number of synthesised datasets. SLIM was also compared with BAR normalisation when applied to phantom data and two clinical examples. The new method was found to be more accurate and less biased than its counterparts for the range of characteristics selected for the synthesised data. These findings were in agreement with the results from the analysis of the experimental and clinical data.

  3. Joint imaging and change detection for robust exploitation in interrupted SAR environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, Joshua N.

    2013-05-01

    Modern radar systems equipped with agile-beam technology support multiple modes of operation, including, for example, tracking, automated target recognition (ATR), and synthetic aperture radar imaging (SAR). In a multimode operating environment, the services compete for radar resources and leave gaps in the coherent collection aperture devoted to SAR imaging. Such gapped collections, referred to as interrupted SAR, typically result in significant image distortion and can substantially degrade subsequent exploitation tasks, such as change detection. In this work we present a new form of exploitation that jointly performs imaging and coherent change detection in interrupted environments. We adopt a Bayesian approach that inherently accommodates different interrupt patterns and compensates for missing data via exploitation of 1) a partially coherent model for reference-pass to mission-pass pixel transitions, and 2) the a priori notion that changes between passes are generally sparse and spatially clustered. We employ approximate message passing for computationally efficient Bayesian inference and demonstrate performance on measured and synthetic SAR data. The results demonstrate near optimal (ungapped) performance with pulse loss rates up to ˜ 50% and highlight orders of magnitude reduction in false alarm rates compared to traditional methods.

  4. Analysis of 2-d ultrasound cardiac strain imaging using joint probability density functions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound frame rates play a key role for accurate cardiac deformation tracking. Insufficient frame rates lead to an increase in signal de-correlation artifacts resulting in erroneous displacement and strain estimation. Joint probability density distributions generated from estimated axial strain and its associated signal-to-noise ratio provide a useful approach to assess the minimum frame rate requirements. Previous reports have demonstrated that bi-modal distributions in the joint probability density indicate inaccurate strain estimation over a cardiac cycle. In this study, we utilize similar analysis to evaluate a 2-D multi-level displacement tracking and strain estimation algorithm for cardiac strain imaging. The effect of different frame rates, final kernel dimensions and a comparison of radio frequency and envelope based processing are evaluated using echo signals derived from a 3-D finite element cardiac model and five healthy volunteers. Cardiac simulation model analysis demonstrates that the minimum frame rates required to obtain accurate joint probability distributions for the signal-to-noise ratio and strain, for a final kernel dimension of 1 λ by 3 A-lines, was around 42 Hz for radio frequency signals. On the other hand, even a frame rate of 250 Hz with envelope signals did not replicate the ideal joint probability distribution. For the volunteer study, clinical data was acquired only at a 34 Hz frame rate, which appears to be sufficient for radio frequency analysis. We also show that an increase in the final kernel dimensions significantly affect the strain probability distribution and joint probability density function generated, with a smaller effect on the variation in the accumulated mean strain estimated over a cardiac cycle. Our results demonstrate that radio frequency frame rates currently achievable on clinical cardiac ultrasound systems are sufficient for accurate analysis of the strain probability distribution, when a multi-level 2-D

  5. Rigid model-based 3D segmentation of the bones of joints in MR and CT images for motion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiamin; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Saha, Punam K.; Odhner, Dewey; Hirsch, Bruce E.; Siegler, Sorin; Simon, Scott; Winkelstein, Beth A.

    2008-01-01

    There are several medical application areas that require the segmentation and separation of the component bones of joints in a sequence of images of the joint acquired under various loading conditions, our own target area being joint motion analysis. This is a challenging problem due to the proximity of bones at the joint, partial volume effects, and other imaging modality-specific factors that confound boundary contrast. In this article, a two-step model-based segmentation strategy is proposed that utilizes the unique context of the current application wherein the shape of each individual bone is preserved in all scans of a particular joint while the spatial arrangement of the bones alters significantly among bones and scans. In the first step, a rigid deterministic model of the bone is generated from a segmentation of the bone in the image corresponding to one position of the joint by using the live wire method. Subsequently, in other images of the same joint, this model is used to search for the same bone by minimizing an energy function that utilizes both boundary- and region-based information. An evaluation of the method by utilizing a total of 60 data sets on MR and CT images of the ankle complex and cervical spine indicates that the segmentations agree very closely with the live wire segmentations, yielding true positive and false positive volume fractions in the range 89%–97% and 0.2%–0.7%. The method requires 1–2 minutes of operator time and 6–7 min of computer time per data set, which makes it significantly more efficient than live wire—the method currently available for the task that can be used routinely. PMID:18777924

  6. Rigid model-based 3D segmentation of the bones of joints in MR and CT images for motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiamin; Udupa, Jayaram K; Saha, Punam K; Odhner, Dewey; Hirsch, Bruce E; Siegler, Sorin; Simon, Scott; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2008-08-01

    There are several medical application areas that require the segmentation and separation of the component bones of joints in a sequence of images of the joint acquired under various loading conditions, our own target area being joint motion analysis. This is a challenging problem due to the proximity of bones at the joint, partial volume effects, and other imaging modality-specific factors that confound boundary contrast. In this article, a two-step model-based segmentation strategy is proposed that utilizes the unique context of the current application wherein the shape of each individual bone is preserved in all scans of a particular joint while the spatial arrangement of the bones alters significantly among bones and scans. In the first step, a rigid deterministic model of the bone is generated from a segmentation of the bone in the image corresponding to one position of the joint by using the live wire method. Subsequently, in other images of the same joint, this model is used to search for the same bone by minimizing an energy function that utilizes both boundary- and region-based information. An evaluation of the method by utilizing a total of 60 data sets on MR and CT images of the ankle complex and cervical spine indicates that the segmentations agree very closely with the live wire segmentations, yielding true positive and false positive volume fractions in the range 89%-97% and 0.2%-0.7%. The method requires 1-2 minutes of operator time and 6-7 min of computer time per data set, which makes it significantly more efficient than live wire-the method currently available for the task that can be used routinely.

  7. Joint optic disc and cup boundary extraction from monocular fundus images.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Arunava; Sivaswamy, Jayanthi

    2017-08-01

    Accurate segmentation of optic disc and cup from monocular color fundus images plays a significant role in the screening and diagnosis of glaucoma. Though optic cup is characterized by the drop in depth from the disc boundary, most existing methods segment the two structures separately and rely only on color and vessel kink based cues due to the lack of explicit depth information in color fundus images. We propose a novel boundary-based Conditional Random Field formulation that extracts both the optic disc and cup boundaries in a single optimization step. In addition to the color gradients, the proposed method explicitly models the depth which is estimated from the fundus image itself using a coupled, sparse dictionary trained on a set of image-depth map (derived from Optical Coherence Tomography) pairs. The estimated depth achieved a correlation coefficient of 0.80 with respect to the ground truth. The proposed segmentation method outperformed several state-of-the-art methods on five public datasets. The average dice coefficient was in the range of 0.87-0.97 for disc segmentation across three datasets and 0.83 for cup segmentation on the DRISHTI-GS1 test set. The method achieved a good glaucoma classification performance with an average AUC of 0.85 for five fold cross-validation on RIM-ONE v2. We propose a method to jointly segment the optic disc and cup boundaries by modeling the drop in depth between the two structures. Since our method requires a single fundus image per eye during testing it can be employed in the large-scale screening of glaucoma where expensive 3D imaging is unavailable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint in dogs and cats. Effect of different coils on image quality].

    PubMed

    Gäbler, Katrin; Brühschwein, A; Loderstedt, S; Oechtering, G; Ludewig, E

    2011-01-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the image quality is considerably affected by the coil used, particularly when small structures are examined. The purpose of this study was to determine which coil provides the best scanning results for imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of dogs and cats. MRI investigations were performed using a standard human knee coil and an 8-cm-diameter surface coil with a low-field MRI-system (field strength 0.5 T). TMJs of two dogs and two cats were examined. The scan protocol consisted of T1-weighted spin echo (T1W/SE), T2-weighted turbo spin echo (T2W/TSE), a proton density-weighted sequence (PDW) (slice thickness: 3 mm each), and gradient echo sequences (slice thickness: 1-1.5 mm) in the sagittal plane. Three observers independently compared the features "contrast resolution", "bone structure", "spatial resolution", and "signal-to-noise ratio" (SNR) using a 5-point scale. Investigators were blinded with respect to the coils used. Approximately 50% of the images obtained by the use of the surface coil were rated superior in comparison with the knee coil in terms of the features "contrast resolution", "bone structure", and "spatial resolution". In approximately 50% of the MRI-images no differences in the ratings were seen. With respect to the criterion "signal-to-noise ratio" 90% of the images acquired with the surface coil were rated better. In 5% of the images an identical quality was recorded. The surface coil proved to be superior both in dogs and cats. Display quality of small structures of the TMJ is dependent on the spatial resolution of the MR images. Therefore, a dedicated coil and a small field of view (FOV) should be used. Results reveal that low-field MRI is able to display subtle anatomic structures of the TMJ in dogs and cats. In principle, the results can be transmitted to other MRI-systems. However, to generate valid scan protocols it is necessary to adapt scan parameters and coil selection specifically.

  9. Imaging Science Panel. Multispectral Imaging Science Working Group joint meeting with Information Science Panel: Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of multispectral sensing is reviewed and recommendations for future research and development are proposed. specifically, two generic sensor concepts were discussed. One is the multispectral pushbroom sensor utilizing linear array technology which operates in six spectral bands including two in the SWIR region and incorporates capabilities for stereo and crosstrack pointing. The second concept is the imaging spectrometer (IS) which incorporates a dispersive element and area arrays to provide both spectral and spatial information simultaneously. Other key technology areas included very large scale integration and the computer aided design of these devices.

  10. Joint NDT image restoration and segmentation using Gauss-Markov-Potts prior models and variational Bayesian computation.

    PubMed

    Ayasso, Hacheme; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to simultaneously restore and to segment piecewise homogeneous images degraded by a known point spread function (PSF) and additive noise. For this purpose, we propose a family of nonhomogeneous Gauss-Markov fields with Potts region labels model for images to be used in a Bayesian estimation framework. The joint posterior law of all the unknowns (the unknown image, its segmentation (hidden variable) and all the hyperparameters) is approximated by a separable probability law via the variational Bayes technique. This approximation gives the possibility to obtain practically implemented joint restoration and segmentation algorithm. We will present some preliminary results and comparison with a MCMC Gibbs sampling based algorithm. We may note that the prior models proposed in this work are particularly appropriate for the images of the scenes or objects that are composed of a finite set of homogeneous materials. This is the case of many images obtained in nondestructive testing (NDT) applications.

  11. Imaging of posterior element axial pain generators: facet joints, pedicles, spinous processes, sacroiliac joints, and transitional segments.

    PubMed

    Kotsenas, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    The role of the posterior elements in generating axial back and neck pain is well established; the imaging detection of posterior element pain generators remains problematic. Morphologic imaging findings have proved to be nonspecific and are frequently present in asymptomatic patients. Edema, inflammation, and hypervascularity are more specific for sites of pain generation, but are often overlooked by imagers if physiologic imaging techniques such as fat-suppressed T2 or contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide bone scanning with single-photon emission computed tomography (CT), or (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with CT are not used. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-10-21

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head-neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone-cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation.

  13. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head-neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone-cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation.

  14. Mobile Biplane X-Ray Imaging System for Measuring 3D Dynamic Joint Motion During Overground Gait.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shanyuanye; Gray, Hans A; Keynejad, Farzad; Pandy, Marcus G

    2016-01-01

    Most X-ray fluoroscopy systems are stationary and impose restrictions on the measurement of dynamic joint motion; for example, knee-joint kinematics during gait is usually measured with the subject ambulating on a treadmill. We developed a computer-controlled, mobile, biplane, X-ray fluoroscopy system to track human body movement for high-speed imaging of 3D joint motion during overground gait. A robotic gantry mechanism translates the two X-ray units alongside the subject, tracking and imaging the joint of interest as the subject moves. The main aim of the present study was to determine the accuracy with which the mobile imaging system measures 3D knee-joint kinematics during walking. In vitro experiments were performed to measure the relative positions of the tibia and femur in an intact human cadaver knee and of the tibial and femoral components of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) implant during simulated overground gait. Accuracy was determined by calculating mean, standard deviation and root-mean-squared errors from differences between kinematic measurements obtained using volumetric models of the bones and TKA components and reference measurements obtained from metal beads embedded in the bones. Measurement accuracy was enhanced by the ability to track and image the joint concurrently. Maximum root-mean-squared errors were 0.33 mm and 0.65° for translations and rotations of the TKA knee and 0.78 mm and 0.77° for translations and rotations of the intact knee, which are comparable to results reported for treadmill walking using stationary biplane systems. System capability for in vivo joint motion measurement was also demonstrated for overground gait.

  15. Geophysical imaging of near subsurface layers to detect fault and fractured zones in the Tournemire Experimental Platform, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhu Ba, Elise, Vi; Noble, Mark; Gélis, Céline; Gesret, Alexandrine; Cabrera, Justo

    2013-04-01

    could either be detected in the upper limestone formation because of the acquisition geometry. In order to better image the clay-rock and upper limestone layers, IRSN, Mines ParisTech and UPPA conducted large-scale 2D and 3D very high-resolution seismic surveys in 2010 and 2011 from the surface in the framework of the GNR TRASSE. We analyze this new dataset with the first arrival traveltime tomography method in order to assess its potential to detect fault and fracture zones in near subsurface layers. For this purpose, we develop a new fast inversion algorithm that allows introducing a priori information and choosing a specific model parameterization. We validate our approach based on the Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique with synthetic data and present the first results of the new real dataset processing. We finally compare these results to a 2D high-resolution electrical resistivity profile acquired at the same location. These electrical resistivity data could also be considered as some a priori information in our inversion scheme.

  16. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction in patients with imaging-proven lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Galm, R; Fröhling, M; Rittmeister, M; Schmitt, E

    1998-01-01

    A dysfunction of a joint is defined as a reversible functional restriction of motion presenting with hypomobility according to manual medicine terminology. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency and significance of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) dysfunction in patients with low back pain and sciatica and imaging-proven disc herniation. We examined the SIJs of 150 patients with low back pain and sciatica; all of these patients had herniated lumbar disks, but none of them had sensory or motor losses. Forty-six patients, hereinafter referred to as group A, were diagnosed with dysfunction of the SIJ. The remaining 104 patients, hereinafter referred to as group B, had no SIJ dysfunction. Dysfunctions were resolved with mobilizing and manipulative techniques of manual medicine. Regardless of SIJ findings, all patients received intensive physiotherapy throughout a 3-week hospitalisation. At the 3 weeks follow-up, 34 patients of group A (73.9%) reported an improvement of lumbar and ischiadic pain, 5 patients were pain free. Improvement was recorded in 57 of the group B patients (54.8%); however, nobody in group B was free of symptoms. We conclude that in the presence of lumbar and ischiadic symptoms our presented data suggest consideration of SIJ dysfunction, requiring manual medicine examination and, in the presence of SIJ dysfunction, appropriate therapy, regardless of intervertebral disc pathomorphology. This could avoid wrong indications for nucleotomy.

  17. [Magnetic resonance imaging for the wrist joint of the coal miners in vibration department].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuan-zhi; Liu, Rui-lian; Hu, Shu-dong; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Wen-xiu; Ge, Ling-xia

    2006-04-01

    To study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the wrist joint of coal miners who work in excavation and vibration department. Forty-three coal miners with the hand-arm vibration disease served as the observation group while 20 workers who were not working in the vibration department acted as the control group. The patients in the observation group were divided into five subgroups according to the time when they received vibration. The regularity of the development of signs and symptoms of MRI was observed and analyzed. The hydroarthrosis was most found in MRI. There were significant difference in hydroarthrosis (chi(2) = 8.80, P < 0.01), osteoporosis and osteomyelitis (chi(2) = 3.91, chi(2) = 5.01, P < 0.05 respectively) between the observation group and the control group. The edema of bone marrow and the avascular necrosis of ossa carpi were found only in the observation group and not found in the control group. The hydroarthrosis and the edema of bone marrow occurred most in the early stage of vibration. The signal in the edema of the bone marrow of the distal end of the radius was decreased in the GE sequence T(2)WI with the specificity. (1) Changes in the wrist joint occur in the early stage of the vibration work, and can be found in the MRI. (2) The edema of the bone marrow of the distal end of the radius is of great value in the diagnosis of the hand-arm vibration disease.

  18. Deep learning and shapes similarity for joint segmentation and tracing single neurons in SEM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Qiang; Xiao, Chi; Han, Hua; Chen, Xi; Shen, Lijun; Xie, Qiwei

    2017-02-01

    Extracting the structure of single neurons is critical for understanding how they function within the neural circuits. Recent developments in microscopy techniques, and the widely recognized need for openness and standardization provide a community resource for automated reconstruction of dendritic and axonal morphology of single neurons. In order to look into the fine structure of neurons, we use the Automated Tape-collecting Ultra Microtome Scanning Electron Microscopy (ATUM-SEM) to get images sequence of serial sections of animal brain tissue that densely packed with neurons. Different from other neuron reconstruction method, we propose a method that enhances the SEM images by detecting the neuronal membranes with deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) and segments single neurons by active contour with group shape similarity. We joint the segmentation and tracing together and they interact with each other by alternate iteration that tracing aids the selection of candidate region patch for active contour segmentation while the segmentation provides the neuron geometrical features which improve the robustness of tracing. The tracing model mainly relies on the neuron geometrical features and is updated after neuron being segmented on the every next section. Our method enables the reconstruction of neurons of the drosophila mushroom body which is cut to serial sections and imaged under SEM. Our method provides an elementary step for the whole reconstruction of neuronal networks.

  19. Autocalibrated wave-CAIPI reconstruction; Joint optimization of k-space trajectory and parallel imaging reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cauley, Stephen F; Setsompop, Kawin; Bilgic, Berkin; Bhat, Himanshu; Gagoski, Borjan; Wald, Lawrence L

    2017-09-01

    Fast MRI acquisitions often rely on efficient traversal of k-space and hardware limitations, or other physical effects can cause the k-space trajectory to deviate from a theoretical path in a manner dependent on the image prescription and protocol parameters. Additional measurements or generalized calibrations are typically needed to characterize the discrepancies. We propose an autocalibrated technique to determine these discrepancies. A joint optimization is used to estimate the trajectory simultaneously with the parallel imaging reconstruction, without the need for additional measurements. Model reduction is introduced to make this optimization computationally efficient, and to ensure final image quality. We demonstrate our approach for the wave-CAIPI fast acquisition method that uses a corkscrew k-space path to efficiently encode k-space and spread the voxel aliasing. Model reduction allows for the 3D trajectory to be automatically calculated in fewer than 30 s on standard vendor hardware. The method achieves equivalent accuracy to full-gradient calibration scans. The proposed method allows for high-quality wave-CAIPI reconstruction across wide ranges of protocol parameters, such as field of view (FOV) location/orientation, bandwidth, echo time (TE), resolution, and sinusoidal amplitude/frequency. Our framework should allow for the autocalibration of gradient trajectories from many other fast MRI techniques in clinically relevant time. Magn Reson Med 78:1093-1099, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. A computer-based image analysis method for assessing the severity of hip joint osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, Ioannis; Costaridou, Lena; Cavouras, Dionisis; Panagiotopoulos, Elias; Panayiotakis, George

    2006-12-01

    A computer-based image analysis method was developed for assessing the severity of hip osteoarthritis (OA). Eighteen pelvic radiographs of patients with verified unilateral hip OA, were digitized and enhanced employing custom developed software. Two ROIs corresponding to osteoarthritic and contralateral-physiological radiographic Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs) were determined on each radiograph. Textural features were extracted from the HJS-ROIs utilizing the run-length matrices and Laws textural measures. A k-Nearest Neighbour based hierarchical tree structure was designed for classifying hips into three OA severity categories labeled as "Normal", "Mild/Moderate", and "Severe". Employing the run-length features, the overall classification accuracy of the hierarchical tree structure was 86.1%. The utilization of Laws' textural measures improved the system classification performance, providing an overall classification accuracy of 94.4%. The proposed method maybe of value to physicians in assessing the severity of hip OA.

  1. Joint pattern recognition/data compression concept for ERTS multispectral imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique which jointly applies clustering and source encoding concepts to obtain data compression. The cluster compression technique basically uses clustering to extract features from the measurement data set which are used to describe characteristics of the entire data set. In addition, the features may be used to approximate each individual measurement vector by forming a sequence of scalar numbers which define each measurement vector in terms of the cluster features. This sequence, called the feature map, is then efficiently represented by using source encoding concepts. A description of a practical cluster compression algorithm is given and experimental results are presented to show trade-offs and characteristics of various implementations. Examples are provided which demonstrate the application of cluster compression to multispectral image data of the Earth Resources Technology Satellite.

  2. Negative magnetic resonance imaging in femoral neck stress fracture with joint effusion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Seki, Nobutoshi; Okuyama, Koichiro; Kamo, Keiji; Chiba, Mitsuho; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-06-01

    Femoral neck stress fracture (FNSF) is well documented in the orthopedic literature and is generally associated with strenuous activities such as long-distance running and military training. The diagnostic yield of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for FNSF was reported to be 100 %, and early MRI is recommended when this fracture is suspected. We encountered a 16-year-old male long-distance runner with FNSF in whom the left femoral neck showed no signal changes on MRI although an effusion was detected in the left hip joint. One month later, roentgenograms revealed periosteal callus and oblique consolidation of the left femoral neck, confirming the diagnosis of compression FNSF. Because FNSF with a normal bone marrow signal on MRI is very rare, this patient is presented here.

  3. Adaptive sparse reconstruction with joint parametric estimation for high-speed uniformly moving targets in coincidence imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Guofeng; Wang, Hongqiang; Yang, Zhaocheng; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2016-04-01

    As a complementary imaging technology, coincidence imaging radar (CIR) achieves high resolution for stationary or low-speed targets under the assumption of ignoring the influence of the original position mismatching. As to high-speed moving targets moving from the original imaging cell to other imaging cells during imaging, it is inaccurate to reconstruct the target using the previous imaging plane. We focus on the recovery problem for high-speed moving targets in the CIR system based on the intrapulse frequency random modulation signal in a single pulse. The effects induced by the motion on the imaging performance are analyzed. Because the basis matrix in the CIR imaging equation is determined by the unknown velocity parameter of the moving target, both the target images and basis matrix should be estimated jointly. We propose an adaptive joint parametric estimation recovery algorithm based on the Tikhonov regularization method to update the target velocity and basis matrix adaptively and recover the target images synchronously. Finally, the target velocity and target images are obtained in an iterative manner. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  4. EDITORIAL: The interface between geophysics and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    imaging to reduce uncertainty and associated risk. In the economically dominant area of petroleum exploration and production, the focus has moved dramatically from exploration to production. This shift is leading increasingly to integration between petroleum geoscience and petrophysics on the one hand, and petroleum engineering and rock mechanics on the other. This integration means that petroleum engineers need to be aware of developments in geophysics, and geophysicists need to be aware of the problems and requirements of the reservoir engineer. Journal of Geophysics and Engineering has been established firmly in that context, and we expect this trend to strengthen and extend far into the future. The Editors welcome your submissions, and comments on this first issue of JGE.

  5. In-vitro and in-vivo imaging of MMP activity in cartilage and joint injury

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Tomoaki; Tenborg, Elizabeth; Yik, Jasper H.N.; Haudenschild, Dominik R.

    2015-05-08

    Non-destructive detection of cartilage-degrading activities represents an advance in osteoarthritis (OA) research, with implications in studies of OA pathogenesis, progression, and intervention strategies. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are principal cartilage degrading enzymes that contribute to OA pathogenesis. MMPSense750 is an in-vivo fluorimetric imaging probe with the potential to continuously and non-invasively trace real-time MMP activities, but its use in OA-related research has not been reported. Our objective is to detect and characterize the early degradation activities shortly after cartilage or joint injury with MMPSense750. We determined the appropriate concentration, assay time, and linear range using various concentrations of recombinant MMPs as standards. We then quantified MMP activity from cartilage explants subjected to either mechanical injury or inflammatory cytokine treatment in-vitro. Finally, we performed in-vivo MMP imaging of a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. Our in-vitro results showed that the optimal assay time was highly dependent on the MMP enzyme. In cartilage explant culture media, mechanical impact or cytokine treatment increased MMP activity. Injured knees of mice showed significantly higher fluorescent signal than uninjured knees. We conclude that MMPSense750 detects human MMP activities and can be used for in-vitro study with cartilage, as well as in-vivo studies of knee injury, and can offering real-time insight into the degradative processes that occurring within the joint before structural changes become evident radiographically. - Highlights: • MMPSense750 is near-infrared fluorescent probe which can detect MMP activity. • MMPSense750 can detect human MMP-3, -9, and -13. • The reaction kinetics with MMPSense750 were different for the three MMPs. • MMPSense750 can visualized real time MMP activity in mouse injured knees. • MMPSense750 is convenient tool to evaluate real-time MMP activity non-invasively.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation for Anterior Disc Displacement of the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhongjun; Wang, Mingguo; Ma, Yingwei; Lai, Qingguo; Tong, Dongdong; Zhang, Fenghe; Dong, Lili

    2017-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the criterion standard imaging technique for visualization of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region, and is currently considered the optimum modality for comprehensive evaluation in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). This study was aimed at finding the value of MRI in pre-clinical diagnosis of TMJ disc displacement. Material/Methods Patients primarily diagnosed as having anterior disc displacement by clinical symptoms and X-ray were selected in the present study. MRI was used to evaluate surrounding anatomical structures and position, as well as morphological and signal intensity change between patients and normal controls. Results Posterior band position was significantly different between the patient group and control group. At the maximum opened-mouth position, the location of disc intermediate zone returned to normal. At closed-mouth position, the thickness of anterior and middle, but not posterior, band increased. The motion range of the condyle in the anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWR) patient group was significantly less than the value in the anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR) patient group and the control group. Whether at closed-mouth position or maximum opened-mouth position, the exudate volume in the patient group was greater than in the normal group. Conclusions MRI can be successfully used to evaluate multiple morphological changes at different mouth positions of normal volunteers and patients. The disc-condyle relationship can serve as an important indicator in assessing anterior disc displacement, and can be used to distinguish disc displacement with or without reduction. PMID:28176754

  7. Crustal structure of the northern Menderes Massif, western Turkey, imaged by joint gravity and magnetic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Klaus; Gallardo, Luis A.; Wedin, Francis; Sener, Kerim

    2016-10-01

    In western Anatolia, the Anatolide domain of the Tethyan orogen is exposed in one of the Earth's largest metamorphic core complexes, the Menderes Massif. The Menderes Massif experienced a two-stage exhumation: tectonic denudation in the footwall of a north-directed Miocene extensional detachment, followed by fragmentation by E-W and NW-SE-trending graben systems. Along the northern boundary of the core complex, the tectonic units of the Vardar-Izmir-Ankara suture zone overly the stage one footwall of the core complex, the northern Menderes Massif. In this study, we explore the structure of the upper crust in the northern Menderes Massif with cross-gradient joint inversion of gravity and aeromagnetic data along a series of 10-km-deep profiles. Our inversions, which are based on gravity and aeromagnetic measurements and require no geological and petrophysical constraints, reveal the salient features of the Earth's upper crust. We image the northern Menderes Massif as a relatively homogenous domain of low magnetization and medium to high density, with local anomalies related to the effect of interspersed igneous bodies and shallow basins. In contrast, both the northern and western boundaries of the northern Menderes Massif stand out as domains where dense mafic, metasedimentary and ultramafic domains with a weak magnetic signature alternate with low-density igneous complexes with high magnetization. With our technique, we are able to delineate Miocene basins and igneous complexes, and map the boundary between intermediate to mafic-dominated subduction-accretion units of the suture zone and the underlying felsic crust of the Menderes Massif. We demonstrate that joint gravity and magnetic inversion are not only capable of imaging local and regional changes in crustal composition, but can also be used to map discontinuities of geodynamic significance such as the Vardar-Izmir-Ankara suture and the West Anatolia Transfer Zone.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation for Anterior Disc Displacement of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhongjun; Wang, Mingguo; Ma, Yingwei; Lai, Qingguo; Tong, Dongdong; Zhang, Fenghe; Dong, Lili

    2017-02-08

    BACKGROUND Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the criterion standard imaging technique for visualization of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region, and is currently considered the optimum modality for comprehensive evaluation in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). This study was aimed at finding the value of MRI in pre-clinical diagnosis of TMJ disc displacement. MATERIAL AND METHODS Patients primarily diagnosed as having anterior disc displacement by clinical symptoms and X-ray were selected in the present study. MRI was used to evaluate surrounding anatomical structures and position, as well as morphological and signal intensity change between patients and normal controls. RESULTS Posterior band position was significantly different between the patient group and control group. At the maximum opened-mouth position, the location of disc intermediate zone returned to normal. At closed-mouth position, the thickness of anterior and middle, but not posterior, band increased. The motion range of the condyle in the anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWR) patient group was significantly less than the value in the anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR) patient group and the control group. Whether at closed-mouth position or maximum opened-mouth position, the exudate volume in the patient group was greater than in the normal group. CONCLUSIONS MRI can be successfully used to evaluate multiple morphological changes at different mouth positions of normal volunteers and patients. The disc-condyle relationship can serve as an important indicator in assessing anterior disc displacement, and can be used to distinguish disc displacement with or without reduction.

  9. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Geophysical Model Research and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Walter, W; Tkalcic, H; Franz, G; Flanagan, M

    2004-07-07

    Geophysical models constitute an important component of calibration for nuclear explosion monitoring. We will focus on four major topics: (1) a priori geophysical models, (2) surface wave models, (3) receiver function derived profiles, and (4) stochastic geophysical models. The first, a priori models, can be used to predict a host of geophysical measurements, such as body wave travel times, and can be derived from direct regional studies or even by geophysical analogy. Use of these models is particularly important in aseismic regions or regions without seismic stations, where data of direct measurements might not exist. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed the Western Eurasia and North Africa (WENA) model which has been evaluated using a number of data sets, including travel times, surface waves, receiver functions, and waveform analysis (Pasyanos et al., 2004). We have joined this model with our Yellow Sea - Korean Peninsula (YSKP) model and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) East Asia model to construct a model for all of Eurasia and North Africa. Secondly, we continue to improve upon our surface wave model by adding more paths. This has allowed us to expand the region to all of Eurasia and into Africa, increase the resolution of our model, and extend results to even shorter periods (7 sec). High-resolution models exist for the Middle East and the YSKP region. The surface wave results can be inverted either alone, or in conjunction with other data, to derive models of the crust and upper mantle structure. We are also using receiver functions, in joint inversions with the surface waves, to produce profiles directly under seismic stations throughout the region. In a collaborative project with Ammon, et al., they have been focusing on stations throughout western Eurasia and North Africa, while we have been focusing on LLNL deployments in the Middle East, including Kuwait, Jordan, and the United Arab Emirates. Finally, we have been

  11. Geophysics in INSPIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sőrés, László

    2013-04-01

    INSPIRE is a European directive to harmonize spatial data in Europe. Its' aim is to establish a transparent, multidisciplinary network of environmental information by using international standards and OGC web services. Spatial data themes defined in the annex of the directive cover 34 domains that are closely bundled to environment and spatial information. According to the INSPIRE roadmap all data providers must setup discovery, viewing and download services and restructure data stores to provide spatial data as defined by the underlying specifications by 2014 December 1. More than 3000 institutions are going to be involved in the progress. During the data specification process geophysics as an inevitable source of geo information was introduced to Annex II Geology. Within the Geology theme Geophysics is divided into core and extended model. The core model contains specifications for legally binding data provisioning and is going to be part of the Implementation Rules of the INSPIRE directives. To minimize the work load of obligatory data transformations the scope of the core model is very limited and simple. It covers the most essential geophysical feature types that are relevant in economic and environmental context. To fully support the use cases identified by the stake holders the extended model was developed. It contains a wide range of spatial object types for geophysical measurements, processed and interpreted results, and wrapper classes to help data providers in using the Observation and Measurements (O&M) standard for geophysical data exchange. Instead of introducing the traditional concept of "geophysical methods" at a high structural level the data model classifies measurements and geophysical models based on their spatial characteristics. Measurements are classified as geophysical station (point), geophysical profile (curve) and geophysical swath (surface). Generic classes for processing results and interpretation models are curve model (1D), surface

  12. Radiological Followup of the Evolution of Inflammatory Process in Sacroiliac Joint with Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Case with Pyogenic Sacroiliitis

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Muhammet; Sanal, Hatice Tugba; Yilmaz, Sedat; Simsek, Ismail; Erdem, Hakan; Pay, Salih; Dinc, Ayhan

    2012-01-01

    Pyogenic sacroiliitis (PS) is an acute form of sacroiliitis that mostly starts with very painful buttock pain. Here in this case, the followup magnetic resonance (MR) images of a 49-year-old male patient with PS is displayed. After his sacroiliitis was documented by MR images, he was treated with the combination of rifampicin plus streptomycin and moxifloxacin. Serial MR investigations were done to disclose acute and subsequent imaging changes concerning sacroiliac joint and surrounding bone structures. Although after treatment all the symptoms were completely resolved, 20 months later changes suggesting active sacroiliitis on MR images were continuing. PMID:23050188

  13. Double-image encryption using chaotic maps and nonlinear non-DC joint fractional Fourier transform correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongjie; Zhong, Zhi; Fang, Weiwei; Xie, Hong; Zhang, Yabin; Shan, Mingguang

    2016-09-01

    A double-image encryption method is reported using chaotic maps, nonlinear non-DC joint transform correlator (JTC), and fractional Fourier transform (FrFT). The double images are converted into the amplitude and phase of a synthesized function through the application of chaotic pixel scrambling. The synthesized function bonded with a chaotic random phase mask (CRPM) and another different CRPM serve as the input signal of the JTC architecture in the fractional Fourier domain to obtain a real-valued encrypted image. The nonlinear and non-DC operation is also done to improve the security and decrypted image quality. The parameters in joint FrFT correlator and chaotic map serve as the encrypted keys. Numerical simulations have been done to demonstrate the feasibility and validity of this algorithm.

  14. Integration of historical aerial and satellite photos, recent satellite images and geophysical surveys for the knowledge of the ancient Dyrrachium (Durres, Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malfitana, Daniele; Shehi, Eduard; Masini, Nicola; Scardozzi, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    The paper presents the preliminary results of an integrated multidiscipliary research project concerning the urban area of the modern Durres (ancient Dyrrachium). Here a joint Italian and Albanian researcher are starting preliminary investigations on the place of an ancient roman villa placed in the urban centre of the modern town. In a initial phase are offering interesting results the use of a rich multitemporal remote sensing data-set, historical aerial photos of 1920s and 1930s, photos of USA spy satellites of 1960s and 1970s (Corona KH-4A and KH-4B), and very high resolution satellite imagery. The historical aerial documentation is very rich and includes aerial photogrammetrich flights of two Italian Institutions: the private company SARA - Società Anonima Rilevamenti Aerofotogrammetrici in Rome (1928) and the IGM - Istituto Geografico Militare (1936, 1937 e 1941), which flew on Durres for purposes of cartographic production and military. These photos offer an image of the city before the urban expansion after the Second World War and in recent decades, progressively documented by satellite images of the 1960s-1970s and recent years. They enable a reconstruction of the ancient topography of the urban area, even with the possibility of detailed analysis, as in the case of the the Roman villa, nowadays buried under a modern garden, but also investigated with a GPR survey, in order to rebuild its plan and contextualize the villa in relation to the urban area of the ancient Dyrrachium.

  15. 78 FR 12762 - Joint Meeting of the Medical Imaging Drugs Advisory Committee and the Oncologic Drugs Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Joint Meeting of the Medical Imaging Drugs Advisory Committee and the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting. AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a...

  16. Atomic modeling of cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions--joint refinement of model and imaging parameters.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Michael S; Trzynka, Andrew; Chapman, Brynmor K

    2013-04-01

    When refining the fit of component atomic structures into electron microscopic reconstructions, use of a resolution-dependent atomic density function makes it possible to jointly optimize the atomic model and imaging parameters of the microscope. Atomic density is calculated by one-dimensional Fourier transform of atomic form factors convoluted with a microscope envelope correction and a low-pass filter, allowing refinement of imaging parameters such as resolution, by optimizing the agreement of calculated and experimental maps. A similar approach allows refinement of atomic displacement parameters, providing indications of molecular flexibility even at low resolution. A modest improvement in atomic coordinates is possible following optimization of these additional parameters. Methods have been implemented in a Python program that can be used in stand-alone mode for rigid-group refinement, or embedded in other optimizers for flexible refinement with stereochemical restraints. The approach is demonstrated with refinements of virus and chaperonin structures at resolutions of 9 through 4.5 Å, representing regimes where rigid-group and fully flexible parameterizations are appropriate. Through comparisons to known crystal structures, flexible fitting by RSRef is shown to be an improvement relative to other methods and to generate models with all-atom rms accuracies of 1.5-2.5 Å at resolutions of 4.5-6 Å. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. STUDY ON THE PATELLOFEMORAL JOINT USING MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING: MORPHOLOGICAL VARIATION OF THE MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Alfredo dos Santos; de Brito, Marcelo Botelho Soares; Severino, Fabrício Roberto; Campos, Leila Rodrigues Andrade; Nico, Marcelo Astolfi Caetano; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To study the measurements and anatomical relationships of the patellofemoral joint using magnetic resonance imaging, and to evaluate the variation in the morphology of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) according to patients' heights and ages and the variation in measurements on other structures that are known to be involved in predisposition to patellar instability. Method: Twenty-three knees (18 patients) underwent magnetic resonance imaging and their interepicondylar distance, patellar height, trochlear depth, ventral trochlear prominence, trochlear groove angle, lateral facet tilt, lateral patellar tilt and size of the lateral and medial facets and their ratio were measured. These measurements were compared with the length and thickness of the MPFL. Results: The average length of the MPFL was 46.4 mm, while the average thicknesses of its patellar insertion, middle third and femoral insertion were, respectively, 1.7 mm, 1.4 mm and 1.2 mm. The thickness of the MPFL correlated positively with the lateral condyle and interepicondylar distance measurements, and negatively with the patients' ages. Conclusion: The morphology of the MPFL varies with the interepicondylar distance and the lateral condyle distance, and with patients' ages. PMID:27042622

  18. Images from a jointly-arousing collective ritual reveal affective polarization

    PubMed Central

    Bulbulia, Joseph A.; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Schjoedt, Uffe; Fondevila, Sabela; Sibley, Chris G.; Konvalinka, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Collective rituals are biologically ancient and culturally pervasive, yet few studies have quantified their effects on participants. We assessed two plausible models from qualitative anthropology: ritual empathy predicts affective convergence among all ritual participants irrespective of ritual role; rite-of-passage predicts emotional differences, specifically that ritual initiates will express relatively negative valence when compared with non-initiates. To evaluate model predictions, images of participants in a Spanish fire-walking ritual were extracted from video footage and assessed by nine Spanish raters for arousal and valence. Consistent with rite-of-passage predictions, we found that arousal jointly increased for all participants but that valence differed by ritual role: fire-walkers exhibited increasingly positive arousal and increasingly negative valence when compared with passengers. This result offers the first quantified evidence for rite of passage dynamics within a highly arousing collective ritual. Methodologically, we show that surprisingly simple and non-invasive data structures (rated video images) may be combined with methods from evolutionary ecology (Bayesian Generalized Linear Mixed Effects models) to clarify poorly understood dimensions of the human condition. PMID:24399979

  19. Images from a jointly-arousing collective ritual reveal affective polarization.

    PubMed

    Bulbulia, Joseph A; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Schjoedt, Uffe; Fondevila, Sabela; Sibley, Chris G; Konvalinka, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Collective rituals are biologically ancient and culturally pervasive, yet few studies have quantified their effects on participants. We assessed two plausible models from qualitative anthropology: ritual empathy predicts affective convergence among all ritual participants irrespective of ritual role; rite-of-passage predicts emotional differences, specifically that ritual initiates will express relatively negative valence when compared with non-initiates. To evaluate model predictions, images of participants in a Spanish fire-walking ritual were extracted from video footage and assessed by nine Spanish raters for arousal and valence. Consistent with rite-of-passage predictions, we found that arousal jointly increased for all participants but that valence differed by ritual role: fire-walkers exhibited increasingly positive arousal and increasingly negative valence when compared with passengers. This result offers the first quantified evidence for rite of passage dynamics within a highly arousing collective ritual. Methodologically, we show that surprisingly simple and non-invasive data structures (rated video images) may be combined with methods from evolutionary ecology (Bayesian Generalized Linear Mixed Effects models) to clarify poorly understood dimensions of the human condition.

  20. MR imaging of stem cell apoptosis in arthritic joints with a caspase-activatable contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Ye, Deju; Lenkov, Olga D.; Donig, Jessica; Martin, John E.; Castillo, Rostislav; Derugin, Nikita; Sennino, Barbara; Rao, Jianghong; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2015-01-01

    About 43 million individuals in the U.S. encounter cartilage injuries due to trauma or osteoarthritis, leading to joint pain and functional disability. Matrix associated stem cell implants (MASI) represent a promising approach for repair of cartilage defects. However, limited survival of MASI creates a significant bottleneck for successful cartilage regeneration outcomes and functional reconstitution. We report a new approach for non-invasive detection of stem cell apoptosis with MR imaging, based on a caspase-3 sensitive nano-aggregation MRI probe (C-SNAM). C-SNAM self-assembles into nanoparticles after hydrolysis by caspase-3, leading to 90% amplification of 1H MR and prolonged in vivo retention. Following intra-articular injection, C-SNAM causes significant MR signal enhancement in apoptotic MASI compared to viable MASI. Our results indicate that C-SNAM functions as an imaging biomarker for stem cell apoptosis in MASI. This concept could be applied to a broad range of cell transplants and target sites. PMID:25597243

  1. Joint source/channel iterative arithmetic decoding with JPEG 2000 image transmission application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaibi, Sonia; Zribi, Amin; Pyndiah, Ramesh; Aloui, Nadia

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by recent results in Joint Source/Channel coding and decoding, we consider the decoding problem of Arithmetic Codes (AC). In fact, in this article we provide different approaches which allow one to unify the arithmetic decoding and error correction tasks. A novel length-constrained arithmetic decoding algorithm based on Maximum A Posteriori sequence estimation is proposed. The latter is based on soft-input decoding using a priori knowledge of the source-symbol sequence and the compressed bit-stream lengths. Performance in the case of transmission over an Additive White Gaussian Noise channel is evaluated in terms of Packet Error Rate. Simulation results show that the proposed decoding algorithm leads to significant performance gain while exhibiting very low complexity. The proposed soft input arithmetic decoder can also generate additional information regarding the reliability of the compressed bit-stream components. We consider the serial concatenation of the AC with a Recursive Systematic Convolutional Code, and perform iterative decoding. We show that, compared to tandem and to trellis-based Soft-Input Soft-Output decoding schemes, the proposed decoder exhibits the best performance/complexity tradeoff. Finally, the practical relevance of the presented iterative decoding system is validated under an image transmission scheme based on the JPEG 2000 standard and excellent results in terms of decoded image quality are obtained.

  2. Aperture optimization in emission imaging using ideal observers for joint detection and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lili; Khurd, Parmeshwar; Kulkarni, Santosh; Rangarajan, Anand; Gindi, Gene

    2008-04-01

    For the familiar 2-class detection problem (signal present/absent), ideal observers have been applied to optimization of pinhole and collimator parameters in planar emission imaging. Given photon noise and background and signal variabilities, such experiments show how to optimize an aperture to maximize detectability of the signal. Here, we consider a fundamentally different, more realistic task in which the observer is required to both detect and localize a signal. The signal is embedded in a variable background and is known except for location. We inquire whether the addition of a localization requirement changes conclusions on aperture optimization. We have previously formulated an ideal observer for this joint detection/localization task, and here apply it to the classic problem of determining an optimal pinhole diameter in a planar emission imaging system. We conclude that as search tolerance on localization decreases, the optimal pinhole diameter shrinks from that required by detection alone, and, in addition, task performance becomes more sensitive to fluctuations about the optimal pinhole diameter. As in the case for detection only, the optimal pinhole diameter shrinks as the amount of background variability grows and, in addition, conspicuity limits can be observed. Unlike the case for detection only, our task leads to a finite aperture size in the absence of background variability. For both tasks, the inclusion of background variability yields a finite aperture size.

  3. Overview of the Joint NASA ISRO Imaging Spectroscopy Science Campaign in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. O.; Bhattacharya, B. K.; Eastwood, M. L.; Saxena, M.; Thompson, D. R.; Sadasivarao, B.

    2016-12-01

    In the period from December 2015 to March 2016 the Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer Next Generation (AVIRIS-NG) was deployed to India for a joint NASA ISRO science campaign. This campaign was conceived to provide first of their kind high fidelity imaging spectroscopy measurements of a diverse set of Asian environments for science and applications research. During this campaign measurements were acquired for 57 high priority sites that have objectives spanning: snow/ice of the Himalaya; coastal habitats and water quality; mangrove forests; soils; dry and humid forests; hydrocarbon alteration; mineralogy; agriculture; urban materials; atmospheric properties; and calibration/validation. Measurements from the campaign have been processed to at-instrument spectral radiance and atmospherically corrected surface reflectance. New AVIRIS-NG algorithms for retrieval of vegetation canopy water and for estimation of the fractions of photosynthetic, non-photosynthetic vegetation have been tested and evaluated on these measurements. An inflight calibration validation experiment was performed on the 11thof December 2015 in Hyderabad to assess the spectral and radiometric calibration of AVIRIS-NG in the flight environment. We present an overview of the campaign, calibration and validation results, and initial science analysis of a subset of these unique and diverse data sets.

  4. Atomic modeling of cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions – Joint refinement of model and imaging parameters

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Michael S.; Trzynka, Andrew; Chapman, Brynmor K.

    2013-01-01

    When refining the fit of component atomic structures into electron microscopic reconstructions, use of a resolution-dependent atomic density function makes it possible to jointly optimize the atomic model and imaging parameters of the microscope. Atomic density is calculated by one-dimensional Fourier transform of atomic form factors convoluted with a microscope envelope correction and a low-pass filter, allowing refinement of imaging parameters such as resolution, by optimizing the agreement of calculated and experimental maps. A similar approach allows refinement of atomic displacement parameters, providing indications of molecular flexibility even at low resolution. A modest improvement in atomic coordinates is possible following optimization of these additional parameters. Methods have been implemented in a Python program that can be used in stand-alone mode for rigid-group refinement, or embedded in other optimizers for flexible refinement with stereochemical restraints. The approach is demonstrated with refinements of virus and chaperonin structures at resolutions of 9 through 4.5 Å, representing regimes where rigid-group and fully flexible parameterizations are appropriate. Through comparisons to known crystal structures, flexible fitting by RSRef is shown to be an improvement relative to other methods and to generate models with all-atom rms accuracies of 1.5–2.5 Å at resolutions of 4.5–6 Å. PMID:23376441

  5. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  6. High temperature geophysical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1988-06-01

    The instrumentation development program was to proceed in parallel with scientific research and was driven by the needs of researchers. The development of these instruments has therefore included numerous geophysical field tests, many of which have resulted in the publication of scientific articles. This paper is a brief summary of some of the major geophysical instruments that have been developed and tested under the High Temperature Geophysics Program. These instruments are briefly described and references are given for further detailed information and for scientific papers that have resulted from the use of these instruments. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  7. Double images hiding by using joint transform correlator architecture adopting two-step phase-shifting digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Daomu; Huang, Yinbo

    2013-06-01

    Based on the joint Fresnel transform correlator, a new system for double images hiding is presented. By this security system, the dual secret images are encrypted and recorded as intensity patterns employing phase-shifting interference technology. To improve the system security, a dual images hiding method is used. By digital means, the deduced encryption complex distribution is divided into two subparts. For each image, only one subpart is reserved and modulated by a phase factor. Then these modified results are combined together and embedded into the host image. With all correct keys, by inverse Fresnel transform, the secret images can be extracted. By the phase modulation, the cross talk caused by images superposition can be reduced for their spatial parallel separation. Theoretical analyses have shown the system's feasibility. Computer simulations are performed to show the encryption capacity of the proposed system. Numerical results are presented to verify the validity and the efficiency of the proposed method.

  8. Ultrasound assessment of synovial pathologic features in rheumatoid arthritis using comprehensive multiplane images of the second metacarpophalangeal joint: identification of the components that are reliable and influential on the global assessment of the whole joint.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kei; Seto, Yohei; Narita, Akihiro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Ito, Hiromu; Matsushita, Isao; Ohno, Shigeru; Nishida, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Takeshi; Kaneko, Atsushi; Ogasawara, Michihiro; Fukae, Jun; Henmi, Mihoko; Sumida, Takayuki; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Koike, Takao

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to provide groundwork that could be utilized to optimize the global ultrasound (US) assessment of the whole joint for synovial pathologic features in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). US images of the second metacarpophalangeal joint in 8 predefined imaging planes, comprising regions that comprehensively capture the synovial pathologic features of the whole joint, were obtained from 30 patients with RA. Twelve experienced sonographers evaluated these images at the level of both the individual image and the whole joint, using a visual analog scale (VAS) to assess pathologic severity. Interrater reproducibility of the VAS scores was evaluated with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and factors that independently influenced the global assessment of the whole joint were identified using multiple linear regression analysis. A total of 14,276 VAS scores were analyzed. Interrater reproducibility of any eligible VAS assessment of synovial pathologic features was good (ICC 0.65). US assessment of synovial pathologic features in joints with mild inflammation was less reproducible than that in joints with severe inflammation. Although the most severely affected region in a joint did not always represent the average pathologic severity among the 8 regions, global assessment of the whole joint strongly correlated with assessment of the most severely affected region (P < 0.001). Importantly, the standard, midline imaging plane was not the most influential plane on the global assessment of the whole joint. Assessment of synovial fluid accumulation was not reproducible (ICCs 0.20-0.42) and did not substantially influence the global assessment of synovial inflammation (β = 0.06). The results of this study provide a unique data set that could be utilized to optimize the global US assessment of synovial pathologic features of the whole joint in patients with RA. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Ruptured disc after arthroscopic repositioning in the temporomandibular joint: a retrospective magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Cai, Xieyi; Yang, Chi; Wang, Shaoyi; Huang, Linjian

    2014-07-01

    Our aim was to explore the incidence of rupture after arthroscopic repositioning of the disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by reviewing magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the TMJ taken before and after operation, and to investigate correlations retrospectively. We studied 247 patients with anterior disc displacement of the TMJ, and categorised them into 3 groups based on the postoperative MRI. The first group comprised those whose disc ruptured after repositioning, the second those who had a possible rupture of the disc after repositioning, and the third had no rupture of the disc after repositioning. Age, sex, duration of symptoms, maximum incisal mouth opening, whether the anterior disc displacement was unilateral or bilateral, and the Wilkes stage, were included in the analysis. The incidence of rupture (5/247) was 2%. Weak points at the intermediate zone of the disc were found in 4 of the 5 joints. The patients whose discs ruptured were significantly younger than the other 2 groups (p=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in preoperative duration of symptoms and mouth opening among the groups. The proportions of unilateral and bilateral disc displacement (p=0.047) and Wilkes stage (p=0.027) differed among the 3 groups. The Wilkes stages was significantly more advanced in the ruptured group than in the other 2 groups (p=0.027) with 4/5 being bilateral. The weak point in the intermediate zone of the disc on MRI could be a sign of rupture. Teenagers and young adults with anterior disc displacement without reduction, particularly those in whom it is bilateral, are at a higher risk of a rupture after repositioning of the disc by arthroscopy.

  10. Small field of view cone beam CT temporomandibular joint imaging dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Lukat, T D; Wong, J C M; Lam, E W N

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Cone beam CT (CBCT) is generally accepted as the imaging modality of choice for visualisation of the osseous structures of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation dose of a protocol for CBCT TMJ imaging using a large field of view Hitachi CB MercuRay™ unit (Hitachi Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) with an alternative approach that utilizes two CBCT acquisitions of the right and left TMJs using the Kodak 9000® 3D system (Carestream, Rochester, NY). Methods: 25 optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters were placed in various locations of an anthropomorphic RANDO® Man phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories, Stanford, CT). Dosimetric measurements were performed for each technique, and effective doses were calculated using the 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection tissue weighting factor recommendations for all protocols. Results: The radiation effective dose for the CB MercuRay technique was 223.6 ± 1.1 μSv compared with 9.7 ± 0.1 μSv (child), 13.5 ± 0.9 μSv (adolescent/small adult) and 20.5 ± 1.3 μSv (adult) for the bilateral Kodak acquisitions. Conclusions: Acquisitions of individual right and left TMJ volumes using the Kodak 9000 3D CBCT imaging system resulted in a more than ten-fold reduction in the effective dose compared with the larger single field acquisition with the Hitachi CB MercuRay. This decrease is made even more significant when lower tube potential and tube current settings are used. PMID:24048693

  11. Small field of view cone beam CT temporomandibular joint imaging dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Lukat, T D; Wong, J C M; Lam, E W N

    2013-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) is generally accepted as the imaging modality of choice for visualisation of the osseous structures of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation dose of a protocol for CBCT TMJ imaging using a large field of view Hitachi CB MercuRay™ unit (Hitachi Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) with an alternative approach that utilizes two CBCT acquisitions of the right and left TMJs using the Kodak 9000(®) 3D system (Carestream, Rochester, NY). 25 optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters were placed in various locations of an anthropomorphic RANDO(®) Man phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories, Stanford, CT). Dosimetric measurements were performed for each technique, and effective doses were calculated using the 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection tissue weighting factor recommendations for all protocols. The radiation effective dose for the CB MercuRay technique was 223.6 ± 1.1 μSv compared with 9.7 ± 0.1 μSv (child), 13.5 ± 0.9 μSv (adolescent/small adult) and 20.5 ± 1.3 μSv (adult) for the bilateral Kodak acquisitions. Acquisitions of individual right and left TMJ volumes using the Kodak 9000 3D CBCT imaging system resulted in a more than ten-fold reduction in the effective dose compared with the larger single field acquisition with the Hitachi CB MercuRay. This decrease is made even more significant when lower tube potential and tube current settings are used.

  12. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  13. Classifying degenerative joint disease by the RDC/TMD and by panoramic imaging: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Winocur, E; Reiter, S; Krichmer, M; Kaffe, I

    2010-03-01

    The purposes of the study were to evaluate the utility of diagnosing degenerative joint disease (DJD) by the clinical finding of coarse crepitus alone, without supporting imaging studies, as defined by the RDC/TMD, and to evaluate the contribution of panoramic radiography as an aid in the diagnosis of DJD. A retrospective analysis of 372 consecutive patients with TMD was conducted. Their panoramic radiographs were evaluated for the extent of their contribution to the final diagnosis. Panoramic radiography was of no diagnostic value in 94.4% of the cases when the group was considered as a whole. When patients diagnosed with DJD were considered separately, panoramic radiography was completely sufficient for reaching the final diagnosis in 20.0% of the cases. In almost 90% of these patients, however, the clinical examination did not support the diagnosis of DJD (no coarse crepitus was found). This raises some doubts about the effectiveness of the clinical examination according to the RDC/TMD and about the utility of panoramic radiography in the definitive diagnosis of DJD, because both techniques have low accuracy (11.1% and 20%, respectively). The present study supports the current recommendations that panoramic radiography should not be ordered routinely to assess DJD, but still it is first choice when any dental problem is suspected. Further additional imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) should be considered only if there is reason to expect that the findings might affect diagnosis and management. This study adds to recent criticisms of the clinical validity of the RDC/TMD, with regard to DJD.

  14. Correlation between pain and degenerative bony changes on cone-beam computed tomography images of temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Bae, SunMee; Park, Moon-Soo; Han, Jin-Woo; Kim, Young-Jun

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess correlation between pain and degenerative bony changes on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of temporomandibular joints (TMJs). Two hundred eighty-three temporomandibular joints with degenerative bony changes were evaluated. Pain intensity (numeric rating scale, NRS) and pain duration in patients with degenerative joint disease (DJD) were also analyzed. We classified condylar bony changes on CBCT into five types: osteophyte (Osp), erosion (Ero), flattening (Fla), subchondral sclerosis (Scl), and pseudocyst (Pse). Degenerative bony changes were the most frequent in the age groups of 10~19, 20-29, and 50~59 years. The most frequent pain intensity was "none" (NRS 0, 34.6%) followed by "annoying" (NRS 3-5, 29.7%). The most frequent condylar bony change was Fla (219 joints, 77.4%) followed by Ero (169 joints, 59.7%). "Ero + Fla" was the most common combination of the bony changes (12.7%). The frequency of erosion was directly proportional to NRS, but the frequency of osteophyte was inversely proportional. The prevalence of Ero increased from onset until 2 years and gradually decreased thereafter. The prevalence of Osp, Ero, and Pse increased with age. Osp and Ero can be pain-related variables in degenerative joint disease (DJD) patients. "Six months to 2 years" may be a meaningful time point from the active, unstable phase to the stabilized late phase of DJD.

  15. Basic exploration geophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, E.S.

    1988-01-01

    An introduction to geophysical methods used to explore for natural resources and to survey earth's geology is presented in this volume. It is suitable for second-and third-year undergraduate students majoring in geology or engineering and for professional engineering and for professional engineers and earth scientists without formal instruction in geophysics. The author assumes the reader is familiar with geometry, algebra, and trigonometry. Geophysical exploration includes seismic refraction and reflection surveying, electrical resistivity and electromagnetic field surveying, and geophysical well logging. Surveying operations are described in step-by-step procedures and are illustrated by practical examples. Computer-based methods of processing and interpreting data as well as geographical methods are introduced.

  16. Magic angle effect in normal collateral ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint in horses imaged with a high-field magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Werpy, Natasha M; Ho, Charles P; Kawcak, Christopher E

    2010-01-01

    Distal forelimb specimens of eight skeletally mature horses were imaged using proton density turbo spin echo, T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo, T2*-weighted gradient echo, short tau inversion recovery and T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences with the limb parallel to the main magnetic field, and with angulation of the limb relative to the main magnetic field. The magic angle effect can be identified in the collateral ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint when imaged in a high-field magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system with a horizontally oriented main magnetic field. This effect has previously been described in the collateral ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint in a low-field system with a vertically oriented main magnetic field. The curvature of the ligaments places the fibers at the magic angle in both horizontally and vertically orientated main magnetic fields. This effect can be identified on short time of echo sequences and impacts the signal pattern of the ligaments at the level of the middle phalanx with the limb in a neutral position and with angulation of the limb. Magic angle effect should be considered as a possible cause of an asymmetrical signal pattern, depending on the positioning of the limb and the sequences used for imaging, when evaluating the collateral ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint on images acquired with a high-field MR imaging system that has a horizontally oriented main magnetic field.

  17. Ultrasound imaging for the rheumatologist. VI. Ultrasonography of the elbow, sacroiliac, parasternal, and temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Delle Sedie, A; Riente, L; Iagnocco, A; Filippucci, E; Meenagh, G; Valesini, G; Grassi, W; Bombardieri, S

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) examination of the elbow and parasternal joints is very useful to detect synovitis, degenerative changes, intrarticular calcification or soft tissue abnormalities. More recently new fields of research involving the sacroiliac and temporomandibular (TM) joints have evolved. Moreover, important information has been obtained about vascularization of the synovial joint in the sacroiliac region and structural modification such as internal derangement in the TM joint.. In this paper, we review and discuss the role of US in the evaluation of elbow, sacroiliac, parasternal and TM joint pathology.

  18. Anatomy assisted PET image reconstruction incorporating multi-resolution joint entropy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-01-01

    A promising approach in PET image reconstruction is to incorporate high resolution anatomical information (measured from MR or CT) taking the anato-functional similarity measures such as mutual information or joint entropy (JE) as the prior. These similarity measures only classify voxels based on intensity values, while neglecting structural spatial information. In this work, we developed an anatomy-assisted maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction algorithm wherein the JE measure is supplied by spatial information generated using wavelet multi-resolution analysis. The proposed wavelet-based JE (WJE) MAP algorithm involves calculation of derivatives of the subband JE measures with respect to individual PET image voxel intensities, which we have shown can be computed very similarly to how the inverse wavelet transform is implemented. We performed a simulation study with the BrainWeb phantom creating PET data corresponding to different noise levels. Realistically simulated T1-weighted MR images provided by BrainWeb modeling were applied in the anatomy-assisted reconstruction with the WJE-MAP algorithm and the intensity-only JE-MAP algorithm. Quantitative analysis showed that the WJE-MAP algorithm performed similarly to the JE-MAP algorithm at low noise level in the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) regions in terms of noise versus bias tradeoff. When noise increased to medium level in the simulated data, the WJE-MAP algorithm started to surpass the JE-MAP algorithm in the GM region, which is less uniform with smaller isolated structures compared to the WM region. In the high noise level simulation, the WJE-MAP algorithm presented clear improvement over the JE-MAP algorithm in both the GM and WM regions. In addition to the simulation study, we applied the reconstruction algorithms to real patient studies involving DPA-173 PET data and Florbetapir PET data with corresponding T1-MPRAGE MRI images. Compared to the intensity-only JE-MAP algorithm, the WJE

  19. Anatomy assisted PET image reconstruction incorporating multi-resolution joint entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-01-01

    A promising approach in PET image reconstruction is to incorporate high resolution anatomical information (measured from MR or CT) taking the anato-functional similarity measures such as mutual information or joint entropy (JE) as the prior. These similarity measures only classify voxels based on intensity values, while neglecting structural spatial information. In this work, we developed an anatomy-assisted maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction algorithm wherein the JE measure is supplied by spatial information generated using wavelet multi-resolution analysis. The proposed wavelet-based JE (WJE) MAP algorithm involves calculation of derivatives of the subband JE measures with respect to individual PET image voxel intensities, which we have shown can be computed very similarly to how the inverse wavelet transform is implemented. We performed a simulation study with the BrainWeb phantom creating PET data corresponding to different noise levels. Realistically simulated T1-weighted MR images provided by BrainWeb modeling were applied in the anatomy-assisted reconstruction with the WJE-MAP algorithm and the intensity-only JE-MAP algorithm. Quantitative analysis showed that the WJE-MAP algorithm performed similarly to the JE-MAP algorithm at low noise level in the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) regions in terms of noise versus bias tradeoff. When noise increased to medium level in the simulated data, the WJE-MAP algorithm started to surpass the JE-MAP algorithm in the GM region, which is less uniform with smaller isolated structures compared to the WM region. In the high noise level simulation, the WJE-MAP algorithm presented clear improvement over the JE-MAP algorithm in both the GM and WM regions. In addition to the simulation study, we applied the reconstruction algorithms to real patient studies involving DPA-173 PET data and Florbetapir PET data with corresponding T1-MPRAGE MRI images. Compared to the intensity-only JE-MAP algorithm, the WJE

  20. Characterizing the Mechanical Properties of Actual SAC105, SAC305, and SAC405 Solder Joints by Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Yu, D.; Park, S. B.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the mechanical properties of three lead-free solder alloys 95.5Sn-4.0Ag-0.5Cu (SAC405), 96.5Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu (SAC305), and 98.5Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu (SAC105) at the solder joint scale. Several actual ChipArray ® ball grid array (CABGA) packages were cross-sectioned, polished, and used as test vehicles. Compressive tests were performed using a nanocharacterization system over the temperature range of 25°C to 105°C. Images of the cross-sectioned solder joints were recorded by microscope during the tests. The recorded images were then processed by using a digital image correlation (DIC) program to calculate the displacement and strain fields on the solder joints. Finite-element method (FEM) modeling was used to extract the Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus, and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the solder alloys over the temperature range. The methodology developed in this paper enables characterization of the mechanical properties of the actual solder joints at low strain range with high accuracy.

  1. Phillips Laboratory Geophysics Scholar Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-30

    research at Phillips Laboratory . Research sponsored by Air Force Geophysics Laboratory ...Geophysics Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory , Geophysics Directorate), United States Air Force for its sponsorship of this research through the Air ...September 1993 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited PHILLIPS LABORATORY Directorate of Geophysics AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND

  2. The comparison of efficacy of different imaging techniques (conventional radiography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance) in assessment of wrist joints and metacarpophalangeal joints in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sankowski, Artur Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula Maria; Ćwikła, Jarosław; Walecka, Irena; Walecki, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which develops in patients with psoriasis. The rheumatoid factor is characteristically absent in the serum of PsA patients. Etiology of the disease is still unclear but a number of genetic associations have been identified. Inheritance of the disease is multilevel and the role of environmental factors is emphasized. Immunology of PsA is also quite complex. Inflammation is caused by immunological reactions leading to a release of kinins. Destructive changes in bones usually appear after a few months from the onset of clinical symptoms. Material/Methods: PsA typically involves joints of the axial skeleton with an asymmetrical patern. The spectrum of symptoms includes inflammatory changes in attachments of articular capsules, tendons, and ligaments to bone surface. The disease can have a diverse clinical course but usually manifests as oligoarthritis. Results: Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of PsA. Classical radiography has been used for this purpose for over a hundred years. It allows to identify late stages of the disease, when bone tissue is affected. In the last 20 years however many new imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), have been developed and became important diagnostic tools for evaluating rheumatoid diseases. They enable the assessment and monitoring of early inflammatory changes. Conclusions: As a result, patients have earlier access to modern treatment and thus formation of destructive changes in joints can be markedly delayed or even avoided. PMID:23494635

  3. An Experimental Study of Vortex-Flame Interaction Using Joint Filtered Rayleigh and Raman Scattering Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Sean P.; Schefer, Robert W.; Beresh, Steven J.; Grasser, Thomas W.

    2003-11-01

    In this work, the application of a filtered-Rayleigh-scattering (FRS) instrument for nonintrusive temperature imaging in a vortex-driven diffusion flame is described. The FRS technique provides quantitative, spatially correlated temperature data without the flow intrusion or time lag associated with physical probes. Use of a molecular iodine filter relaxes the requirement for clean, particulate-free flowfields and offers the potential for imaging near walls, test section windows and in sooty flames, all of which are precluded in conventional Rayleigh imaging, where background interference from these sources typically overwhelms the weak molecular scattering signal. For combustion applications, FRS allows for full-field temperature imaging without chemical seeding of the flowfield, which makes FRS an attractive option to other laser-based imaging methods such as planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF). In this work, the details of our FRS imaging system are presented and temperature measurements from an acoustically forced diffusion flame are provided. The local Rayleigh cross-section is corrected using Raman imaging measurements of the methane fuel molecule, which are then correlated to other major species using a laminar flamelet approach. To our knowledge, this is the first report of joint Raman/FRS imaging for nonpremixed combustion. FRS-temperature, Raman fuel-mole-fraction, and CH-chemiluminescence data are presented for the 7.5- and 90-Hz forcing frequencies in the forced Wolfhard-Parker burner previously studied by Mueller and Schefer [1]. The 7.5-Hz case shows the impact of a single fuel-side vortex interacting with the flame zone with changes in local flame temperature from as high as 2050 K (near adiabatic equilibrium) in regions of negative strain to values as low as 1700 K in regions of strong, positive strain. The FRS-measured temperatures in the 7.5-Hz flame were generally 50-100 K lower than nitrogen CARS measurements conducted in the same facility

  4. Geophysical Model Applications for Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Walter, W; Tkalcic, H; Franz, G; Gok, R; Rodgers, A

    2005-07-11

    Geophysical models constitute an important component of calibration for nuclear explosion monitoring. We will focus on four major topics and their applications: (1) surface wave models, (2) receiver function profiles, (3) regional tomography models, and (4) stochastic geophysical models. First, we continue to improve upon our surface wave model by adding more paths. This has allowed us to expand the region to all of Eurasia and into Africa, increase the resolution of our model, and extend results to even shorter periods (7 sec). High-resolution models exist for the Middle East and the YSKP region. The surface wave results can be inverted either alone, or in conjunction with other data, to derive models of the crust and upper mantle structure. One application of the group velocities is to construct phase-matched filters in combination with regional surface-wave magnitude formulas to improve the mb:Ms discriminant and extend it to smaller magnitude events. Next, we are using receiver functions, in joint inversions with the surface waves, to produce profiles directly under seismic stations throughout the region. In the past year, we have been focusing on deployments throughout the Middle East, including the Arabian Peninsula and Turkey. By assembling the results from many stations, we can see how regional seismic phases are affected by complicated upper mantle structure, including lithospheric thickness and anisotropy. The next geophysical model item, regional tomography models, can be used to predict regional travel times such as Pn and Sn. The times derived by the models can be used as a background model for empirical measurements or, where these don't exist, simply used as is. Finally, we have been exploring methodologies such as Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to generate data-driven stochastic models. We have applied this technique to the YSKP region using surface wave dispersion data, body wave travel time data, receiver functions, and gravity data. The models

  5. Robust image transmission using a new joint source channel coding algorithm and dual adaptive OFDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farshchian, Masoud; Cho, Sungdae; Pearlman, William A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of robust image coding and packetization for the purpose of communications over slow fading frequency selective channels and channels with a shaped spectrum like those of digital subscribe lines (DSL). Towards this end, a novel and analytically based joint source channel coding (JSCC) algorithm to assign unequal error protection is presented. Under a block budget constraint, the image bitstream is de-multiplexed into two classes with different error responses. The algorithm assigns unequal error protection (UEP) in a way to minimize the expected mean square error (MSE) at the receiver while minimizing the probability of catastrophic failure. In order to minimize the expected mean square error at the receiver, the algorithm assigns unequal protection to the value bit class (VBC) stream. In order to minimizes the probability of catastrophic error which is a characteristic of progressive image coders, the algorithm assigns more protection to the location bit class (LBC) stream than the VBC stream. Besides having the advantage of being analytical and also numerically solvable, the algorithm is based on a new formula developed to estimate the distortion rate (D-R) curve for the VBC portion of SPIHT. The major advantage of our technique is that the worst case instantaneous minimum peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) does not differ greatly from the averge MSE while this is not the case for the optimal single stream (UEP) system. Although both average PSNR of our method and the optimal single stream UEP are about the same, our scheme does not suffer erratic behavior because we have made the probability of catastrophic error arbitarily small. The coded image is sent via orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) which is a known and increasing popular modulation scheme to combat ISI (Inter Symbol Interference) and impulsive noise. Using dual adaptive energy OFDM, we use the minimum energy necessary to send each bit stream at a

  6. Fast super-resolution imaging with ultra-high labeling density achieved by joint tagging super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhiping; Chen, Xuanze; Wang, Hening; Huang, Ning; Shan, Chunyan; Zhang, Hao; Teng, Junlin; Xi, Peng

    2015-02-10

    Previous stochastic localization-based super-resolution techniques are largely limited by the labeling density and the fidelity to the morphology of specimen. We report on an optical super-resolution imaging scheme implementing joint tagging using multiple fluorescent blinking dyes associated with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (JT-SOFI), achieving ultra-high labeling density super-resolution imaging. To demonstrate the feasibility of JT-SOFI, quantum dots with different emission spectra were jointly labeled to the tubulin in COS7 cells, creating ultra-high density labeling. After analyzing and combining the fluorescence intermittency images emanating from spectrally resolved quantum dots, the microtubule networks are capable of being investigated with high fidelity and remarkably enhanced contrast at sub-diffraction resolution. The spectral separation also significantly decreased the frame number required for SOFI, enabling fast super-resolution microscopy through simultaneous data acquisition. As the joint-tagging scheme can decrease the labeling density in each spectral channel, thereby bring it closer to single-molecule state, we can faithfully reconstruct the continuous microtubule structure with high resolution through collection of only 100 frames per channel. The improved continuity of the microtubule structure is quantitatively validated with image skeletonization, thus demonstrating the advantage of JT-SOFI over other localization-based super-resolution methods.

  7. Fast Super-Resolution Imaging with Ultra-High Labeling Density Achieved by Joint Tagging Super-Resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhiping; Chen, Xuanze; Wang, Hening; Huang, Ning; Shan, Chunyan; Zhang, Hao; Teng, Junlin; Xi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Previous stochastic localization-based super-resolution techniques are largely limited by the labeling density and the fidelity to the morphology of specimen. We report on an optical super-resolution imaging scheme implementing joint tagging using multiple fluorescent blinking dyes associated with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (JT-SOFI), achieving ultra-high labeling density super-resolution imaging. To demonstrate the feasibility of JT-SOFI, quantum dots with different emission spectra were jointly labeled to the tubulin in COS7 cells, creating ultra-high density labeling. After analyzing and combining the fluorescence intermittency images emanating from spectrally resolved quantum dots, the microtubule networks are capable of being investigated with high fidelity and remarkably enhanced contrast at sub-diffraction resolution. The spectral separation also significantly decreased the frame number required for SOFI, enabling fast super-resolution microscopy through simultaneous data acquisition. As the joint-tagging scheme can decrease the labeling density in each spectral channel, thereby bring it closer to single-molecule state, we can faithfully reconstruct the continuous microtubule structure with high resolution through collection of only 100 frames per channel. The improved continuity of the microtubule structure is quantitatively validated with image skeletonization, thus demonstrating the advantage of JT-SOFI over other localization-based super-resolution methods. PMID:25665878

  8. Imaging the M7.9 Denali Fault Earthquake 2002 rupture at the Delta River using LiDAR, RADAR, and SASW Surface Wave Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayen, R.; Barnhardt, W.; Carkin, B.; Collins, B. D.; Grossman, E. E.; Minasian, D.; Thompson, E.

    2004-12-01

    The Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake of 3 November 2002 resulted in approximately 5.5 meters of right-lateral offset and sub-meter (0.6m average) up-to-the north vertical displacement of alluvial deposits of the Delta River. We characterize the surface rupture and shallow fault structure of the Denali fault zone at the Delta River in order to better understand these most recent displacements and to estimate the total vertical offset of alluvium above glacially scoured bedrock. To analyze deformations along the fault-trace, we performed tripod-mounted ground-based LiDAR surveys, and Spectral analysis of Surface Wave (SASW) and Ground Penetrating RADAR (GPR) geophysical investigations. These studies were performed between the Trans-Alaska Pipeline (TAPS) corridor on the terrace deposits of the eastern flanks of the Delta River valley and the steeply sloping bedrock surface on the western side of the river. To produce digital terrain models (DTM) of the surface break we used a Riegl Z210i Laser-scanner to image eight independent LiDAR scans, and ISite3D modeling software to merge these scans into three DTM surfaces. We find that using a rotating scanning-laser allows us to produce ultra-high resolution quantitative DTMs for geomorphic analysis that can be used to resolve features and detect topographic changes on a fine-scale (0.9-2.5cm). Local geo-referencing control points are established using fixed auto reflectors. The near subsurface alluvium was imaged using reflection-based (GPR). A suite of parallel and orthogonal GPR reflection lines were measured to develop block models of the surface rupture at two locations. Radar imagery clearly delineates a plane of chaotic reflectors across the rupture zone. To characterize the depth of alluvium over bedrock on either side of the fault, we used the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) approach to invert the near-surface shear wave velocity profile. An Alyeska Co. Catepillar D9N track-mounted dozer was used as a high

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Treatment of Equine Distal Interphalangeal Joint Collateral Ligaments: 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    White, Nathaniel A; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    To determine the outcome of treating distal interphalangeal joint collateral ligament (DIJCL) desmopathy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided ligament injection. Medical records of 13 adult horses diagnosed with DIJCL desmopathy using low-field MRI and treated by MRI-guided ligament injection of mesenchymal stem cells and/or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were reviewed. Information collected included signalment, MRI diagnosis, treatment type, time to resolution of lameness, and level of exercise after treatment. Collateral ligament inflammation was diagnosed as a cause of lameness in 13 horses. MRI was used to guide the injection of the injured DIJCL. All lameness attributed to DIJCL desmopathy resolved with the resulting level of performance at expected (10) or less than expected (3). Injection of the DIJCL can be safely completed in horses standing in a low-field magnet guided by MRI as previously demonstrated in cadaver specimens. The positive response in all horses suggests that administration of stem cells or PRP along with rest and appropriate shoeing may be a safe and useful treatment for DIJCL desmopathy.

  10. Joint segmentation of 3D femoral lumen and outer wall surfaces from MR images.

    PubMed

    Ukwatta, Eranga; Yuan, Jing; Qiu, Wu; Rajchl, Martin; Chiu, Bernard; Shavakh, Shadi; Xu, Jianrong; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel algorithm to jointly delineate the femoral artery lumen and outer wall surfaces from 3D black-blood MR images, while enforcing the spatial consistency of the reoriented MR slices along the medial axis of the femoral artery. We demonstrate that the resulting optimization problem of the proposed segmentation can be solved globally and exactly by means of convex relaxation, for which we introduce a novel coupled continuous max-flow (CCOMF) model based on an Ishikawa-type flow configuration and show its duality to the studied convex relaxed optimization problem. Using the proposed CCMF model, the exactness and globalness of its dual convex relaxation problem is proven. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method yielded high accuracy (i.e. Dice similarity coefficient > 85%) for both the lumen and outer wall and high reproducibility (intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.95) for generating vessel wall area. The proposed method outperformed the previous method, in terms of computation time, by a factor of pproximately 20.

  11. Hyperspectral Image Classification via Multitask Joint Sparse Representation and Stepwise MRF Optimization.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Lin, Jianzhe; Wang, Qi

    2016-12-01

    Hyperspectral image (HSI) classification is a crucial issue in remote sensing. Accurate classification benefits a large number of applications such as land use analysis and marine resource utilization. But high data correlation brings difficulty to reliable classification, especially for HSI with abundant spectral information. Furthermore, the traditional methods often fail to well consider the spatial coherency of HSI that also limits the classification performance. To address these inherent obstacles, a novel spectral-spatial classification scheme is proposed in this paper. The proposed method mainly focuses on multitask joint sparse representation (MJSR) and a stepwise Markov random filed framework, which are claimed to be two main contributions in this procedure. First, the MJSR not only reduces the spectral redundancy, but also retains necessary correlation in spectral field during classification. Second, the stepwise optimization further explores the spatial correlation that significantly enhances the classification accuracy and robustness. As far as several universal quality evaluation indexes are concerned, the experimental results on Indian Pines and Pavia University demonstrate the superiority of our method compared with the state-of-the-art competitors.

  12. Multimodal image registration using floating regressors in the joint intensity scatter plot.

    PubMed

    Orchard, Jeff

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents a new approach for multimodal medical image registration and compares it to normalized mutual information (NMI) and the correlation ratio (CR). Like NMI and CR, the new method's measure of registration quality is based on the distribution of points in the joint intensity scatter plot (JISP); compact clusters indicate good registration. This method iteratively fits the JISP clusters with regressors (in the form of points and line segments), and uses those regressors to efficiently compute the next motion increment. The result is a striking, dynamic process in which the regressors float around the JISP, tracking groups of points as they contract into tight clusters. One of the method's strengths is that it is intuitive and customizable, offering a multitude of ways to incorporate prior knowledge to guide the registration process. Moreover, the method is adaptive, and can adjust itself to fit data that does not quite match the prior model. Finally, the method is efficiently expandable to higher-dimensional scatter plots, avoiding the "curse of dimensionality" inherent in histogram-based registration methods such as MI and NMI. In two sets of experiments, a simple implementation of the new registration framework is shown to be comparable to (if not superior to) state-of-the-art implementations of NMI and CR in both accuracy and convergence robustness.

  13. Joint Traveltime and Waveform Envelope Inversion for Near-surface Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiyang; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-01

    In the linearized seismic full waveform inversion (FWI), it is well known that a good initial model is needed to avoid cycle-skipping issue, especially when the low-frequency components of data are lacking. To solve the problem, we develop a joint first-arrival traveltime and early arrival envelope inversion method (JTE) to build a good near-surface velocity model with low-wavenumber components. The JTE method combines the robustness of nonlinear traveltime inversion and the low-frequency information embedded in the waveform envelope. In two synthetic experiments, we confirm that traveltime inversion constrains the top near-surface velocity structures tightly, while the envelope inversion recovers the low-wavenumber structures with low-velocity objects or layers. Using the results of JTE as starting models, we find that FWI can produce accurate solutions for complex numerical models. In a real-data example, JTE followed by FWI resolves a near-surface velocity model to improve statics corrections for the subsurface stacking image.

  14. Technetium-99m-labeled annexin V imaging for detecting prosthetic joint infection in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cheng; Wang, Feng; Hou, Yanjie; Lu, Shanshan; Tian, Wei; Xu, Yan; Jin, Chengzhe; Wang, Liming

    2015-05-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection is essential to initiate early treatment and achieve a favorable outcome. In this study, we used a rabbit model to assess the feasibility of technetium-99m-labeled annexin V for detecting prosthetic joint infection. Right knee arthroplasty was performed on 24 New Zealand rabbits. After surgery, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus was intra-articularly injected to create a model of prosthetic joint infection (the infected group, n = 12). Rabbits in the control group were injected with sterile saline (n = 12). Seven and 21 days after surgery, technetium-99m-labeled annexin V imaging was performed in 6 rabbits of each group. Images were acquired 1 and 4 hours after injection of technetium-99m-labeled annexin V (150 MBq). The operated-to-normal-knee activity ratios were calculated for quantitative analysis. Seven days after surgery, increased technetium-99m-labeled annexin V uptake was observed in all cases. However, at 21 days a notable decrease was found in the control group, but not in the infected group. The operated-to-normal-knee activity ratios of the infected group were 1.84 ± 0.29 in the early phase and 2.19 ± 0.34 in the delay phase, both of which were significantly higher than those of the control group (P = 0.03 and P = 0.02). The receiver operator characteristic curve analysis showed that the operated-to-normal-knee activity ratios of the delay phase at 21 days was the best indicator, with an accuracy of 80%. In conclusion, technetium-99m-labeled annexin V imaging could effectively distinguish an infected prosthetic joint from an uninfected prosthetic joint in a rabbit model.

  15. Dynamic high-resolution sonography compared to magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disk displacement.

    PubMed

    Habashi, Hadeel; Eran, Ayelet; Blumenfeld, Israel; Gaitini, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of dynamic high-resolution sonography for evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk displacement compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the mouth closed and during the maximal mandibular range of motion. Dynamic high-resolution sonography with the mouth closed and during the maximal mandibular range of motion was performed on 39 consecutive patients (78 joints; 13 male and 26 female; age range, 18-77 years; mean age ± SD, 37.23 ± 16.26 years) with TMJ disorders. A TMJ MRI study was performed 1 to 7 days after sonography. We searched for signs of disk displacement and findings compatible with degenerative joint disease. Both studies were performed and interpreted independently by blinded operators. Magnetic resonance imaging depicted 22 normal joints (28.2%), 21 (26.9%) with anterior disk displacement with reduction, 15 (19.2%) with anterior disk displacement without reduction, and 20 (25.6%) with degenerative disease. Sonography depicted 30 normal joints (38.5%), 22 (28.2%) with anterior disk displacement with reduction, 12 (15.4%) with anterior disk displacement without reduction, and 14 (17.9%) with degenerative disease. The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of sonography for diagnosis of disk displacement were 74.3%, 84.2%, and 77.7%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for diagnosis of disk displacement with reduction were 78.6%, 66.7%, and 73.0%, and the values for diagnosis of disk displacement without reduction were 66.7%, 78.6%, and 73.0%. Dynamic high-resolution sonography is a potential imaging method for diagnosis of TMJ disk displacement and degenerative diseases. Further studies are needed to make dynamic high-resolution sonography the first-line test for diagnosis of TMJ disk displacement. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  16. Image denoising using trivariate shrinkage filter in the wavelet domain and joint bilateral filter in the spatial domain.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hancheng; Zhao, Li; Wang, Haixian

    2009-10-01

    This correspondence proposes an efficient algorithm for removing Gaussian noise from corrupted image by incorporating a wavelet-based trivariate shrinkage filter with a spatial-based joint bilateral filter. In the wavelet domain, the wavelet coefficients are modeled as trivariate Gaussian distribution, taking into account the statistical dependencies among intrascale wavelet coefficients, and then a trivariate shrinkage filter is derived by using the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator. Although wavelet-based methods are efficient in image denoising, they are prone to producing salient artifacts such as low-frequency noise and edge ringing which relate to the st