Science.gov

Sample records for joint military operations

  1. Developing a pharmaceutical formulary for joint military medical operations.

    PubMed

    Caouette, Marc L

    2005-02-01

    This article describes the development of a standardized formulary for medical contingency operations for any theater of operations. The article compares peacetime health care systems within the Department of Defense and the formulary systems developed and used within the fixed facility environment with Department of Defense contingency health care operations systems and the complications encountered while attempting formulary development for the deployed environment. Despite great difficulties, the Joint Readiness Clinical Advisory Board developed, published, and marketed a jointly approved, standardized, modernized formulary to assist forces deploying for Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. The process used by the Joint Readiness Clinical Advisory Board during formulary development is described in detail, giving readers an understanding of the foundations of the Joint Deployment Formulary. The military departments will experience the benefits of enhanced supply chain predictability and responsiveness, increased clinician satisfaction, and improved patient safety and health care quality by implementing the Joint Deployment Formulary for their forces engaged in contingency operations. PMID:15782828

  2. Distance Learning in Advanced Military Education: Analysis of Joint Operations Course in the Taiwan Military

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tung, Ming-Chih; Huang, Jiung-yao; Keh, Huan-Chao; Wai, Shu-shen

    2009-01-01

    High-ranking officers require advanced military education in war tactics for future combat. However, line officers rarely have time to take such courses on campus. The conventional solution to this problem used to take the inefficient correspondence courses. Whereas Internet technologies progress, online course is the current trend for military…

  3. Operational Stress and Correlates of Mental Health Among Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Webb-Murphy, Jennifer A; De La Rosa, Gabriel M; Schmitz, Kimberly J; Vishnyak, Elizabeth J; Raducha, Stephanie C; Roesch, Scott C; Johnston, Scott L

    2015-12-01

    Military personnel deployed to Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay (JTF-GTMO) faced numerous occupational stressors. As part of a program evaluation, personnel working at JTF-GTMO completed several validated self-report measures. Personnel were at the beginning, middle, or end of their deployment phase. This study presents data regarding symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, alcohol abuse, depression, and resilience among 498 U.S. military personnel deployed to JTF-GTMO in 2009. We also investigated individual and organizational correlates of mental health among these personnel. Findings indicated that tenure at JTF-GTMO was positively related to adverse mental health outcomes. Regression models including these variables had R2 values ranging from .02 to .11. Occupation at JTF-GTMO also related to mental health such that guards reported poorer mental health than medical staff. Reluctance to seek out mental health care was also related to mental health outcomes. Those who reported being most reluctant to seek out care tended to report poorer mental health than those who were more willing to seek out care. Results suggested that the JTF-GTMO deployment was associated with significant psychological stress, and that both job-related and attitude-related variables were important to understanding mental health symptoms in this sample.

  4. Simulation and modeling for military air operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreichauf, Ruth D.; Bedros, Saad; Ateskan, Yusuf; Hespanha, Joao; Kizilocak, Hakan

    2001-09-01

    The Joint Forces Air Component Commander (JFACC) in military air operations controls the allocation of resources (wings, squadrons, air defense systems, AWACS) to different geographical locations in the theater of operations. The JFACC mission is to define a sequence of tasks for the aerospace systems at each location, and providing feedback control for the execution of these tasks in the presence of uncertainties and a hostile enemy. Honeywell Labs has been developing an innovative method for control of military air operations. The novel model predictive control (MPC) method extends the models and optimization algorithms utilized in traditional model predictive control systems. The enhancements include a tasking controller and, in a joint effort with USC, a probabilistic threat/survival map indicating high threat regions for aircraft and suggesting optimal routes to avoid these regions. A simulation/modeling environment using object-oriented methodologies has been developed to serve as an aide to demonstrate the value of MPC and facilitate its development. The simulation/modeling environment is based on an open architecture that enables the integration, evaluation, and implementation of different control approaches. The simulation offers a graphical user interface displaying the battlefield, the control performance, and a probability map displaying high threat regions. This paper describes the features of the different control approaches and their integration into the simulation environment.

  5. Military Sleep Management: An Operational Imperative.

    PubMed

    Mysliwiec, Vincent; Walter, Robert J; Collen, Jacob; Wesensten, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is critical for military operational readiness but is commonly disregarded during operational planning. The start of combat operations with Operation Iraqi Freedom saw a dramatic rise in diagnosis rates of clinically significant sleep disorders among officers and enlisted. This coincided with a parallel rise in behavioral health disorders. In this article, the etiology of sleep problems and sleep disorders in our military population is reviewed, and guidance is provided for improving sleep health in our military population. It is our view that appropriate sleep planning and management affords military units and commanders a near-term tactical advantage in terms of maintaining alertness, a midterm tactical advantage of decreasing susceptibility to sleep and behavioral health disorders, and a long-term strategic advantage with increased readiness and resiliency of their Soldiers. PMID:27215880

  6. Cultural intelligence support for military operations

    SciTech Connect

    Guthormsen, Amy M.; MacKerrow, Edward P; Merritt, Terence M; Morgart, Ruth E

    2010-04-08

    It has long been recognized that military success relies on knowledge of the enemy. In the context of standard warfare, adequate knowledge of the enemy may be gained by analyzing observable, measurable data. In the context of modern counterinsurgency operations and the global war on terror, the task of predicting the behavior of the enemy is vastly more complex and difficult. Without an understanding of the ways individuals in the host nation interpret and react to events, no amount of objective information can provide the insight required to accurately predict behavior. US military doctrine has begun to recognize the importance of the many ways that local culture can affect operation success. Increasingly military decision makers use cultural information in the service of operation planning, and troops are provided with pre-deployment cultural training. However, no amount of training can cover the breadth and depth of potentially useful cultural information, and no amount of careful planning can avoid the need to adapt as situations develop. Therefore, a critical challenge is to provide useful tools to US personnel in their efforts to collect, analyze, and utilize cultural information. Essential functions for cultural support tools include the following: (1) to narrow down a broad range of available data and focus the user's attention on context-relevant information, (2) to present cultural information in an easily understood form, (3) to prompt the user to seek relevant information in the environment, (4) to synthesize information, and (5) to predict outcomes based on possible courses of operation. In this paper, we begin by reviewing the ways in which military operations can benefit from cultural intelligence. We then discuss frameworks for analyzing cultural information in the context of a military operation. We conclude with a demonstration of our current efforts to develop a tool that meets the aforementioned functional challenges.

  7. The application of CRM to military operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanagh, Dale E.; Williams, Kenneth R.

    1987-01-01

    The detailed content of the CRM training component of the C-5 Aircrew Training System (ATS) was left to the discretion of the contractor. As a part of determining what the content should be, United Airlines Services Corporation has made an effort to understand how the needs of MAC crews compare with those of civilian airline crews. There are distinct similarities between the crew roles in the cockpits of civilian airliners and military air transports. Many of the attitudes and behaviors exhibited by civil and military crew members are comparable, hence much of the training in the field referred to as Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) is equally appropriate to civil or military aircrews. At the same time, there are significant differences which require assessment to determine if modifications to what might be termed generic CRM are necessary. The investigation enabled the definition and specification of CRM training which is believed to address the needs of the C-5 operational community. The study has concentrated largely on military airlift, but the training objectives and course content of the CRM training are readily adaptable to a wider range of military cockpits than are found in strategic airlift. For instance, CRM training focusing on communication, leadership, situational awareness, and crew coordination is just as appropriate, with some modification, to the pilots manning a flight to Tactical Airlift Command A-7's as it is to the pilots, flight engineers, and loadmasters crewing a C-5.

  8. Medical supply on contingency military operations: experience from Operation GRITROCK.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J P; Reeves, P

    2015-01-01

    Medical supply during military operations has the ability to affect the efficacy of the operation being undertaken, either negatively or positively. An appropriately-managed maritime platform with a robust medical supply chain during transit and on arrival in theatre is the main aim. A secure supply chain will reduce any implications that logistics may have with regard to capability, and negate the effects of deficiencies of short shelf life items occurring over time and during use in high tempo operations. PMID:26867409

  9. Medical supply on contingency military operations: experience from Operation GRITROCK.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J P; Reeves, P

    2015-01-01

    Medical supply during military operations has the ability to affect the efficacy of the operation being undertaken, either negatively or positively. An appropriately-managed maritime platform with a robust medical supply chain during transit and on arrival in theatre is the main aim. A secure supply chain will reduce any implications that logistics may have with regard to capability, and negate the effects of deficiencies of short shelf life items occurring over time and during use in high tempo operations.

  10. Military Personnel: Joint Officer Development Has Improved, But a Strategic Approach Is Needed. Report to the Subcommittee on Military Personnel, Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    In response to the need of military leaders to be better prepared to plan, support, and conduct joint (multi-service and multi-national) operations, Congress enacted the Goldwater- Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986. Positive steps were taken to implement provisions in the Act that address the education, assignment, and…

  11. Planning and operational considerations for units utilizing military working dogs.

    PubMed

    Royal, Joseph; Taylor, Charles L

    2009-01-01

    Military working dogs are rapidly becoming integral to military operations. While they bring many valuable capabilities to the battlefield, it is important that Special Operations leaders consider canine team capabilities and requirements when planning missions. Careful logistical and operational planning can optimize the health, performance, and readiness of the working dog while protecting the safety and well-being of the team members working with them. We also offer recommendations for medical treatment of dog bites.

  12. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Joint operations. 225.23 Section 225.23....23 Joint operations. (a) Any reportable death, injury, or illness of an employee arising from an accident/incident involving joint operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the...

  13. 7 CFR 1400.203 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Joint operations. 1400.203 Section 1400.203... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.203 Joint operations. (a) A member of a joint operation will be considered to be actively engaged in farming with respect to...

  14. 7 CFR 1400.203 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Joint operations. 1400.203 Section 1400.203... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.203 Joint operations. (a) A member of a joint operation will be considered to be actively engaged in farming with respect to...

  15. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Joint operations. 225.23 Section 225.23....23 Joint operations. (a) Any reportable death, injury, or illness of an employee arising from an accident/incident involving joint operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the...

  16. 7 CFR 1400.203 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Joint operations. 1400.203 Section 1400.203... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.203 Joint operations. (a) A member of a joint operation will be considered to be actively engaged in farming with respect to...

  17. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Joint operations. 225.23 Section 225.23....23 Joint operations. (a) Any reportable death, injury, or illness of an employee arising from an accident/incident involving joint operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the...

  18. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Joint operations. 225.23 Section 225.23....23 Joint operations. (a) Any reportable death, injury, or illness of an employee arising from an accident/incident involving joint operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the...

  19. 7 CFR 1400.203 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint operations. 1400.203 Section 1400.203... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.203 Joint operations. (a) A member of a joint operation will be considered to be actively engaged in farming with respect to...

  20. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Joint operations. 225.23 Section 225.23....23 Joint operations. (a) Any reportable death, injury, or illness of an employee arising from an accident/incident involving joint operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the...

  1. 7 CFR 1400.203 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint operations. 1400.203 Section 1400.203... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.203 Joint operations. (a) A member of a joint operation will be considered to be actively engaged in farming with respect to...

  2. An innovative medical civil-military operation training program.

    PubMed

    Lougee, Douglas; Kemmer, Teresa M; Lynch, Julia

    2007-02-01

    The San Antonio Military Pediatric Center has developed an innovative humanitarian civic assistance (HCA) program. Many medical HCA programs focus on short-term medical interventions and provide transient benefit. To have a more lasting impact, this program focuses on public health surveillance. U.S. military medics conduct random household nutritional surveys and train in austere settings and on rounds in Honduran hospitals. Since 2001, >200 military medics have been trained in population assessment, primary medical care in developing nations, and other skills critical for medical civil-military operations. All activities are coordinated with the host nation. Public health data are collected and reported to Honduran public health leaders, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and nongovernmental organizations, to assist with program and policy development. This innovative project is a potential model to improve both military training and host nation benefit from HCA programs. PMID:17357779

  3. Nursing advocacy during a military operation.

    PubMed

    Foley, B J; Minick, P; Kee, C

    2000-06-01

    Advocacy is an essential component of the registered nurse's professional role, yet experts provide no consistent definition of advocacy. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of military nurses as they engage in advocating practices and to describe their shared practices and common meanings. Heideggerian hermeneutic phenomenology, provided the framework and method for this study. Twenty-four U.S. Army nurses were individually interviewed and the researcher kept interview observational notes. The constant comparative method of analysis was used. The stories of these nurses revealed one constitutive pattern--safeguarding--and four related themes. The themes were advocating as protecting, advocating as attending the whole person, advocating as being the patient's voice, and advocating as preserving personhood. One conclusion was that military nurses must be prepared for the important safe-guarding role. They must be coached in how to deal with other members of the health team on the patient's behalf. PMID:10826256

  4. GIS applications for military operations in coastal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, S.; Jordan, T.; Madden, M.; Usery, E. L.; Welch, R.

    In order to successfully support current and future US military operations in coastal zones, geospatial information must be rapidly integrated and analyzed to meet ongoing force structure evolution and new mission directives. Coastal zones in a military-operational environment are complex regions that include sea, land and air features that demand high-volume databases of extreme detail within relatively narrow geographic corridors. Static products in the form of analog maps at varying scales traditionally have been used by military commanders and their operational planners. The rapidly changing battlefield of 21st Century warfare, however, demands dynamic mapping solutions. Commercial geographic information system (GIS) software for military-specific applications is now being developed and employed with digital databases to provide customized digital maps of variable scale, content and symbolization tailored to unique demands of military units. Research conducted by the Center for Remote Sensing and Mapping Science at the University of Georgia demonstrated the utility of GIS-based analysis and digital map creation when developing large-scale (1:10,000) products from littoral warfare databases. The methodology employed-selection of data sources (including high resolution commercial images and Lidar), establishment of analysis/modeling parameters, conduct of vehicle mobility analysis, development of models and generation of products (such as a continuous sea-land DEM and geo-visualization of changing shorelines with tidal levels)-is discussed. Based on observations and identified needs from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, formerly the National Imagery and Mapping Agency, and the Department of Defense, prototype GIS models for military operations in sea, land and air environments were created from multiple data sets of a study area at US Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Results of these models, along with methodologies for developing large

  5. Benign joint hypermobility syndrome in soldiers; what is the effect of military training courses on associated joint instabilities?

    PubMed Central

    Azma, Kamran; Mottaghi, Peyman; Hosseini, Alireza; Abadi, Hossein Hassan; Nouraei, Mohammad Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypermobile joints are joints with beyond normal range of motion and may be associated with joint derangements. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) among soldiers and effect of training courses on related joint instabilities. Materials and Methods: In a prospective cohort study on 721 soldiers of Iran Army in Isfahan in 2013 the prevalence of joint hypermobility was obtained by using Beighton criteria. Soldiers divided in two groups of healthy and suffered based on their scores. The prevalence of ankle sprain, shoulder and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocations identified before beginning service by history-taking and reviewing paraclinical documents. After 3 months of military training, a recent occurrence of mentioned diseases was revaluated in two groups. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS-20 software using Independent-T and Chi-square tests. Results: The frequency of BJHS before military training was 29.4%. After passing military training period, the incidence of ankle sprain was significantly higher in suffered group achieving the minimum Beighton score (BS) of 4 (4.3%, P = 0.03), 5 (5.5%, P = 0.005) and also 6 out of 9 (6.5%, P = 0.01). The incidence of TMJ dislocation was not significantly different based on a minimum score of 4, while it was higher in suffered group when considering the score of 5 (2.1%) and 6 (2.6%) for discrimination of two groups (P = 0.03). There was no significant difference between two groups in case of shoulder dislocation anyway. Conclusion: Military training can increase the incidence of ankle sprains and TMJ dislocations in hypermobility persons with higher BS in comparison with healthy people. Therefore, screening of joint hypermobility may be useful in identifying individuals at increased risk for joint instabilities. PMID:25364364

  6. Peacekeeping and stability operations: a military surgeon's perspective.

    PubMed

    Starnes, Benjamin W

    2006-06-01

    Military surgeons serve a unique role in peacekeeping and stability operations and in response to natural disasters. Military medical units are the best medical resource to respond early in times of cri-sis but are often less equipped for prolonged missions and subsequent management of the chronic health care needs of the masses. Because endemic and host-nation diseases often add complexity to the management of these cases, military surgeons must perform operations outside the scope of their usual civilian practice. The primary medical mission is to treat the peacekeeping force, but the reality lies in eventually treating the refugees and victims of hostile conflict, including women, small children, and the elderly. This article explores the unique features of a surgeon's role in the support of these missions. PMID:16781280

  7. GIS applications for military operations in coastal zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, S.; Jordan, T.; Madden, M.; Usery, E.L.; Welch, R.

    2009-01-01

    In order to successfully support current and future US military operations in coastal zones, geospatial information must be rapidly integrated and analyzed to meet ongoing force structure evolution and new mission directives. Coastal zones in a military-operational environment are complex regions that include sea, land and air features that demand high-volume databases of extreme detail within relatively narrow geographic corridors. Static products in the form of analog maps at varying scales traditionally have been used by military commanders and their operational planners. The rapidly changing battlefield of 21st Century warfare, however, demands dynamic mapping solutions. Commercial geographic information system (GIS) software for military-specific applications is now being developed and employed with digital databases to provide customized digital maps of variable scale, content and symbolization tailored to unique demands of military units. Research conducted by the Center for Remote Sensing and Mapping Science at the University of Georgia demonstrated the utility of GIS-based analysis and digital map creation when developing large-scale (1:10,000) products from littoral warfare databases. The methodology employed-selection of data sources (including high resolution commercial images and Lidar), establishment of analysis/modeling parameters, conduct of vehicle mobility analysis, development of models and generation of products (such as a continuous sea-land DEM and geo-visualization of changing shorelines with tidal levels)-is discussed. Based on observations and identified needs from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, formerly the National Imagery and Mapping Agency, and the Department of Defense, prototype GIS models for military operations in sea, land and air environments were created from multiple data sets of a study area at US Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Results of these models, along with methodologies for developing large

  8. 48 CFR 252.246-7004 - Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. 252.246-7004 Section 252.246-7004 Federal Acquisition..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. As prescribed in 246.270-4, use the following clause: SAFETY OF FACILITIES, INFRASTRUCTURE, AND EQUIPMENT FOR MILITARY OPERATIONS (OCT 2010) (a)...

  9. 48 CFR 252.246-7004 - Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. 252.246-7004 Section 252.246-7004 Federal Acquisition..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. As prescribed in 246.270-4, use the following clause: Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations (OCT 2010) (a)...

  10. 48 CFR 252.246-7004 - Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. 252.246-7004 Section 252.246-7004 Federal Acquisition..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. As prescribed in 246.270-4, use the following clause: Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations (OCT 2010) (a)...

  11. 48 CFR 252.246-7004 - Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. 252.246-7004 Section 252.246-7004 Federal Acquisition..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. As prescribed in 246.270-4, use the following clause: Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations (OCT 2010) (a)...

  12. Toxoplasmosis in military personnel involved in jungle operations.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique; de-la-Torre, Alejandra; Barrios, Patricia; Cardona, Nestor; Álvarez, Catalina; Herrera, Claudia

    2012-04-01

    Tropical diseases, mainly leishmaniasis and malaria, increased among Colombian military personnel due to intensive operations in the jungle in the last ten years; as a result the Colombian army developed important preventive strategies for malaria and leishmaniasis. However, no knowledge exists about toxoplasmosis, an emergent disease in military personnel. We compared the prevalence of IgG anti-Toxoplasma antibodies by ELISA and of parasitaemia by a real time PCR assay, in 500 professional soldiers that operated in the jungle with a group of 501 soldiers working in an urban zone (Bogotá). We found that the prevalence was significantly different between both groups of soldiers (80% in soldiers operating in jungle vs. 45% in urban soldiers, adjusted OR 11.4; CI 95%: 3.8-34; p<0.0001). All soldiers operating in the jungle drink unboiled and chlorine untreated lake or river water. In urban soldiers, these risk factors along with eating wild animal meat or eating tigrillo (little spotted cat) were significantly associated with a higher prevalence. Characteristic toxoplasmic choriorretinal lesions were found in 4 soldiers that operated in the jungle (0.8%) and in one urban soldier (0.19%). All soldiers before being deployed in jungle operations should be tested for Toxoplasma antibodies and to receive adequate health information about the routine use of personnel filters to purify their water for consumption.

  13. Military Exercises, Knee and Ankle Joint Position Sense, and Injury in Male Conscripts: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Farshid; Azma, Kamran; Naseh, Iman; Emadifard, Reza; Etemadi, Yasaman

    2013-01-01

    Context: The high incidence of lower limb injuries associated with physical exercises in military conscripts suggests that fatigue may be a risk factor for injuries. Researchers have hypothesized that lower limb injuries may be related to altered ankle and knee joint position sense (JPS) due to fatigue. Objective: To evaluate if military exercises could alter JPS and to examine the possible relation of JPS to future lower extremity injuries in military service. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 50 male conscripts (age = 21.4 ± 2.3 years, height = 174.5 ± 6.4 cm, mass = 73.1 ± 6.3 kg) from a unique military base were recruited randomly. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants performed 8 weeks of physical activities at the beginning of a military course. In the first part of the study, we instructed participants to recognize predetermined positions before and after military exercises so we could examine the effects of military exercise on JPS. The averages of the absolute error and the variable error of 3 trials were recorded. We collected data on the frequency of lower extremity injuries over 8 weeks. Next, the participants were divided into 2 groups: injured and uninjured. Separate 2 × 2 × 2 (group-by-time-by-joint) mixed-model analyses of variance were used to determine main effects and interactions of these factors for each JPS measure. In the second part of the study, we examined whether the effects of fatigue on JPS were related to the development of injury during an 8-week training program. We calculated Hedges effect sizes for JPS changes postexercise in each group and compared change scores between groups. Results: We found group-by-time interactions for all JPS variables (F range = 2.86–4.05, P < .01). All participants showed increases in JPS errors postexercise (P < .01), but the injured group had greater changes for all the variables (P < .01). Conclusions: Military conscripts who sustained lower

  14. A novel surveillance system for rescue and military operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Win, Yin Thu; Ashraf, Muhammad Waseem; Afzulpurkar, Nitin; Tayyaba, Shahzadi; Htun, Hla Thar; Punyasai, Chumnarm

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, a novel design of ultrasonic based surveillance system for rescue and military operations has been presented. The developed system consists of electronic module, transmitter, receiver, digital to analogue converter, liquid crystal display (LCD) and power supply. First, the mathematical model has been presented for the object detection system. Then the numerical simulation has been performed using Matlab plate form. The experiments have been conducted using ultrasonic frequencies. The thin cloth, thin curtain, thick curtain, paper and transparent plastic have been considered as a media during experiments. The presented system is highly accurate for object detection behind the obstacle.

  15. Novel Cooling Strategies for Military Training and Operations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason K W; Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2015-11-01

    The deleterious effects of environmental heat stress, combined with high metabolic loads and protective clothing and equipment of the modern Warfighter, impose severe heat strain, impair task performance, and increase risk of heat illness, thereby reducing the chance for mission success. Despite the implementation of heat-risk mitigation procedures over the past decades, task performance still suffers and exertional heat illness remains a major military problem. We review 3 novel heat mitigation strategies that may be implemented in the training or operational environment to reduce heat strain and the risk of exertional heat illness. These strategies include ingestion of ice slurry, arm immersion cooling, and microclimate cooling. Each of these strategies is suitable for use in different scenarios and the choice of cooling strategy is contingent on the requirements, circumstances, and constraints of the training and operational scenario. Ingestion of ice slurry and arm immersion cooling are practical strategies that may be implemented during training scenarios; ice slurry can be ingested before and during exercise, whereas arm immersion cooling can be administered after exercise-heat exposure. In the operational environment, existing microclimate cooling can be implemented with retrofitted vehicles and as an unmounted system, and it has the potential for use in many military occupational scenarios. This review will discuss the efficacy, limitations, and practical considerations for field implementation of each strategy. PMID:26506203

  16. An introduction to the special section on U.S. military operations: effects on military members' partners and children.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Michelle L; Jouriles, Ernest N

    2011-08-01

    The deployment of U.S. military personnel to global hot spots, whether as combatants or as peacekeepers, has increased attention to the psychological well-being of military personnel and their family members. Despite the growing awareness that deployments have reverberating effects on all family members, theoretical explanations and empirical research on the impact of deployment on couple, family, and child adjustment, factors that serve to protect families from the demands of military employment, and effective methods of treating the mental health needs of military families are needed. The seven papers in this section increase our understanding of how the demands of U.S. military operations impact couples, family functioning, parenting, and child psychological adjustment and provide an additional resource for mental health professionals who work with these families.

  17. Medical support of military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Bochniak, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    The system of medical support in the territory of military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan is based on four levels of medical treatment. Level 4 is organized outside the war theatre, in the territories of the countries that are a part of the stabilization forces of international organizations (NATO). Both the tasks and the structure of medical support are adjusted to fit the requirements of the U.S. Forces. The same tasks and structure are also recognized by medical services of other NATO countries participating in military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Each subsequent level of medical support is progressively more highly specialized and capable of providing more advanced medical treatment in comparison to the preceding level. Medical evacuation is executed either by air or overland depending on the type of illness or injury as well as the tactical situation prevailing in the combat zone. The aim of this paper is to present the planning, challenges, and problems of medical assistance in the contemporary battlefield. PMID:21534227

  18. Cardiovascular Complaints Among Military Members During Operation Enduring Freedom.

    PubMed

    Watts, James A; Russo, Frank D; Villines, Todd C; Jones, Samuel O; Patino, Gilberto; Nasir, Javed M; Eckart, Robert E; Steel, Kevin E

    2016-01-01

    During Operation Enduring Freedom, the US military began deploying a dedicated theater cardiology consultant to Afghanistan in an effort to increase rates of return to duty in service members with cardiovascular complaints. This study was designed to categorize these complaints and determine the effect on both aeromedical evacuation and return to duty rates during a 2.5 year observation period. A total of 1,495 service members were evaluated, with 43% presenting due to chest pain followed by arrhythmias/palpitations (24.5%) and syncope (13.5%). Eighty-five percent of individuals returned to duty, most commonly with complaints of noncardiac chest pain, palpitations, or abnormal electrocardiograms. Fifteen percent were evacuated out of theater, most often with acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolus, or ventricular tachycardia. The forward-deployed theater cardiology consultant is vital in the disposition of military members by effectively parsing out life threatening cardiovascular conditions versus low risk diagnoses that can safely return to duty. PMID:27215883

  19. Blast injuries of the ear in military operations.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Y Y; Zajtchuk, J T

    1989-05-01

    Exposure to blast waves from the explosion of ordnance is a common feature of combat operations. The ear is the organ most sensitive to such strong pressure waves. Blast damage to the ear may range from minor acoustic trauma to major disruption of middle and inner ear structures. Standard hearing protectors should offer a significant degree of shielding from these injuries. Aural injury alone seldom should cause a soldier to abandon a combat mission. However, the potential for a large temporary or permanent neurosensory hearing loss does raise issues about such a soldier's effectiveness on the modern, communication-intensive battlefield. Further research is necessary on mechanisms of injury, protective measures, and the effect of hearing loss on military performance.

  20. Military applications of hypoxic training for high-altitude operations.

    PubMed

    Muza, Stephen R

    2007-09-01

    Rapid deployment of unacclimatized soldiers to high mountainous environments causes debilitating effects on operational capabilities (physical work performance), and force health (altitude sickness). Most of these altitude-induced debilitations can be prevented or ameliorated by a wide range of physiological responses collectively referred to as altitude acclimatization. Acclimatization to a target altitude can be induced by slow progressive ascents or continuous sojourns at intermediate altitudes. However, this "altitude residency" requirement reduces their utilization in rapid response military missions that exploit the air mobility capability of modern military forces to quickly deploy to an area of operations on short notice. A more recent approach to induce altitude acclimatization is the use of daily intermittent hypoxic exposures (IHE) in lieu of continuous residence at high altitudes. IHE treatments consist of three elements: 1) IHE simulated altitude (inspired oxygen partial pressure: PIO2), 2) IHE session duration, and 3) total number of IHE sessions over the treatment period. This paper reviews and summarizes the results of 25 published IHE studies. This review finds that an IHE altitude>or=4000 m, and daily exposure duration of at least 1.5 h repeated over a week or more are required to have a high probability of developing altitude acclimatization. The efficacy of shorter duration (<1.5 h) hypoxic exposures at >or=4000 m simulated altitudes, and longer exposures (>4 h) at moderate altitudes (2500-3500 m) is not well documented. The predominate IHE-induced altitude acclimatization response appears to be increased arterial oxygen content through ventilatory acclimatization. Thus, IHE is a promising approach to provide the benefits of altitude acclimatization to low-altitude-based soldiers before their deployment to high mountainous regions.

  1. Conspiring to succeed: the process of a joint military health care merger.

    PubMed

    Wells, D L; Murray, C L

    1997-05-01

    Congress has mandated that the military services improve their health care systems to improve access, assure high-quality care, provide more choices, and contain costs. In response, the Department of Defense established the TRICARE system, organizing it geographically into 12 health services regions. This paper tracks the efforts of one of those 12--region IV--to plan for this change using strategic planning. Region IV's board of governors represents military facilities in Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Tennessee, and Louisiana, including one clinic managed by the U.S. Coast Guard, Department of Transportation. Strategic planning usually involves people who know each other and work together. Because of the joint nature of this effort, the members were unfamiliar with one another and with the others' systems. There were also physical distances to overcome. This paper documents that unique experience, likened to a "corporate merger," and the lessons learned from it.

  2. Medical civil-military operations: the deployed medical brigade's role in counterinsurgency operations.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Jeffrey; Miyamoto, Danelle; Holman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Medical civil-military operations are a critical combat multiplier directly supporting the counterinsurgency fight. Army Medical Department Soldiers support medical civil affairs activities at all levels from platoon to the United States Mission-Iraq (Department of State) initiatives enhancing the legitimacy of medical services in the Iraq Ministry of Health, Ministry of Defense, Ministry of the Interior, and Ministry of Justice. The civil-military operations mission of the deployed Task Force 62 Medical Brigade has also evolved into a broad mission encompassing over 120 contractors including Iraqi-American, Bilingual Bicultural Advisors-Subject Matter Experts serving as case management liaison officers and medical trainers, as well as Iraqi Advisor Task Force members providing medical atmospherics, assessments, training, and the overall management of Iraqi linguists supporting all level III medical facilities. PMID:20088052

  3. Success in Kashmir: a positive trend in civil-military integration during humanitarian assistance operations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Wiley C

    2010-01-01

    The modern cast of disaster relief actors includes host nations, non-governmental organisations, private volunteer organisations, military organisations and others. Each group, civilian or military, has valuable skills and experiences critical to disaster relief work. The goal of this paper is to supplement the study of civil-military relief efforts with contemporary anecdotal experience. The paper examines the interaction between US military forces and other disaster relief actors during the 2005 Kashmir earthquake relief effort. The author uses direct observations made while working in Pakistan to contrast the relationships and activities from that effort with other accounts in prevailing scholarly disaster literature and military doctrine. Finally, this paper suggests that the Kashmir model of integration, coordination and transparency of intent creates a framework in which future humanitarian assistance operations could be successfully executed. Recommendations to improve civil-military interaction in future relief efforts will also be addressed.

  4. Soldiers Working Internationally: Impacts of Masculinity, Military Culture, and Operational Stress on Cross-Cultural Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keats, Patrice A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the ramifications of masculinized military culture and operational stress on cross-cultural adaptation. The author examines how characteristics of military culture may obstruct effective cross-cultural adaptation by promoting a hypermasculinity that tends to oppose effective management of trauma, and thereby suppresses skills…

  5. Malaria in Tunisian Military Personnel after Returning from External Operation

    PubMed Central

    Ajili, Faïda; Battikh, Riadh; Laabidi, Janet; Abid, Rim; Bousetta, Najeh; Jemli, Bouthaina; Ben abdelhafidh, Nadia; Bassem, Louzir; Gargouri, Saadia; Othmani, Salah

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Malaria had been eliminated in Tunisia since 1979, but there are currently 40 to 50 imported cases annually. Soldiers are no exception as the incidence of imported malaria is increasing in Tunisian military personnel after returning from malaria-endemic area, often in Sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and biological presentations, treatment, and outcomes of 37 Tunisian military personnel hospitalized at the Department of Internal Medicine, the Military Hospital of Tunis, between January 1993 and January 2011, for imported malaria. The clinical and laboratory features were obtained from the medical records and a questionnaire was filled by the patients about the compliance of malaria prophylaxis. Results. Thirty-seven male patients, with a mean age of 41 years, were treated for malaria infection. Twenty-two were due to Plasmodium falciparum. The outcome was favourable for all patients, despite two severe access. The long-term use of chemoprophylaxis has been adopted by only 21 (51%) of expatriate military for daily stresses. Moreover, poor adherence was found in 32 patients. Conclusion. The risk of acquiring malaria infection in Tunisian military personnel can largely be prevented by the regular use of chemoprophylactic drugs combined with protective measures against mosquito bites. PMID:23766922

  6. The expanding role of military entomologists in stability and counterinsurgency operations.

    PubMed

    Robert, Leon L; Rankin, Steven E

    2011-01-01

    Military entomologists function as part of medical civil-military operations and are an essential combat multiplier direction supporting COIN operations. They not only directly support US and coalition military forces by performing their traditional wartime mission of protecting personnel from vector-borne and rodent-borne diseases but also enhance the legitimacy of medical services by the host nation government such as controlling diseases promulgated by food, water, vectors, and rodents. These unique COIN missions demand a new skill set required of military entomologists that are not learned from existing training courses and programs. New training opportunities must be afforded military entomologists to familiarize them with how to interact with and synergize the efforts of host nation assets, other governmental agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and international military partners. Teamwork with previously unfamiliar groups and organizations is an essential component of working in the COIN environment and can present unfamiliar tasks for entomologists. This training should start with initial entry training and be a continual process throughout a military entomologist's career. Current COIN operations require greater tactical and operational flexibility and diverse entomological expertise. The skills required for today's full spectrum medical operations are different from those of the past. Counterinsurgency medical operations demand greater agility, rapid task-switching, and the ability to adequately address unfamiliar situations and challenges.

  7. The expanding role of military entomologists in stability and counterinsurgency operations.

    PubMed

    Robert, Leon L; Rankin, Steven E

    2011-01-01

    Military entomologists function as part of medical civil-military operations and are an essential combat multiplier direction supporting COIN operations. They not only directly support US and coalition military forces by performing their traditional wartime mission of protecting personnel from vector-borne and rodent-borne diseases but also enhance the legitimacy of medical services by the host nation government such as controlling diseases promulgated by food, water, vectors, and rodents. These unique COIN missions demand a new skill set required of military entomologists that are not learned from existing training courses and programs. New training opportunities must be afforded military entomologists to familiarize them with how to interact with and synergize the efforts of host nation assets, other governmental agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and international military partners. Teamwork with previously unfamiliar groups and organizations is an essential component of working in the COIN environment and can present unfamiliar tasks for entomologists. This training should start with initial entry training and be a continual process throughout a military entomologist's career. Current COIN operations require greater tactical and operational flexibility and diverse entomological expertise. The skills required for today's full spectrum medical operations are different from those of the past. Counterinsurgency medical operations demand greater agility, rapid task-switching, and the ability to adequately address unfamiliar situations and challenges. PMID:21805451

  8. Operation United Assistance: infectious disease threats to deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Murray, Clinton K; Yun, Heather C; Markelz, Ana Elizabeth; Okulicz, Jason F; Vento, Todd J; Burgess, Timothy H; Cardile, Anthony P; Miller, R Scott

    2015-06-01

    As part of the international response to control the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the Department of Defense has deployed military personnel to train Liberians to manage the disease and build treatment units and a hospital for health care volunteers. These steps have assisted in providing a robust medical system and augment Ebola diagnostic capability within the affected nations. In order to prepare for the deployment of U.S. military personnel, the infectious disease risks of the regions must be determined. This evaluation allows for the establishment of appropriate force health protection posture for personnel while deployed, as well as management plans for illnesses presenting after redeployment. Our objective was to detail the epidemiology and infectious disease risks for military personnel in West Africa, particularly for Liberia, along with lessons learned from prior deployments.

  9. Probing Emissions of Military Cargo Aircraft: Description of a Joint Field Measurement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mengdawn; Corporan, E.; DeWitt, M.; Spicer, C.; Holdren, M.; Cowen, K.; Harris, B.; Shores, R.; Hashmonay, R.; Kaganan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Direct emissions of NOx, volatile organic compounds, and particulate matter (PM) by aircraft contribute to the pollutant levels found in the atmosphere. Aircraft emissions can be injected at the ground level or directly at the high altitude in flight. Conversion of the precursor gases into secondary PM is one of the pathways for the increased atmospheric PM. Atmospheric PM interacts with solar radiation altering atmospheric radiation balance and potentially contributing to global and regional climate changes. Also, direct emissions of air toxics, ozone precursors and PM from aircraft in and around civilian airports and military air bases can worsen local air quality in non-attainment and/or maintenance areas. These emissions need to be quantified. However, the current EPA methods for particle emission measurements from such sources, modified Method 5 and Conditional Test Method 039, are gravimetric-based, and it is anticipated that these methods will not be suitable for current and future generations of aircraft turbine engines, whose particle mass emissions are low. To evaluate measurement approaches for military aircraft emissions, two complementary projects were initiated in 2005. A joint field campaign between these two programs was executed during the first week of October 2005 at the Kentucky Air National Guard (KYANG) base in Louisville, KY. This campaign represented the first in a series of field studies for each program funded by the DoD Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) and provided the basis for cross-comparison of the sampling approaches and measurement techniques employed by the respective program teams. This paper describes the overall programmatic of the multi-year SERDP aircraft emissions research and presents a summary of the results from the joint field campaign.

  10. Emissions from Open Burning of Simulated Military Waste from Forward Operating Bases

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions from open burning of simulated military waste from forward operating bases (FOBs) were extensively characterized as an initial step in assessing potential inhalation exposure of FOB personnel and future disposal alternatives. Emissions from two different burning scenar...

  11. An Operant Analysis of Joint Attention Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holth, Per

    2005-01-01

    Joint attention, a synchronizing of the attention of two or more persons, has been an increasing focus of research in cognitive developmental psychology. Research in this area has progressed mainly outside of behavior analysis, and behavior-analytic research and theory has tended to ignore the work on joint attention. It is argued here, on the one…

  12. The supply of pharmaceuticals in humanitarian assistance missions: implications for military operations.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Maysaa; Riley, Kevin; Bennett, David; Anderson, Warner

    2011-08-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of key international guidelines governing the supply of pharmaceuticals during disasters and complex emergencies. We review the World Health Organization's guidelines on pharmaceutical supply chain management and highlight their relevance for military humanitarian assistance missions. Given the important role of pharmaceuticals in addressing population health needs during humanitarian emergencies, a good understanding of how pharmaceuticals are supplied at the local level in different countries can help military health personnel identify the most appropriate supply options. Familiarity with international guidelines involved in cross-border movement of pharmaceuticals can improve the ability of military personnel to communicate more effectively with other actors involved in humanitarian and development spheres. Enhancing the knowledge base available to military personnel in terms of existing supply models and funding procedures can improve the effectiveness of humanitarian military operations and invite policy changes necessary to establish more flexible acquisition and funding regulations.

  13. Dengue and US Military Operations from the Spanish–American War through Today

    PubMed Central

    Streitz, Matthew; Babina, Tatyana; Fried, Jessica R.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is a major cause of illness among travelers and a threat to military troops operating in areas to which it is endemic. Before and during World War II, dengue frequently occurred in US military personnel in Asia and the South Pacific. From the 1960s into the 1990s, dengue often occurred in US troops in Vietnam, the Philippines, Somalia, and Haiti. We found attack rates as high as 80% and periods of convalescence up to 3-1/2 weeks beyond the acute illness. The increase in dengue throughout the world suggests that it will remain a problem for military personnel until an effective vaccine is licensed. PMID:22469290

  14. Roles for international military medical services in stability operations (security sector reform).

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C M; Thompson, D

    2007-06-01

    This is the second in a series of three papers that examine the role of international military medical services in stability operations in unstable countries. The paper discusses security sector reform in general terms and highlights the interdependency of the armed forces, police, judiciary and penal systems in creating a 'secure environment'. The paper then looks at components of a local military medical system for a counter-insurgency campaign operating on interior lines and the contribution and challenges faced by the international military medical community in supporting the development of this system. Finally the paper highlights the importance of planning the medical support of the international military personnel who will be supporting wider aspects of security sector reform. The paper is based on background research and my personal experience as Medical Director in the Headquarters of the NATO International Stability Assistance Force in Afghanistan in 2006.

  15. Roles for international military medical services in stability operations (security sector reform).

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C M; Thompson, D

    2007-06-01

    This is the second in a series of three papers that examine the role of international military medical services in stability operations in unstable countries. The paper discusses security sector reform in general terms and highlights the interdependency of the armed forces, police, judiciary and penal systems in creating a 'secure environment'. The paper then looks at components of a local military medical system for a counter-insurgency campaign operating on interior lines and the contribution and challenges faced by the international military medical community in supporting the development of this system. Finally the paper highlights the importance of planning the medical support of the international military personnel who will be supporting wider aspects of security sector reform. The paper is based on background research and my personal experience as Medical Director in the Headquarters of the NATO International Stability Assistance Force in Afghanistan in 2006. PMID:17896536

  16. Joint Lead-Free Solder Test Program for High Reliability Military and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christina

    2004-01-01

    Current and future space and defense systems face potential risks from the continued use of tin-lead solder, including: compliance with current environmental regulations, concerns about potential environmental legislation banning lead-containing products, reduced mission readiness, and component obsolescence with lead surface finishes. For example, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has lowered the Toxic Chemical Release reporting threshold for lead to 100 pounds. Overseas, the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) and the Restriction on Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Dicctives in Europe and similar mandates in Japan have instilled concern that a legislative body will prohibit the use of lead in aerospace/military electronics soldering. Any potential banning of lead compounds could reduce the supplier base and adversely affect the readiness of missions led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Before considering lead-free electronics for system upgrades or future designs, however, it is important for the DoD and NASA to know whether lead-free solders can meet their systems' requirements. No single lead-free solder is likely to qualify for all defense and space applications. Therefore, it is important to validate alternative solders for discrete applications. As a result of the need for comprehensive test data on the reliability of lead-free solders, a partnership was formed between the DoD, NASA, and several original equipment manufactures (OEMs) to conduct solder-joint reliability (laboratory) testing of three lead-free solder alloys on newly manufactured and reworked circuit cards to generate performance data for high-reliability (IPC Class 3) applications.

  17. Joint motion clusters in servomanipulator operation

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Sundstrom, E.; Herndon, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing advanced teleoperator systems for maintenance of future nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. Remote maintenance systems developed by the CFRP emphasize man-in-the-loop teleoperation. This paper reports the results of a recent experiment which investigated how users interact with a multi-degree-of-freedom servomanipulator. Principal components analysis performed on data collected during completion of typical remote maintenance tests indicates that joint motions may be summarized by two orthogonal clusters, one which represents fine-adjusting motions and one which represents slewing motions. Implications of these findings for servomanipulator design are discussed. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Using military friendships to optimize postdeployment reintegration for male Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom veterans.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa, Ramon; Hinojosa, Melanie Sberna

    2011-01-01

    Social relationships are important to health out comes. The postdeployment family reintegration literature focuses on the role of the civilian family in facilitating the transition from Active Duty military deployment to civilian society. The focus on the civilian family relationship may miss other important personal connections in veterans' lives. One such connection is the relationship many veterans have with former military unit members who served with them when deployed. Drawing on interviews with male Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom veterans conducted from 2008 to 2009, we argue that the members of a military unit, especially during armed conflict, should be considered a resource to help the "family" reintegration process rather than impede it. This research has implications for current reintegration policy and how best to assist veterans transitioning into civilian society.

  19. Joint Forward Operating Base Elements of Command and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, William C.

    2002-01-01

    Since the 1986 Goldwater-Nichols Act directed the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to develop doctrine for the joint employment of the armed forces, tactics, techniques, and procedures have evolved at different rates depending on the competency. Whereas the command of joint air forces is well prescribed within the structure of the air operations center and its associated leadership, command of air assets at a joint forward operating base lacks guidance. Today, the United States prosecutes an air war over Afghanistan from bases in Uzbekistan, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. Elements of the United States Army, Air Force, and Marines combine at these geographically minute locations, each bringing a certain complement of support and command and control. Evidence from operations during the 1999 air war for Kosovo at Tirana Rinas Airport in Albania suggests that when these service elements meet at the airfield for the first time, there are problems associated with local procedure. At best, time is wasted creating local joint systems to overcome the difficulties. At worst, safety and mission accomplishment are jeopardized. This thesis will address the need to develop doctrine and a jointly integrated organization to support the command and control function at a forward operating base.

  20. 48 CFR 246.270 - Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations. 246.270 Section 246.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations... ASSURANCE Contract Quality Requirements 246.270 Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment...

  1. 48 CFR 246.270 - Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations. 246.270 Section 246.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations... ASSURANCE Contract Quality Requirements 246.270 Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment...

  2. 48 CFR 246.270 - Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations. 246.270 Section 246.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations... ASSURANCE Contract Quality Requirements 246.270 Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment...

  3. 48 CFR 246.270 - Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations. 246.270 Section 246.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations... ASSURANCE Contract Quality Requirements 246.270 Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment...

  4. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Club Restaurant Operations, Part II, 9-10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Quartermaster School, Ft. Lee, VA.

    These programmed instructional materials for part 2 of a secondary-postsecondary subcourse in club management operations are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in civilian settings. This part of the subcourse consists of three lessons and an…

  5. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Club Restaurant Operations, Part I, 9-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Quartermaster School, Ft. Lee, VA.

    These reading materials, self-test reviews, and examination for part 1 of a secondary-postsecondary subcourse in club management operations are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in civilian settings. Five lessons focusing on two topics are included…

  6. Use of eternal flight unmanned aircraft in military operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kök, Zafer

    2014-06-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), are planned to use solar energy, are being more common and interesting gradually. Today, these systems are very promising while fossil fuels are diminishing rapidly. Academic research is still being conducted to develop unmanned aerial systems which will store energy during day time and use it during night time. Development of unmanned aerial systems, which have eternal flight or very long loiter periods, could be possible by such an energy management. A UAV, which can fly very long time, could provide many advantages that cannot be obtained by conventional aircrafts and satellites. Such systems can be operated as fixed satellites on missions with very low cost in circumstances that require continuous intelligence. By improving automation systems these vehicles could be settled on operation area autonomously and can be grounded easily in case of necessities and maintenance. In this article, the effect of solar powered UAV on operation area has been done a literature review, to be used in surveillance and reconnaissance missions.

  7. Rwanda 1994: a study of medical support in military humanitarian operations.

    PubMed

    Hawley, A

    1997-06-01

    The deployment of British Contingent (BRITCON) to United Nations Force in Rwanda (UNAMIR) on Operation GABRIEL in 1994, proved to be a successful deployment on humanitarian operations. Many of the lessons have been successfully incorporated into training, equipment and organisational structures since the deployment. Others require further work to develop and assimilate. The essential issue concerning principles of humanitarian relief doctrine, mission definition, understanding the Disaster-Development continuum, capability mix, spectrum of military utility and the importance of force maintenance were all highlighted by the Rwanda deployment. Implications for future humanitarian operations include a co-operative approach to pre-deployment training with the Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO) community. This will help to promote understanding between the 2 arms of the humanitarian effort and will exploit the strengths of both sides. Equally, the military medical services have to be fully aware of mission definition and its centrality to planning, execution and audit of performance.

  8. Assessing the service quality of Iran military hospitals: Joint Commission International standards and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) technique

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ravangard, Ramin; Yaghoubi, Maryam; Alimohammadzadeh, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Military hospitals are responsible for preserving, restoring and improving the health of not only armed forces, but also other people. According to the military organizations strategy, which is being a leader and pioneer in all areas, providing quality health services is one of the main goals of the military health care organizations. This study was aimed to evaluate the service quality of selected military hospitals in Iran based on the Joint Commission International (JCI) standards and comparing these hospitals with each other and ranking them using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) technique in 2013. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional and descriptive study conducted on five military hospitals, selected using the purposive sampling method, in 2013. Required data collected using checklists of accreditation standards and nominal group technique. AHP technique was used for prioritizing. Furthermore, Expert Choice 11.0 was used to analyze the collected data. Results: Among JCI standards, the standards of access to care and continuity of care (weight = 0.122), quality improvement and patient safety (weight = 0.121) and leadership and management (weight = 0.117) had the greatest importance, respectively. Furthermore, in the overall ranking, BGT (weight = 0.369), IHM (0.238), SAU (0.202), IHK (weight = 0.125) and SAB (weight = 0.066) ranked first to fifth, respectively. Conclusion: AHP is an appropriate technique for measuring the overall performance of hospitals and their quality of services. It is a holistic approach that takes all hospital processes into consideration. The results of the present study can be used to improve hospitals performance through identifying areas, which are in need of focus for quality improvement and selecting strategies to improve service quality. PMID:25250364

  9. Dietary supplements and military operations: caution is advised.

    PubMed

    Boos, C J; White, S H; Bland, S A; McAllister, P D

    2010-03-01

    We describe the case of a 32-year-old soldier who presented with acute organic psychosis during an operational tour to Iraq. This was precipitated by excessive consumption of caffeine coupled with additional use of oral nutritional stimulants. Her biochemical profile was compounded by the additional use of exogenous creatine. We present a brief overview of the issue of exercise supplementation and highlight some of the potential problems and clinical issues surrounding their use. This has important implications for both serving soldiers and the wider medical community.

  10. Higher-level fusion for military operations based on abductive inference: proof of principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaleev, Aleksandar V.; Josephson, John

    2006-04-01

    The ability of contemporary military commanders to estimate and understand complicated situations already suffers from information overload, and the situation can only grow worse. We describe a prototype application that uses abductive inferencing to fuse information from multiple sensors to evaluate the evidence for higher-level hypotheses that are close to the levels of abstraction needed for decision making (approximately JDL levels 2 and 3). Abductive inference (abduction, inference to the best explanation) is a pattern of reasoning that occurs naturally in diverse settings such as medical diagnosis, criminal investigations, scientific theory formation, and military intelligence analysis. Because abduction is part of common-sense reasoning, implementations of it can produce reasoning traces that are very human understandable. Automated abductive inferencing can be deployed to augment human reasoning, taking advantage of computation to process large amounts of information, and to bypass limits to human attention and short-term memory. We illustrate the workings of the prototype system by describing an example of its use for small-unit military operations in an urban setting. Knowledge was encoded as it might be captured prior to engagement from a standard military decision making process (MDMP) and analysis of commander's priority intelligence requirements (PIR). The system is able to reasonably estimate the evidence for higher-level hypotheses based on information from multiple sensors. Its inference processes can be examined closely to verify correctness. Decision makers can override conclusions at any level and changes will propagate appropriately.

  11. [Military psychiatry in a theatre of operations: on mission in Mali].

    PubMed

    Colas, Marie-Dominique

    2015-01-01

    The recent missions of military psychiatrists in the theatres of operation underline the reactivity of the French healthcare system, focused on the expertise of the combat unit doctor. Operation Serval in Mali illustrates in particular the methods of medical-psychological support in exceptional situations, across a vast geographical area and in very difficult climatic conditions. The concept of "forward psychiatry" has a particularly important role to play in the early screening and treatment of psychological disorders in order to preserve the operational capacity of the deployed personnel. PMID:25975168

  12. Occupational exposure of personnel operating military radio equipment: measurements and simulation.

    PubMed

    Paljanos, Annamaria; Miclaus, Simona; Munteanu, Calin

    2015-09-01

    Technical literature provides numerous studies concerning radiofrequency exposure measurements for various radio communication devices, but there are few studies related to exposure of personnel operating military radio equipment. In order to evaluate exposure and identify cases when safety requirements are not entirely met, both measurements and simulations are needed for accurate results. Moreover, given the technical characteristics of the radio devices used in the military, personnel mainly operate in the near-field region so both measurements and simulation becomes more complex. Measurements were made in situ using a broadband personal exposimeter equipped with two isotropic probes for both electric and magnetic components of the field. The experiment was designed for three different operating frequencies of the same radio equipment, while simulations were made in FEKO software using hybrid numerical methods to solve complex electromagnetic field problems. The paper aims to discuss the comparative results of the measurements and simulation, as well as comparing them to reference levels specified in military or civilian radiofrequency exposure standards.

  13. UAV-guided navigation for ground robot tele-operation in a military reconnaissance environment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jessie Y C

    2010-08-01

    A military reconnaissance environment was simulated to examine the performance of ground robotics operators who were instructed to utilise streaming video from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to navigate his/her ground robot to the locations of the targets. The effects of participants' spatial ability on their performance and workload were also investigated. Results showed that participants' overall performance (speed and accuracy) was better when she/he had access to images from larger UAVs with fixed orientations, compared with other UAV conditions (baseline- no UAV, micro air vehicle and UAV with orbiting views). Participants experienced the highest workload when the UAV was orbiting. Those individuals with higher spatial ability performed significantly better and reported less workload than those with lower spatial ability. The results of the current study will further understanding of ground robot operators' target search performance based on streaming video from UAVs. The results will also facilitate the implementation of ground/air robots in military environments and will be useful to the future military system design and training community. PMID:20658388

  14. UAV-guided navigation for ground robot tele-operation in a military reconnaissance environment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jessie Y C

    2010-08-01

    A military reconnaissance environment was simulated to examine the performance of ground robotics operators who were instructed to utilise streaming video from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to navigate his/her ground robot to the locations of the targets. The effects of participants' spatial ability on their performance and workload were also investigated. Results showed that participants' overall performance (speed and accuracy) was better when she/he had access to images from larger UAVs with fixed orientations, compared with other UAV conditions (baseline- no UAV, micro air vehicle and UAV with orbiting views). Participants experienced the highest workload when the UAV was orbiting. Those individuals with higher spatial ability performed significantly better and reported less workload than those with lower spatial ability. The results of the current study will further understanding of ground robot operators' target search performance based on streaming video from UAVs. The results will also facilitate the implementation of ground/air robots in military environments and will be useful to the future military system design and training community.

  15. SOCAP: Lessons learned in applying SIPE-2 to the military operations crisis action planning domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desimone, Roberto

    1992-01-01

    This report describes work funded under the DARPA Planning and Scheduling Initiative that led to the development of SOCAP (System for Operations Crisis Action Planning). In particular, it describes lessons learned in applying SIPE-2, the underlying AI planning technology within SOCAP, to the domain of military operations deliberate and crisis action planning. SOCAP was demonstrated at the U.S. Central Command and at the Pentagon in early 1992. A more detailed report about the lessons learned is currently being prepared. This report was presented during one of the panel discussions on 'The Relevance of Scheduling to AI Planning Systems.'

  16. Operational military helicopter interior noise and vibration measurements with comparisons to ride quality criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Leatherwood, J. D.; Hollenbaugh, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    Balka (1981) has identified the attainment of a 'jet-smooth' ride as a primary goal of the helicopter industry for commercial and certain military helicopters. It was noted that criteria accounting for both multiple axis vibration and interior noise are needed. The present investigation has the objective to present a vibration and interior noise data base in a format suitable for direct evaluation of aircraft ride quality. The investigation is also concerned with an assessment of the measured environment against available criteria as an indication of the state-of-the-art for current machines. Interior noise and vibration measurements were obtained on eight military helicopters during routine operational flights. The data are presented in the form of a number of parameters.

  17. [Radiographical changes in the elbow joints of chainsaw operators].

    PubMed

    Une, H; Kondo, S; Goto, M

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the relation between the labor history of chainsaw operators and changes in their elbow joints. Osteophytic and degenerative changes on X-ray films of the elbow joints were compared quantitatively between chainsaw operators and a control group of age-matched road maintenance workers. Subjects were divided into three groups according to length of chainsaw use. Although no statistically significant differences were found among the three groups, radiographical examination showed significant changes (p less than 0.05) in the subjects as compared with the controls. Because of other labor factors that were not considered, the existence of a dose-response relationship between elbow damage and length of chainsaw use cannot be confirmed from this study, but such a relationship is suggested.

  18. Impact of phlebotomine sand flies on U.S. Military operations at Tallil Air Base, Iraq: 1. background, military situation, and development of a "Leishmaniasis Control Program".

    PubMed

    Coleman, Russell E; Burkett, Douglas A; Putnam, John L; Sherwood, Van; Caci, Jennifer B; Jennings, Barton T; Hochberg, Lisa P; Spradling, Sharon L; Rowton, Edgar D; Blount, Keith; Ploch, John; Hopkins, Grady; Raymond, Jo-Lynne W; O'Guinn, Monica L; Lee, John S; Weina, Peter J

    2006-07-01

    One of the most significant modern day efforts to prevent and control an arthropod-borne disease during a military deployment occurred when a team of U.S. military entomologists led efforts to characterize, prevent, and control leishmaniasis at Tallil Air Base (TAB), Iraq, during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Soon after arriving at TAB on 22 March 2003, military entomologists determined that 1) high numbers of sand flies were present at TAB, 2) individual soldiers were receiving many sand fly bites in a single night, and 3) Leishmania parasites were present in 1.5% of the female sand flies as determined using a real-time (fluorogenic) Leishmania-generic polymerase chain reaction assay. The rapid determination that leishmaniasis was a specific threat in this area allowed for the establishment of a comprehensive Leishmaniasis Control Program (LCP) over 5 mo before the first case of leishmaniasis was confirmed in a U.S. soldier deployed to Iraq. The LCP had four components: 1) risk assessment, 2) enhancement of use of personal protective measures by all personnel at TAB, 3) vector and reservoir control, and 4) education of military personnel about sand flies and leishmaniasis. The establishment of the LCP at TAB before the onset of any human disease conclusively demonstrated that entomologists can play a critical role during military deployments. PMID:16892621

  19. Impact of phlebotomine sand flies on U.S. Military operations at Tallil Air Base, Iraq: 1. background, military situation, and development of a "Leishmaniasis Control Program".

    PubMed

    Coleman, Russell E; Burkett, Douglas A; Putnam, John L; Sherwood, Van; Caci, Jennifer B; Jennings, Barton T; Hochberg, Lisa P; Spradling, Sharon L; Rowton, Edgar D; Blount, Keith; Ploch, John; Hopkins, Grady; Raymond, Jo-Lynne W; O'Guinn, Monica L; Lee, John S; Weina, Peter J

    2006-07-01

    One of the most significant modern day efforts to prevent and control an arthropod-borne disease during a military deployment occurred when a team of U.S. military entomologists led efforts to characterize, prevent, and control leishmaniasis at Tallil Air Base (TAB), Iraq, during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Soon after arriving at TAB on 22 March 2003, military entomologists determined that 1) high numbers of sand flies were present at TAB, 2) individual soldiers were receiving many sand fly bites in a single night, and 3) Leishmania parasites were present in 1.5% of the female sand flies as determined using a real-time (fluorogenic) Leishmania-generic polymerase chain reaction assay. The rapid determination that leishmaniasis was a specific threat in this area allowed for the establishment of a comprehensive Leishmaniasis Control Program (LCP) over 5 mo before the first case of leishmaniasis was confirmed in a U.S. soldier deployed to Iraq. The LCP had four components: 1) risk assessment, 2) enhancement of use of personal protective measures by all personnel at TAB, 3) vector and reservoir control, and 4) education of military personnel about sand flies and leishmaniasis. The establishment of the LCP at TAB before the onset of any human disease conclusively demonstrated that entomologists can play a critical role during military deployments.

  20. The joint operating company: an innovative approach to collaboration.

    PubMed

    Mason, S A; Seymour, D W

    1995-06-01

    Hospitals interested in horizontal integration often run into difficulties. In spite of otherwise sound business logic for two organizations to merge, there may be political, legal or financial reasons why a merger option cannot be pursued. Increasingly, enterprises are turning to a joint operating company structure as the solution to their needs. Scott A. Mason and Donald W. Seymour, partners with consulting firm National Health Advisors, explore situations where a JOC model of collaboration may be appropriate.

  1. Prairie North: a joint civilian/military mass casualty exercise highlights the role of the National Guard in community disaster response.

    PubMed

    Vukotich, George; Bayram, Jamil D; Miller, Miriam I

    2012-01-01

    In a joint military/civilian exercise conducted in June 2010, military National Guard medical and decontamination response efforts proved to be paramount in supporting hospital resources to sustain an adequate response during a simulated terrorist event. Traditionally, hospitals include local responders in their disaster preparedness but overlook other available state and federal resources such as the National Guard. Lessons learned from the exercise included the value of regular joint disaster planning and training between the military and civilian medical sectors. Additionally, military communication and medical equipment compatibility with the civilian infrastructure was identified as one of the top areas for the improvement of this joint exercise. Involving the National Guard in community disaster planning provides a valuable medical support asset that can be critical in responding to multiple casualty events. National Guard response is inherently faster than its federal counterpart. Based on the findings from our joint exercise, states are encouraged to incorporate their corresponding National Guard in civilian critical medical infrastructure disaster preparedness activities, as the National Guard can be an integral part of the disaster response efforts in real multiple casualty events.

  2. Prairie North: a joint civilian/military mass casualty exercise highlights the role of the National Guard in community disaster response.

    PubMed

    Vukotich, George; Bayram, Jamil D; Miller, Miriam I

    2012-01-01

    In a joint military/civilian exercise conducted in June 2010, military National Guard medical and decontamination response efforts proved to be paramount in supporting hospital resources to sustain an adequate response during a simulated terrorist event. Traditionally, hospitals include local responders in their disaster preparedness but overlook other available state and federal resources such as the National Guard. Lessons learned from the exercise included the value of regular joint disaster planning and training between the military and civilian medical sectors. Additionally, military communication and medical equipment compatibility with the civilian infrastructure was identified as one of the top areas for the improvement of this joint exercise. Involving the National Guard in community disaster planning provides a valuable medical support asset that can be critical in responding to multiple casualty events. National Guard response is inherently faster than its federal counterpart. Based on the findings from our joint exercise, states are encouraged to incorporate their corresponding National Guard in civilian critical medical infrastructure disaster preparedness activities, as the National Guard can be an integral part of the disaster response efforts in real multiple casualty events. PMID:22649870

  3. Rehabilitation of acromioclavicular joint separations: operative and nonoperative considerations.

    PubMed

    Cote, Mark P; Wojcik, Karen E; Gomlinski, Gregg; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2010-04-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (AC) separations are one of the most common injuries seen in orthopedic and sports medicine practices, accounting for 9% of all injuries to the shoulder girdle. Various operative and nonoperative treatment schemes have been described for the management of AC joint injuries. Although there is controversy about the efficacy of surgical reconstruction versus nonoperative intervention for grade III type injuries, grade I and II separations seem to respond favorably to conservative management. Conversely, grades IV, V, and VI often require surgical reconstruction. Regardless of the type of injury, rehabilitation as a part of conservative management and postoperative care plays an important role in the management of these injuries. This article presents a rehabilitation approach to treatment of acromioclavicular separations pre- and postoperatively.

  4. Health hazards in areas of military operations conducted in different climatic and sanitary conditions.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the most common health hazards occurring among personnel of peacekeeping and stabilization missions functioning within armed conflicts in the contemporary world. Military operations have been executed in diverse climatic and sanitary conditions, which are frequently unfamiliar for their participants. Some of them, e.g. the UN peacekeeping missions in the Middle East (Lebanon, the Golan Heights), have been carried out in a relatively stable geopolitical environment; whereas, stabilization missions in Iraq and Afghanistan, which are actually combat activities, undoubtedly fall into the group of the most perilous military operations in the world. Hot or cold climate, poor sanitary and hygienic conditions along with warfare facilitate the occurrence of numerous diseases and body injuries not only among the local people but also among peacekeepers, who represent the population of immigrants. Health hazards which pose major epidemiological threats in combat zones are arthropod-borne, food and water-borne, respiratory tract diseases, sexually transmitted diseases, enzootic diseases, battle injuries, and non- -battle injuries, e.g. traffic accidents. Another considerable health problem are psychiatric disorders, which can either appear directly after the occurrence of a traumatic event in a combat zone or indirectly, after some time had elapsed. In addition to the health hazards listed above, environmental factors such as changeable weather conditions and local fauna may also be life threatening. PMID:21534225

  5. Performance assessments of Android-powered military applications operating on tactical handheld devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Brian A.; Fronczek, Lisa; Morse, Emile; Kootbally, Zeid; Schlenoff, Craig

    2013-05-01

    Transformative Apps (TransApps) is a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) funded program whose goal is to develop a range of militarily-relevant software applications ("apps") to enhance the operational-effectiveness of military personnel on (and off) the battlefield. TransApps is also developing a military apps marketplace to facilitate rapid development and dissemination of applications to address user needs by connecting engaged communities of endusers with development groups. The National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) role in the TransApps program is to design and implement evaluation procedures to assess the performance of: 1) the various software applications, 2) software-hardware interactions, and 3) the supporting online application marketplace. Specifically, NIST is responsible for evaluating 50+ tactically-relevant applications operating on numerous Android™-powered platforms. NIST efforts include functional regression testing and quantitative performance testing. This paper discusses the evaluation methodologies employed to assess the performance of three key program elements: 1) handheld-based applications and their integration with various hardware platforms, 2) client-based applications and 3) network technologies operating on both the handheld and client systems along with their integration into the application marketplace. Handheld-based applications are assessed using a combination of utility and usability-based checklists and quantitative performance tests. Client-based applications are assessed to replicate current overseas disconnected (i.e. no network connectivity between handhelds) operations and to assess connected operations envisioned for later use. Finally, networked applications are assessed on handhelds to establish baselines of performance for when connectivity will be common usage.

  6. Secure Multi-party Computation Protocol for Defense Applications in Military Operations Using Virtual Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Rohit; Joshi, Satyadhar

    With the advent into the 20th century whole world has been facing the common dilemma of Terrorism. The suicide attacks on US twin towers 11 Sept. 2001, Train bombings in Madrid Spain 11 Mar. 2004, London bombings 7 Jul. 2005 and Mumbai attack 26 Nov. 2008 were some of the most disturbing, destructive and evil acts by terrorists in the last decade which has clearly shown their evil intent that they can go to any extent to accomplish their goals. Many terrorist organizations such as al Quaida, Harakat ul-Mujahidin, Hezbollah, Jaish-e-Mohammed, Lashkar-e-Toiba, etc. are carrying out training camps and terrorist operations which are accompanied with latest technology and high tech arsenal. To counter such terrorism our military is in need of advanced defense technology. One of the major issues of concern is secure communication. It has to be made sure that communication between different military forces is secure so that critical information is not leaked to the adversary. Military forces need secure communication to shield their confidential data from terrorist forces. Leakage of concerned data can prove hazardous, thus preservation and security is of prime importance. There may be a need to perform computations that require data from many military forces, but in some cases the associated forces would not want to reveal their data to other forces. In such situations Secure Multi-party Computations find their application. In this paper, we propose a new highly scalable Secure Multi-party Computation (SMC) protocol and algorithm for Defense applications which can be used to perform computation on encrypted data. Every party encrypts their data in accordance with a particular scheme. This encrypted data is distributed among some created virtual parties. These Virtual parties send their data to the TTP through an Anonymizer layer. TTP performs computation on encrypted data and announces the result. As the data sent was encrypted its actual value can’t be known by TTP

  7. 14 CFR 249.21 - Preservation of records by public charter operators and overseas military personnel charter...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preservation of records by public charter operators and overseas military personnel charter operators. 249.21 Section 249.21 Aeronautics and Space... of an authorized representative of the DOT. (a) All receipts and statements of travel agents and...

  8. Operational Physical Performance and Fitness in Military Women: Physiological, Musculoskeletal Injury, and Optimized Physical Training Considerations for Successfully Integrating Women Into Combat-Centric Military Occupations.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Bradley C; Jones, Bruce H; Van Arsdale, Stephanie J; Kelly, Karen; Kraemer, William J

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations from a 2014 United States Department of Defense (DoD) Health Affairs Women in Combat symposium addressing physiological, musculoskeletal injury, and optimized physical training considerations from the operational physical performance section. The symposium was held to provide a state-of-the-science meeting on the U.S. DoD's rescinding of the ground combat exclusion policy opening up combat-centric occupations to women. Physiological, metabolic, body composition, bone density, cardiorespiratory fitness, and thermoregulation differences between men and women were briefly reviewed. Injury epidemiological data are presented within military training and operational environments demonstrating women to be at a higher risk for musculoskeletal injuries than men. Physical training considerations for improved muscle strength and power, occupational task performance, load carriage were also reviewed. Particular focus of this article was given to translating physiological and epidemiological findings from the literature on these topics toward actionable guidance and policy recommendations for military leaders responsible for military physical training doctrine: (1) inclusion of resistance training with special emphasis on strength and power development (i.e., activation of high-threshold motor units and recruitment of type II high-force muscle fibers), upper-body strength development, and heavy load carriage, (2) moving away from "field expediency" as the major criteria for determining military physical training policy and training implementation, (3) improvement of load carriage ability with emphasis placed on specific load carriage task performance, combined with both resistance and endurance training, and (4) providing greater equipment resources, coaching assets, and increased training time dedicated to physical readiness training. PMID:26741902

  9. Operational Physical Performance and Fitness in Military Women: Physiological, Musculoskeletal Injury, and Optimized Physical Training Considerations for Successfully Integrating Women Into Combat-Centric Military Occupations.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Bradley C; Jones, Bruce H; Van Arsdale, Stephanie J; Kelly, Karen; Kraemer, William J

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations from a 2014 United States Department of Defense (DoD) Health Affairs Women in Combat symposium addressing physiological, musculoskeletal injury, and optimized physical training considerations from the operational physical performance section. The symposium was held to provide a state-of-the-science meeting on the U.S. DoD's rescinding of the ground combat exclusion policy opening up combat-centric occupations to women. Physiological, metabolic, body composition, bone density, cardiorespiratory fitness, and thermoregulation differences between men and women were briefly reviewed. Injury epidemiological data are presented within military training and operational environments demonstrating women to be at a higher risk for musculoskeletal injuries than men. Physical training considerations for improved muscle strength and power, occupational task performance, load carriage were also reviewed. Particular focus of this article was given to translating physiological and epidemiological findings from the literature on these topics toward actionable guidance and policy recommendations for military leaders responsible for military physical training doctrine: (1) inclusion of resistance training with special emphasis on strength and power development (i.e., activation of high-threshold motor units and recruitment of type II high-force muscle fibers), upper-body strength development, and heavy load carriage, (2) moving away from "field expediency" as the major criteria for determining military physical training policy and training implementation, (3) improvement of load carriage ability with emphasis placed on specific load carriage task performance, combined with both resistance and endurance training, and (4) providing greater equipment resources, coaching assets, and increased training time dedicated to physical readiness training.

  10. Problems with veteran-family communication during operation enduring freedom/operation Iraqi freedom military deployment.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa, Ramon; Hinojosa, Melanie Sberna; Högnäs, Robin S

    2012-02-01

    Twenty Reserve component (Army and Marines) and Army National Guard male veterans of Operational Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom discuss their deployment and postdeployment family reintegration experiences. A Grounded Theory approach is used to highlight some of the ways in which family miscommunication during deployment can occur. Communication with civilian family members is affected by the needs of operational security, technical problems with communication tools, miscommunication between family members, or because veterans have "nothing new to say" to family back home. These communication difficulties may lead to an initial gulf of understanding between veterans and family members that can cause family strain during postdeployment family reintegration. We end with a discussion of veteran family reintegration difficulties.

  11. Interior noise and vibration measurements on operational military helicopters and comparisons with various ride quality criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Leatherwood, J. D.; Hollenbaugh, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The results of physical measurements of the interior noise and vibration obtained within eight operational military helicopters are presented. The data were extensively analyzed and are presented in the following forms: noise and vibration spectra, overall root-mean-square acceleration levels in three linear axes, peak accelerations at dominant blade passage frequencies, acceleration exceedance data, and overall and ""A'' weighted sound pressure levels. Peak acceleration levels were compared to the ISO 1-hr reduced comfort and fatigue decreased proficiency boundaries and the NASA discomfort criteria. The ""A'' weighted noise levels were compared to the NASA annoyance criteria, and the overall noise spectra were compared to MIL-STD-1294 (""Acoustical Noise Limits in Helicopters''). Specific vibration components at blade passage frequencies for several aircraft exceeded both the ISO reduced comfort boundary and the NASA passenger discomfort criteria. The ""A'' weighted noise levels, corrected for SPH-4 helmet attenuation characteristics, exceeded the NASA annoyance threshold for several aircraft.

  12. Interior noise and vibration measurements on operational military helicopters and comparisons with various ride quality criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Leatherwood, J. D.; Hollenbaugh, D. D.

    1983-08-01

    The results of physical measurements of the interior noise and vibration obtained within eight operational military helicopters are presented. The data were extensively analyzed and are presented in the following forms: noise and vibration spectra, overall root-mean-square acceleration levels in three linear axes, peak accelerations at dominant blade passage frequencies, acceleration exceedance data, and overall and ""A'' weighted sound pressure levels. Peak acceleration levels were compared to the ISO 1-hr reduced comfort and fatigue decreased proficiency boundaries and the NASA discomfort criteria. The ""A'' weighted noise levels were compared to the NASA annoyance criteria, and the overall noise spectra were compared to MIL-STD-1294 (""Acoustical Noise Limits in Helicopters''). Specific vibration components at blade passage frequencies for several aircraft exceeded both the ISO reduced comfort boundary and the NASA passenger discomfort criteria. The ""A'' weighted noise levels, corrected for SPH-4 helmet attenuation characteristics, exceeded the NASA annoyance threshold for several aircraft.

  13. NPOESS environmental data products for civil and military operations and climate monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussetto, Michael S.

    2004-09-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) will produce 54 environmental data products serving military and civil operational users and the science community, supporting the atmospheric, cloud, land, ocean/water, earth radiation budget, and space remote sensing disciplines. Data products that are key to operations included imager, atmospheric temperature and moisture profiling, sea surface temperature and wind speed/direction, and soil moisture. NPOESS exploits advanced sensor and data product development on the Earth Observing System (EOS) and other envirosats, including a predecessor mission, the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP). The NPOESS data products will be used in weather forecasting, operational decision making, and climate monitoring. The products are delivered with low latency following data acquisition on-orbit by using downlink to a globally distributed network. Synergistic interconnected processing of data products is used to improve quality and reliability. Because the NPOESS system will serve for many years, planning hgas included consideration of product improvements and long term measurement stability for support to climate monitoring.

  14. 77 FR 5780 - Record of Decision for the White Elk Military Operations Area White Pine and Elko Counties...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... Department of the Air Force Record of Decision for the White Elk Military Operations Area White Pine and Elko... Decision (ROD). SUMMARY: On November 4, 2011, the United States Air Force signed the ROD for the White Elk... select the Proposed Action to establish the White Elk MOA airspace adjacent to the Utah Test and...

  15. The Benefits of Deploying Health Physics Specialists to Joint Operation Areas.

    PubMed

    Mower, Scott; Bast, Joshua D; Myers, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Preventive Medicine Specialists (military occupational specialty [MOS] 68S) with the health physics specialist (N4) qualification identifier possess a unique force health protection skill set. In garrison, they ensure radiation exposures to patients, occupational workers and the public from hospital activities such as radioisotope therapy and x-ray machines do not to exceed Federal law limits and kept as low as reasonably achievable. Maintaining sufficient numbers of health physics specialists (HPSs) to fill authorizations has been a consistent struggle for the Army Medical Department due to the rigorous academic requirements of the additional skill identifier-producing program. This shortage has limited MOS 68SN4 deployment opportunities in the past and prevented medical planners from recognizing the capabilities these Soldiers can bring to the fight. In 2014, for the first time, HPSs were sourced to deploy as an augmentation capability to the 172nd Preventive Medicine Detachment (PM Det), the sole PM Det supporting the Combined Joint Operations Area-Afghanistan. Considerable successes in bettering radiation safety practices and improvements in incident and accident response were achieved as a result of their deployment. The purposes of this article are to describe the mission services performed by HPSs in Afghanistan, discuss the benefits of deploying HPSs with PM Dets, and demonstrate to senior medical leadership the importance of maintaining a health physics capability in a theater environment.

  16. Respiratory disease among military personnel in Saudi Arabia during Operation Desert Shield.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, A L; Hyams, K C; Watts, D M; Rozmajzl, P J; Woody, J N; Merrell, B R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to determine whether respiratory disease due to crowded living conditions and high levels of suspended and blowing sand had a major adverse impact on US military personnel during Operation Desert Shield. METHODS. A questionnaire survey was administered to 2598 combat troops stationed in Northeast Saudi Arabia for a mean of 102 days. Samples of surface sand from seven different locations were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. RESULTS. Among surveyed troops, 34.4% reported a sore throat, 43.1% complained of a cough, 15.4% complained of chronic rhinorrhea, and 1.8% were unable to perform their routine duties because of upper respiratory symptoms. Evaluation of sleeping accommodations indicated that complaints of a sore throat and cough were most closely associated with sleeping in air-conditioned buildings; in contrast, complaints of rhinorrhea were associated with exposure to the outdoor environment while living in tents. Sand samples consisted mostly of quartz, with just 0.21% by weight of respirable size (< 10 microns in diameter). CONCLUSIONS. These findings indicate that upper respiratory complaints were frequent among Operation Desert Shield troops and were related both to the troops' housing and to their exposure to the outside environment. PMID:8363011

  17. Measurement and prediction of noise from low-altitude military aircraft operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Bernard F.; Payne, Richard C.; Harris, Anthony L.; Weston, Ralph J.

    1992-04-01

    In response to the rapid growth in demand for information on noise levels around military airfields in the UK, NPL developed AIRNOISE, a mathematical model for computing aircraft noise contours. Since its first applications in 1981, the model has been used to determine zones of eligibility within the MoD compensation scheme. The model has been subject to continuous development, e.g., the incorporation of Harrier V/STOL operations. We have now extended the model to include noise from high-speed, low-level operations. The model predicts not only maximum levels but the complete time-history, so that the time-onset rate can be estimated. To aid refinement and validation of the model, a special exercise has been conducted in which Tornado, Harrier, Jaguar, Hawk, F-15 and F-16 aircraft have flown straight and level at heights between about 100 and 400 feet, at various speeds and engine power settings over an array of microphones. This paper describes the trial and the results obtained. The prediction model is outlined and comparisons made between predictions and measurements.

  18. A literature review of the military uses of silver-nylon dressings with emphasis on wartime operations.

    PubMed

    Barillo, David J; Pozza, Morano; Margaret-Brandt, Mary

    2014-12-01

    Medical support of military operations involves treatment of massive soft tissue wounds, thermal burns, open fractures, blast injuries and traumatic amputations under conditions that are often austere and far from supply lines. Military hospitals, as recently deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan, are designed and equipped for stabilization and rapid transfer of injured patients back to their home nation. These austere facilities are often tasked with the emergency or long-term treatment of local populations when injured or burned, further stressing the medical resupply system. Pathogens encountered in contemporary wartime practice are increasingly resistant to antibiotics. Ionic silver is bactericidal against a broad spectrum of bacteria, yeasts and fungi, has been utilized as a topical antiseptic for over 100 years, and has no known clinically-relevant resistance. Silver-nylon dressings, initially stocked in US military hospitals as a burn dressing, are now finding utility as a universal dressing for all types of combat wounds. Compared to conventional burn dressings, they are easier to transport and store, easier to use, and do not need to be changed as frequently, allowing for conservation of nursing resources. In this literature review, the recent military uses of silver-nylon dressings are examined. The stockpiling and use of silver-nylon as a universal military burn and wound dressing is advocated.

  19. A literature review of the military uses of silver-nylon dressings with emphasis on wartime operations.

    PubMed

    Barillo, David J; Pozza, Morano; Margaret-Brandt, Mary

    2014-12-01

    Medical support of military operations involves treatment of massive soft tissue wounds, thermal burns, open fractures, blast injuries and traumatic amputations under conditions that are often austere and far from supply lines. Military hospitals, as recently deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan, are designed and equipped for stabilization and rapid transfer of injured patients back to their home nation. These austere facilities are often tasked with the emergency or long-term treatment of local populations when injured or burned, further stressing the medical resupply system. Pathogens encountered in contemporary wartime practice are increasingly resistant to antibiotics. Ionic silver is bactericidal against a broad spectrum of bacteria, yeasts and fungi, has been utilized as a topical antiseptic for over 100 years, and has no known clinically-relevant resistance. Silver-nylon dressings, initially stocked in US military hospitals as a burn dressing, are now finding utility as a universal dressing for all types of combat wounds. Compared to conventional burn dressings, they are easier to transport and store, easier to use, and do not need to be changed as frequently, allowing for conservation of nursing resources. In this literature review, the recent military uses of silver-nylon dressings are examined. The stockpiling and use of silver-nylon as a universal military burn and wound dressing is advocated. PMID:25418434

  20. Repeated concussion among U.S. military personnel during Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, Andrew J; Dougherty, Amber L; Morrison, Rosemary H; Quinn, Kimberly H; Galarneau, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Concussions are a predominant injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The aims of this study were to describe repeated concussive events among U.S. military personnel injured in Operation Iraqi Freedom and examine subsequent healthcare utilization. We reviewed clinical records from the Expeditionary Medical Encounter Database to identify service members with repeat concussions. We abstracted demographic and injury-specific variables, calculated time between events, and identified healthcare utilization from electronic medical databases. Overall, 113 personnel experienced more than one concussion between 2004 and 2008. A majority of these incidents were blast related. The median time between events was 40 days, with 20% experiencing a second event within 2 weeks of the first and 87% within 3 months. Time between events was not associated with severity of the second event. Greater severity of the second concussive event was associated with higher postinjury utilization of mental health and neurology services. This study is one of the first to describe repeated concussions in a combat setting. We found that repeated concussions occur within a short interval among deployed personnel, although the effects of the first event are unclear. Further research is needed to define the effect of repeated concussions on the health of combat veterans.

  1. Decentralized operating procedures for orchestrating data and behavior across distributed military systems and assets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present a method for a highly decentralized yet structured and flexible approach to achieve systems interoperability by orchestrating data and behavior across distributed military systems and assets with security considerations addressed from the beginning. We describe an architecture of a tool-based design of business processes called Decentralized Operating Procedures (DOP) and the deployment of DOPs onto run time nodes, supporting the parallel execution of each DOP at multiple implementation nodes (fixed locations, vehicles, sensors and soldiers) throughout a battlefield to achieve flexible and reliable interoperability. The described method allows the architecture to; a) provide fine grain control of the collection and delivery of data between systems; b) allow the definition of a DOP at a strategic (or doctrine) level by defining required system behavior through process syntax at an abstract level, agnostic of implementation details; c) deploy a DOP into heterogeneous environments by the nomination of actual system interfaces and roles at a tactical level; d) rapidly deploy new DOPs in support of new tactics and systems; e) support multiple instances of a DOP in support of multiple missions; f) dynamically add or remove run-time nodes from a specific DOP instance as missions requirements change; g) model the passage of, and business reasons for the transmission of each data message to a specific DOP instance to support accreditation; h) run on low powered computers with lightweight tactical messaging. This approach is designed to extend the capabilities of existing standards, such as the Generic Vehicle Architecture (GVA).

  2. Automated ambulatory assessment of cognitive performance, environmental conditions, and motor activity during military operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Harris R.; Kramer, F. Matthew; Montain, Scott J.; Niro, Philip; Young, Andrew J.

    2005-05-01

    Until recently scientists had limited opportunities to study human cognitive performance in non-laboratory, fully ambulatory situations. Recently, advances in technology have made it possible to extend behavioral assessment to the field environment. One of the first devices to measure human behavior in the field was the wrist-worn actigraph. This device, now widely employed, can acquire minute-by-minute information on an individual"s level of motor activity. Actigraphs can, with reasonable accuracy, distinguish sleep from waking, the most critical and basic aspect of human behavior. However, rapid technologic advances have provided the opportunity to collect much more information from fully ambulatory humans. Our laboratory has developed a series of wrist-worn devices, which are not much larger then a watch, which can assess simple and choice reaction time, vigilance and memory. In addition, the devices can concurrently assess motor activity with much greater temporal resolution then the standard actigraph. Furthermore, they continuously monitor multiple environmental variables including temperature, humidity, sound and light. We have employed these monitors during training and simulated military operations to collect information that would typically be unavailable under such circumstances. In this paper we will describe various versions of the vigilance monitor and how each successive version extended the capabilities of the device. Samples of data from several studies are presented, included studies conducted in harsh field environments during simulated infantry assaults, a Marine Corps Officer training course and mechanized infantry (Stryker) operations. The monitors have been useful for documenting environmental conditions experienced by wearers, studying patterns of sleep and activity and examining the effects of nutritional manipulations on warfighter performance.

  3. 7 CFR 795.7 - Entities or joint operations not considered as a person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provisions of § 795.3, each individual or other legal entity who shares in the proceeds derived from farming... individual or other legal entity shares in the proceeds derived from farming by such joint operation... farming by such joint operation shall not be considered as a separate person unless the individual...

  4. 7 CFR 795.7 - Entities or joint operations not considered as a person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... provisions of § 795.3, each individual or other legal entity who shares in the proceeds derived from farming... individual or other legal entity shares in the proceeds derived from farming by such joint operation... farming by such joint operation shall not be considered as a separate person unless the individual...

  5. 7 CFR 795.7 - Entities or joint operations not considered as a person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... provisions of § 795.3, each individual or other legal entity who shares in the proceeds derived from farming... individual or other legal entity shares in the proceeds derived from farming by such joint operation... farming by such joint operation shall not be considered as a separate person unless the individual...

  6. 7 CFR 795.7 - Entities or joint operations not considered as a person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... provisions of § 795.3, each individual or other legal entity who shares in the proceeds derived from farming... individual or other legal entity shares in the proceeds derived from farming by such joint operation... farming by such joint operation shall not be considered as a separate person unless the individual...

  7. 7 CFR 795.7 - Entities or joint operations not considered as a person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provisions of § 795.3, each individual or other legal entity who shares in the proceeds derived from farming... individual or other legal entity shares in the proceeds derived from farming by such joint operation... farming by such joint operation shall not be considered as a separate person unless the individual...

  8. 78 FR 44436 - Safety Zone; Joint Operations Exercise, Lake Michigan, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... Department of Homeland Security DOD Department of Defense FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Joint Operations Exercise, Lake Michigan... vessels from a portion of Lake Michigan due to a joint operations exercise involving the Department...

  9. A complexity science-based framework for global joint operations analysis to support force projection: LDRD Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    The military is undergoing a significant transformation as it modernizes for the information age and adapts to address an emerging asymmetric threat beyond traditional cold war era adversaries. Techniques such as traditional large-scale, joint services war gaming analysis are no longer adequate to support program evaluation activities and mission planning analysis at the enterprise level because the operating environment is evolving too quickly. New analytical capabilities are necessary to address modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD) enterprise. This presents significant opportunity to Sandia in supporting the nation at this transformational enterprise scale. Although Sandia has significant experience with engineering system of systems (SoS) and Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS), significant fundamental research is required to develop modeling, simulation and analysis capabilities at the enterprise scale. This report documents an enterprise modeling framework which will enable senior level decision makers to better understand their enterprise and required future investments.

  10. Teleradiology network to improve patient care in a peacekeeping military operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kevin R.; Levine, Betty A.; Norton, Gary S.; Mun, Seong K.; Cramer, Timothy J.; de Treville, Robert E.

    1997-05-01

    The Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center of the Department of Radiology at Georgetown University Medical Center recently collaborated with the US Army in developing an off-the-shelf teleradiology network for Operation Joint Endeavor, the peace-keeping mission in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The network is part of Operation Primetime III, a project to deploy advanced communications and medical equipment to provide state-of-the-art medical care to the 20,000 US troops stationed there. The network encompasses three major sites: the 212th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH) near Tuzla, Bosnia-Herzegovina; the 67th Combat Support Hospital (CSH) in Taszar, Hungary; and the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center (LRMC) in Landstuhl, Germany. Planning for the project began in January 1996, and all three sites were operational by April 1996. Since the system was deployed, computed radiography (CR) has been sued almost exclusively at the MASH and CSH for all general x-ray exams. From mid- May to September 1996, over 2700 CR images were acquired at the MASH and over 1600 at the CSH. Since there was not a radiologist a the MASH, the images were transferred to the CSH for primary diagnosis and archiving. In the same time period, over 550 patient folders were sent from the MASH to the CSH.

  11. Comparative Occupational Survey of Civilian and Military Members in the Pavements Maintenance and Construction Equipment Operator Specialties. Final Report for Period 1 October 1975-30 October 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Douglas K.

    A study was conducted to analyze and compare the job performance of civil service and military pavements maintenance workers and construction equipment operators. A military sample of 2,675 and a civilian sample of 1,974 were surveyed by means of a job inventory checklist and relative time spent rating method. Of the three job types that were…

  12. VOC and hazardous air pollutant emission factors for military aircraft fuel cell inspection, maintenance, and repair operations

    SciTech Connect

    Nand, K.; Sahu, R.

    1997-12-31

    Accurate emission estimation is one of the key aspects of implementation of any air quality program. The Federal Title 5 program, specially requires an accurate and updated inventory of criteria as well hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from all facilities. An overestimation of these two categories of pollutants, may cause the facility to be classified as a major source, when in fact it may actually be a minor source, and may also trigger unnecessary compliance requirements. A good example of where overestimation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and HAPs is easily possible are military aircraft fuel cells inspection, maintenance, and repair operations. The military aircraft fuel tanks, which are commonly identified as fuel cells, are routinely inspected for maintenance and repairs at military aircraft handling facilities. Prior to entry into the fuel cell by an inspector, fuel cells are first drained into bowsers and then purged with fresh air; the purged air is generally released without any controls to the atmosphere through a stack. The VOC and HAPs emission factors from these operations are not available in the literature for JP-8 fuel, which is being used increasingly by military aircraft. This paper presents two methods for estimating emissions for this source type, which are based on engineering calculations and professional judgment. This paper presents several methods for estimating emissions for this source type, which are based on engineering calculations and professional judgment. There are three emission producing phases during the draining and purging operations: (1) emissions during splash loading of bowsers (unloading of fuel cells), (2) emissions from spillage of fuel during loading of bowsers, and (3) emissions from fuel cell purging operations. Results of the emission estimation, including a comparison of the two emission estimation methods are presented in this paper.

  13. Effect of commercial and military performance requirements for transport category aircraft on space shuttle booster design and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bithell, R. A.; Pence, W. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of two sets of performance requirements, commercial and military, on the design and operation of the space shuttle booster is evaluated. Critical thrust levels are established according to both sets of operating rules for the takeoff, cruise, and go-around flight modes, and the effect on engine requirements determined. Both flyback and ferry operations are considered. The impact of landing rules on potential shuttle flyback and ferry bases is evaluated. Factors affecting reserves are discussed, including winds, temperature, and nonstandard flight operations. Finally, a recommended set of operating rules is proposed for both flyback and ferry operations that allows adequate performance capability and safety margins without compromising design requirements for either flight phase.

  14. A Summary of Operating Conditions Experienced by Three Military Helicopters and a Mountain-Based Commercial Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, Andrew B.

    1960-01-01

    The results of a survey of the flight conditions experienced by three military helicopters engaged in simulated and actual military missions, and a commercial helicopter operated in the mountainous terrain surrounding Denver, CO, are presented. The data, obtained with NASA helicopter VGHN recorders, represent 813 flights or 359 flying hours, and are compared where applicable to previous survey results. The current survey results show that none of the helicopters exceeded the maximum design airspeed. One military helicopter, used for instrument flight training, never exceeded 70 percent of its maximum design airspeed. The rates of climb and descent utilized by the IFR training helicopter and of the mountain-based helicopter were generally narrowly distributed within all the airspeed ranges. The number of landings per hour for all four of the helicopters ranged from 1.6 to 3.3. The turbine-engine helicopter experienced more frequent normal-acceleration increments above a threshold of +/-0.4g (where g is acceleration due to gravity) than the mountain-based helicopter, but the mountain-based helicopter experienced acceleration increments of greater magnitude. Limited rotor rotational speed time histories showed that all the helicopters were operated at normal rotor speeds during all flight conditions.

  15. Operation MEDIHC in Texas; Military Experience Directed into Health Careers. March 1970--June 1971. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Houston. School of Public Health.

    The purpose of the project was to develop and establish a counseling and vocational guidance service to assist military health personnel in the transition to civilian health programs, and in so doing, establish procedures and guidelines adaptable to other MEDIHC offices in other states. Recognizing that five percent of the discharged Armed Forces…

  16. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Petroleum Equipment and Technical Operations, QM0142, 19-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This subcourse containg lesson assignments, lesson texts, and programmed reviews covers the most frequently used equipment for transporting and storing petroleum products from the time they are purchased until they are consumed by the user. The course is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to…

  17. Operational Applications of Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise as a Treatment for Airsickness in the Military

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebreyesus, Fiyore; Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Airsickness is experienced by about 50% of military aviators some time in their career. Aviators who suffer from recurrent episodes of airsickness are typically referred to the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) at Pensacola where they undergo extensive evaluation and 8 weeks of training in the Self-Paced Airsickness Desensitization (SPAD) program. Researchers at NASA Ames have developed an alternative mitigation training program, Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) that has demonstrated an 80% success rate for improving motion sickness tolerance.

  18. A retrospective analysis of open fractures sustained by U.S. military personnel during Operation Just Cause.

    PubMed

    Jacob, E; Erpelding, J M; Murphy, K P

    1992-10-01

    A retrospective analysis was conducted of 37 open fracture cases sustained by U.S. military personnel during the recent low-intensity conflict in Panama (Operation Just Cause). The etiology, location, classification, and management of open fractures sustained in combat is presented. A significant difference was noted in the infection rate for type III open fractures that were debrided in Panama (22%) as compared to those that were debrided only after transport to CONUS (66%). This study supports the critical importance of adequate battlefield surgical support in low-intensity conflicts, and reemphasizes the crucial role of early surgical debridement for the prevention of wound infection.

  19. Service and Joint Training: Lessons Learned from Recent Conflicts. Hearing before the Military Forces and Personnel Subcommittee of the Committee on Armed Services. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Armed Services.

    This document contains the oral and written statements of persons whose testimony was presented before a Congressional hearing on training lessons learned from recent military conflicts. Principal witness was Mark E. Gebicke, Director of Military Operations and Capabilities Issues, National Security and International Affairs Division, U.S. General…

  20. Door Opening Affects Operating Room Pressure During Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mears, Simon C; Blanding, Renee; Belkoff, Stephen M

    2015-11-01

    Many resources are expended to ensure a sterile operating room environment. Efforts are made to prevent exposure of patients to personnel and to achieve positive room pressure to keep out airborne contaminants. Foot traffic into and out of the operating room during surgery can undermine these efforts. The authors investigated the number and duration of operating room door openings during hip and knee arthroplasty procedures and the effect of the door openings on room pressure. They tested the hypothesis that door openings defeat positive pressure, permitting air flow into the room. Room pressure and door status were monitored electronically during 191 hip and knee arthroplasty procedures. Operating room staff were unaware that data were being collected. The authors evaluated the data with regression analysis to determine whether the number and duration of door openings had an effect on room pressure. Significance was set at P<.05. Doors were open, on average, 9.5 minutes per case. In 77 of 191 cases, positive pressure was defeated, allowing air flow to reverse into the operating room. Total time with the door open significantly affected the minimum pressure recorded in the room (P<.02), but did not significantly affect average room pressure (P=.7). This finding suggested that the loss of positive pressure was a transient event from which the room recovered. The number and duration of door openings showed a significant association with length of surgery. Door openings threaten positive pressure, potentially jeopardizing operating room sterility. The causes of excessive operating room traffic must be evaluated to identify ways to reduce this traffic and the associated risks.

  1. The Best of Both Worlds: Psychiatry Training at Combined Civilian-Military Programs.

    PubMed

    Welton, Randon S; Hamaoka, Derrick A; Broderick, Pamela J; Schillerstrom, Jason E

    2015-08-01

    Air Force psychiatry faces the task of training competent military psychiatrists in an era of continuing reductions. Beginning in the 1980s, the Air Force started collaborating with University partners to create hybrid training programs, civilian-military psychiatry residencies. These mergers provide stability for Air Force psychiatry training in the face of increased operational missions and uncertain military recruiting. As a result of these combined programs, Air Force psychiatry residents gain access to a broader range of civilian clinical experience and expertise while maintaining a focus on distinctive military requirements. The combining of programs opens up options for academic activities which may not have otherwise existed. Both military and civilian residents benefit from the occupational psychiatry experiences available within military clinical sites. These programs give civilian residents a chance to assist active duty members and their families and provide insight into the military "lifecycle." These collaborations benefit the universities by providing access to a larger pool of residents and faculty. The synthesis of the military and civilian programs raises some ongoing obstacles such as civilian residents' ability to gain access to military resources. The programs must also accommodate separate mechanisms for selecting residents (the National Residency Matching Program versus the Joint Selection Board for Graduate Medical Education). Military residents must also comply with military standards and requirements while maintaining the universities' standards of conduct and professionalism. Merging military training programs into university programs creates a vibrant opportunity to create exceptional military and civilian psychiatrists.

  2. Special report on antitrust. Part One: Antitrust constraints on the creation and operation of joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Enders, R J

    1988-02-01

    In a few areas of the country the phrase "health care joint venture" is still almost unknown. In most areas, however, such ventures are becoming common, and in many parts of the country there is truly a plethora of joint venture activity in the industry. The antitrust treatment of the formation and operation of these affiliations is therefore an area of increased concern for industry executives. This first of a two-part series for the Newsletter will describe the general framework for an antitrust evaluation of a joint venture. Next month's article will discuss specific situations.

  3. [Surgical activity at the military health service antenna during the Turquoise operation in Rwanda June-August 1994].

    PubMed

    Pons, F; Rigal, S; Dupeyron, C; de Saint-Julien, J

    1996-01-01

    The military health service provided a surgery antenna during the two months of the Turquoise operation in Zaire and Rwanda. During this period, the antenna functioned as a back-up station for the French troop and the local populations subjected to various conditions: Rwanda refugees who had escaped the massacres, subjects wounded by canon shots, war wounds, surgery emergencies in the refugee population. There were 315 operations performed including 33% in children and 70% for lesions of the limbs. The activity during the mission was analyzed on the basis of strategy for surgical diagnosis and treatment under local conditions (lack of complementary examinations, limited number of personnel, disrupted families in the refugee population, no possibility for transfer, major cholera and dysentery epidemic...).

  4. Saving Lives on the Battlefield (Part II) ? One Year Later A Joint Theater Trauma System and Joint Trauma System Review of Prehospital Trauma Care in Combined Joint Operations Area?Afghanistan (CJOA-A) Final Report, 30 May 2014.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Samual W; Robinson, John B; Smith, Michael P; Gross, Kirby R; Kotwal, Russ S; Mabry, Robert L; Butler, Frank K; Stockinger, Zsolt T; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Mavity, Mark E; Gillies, Duncan A

    2015-01-01

    The United States has achieved unprecedented survival rates, as high as 98%, for casualties arriving alive at the combat hospital. Our military medical personnel are rightly proud of this achievement. Commanders and Servicemembers are confident that if wounded and moved to a Role II or III medical facility, their care will be the best in the world. Combat casualty care, however, begins at the point of injury and continues through evacuation to those facilities. With up to 25% of deaths on the battlefield being potentially preventable, the prehospital environment is the next frontier for making significant further improvements in battlefield trauma care. Strict adherence to the evidence-based Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) Guidelines has been proven to reduce morbidity and mortality on the battlefield. However, full implementation across the entire force and commitment from both line and medical leadership continue to face ongoing challenges. This report on prehospital trauma in the Combined Joint Operations Area?Afghanistan (CJOA-A) is a follow-on to the one previously conducted in November 2012 and published in January 2013. Both assessments were conducted by the US Central Command (USCENTCOM) Joint Theater Trauma System (JTTS). Observations for this report were collected from December 2013 to January 2014 and were obtained directly from deployed prehospital providers, medical leaders, and combatant leaders. Significant progress has been made between these two reports with the establishment of a Prehospital Care Division within the JTTS, development of a prehospital trauma registry and weekly prehospital trauma conferences, and CJOA-A theater guidance and enforcement of prehospital documentation. Specific prehospital trauma-care achievements include expansion of transfusion capabilities forward to the point of injury, junctional tourniquets, and universal approval of tranexamic acid.

  5. Coordinated ground system for joint science operations for the ExoMars2016 TGO mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Vladimir; Heather, David; Frew, David; Eismont, Natan; Manaud, Nicolas; Ledkov, Anton; Nazirov, Ravil; Metcalfe, Leo; Cardesin, Alejandro; Konoplev, Veniamin; Korotkov, Fedor; Batanov, Oleg; Brumfitt, Jon; Alvarez, Rub; Martin, Patrick; Melnik, Anton; Tretiakov, Alexey; Villacorta, Antonio

    International collaboration is increasingly important for space science missions, often requiring joint operations activity. Such an approach is extremely important for studies of planets and other bodies of the Solar system that usually require high budget for their realization. In addition, as the development of international payloads for such missions is a well-established practice, the establishment of common ground systems for joint science operations is an important feature. Benefits of such an approach are evident: • More science return • Reduced the cost • More redundancy • Technology exchange But on the other hand, common systems for joint operations pose some specific difficulties, such as: • Different review procedures in the developing organisations • Incompatible documentation structures (“document tree”) • A risk of producing a “multiheaded dragon” (inefficient/duplicated task distributions) • Different base technologies • Language problems This article describes approaches for resolving these problems on the basis of the coordinated system for joint science operations for the ExoMars2016 mission, which is at the design stage now. The architecture of the system, the scenario of distributed but joint data management, as well as some methodological and technological aspects, will be discussed

  6. Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) Mission System (JMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, M.; Roberts, T.

    2011-09-01

    US space capabilities benefit the economy, national security, international relationships, scientific discovery, and our quality of life. Realizing these space responsibilities is challenging not only because the space domain is increasingly congested, contested, and competitive but is further complicated by the legacy space situational awareness (SSA) systems approaching end of life and inability to provide the breadth of SSA and command and control (C2) of space forces in this challenging domain. JMS will provide the capabilities to effectively employ space forces in this challenging domain. Requirements for JMS were developed based on regular, on-going engagement with the warfighter. The use of DoD Architecture Framework (DoDAF) products facilitated requirements scoping and understanding and transferred directly to defining and documenting the requirements in the approved Capability Development Document (CDD). As part of the risk reduction efforts, the Electronic System Center (ESC) JMS System Program Office (SPO) fielded JMS Capability Package (CP) 0 which includes an initial service oriented architecture (SOA) and user defined operational picture (UDOP) along with force status, sensor management, and analysis tools. Development efforts are planned to leverage and integrate prototypes and other research projects from Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Air Force Research Laboratories, Space Innovation and Development Center, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Lincoln Laboratories. JMS provides a number of benefits to the space community: a reduction in operational “transaction time” to accomplish key activities and processes; ability to process the increased volume of metric observations from new sensors (e.g., SBSS, SST, Space Fence), as well as owner/operator ephemerides thus enhancing the high accuracy near-real-time catalog, and greater automation of SSA data sharing supporting collaboration with government, civil, commercial, and foreign

  7. Employment of a joint medical task force in a counterinsurgency operational environment.

    PubMed

    Avery, Scott; Holman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    To understand the complexity of the medical task force mission in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, we must first understand the operational environment and its impact on the military healthcare system and the medical task force charged with its execution in theater. Historically the medical task force has focused almost exclusively on delivering a robust and accessible set of level II and III care and force health protection support since operations began in Iraq. Consequently, after 5 years of stable positioning, security, and infrastructure within our bases there were no discernable standardization of healthcare support, clinical quality, or medical equipment beyond what the units had chosen to adopt. Task Force 62 Medical Brigade has taken advantage of this unique time in history to place a concerted focus on institutionalizing our combat healthcare system and meeting the challenges of the counterinsurgency operational environment. Whereas our predecessors rightly focused on delivering combat health support during their tenure, we focused on the future, laying the foundation for the eventual transition to an environment similar to that in the Republic of Korea as the security situation improves. The foundation laid during Operation Iraqi Freedom 07-09 can be the foundation for the Army and the military healthcare system's vision in creating and modifying the delivery of US standard healthcare in a combat theater. PMID:20088053

  8. Selection of stirling engine parameter and modes of joint operation with the Topaz II

    SciTech Connect

    Kirillov, E.Y.; Ogloblin, B.G.; Shalaev, A.I.

    1996-03-01

    In addition to a high-temperature thermionic conversion cycle, application of a low-temperature machine cycle, such as the Stirling engine, is being considered. To select the optimum mode for joint operation of the Topaz II system and Stirling engine, output electric parameters are obtained as a function of thermal power released in the TFE fuel cores. The hydraulic diagram used for joint operation of the Topaz II and the Stirling engine is considered. Requirements to hydraulic characteristics of the Stirling engine heat exchanges are formulated. Scope of necessary modifications to mount the Stirling Engine on the Topaz II is estimated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Converting a commercial electric direct-drive robot to operate from joint torque commands

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, P.F.

    1991-07-01

    Many robot control algorithms for high performance in-contact operations including hybrid force/position, stiffness control and impedance control approaches require the command the joint torques. However, most commercially available robots do not provide joint torque command capabilities. The joint command at the user level is typically position or velocity and at the control developer level is voltage, current, or pulse-width, and the torque generated is a nonlinear function of the command and joint position. To enable the application of high performance in-contact control algorithms to commercially available robots, and thereby facilitate technology transfer from the robot control research community to commercial applications, an methodology has been developed to linearize the torque characteristics of electric motor-amplifier combinations. A four degree of freedom Adept 2 robot, having pulse-width modulation amplifiers and both variable reluctance and brushless DC motors, is converted to operate from joint torque commands to demonstrate the methodology. The commercial robot controller is replaced by a VME-based system incorporating special purpose hardware and firmware programmed from experimental data. The performance improvement is experimentally measured and graphically displayed using three-dimensional plots of torque vs command vs position. The average percentage torque deviation over the command and position ranges is reduced from as much as 76% to below 5% for the direct-drive joints 1, 2 and 4 and is cut by one half in the remaining ball-screw driven joint 3. Further, the torque deviation of the direct-drive joints drops below 2.5% if only the upper 90% of the torque range is considered. 23 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Millimeter wave case study of operational deployments: retail, airport, military, courthouse, and customs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryon, Gary V.

    2008-04-01

    In the wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on America, our security and defense industry was instantly tasked with delivering technologies that could be used to help prevent future terrorist activities. The general public world wide is asking for solutions that will foster a safe society and travel environment. Our best defenses rest in our talents within a free open society to prevent dangerous individuals from boarding planes, entering buildings, courthouses, transportations hubs and military bases with weapons capable of causing damage and bodily harm in the first place. Passive millimeter wave (PMMW) whole body imaging systems are based upon the principle that every physical entity emits, reflects, and/or absorbs electromagnetic energy. The term "passive" means that this approach does not bombard the test subject with energy radiation to further induce the discovery of hidden objects. PMMW whole body imaging systems focus on the human body's natural emission and reflection of millimeter wavelength energy. In physics, "millimeter waves" (MMW) are defined as extremely high-frequency (30-300 GHz) electromagnetic oscillations. On the electromagnetic spectrum these waves are just larger than infrared waves, but smaller than radio waves. The wavelength of a MMW is between 1 millimeter and 10 millimeters. That is approximately the thickness of a large paperclip up to the diameter of an "AAA" battery.

  11. Probing emissions of military cargo aircraft: description of a joint field measurement Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn; Corporan, Edwin; DeWitt, Matthew J; Spicer, Chester W; Holdren, Michael W; Cowen, Kenneth A; Laskin, Alex; Harris, David B; Shores, Richard C; Kagann, Robert; Hashmonay, Ram

    2008-06-01

    To develop effective air quality control strategies for military air bases, there is a need to accurately quantify these emissions. In support of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program project, the particulate matter (PM) and gaseous emissions from two T56 engines on a parked C-130 aircraft were characterized at the Kentucky Air National Guard base in Louisville, KY. Conventional and research-grade instrumentation and methodology were used in the field campaign during the first week of October 2005. Particulate emissions were sampled at the engine exit plane and at 15 m downstream. In addition, remote sensing of the gaseous species was performed via spectroscopic techniques at 5 and 15 m downstream of the engine exit. It was found that PM mass and number concentrations measured at 15-m downstream locations, after dilution-correction generally agreed well with those measured at the engine exhaust plane; however, higher variations were observed in the far-field after natural dilution of the downstream measurements was accounted for. Using carbon dioxide-normalized data we demonstrated that gas species measurements by extractive and remote sensing techniques agreed reasonably well.

  12. Protecting military convoys in Iraq: an examination of battle injuries sustained by a mechanized battalion during Operation Iraqi Freedom II.

    PubMed

    Gondusky, Joseph S; Reiter, Michael P

    2005-06-01

    Improvised explosive devices and mines pose a formidable threat to military convoys traveling in Iraq. This study evaluated battle injuries sustained by a mechanized battalion operating against this threat. The objective was to gain insight into injury profiles and prevention. In the period examined, 32 attacks injured 120 Marines, causing 188 injuries. Upper extremity and head injuries (70%) were common, whereas lower extremity injuries (11%) were rare (as expected, given the threat and the body areas exposed). Shoulder and axilla protectors may be beneficial, but lower arm and hand injuries remain difficult to combat. Ear injury was the most common single injury type (23%). Combat earplugs may reduce ear blast injuries. Eye injuries were uncommon (0.5%), likely because of ballistic eye protection. Injury to the torso (11%) was generally mild, because of body armor vests. The majority of wounds were minor, allowing > 80% of the injured Marines to return to duty.

  13. Operational vector-borne disease surveillance and control: closing the capabilities gap through research at overseas military laboratories.

    PubMed

    Evans, Brian P; Clark, Jeffrey W; Barbara, Kathryn A; Mundal, Kirk D; Furman, Barry D; McAvin, James C; Richardson, Jason H

    2009-01-01

    Malaria, dengue fever, chikungunya virus, leishmaniasis, and a myriad of other vector-borne diseases pose significant threats to the warfighter and to the overall combat effectiveness of units. Military preventive medicine (PM) assets must accurately evaluate the vector-borne disease threat and then implement and/or advise the commander on countermeasures to reduce a particular threat. The success of these measures is contingent upon the biology of the disease vector and on the tools or methods used to conduct vector/pathogen surveillance and vector control. There is a significant gap between the tools available and those required for operational PM assets to provide real-time, effective surveillance and control. A network of US Army and US Navy overseas laboratories is focused on closing the current capabilities gap. Their mission is to develop and field test tools and methods to enhance the combatant commander's ability to identify and mitigate the threat posed by these vector-borne diseases.

  14. 43 CFR 3105.4 - Combination for joint operations or for transportation of oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Combination for joint operations or for transportation of oil. 3105.4 Section 3105.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL AND...

  15. 43 CFR 3105.4 - Combination for joint operations or for transportation of oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combination for joint operations or for transportation of oil. 3105.4 Section 3105.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL AND...

  16. 43 CFR 3105.4 - Combination for joint operations or for transportation of oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Combination for joint operations or for transportation of oil. 3105.4 Section 3105.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL AND...

  17. It is not their war: the impact of military operations on Philippine migrant care workers for elderly people in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Pnina

    2015-01-01

    Objective A majority of work immigrants from the Philippines came to Israel to fill positions involving personal and nursing care. Most of them were in Israel during the Second Lebanon War, the Cast Lead operation, and the Protective Edge Operation. These migrant care workers experienced these events no differently than did the Israeli population. The goal of this study was to examine the connections between the Philippine migrant care workers’ exposure to the military operations and the levels of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), death anxiety, and burnout among them. Methods A random sample of 147 Philippine migrant care workers was recruited through four agencies that employ migrant care workers. Participants completed a self-report questionnaire. Results Philippine migrant care workers reported high levels of PTSD, high levels of death anxiety, and low levels of burnout. Levels of exposure were positively associated with levels of PTSD, death anxiety, and negatively with burnout. A significant inverse relationship was found between interpersonal variables (self-esteem and sense of mastery) and the PTSD, death anxiety, and burnout levels reported by the participants. PMID:26170643

  18. Nutrition research in the military.

    PubMed

    Hill, Neil E; Fallowfield, J L; Delves, S K; Wilson, D R

    2014-06-01

    Military research performed in an operational environment involves mission-specific considerations. The Institute of Naval Medicine was tasked in 2008 by the Surgeon General to investigate the nutritional status of deployed British military personnel, and how this might affect body composition, physical fitness and operational capability. This paper briefly describes the logistic and technical issues specific to military research that were encountered by the study team, how these issues were overcome and how this research has influenced military practice.

  19. Spread of vaccinia virus through shaving during military training, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, TX, June 2014.

    PubMed

    Webber, Bryant J; Montgomery, Jay R; Markelz, Ana E; Allen, Kahtonna C; Hunninghake, John C; Ritchie, Simon A; Pawlak, Mary T; Johnston, Lindsay A; Oliver, Tiffany A; Winterton, Brad S

    2014-08-01

    Although naturally occurring smallpox virus was officially declared eradicated in 1980, concern for biological warfare prompted the U.S. Government in 2002 to recommend smallpox vaccination for select individuals. Vaccinia, the smallpox vaccine virus, is administered into the skin, typically on the upper arm, where the virus remains viable and infectious until the scab falls off and the epidermis is fully intact - typically 2-4 weeks. Adverse events following smallpox vaccination may occur in the vaccinee, in individuals who have contact with the vaccinee (i.e., secondary transmission), or in individuals who have contact with the vaccinee's contact (i.e., tertiary transmission). In June 2014 at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, TX, two cases of inadvertent inoculation of vaccinia and one case of a non-viral reaction following vaccination occurred in the security forces training squadron. This includes the first reported case of shaving as the likely source of autoinoculation after contact transmission. This paper describes the diagnosis and treatment of these cases, the outbreak investigation, and steps taken to prevent future transmission.

  20. Apparatus for maintaining alignment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation

    DOEpatents

    Trent, Jett B.; Murphy, Jimmy L.

    1981-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignment with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a biasing device for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base is indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

  1. Apparatus for maintaining aligment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation

    DOEpatents

    Trent, J.B.; Murphy, J.L.

    1980-01-03

    The invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignement with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a bias means for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base in indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

  2. United States military posture for FY 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of this statement on the military posture of the United States is to supplement testimony by the Chairman and other members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff at congressional hearings in support of the FY 1989 Defense Budget. Chapter I is an overview that describes the main challenges to US national security, outlines objectives and elements of US military strategy, and highlights continuing efforts to field the best possible armed forces for the protection of US national interests. Chapter II compares US defense requirements and resource commitment with those of the Soviet Union. Chapter III provides an overview of the global military environment by comparing US and allied forces with Soviet and Warsaw Pact forces. Chapter IV assesses the current and projected capability of the US Armed Forces to meet the Soviet nuclear threat. Chapter V assesses the current and projected capability of the US Armed Forces, in concert with friends and allies, to meet the Soviet conventional military threat. This chapter deals primarily with joint perspectives that have increased the capabilities and efficiency of our forces. Chapter VI addresses other topics of interest. Unless otherwise noted, data shown in this report have used operational as opposed to treaty inventories for strategic weapon systems, a fiscal year cutoff date of 30 September 1987, and mobilized forces. Additionally, data have been developed based on a global as opposed to regional war scenario.

  3. Derivation of operation rules for reservoirs in parallel with joint water demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiang; Hu, Tiesong; Xiong, Lihua; Cao, Zhixian; Xu, Chongyu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive the general optimality conditions of the commonly used operating policies for reservoirs in parallel with joint water demand, which are defined in terms of system-wide release rules and individual reservoir storage balancing functions. Following that, a new set of release rules for individual reservoirs are proposed in analytical forms by considering the optimality conditions for the balance of total water delivery utility and carryover storage value of individual reservoirs. Theoretical analysis indicates that the commonly used operating policies are a special case of the newly derived rules. The derived release rules are then applied to simulating the operation of a parallel reservoir system in northeastern China. Compared to the performance of the commonly used policies, some advantages of the proposed operation rules are illustrated. Most notably, less water shortage occurrence and higher water supply reliability are obtained from the proposed operation rules.

  4. Operational vector-borne disease surveillance and control: closing the capabilities gap through research at overseas military laboratories.

    PubMed

    Evans, Brian P; Clark, Jeffrey W; Barbara, Kathryn A; Mundal, Kirk D; Furman, Barry D; McAvin, James C; Richardson, Jason H

    2009-01-01

    Malaria, dengue fever, chikungunya virus, leishmaniasis, and a myriad of other vector-borne diseases pose significant threats to the warfighter and to the overall combat effectiveness of units. Military preventive medicine (PM) assets must accurately evaluate the vector-borne disease threat and then implement and/or advise the commander on countermeasures to reduce a particular threat. The success of these measures is contingent upon the biology of the disease vector and on the tools or methods used to conduct vector/pathogen surveillance and vector control. There is a significant gap between the tools available and those required for operational PM assets to provide real-time, effective surveillance and control. A network of US Army and US Navy overseas laboratories is focused on closing the current capabilities gap. Their mission is to develop and field test tools and methods to enhance the combatant commander's ability to identify and mitigate the threat posed by these vector-borne diseases. PMID:20084734

  5. Joint operations planning for space surveillance missions on the MSX satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Grant; Good, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite, sponsored by BMDO, is intended to gather broad-band phenomenology data on missiles, plumes, naturally occurring earthlimb backgrounds and deep space backgrounds. In addition the MSX will be used to conduct functional demonstrations of space-based space surveillance. The JHU/Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), located in Laurel, MD, is the integrator and operator of the MSX satellite. APL will conduct all operations related to the MSX and is charged with the detailed operations planning required to implement all of the experiments run on the MSX except the space surveillance experiments. The non-surveillance operations are generally amenable to being defined months ahead of time and being scheduled on a monthly basis. Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (LL), located in Lexington, MA, is the provider of one of the principle MSX instruments, the Space-Based Visible (SBV) sensor, and the agency charged with implementing the space surveillance demonstrations on the MSX. The planning timelines for the space surveillance demonstrations are fundamentally different from those for the other experiments. They are generally amenable to being scheduled on a monthly basis, but the specific experiment sequence and pointing must be refined shortly before execution. This allocation of responsibilities to different organizations implies the need for a joint mission planning system for conducting space surveillance demonstrations. This paper details the iterative, joint planning system, based on passing responsibility for generating MSX commands for surveillance operations from APL to LL for specific scheduled operations. The joint planning system, including the generation of a budget for spacecraft resources to be used for surveillance events, has been successfully demonstrated during ground testing of the MSX and is being validated for MSX launch within the year. The planning system developed for the MSX forms a

  6. Endocrine-metabolic responses to military field operations: Effects of cold and moderate altitude exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, E.; Hackney, A.C.; Hodgdon, J.A.; Coyne, J.T.; Kelleher, D.L. Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill )

    1991-03-11

    Select endocrine-metabolic responses of US Marines to 4.5 day field operations (FOPS) in different environments were examined. Blood and urine samples were collected in the field immediately before and after FOPS at: (1) sea level, neutral temperatures (Ts) (SLN; n = 14), (2) sea level, cold Ts (SLC; n = 16), (3) 2,500 M altitude, neutral Ts (ALN; n = 16), and (4) 2,500 M altitude, cold Ts (ALC; n = 45). Measures examined were testosterone (T), cortisol (C), glucose (Glu), triglycerides (Tg), and urinary ketones (Uket). T decreased pre-post the FOPS in the cold conditions ({bar X}; 6.7 to 5.5 hg/ml; n = 61) but did not change in neutral conditions. C increased pre-post FOPS at SLC (12.1 to 19.8 ug/dl, p < 0.01), ALN (9.3 to 13.9 ug/dl, p < 0.01), and ALC (16.7 to 19.0 ug/dl, p = 0.08). Normoglycemia was maintained under each condition. Tg decreased (p < 0.01) at SLC, ALN, and ALC ({bar X}{triangle}: {minus}59.1, {minus}102.2, {minus}93.3 mg/dl, respectively), but increased at SLN (+74.0 mg/dl). Uket increased post FOPS only at ALN and ALC ({bar X}{triangle}: 3.4 mg/dl and +11.3 mg/dl). The Uket increases were correlated to Tg decreases. Results suggest FOPS induces a slight endocrine stress response, which is augmented with moderate altitude or cold exposure. Furthermore FOPS at altitude, especially in the cold, seems to shift the body towards fat metabolism.

  7. Operation Aftershock: the U.S. military disaster response to the Yogyakarta earthquake May through June 2006.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Dennis; Lane, David; Ferrara, Elizabeth

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. military has recently been involved in many humanitarian assistance and disaster response missions around the world. This newfound role is in response to the U.S. government's desire to use "medical diplomacy" rather than "military might" to shape its relationship with foreign governments. With each of these humanitarian assistance and disaster response missions, the U.S. military has learned how to more rapidly insert desperately needed services and skill sets into disaster-struck communities, how to arrange for in-country services (translation services, transportation, etc.) that cannot be readily brought in, and how to work closely with foreign governments and nongovernmental organizations to determine their needs and expectations without the U.S. military appearing as if it were trying to establish a permanent presence.

  8. Joint operation and dynamic control of flood limiting water levels for mixed cascade reservoir systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanlai; Guo, Shenglian; Liu, Pan; Xu, Chongyu

    2014-11-01

    Reservoirs are one of the most efficient infrastructures for integrated water resources development and management; and play a more and more important role in flood control and conservation. Dynamic control of the reservoir flood limiting water level (FLWL) is a valuable and effective approach to compromise the flood control, hydropower generation and comprehensive utilization of water resources of river basins during the flood season. The dynamic control models of FLWL for a single reservoir and cascade reservoirs have been extended for a mixed reservoir system in this paper. The proposed model consists of a dynamic control operation module for a single reservoir, a dynamic control operation module for cascade reservoirs, and a joint operation module for mixed cascade reservoir systems. The Three Gorges and Qingjiang cascade reservoirs in the Yangtze River basin of China are selected for a case study. Three-hour inflow data series for representative hydrological years are used to test the model. The results indicate that the proposed model can make an effective tradeoff between flood control and hydropower generation. Joint operation and dynamic control of FLWL can generate 26.4 × 108 kW h (3.47%) more hydropower for the mixed cascade reservoir systems and increase the water resource utilization rate by 3.72% for the Three Gorges reservoir and 2.42% for the Qingjiang cascade reservoirs without reducing originally designed flood prevention standards.

  9. Tuberculosis and the military.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Matthew K; Wilson, D

    2013-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) causes significant morbidity and mortality among the global civilian population. Historically, TB has also been responsible for a considerable burden of disease among military populations during periods of both peace and conflict. TB will continue to be of importance to the military for several reasons. Military units live and work in confined environments, personnel may deploy to areas highly endemic for TB where there is the potential to be exposed to infected local communities, and they undertake physiologically stressful activities during training and operations. These are just a few of the factors that may increase the risk of acquiring, developing and transmitting TB among military personnel. This review examines the military relevance of TB in the modern era within the context of epidemiological, pathological and clinical considerations of this ancient disease.

  10. Risk mitigation for ITER by a prolonged and joint international operation of JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donne, Antonius J.; Cowley, Steve; Jones, Timothy; Litaudon, Xavier; JET Team; CCFE Team

    2015-11-01

    Prolonged operation of the Joint European Torus (JET) in a set-up involving all ITER partners will be beneficial for ITER. Experiments at JET with its ITER-like wall and using a D-T plasma mixture will help to mitigate risks in the ITER research plan. Training of the ITER operators, technicians and engineers at JET will save valuable time when ITER comes into operation. Moreover, the way in which the future ITER experiments will be organized can already be experienced at JET, by imposing a similar organisational structure. This paper will present arguments in favour of an extension of JET and additionally briefly discuss a number of enhancements that will make experiments on JET even more relevant for ITER.

  11. Static Analysis of Large-Scale Multibody System Using Joint Coordinates and Spatial Algebra Operator

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Initial transient oscillations inhibited in the dynamic simulations responses of multibody systems can lead to inaccurate results, unrealistic load prediction, or simulation failure. These transients could result from incompatible initial conditions, initial constraints violation, and inadequate kinematic assembly. Performing static equilibrium analysis before the dynamic simulation can eliminate these transients and lead to stable simulation. Most exiting multibody formulations determine the static equilibrium position by minimizing the system potential energy. This paper presents a new general purpose approach for solving the static equilibrium in large-scale articulated multibody. The proposed approach introduces an energy drainage mechanism based on Baumgarte constraint stabilization approach to determine the static equilibrium position. The spatial algebra operator is used to express the kinematic and dynamic equations of the closed-loop multibody system. The proposed multibody system formulation utilizes the joint coordinates and modal elastic coordinates as the system generalized coordinates. The recursive nonlinear equations of motion are formulated using the Cartesian coordinates and the joint coordinates to form an augmented set of differential algebraic equations. Then system connectivity matrix is derived from the system topological relations and used to project the Cartesian quantities into the joint subspace leading to minimum set of differential equations. PMID:25045732

  12. Static analysis of large-scale multibody system using joint coordinates and spatial algebra operator.

    PubMed

    Omar, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    Initial transient oscillations inhibited in the dynamic simulations responses of multibody systems can lead to inaccurate results, unrealistic load prediction, or simulation failure. These transients could result from incompatible initial conditions, initial constraints violation, and inadequate kinematic assembly. Performing static equilibrium analysis before the dynamic simulation can eliminate these transients and lead to stable simulation. Most exiting multibody formulations determine the static equilibrium position by minimizing the system potential energy. This paper presents a new general purpose approach for solving the static equilibrium in large-scale articulated multibody. The proposed approach introduces an energy drainage mechanism based on Baumgarte constraint stabilization approach to determine the static equilibrium position. The spatial algebra operator is used to express the kinematic and dynamic equations of the closed-loop multibody system. The proposed multibody system formulation utilizes the joint coordinates and modal elastic coordinates as the system generalized coordinates. The recursive nonlinear equations of motion are formulated using the Cartesian coordinates and the joint coordinates to form an augmented set of differential algebraic equations. Then system connectivity matrix is derived from the system topological relations and used to project the Cartesian quantities into the joint subspace leading to minimum set of differential equations.

  13. Dual filtering in operational and joint spaces for reaching and grasping.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Léo; Quinton, Jean-Charles; Mezouar, Youcef

    2015-09-01

    To study human movement generation, as well as to develop efficient control algorithms for humanoid or dexterous manipulation robots, overcoming the limits and drawbacks of inverse-kinematics-based methods is needed. Adequate methods must deal with high dimensionality, uncertainty, and must perform in real time (constraints shared by robots and humans). This paper introduces a Bayesian filtering method, hierarchically applied in the operational and joint spaces to break down the complexity of the problem. The method is validated in simulation on a robotic arm in a cluttered environment, with up to 51 degrees of freedom.

  14. Comparing military and civilian critical thinking and information processes in operational risk management: what are the lessons?

    PubMed

    VanVactor, Jerry D; Gill, Tony

    2010-03-01

    Business continuity has expanded into a discipline that spans most functional areas of large enterprises. Both the military and financial sectors have consistently demonstrated an aptitude to expand the boundaries of continuity planning and crisis mitigation. A comparison of both enterprises is provided to see how their respective methodologies compare. Interestingly, the similarities far outweigh the differences. The paper provides commentary related to comparative insight from risk practitioners' perspectives from within the US Army, one of the largest military organisations in the world, and the Bank of Montreal, one of Canada's leading financial institutions. PMID:20494875

  15. Comparing military and civilian critical thinking and information processes in operational risk management: what are the lessons?

    PubMed

    VanVactor, Jerry D; Gill, Tony

    2010-03-01

    Business continuity has expanded into a discipline that spans most functional areas of large enterprises. Both the military and financial sectors have consistently demonstrated an aptitude to expand the boundaries of continuity planning and crisis mitigation. A comparison of both enterprises is provided to see how their respective methodologies compare. Interestingly, the similarities far outweigh the differences. The paper provides commentary related to comparative insight from risk practitioners' perspectives from within the US Army, one of the largest military organisations in the world, and the Bank of Montreal, one of Canada's leading financial institutions.

  16. Joint operation and energy sales of the Indonesia`s geothermal development project

    SciTech Connect

    Suryadi, D.; Sulaiman, S.; Boedihardi, M.; Agus, I.

    1995-12-31

    The government of Indonesia plans to intensify the utilization of geothermal energy for electrical generation as part of its energy diversification policy. Presently only 1.6% of the 19,650 megawatts country-wide potential are being utilized. To accelerate the development of geothermal energy, the government invites private companies as Contractor to cooperate with PERTAMINA, the State Company that is authorized to explore and exploit oil, gas and geothermal reserves in Indonesia, in a form of Joint Operation Contract (JOC) and gives incentives in fiscal and other terms to contractors that develop this source of energy. In the JOC, PERTAMINA is responsible for the management of operation and Contractor is responsible for the execution of the operation. Contractor has to provide financial, technical assistance and all facilities required to conduct geothermal operation and carries the risks of operating cost and therefore has an economic interest from the project. Each party involved in the development has a right to demand a certain portion of the Net Operating Income (NOI). The Energy Sales Contract (ESC) is made in conjunction with the JOC whereby the buyer agrees to purchase from PERTAMINA geothermal steam or electricity which is generated from geothermal energy produced and delivered by Contractor to the buyer on behalf of PERTAMINA.

  17. Joint Assessment of ETRR-2 Research Reactor Operations Program, Capabilities, and Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; O'Kelly, D S

    2006-05-08

    A joint assessment meeting was conducted at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Agency (EAEA) followed by a tour of Egyptian Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) on March 22 and 23, 2006. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the capabilities of the new research reactor and its operations under Action Sheet 4 between the U.S. DOE and the EAEA, ''Research Reactor Operation'', and Action Sheet 6, ''Technical assistance in The Production of Radioisotopes''. Preliminary Recommendations of the joint assessment are as follows: (1) ETRR-2 utilization should be increased by encouraging frequent and sustained operations. This can be accomplished in part by (a) Improving the supply-chain management for fresh reactor fuel and alleviating the perception that the existing fuel inventory should be conserved due to unreliable fuel supply; and (b) Promulgating a policy for sample irradiation priority that encourages the use of the reactor and does not leave the decision of when to operate entirely at the discretion of reactor operations staff. (2) Each experimental facility in operation or built for a single purpose should be reevaluated to focus on those that most meet the goals of the EAEA strategic business plan. Temporary or long-term elimination of some experimental programs might be necessary to provide more focused utilization. There may be instances of emerging reactor applications for which no experimental facility is yet designed or envisioned. In some cases, an experimental facility may have a more beneficial use than the purpose for which it was originally designed. For example, (a) An effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) program requires nearby high quality medical facilities. These facilities are not available and are unlikely to be constructed near the Inshas site. Further, the BNCT facility is not correctly designed for advanced research and therapy programs using epithermal neutrons. (b) The ETRR-2 is frequently operated to provide color-enhanced gemstones but is

  18. 24 CFR 943.144 - What financial impact do operations of a subsidiary, affiliate, or joint venture have on a PHA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of a subsidiary, affiliate, or joint venture have on a PHA? 943.144 Section 943.144 Housing and Urban... CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Subsidiaries, Affiliates, Joint Ventures in Public Housing § 943.144 What financial impact do operations of a subsidiary, affiliate, or joint venture have on a PHA? Income...

  19. Joint Spacelab-J (SL-J) Activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Featured together in joint ground activities during the SL-J mission are NASA/NASDA personnel at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  20. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 372 - Overseas Military Personnel Charter Operator's Surety Bond Under Part 372 of the Special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR Part 372) A Appendix A to Part 372 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Overseas Military Personnel Charter... Special Regulations of the Department of Transportation (14 CFR Part 372) Know all men by these...

  1. Operational space weather product development and validation at the joint SMC-AFRL Rapid Prototyping Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, S.

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/VSB) and Detachment 11, Space &Missile Systems Center (SMC, Det 11/CIT) have combined efforts to design, develop, test, and implement graphical products for the Air Force's space weather operations center. These products are generated to analyze, specify, and forecast the effects of the near-earth space environment on Department of Defense systems and communications. Jointly-developed products that have been, or will soon be added to real-time operations include: 1) the Operational Space Environment Network Display (OpSEND) suit - a set of four products that address HF communication, UHF satellite communication scintillation, radar auroral clutter, and GP S single- frequency errors; 2) a solar radio background and burst effects (SoRBE) product suite; and C) a meteor effects (ME) product suite. The RPC is also involved in a rather substantial "V&V" effort to produce multiple operational product verifications and validations, with an added end goal of a generalized validation software package. The presentation will provide a general overview of the RPC and each of the products mentioned above, to include background science, operational history, inputs, outputs, dissemination, and customer uses for each.

  2. The results of the three-month co-operation between a German and a Greek surgical team in a role II military hospital in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Gourgiotis, Stavros; Triantafyllou, Christos; Karamitros, Athanasios; Thinnes, Katrin; Thüringen, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: There are a lot of unique challenges for the military medical personnel assigned to Afghanistan. We evaluate the results of the co-operation between a German and a Greek surgical team during a 3-month period in a role II hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients who were admitted to the role II German hospital of Kunduz were evaluated. We reviewed the type of diseases, mechanism and location of injuries, management, types of surgical procedures, blood supply, and outcome. Results: The data included 792 ISAF patients, 18 NGOs patients, and 296 local patients. Out of them, 71.6% of the patients were ISAF personnel; 51 patients underwent a surgical operation; 35 of them were operated in an emergency base. Fifty-five surgical procedures were performed. In 22 (43.1%) of these patients, orthopedic procedures were performed, while in the rest 29 (56.9%) patients the operations were of general surgery interest. Gunshot injuries were the main mechanism of injury for locals, whereas ISAF personnel were usually presented with injuries after IEDs and rocket attacks. A total number of 11 patients were transferred to role III military hospitals for further treatment within 24 hours. Conclusions: The co-operation between surgical teams from different countries, when appropriately trained, staffed, and equipped, can be highly effective in a combat environment. PMID:22416153

  3. Single-Leg Balance Impairments Persist in Fully Operational Military Special Forces Operators With a Previous History of Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Timothy C.; Clark, Nicholas C.; Wood, Dallas; Abt, John P.; Lovalekar, Mita; Lephart, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Single-leg balance (SLB) can be chronically impaired after low back pain (LBP). Impaired SLB is a risk factor for recurrent LBP and lower extremity injury. In the United States military, the special forces operator (SFO) deploys on high-risk missions under extreme conditions, and impaired SLB can potentially threaten SFO safety and mission success. Purpose: To compare SLB in fully operational SFOs with and without a history of LBP. The hypothesis was that SLB deficits would be present in SFOs with a history of LBP. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 226 SFOs were included in this analysis. Comparisons were made between SFOs with and without medical chart documented history of LBP (LBP group [n = 43]: mean age = 31.2 ± 10.3 years, mean height = 177.3 ± 7.2 cm, mean mass = 87.3 ± 11.8 kg; healthy group [n = 183]: mean age = 28.0 ± 6.0 years, mean height = 177.9 ± 6.0 cm, mean mass = 84.9 ± 8.8 kg). Bilateral SLB was tested (eyes open and eyes closed) in both groups using a force plate. The variability in the ground-reaction forces was averaged across 3 trials for each leg for both conditions. Comparisons were made between legs in the LBP and between the LBP and healthy group (α = .05). Results: There were significant between-group differences for each leg for both conditions, with the healthy group demonstrating better SLB compared with the LBP group. P values ranged from .01 to .03. Conclusion: Impaired SLB persists in SFOs with previously reported LBP. Balance assessments of individuals who report LBP may assist with designing targeted interventions to address potential deficits that may increase the risk of future injury. Clinical Relevance: SFOs with a known history of LBP would benefit from examination of SLB and may benefit from balance training to resolve any deficits that may be present to lower the potential risk for future injury. PMID:26535329

  4. Does pre-operative physiotherapy improve outcomes from lower limb joint replacement surgery? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Ilana N; Bennell, Kim L

    2004-01-01

    A systematic review of randomised controlled trials was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of pre-operative physiotherapy programmes on outcome following lower limb joint replacement surgery. A search of relevant key terms was used to find suitable trials, with five papers meeting the inclusion criteria for the review. The methodological quality of the trials was rated using the PEDro scale. Estimates of the size of treatment effects were calculated for each outcome in each trial, with 95% confidence intervals calculated where sufficient data were provided. Of the three trials pertaining to total knee replacement, only very small mean differences were found between control and intervention groups for all of the outcome measures. Where confidence intervals could be calculated, these showed no clinically important differences between the groups. Two papers (one study) pertaining to total hip replacements found significant improvements in WOMAC scores, hip strength and range of movement, walking distance, cadence, and gait velocity for the intervention group, compared to a control group. Estimates of treatment effect sizes for these outcomes were larger than for the total knee replacement studies, with confidence intervals showing potentially clinically important differences between group means. However, as the intervention group also received an additional intensive post-operative physiotherapy program, these results cannot be attributed solely to the pre-operative program. This systematic review shows that pre-operative physiotherapy programmes are not effective in improving outcome after total knee replacement but their effect on outcome from total hip replacement cannot be adequately determined.

  5. Military Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Janet L. S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Includes "Forging Partnerships into the Twenty-First Century" (Brown); "Uncle Sam Wants You to Go to School!" (Perez); "Maintaining Educational Access" (Kelly); "College on Military Bases" (Anderson); "Air Force Members Set High Goals for Continuing Education" (Hoban); "Post-Secondary Education for Military Students through Contracting" (Erdman);…

  6. 28 CFR 48.4 - Application for approval of joint newspaper operating arrangement entered into after July 24, 1970.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... newspaper operating arrangement entered into after July 24, 1970. 48.4 Section 48.4 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) NEWSPAPER PRESERVATION ACT § 48.4 Application for approval of joint newspaper operating arrangement entered into after July 24, 1970. (a) Persons desiring to obtain...

  7. Respiratory infections in the military.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Matthew K; Wilson, D

    2013-09-01

    Military training facilities and operational theatres, and the stressful activities undertaken in such settings, are unique. Military personnel living and working in these environments are at considerable risk of the acquisition and onward transmission of a variety of respiratory infections. While these generally cause mild illness, severe disease may occur with significant associated morbidity and, occasionally, mortality. Epidemic outbreaks among military personnel may have a significant detrimental impact on training schedules and operational effectiveness. The recognition of the burden of such illness among British military personnel, and the development of strategies required to prevent or limit negative impacts, can only be achieved through the use of comprehensive laboratory-based surveillance programmes.

  8. Atypical Presentation of Tuberculosis of Elbow Joint in Operated Case of Distal Humerus Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Yogesh; Khadilkar, Madhav; Ranade, Ashish S.; Vartak, Devendra N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A typical presentations of tuberculosis are not uncommon. Periprosthetic infection with tuberculosis after total joint replacement has well published. Tuberculosis of the elbow following open reduction internal fixation of a distal humerus fraeture is extremely rare. Case Report: We report case of a healthy, immunocompetenet 49-year-old male who underwent open reduction and internal fixation with bicolumnar plating for distal humerus fracture and presented after 18 month with cystic swelling over medial aspect of operated site. There was no wound dehiscence and the underlying fracture was healed well without any signs of implant loosening or bony involvement. Cystic swelling was excised and histopathology provided the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Patient was treated with anti tubercular chemotherapy and patient made uneventful recovery. Conclusion: Although synovial tuberculosis after fracture fixation is a rare entity, tuberculosis should be kept as a differential diagnosis. Surgeons should have high index of suspicion to diagnose atypical presentations of tuberculosis. PMID:27299044

  9. Longitudinal assessment of gender differences in the development of PTSD among US military personnel deployed in support of the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Isabel G; Donoho, Carrie J; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Maguen, Shira

    2015-09-01

    Divergent findings from previous research examining gender differences in the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among US military members deployed to the operations in Iraq or Afghanistan (recent operations) prompted this study utilizing a matching approach to examine whether risk for new-onset PTSD and PTSD severity scores differed by gender. US military members from the Millennium Cohort Study deployed in support of the recent operations were followed for approximately 7 years from baseline through 2 follow-up periods between 2001 and 2008. Propensity score matching was used to match 1 male to each female using demographic, military, and behavioral factors including baseline sexual assault. Analyses were stratified by combat experience defined as reporting at least one of five exposures during follow-up. Outcome measures included a positive screen for PTSD and severity scores measured by the PTSD Patient Checklist-Civilian Version. Discrete-time survival analysis quantified the association between gender and incident PTSD. Among 4684 matched subjects (2342 women and men), 6.7% of women and 6.1% of men developed PTSD during follow-up. Results showed no significant gender differences for the likelihood of developing PTSD or for PTSD severity scores among women and men who reported combat experience and among those who did not. This study is the first of its kind to match a large population of male and female service members on important baseline characteristics including sexual assault. Findings suggest that while combat deployed personnel develop PTSD, women do not have a significantly different risk for developing PTSD than men after experiencing combat.

  10. Joint ASRS and NASA Callback on FANS-1 Datalink Operational Incidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, John; Smith, Nancy; Morrison, Rowena; Palmer, Everett; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The recent certification and implementation of the Future Air Navigation System (FANS- 1) was based on the benefits of reduced separation minima, ability to optimize flight plans enroute, and the prompt transmission and reception of messages between oceanic controllers and 747-400 aircraft transiting the Pacific. In addition, FANS was intended to supersede High Frequency (HF) radio which has been the staple, yet problematic, long distance communication link for years. However, in the three initial years of operation, FANS has revealed its own unique operational issues. Although some technical and engineering problems have been studied and addressed, little research has been conducted on human factors issues associated with the use of FANS on the flight deck. This lack of prior data on the operational use of FANS prompted a joint NASA/Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) inquiry into FANS datalink. In addition, two foreign air carriers and their respective safety agencies were recruited to participate. This international FANS research effort consisting of three aviation safety agencies and three international commercial air-carriers has provided a unique opportunity for conducting human factors research in an operational environment. An ASRS 'callback' format was chosen for the study as a practical and viable method for capturing FANS events on the flight deck. Initially, 747-400 pilots were encouraged to submit reports to their respective safety agencies if they had experienced any positive or negative incidents with the use of FANS. Upon receipt of a report, it was evaluated and if deemed pertinent to the study, a telephone interview or 'callback' was conducted on the FANS incident to elicit further details, capture the key events, and gather contextual information. Once the operational data collection phase was completed, the reports and interviews were analyzed with two purposes in mind: primarily to identify and address problematic human factors issues with

  11. Joint Polar Satellite System's Operational and Research Applications from Suomi NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System is NOAA's new operational satellite program and includes the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) as a bridge between NOAA's operational Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) series, which began in 1978, and the first JPSS operational satellite scheduled for launch in 2017. JPSS provides critical data for key operational and research applications, and includes: 1) Weather forecasting - data from the JPSS Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) are needed to forecast weather events out to 7 days. Nearly 85% of all data used in weather forecasting are from polar orbiting satellites. 2) Environmental monitoring - data from the JPSS Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are used to monitor the environment including the health of coastal ecosystems, drought conditions, fire, smoke, dust, snow and ice, and the state of oceans, including sea surface temperature and ocean color. 3) Climate monitoring - data from JPSS instruments, including OMPS and CERES will provide continuity to climate data records established using NOAA POES and NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite observations. These data records provide a unified and coherent long-term observation of the environment; the records and products are critical to climate modelers, scientists, and decision makers concerned with advancing climate change understanding, prediction, mitigation and adaptation strategies, and policies. To bridge the gap between products and applications, the JPSS Program has established a proving ground program to optimize the use of JPSS data with other data sources to improve key products and services. A number of operational and research applications will be discussed, including the use of CrIS and ATMS for improved weather forecasting, the use of VIIRS for environmental monitoring of sea ice, smoke, fire, floods, droughts, coastal water quality (e.g. harmful algal blooms

  12. Two-axis hydraulic joint for high speed, heavy lift robotic operations

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, M.R.; Robinett, R.D.; Phelan, J.R.; VanZuiden, D.M.

    1994-04-01

    A hydraulically driven universal joint was developed for a heavy lift, high speed nuclear waste remediation application. Each axis is driven by a simple hydraulic cylinder controlled by a jet pipe servovalve. Servovalve behavior is controlled by a force feedback control system, which damps the hydraulic resonance. A prototype single joint robot was built and tested. A two joint robot is under construction.

  13. Joint civilian/national guard mass casualty exercise provides model for preparedness training.

    PubMed

    Grant, William D; Secreti, LaLainia

    2007-08-01

    After-action reports on the 2005 hurricane relief efforts pointed to the need for effective and efficient civilian/military operational cooperation. Cited for particular attention was the interface with National Guard units. This article describes an exercise conducted with National Guard units and members of the Central New York Medical Reserve Corps to educate all participants in effective interaction during disaster responses. Using a unique health care facility located at the New York State Fairgrounds, this 2-day operation demonstrated that jointly trained civilian and military units become well prepared for the conduct of joint relief and rescue operations.

  14. The interposition of Lyodura in operations for ankylosis of the temporo-mandibular joint. An experimental study using pigs.

    PubMed

    Timmel, R; Grundschober, F

    1982-11-01

    Experimental investigations using domestic pigs were carried out in order to study the subject of resorption of lyophilized Dura (Lyodura) interposed in the region of the temporo-mandibular joint after operations for ankylosis. The condyle of the mandible was partially resected on one or both sides, the joint capsule and disc excised and the mandibular fossa stripped of cartilage. Lyodura was interposed between the surfaces of the bones and intravital sequential labelling of the bones was carried out using fluorochromes. The animals were sacrificed after 18, 36, 50 and 120-130 days and the joint region excised. Undecalcified microtome (5-8 mu) and ground sections were prepared and contact microradiographs made. It was found that the Lyodura remained in place in spite of the mechanical loading until it was assimilated by a foreign body reaction and replaced by largely collagenous, endogenous connective tissue. Spaces similar to the joint cavity and lined with pseudosynovia were found after 120-130 days.

  15. 76 FR 13446 - Nittany Bald and Eagle Railroad Company-Operation Exemption-SEDA-COG Joint Rail Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Surface Transportation Board Nittany Bald and Eagle Railroad Company-Operation Exemption-SEDA- COG Joint Rail Authority Nittany Bald and Eagle Railroad Company (N&BE), a Class III carrier, has filed a... the Board in Susquehanna Union R.R.-Control Exemption- N. Shore R.R., Nittany & Bald Eagle...

  16. 76 FR 21789 - ITS Joint Program Office; Vehicle to Infrastructure Core System Concept of Operations; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... ITS Joint Program Office; Vehicle to Infrastructure Core System Concept of Operations; Notice of... host a free public meeting to discuss the Vehicle to Infrastructure (V2I) Core System Concept of... (734.729.7555). The conference is for interested parties to learn about the Core System...

  17. Joint Venture Partnerships: A Scarce Funds Approach to Acquiring and Operating New Facilities at State Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elam, Houston G.

    This book explores partnerships between state colleges and universities and local governments to build and operate facilities in light of increasingly scarce funds at the institutions. With new partnerships, institutions risk losing authority over new facilities, but the benefits of joint partnerships far outweigh the risks. Examined are three…

  18. Joint operation of the superconducting fault current limiter and magnetic energy storage system in an electric power network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, S. I.; Balashov, N. N.; Ivanov, S. S.; Veselovsky, A. S.; Zhemerikin, V. D.

    2010-06-01

    An opportunity of using superconductors as active elements of electric power systems designed to control the electric power distribution, to enhance the systems operating modes and to limit fault currents, was very attractive for investigators for a long time. In this paper, is considered an opportunity to enhance the electric power systems with the aid of superconducting magnetic energy storage systems (SMES) and superconducting fault current limiters (SFCL) operating together. It has been shown that the joint operation of both these superconducting devices allows additional varying of their parameters, what in turn gives a further opportunity to reduce their mass and dimensions and consequently the costs. There had been also shown an additional advantage of the SMES and SFCL joint operation consisting in that they ensure a more effective protection for a power system, preventing its uncontrolled load-off and subsequent acceleration up to the inaccessible rotation speed.

  19. Smart Weapons Operability Enhancement Joint Test and Evaluation Program Grayling 1: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, James P.; Koenig, George G.

    1993-08-01

    The primary objective of the Smart Weapons Operability Enhancement (SWOE) Joint Test and Evaluation (JT&E) Program is to validate the SWOE Process for the Office of the Secretary of Defense. The SWOE Process is a physics based scene generation capability that will enhance the performance of future smart weapon systems for a global variety of battlefield environments. This process is focused on generating complex background environmental scenes, including targets, for a world wide range of battlefield conditions. The SWOE program is a DoD wide partnership incorporating capabilities from the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force. The principal thrusts of SWOE are to quantitatively define the environmental factors and processes and to provide the capabilities to measure, model, render and extrapolate their impact on smart weapon system performance. The Grayling I exercise is the first in a series of four coordinate field deployments focused on validation of the SWOE Process. This paper describes the experimental design, sampling plans, measurement efforts and summarizes preliminary results of the Grayling I exercise.

  20. Overview of Carbon Dioxide Control Issues During International Space Station/Space Shuttle Joint Docked Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Crewed space vehicles have a common requirement to remove the carbon dioxide (CO2) created by the metabolic processes of the crew. The space shuttle [Space Transportation System (STS)] and International Space Station (ISS) each have systems in place that allow control and removal of CO2 from the habitable cabin environment. During periods in which the space shuttle is docked to the ISS, known as "joint docked operations," the space shuttle and ISS share a common atmosphere environment. During this period, an elevated amount of CO2 is produced through the combined metabolic activity of the STS and ISS crews. This elevated CO2 production, together with the large effective atmosphere created by collective volumes of the docked vehicles, creates a unique set of requirements for CO2 removal. This paper will describe individual CO2 control plans implemented by STS and ISS engineering teams, as well as the integrated plans used when both vehicles are docked. The paper will also discuss some of the issues and anomalies experienced by both engineering teams.

  1. DOD Health Care. Extent to which Military Physicians Perform Administrative Tasks. Report to the Chairman, Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    A review was conducted of what the military services have done to determine the extent to which military physicians perform routine administrative and clerical tasks, and what the services have done to solve the problem. It was found that there is general agreement within the Department of Defense (DOD) and the military services that physicians…

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from U.S. military personnel participating in Operation Bright Star, Egypt, from 2005 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Nada, Rania A; Armstrong, Adam; Shaheen, Hind I; Nakhla, Isabelle; Sanders, John W; Riddle, Mark S; Young, Sylvia; Sebeny, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major health problem for travelers to the Middle East. During the autumn months of 2005, 2007, and 2009, U.S. military personnel participated in Operation Bright Star (OBS) exercises in Egypt. Out of 181 military personnel enrolled in a diarrheal surveillance study, E. coli-like colonies were isolated from 170 patients. Isolates were tested for the detection of ETEC enterotoxins and colonization factors (CFs) using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Additionally, we studied the secular trends of ETEC isolates obtained from OBS studies since 1999. ETEC was isolated from 51.2% and 60.0% of the patients based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. Heat stable (ST) was the dominant enterotoxin detected followed by heat labile (LT) and LTST. Additionally, we detected a CF in 59.7% and 67.6% of the ETEC-positive isolates using dot blot and PCR assays, respectively. The predominant CF isolated was CS6 followed by CS3. PMID:23639795

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from U.S. military personnel participating in Operation Bright Star, Egypt, from 2005 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Nada, Rania A; Armstrong, Adam; Shaheen, Hind I; Nakhla, Isabelle; Sanders, John W; Riddle, Mark S; Young, Sylvia; Sebeny, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major health problem for travelers to the Middle East. During the autumn months of 2005, 2007, and 2009, U.S. military personnel participated in Operation Bright Star (OBS) exercises in Egypt. Out of 181 military personnel enrolled in a diarrheal surveillance study, E. coli-like colonies were isolated from 170 patients. Isolates were tested for the detection of ETEC enterotoxins and colonization factors (CFs) using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Additionally, we studied the secular trends of ETEC isolates obtained from OBS studies since 1999. ETEC was isolated from 51.2% and 60.0% of the patients based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. Heat stable (ST) was the dominant enterotoxin detected followed by heat labile (LT) and LTST. Additionally, we detected a CF in 59.7% and 67.6% of the ETEC-positive isolates using dot blot and PCR assays, respectively. The predominant CF isolated was CS6 followed by CS3.

  4. The challenges and ethical dilemmas of a military medical officer serving with a peacekeeping operation in regard to the medical care of the local population

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, J

    2005-01-01

    Medical Officers serving with their national contingents in peacekeeping operations are faced with difficult ethical decisions in regard to their obligations to the local civilian population. Such populations may be under-resourced in regard to medical care, and vulnerable to abuse and exploitation. Though the medical officer may support the local medical services, he/she should never undermine these resources. Adopting a human rights approach and observing the requirements of ethical medicine, aids the doctor in prioritising his/her duties. At times there may be conflict with one's own military superiors. It is wise to discuss potential difficulties prior to setting out on the mission. Human rights abuses cannot be ignored. The medical officer has a duty to do his/her best to report their observations so as to prevent abuse or to bring it to an end. PMID:16199596

  5. The challenges and ethical dilemmas of a military medical officer serving with a peacekeeping operation in regard to the medical care of the local population.

    PubMed

    Tobin, J

    2005-10-01

    Medical Officers serving with their national contingents in peacekeeping operations are faced with difficult ethical decisions in regard to their obligations to the local civilian population. Such populations may be under-resourced in regard to medical care, and vulnerable to abuse and exploitation. Though the medical officer may support the local medical services, he/she should never undermine these resources. Adopting a human rights approach and observing the requirements of ethical medicine, aids the doctor in prioritising his/her duties. At times there may be conflict with one's own military superiors. It is wise to discuss potential difficulties prior to setting out on the mission. Human rights abuses cannot be ignored. The medical officer has a duty to do his/her best to report their observations so as to prevent abuse or to bring it to an end. PMID:16199596

  6. 28 CFR 48.16 - Procedure for filing of terms of a renewal or amendment to an existing joint newspaper operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... renewal or amendment to an existing joint newspaper operating arrangement. 48.16 Section 48.16 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) NEWSPAPER PRESERVATION ACT § 48.16 Procedure for filing of terms of a renewal or amendment to an existing joint newspaper operating arrangement. Within 30 days...

  7. The Contribution of Operational and Research Applications from the Joint Polar Satellite System to Societal Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, M.

    2015-12-01

    Applications of satellite data are paramount to transform science and technology to product and services which are used in critical decision making. For the satellite community, good representations of technology are the satellite sensors, while science provides the instrument calibration and derived geophysical parameters. Weather forecasting is an application of the science and technology provided by remote sensing satellites. The Joint Polar Satellite System, which includes the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) provides formidable science and technology to support many applications and includes support to 1) weather forecasting - data from the JPSS Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) are used to forecast weather events out to 7 days - nearly 85% of all data used in weather forecasting are from polar orbiting satellites; 2) environmental monitoring -data from the JPSS Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are used to monitor the environment including the health of coastal ecosystems, drought conditions, fire, smoke, dust, snow and ice, and the state of oceans, including sea surface temperature and ocean color; and 3) climate monitoring - data from JPSS instruments, including OMPS and CERES will provide continuity to climate data records established using NOAA POES and NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite observations. To bridge the gap between products and applications, the JPSS Program has established a proving ground program to optimize the use of JPSS data with other data sources to improve key products and services. A number of operational and research applications will be presented along with how the data and applications support a large number of societal benefit areas of the Global Earth Observation Systems of Systems (GEOSS).

  8. Military Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton; Hayes, Bill

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" explores questions of military authority. The first article looks at the French Army mutinies in World War I and how the French Army dealt with them. The second article examines President Truman's firing of popular and powerful General Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War. The final article looks at how…

  9. Military preventive medicine and medical surveillance in the post-cold war era.

    PubMed

    Brundage, J F

    1998-05-01

    In response to the end of the cold war, the United States developed new foreign policy and national security strategies. As a result, many medical support concepts that were operative during the cold war were invalidated. Recently, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff provided direction and guidance for long-range strategic planning (Joint Vision 2010). Medical support doctrine that is being developed within the framework of Joint Vision 2010 relies on currently unavailable preventive medicine and medical surveillance capabilities. This report analyzes the relevance and roles of military preventive medicine and medical surveillance in the context of post-cold war resource constraints and military medical support needs, presents the rationale for and objectives of a demand-reduction medical support strategy, and outlines the roles, responsibilities, and characteristics of a defense medical surveillance system.

  10. Preparing for joint operation of numerical modelling and observational data in IMPEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ubaidi, Tarek; Khodachenko, Maxim; Kallio, Esa; Génot, Vincent; Modolo, Ronan; Hess, Sébastien; Schmidt, Walter; Topf, Florian; Alexeev, Igor; Gangloff, Michel; Budnik, Elena; Bouchemit, Myriam; Renard, Benjamin; Bourrel, Natacha; Penou, Emmanuel; André, Nicolas; Belenkaya, Elena

    2013-04-01

    The FP7-SPACE project IMPEx (http://impex-fp7.oeaw.ac.at) was established as a result of scientific collaboration between research teams from Austria, Finland, France, and Russia, working on the integration of a set of interactive data mining, analysis and modeling tools in the field of space plasma and planetary physics. The primary goal of the project is, to bridge the gap between spacecraft measurements and modern computational models of the planetary near-by space environments, enabling their joint operation for better understanding of related physical phenomena. The major challenge of IMPEx development consists in the need to connect different types of data sources, in particular numerical simulation results and observational data. To do so, every IMPEx tool must be able to handle both kinds of data in a consistent way. Thus, a considerable part of effort is dedicated to the development of standardized (web service-) interfaces and protocols for communication between the components, as well as a common approach to share user credentials. One of the systems' cornerstones is the specification of a standard for describing and storing the different data products involved that is able to include simulation outputs as well as observational data within a common standard, i.e. Data Model (DM). The IMPEx DM is an extension of the widely used SPASE DM and constitutes the first attempt in the field of space plasma physics worldwide, to create a unified data model that is able to store simulation outputs as well as observational data products in a shared data structure. To meet the requirement of extendibility, i.e. to have a possibility to include new computational models as well as analysis and visualization tools, the IMPEx DM as well as communication protocols have been designed to be as compact as possible and yet general and powerful enough to integrate a wide range of data sets and to allow for simple procedures when attaching new components to the system. A draft

  11. Cooperative Extension Training Impact on Military Youth and 4-H Youth: The Case of Speak Out for Military Kids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwin, James; McKinley, Steve; Talbert, B. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Extension needs new venues to promote their programming skills to unfamiliar audiences. One new audience Extension is currently reaching is military children. By partnering with Operation: Military Kids to offer a Speak Out for Military Kids training, Extension supports military children and document changes in the behavior of this audience.…

  12. 76 FR 3157 - Joint Operations Center Relocation Project, Sacramento County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... occupied by June 2015. The new JOC would provide typical office space and special needs/ essential services space for combined occupancy by Reclamation, DWR, and the NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) to replace jointly occupied space at 3310 El Camino Avenue in Sacramento. DATES: Written comments on...

  13. Pre-Operative Status and Quality of Life Following Total Joint Replacement in a Developing Country: A Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Nina N.; Collins, Jamie E.; Thornhill, Thomas S.; Alcantara Abreu, Luis; Ghazinouri, Roya; Okike, Kanu; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of medical relief organizations have launched programs to perform total joint replacements in the developing world. There is a paucity of data on the clinical outcomes of these procedures. We documented pre- and post-operative pain and functional status in a group of low income Dominicans who underwent total hip or knee replacement performed by an American relief organization. Methods: In March 2009 and 2010, we surveyed patients participating in Operation Walk Boston, a medical relief organization that provides total joint replacements to patients in the Dominican Republic. Questionnaires included the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) Index scales and the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) scales for physical activity and mental health. Scores were transformed to a 0 - 100 point scale (100 is best). Results: 81 individuals (mean age 61 years, 60% female) completed the pre-operative questionnaires. Twenty eight of the 35 who completed preoperative forms in 2009 also completed follow up forms in 2010 (follow-up rate 80%). Patients reported poor pre-operative WOMAC function (mean = 33.6, sd = 22.0) and WOMAC pain (mean = 38.4, sd = 22.9) scores preoperatively. Mean post-operative WOMAC pain and function scores were 86.4 (sd = 13.1) and 88.1 (sd = 11.4) respectively. Improvement in pain and function was similar for patients undergoing hip (n=11) and knee (n=17) replacements. Conclusion: Total joint replacement was effective in relieving pain and restoring function in this program. These results are useful for comparison to outcomes in developed countries and for establishing benchmarks for future programs. PMID:21886686

  14. Responses of Raptorial Birds to Low Level Military Jets and Sonic Booms: Results of the 1980-1981 Joint U.S. Air Force-U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Summary: For this study, we gathered several kinds of data to determine the likely effects of low level jets and sonic booms on nesting Peregrine Falcons and other raptors. We directly observed responses to worst case stimulus loads: responses to extremely frequent and extremely nearby jet aircraft were often minimal, seldom significant and never associated with reproductive failure. Likewise, responses to real and simulated sonic booms were often minimal and never productivity limiting. In addition to directly observing behavioral responses, in 1981 we invited jet passes at four Prairie Falcon eyries during courtship and incubation when the adults were most likely to abandon, on an ad libitum basis. All four eyries fledged young. Nesting success and site reoccupancy rates were high for all eyries. In tests of two relatively naive captive Peregrine Falcons, we failed to detect significantly negative responses. Typically the birds either quickly resumed feeding or other activities within a few seconds following a pass or boom. The female falcon repeatedly made hunting forays as jets swept overhead. From heart rate (HR) data taken via a telemetering egg during incubation at a wild Prairie Falcon eyrie, we determined that stimulus induced HR alterations were comparable to rate changes of the birds settling to incubate following flight. No significant long term responses were identified. The falcons successfully fledged two young even with the more disruptive activities associated with entering the eyrie three times to position and recover the telemetering eggs. Significantly, birds ofprey of several genera commonly nest in the supersonic military operations areas in southern Arizona. In addition, raptor eyries are frequently found at locations where low level jet traffic naturally concentrates. For example, Prairie Falcon Site 11 is directly on the approach path to strafing and bombing targets. Prairie Falcon Site 1 is in a narrow canyon through which A-10 aircraft

  15. Institutional options and operational challenges in the management of a joint implementation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mintzer, I.M.

    1995-11-01

    In 1992, the delegation from Norway introduced a concept into the negotiations of the Framework Convention on Climate Change which they called Joint Implementation. The term Joint Implementation (or simply JI) has been used subsequently to describe a range of cooperative arrangements between countries that are designed to reduce the risks of rapid climate change in a cost-effective manner. These arrangements may lead to the implementation of specific projects that seek to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (also called GHGs) to the atmosphere or increase the absorptive capacity of terrestrial and oceanic sinks for these gases. As an outcome of these projects, the countries may divide any greenhouse {open_quotes}credits{close_quotes} that accrue and that are recognized by the international community pursuant to the terms of the Framework Convention.

  16. Engaging Military Partners: Supporting Connections to Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harriett C.

    2009-01-01

    In the current Overseas Contingency Operation (OCO), families and communities have been impacted by multiple deployments. This is particularly challenging for families that are geographically isolated from military installations and resources typically available near these facilities. Operation Military Kids (OMK) is a national partnership…

  17. STS payloads mission control study. Volume 2-A, Task 1: Joint products and functions for preflight planning of flight operations, training and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Specific products and functions, and associated facility availability, applicable to preflight planning of flight operations were studied. Training and simulation activities involving joint participation of STS and payload operations organizations, are defined. The prelaunch activities required to prepare for the payload flight operations are emphasized.

  18. [Operative corrections of posttraumatic deformities of the elbow joint in children].

    PubMed

    Eberl, R; Weinberg, A M

    2010-02-01

    Posttraumatic deformities with need for surgical correction are rare and demanding in the pediatric population. The consequences of a bad outcome may last a life time. The best prevention of deformities around the elbow joint is proper initial treatment. The most common deformities are cubitus varus, cubitus valgus, chronic dislocation of the radial head and pseudarthrosis of the radial condyle. In contrast to the wide spread opinion to await the effect of the further growth, the deformity should be treated contemporarily to the underlying injury. This strategy will optimize the outcome. In special cases treatment with delay is justified. PMID:20127305

  19. The medial and lateral epicondyle as a reliable landmark for intra-operative joint line determination in revision knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sen, T.; Cankaya, D.; Kendir, S.; Basarır, K.; Tabak, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop an accurate, reliable and easily applicable method for determining the anatomical location of the joint line during revision knee arthroplasty. Methods The transepicondylar width (TEW), the perpendicular distance between the medial and lateral epicondyles and the distal articular surfaces (DMAD, DLAD) and the distance between the medial and lateral epicondyles and the posterior articular surfaces (PMAD, DLAD) were measured in 40 knees from 20 formalin-fixed adult cadavers (11 male and nine female; mean age at death 56.9 years, sd 9.4; 34 to 69). The ratios of the DMAD, PMAD, DLAD and PLAD to TEW were calculated. Results The mean TEW, DMAD, PMAD, DLAD and PLAD were 82.76 mm (standard deviation (sd) 7.74), 28.95 mm (sd 3.3), 28.57 mm (sd 3), 23.97 mm (sd 3.27) and 24.42 mm (sd 3.14), respectively. The ratios between the TEW and the articular distances (DMAD/TEW, DLAD/TEW, PMAD/TEW and PLAD/TEW) were calculated and their means were 0.35 (sd 0.02), 0.34 (sd 0.02), 0.28 (sd 0.03) and 0.29 (sd 0.03), respectively. Conclusion This method provides a simple, reproducible and reliable technique enabling accurate anatomical joint line restoration during revision total knee arthroplasty. Cite this article: B. Ozkurt, T. Sen, D. Cankaya, S. Kendir, K. Basarır, Y. Tabak. The medial and lateral epicondyle as a reliable landmark for intra-operative joint line determination in revision knee arthroplasty. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:280–286. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.57.BJR-2016-0002.R1. PMID:27388715

  20. Military specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Philip

    1987-01-01

    The current situation relative to the military specification is that there is not one specific model of turbulence which people are using. Particular disagreement exists on how turbulence levels will vary with qualitative analysis. It does not tie one down to specifics. When it comes to flying quality specifications, many feel that one should stay with the definitions of the Cooper-Harper rating scale but allow the levels to shift depending on the level of turbulence. There is a ride quality specification in the MIL-SPEC having to do with flight control systems design that is related to a turbulence model. This spec (MIL-F8785C) and others are discussed.

  1. DEVELOPMENT, INSTALLATION AND OPERATION OF THE MPC&A OPERATIONS MONITORING (MOM) SYSTEM AT THE JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH (JINR) DUBNA, RUSSIA

    SciTech Connect

    Kartashov,V.V.; Pratt,W.; Romanov, Y.A.; Samoilov, V.N.; Shestakov, B.A.; Duncan, C.; Brownell, L.; Carbonaro, J.; White, R.M.; Coffing, J.A.

    2009-07-12

    The Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Operations Monitoring (MOM) systems handling at the International Intergovernmental Organization - Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) is described in this paper. Category I nuclear material (plutonium and uranium) is used in JINR research reactors, facilities and for scientific and research activities. A monitoring system (MOM) was installed at JINR in April 2003. The system design was based on a vulnerability analysis, which took into account the specifics of the Institute. The design and installation of the MOM system was a collaborative effort between JINR, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Financial support was provided by DOE through BNL. The installed MOM system provides facility management with additional assurance that operations involving nuclear material (NM) are correctly followed by the facility personnel. The MOM system also provides additional confidence that the MPC&A systems continue to perform effectively.

  2. Introduction to military medicine: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Hetz, Stephen P

    2006-06-01

    This article provides an overview of the current organization and structure of the United States military medical forces. The five levels of care are presented. The "glue" that binds the five levels of care together -- medical evacuation -- is briefly discussed. The logistics system/structure that sustains military medical systems in remote locations is summarized. Finally, the overall command and control of in-theater combat medical assets, the initiative to establish a Joint Military Trauma Record system, and the ongoing efforts to collect real-time casualty data with the goal of enhancing combat care through improved training and early equipment fielding are described. PMID:16781276

  3. Medical support for Operation Cooperative Nugget '95: joint readiness training in the post-cold war era.

    PubMed

    Jerant, A F; Epperly, T D; Marionneaux, R D

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the demographic characteristics, injury and illness profiles, and dispositions of patients seen at the 249th General Hospital during its month-long deployment in support of Operation Cooperative Nugget '95 at the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC), Fort Polk, Louisiana. A descriptive analysis of patient demographic, diagnostic, and disposition data was performed. A total of 769 patient contacts were made, with orthopedic injuries (31%), dermatologic disorders (17%), upper respiratory infections (6%), and heat injuries (5%) accounting for the majority of visits. Because of aggressive preventive medicine interventions, there were no cases of heat stroke despite daily heat indices of 110 to 120 degrees F. In addition to emphasizing the importance of anticipating environmental medical threats, the authors relate some lessons learned, which should be valuable to medical providers tasked for future multinational operations other than war at the JRTC and elsewhere.

  4. Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J C

    2012-12-01

    The combatant soldier on the battlefield remains protected from any claim in negligence by the doctrine of combat immunity for any negligent act or omission they may make when fighting. In other words, the combatant soldier does not owe a fellow soldier a duty of care on the battlefield, as the duty of care is non-justiciable. However, the non-combatant Military Healthcare Professional, although sometimes operating in the same hostile circumstances as the fighting soldier, is unlikely to benefit from combat immunity for any clinical negligence on the battlefield. This is because they continue to owe their patient a duty of care, although this has not been tested in the courts. This paper considers if any military healthcare professional could ever benefit from combat immunity, which is unlikely due to their non-combatant status. Instead, this paper suggests that a modified form of immunity; namely, Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity could be a new, unique and viable doctrine, however, this could only be granted in rare circumstances and to a much lesser degree than combat immunity.

  5. A technique for determining viable military logistics support alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Jesse Stuart

    A look at today's US military will see them operating much beyond the scope of protecting and defending the United States. These operations now consist of, but are not limited to humanitarian aid, disaster relief, peace keeping, and conflict resolution. This broad spectrum of operational environments has necessitated a transformation of the individual military services to a hybrid force that is attempting to leverage the inherent and emerging capabilities and strengths of all those under the umbrella of the Department of Defense (DOD), this concept has been coined Joint Operations. Supporting Joint Operations requires a new approach to determining a viable military logistics support system. The logistics architecture for these operations has to accommodate scale, time, varied mission objectives, and imperfect information. Compounding the problem is the human in the loop (HITL) decision maker (DM) who is a necessary component for quickly assessing and planning logistics support activities. Past outcomes are not necessarily good indicators of future results, but they can provide a reasonable starting point for planning and prediction of specific needs for future requirements. Adequately forecasting the necessary logistical support structure and commodities needed for any resource intensive environment has progressed well beyond stable demand assumptions to one in which dynamic and nonlinear environments can be captured with some degree of fidelity and accuracy. While these advances are important, a holistic approach that allows exploration of the operational environment or design space does not exist to guide the military logistician in a methodical way to support military forecasting activities. To bridge this capability gap, a method called Adaptive Technique for Logistics Architecture Solutions (ATLAS) has been developed. This method provides a process that facilitates the use of techniques and tools that filter and provide relevant information to the DM. By doing

  6. Injuries due to firearms and air guns among U.S. military members not participating in overseas combat operations, 2002-2011.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    During 2002-2011, active component U.S. service members sustained 4,657 firearm-related injuries in circumstances other than deployment to the wars in Iraq/Afghanistan; 35 percent of the injuries were fatal. The highest firearm-related injury rates reflected service members in law enforcement/security and combat occupations. Of fatal injuries, 28 percent and 24 percent were suicides and homicides, respectively; among service members 30 and older, 84 percent of noncombat firearm-related deaths were suicides and 14 percent were homicides. In circumstances other than war, rates of both fatal and nonfatal firearm- related injuries are much lower among military members than civilian males aged 18-44. During the period, rates of nonfatal firearm-related injuries among non-deployed military members increased sharply, peaking in 2008. The trend reflects that among U.S. civilian males aged 18-44. However, firearm-related fatality rates were stable among civilians but increased among military members. The increase in rates of firearm-related fatalities among non-deployed military members reflects the increase in rates of suicides by firearms. Rates of injuries due to BB, pellet or paintball guns also increased during the period.

  7. THE TECHNOLOGY OF MILITARY TRAINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WALLIS, D.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS PART OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF A CONFERENCE ON OPERATIONAL AND PERSONNEL RESEARCH IN THE MANAGEMENT OF MANPOWER SYSTEMS, HELD IN BRUSSELS IN 1965. A MODEL ILLUSTRATES THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED MILITARY INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEM WHICH PROVIDES CONTINUOUS FEEDBACK AND CONTROL OF LEARNING. THE TRAINING COURSE INCLUDES--(1) A CLEAR…

  8. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor types collected from 1997 to 2001 in US military personnel during operation Bright Star in northern Egypt.

    PubMed

    Rockabrand, David M; Shaheen, Hind I; Khalil, Sami B; Peruski, Leonard F; Rozmajzl, Patrick J; Savarino, Stephen J; Monteville, Marshall R; Frenck, Robert W; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Putnam, Shannon D; Sanders, John W

    2006-05-01

    Operation Bright Star (OBS) is a biennial, multinational exercise in Egypt involving 15000 US troops. Consistent with past observations in deployed troops, diarrhea is the most significant cause of morbidity. Focused efforts are ongoing to develop vaccines against the most common pathogens affecting our troops. As part of these efforts, diarrhea surveillance was conducted during OBS to monitor pathogens associated with illness and to identify new vaccine targets. A retrospective review was conducted of prior studies with similar methods. Soldiers with diarrhea presenting to the OBS clinic provided a stool sample that was inoculated into Carey-Blair transport media. Within 3 days, the Cary-Blair tubes were transported to the Naval Medical Research Unit no. 3 in Cairo where bacterial culture was performed. As part of the evaluation, 5 Escherichia coli-like colonies were collected and tested for toxin production using the GM1-ELISA. Toxin-positive isolates were further tested for colonization factors (CF) by a dot-blot assay using a standardized panel of monoclonal antibodies against CFA/I, CS1-CS7, CS17, CS8 (CFA/III), CS12 (PCFO159), and CS14 (PCFO166). Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) was the most frequently isolated pathogen during each OBS from which data were collected. The rate of ETEC-associated diarrhea ranged from 22% to 58%. Over time, there were dramatic shifts in the frequency and distribution of CFs. Over the 5 years of study, an increasing number of ETEC isolates had no known CF identified, and in 2001, only 40% of ETEC was associated with known CFs. The most commonly identified CF was CS6. Diarrheal disease, particularly ETEC, continues to be a common malady among US military personnel deployed to Egypt. We have identified ETEC CF types, especially CS6, which should be considered potential vaccine candidates. However, despite intensive testing, CFs could not be identified in most of the ETEC isolated, highlighting the need for further studies to identify

  9. Total Force Fitness in units part 1: military demand-resource model.

    PubMed

    Bates, Mark J; Fallesen, Jon J; Huey, Wesley S; Packard, Gary A; Ryan, Diane M; Burke, C Shawn; Smith, David G; Watola, Daniel J; Pinder, Evette D; Yosick, Todd M; Estrada, Armando X; Crepeau, Loring; Bowles, Stephen V

    2013-11-01

    The military unit is a critical center of gravity in the military's efforts to enhance resilience and the health of the force. The purpose of this article is to augment the military's Total Force Fitness (TFF) guidance with a framework of TFF in units. The framework is based on a Military Demand-Resource model that highlights the dynamic interactions across demands, resources, and outcomes. A joint team of subject-matter experts identified key variables representing unit fitness demands, resources, and outcomes. The resulting framework informs and supports leaders, support agencies, and enterprise efforts to strengthen TFF in units by (1) identifying TFF unit variables aligned with current evidence and operational practices, (2) standardizing communication about TFF in units across the Department of Defense enterprise in a variety of military organizational contexts, (3) improving current resources including evidence-based actions for leaders, (4) identifying and addressing of gaps, and (5) directing future research for enhancing TFF in units. These goals are intended to inform and enhance Service efforts to develop Service-specific TFF models, as well as provide the conceptual foundation for a follow-on article about TFF metrics for units.

  10. The Joint Space Operations Center Mission System and the Advanced Research, Collaboration, and Application Development Environment Status Update 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Krezan, Jeremy; Howard, Samantha; Sabol, Chris; Kim, Richard; Echeverry, Juan

    2016-05-01

    The Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) Mission System (JMS) is a service-oriented architecture (SOA) infrastructure with increased process automation and improved tools to enhance Space Situational Awareness (SSA) performed at the US-led JSpOC. The Advanced Research, Collaboration, and Application Development Environment (ARCADE) is a test-bed maintained and operated by the Air Force to (1) serve as a centralized test-bed for all research and development activities related to JMS applications, including algorithm development, data source exposure, service orchestration, and software services, and provide developers reciprocal access to relevant tools and data to accelerate technology development, (2) allow the JMS program to communicate user capability priorities and requirements to developers, (3) provide the JMS program with access to state-of-the-art research, development, and computing capabilities, and (4) support JMS Program Office-led market research efforts by identifying outstanding performers that are available to shepherd into the formal transition process. In this paper we will share with the international remote sensing community some of the recent JMS and ARCADE developments that may contribute to greater SSA at the JSpOC in the future, and share technical areas still in great need.

  11. 22 CFR 126.6 - Foreign-owned military aircraft and naval vessels, and the Foreign Military Sales program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS GENERAL POLICIES AND PROVISIONS § 126.6 Foreign-owned military..., leased, or loaned by the Department of Defense to a foreign country or international organization...-Military Affairs, Office of International Security Operations. (c) Foreign Military Sales Program....

  12. 22 CFR 126.6 - Foreign-owned military aircraft and naval vessels, and the Foreign Military Sales program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS GENERAL POLICIES AND PROVISIONS § 126.6 Foreign-owned military..., leased, or loaned by the Department of Defense to a foreign country or international organization...-Military Affairs, Office of International Security Operations. (c) Foreign Military Sales Program....

  13. British military forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Turner, Mark A; Neal, Leigh A

    2004-04-01

    Military psychiatry has recently generated a lot of interest. In contrast there is virtually no literature on military forensic psychiatry. The first section of the paper is a brief review of British military psychiatric services and recent data on the prevalence of mental illness in British armed forces personnel. The second section summarizes the relevant aspects of the British military judicial and penal systems including the practice of summary justice, the court martial system, and sentencing and corrective training. The third section of the paper addresses issues which are particular to forensic psychiatry, including mental defences in relation to the military, the military offences of malingering and impersonation, risk assessment in military contexts and the notion of 'temperamental unsuitability' to military service. PMID:15176622

  14. Military Education in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haussman, Fay

    1974-01-01

    A large share of the credit for Brazil's recent progress must go to Brazil's highly structured military education, including the colegios militares (high schools), the military colleges, and the general staff schools. (Author/PG)

  15. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... EFMP + Special Needs Health Care Leaving the Military Marriage + Divorce Survivors Wounded + Caregivers Spouses + Scholarships NMFA Scholarships ... EFMP + Special Needs Health Care Leaving the Military Marriage + Divorce Survivors Wounded + Caregivers Spouses + Scholarships NMFA Scholarships ...

  16. Solar Radio Burst Effects and Meteor Effects: Operational Products Under Development at the Joint SMC-AFRL Rapid Prototyping Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, S.

    2002-05-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/VSB) and Detachment 11, Space & Missile Systems Center (SMC, Det 11/CIT) have combined efforts to design, develop, test, and implement graphical products for the Air Force's space weather operations center. These products are generated to analyze, specify, and forecast the effects of the near-earth space environment on Department of Defense systems and communications. Jointly-developed products that will be added to real-time operations in the near future include a solar radio background and burst effects (SoRBE) product suite, and a meteor effects (ME) product suite. The SoRBE product addresses the effect of background and event-level solar radio output on operational DoD systems. Strong bursts of radio wave emissions given off by the sun during solar ``events'' can detrimentally affect radar and satellite communication systems that have operational receiving geometries within the field of view of the sun. For some systems, even the background radiation from the sun can produce effects. The radio frequency interference (RFI) of interest occurs on VHF, UHF, and SHF frequency bands, usually lasting several minutes during a solar flare. While such effects are limited in time and area (typically a few degrees in viewing angle), they can be quite severe in magnitude. The result can be a significant lack in a radar system's ability to detect and/or track an object, and loss of a communication system's ability to receive satellite signals. The ME product will address the detrimental effects of meteors on operational DoD systems. These include impacts on satellites, visible trail observations, and radar clutter. While certain types of individual meteors can produce system effects, the initial ME product will address the more generalized range of meteor shower activity and associated affects. These effects can result in damage to satellites, incorrect assessment of satellite sensor observations, and false target returns on radar

  17. Joint NASA Ames/Langley Experimental Evaluation of Integrated Air/Ground Operations for En Route Free Maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhydt, Richard; Kopardekar, Parimal; Battiste, Vernol; Doble, Nathan; Johnson, Walter; Lee, Paul; Prevot, Thomas; Smith, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    In order to meet the anticipated future demand for air travel, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is investigating a new concept of operations known as Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM). Under the En Route Free Maneuvering component of DAG-TM, appropriately equipped autonomous aircraft self separate from other autonomous aircraft and from managed aircraft that continue to fly under today s Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). Controllers provide separation services between IFR aircraft and assign traffic flow management constraints to all aircraft. To address concept feasibility issues pertaining to integrated air/ground operations at various traffic levels, NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers conducted a joint human-in-the-loop experiment. Professional airline pilots and air traffic controllers flew a total of 16 scenarios under four conditions: mixed autonomous/managed operations at three traffic levels and a baseline all-managed condition at the lowest traffic level. These scenarios included en route flights and descents to a terminal area meter fix in airspace modeled after the Dallas Ft. Worth area. Pilots of autonomous aircraft met controller assigned meter fix constraints with high success. Separation violations by subject pilots did not appear to vary with traffic level and were mainly attributable to software errors and procedural lapses. Controller workload was lower for mixed flight conditions, even at higher traffic levels. Pilot workload was deemed acceptable under all conditions. Controllers raised several safety concerns, most of which pertained to the occurrence of near-term conflicts between autonomous and managed aircraft. These issues are being addressed through better compatibility between air and ground systems and refinements to air and ground procedures.

  18. Addressing Needs of Military Families during Deployment: Military Service Providers' Perceptions of Integrating Support Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Seth Christian Walter

    2011-01-01

    Service providers are increasingly recognizing the need to develop effective methods for delivering supporting services to military families during deployment. Research suggests that military families experience increased levels of stress during the cycle of deployment. Bronfenbrenner (1979) conceptualized the family operating within the context…

  19. PRA in Design: Increasing Confidence in Pre-Operational Assessments of Risks (Results of a Joint NASA/NRC Workshop)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngblood, Robert; Dezfuli, Homayoon; Siu, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    In late 2009, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) jointly organized a workshop to discuss technical issues associated with application of risk assessments to early phases of system design. The workshop, which was coordinated by the Idaho National Laboratory, involved invited presentations from a number of PRA experts in the aerospace and nuclear fields and subsequent discussion to address the following questions: (a) What technical issues limit decision-makers' confidence in PRA results, especially at a pre-operational phase of the system life cycle? (b) What is being done to address these issues'? (c) What more can be done ? The workshop resulted in participant observations and suggestions on several technical issues, including the pursuit of non-traditional approaches to risk assessment and the verification and validation of risk models. The workshop participants also identified several important non-technical issues, including risk communication with decision makers, and the integration of PRA into the overall design process.

  20. Classification of vegetation types in military region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Miguel; Silva, Jose Silvestre; Bioucas-Dias, Jose

    2015-10-01

    In decision-making process regarding planning and execution of military operations, the terrain is a determining factor. Aerial photographs are a source of vital information for the success of an operation in hostile region, namely when the cartographic information behind enemy lines is scarce or non-existent. The objective of present work is the development of a tool capable of processing aerial photos. The methodology implemented starts with feature extraction, followed by the application of an automatic selector of features. The next step, using the k-fold cross validation technique, estimates the input parameters for the following classifiers: Sparse Multinomial Logist Regression (SMLR), K Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Linear Classifier using Principal Component Expansion on the Joint Data (PCLDC) and Multi-Class Support Vector Machine (MSVM). These classifiers were used in two different studies with distinct objectives: discrimination of vegetation's density and identification of vegetation's main components. It was found that the best classifier on the first approach is the Sparse Logistic Multinomial Regression (SMLR). On the second approach, the implemented methodology applied to high resolution images showed that the better performance was achieved by KNN classifier and PCLDC. Comparing the two approaches there is a multiscale issue, in which for different resolutions, the best solution to the problem requires different classifiers and the extraction of different features.

  1. 42 CFR 71.34 - Carriers of U.S. military services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carriers of U.S. military services. 71.34 Section... Carriers of U.S. military services. (a) Carriers belonging to or operated by the military services of the... regulations of the military services which also meet the requirements of the regulations in this part....

  2. Comparing Marital Status and Divorce Status in Civilian and Military Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karney, Benjamin R.; Loughran, David S.; Pollard, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Since military operations began in Afghanistan and Iraq, lengthy deployments have led to concerns about the vulnerability of military marriages. Yet evaluating military marriages requires some benchmark against which marital outcomes in the military may be compared. These analyses drew from personnel records from the entire male population of the…

  3. Effects of military load carriage on kinematics of gait.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Deepti; Pal, Madhu Sudan; Majumdar, Dhurjati

    2010-06-01

    Manual load carriage is a universal activity and an inevitable part of the daily schedule of a soldier. Indian Infantry soldiers carry loads on the waist, back, shoulders and in the hands for a marching order. There is no reported study on the effects of load on gait in this population. It is important to evaluate their kinematic responses to existing load carriage operations and to provide guidelines towards the future design of heavy military backpacks (BPs) for optimising soldiers' performance. Kinematic changes of gait parameters in healthy male infantry soldiers whilst carrying no load (NL) and military loads of 4.2-17.5 kg (6.5-27.2% body weight) were investigated. All comparisons were conducted at a self-selected speed. Soldier characteristics were: mean (SD) age 23.3 (2.6) years; height 172.0 (3.8) cm; weight 64.3 (7.4) kg. Walk trials were collected using a 3-D Motion Analysis System. Results were subjected to one-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett post hoc test. There were increases in step length, stride length, cadence and midstance with the addition of a load compared to NL. These findings were resultant of an adaptive phenomenon within the individual to counterbalance load effect along with changes in speed. Ankle and hip ranges of motion (ROM) were significant. The ankle was more dorsiflexed, the knee and hip were more flexed during foot strike and helped in absorption of the load. The trunk showed more forward leaning with the addition of a load to adjust the centre of mass of the body and BP system back to the NL condition. Significant increases in ankle and hip ROM and trunk forward inclination (> or =10 degrees ) with lighter loads, such as a BP (10.7 kg), BP with rifle (14.9 kg) and BP with a light machine gun (17.5 kg), may cause joint injuries. It is concluded that the existing BP needs design improvisation specifically for use in low intensity conflict environments. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The present study evaluates spatial, temporal and angular

  4. Military applications of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sponable, Jess M.

    1996-03-01

    With the development and operational fielding of fully reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) becoming imminent, coupled with the ``end of the Cold War'' and fractionalization of the former ``bi-polar'' world into a ``multi-polar'' one, the need and potential for military versions of RLVs are being recognized by the military strategic planner. Recognizing the instability of the world order, especially with the potential for terrorism from all quarters, planning for the development of systems capable of defending our critical space based assests is becoming more essential. This paper presents some of the potential military applications of RLVs to support the Nation's defense and security interests world-wide.

  5. PRE- AND POST-OPERATIVE SELF-REPORTED FUNCTION AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN WOMEN WITH AND WITHOUT GENERALIZED JOINT LAXITY UNDERGOING HIP ARTHROSCOPY FOR FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Pontiff, Mattie; Ithurburn, Matthew P.; Ellis, Thomas; Cenkus, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Generalized joint laxity is more prevalent in women than men and may lead to poorer post-operative outcomes in select orthopedic populations. There are no studies examining peri-operative function in patients with generalized joint laxity (GJL) and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in perceived function and quality of life as measured by the Hip Outcome Score ADL subscale (HOS-ADL), International Hip Outcomes Tool (iHOT-33) and the Short Form 12-Item Health Survey (SF-12) in women with and without GJL prior to and six months after undergoing hip arthroscopy for FAI. Study Design Cohort Study Methods Peri-operative data were collected from women with FAI from November 2011-September 2014. Lax subjects were women with laxity scores ≥4/9 on the Beighton and Horan Joint Mobility Index; Nonlax subjects were women with laxity scores <4/9. Functional outcomes were evaluated using the HOS-ADL, iHOT-33, PCS-12, and the MCS-12 pre-operatively and at 6 months post-operatively. Change scores (post-score – pre-score) were calculated for each outcome measure and compared between groups, along with pre-operative and post-operative means, using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results 166 women met the inclusion criteria: Nonlax (n = 131), Lax (n = 35). There were no statistically significant differences between groups in pre-operative functional outcomes (all p > .05). Additionally, there were no statistically significant differences between groups in post-operative means or change scores, respectively, for HOS-ADL (p = .696, .358), iHOT-33 (p = .550, .705), PCS-12 (p = .713, .191), and MCS-12 (p = .751, .082). Laxity score was not associated with any post-operative functional outcome score or change score (all p > .05). Conclusion Women with and without generalized joint laxity do not appear to report differences in hip function in the 6-month peri-operative period before and after hip

  6. Canadian military space activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Geoffrey W.

    This paper outlines the Department of National Defence (DND) of Canada policy on the military use of space and discusses DND space systems. The NAVSTAR global positioning system will be the standard for future navigation systems. Canada is one of four founding nations of the international COSPAS/SARSAT satellite assisted search and rescue system. Three new earth stations will provide complete coverage of Canadian synthetic aperture radar (SAR) territory. In addition, funds have been committed for research and development of space based surveillance radar technology. The Canadian Forces Weather Service will receive digitalized satellite imagery and weather charts as part of the planned Meteorological Satellite Information System (METSIS). METSIS will provide weather information through Anik D satellite broadcast. A three phased approach is planned to satisfy satellite communications requirements. Leased point to point communications have been established for some locations. Mobile terminals are being developed and are being used to test technologies and operating techniques. Phase two will be the acquisition of a mix of fixed and mobile terminals to use existing commercial and military space bands. Encryption capabilities and antijamming technologies are being developed. Phase three calls for launching of several nongeostationary satellites to provide continuous coverage to the areas in the high Arctic which are below the horizon for geostationary satellites. DND policy can be summarized as follows: (1) the DND will enhance defence commitments by using space technology where appropriate and cost effective; (2) it will enhance the peaceful use of space; and (3) DND will use space programs to contribute to the Canadian economic and defence production base.

  7. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  8. Application of Mobile Router to Military Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David H.; Ivancic, William D.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA Glenn Research Center under a NASA Space Act Agreement have been performing joint networking research to apply Internet technologies and protocols to space-based communications. During this time, Cisco Systems developed the mobile-router which NASA and Cisco jointly tested. The early field trials of this technology have been successfully completed. The mobile-router is software code that resides in a network router. A Mobile-Router allows entire networks to roam while maintaining connectivity to the Internet. This router code is pertinent to a myriad of applications for both the government and commercial sectors. This technology will be applied to the wireless battlefield. NASA and the Department of Defense will utilize this technology for near-planetary observation and sensing spacecraft. It is the enabling technology for communication via the Internet or Intranets to aircraft. Information such as weather, air traffic control, voice and video can be easily and inexpensively transmitted to the aircraft using Internet protocols. The mobile router can be incorporated into emergency vehicles particularly ambulances and life-flight aircraft to provide real-time connectivity back to the hospital and healthcare experts. Commercial applications include entertainment services, IP telephone, and Internet connectivity for cruise ships, commercial shipping, tour busses, aircraft, and eventually cars. This paper will briefly describe the mobile router operation. An upcoming wide area network field test with application to US Coast Guard communications will be described. The paper will also highlight military and government networks that will benefit from the deployment of mobile router and the associated applications.

  9. ARPA-E: Improving Military Energy Security

    ScienceCinema

    Willson, Bryan; Mahvi, Allison; Stepien, Tom; Wasco, Mick

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. military has a vested interest in advancing microgrid technologies that can power forward operating bases. These technologies could not only help the military significantly reduce its energy demand both at home and abroad, but also they could reduce the number of fuel-supply convoys required on the battlefield and the number of troops killed in fuel-supply convoy attacks. This video highlights two ARPA-E projects that have formed strategic partnerships with the military to enable these microgrids at forward operating bases. Georgia Tech is developing an innovative absorption heat pump that utilizes exhaust heat to provide heating and cooling, which could cut the amount of energy used to heat and cool forward operating bases by 50%. Primus Power is developing a low-cost, energy-dense storage system that could store enough energy to operate a base for several days in the event of a disruption.

  10. [Haemovigilance and blood safety in overseas military].

    PubMed

    Sailliol, A; Plang, S; Martinaud, C; Pouget, T; Vedy, S; Clavier, B; Cellarier, V; Roche, C; Civadier, C; Ausset, S

    2014-11-01

    The French military blood institute (FMBI) is the only military blood supplier in France. FMBI operates independently and autonomously under the Ministry of Defense's supervision, and accordingly, to the French, European and NATO technical and safety guidelines. FMBI is in charge of the collection, preparation and distribution of blood products to supply transfusion support to armed forces, especially during overseas operations. In overseas military, a primary physician is responsible for haemovigilance in permanent relation with an expert in the FMBI to manage any adverse reaction. Additionally, traceability of delivered or collected blood products during overseas operation represents a priority, allowing an appropriate management of transfusion inquiries and assessment of practices aiming to improve and update procedures and training. Transfusion safety in overseas operation is based on regular and specific training of people concerned by blood supply chain in exceptional situation.

  11. ARPA-E: Improving Military Energy Security

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, Bryan; Mahvi, Allison; Stepien, Tom; Wasco, Mick

    2014-02-24

    The U.S. military has a vested interest in advancing microgrid technologies that can power forward operating bases. These technologies could not only help the military significantly reduce its energy demand both at home and abroad, but also they could reduce the number of fuel-supply convoys required on the battlefield and the number of troops killed in fuel-supply convoy attacks. This video highlights two ARPA-E projects that have formed strategic partnerships with the military to enable these microgrids at forward operating bases. Georgia Tech is developing an innovative absorption heat pump that utilizes exhaust heat to provide heating and cooling, which could cut the amount of energy used to heat and cool forward operating bases by 50%. Primus Power is developing a low-cost, energy-dense storage system that could store enough energy to operate a base for several days in the event of a disruption.

  12. [Haemovigilance and blood safety in overseas military].

    PubMed

    Sailliol, A; Plang, S; Martinaud, C; Pouget, T; Vedy, S; Clavier, B; Cellarier, V; Roche, C; Civadier, C; Ausset, S

    2014-11-01

    The French military blood institute (FMBI) is the only military blood supplier in France. FMBI operates independently and autonomously under the Ministry of Defense's supervision, and accordingly, to the French, European and NATO technical and safety guidelines. FMBI is in charge of the collection, preparation and distribution of blood products to supply transfusion support to armed forces, especially during overseas operations. In overseas military, a primary physician is responsible for haemovigilance in permanent relation with an expert in the FMBI to manage any adverse reaction. Additionally, traceability of delivered or collected blood products during overseas operation represents a priority, allowing an appropriate management of transfusion inquiries and assessment of practices aiming to improve and update procedures and training. Transfusion safety in overseas operation is based on regular and specific training of people concerned by blood supply chain in exceptional situation. PMID:25284434

  13. MAST (Military Assistance to Safety and Traffic. Report of Test Program by the Interagency Study Group (July-December 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    As a joint endeavor by the Departments of Defense, Transportation, and Health, Education, and Welfare to demonstrate military resources and techniques which are utilized in combat, the Military Assistance to Safety and Traffic (MAST) program was pilot-tested in 1970 at five military bases. Undertaken to explore the feasibility of utilizing…

  14. Pseudogout in the temporomandibular joint with imaging, arthroscopic, operative, and pathologic findings. Report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Laviv, Amir; Sadow, Peter M; Keith, David A

    2015-06-01

    The authors present a case of a 60-year-old woman with a destructive painful condition in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that proved to be calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposits at subsequent biopsy examination. The patient presented with the chief complaints of pain and limitation that had not resolved with splint therapy, medications, and habit control. Magnetic resonance imaging studies showed internal derangement without reduction. Right TMJ arthroscopy with manipulation of the jaw under anesthesia showed unique findings of fronds of synovial tissue in the posterior joint space and areas of white matter. Because there was no long-term improvement in her clinical symptoms, she subsequently underwent arthroplasty of the right joint, with the white material clearly seen at surgery, and the biopsy examination confirmed the clinical and arthroscopic impression of pseudogout. The presentation, diagnosis, pathology, and treatment of pseudogout of the TMJ are discussed.

  15. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  16. Advising Transfer Military Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Today's students can come from a larger area than just high school. With the entire world's conflicts and today's society, more and more of our present day students may have come from the military ranks. Though we have not come to an actual draft system, more and more modern day students have served their time in the military, to keep America…

  17. [Volgograd military hospital--70 years].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V Ia; Alborov, Z Ts

    2012-01-01

    History of the Volgograd military hospital dates back to July 24, 1941, when on the basis of the regional children's bone tuberculosis sanatorium in Krasnodar was transformed into 2150th military hospital consisted of 240 beds. Since May 1944 relocated in the city of Stalingrad became a garrison hospital. Today the hospital is a multidisciplinary health centre of the Russian Defense Ministry. Annually, the hospital performed at least 3000 surgical procedures, including more than 37%--are complex. In surgery, improved endovideosurgical direction, over 31% of emergency operations performed using this method. Since December 2009 the hospital became a structural division of the District Hospital in 1602 in Rostov on Don. The close connection between the branch and district hospital allows for complex diagnostic situations to consult leading experts, including consultation, thus ensuring the most effective treatment results.

  18. Team spirit makes the difference: the interactive effects of team work engagement and organizational constraints during a military operation on psychological outcomes afterwards.

    PubMed

    Boermans, S M; Kamphuis, W; Delahaij, R; van den Berg, C; Euwema, M C

    2014-12-01

    This article prospectively explores the effects of collective team work engagement and organizational constraints during military deployment on individual-level psychological outcomes afterwards. Participants were 971 Dutch peacekeepers within 93 teams who were deployed between the end of 2008 and beginning of 2010, for an average of 4 months, in the International Security Assistance Force. Surveys were administered 2 months into deployment and 6 months afterwards. Multi-level regression analyses demonstrated that team work engagement during deployment moderated the relation between organizational constraints and post-deployment fatigue symptoms. Team members reported less fatigue symptoms after deployment if they were part of highly engaged teams during deployment, particularly when concerns about organizational constraints during deployment were high. In contrast, low team work engagement was related to more fatigue symptoms, particularly when concerns about organizational constraints were high. Contrary to expectations, no effects for team work engagement or organizational constraints were found for post-traumatic growth. The present study highlights that investing in team work engagement is important for those working in highly demanding jobs.

  19. Improved resiliency and well-being among military personnel in a Swedish Naval Force after a counter-piracy operation off the coast of Somalia.

    PubMed

    Bäccman, Charlotte; Hjärthag, Fredrik; Almqvist, Kjerstin

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore: (1) how the psychological health of the members of the first European Union Naval Force (ME01) was affected by international deployment off the coast of Somalia; and (2) if and how organizational and personal factors (e.g., type of personnel category, previous experiences, and resilience) affected their psychological health and well-being post-deployment. The study had an exploratory longitudinal design, where the participants were assessed both before and after deployment (i.e., T1 and T2). The participants (n = 129, 120 men, 9 women) were equally distributed between officers (n = 68; 64 men, 4 women) and sailors (n = 61; 56 men, 5 women). The members' average age was 31 years, ranging from 20 to 61. For the majority (78%) ME01 was their first international deployment and officers were, in general, more experienced than sailors. The overall results showed that the members' reported a positive experience with improved resilience and well-being (e.g., sense of coherence). However, the result also showed that type of personnel category (i.e., officer or sailor) affected their psychological health. Why and how these differences among military personnel arise is discussed, but deserves further attention. PMID:27253612

  20. Improved resiliency and well-being among military personnel in a Swedish Naval Force after a counter-piracy operation off the coast of Somalia.

    PubMed

    Bäccman, Charlotte; Hjärthag, Fredrik; Almqvist, Kjerstin

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore: (1) how the psychological health of the members of the first European Union Naval Force (ME01) was affected by international deployment off the coast of Somalia; and (2) if and how organizational and personal factors (e.g., type of personnel category, previous experiences, and resilience) affected their psychological health and well-being post-deployment. The study had an exploratory longitudinal design, where the participants were assessed both before and after deployment (i.e., T1 and T2). The participants (n = 129, 120 men, 9 women) were equally distributed between officers (n = 68; 64 men, 4 women) and sailors (n = 61; 56 men, 5 women). The members' average age was 31 years, ranging from 20 to 61. For the majority (78%) ME01 was their first international deployment and officers were, in general, more experienced than sailors. The overall results showed that the members' reported a positive experience with improved resilience and well-being (e.g., sense of coherence). However, the result also showed that type of personnel category (i.e., officer or sailor) affected their psychological health. Why and how these differences among military personnel arise is discussed, but deserves further attention.

  1. The civil and military medical response to natural disasters.

    PubMed

    Dowlen, H; Nicol, E; Mozumder, A

    2008-09-01

    This article explores the topic of military involvement in disaster response. This was debated during a conference held at the Royal Society of Medicine, through presentations on experiences and procedures within both the military and civilian roles. The conference was run jointly by the Haywood Club Tri-Service Medical Society and the Catastrophes & Conflict Forum of the Royal Society of Medicine on 20th April 2007. Issues of collaboration and accountability are seen as key themes of disaster response, within which the military can have a role, but which needs to be carefully administered in order to avoid an inappropriate response with an associated political fallout. PMID:19202828

  2. Impact of phlebotomine sand flies on U.S. military operations at Tallil Air Base, Iraq: 4. Detection and identification of leishmania parasites in sand flies.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Russell E; Hochberg, Lisa P; Swanson, Katherine I; Lee, John S; McAvin, James C; Moulton, John K; Eddington, David O; Groebner, Jennifer L; O'Guinn, Monica L; Putnam, John L

    2009-05-01

    Sand flies collected between April 2003 and November 2004 at Tallil Air Base, Iraq, were evaluated for the presence of Leishmania parasites using a combination of a real-time Leishmania-generic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and sequencing of a 360-bp fragment of the glucose-6-phosphate-isomerase (GPI) gene. A total of 2,505 pools containing 26,574 sand flies were tested using the real-time PCR assay. Leishmania DNA was initially detected in 536 pools; however, after extensive retesting with the real-time PCR assay, a total of 456 pools were considered positive and 80 were considered indeterminate. A total of 532 samples were evaluated for Leishmania GPI by sequencing, to include 439 PCR-positive samples, 80 PCR-indeterminate samples, and 13 PCR-negative samples. Leishmania GPI was detected in 284 samples that were sequenced, to include 281 (64%) of the PCR-positive samples and 3 (4%) of the PCR-indeterminate samples. Of the 284 sequences identified as Leishmania, 261 (91.9%) were L. tarentolae, 18 (6.3%) were L. donovani-complex parasites, 3 (1.1%) were L. tropica, and 2 were similar to both L. major and L. tropica. Minimum field infection rates were 0.09% for L. donovani-complex parasites, 0.02% for L. tropica, and 0.01% for the L. major/tropica-like parasite. Subsequent sequencing of a 600-bp region of the "Hyper" gene of 12 of the L. donovani-complex parasites showed that all 12 parasites were L. infantum. These data suggest that L. infantum was the primary leishmanial threat to U.S. military personnel deployed to Tallil Air Base. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  3. The military insanity defense.

    PubMed

    Lande, R G

    1991-01-01

    This article describes the military insanity defense. The success of the litigated insanity defense is explored through the number of insanity acquittals over a 28-month period. A questionnaire distributed to all United States Army psychiatrists provided information on the number of forensic evaluations performed, the number of not criminally responsible (NCR) opinions made, and the disposition of noncontested NCR opinions. The questionnaire also tested the Army psychiatrists' knowledge about recent changes in the military insanity defense. This pilot study raises interesting questions about the military insanity defense that further research can address.

  4. Butt Joint Tool Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-12-06

    ITER Central Solenoid uses butt joints for connecting the pancakes in the CS module. The principles of the butt joining of the CICC were developed by the JAPT during CSMC project. The difference between the CSMC butt joint and the CS butt joint is that the CS butt joint is an in-line joint, while the CSMC is a double joint through a hairpin jumper. The CS butt joint has to carry the hoop load. The straight length of the joint is only 320 mm, and the vacuum chamber around the joint has to have a split in the clamp shell. These requirements are challenging. Fig.1 presents a CSMC joint, and Fig.2 shows a CS butt joint. The butt joint procedure was verified and demonstrated. The tool is capable of achieving all specified parameters. The vacuum in the end was a little higher than the target, which is not critical and readily correctable. We consider, tentatively that the procedure is established. Unexpectedly, we discover significant temperature nonuniformity in the joint cross section, which is not formally a violation of the specs, but is a point of concern. All testing parameters are recorded for QA purposes. We plan to modify the butt joining tool to improve its convenience of operation and provide all features necessary for production of butt joints by qualified personnel.

  5. Myocarditis and the military patient.

    PubMed

    Cox, Andrew T; White, S; Ayalew, Y; Boos, C; Haworth, K; McKenna, W J

    2015-09-01

    Myocarditis, simply defined as inflammation of the heart muscle, is a commonly encountered cardiac disease in primary and secondary care, both in the UK and on Operational deployments. In the UK Armed Forces, myocarditis results in deaths as well as the premature termination of military careers on medical grounds. The aetiology is usually the result of a number of infectious aetiologies with viruses being the most common pathogens in the vast majority of cases. However, it may also be the result of autoimmune activation, chemical or pharmacological toxins, environmental insult or hypersensitivity reactions. Particular aetiologies that are more likely to be seen in a military population are discussed and include certain infections, smallpox vaccine, and hyperthermia and hypothermia. The clinical features can be highly variable ranging from an asymptomatic infection to fulminant heart failure. Features pertinent to the military doctor, including the natural history, investigative modalities and management strategies, with a particular emphasis on the occupational impact of myocarditis in the UK Armed Forces are reviewed.

  6. COST EFFECTIVE VOC EMISSION CONTROL STARTEGIES FOR MILITARY, AEROSPACE,AND INDUSTRIAL PAINT SPRAY BOOTH OPERATIONS: COMBINING IMPROVED VENTILATION SYSTEMS WITH INNOVATIVE, LOW COST EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a full-scale demonstration program in which several paint booths were modified for recirculation ventilation; the booth exhaust streams are vented to an innovative volatile organic compound (VOC) emission control system having extremely low operating costs. ...

  7. Families in the Military

    MedlinePlus

    ... have led to deployment of large numbers of military personnel (active duty, Reserves, National Guard). As a result ... worries and plans for the future. Let your child know that the family member is making a ...

  8. Music in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda

    1981-01-01

    Following a very brief history of military bands, the author describes the musical performance opportunities currently available in the United States Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for young musicians who may wish to enlist. (SJL)

  9. Vaccines for military use.

    PubMed

    Artenstein, Andrew W

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have long been used by military forces in order to prevent communicable diseases and thereby preserve the fighting force. A tradition that began with the mass vaccination of the Continental Army against smallpox during the War of the American Revolution in the late 18th century continues today with routine and deployment-based vaccination of military forces against potential pathogens of nature and biological weapon threats. As their role has expanded in recent years to include humanitarian and peacekeeping missions, the military's use of vaccines against infectious diseases has concomitantly broadened to include civilian populations worldwide. The emergence of new threats and the recognition of additional global challenges will continue to compel the development and promotion of vaccines to combat infectious diseases of military significance. PMID:19837279

  10. Radiometry in military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Krzysztof

    2001-08-01

    Missiles guided using optoelectronic methods, optoelectronic imaging systems (thermal imaging systems, night vision devices, LLLTV cameras, TV cameras), and optoelectronic countermeasures (smoke screens, camouflage paints and nets, IR flares, decoys, jamming systems, warning systems) are one of the most important components of modern military armament. There are numerous military standards, some of them secret, that precise radiometric parameters to be measured and the testing methods to be used. There is also much literature on the subject of testing of the systems mentioned above, although mostly on subject of testing of the thermal imaging systems. In spite of this apparently numerous literature, there still significant confusion in this area due to secrecy of some parameters and testing methods, differences in recommendations of different military standards, fast progress in military optoelectronics, and also due to enormous number of different types of optoelectronics systems used in the military armament. A review of testing methods of the three basic groups of optoelectronics systems used in modern military armament: the missiles guided using optoelectronics methods, the optoelectronic imaging systems, and the optoelectronic countermeasures is presented in this paper. Trends in the measuring sets.

  11. Military Bases and Conservation Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Ankeny

    2007-09-01

    Over time, DoD is likely to be one of the largest buyers and sellers in a water quality trading market. The Department of Defense (DoD) operates military bases that resemble small cities in infrastructure. As units redeploy, bases are likely to find themselves well within their environmental limits at the originating base and potentially bumping against limits such as nitrate and phosphate loading at the destination base. Stricter rules and heavier loadings in growing watersheds also present challenges to local bases and municipalities as regulators clamp down on loadings from existing Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTPs) to meet water quality standards.

  12. Military Beliefs and PTSD in Active Duty U.S. Army Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Loew, Benjamin; Carter, Sarah; Allen, Elizabeth; Markman, Howard; Stanley, Scott; Rhoades, Galena

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic distress after military combat is a major cost of war. One under-investigated factor potentially associated with PTSD symptoms is specific beliefs about one’s military service. This study examined post-deployment self-reports from 272 active-duty U.S. Army soldiers, to investigate potential associations between military-related PTSD symptom severity and three beliefs about the military: the importance and value ascribed to one’s own work in the Army, to current military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, and to military service in general. Higher scores on these three beliefs were negatively correlated with military-related PTSD symptom severity. However, in a combined regression model that controlled for recent combat exposure, only the belief about current military operations had a significant, unique association with PTSD symptom severity. That is, more positive beliefs about the value of operations in Iraq or Afghanistan were associated with lower PTSD symptoms. PMID:25530729

  13. Military Careers: A Guide to Military Occupations and Selected Military Career Paths, 1992-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This book was developed to help educators and youth learn about career opportunities in the military. It is a compendium of military occupational, training, and career information and is designed for use by students interested in the military. The first section, military occupations, contains descriptions of 197 enlisted and officer occupations.…

  14. The military physician and contested medical humanitarianism: a dueling identity?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Stuart

    2014-11-01

    A critical issue in the study of humanitarianism is who counts as a medical humanitarian. Military physicians are often characterized as caught between the potentially incompatible roles of physician and military professional. Medical NGOs, such as Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), have also vociferously rejected military medical humanitarianism: questioning the mandate, skills, and appropriateness of military involvement in humanitarian medicine as well as the potential impact on 'humanitarian space'. Yet many military doctors contest this. Consequently this study examines the ways in which primarily British military physicians identify and manage their identities as both medical humanitarians and soldiers. The research utilized a mixed method, grounded theory approach involving systematic document searches/expert identification of a core literature of 300 policy and peer reviewed documents, plus grey literature and 53 formal medical post operational reports from units serving in Iraq and Afghanistan between 2004 and 2012. Semi structured interviews involved purposive sampling (34 respondents) ranging from a former Surgeon General to more junior staff. Methods also included an analysis of the original data and literature from the 2003 Medical Services Delphi study (involving an additional 40 experts and an extensive literature review) on military medical identity/future roles as well as direct observation of military doctors in Iraq and Afghanistan (two, 2 month research trips). The research concluded that military physicians conceived of themselves as autonomous medical humanitarians with an individual morality rooted in civilian medical ethics that facilitated resistance to the potentially hegemonic military identity. Nevertheless military physicians were part of a medical organization with fundamentally different priorities from those of civilian humanitarian physicians. Furthermore, the perceived emergence of multiple civilian 'humanitarianisms' has

  15. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  16. Are all metal-on-metal hip revision operations contributing to the National Joint Registry implant survival curves?

    PubMed Central

    Sabah, S. A.; Henckel, J.; Koutsouris, S.; Rajani, R.; Hothi, H.; Skinner, J. A.; Hart, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (NJR) has extended its scope to report on hospital, surgeon and implant performance. Data linkage of the NJR to the London Implant Retrieval Centre (LIRC) has previously evaluated data quality for hip primary procedures, but did not assess revision records. Methods We analysed metal-on-metal hip revision procedures performed between 2003 and 2013. A total of 69 929 revision procedures from the NJR and 929 revised pairs of components from the LIRC were included. Results We were able to link 716 (77.1%) revision procedures on the NJR to the LIRC. This meant that 213 (22.9%) revision procedures at the LIRC could not be identified on the NJR. We found that 349 (37.6%) explants at the LIRC completed the full linkage process to both NJR primary and revision databases. Data completion was excellent (> 99.9%) for revision procedures reported to the NJR. Discussion This study has shown that only approximately one third of retrieved components at the LIRC, contributed to survival curves on the NJR. We recommend prospective registry-retrieval linkage as a tool to feedback missing and erroneous data to the NJR and improve data quality. Take home message: Prospective Registry – retrieval linkage is a simple tool to evaluate and improve data quality on the NJR. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:33–9. PMID:26733513

  17. Continuing Professional Education in the Military

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleiman, Ashley; Zacharakis, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The military relies on continuing professional education as a key component to the success of its organization. With decreasing budgets and increasing importance for a force that operates efficiently and thinks critically, the cognitive tension among training, education, and learning comes center stage.

  18. Role of Human Health Care Providers and Medical Treatment Facilities in Military Working Dog Care and Accessibility Difficulties with Military Working Dog Blood Products.

    PubMed

    Giles Iii, James T

    2016-01-01

    The use of military working dogs (MWDs) in support of military operations has increased dramatically over recent years, as they have proven to be our most reliable deterrent to improvised explosive devices. Healthcare delivery for MWDs in combat presents unique challenges and requires extensive collaboration between veterinarians and human health care providers (HCPs). A successful example is the incorporation of MWD emergency care for nonveterinary HCPs into the Joint Trauma System Clinical Practice Guidelines, which has proven to be a helpful product. Additional challenges that need further solutions include MWDs as patients in human medical treatment facilities (MTFs) and the procurement of appropriate canine blood components in an operational environment. It is often necessary for MWDs to be treated as patients in human MTFs, however, there is no Department of Defense guidance to support this activity. Access to MWD blood products is limited to collection of fresh whole blood in the operational setting. Similar to humans, specific blood component therapy, such as fresh frozen plasma, is often indicated for sick or injured MWDs. Currently there is no formal system in place to deliver any blood products for MWDs or to facilitate collection in theater. PMID:27215885

  19. Role of Human Health Care Providers and Medical Treatment Facilities in Military Working Dog Care and Accessibility Difficulties with Military Working Dog Blood Products.

    PubMed

    Giles Iii, James T

    2016-01-01

    The use of military working dogs (MWDs) in support of military operations has increased dramatically over recent years, as they have proven to be our most reliable deterrent to improvised explosive devices. Healthcare delivery for MWDs in combat presents unique challenges and requires extensive collaboration between veterinarians and human health care providers (HCPs). A successful example is the incorporation of MWD emergency care for nonveterinary HCPs into the Joint Trauma System Clinical Practice Guidelines, which has proven to be a helpful product. Additional challenges that need further solutions include MWDs as patients in human medical treatment facilities (MTFs) and the procurement of appropriate canine blood components in an operational environment. It is often necessary for MWDs to be treated as patients in human MTFs, however, there is no Department of Defense guidance to support this activity. Access to MWD blood products is limited to collection of fresh whole blood in the operational setting. Similar to humans, specific blood component therapy, such as fresh frozen plasma, is often indicated for sick or injured MWDs. Currently there is no formal system in place to deliver any blood products for MWDs or to facilitate collection in theater.

  20. UK role 4 military infection services: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Dufty, Ngozi E; Bailey, M S

    2013-09-01

    NATO describes 'Role 4' military medical services as those provided for the definitive care of patients who cannot be treated within a theatre of operations and these are usually located in a military force's country of origin and may include the involvement of civilian medical services. The UK Defence Medical Services have a proud history of developing and providing clinical services in infectious diseases and tropical medicine, sexual health and HIV medicine, and medical microbiology and virology. These UK Role 4 Military Infection Services have adapted well to recent overseas deployments, but new challenges will arise due to current military cutbacks and a greater diversity of contingency operations in the future. Further evidence-based development of these services will require leadership by military clinicians and improved communication and support for 'reach-back' services. PMID:24109133

  1. Implications drawn from a military bioterror exercise in Israel.

    PubMed

    Berger, Tamar; Fogel, Itay; Poles, Lion; Aran, Adi Avniel; Shental, Omri; Kassirer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Orange Flame is an Israeli preparedness build-up project, conducted by the Ministry of Health, that is aimed at improving national readiness and preparedness for unusual biological events. The project is intended for both medical and nonmedical organizations, and, since 2011, the exercise has also included operational units outside the medical corps. This has provided valuable insights into the consequences of bioterror or naturally occurring outbreaks for operative functionality and for the unique medical, logistical, and administrative efforts required from the armed forces in such an event. The 2-day drill reported on here executed a notional scenario in which category A bioterror agents were dispersed, causing civil and military casualties. Military personnel observed and assessed the performances of all participating organizations and observed the employment of emergency protocols during the drill. Military sustainment and operative capabilities were significantly affected by the occurrence of an unusual biological event. Comprehensive actions to be executed during such a scenario included quarantining military bases, considering postponement of military operations, and transferring on-call missions to other bases. Logistic consequences included the need for manpower and equipment reinforcement, as well as food and water supplies in cases of suspected source contamination. The project unveiled many operational and logistic quandaries and exposed various potential effects of a bioterror attack in the military. Lessons learned were used to revise preevent national and military doctrine for unusual biological events. PMID:25813977

  2. [Juvenile obesity and fitness for military service].

    PubMed

    Frehner, C; Senn, H J

    1988-10-01

    In a prospective-catamnestic study among 21,978 19-20-year-old Swiss males at the time of military recruitment, a total of 412 (2.6%) obese young men were registered during the years of 1979-1981 for medical follow-up. They were matched for comparison with a group of 318 normal weight controls and studied for discharge rate from military service as well as rate and type of medical problems. After median follow-up of 3 years (basic military training and at least 1 annual repetition course) the obese group showed a discharge rate of 9% (37/412), 3.6 times higher than the normal weight group (2.5%, 8/318; p less than 0.001). There was no correlation between the extent of overweight and discharge rate within the obese group of young males. However, considerable differences for discharge rates showed up between military incorporations/functions (with values for the normal weight group in parenthesis). "Low-risk" incorporation subgroups for obese servicemen were: kitchen/logistics 2.7% (11.5%) and drivers 5.2% (2.6%), possibly due to overlap of professional and military functions. "High-risk" incorporation subgroups for obese servicemen were: medical corps/air defense 14.8% (0%) and artillery/technical functions 14.1% (2.7%), with infantry 7.8% (2.7%) in an intermediate position. The result of the gymnastic training test at military recruitment correlated best with the discharge rate from military service. The distribution of medical reasons (diagnoses) did not differ basically between obese and normal weight young servicemen. Diseases of the spine/joints and feet with 46% (37.5%) ranked first, followed by psychological problems with 22% (37.5%) and cardiovascular and other diseases with 8% (0%). Illness was the cause of discharge from military service in 7% (29/412) of the obese group compared to 1.6% (5/318) in the normal weight group (p less than 0.001), while the respective values for accident-derived discharges (1.9% vs 0.9%) showed no statistically significant

  3. Aerospace and military

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.A.; Esch, K

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews military and aerospace developments of 1989. The Voyager spacecraft returned astounding imagery from Neptune, sophisticated sensors were launched to explore Venus and Jupiter, and another craft went into earth orbit to explore cosmic rays, while a huge telescope is to be launched early in 1990. The U.S. space shuttle redesign was completed and access to space has become no longer purely a governmental enterprise. In the military realm, events within the Soviet bloc, such as the Berlin Wall's destruction, have popularized arms control. Several big treaties could be signed within the year. Massive troop, equipment, and budget reductions are being considered, along with a halt or delay of major new weapons systems. For new missions, the U.S. military is retreating to its role of a century ago - patrolling the nation's borders, this time against narcotics traffickers.

  4. Nuclear plants - military hostages

    SciTech Connect

    Ramberg, B.

    1986-03-01

    Recent events suggest that nuclear reactors could make tempting military or terrorist targets. Despite the care with which most reactors are built, studies document their vulnerability to willful destruction through disruption of coolant mechanisms both inside and outside the containment building. In addition to reactors, such nuclear support facilities as fuel fabrication, reprocessing, and waste storage installations may be attractive military targets. A nuclear bomb which exploded in the vicinity of a reactor could increase its lethal effects by one-third. The implications of this is vulnerability for Middle East stability as well as to other volatile regions. The author suggests several avenues for controlling the dangers: international law, military and civil defense, facility siting, increasing plant safety, and the international management of nuclear energy. 21 references.

  5. 48 CFR 217.173 - Multiyear contracts for military family housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... military family housing. 217.173 Section 217.173 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Mulityear Contracting 217.173 Multiyear contracts for military family housing. The head of the agency may... management, maintenance, and operation of military family housing and may pay the costs of such contracts...

  6. The intersection of a military culture and indigenous peoples in conservation issues.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E

    2013-11-01

    Military operations impose various positive and negative consequences on the environment. Three case studies are presented illuminating how local indigenous peoples as stakeholders may be vulnerable to being disenfranchised from important discussions concerning military activities. The study of ecological issues associated with sustaining a military footprint may be particularly useful for informing the global debate that pits strict conservation against human well-being.

  7. 48 CFR 217.173 - Multiyear contracts for military family housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... military family housing. 217.173 Section 217.173 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Mulityear Contracting 217.173 Multiyear contracts for military family housing. The head of the agency may... management, maintenance, and operation of military family housing and may pay the costs of such contracts...

  8. 48 CFR 217.173 - Multiyear contracts for military family housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... military family housing. 217.173 Section 217.173 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Mulityear Contracting 217.173 Multiyear contracts for military family housing. The head of the agency may... management, maintenance, and operation of military family housing and may pay the costs of such contracts...

  9. 48 CFR 217.173 - Multiyear contracts for military family housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... military family housing. 217.173 Section 217.173 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Mulityear Contracting 217.173 Multiyear contracts for military family housing. The head of the agency may... management, maintenance, and operation of military family housing and may pay the costs of such contracts...

  10. Joint service design for testability program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiner, W. L.

    1984-10-01

    As electronics become more complex and more critical to weapon system operation, there is an acknowledge that new designs must be somehow constrained to be more easily tested or they may become completely unsupportable. As a result, design for testability is becoming increasingly important to the services. The Joint Logistics Commanders (JLC) Panel on Automatic Testing established a comprehensive program to coordinate the development of testing technology and its management within the military services. One important part of the program deals with the design aspects of the prime equipment which permit weapon systems to be more easily and confidently tested using automatic test resources. A JLC Testability Subpanel was established under the JPLC Panel to provide acquisition support tools and research and development programs in design for testability (DFT).

  11. [The military pharmocopoeias in Denmark].

    PubMed

    Kruse, P R

    2000-09-01

    In 1812, the Danish king decided to reform the medicine supply to the military on the initiative of the pharmacist Jens Peter Groth (1785-1832), the tenant of the Royal Orphanage Pharmacy in Copenhagen. Up till then, the military physicians themselves for fixed medicine money had supplied the army and the navy with the necessary medicine, but now it was decided that Groth should establish a military pharmacy to manage the future medicine supply to the army and the navy in Copenhagen and also that the medicial members of the General Direction of the Military Medical Service should compile a military pharmacopoeia for both of the fighting services. The Royal Orphanage Pharmacy was named the Royal Military & Orphanage Pharmacy and the ordered military pharmacopoeia was issued in 1813. Compared with the national pharmacopoeia, the military pharmacopoeia was characterized by a limitation of the number of medicaments and by a simplification of the compositions. These facts were caused by the economic considerations and the duty of the military physicians themselves to prepare the simple medicaments. The subsequent editions of the military pharmacopoeia were published in 1840, 1857 og 1869, but in 1874, the military pharmacopoeia was cancelled, because the medicaments in the military pharmacopoeia were less effectual and less palatable than the medicaments in the national pharmacopoeia, and because the use of the military pharmacopoeia did not result in economic savings. PMID:11640530

  12. β-Alanine supplementation and military performance.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Harris, Roger C; Moran, Daniel S

    2015-12-01

    During sustained high-intensity military training or simulated combat exercises, significant decreases in physical performance measures are often seen. The use of dietary supplements is becoming increasingly popular among military personnel, with more than half of the US soldiers deployed or garrisoned reported to using dietary supplements. β-Alanine is a popular supplement used primarily by strength and power athletes to enhance performance, as well as training aimed at improving muscle growth, strength and power. However, there is limited research examining the efficacy of β-alanine in soldiers conducting operationally relevant tasks. The gains brought about by β-alanine use by selected competitive athletes appears to be relevant also for certain physiological demands common to military personnel during part of their training program. Medical and health personnel within the military are expected to extrapolate and implement relevant knowledge and doctrine from research performed on other population groups. The evidence supporting the use of β-alanine in competitive and recreational athletic populations suggests that similar benefits would also be observed among tactical athletes. However, recent studies in military personnel have provided direct evidence supporting the use of β-alanine supplementation for enhancing combat-specific performance. This appears to be most relevant for high-intensity activities lasting 60-300 s. Further, limited evidence has recently been presented suggesting that β-alanine supplementation may enhance cognitive function and promote resiliency during highly stressful situations.

  13. Lower extremity stress fractures in the military.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeremy M; Cameron, Kenneth L; Bojescul, John A

    2014-10-01

    Stress fractures of the lower extremities are common among the military population and, more specifically, military recruits who partake in basic training. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors play a role in the development of these injuries, and it is important to identify those individuals at risk early in their military careers. Some of these factors are modifiable, so they may become preventable injuries. It is important to reiterate that one stress fracture places the soldier at risk for future stress fractures; but the first injury should not be reason enough for separation from the military, as literature would support no long-term deficits from properly treated stress fractures. Early in the process, radiographic analysis is typically normal; continued pain may warrant advanced imaging, such as scintigraphy or MRI. Most stress fractures that are caught early are amendable to nonoperative management consisting of a period of immobilization and NWB followed by progressive rehabilitation to preinjury levels. Complete or displaced fractures may require operative intervention as do tension-sided FNSF. Improving dietary and preaccession physical fitness levels may play a role in reducing the incidence of stress fractures in the active-duty military population. It is important to keep in mind when evaluating soldiers and athletes who present with activity-related pain that stress fractures are not uncommon and should be given significant consideration.

  14. PRA In Design: Increasing Confidence in Pre-operational Assessments of Risks (Results of a Joint NASA/ NRC Workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Youngblood

    2010-06-01

    In late 2009, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) jointly organized a workshop to discuss technical issues associated with application of risk assessments to early phases of system design. The workshop, which was coordinated by the Idaho National Laboratory, involved invited presentations from a number of PRA experts in the aerospace and nuclear fields and subsequent discussion to address the following questions: (a) What technical issues limit decision-makers’ confidence in PRA results, especially at a preoperational phase of the system life cycle? (b) What is being done to address these issues? (c) What more can be done? The workshop resulted in participant observations and suggestions on several technical issues, including the pursuit of non-traditional approaches to risk assessment and the verification and validation of risk models. The workshop participants also identified several important non-technical issues, including risk communication with decision makers, and the integration of PRA into the overall design process.

  15. Substance Abuse in the Military

    MedlinePlus

    ... Although illicit drug use is lower among U.S. military personnel than among civilians, heavy alcohol and tobacco use, ... in identifying and treating substance use problems in military personnel, as does lack of confidentiality that deters many ...

  16. A content analysis of military commander messages about tobacco and other health issues in military installation newspapers: what do military commanders say about tobacco?

    PubMed

    Poston, Walker S C; Haddock, Christopher K; Jahnke, Sara A; Hyder, Melissa L; Jitnarin, Nattinee

    2015-06-01

    Military installation newspapers are a primary means used by military commanders to communicate information about topics important to military personnel including leadership, training issues, installation events, safety concerns, and vital health issues. We conducted a content analysis of military commanders' messages about health issues that were published in online military installation newspapers/newsfeeds. We identified a total of 75 publicly accessible installation newspapers/newsfeeds with commanders' messages (n = 39 Air Force, n = 19 Army, n = 7 Navy, n = 1 Marine, and n = 9 Joint Bases). Commander messages published from January 2012 to December 2012 were collected, screened, and coded. Coder inter-rater reliability was 98.9%. Among the 2,479 coded commanders' messages, 132 (5.3%) addressed a health topic as the primary focus. There were no significant differences between service branches in the percentage of health-oriented messages (χ(2) = 5.019, p = 0.285). The most commonly addressed health topics were exercise/fitness (23.5%), other mental health concerns (19.7%), alcohol/driving under the influence (13.6%), and suicide (12.1%). Tobacco use was directly addressed as a primary health aim in only two commanders' messages (1.5%). Health topics, and particularly tobacco-related content, are rarely written about by military commanders. The absence of tobacco-related health messages from line leadership contributes to the perception that tobacco control is a low priority. PMID:26032388

  17. A CONTENT ANALYSIS OF MILITARY COMMANDER MESSAGES ABOUT TOBACCO AND OTHER HEALTH ISSUES IN MILITARY INSTALLATION NEWSPAPERS: WHAT DO MILITARY COMMANDERS SAY ABOUT TOBACCO?

    PubMed Central

    Poston, Walker S.C.; Haddock, Christopher K.; Jahnke, Sara A.; Hyder, Melissa L.; Jitnarin, Nattinee

    2014-01-01

    Military installation newspapers are a primary means used by military commanders to communicate information about topics important to military personnel including leadership, training issues, installation events, safety concerns, and vital health issues. We conducted a content analysis of military commanders’ messages about health issues that were published in online military installation newspapers/newsfeeds. We identified a total of 75 publicly accessible installation newspapers/newsfeeds with commanders’ messages (n=39 Air Force, n=19 Army, n=7 Navy, n=1 Marine, and n=9 Joint Bases). Commander messages published between January 2012–December 2012 were collected, screened, and coded. Coder inter-rater reliability was 98.9%. Among the 2,479 coded commanders’ messages, 132 (5.3%) addressed a health topic as the primary focus. There were no significant differences between service branches in the percentage of health-oriented messages (χ2=5.019, p=0.285). The most commonly addressed health topics were exercise/fitness (23.5%), other mental health concerns (19.7%), alcohol/DUI (13.6%), and suicide (12.1%). Tobacco use was directly addressed as a primary health aim in only two commanders’ messages (1.5%). Health topics, and particularly tobacco-related content, are rarely written about by military commanders. The absence of tobacco-related health messages from line leadership contributes to the perception that tobacco control is a low priority. PMID:26032388

  18. Innovations in military handling of facial trauma.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Jeffrey A; Ferguson, Earl E

    2009-01-01

    As the military medical treatment facilities of Operation Iraqi Freedom have transitioned from make-shift tent facilities to more formal fixed facilities, the capability to deliver more complex care has markedly improved. Using case presentations, the authors illustrate the integration of advances in surgical technology in managing complex and devastating craniofacial trauma at the 332nd Air Force Theater Hospital in Balad Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom 2006. PMID:19164991

  19. Evolution of US military space doctrine: precedents, prospects, and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation examines the evolution of US military space doctrine by: (1) defining military doctrine, its importance, and how it should be evaluated; (2) identifying principles of geopolitics, strategy, and war applicable to military space operations; (3) establishing how well does Air Force aerospace doctrine treat space issues and requirements for itself and the other Services: (4) identifying future directions for military space doctrine; and (5) postulating what might constitute a US military space doctrine in the future. The approach utilized incorporates analyses of the space environment, geopolitics, strategy, the principles of war, and the development of air power and sea power to provide a framework of constants or invariants within which military space operations must be conducted. It also utilizes a framework of inconstants or variants, consisting of technology impacts and organizational requirements, to which military space doctrine must respond. Other doctrinal requirements are derived from the 1987 DOD space policy, the Strategic Defense Initiative, and international space law. Finally, an assessment is made of future concepts and directions of US military space doctrine.

  20. Gifted Military Dependents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tittle, Bess M.; Walters, Debbie

    1985-01-01

    Two articles address problems and issues in serving gifted military dependents. The first offers suggestions for parents, including handcarrying records, involving themselves in schools, and maintaining a positive attitude toward service life. The second article describes TAG (talented and gifted) programs at the Department of Defense Dependents…

  1. HIV ban in military.

    PubMed

    1995-06-16

    The Defense Department has written into its budget a proposal to discharge all HIV-positive members of the armed services. The House Committee on National Security has approved the fiscal 1996 defense budget with the ban included. Rep. Robert K. Dornan, R- Calif., contends that having HIV-positive service members in the military compromises the nation's readiness because, under Defense Department policy, they cannot be stationed abroad. However, only one-fifth of all service members on limited assignment have HIV, the others have diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. This shows the military's readiness to discriminate against HIV-positive individuals, according to William J. Freeman of the National Association of People with AIDS. Currently all recruits are tested for HIV; if they test positive, they are denied entry to the armed services. All service members are tested annually for HIV antibodies. In anticipation of cutbacks in military-related AIDS research due to the Republican control of Congress, the military has begun to eliminate most of the AIDS research it conducts. PMID:11362530

  2. HIV ban in military.

    PubMed

    1995-06-16

    The Defense Department has written into its budget a proposal to discharge all HIV-positive members of the armed services. The House Committee on National Security has approved the fiscal 1996 defense budget with the ban included. Rep. Robert K. Dornan, R- Calif., contends that having HIV-positive service members in the military compromises the nation's readiness because, under Defense Department policy, they cannot be stationed abroad. However, only one-fifth of all service members on limited assignment have HIV, the others have diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. This shows the military's readiness to discriminate against HIV-positive individuals, according to William J. Freeman of the National Association of People with AIDS. Currently all recruits are tested for HIV; if they test positive, they are denied entry to the armed services. All service members are tested annually for HIV antibodies. In anticipation of cutbacks in military-related AIDS research due to the Republican control of Congress, the military has begun to eliminate most of the AIDS research it conducts.

  3. Why Military History?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunting, Josiah, III

    2008-01-01

    Interest in military history is as strong as it has ever been--except on American college campuses. Lt. Gen. Josiah Bunting III examines why today's undergraduates need to study the facts of war, and why knowing its causes and consequences remain a vital part of our common knowledge.

  4. Resilience among Military Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Lerner, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors present their approach to understanding resilience among military connected young people, and they discuss some of the gaps in their knowledge. They begin by defining resilience, and then present a theoretical model of how young people demonstrate resilient functioning. Next they consider some of the research on…

  5. Truss Slip Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Truss slip joint has few parts, strong, and assembled and disassembled easily. Designed to carry axial loads as large as 100,000 lb and to accommodate slight initial axial-displacement and angular misalignments. Joint assembled or disassembled by astronaut in space suit or, on Earth, by technician in heavy protective clothing; simple enough to be operable by robot. Modified to accommodate welding.

  6. Special effects of gust loads on military aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houbolt, John C.

    1994-01-01

    In the operation of airplanes, atmospheric turbulence creates a broad spectrum of problems. The nature of these problems is presented in this paper. Those that are common to both the commercial carriers and to the military fleet are discussed first. Attention is then focused on the problems that are of special concern in military operations. An aim is to bring out the need for continued effort in the gust research area.

  7. Human knee laxity in ACL-deficient and physiological contralateral joints: intra-operative measurements using a navigation system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The comprehension of human knee laxity and of the failures of relevant surgical reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be enhanced by the knowledge of the laximetric status of the contralateral healthy knee (CHK). Rarely this is available in patients, directly from the skeletal structures, and for a number of the standard clinical tests. The general aim of this study was to measure the extent to which laxity occurs immediately before surgery in the ACL deficient knee (ADK) with respect to CHK, in a number of standard clinical evaluation tests. Method Thirty-two patients with ACL deficiency were analyzed at ADK and at CHK by a navigation system immediately before reconstructions. Knee laxity was assessed based on digitized anatomical references during the antero-posterior drawer, Lachman, internal-external rotation, varus-valgus, and pivot-shift tests. Antero-posterior laxity was normalized based on patient-specific length of the tibial plateau. Results In the drawer test, statistical significance (p < 0.05) was found for the larger antero-posterior laxity in ADK than in CHK, on average, of 54' in the medial and 47' in the lateral compartments, when measured in normalized translations. In the Lachman test, these were about 106' and 68'. The pivot-shift test revealed a significant 70' larger antero-posterior central laxity and a 32' larger rotational laxity. No statistically relevant differences were observed in the other tests. Conclusion The first conclusion is that it is important to measure also the antero-posterior and rotational laxity of the uninjured contralateral knee in assessing the laxity of the injured knee. A second is that the Lachman test shows knee laxity better than the AP drawer, and that the pivot-shift test was the only one able to reveal rotational instability. The present original measurements and analyses contribute to the knowledge of knee joint mechanics, with possible relevant applications in biomedical

  8. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  9. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  10. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  11. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  12. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  13. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  14. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  15. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  16. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  17. Academic and Military Instructional Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Robert K.

    This paper examines the practices and accomplishments of the military in the area of instructional technology. An examination of historical background is used to increase the precision of the definition of instructional technology. Specific contributions of the military are described and then uses of instructional technology in the military and…

  18. DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program. Joint Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Don

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation’s electrical generation capability. By the end of 2014, about one-third of the existing domestic fleet will have passed their 40th anniversary of power operations, and about one-half of the fleet will reach the same 40-year mark within this decade. Recognizing the challenges associated with pursuing extended service life of commercial nuclear power plants, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs (DOE-NE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability [LWRS] Program and EPRI’s Long-Term Operations [LTO] Program) to address these challenges. To ensure that a proper linkage is maintained between the programs, DOE-NE and EPRI executed a memorandum of understanding in late 2010 to “establish guiding principles under which research activities (between LWRS and LTO) could be coordinated to the benefit of both parties.” This document represents the third annual revision to the initial version (March 2011) of the plan as called for in the memorandum of understanding.

  19. [Modern medical science and Military Medical Academy].

    PubMed

    Gaĭdar, B V; Lobzin, Iu V; Chursin, I G; Tsygan, V N

    2005-08-01

    The article presents the information about the main directions of scientific investigations of Military Medical Academy and their results during the period of 1999-2000. The scientific work was conducted in conformity with demands of orders and directives of RF Ministry of Defense. 12 integrated scientific problems were formed in the annual plans of the Academy's research work. Together with traditional directions the new ones connected with the experience of troops medical support during the armed conflicts, liquidation of consequences of extreme situations, participation of military contingents in peace-making operations were developed. The complex clinical investigations of specific features of combat pathology due to firearms used by the enemy during the military operations in Afghanistan and in the Northern Caucasus are going on. In the most of clinical departments the problems of etiology, pathogenesis and treatment of servicemen' diseases under peacetime conditions are the main directions of scientific investigations. Every year the Academy's rationalizers and inventors produce 60-70 inventions and more than 500 rationalization proposals. Since 1995 the Academy publishes the journal "Clinical medicine and pathophysiology" and since 1999--"Bulletin of Russian Military Medical Academy". The Academy's scientific potential comprises 194 professors, 295 associate professors, 349 Doctors and 894 Candidates of Science, 20 Honoured Scientists of RF, 57 members and corresponding members of academies (Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Russian Academy of Natural Sciences and other social academies). PMID:16259295

  20. The Clinton military budget

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, J. )

    1993-05-01

    In February, the Clinton administration presented the overall contours, if not the details, of its military budget plans for the next five years. $263.5 billion was requested in new budget authority for fiscal 1994. By fiscal 1995, according to the administration blueprint, the budget would be reduced to about $250 billion annually. The three points that stand out, apart from the modest nature of the reductions from the previous administration's five-year Pentagon plan, are discussed in this article. First, the Clinton team downplayed the magnitude of the cutbacks. Second, the Clinton reductions generated great confusion, as an extraordinary range of numbers was banded about. Third, the pro-military members of Congress were remarkably quiet about the Clinton defense plan. Explanations and implications of these points are explained.

  1. Implementing and preserving the advances in combat casualty care from Iraq and Afghanistan throughout the US Military.

    PubMed

    Butler, Frank K; Smith, David J; Carmona, Richard H

    2015-08-01

    Thirteen years of continuous combat operations have enabled the US Military and its coalition partners to make a number of major advances in casualty care. The coalition nations have developed a superb combat trauma system and achieved unprecedented casualty survival rates. There remains, however, a need to accelerate the translation of new battlefield trauma care information, training, and equipment to units and individuals deploying in support of combat operations. In addition, the US Military needs to ensure that these advances are sustained during peace intervals and that we continue to build upon our successes as we prepare for future conflicts. This article contains recommendations designed to accomplish those goals. For the proposed actions to benefit all branches of our armed services, the direction will need to come from the Office of the Secretary of Defense in partnership with the Joint Staff. Effective translation of military advances in prehospital trauma care may also increase survival for law enforcement officers wounded in the line of duty and for civilian victims of Active Shooter or terrorist-related mass-casualty incidents.

  2. Implementing and preserving the advances in combat casualty care from Iraq and Afghanistan throughout the US Military.

    PubMed

    Butler, Frank K; Smith, David J; Carmona, Richard H

    2015-08-01

    Thirteen years of continuous combat operations have enabled the US Military and its coalition partners to make a number of major advances in casualty care. The coalition nations have developed a superb combat trauma system and achieved unprecedented casualty survival rates. There remains, however, a need to accelerate the translation of new battlefield trauma care information, training, and equipment to units and individuals deploying in support of combat operations. In addition, the US Military needs to ensure that these advances are sustained during peace intervals and that we continue to build upon our successes as we prepare for future conflicts. This article contains recommendations designed to accomplish those goals. For the proposed actions to benefit all branches of our armed services, the direction will need to come from the Office of the Secretary of Defense in partnership with the Joint Staff. Effective translation of military advances in prehospital trauma care may also increase survival for law enforcement officers wounded in the line of duty and for civilian victims of Active Shooter or terrorist-related mass-casualty incidents. PMID:26218704

  3. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  4. Technical and economic assessment of swept-wing span-distributed load concepts for civil and military air cargo transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of large freighter aircraft was assessed, including the impact of military requirements on the performance, economics, and fuel consumption characteristics. Only configurations having net payloads of 272,155 to 544,311 kilograms contained within swept wings of constant chord were studied. These configurations were of advanced composite construction with controllable winglets and full-span digitally-controlled trailing-edge surfaces. Civil, military, and joint civil/military production programs were considered.

  5. Renewable energy technology handbook for military engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-03-01

    Renewable energy applications are introduced that are considered promising for military use in the 1980s. These are: solar hot water for buildings, active solar hot water and space heating for buildings, passive solar heating and cooling of buildings, solar industrial process heata, solar ponds, photovoltaic power for homes, photovoltaic power for remote applications, parabolic dish solar systems for remote applications, wind energy for buildings, wind energy for central power plants, wind energy for water pumping, biomass energy systems for buildings, biomass energy systems for central power plants, geothermal energy for process heat, and geothermal energy for central power plants. For each of these is given: a brief history of the technology and information on how the technology works; a detailed technical and economic profile of an operating system; and a summary listing of operating civilian and military systems that are open for public viewing.

  6. Fear of radiation in U.S. military medical personnel.

    PubMed

    Pastel, R H; Mulvaney, J

    2001-12-01

    The fear of radiation, even low-level radiation, could significantly impair military operations. To measure knowledge of and attitudes toward radiation, the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute developed a questionnaire that military medical personnel completed both before and after the 3-day Medical Effects of Ionizing Radiation (MEIR) course. Findings included a positive correlation between the resulting increased knowledge and more positive attitudes. No gender effects were observed for knowledge or attitude, but both education level and military rank were related to knowledge and attitude.

  7. Formulary management in a military treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Carr, V F; Walker, J C

    1997-03-01

    In an environment of increased fiscal responsibility and cost constraints, the medical staff must take an active role in deciding how an institution's operating budget is spent. A major expense of a military treatment facility (MTF) is maintaining an adequate and cost-effective formulary. The large number of pharmaceuticals available on the market forces a decision regarding which products to stock. Decision analysis is a technique that helps a medical staff to manage its formulary by listing all of the objective and subjective considerations. The Department of Defense Pharmacoeconomic Center has developed a tri-service formulary to standardize a basic drug list that would be available in each military treatment facility. However, this list cannot be expected to answer all of the factors a medical staff must weigh in developing an MTF-specific formulary. Many considerations must be addressed in these decisions, including the beneficiary population, the potential diagnoses as defined by a database such as the Retrospective Case Mix Analysis System or the Military Health Services System, the institution's mission and defined scope of care, physician interests and specialization, and facility limitations. Military treatment facilities can maintain an appropriate stock of medications that is specific for the scope and practice of a medical staff and work within a budget through careful planning and employment of a decision matrix. This balance of appropriateness and fiscal responsibility allows the maximum range of services within a facility. PMID:9121669

  8. Formulary management in a military treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Carr, V F; Walker, J C

    1997-03-01

    In an environment of increased fiscal responsibility and cost constraints, the medical staff must take an active role in deciding how an institution's operating budget is spent. A major expense of a military treatment facility (MTF) is maintaining an adequate and cost-effective formulary. The large number of pharmaceuticals available on the market forces a decision regarding which products to stock. Decision analysis is a technique that helps a medical staff to manage its formulary by listing all of the objective and subjective considerations. The Department of Defense Pharmacoeconomic Center has developed a tri-service formulary to standardize a basic drug list that would be available in each military treatment facility. However, this list cannot be expected to answer all of the factors a medical staff must weigh in developing an MTF-specific formulary. Many considerations must be addressed in these decisions, including the beneficiary population, the potential diagnoses as defined by a database such as the Retrospective Case Mix Analysis System or the Military Health Services System, the institution's mission and defined scope of care, physician interests and specialization, and facility limitations. Military treatment facilities can maintain an appropriate stock of medications that is specific for the scope and practice of a medical staff and work within a budget through careful planning and employment of a decision matrix. This balance of appropriateness and fiscal responsibility allows the maximum range of services within a facility.

  9. The Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) Mission System (JMS) and the Advanced Research, Collaboration, and Application Development Environment (ARCADE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K.; Kim, R.; Echeverry, J.

    The Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) is a command and control center focused on executing the Space Control mission of the Joint Functional Component Command for Space (JFCC-SPACE) to ensure freedom of action of United States (US) space assets, while preventing adversary use of space against the US. To accomplish this, the JSpOC tasks a network of space surveillance sensors to collect Space Situational Awareness (SSA) data on resident space objects (RSOs) in near earth and deep space orbits. SSA involves the ingestion of data sources and use of algorithms and tools to build, maintain, and disseminate situational awareness of RSOs in space. On the heels of emergent and complex threats to space assets, the JSpOC's capabilities are limited by legacy systems and CONOPs. The JSpOC Mission System (JMS) aims to consolidate SSA efforts across US agencies, international partners, and commercial partners. The JMS program is intended to deliver a modern service-oriented architecture (SOA) based infrastructure with increased process automation and improved tools to remove the current barriers to JSpOC operations. JMS has been partitioned into several developmental increments. Increment 1, completed and operational in early 2013, and Increment 2, which is expected to be completed in 2016, will replace the legacy Space Defense Operations Center (SPADOC) and Astrodynamics Support Workstation (ASW) capabilities. In 2017 JMS Increment 3 will continue to provide additional SSA and C2 capabilities that will require development of new applications and procedures as well as the exploitation of new data sources. Most importantly, Increment 3 is uniquely postured to evolve the JSpOC into the centralized and authoritative source for all Space Control applications by using its SOA to aggregate information and capabilities from across the community. To achieve this goal, Scitor Corporation has supported the JMS Program Office as it has entered into a partnership with AFRL/RD (Directed

  10. The Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) Mission System (JMS) and the Advanced Research, Collaboration, and Application Development Environment (ARCADE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K.; Kim, R.; Echeverry, J.

    The Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) is a command and control center focused on executing the Space Control mission of the Joint Functional Component Command for Space (JFCC-SPACE) to ensure freedom of action of United States (US) space assets, while preventing adversary use of space against the US. To accomplish this, the JSpOC tasks a network of space surveillance sensors to collect Space Situational Awareness (SSA) data on resident space objects (RSOs) in near earth and deep space orbits. SSA involves the ingestion of data sources and use of algorithms and tools to build, maintain, and disseminate situational awareness of RSOs in space. On the heels of emergent and complex threats to space assets, the JSpOC's capabilities are limited by legacy systems and CONOPs. The JSpOC Mission System (JMS) aims to consolidate SSA efforts across US agencies, international partners, and commercial partners. The JMS program is intended to deliver a modern service-oriented architecture (SOA) based infrastructure with increased process automation and improved tools to remove the current barriers to JSpOC operations. JMS has been partitioned into several developmental increments. Increment 1, completed and operational in early 2013, and Increment 2, which is expected to be completed in 2016, will replace the legacy Space Defense Operations Center (SPADOC) and Astrodynamics Support Workstation (ASW) capabilities. In 2017 JMS Increment 3 will continue to provide additional SSA and C2 capabilities that will require development of new applications and procedures as well as the exploitation of new data sources. Most importantly, Increment 3 is uniquely postured to evolve the JSpOC into the centralized and authoritative source for all Space Control applications by using its SOA to aggregate information and capabilities from across the community. To achieve this goal, Scitor Corporation has supported the JMS Program Office as it has entered into a partnership with AFRL/RD (Directed

  11. Military applications of hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briottet, X.; Boucher, Y.; Dimmeler, A.; Malaplate, A.; Cini, A.; Diani, M.; Bekman, H.; Schwering, P.; Skauli, T.; Kasen, I.; Renhorn, I.; Klasén, L.; Gilmore, M.; Oxford, D.

    2006-05-01

    Optical imaging, including infrared imaging, generally has many important applications, both civilian and military. In recent years, technological advances have made multi- and hyperspectral imaging a viable technology in many demanding military application areas. The aim of the CEPA JP 8.10 program has been to evaluate the potential benefit of spectral imaging techniques in tactical military applications. This unclassified executive summary describes the activities in the program and outlines some of the results. More specific results are given in classified reports and presentations. The JP 8.10 program started in March 2002 and ended in February 2005. The participating nations were France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and United-Kingdom, each with a contribution of 2 man-years per year. Essential objectives of the program were to: 1) analyze the available spectral information in the optronic landscape from visible to infrared; 2) analyze the operational utility of multi- and hyperspectral imaging for detection, recognition and identification of targets, including low-signature targets; 3) identify applications where spectral imaging can provide a strong gain in performance; 4) propose technical recommendations of future spectral imaging systems and critical components. Finally, a stated objective of the JP 8.10 program is to "ensure the proper link with the image processing community". The presentation is organized as follows. In a first step, the two trials (Pirrene and Kvarn) are presented including a summary of the acquired optical properties of the different landscape materials and of the spectral images. Then, a phenomenology study is conducted analyzing the spectral behavior of the optical properties, understanding the signal at the sensor and, by processing spectroradiometric measurements evaluating the potential to discriminate spectral signatures. Cameo-Sim simulation software is presented including first validation results and the

  12. Joint Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  13. Burns and military clothing.

    PubMed

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  14. Recruits' Military Preferences and Their Accommodation by the Military Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoehn, Arthur J.; And Others

    The research report provides information on recruits' military occupational preferences, match of military assignments to recruits' preferences, and changes that occur in these preferences between service entry and completion of basic training. Questionnaires were administered to recruits from four services just before classification interviewing…

  15. Joint NASA/USAF Airborne Field Mill Program - Operation and safety considerations during flights of a Lear 28 airplane in adverse weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Bruce D.; Phillips, Michael R.; Maier, Launa M.

    1992-01-01

    A NASA Langley Research Center Learjet 28 research airplane was flown in various adverse weather conditions in the vicinity of the NASA Kennedy Space Center from 1990-1992 to measure airborne electric fields during the Joint NASA/USAF Airborne Field Mill Program. The objective of this program was to characterize the electrical activity in various weather phenomena common to the NASA-Kennedy area in order to refine Launch Commit Criteria for natural and triggered lightning. The purpose of the program was to safely relax the existing launch commit criteria, thereby increasing launch availability and reducing the chance for weather holds and delays. This paper discusses the operational conduct of the flight test, including environmental/safety considerations, aircraft instrumentation and modification, test limitations, flight procedures, and the procedures and responsibilities of the personnel in the ground station. Airborne field mill data were collected for all the Launch Commit Criteria during two summer and two winter deployments. These data are now being analyzed.

  16. Assessing homeland chemical hazards outside the military gates: industrial hazard threat assessments for department of defense installations.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Jeffrey S; Howard, Jacqueline M; Reed, David A

    2002-04-01

    As part of comprehensive joint medical surveillance measures outlined by the Department of Defense, the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) is beginning to assess environmental health threats to continental US military installations. A common theme in comprehensive joint medical surveillance, in support of Force Health Protection, is the identification and assessment of potential environmental health hazards, and the evaluation and documentation of actual exposures in both a continental US and outside a continental US setting. For the continental US assessments, the USACHPPM has utilized the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) database for risk management plans in accordance with Public Law 106-40, and the toxic release inventory database, in a state-of the art geographic information systems based program, termed the Consequence Assessment and Management Tool Set, or CATS, for assessing homeland industrial chemical hazards outside the military gates. As an example, the US EPA toxic release inventory and risk management plans databases are queried to determine the types and locations of industries surrounding a continental US military installation. Contaminants of concern are then ranked with respect to known toxicological and physical hazards, where they are then subject to applicable downwind hazard simulations using applicable meteorological and climatological data sets. The composite downwind hazard areas are mapped in relation to emergency response planning guidelines (ERPG), which were developed by the American Industrial Hygiene Association to assist emergency response personnel planning for catastrophic chemical releases. In addition, other geographic referenced data such as transportation routes, satellite imagery and population data are included in the operational, equipment, and morale risk assessment and management process. These techniques have been developed to assist military medical planners and operations

  17. Compliant Joints For Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Compliant joints devised to accommodate misalignments of tools and/or workpieces with respect to robotic manipulators. Has characteristics and appearance of both universal-joint and cable-spring-type flexible shaft coupling. Compliance derived from elastic properties of short pieces of cable. Compliance of joint determined by lengths, distances between, relative orientations, thickness of strands, number of strands, material, amount of pretwist, and number of short pieces of cable. Worm-drive mechanism used to adjust lengths to vary compliance as needed during operation.

  18. Operation tropic refuge: the East Wood rescue.

    PubMed

    Cashman, T M; Hassell, L H; Barker, A J; Funderburk, L K

    1994-12-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard rescued 525 Chinese nationals and ten Indonesian crewmen from the disabled motor vessel East Wood. They were participating in a human smuggling operation. Subjected to a trying ordeal at sea, these individuals were at great risk to life and health but survived remarkably well because of their good health, age, and mutual cooperation. The U.S. military organized the joint task force, Operation Provide Refuge, to provide humanitarian aid. The task force rapidly mobilized resources to support camp development on Kwajalein Island and provide nutrition and health care to the stranded travelers. Preventive Medicine personnel, called in at the beginning of the operation, helped develop a healthy campsite, which contributed to a relatively uneventful refugee experience. Close liaison with the local medical resources on Kwajalein was essential to the success of the operation.

  19. Economic Conditions of Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosek, James; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors found that the economic circumstances of military families are good, certainly much improved compared with even a decade ago. The military context is nonetheless challenging, with long hours, dangerous work, frequent transfers, and stressful absences during deployment. Service members receive relatively high pay and…

  20. Military R&D Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Ulrich

    1983-01-01

    Military research and development (R&D) in Western countries and the USSR are analyzed in terms of growth; self-perception of R&D personnel; relationships with industry and the state bureaucracy; reproduction schemes which result in war-oriented work; and worker training. Prospects are slim for the conversion of military production to civilian…

  1. Condylar hyperplasia following unilateral temporomandibular joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Machon, V; Levorova, J; Hirjak, D; Foltan, R

    2015-06-01

    Total joint replacement of the temporomandibular joint (TJR) can be associated with intraoperative and postoperative complications. We report herein the occurrence of a postoperative open bite malocclusion, the result of condylar hyperplasia affecting the non-operated joint at 1 year after unilateral total joint replacement. PMID:25662429

  2. Military housing foam application and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J. J.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in sustainable communities. This project consists of two activities conducted in Hawaii that focus on performance, integration and application of energy saving technologies. Hawaii has many energy challenges, making this location an excellent testbed for these activities. Under this project, spray foam technology was applied at military housing on Oahu and the consumption data collected. A cost benefit and operational analysis of the foam was completed. The second phase of this project included design, integration, and analysis of photovoltaic systems at a military community on Oahu. This phase of the project was conducted as part of Forest City's second Solar America Showcase Award.

  3. Networking: challenges for network centric operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotts, Larry B.; Allen, John G.

    2004-11-01

    This paper examines some of the challenges facing the community in providing radio communications to enable information systems for military operations. We believe that much of the on-going/completed work is necessary, but not sufficient, to provide the military Network Centric Operations, which integrates military"s network centric enterprise with network centric warfare. Additional issues need to be addressed to better support battle commanders as well as decider-sensor-effecter linkages. We discuss a possible way ahead.

  4. Risky business: challenges and successes in military radiation risk communication.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Mark A; Geckle, Lori S; Davidson, Bethney A

    2012-01-01

    Given the general public's overall lack of knowledge about radiation and their heightened fear of its harmful effects, effective communication of radiation risks is often difficult. This is especially true when it comes to communicating the radiation risks stemming from military operations. Part of this difficulty stems from a lingering distrust of the military that harkens back to the controversy surrounding Veteran exposures to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War along with the often classified nature of many military operations. Additionally, there are unique military exposure scenarios, such as the use of nuclear weapons and combat use of depleted uranium as antiarmor munitions that are not found in the civilian sector. Also, the large, diverse nature of the military makes consistent risk communication across the vast and widespread organization very difficult. This manuscript highlights and discusses both the common and the distinctive challenges of effectively communicating military radiation risks, to include communicating through the media. The paper also introduces the Army's Health Risk Communication Program and its role in assisting in effective risk communication efforts. The authors draw on their extensive collective experience to share 3 risk communication success stories that were accomplished through the innovative use of a matrixed, team approach that combines both health physics and risk communication expertise.

  5. Risky business: challenges and successes in military radiation risk communication.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Mark A; Geckle, Lori S; Davidson, Bethney A

    2012-01-01

    Given the general public's overall lack of knowledge about radiation and their heightened fear of its harmful effects, effective communication of radiation risks is often difficult. This is especially true when it comes to communicating the radiation risks stemming from military operations. Part of this difficulty stems from a lingering distrust of the military that harkens back to the controversy surrounding Veteran exposures to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War along with the often classified nature of many military operations. Additionally, there are unique military exposure scenarios, such as the use of nuclear weapons and combat use of depleted uranium as antiarmor munitions that are not found in the civilian sector. Also, the large, diverse nature of the military makes consistent risk communication across the vast and widespread organization very difficult. This manuscript highlights and discusses both the common and the distinctive challenges of effectively communicating military radiation risks, to include communicating through the media. The paper also introduces the Army's Health Risk Communication Program and its role in assisting in effective risk communication efforts. The authors draw on their extensive collective experience to share 3 risk communication success stories that were accomplished through the innovative use of a matrixed, team approach that combines both health physics and risk communication expertise. PMID:22815169

  6. Military nephrology—what a civilian doctor should know

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This article provides some background on military nephrology in the UK. The primary objective of the Defence Medical Services is the maintenance of operational capability of military personnel. This includes exclusion of nephrological diseases that might reduce renal reserve to a critical level under field conditions, increasing susceptibility to trauma, burns, infection and adverse environmental conditions and increasing the need for renal support. Renal failure potentially compromises not only the patient but also his comrades through reduced staffing and inability to execute the military mission. Safety of weapon systems for which the patient is responsible may be reduced. At forward locations, need for evacuation may put aircraft or vehicles and their crew with medical attendants at unnecessary risk. Regular follow-up and continuity of care are difficult owing to the demands of military life that include frequent postings and deployments. PMID:25984145

  7. Military Occupational Data Bank (MODB): Personnel Selection and Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    The regulation contains policy guidance, administrative procedures, and responsibilities for the operation and maintenance of the Military Occupational Data Bank (MODB). It revises a former regulation governing the MODB method of operation by revising the list of occupational data collection agencies and by providing expanded information…

  8. The importance of militaries from developing countries in global infectious disease surveillance.

    PubMed

    Chretien, Jean-Paul; Blazes, David L; Coldren, Rodney L; Lewis, Michael D; Gaywee, Jariyanart; Kana, Khunakorn; Sirisopana, Narongrid; Vallejos, Victor; Mundaca, Carmen C; Montano, Silvia; Martin, Gregory J; Gaydos, Joel C

    2007-01-01

    Military forces from developing countries have become increasingly important as facilitators of their government's foreign policy, taking part in peacekeeping operations, military exercises and humanitarian relief missions. Deployment of these forces presents both challenges and opportunities for infectious disease surveillance and control. Troop movements may cause or extend epidemics by introducing novel agents to susceptible populations. Conversely, military units with disease surveillance and response capabilities can extend those capabilities to civilian populations not served by civilian public health programmes, such as those in remote or post-disaster settings. In Peru and Thailand, military health organizations in partnership with the military of the United States use their laboratory, epidemiological, communications and logistical resources to support civilian ministry of health efforts. As their role in international affairs expands, surveillance capabilities of militaries from developing countries should be enhanced, perhaps through partnerships with militaries from high-income countries. Military-to-military and military-to-civilian partnerships, with the support of national and international civilian health organizations, could also greatly strengthen global infectious disease surveillance, particularly in remote and post-disaster areas where military forces are present. PMID:18405198

  9. The importance of militaries from developing countries in global infectious disease surveillance.

    PubMed

    Chretien, Jean-Paul; Blazes, David L; Coldren, Rodney L; Lewis, Michael D; Gaywee, Jariyanart; Kana, Khunakorn; Sirisopana, Narongrid; Vallejos, Victor; Mundaca, Carmen C; Montano, Silvia; Martin, Gregory J; Gaydos, Joel C

    2007-03-01

    Military forces from developing countries have become increasingly important as facilitators of their government's foreign policy, taking part in peacekeeping operations, military exercises and humanitarian relief missions. Deployment of these forces presents both challenges and opportunities for infectious disease surveillance and control. Troop movements may cause or extend epidemics by introducing novel agents to susceptible populations. Conversely, military units with disease surveillance and response capabilities can extend those capabilities to civilian populations not served by civilian public health programmes, such as those in remote or post-disaster settings. In Peru and Thailand, military health organizations in partnership with the military of the United States use their laboratory, epidemiological, communications and logistical resources to support civilian ministry of health efforts. As their role in international affairs expands, surveillance capabilities of militaries from developing countries should be enhanced, perhaps through partnerships with militaries from high-income countries. Military-to-military and military-to-civilian partnerships, with the support of national and international civilian health organizations, could also greatly strengthen global infectious disease surveillance, particularly in remote and post-disaster areas where military forces are present. PMID:17486207

  10. Cultural self-awareness as a crucial component of military cross-cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Pappamihiel, Constantine J; Pappamihiel, Eleni

    2013-01-01

    The military forces in the United States represent a unique culture that includes many subcultures within their own military society. Acculturation into the military often deemphasizes the influence of personal narrative and thereby establishes the primacy of military culture over personal cultural influences. The authors make the argument that military personnel need to further develop an understanding and appreciation of personal cultural narrative as well as organizational culture. The increased integration of military personnel with interagency partners, along with cooperative efforts between relief organizations, and nongovernmental organizations in politically/economically unstable areas around the globe serves to make cross-cultural interaction unavoidable in the future. Military medical personnel are especially likely to interact with others who have culturally different values. These interactions can occur between organizations as easily as they can during patient care. They must be able to step outside of their military culture and develop cross-cultural competence that is grounded in cultural self-awareness. Without an appropriate level of cultural self-awareness, military and medical personnel run the risk of being unable to communicate across dissimilar cultures or worse, alienating key stakeholders in collaborative operations between military services, coalition partners, and nonmilitary organizations. It is the authors? contention that unless military personnel, especially those in the medical arena, are able to appropriately self-assess situations that are impacted by culture, both their own and the other personnel involved, the resulting cultural dissonance is more likely to derail any significant positive effect of such collaborations.

  11. Concept for a Predeployment Assessment of Basic Military Fitness in the German Armed Forces.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Ulrich; Sievert, Alexander; Rüther, Thomas; Witzki, Alexander; Leyk, Dieter

    2015-11-01

    Military fitness is defined as a hierarchical 4-level construct in the German armed forces: (a) "Fundamental/Baseline Fitness," (b) "Basic Military Fitness," (c) "Task Fitness," and (d) "Mission Fitness." "Fundamental/Baseline Fitness" is assessed with the "Basic Fitness Test." However, this test alone is not sufficient to assess readiness for the physical demands of deployments. The first part of the article describes the development of a tool mirroring the specific physiological requirements of military operations on a joint forces level. The "Basic Military Fitness Tool" (BMFT) combines 4 crucial military demands into one single timed test run performed with field uniform (5 kg), body armor (13.4 kg), and helmet (1.6 kg): (a) maneuver under fire: 130 m run with changes in direction, velocity, and body position, (b) casualty rescue: 40 m of dragging a 50 kg load, (c) load carrying: 100 m carrying of two 18 kg loads, and (d) load lifting: lifting a 24 kg load on to a 1.25 m high rack 5 times. The second part covers the first assessment of BMFT selectivity between high- and low-performing groups. Muscle mass and strength are important factors for working with loads. Thus, female soldiers are expected to need more time to complete BMFT because of their on average lower muscle mass. Eighteen female (age = 28.5 ± 6.6 years, lean body mass [LBM] = 45.0 ± 4.5 kg; mean ± SD) and 104 male soldiers (age = 30.0 ± 8.4, LBM = 64.3 ± 7.1) completed isometric strength testing (hand grip = 344.3 ± 51.4 N and 547.3 ± 79.1 N, elbow flexors = 118.9 ± 16.9 and 235.1 ± 42.0, knee extensors = 433.2 ± 87.4 and 631.4 ± 111.4) and BMFT (259.2 ± 44.0 and 150.0 ± 21.1 s). Except age, all variables differed significantly (p < 0.01) between groups.

  12. Women at war: understanding how women veterans cope with combat and military sexual trauma.

    PubMed

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Haskell, Sally G; Krebs, Erin E; Justice, Amy C; Yano, Elizabeth M; Brandt, Cynthia

    2012-02-01

    The wars in Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom, OIF) and Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom, OEF) have engendered a growing population of US female veterans, with women now comprising 15% of active US duty military personnel. Women serving in the military come under direct fire and experience combat-related injuries and trauma, and are also often subject to in-service sexual assaults and sexual harassment. However, little is known regarding how women veterans cope with these combat and military sexual trauma experiences once they return from deployment. To better understand their experiences, we conducted semi-structured interviews with nineteen OEF/OIF women veterans between January-November 2009. Women veterans identified stressful military experiences and post-deployment reintegration problems as major stressors. Stressful military experiences included combat experiences, military sexual trauma, and separation from family. Women had varying abilities to address and manage stressors, and employed various cognitive and behavioral coping resources and processes to manage their stress.

  13. A Technical and Operational Perspective on the DOE Energy Innovation Hub in Fuels from Sunlight, the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, N.; Royea, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    The design of highly efficient, non-biological, molecular-level energy conversion 'machines' that generate fuels directly from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide is both a formidable challenge and an opportunity that, if realized, could have a revolutionary impact on our energy system. Basic research has already provided enormous advances in our understanding of the subtle and complex photochemistry behind the natural photosynthetic system, and in the use of inorganic photo-catalytic methods to split water or reduce carbon dioxide--key steps in photosynthesis. Yet we still lack sufficient knowledge to design solar fuel generation systems with the required efficiency, scalability, and sustainability to be economically viable. In the DOE Energy Innovation Hub, the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, we are developing an artificial photosynthetic system that will only utilize sunlight and water as the inputs and will produce hydrogen and oxygen as the outputs. We are taking a modular, parallel development approach in which the three distinct primary components--the photoanode, the photocathode, and the product-separating but ion-conducting membrane--are fabricated and optimized separately before assembly into a complete water-splitting system. The design principles incorporate two separate, photosensitive semiconductor/liquid junctions that will collectively generate the 1.7-1.9 V at open circuit necessary to support both the oxidation of H2O (or OH-) and the reduction of H+ (or H2O). The photoanode and photocathode will consist of rod-like semiconductor components, with attached heterogeneous multi-electron transfer catalysts, which are needed to drive the oxidation or reduction reactions at low overpotentials. This talk will discuss a feasible and functional prototype and blueprint for an artificial photosynthetic system, composed of only inexpensive, earth-abundant materials, that is simultaneously efficient, durable, scalably manufacturable, and readily

  14. Simulation of a new 3D imaging sensor for identifying difficult military targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Christophe; Wood, Jonathan; Randall, Peter; Watson, Graham; Smith, Gordon

    2008-04-01

    This paper reports the successful application of automatic target recognition and identification (ATR/I) algorithms to simulated 3D imagery of 'difficult' military targets. QinetiQ and Selex S&AS are engaged in a joint programme to build a new 3D laser imaging sensor for UK MOD. The sensor is a 3D flash system giving an image containing range and intensity information suitable for targeting operations from fast jet platforms, and is currently being integrated with an ATR/I suite for demonstration and testing. The sensor has been extensively modelled and a set of high fidelity simulated imagery has been generated using the CAMEO-SIM scene generation software tool. These include a variety of different scenarios (varying range, platform altitude, target orientation and environments), and some 'difficult' targets such as concealed military vehicles. The ATR/I algorithms have been tested on this image set and their performance compared to 2D passive imagery from the airborne trials using a Wescam MX-15 infrared sensor and real-time ATR/I suite. This paper outlines the principles behind the sensor model and the methodology of 3D scene simulation. An overview of the 3D ATR/I programme and algorithms is presented, and the relative performance of the ATR/I against the simulated image set is reported. Comparisons are made to the performance of typical 2D sensors, confirming the benefits of 3D imaging for targeting applications.

  15. The Importance of Military Cultural Competence.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eric G; Writer, Brian W; Brim, William

    2016-03-01

    Military cultural competence has recently gained national attention. Experts have posited that limited outcomes in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression in the military may be related to limited familiarity with the military. National surveys have indicated low military cultural competence among providers and limited educational efforts on military culture or pertinent military pathology in medical schools and residency training programs. Military families, with their own unique military cultural identity, have been identified as a population with increased risks associated with deployment. In response to these findings, several curricula regarding military culture have been established and widely distributed. Assessments of military cultural competence have also been developed. The clinical impact of enhanced cultural competence in general has thus far been limited. The military, however, with its highly prescribed cultural identity, may be a model culture for further study. PMID:26830884

  16. The Importance of Military Cultural Competence.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eric G; Writer, Brian W; Brim, William

    2016-03-01

    Military cultural competence has recently gained national attention. Experts have posited that limited outcomes in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression in the military may be related to limited familiarity with the military. National surveys have indicated low military cultural competence among providers and limited educational efforts on military culture or pertinent military pathology in medical schools and residency training programs. Military families, with their own unique military cultural identity, have been identified as a population with increased risks associated with deployment. In response to these findings, several curricula regarding military culture have been established and widely distributed. Assessments of military cultural competence have also been developed. The clinical impact of enhanced cultural competence in general has thus far been limited. The military, however, with its highly prescribed cultural identity, may be a model culture for further study.

  17. The intersection of a military culture and indigenous peoples in conservation issues

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Military operations impose various positive and negative consequences on the environment. Three case studies are presented illuminating how local indigenous peoples as stakeholders may be vulnerable to being disenfranchised from important discussions concerning military activities. The study of ecological issues associated with sustaining a military footprint may be particularly useful for informing the global debate that pits strict conservation against human well-being. PMID:24567778

  18. Dermatology aboard the USNS COMFORT: Disaster relief operations in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake.

    PubMed

    Galeckas, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    On the 12th of January 2010, Haiti was struck by a 7.0 Richter magnitude earthquake that devastated its already fragile capital region. Approximately 230,000 people died immediately or during ensuing weeks, mostly due to acute trauma. Countless others suffered significant life- or limb-threatening injuries. As a part of the United States' response to this tragedy, eventually named Operation Unified Response, the United States Navy deployed hundreds of physicians and other medical response individuals on a hospital ship. Operation Unified Response was a military joint task force operation augmented by governmental and nongovernmental organizations. Its mission was to bring medical and logistical support to the region.

  19. Continued growth for military PAs.

    PubMed

    Salyer, Steven W

    2002-10-01

    The US military physician assistant (PA) originated from the corpsmen and medics of the army, navy, air force, and Coast Guard. PAs have been present in every military campaign since 1980 and serve in a wide variety of medical roles. Their combat role has expanded so that in many instances the PA has replaced the physician as the front-line care provider. All have moved from warrant officer into the commissioned officer ranks, a change that has enabled them to rise into command and administrative positions. Narrowing of the pay differential between military and civilian PAs has contributed to their retention.

  20. Military laser weapons: current controversies.

    PubMed

    Seet, B; Wong, T Y

    2001-09-01

    Military laser weapons systems are becoming indispensable in most modern armies. These lasers have undergone many stages of development, and have outpaced research on eye protection measures, which continue to have inherent limitations. Eye injuries caused by military lasers are increasingly reported, leading to speculation that these would become an important cause of blinding in modern conflicts. As part of the effort to ban inhumane weapons, international laws have been passed to restrict the proliferation of such blinding weapons. However, there are controversies concerning the interpretation, implementation and effectiveness of these laws. The ophthalmic community can play a greater role in highlighting ocular morbidity from military lasers, and in preventing their further proliferation.

  1. Ceramic joints

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Bradley J.; Patten, Jr., Donald O.

    1991-01-01

    Butt joints between materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion are prepared having a reduced probability of failure of stress facture. This is accomplished by narrowing/tapering the material having the lower coefficient of thermal expansion in a direction away from the joint interface and not joining the narrow-tapered surface to the material having the higher coefficient of thermal expansion.

  2. Expanding role for autonomy in military space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. D.; Gajewski, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is currently transferring satellite on-board autonomy technology to the USAF for use in military spacecraft as a means of lowering the ground support requirements. The techniques were proven on the Viking and Voyager spacecraft and permitted on-board fault detection and correction. New military satellites will incorporate an autonomous redundancy and maintenance management subsystem in an on-board computer, while the system will still be subject to ground-based safing commands for situations demanding deeper analyses. A level 5 autonomy will need 256 kb memory, 10 Mb nonvolatile data storage and 50 W power and will weigh 20 kg. Systems will be periodically checked and compared with an ideal in the data base. Deviations detected will result in a rollback and redundant examination by two microprocessors, which can initiate correction commands until operational criteria are met. The development of the expert systems to the point that they satisfy military specifications is expected to take 10 yr.

  3. Epidemiology of U.K. military burns.

    PubMed

    Foster, Mark Anthony; Moledina, Jamil; Jeffery, Steve L A

    2011-01-01

    The authors review the etiology of U.K. military burns in light of increasing hybrid warfare. Analysis of the nature of these injured personnel will provide commanders with the evidence to plan for on-going and future operations. Case notes of all U.K. Armed Forces burn injured patients who were evacuated to the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine were reviewed. Demographics, burn severity, pattern, and mortality details were included. There were 134 U.K. military personnel with burns requiring return to the United Kingdom during 2001-2007. The median age was 27 (20-62) years. Overall, 60% of burns seen were "accidental." Burning waste, misuse or disrespect of fuel, and scalds were the most prevalent noncombat burns. Areas commonly burned were the face, legs, and hands. During 2006-2007 in the two major conflicts, more than 59% (n = 36) of the burned patients evacuated to the United Kingdom were injured during combat. Burns sustained in combat represent 5.8% of all combat casualties and were commonly associated with other injuries. Improvised explosive device, minestrike, and rocket-propelled grenade were common causes. The mean TBSA affected for both groups was 5% (1-70). The majority of combat burn injuries have been small in size. Greater provision of flame retardant equipment and clothing may reduce the extent and number of combat burns in the future. The numbers of noncombat burns are being reduced by good military discipline. PMID:21422938

  4. A vision of network-centric military communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, Ross, Jr.; Burbank, Jack; Nichols, Robert, Jr.

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents a vision for a future capability-based military communications system that considers user requirements. Historically, the military has developed and fielded many specialized communications systems. While these systems solved immediate communications problems, they were not designed to operate with other systems. As information has become more important to the execution of war, the "stove-pipe" nature of the communications systems deployed by the military is no longer acceptable. Realizing this, the military has begun the transformation of communications to a network-centric communications paradigm. However, the specialized communications systems were developed in response to the widely varying environments related to military communications. These environments, and the necessity for effective communications within these environments, do not disappear under the network-centric paradigm. In fact, network-centric communications allows for one message to cross many of these environments by transiting multiple networks. The military would also like one communications approach that is capable of working well in multiple environments. This paper presents preliminary work on the creation of a framework that allows for a reconfigurable device that is capable of adapting to the physical and network environments. The framework returns to the Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) architecture with the addition of a standardized intra-layer control interface for control information exchange, a standardized data interface and a proposed device architecture based on the software radio.

  5. The Military and the Transition to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelty, Ryan; Kleykamp, Meredith; Segal, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Ryan Kelty, Meredith Kleykamp, and David Segal examine the effect of military service on the transition to adulthood. They highlight changes since World War II in the role of the military in the lives of young adults, focusing especially on how the move from a conscription to an all-volunteer military has changed the way military service affects…

  6. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military...

  7. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military...

  8. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military...

  9. Changing Families in a Changing Military System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Edna J., Ed.

    Recently, the military system has begun to feel the impact of the military family. Whenever sudden dramatic changes or transitions occur, crises may result either for the individual or for the institution. At present both the military system and the military family are in a period of rapid transition. Perhaps one of the most important changes that…

  10. Satellite Power System (SPS) military implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    The military implications of the reference satellite power system (SPS) were examined is well as important military related study tasks. Primary areas of investigation were the potential of the SPS as a weapon, for supporting U.S. military preparedness, and for affecting international relations. In addition, the SPS's relative vulnerability to overt military action, terrorist attacks, and sabotage was considered.

  11. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health > The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Main Content Title: The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Description: The temporomandibular joint connects the lower ...

  12. Family housing metering test. A test program to determine the feasibility of installing utility meters in military family housing, developing energy ceilings, and operating a penalty billing system for occupants who overconsume energy. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Appendices: Feasibility Study of Utility Metering for Family Housing Units at Public Works Center, Great Lakes, Illinois; Photographs Showing Meter Reading Problems and Typical Meter Installations; Family Housing Survey; Family Housing Mock Utility Billing System User Manual; Analyses of Familiy Housing Norms; The Utility Norm Analysis Task of the Energy Conservation Program; ADP Portion of the Billing System; Occupant Guide to the Military Family Housing Utility Billing Test; NAVFAC Utility Billing System Study; PACNAVFACENGCOM Audit Report; Alternative Strategies for Optimizing Energy Supply, Distribution, and Consumption Systems on Naval Bases; Energy Conservation Attitudes and Behaviors of Navy Family Housing Residents; and The Corry Kil-A-Watt Newsletter.

  13. MODELING UNDERGROUND STRUCTURE VULNERABILITY IN JOINTED ROCK

    SciTech Connect

    R. SWIFT; D. STEEDMAN

    2001-02-01

    The vulnerability of underground structures and openings in deep jointed rock to ground shock attack is of chief concern to military planning and security. Damage and/or loss of stability to a structure in jointed rock, often manifested as brittle failure and accompanied with block movement, can depend significantly on jointed properties, such as spacing, orientation, strength, and block character. We apply a hybrid Discrete Element Method combined with the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics approach to simulate the MIGHTY NORTH event, a definitive high-explosive test performed on an aluminum lined cylindrical opening in jointed Salem limestone. Representing limestone with discrete elements having elastic-equivalence and explicit brittle tensile behavior and the liner as an elastic-plastic continuum provides good agreement with the experiment and damage obtained with finite-element simulations. Extending the approach to parameter variations shows damage is substantially altered by differences in joint geometry and liner properties.

  14. Accommodation of COTS LCDs in military displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, James B.; Henz, James M.; Dodd, Sonia R.

    1998-09-01

    Commercial off the shelf (COTS) liquid crystal displays are attractive as an alternative to LCDs that are custom designed and manufactured for the military environment. Commercial displays require significant modification to accommodate their use. This paper describes specific modifications that create a thermal cocoon around a nominal 3.6 X 4.6-inch commercial industrial/automotive display. The thermal design techniques allow the display to function in the particularly challenging F-16 thermal environment without exceeding the display's operating specification. The work is extended to examine what additional design extensions are required for still larger displays.

  15. Pre- and post-operative comorbidities in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome: cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis of the thumb, and trigger digit.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Gong, H S; Lee, H J; Lee, Y H; Rhee, S H; Baek, G H

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 633 hands in 362 patients who had idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome and underwent carpal tunnel release between 1999 and 2009. Electrophysiological studies and simple radiographs of the wrist, cervical spine, and basal joint of the thumb were routinely checked, and patients were also assessed for the presence of trigger digit or de Quervain's disease before and after surgery. Among 362 patients, cervical arthritis was found in 253 patients (70%), and C5-C6 arthritis was the most common site. Basal joint arthritis of the thumb was observed in 216 (34%) of the 633 hands. Trigger digit or de Quervain's disease was observed in 85 of the 633 hands (13%) before surgery, and developed in 67 hands (11%) after surgery. Cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis, and trigger digit commonly coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Patient education about these disorders is very important when they coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

  16. Battlefield ethics training: integrating ethical scenarios in high-intensity military field exercises

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Megan M.; Jetly, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that modern missions have added stresses and ethical complexities not seen in previous military operations and that there are links between battlefield stressors and ethical lapses. Military ethicists have concluded that the ethical challenges of modern missions are not well addressed by current military ethics educational programs. Integrating the extant research in the area, we propose that scenario-based operational ethics training in high-intensity military field training settings may be an important adjunct to traditional military ethics education and training. We make the case as to why this approach will enhance ethical operational preparation for soldiers, supporting their psychological well-being as well as mission effectiveness. PMID:25206947

  17. Military applications of the laser weapons in the future battlefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Hasan; Adana, Saban; Yahsi, Erhan

    2013-05-01

    Contemporary operating environment requires a wide range of tools to respond to a myriad of regular and irregular threats. Accordingly, conventional weapons do not suffice in some cases. As technology improves exponentially, the dominance of conventional weapons is slowly fading away by the advances in laser technology. This study first outlines the characteristics of laser weapons, then provides the military applications of them in land, maritime, air and space domains and finally exhibits implications for battlefield functions. This study concludes that any country that is seeking primacy in military terms must allocate extra time and resources to obtain this emerging technology. Since it seems that there are not adequate studies about the military applications and operational concepts of the laser weapons, this study tries to increase awareness about their potential advantages.

  18. Effect of Heat Input Pulse on the Structure and Properties of Welded Joints of Steels Ferritic-Pearlitic Class, Operating Under Low-Frequency Temperature-Force Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Y. N.; Bezborodov, V. P.; Putilova, E. A.

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the influence of the modes of adaptive pulse-arc welding and surfacing on the structure and physical-mechanical properties of welded joints of steel 09Mn2Si and the surfaced composition of this steel coated with modified powder material of chromium carbide with the submicrocrystalline structure. It is shown that the pulsed mode of welding and surfacing can improve the homogeneity of the structure of the welded joint of steel and surfaced coating and reduce the grain size of metals in both of them. Structural changes lead to the increase in ductility and toughness of the weld metal.

  19. A research note about military-civilian humanitarianism: more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Weiss, T G

    1997-06-01

    'Military-civilian humanitarianism'--or the coming together of military forces and civilian aid agencies to deal with the human suffering from complex emergencies--has numerous forms, but disenchantment has resulted from the Somalia and Bosnia syndromes. There is little political will at present, but evidence from the immediate post-Cold War era suggests how multilateral military operations could expand or contract in future to the benefit or peril of war victims. Partly a literature review but more importantly a framework for interpreting recent publications, this essay seeks to move beyond exchanging assertions. There is a contextualisation of recent literature; a definition of military-civilian humanitarianism; a discussion of possible military contributions to humanitarian action; a framework to assess the effectiveness of military-civilian humanitarianism; and a preliminary analysis of experience from northern Iraq, Somalia, Bosnia, Rwanda and Haiti. Caveat lector: At this point in time, there are still 'more questions than answers'. PMID:9235222

  20. Factors that affect mosquito bite prevention from permethrin-treated US military combat uniforms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historically, casualties from diseases have greatly outnumbered those from combat during military operations. Since 1951, US military combat uniforms have been chemically treated to protect personnel from arthropod attack. In the 1970s and 1980s, permethrin was one of several insecticides evaluate...

  1. Health Services Management Education On-Site at a Military Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stephen J.; Poss, W. Bradley; Cupp, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A cooperative educational program with the U.S. military is described to illustrate a unique opportunity that confronted a graduate healthcare management program. The resulting degree program supported the military's operational medical mission but also presented interesting and unexpected challenges resulting from the wars in Iraq and…

  2. Structuring managed care joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Williams, L

    1995-08-01

    Providers that undertake joint ventures to secure managed care contracts must understand the important governance, operational, legal, and political issues involved. Careful planning in all these areas can help ensure that the joint venture will meet its goals and avoid problems such as inappropriately negotiated contracts and legal violations.

  3. Compliant joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Wayne D. (Inventor); Kerley, James J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A compliant joint is provided for prosthetic and robotic devices which permits rotation in three different planes. The joint provides for the controlled use of cable under motion. Perpendicular outer mounting frames are joined by swaged cables that interlock at a center block. Ball bearings allow for the free rotation of the second mounting frame relative to the first mounting frame within a predetermined angular rotation that is controlled by two stop devices. The cables allow for compliance at the stops and the cables allow for compliance in six degrees of freedom enabling the duplication or simulation of the rotational movement and flexibility of a natural hip or knee joint, as well as the simulation of a joint designed for a specific robotic component for predetermined design parameters.

  4. Joint Commission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sunday 1:00 CST, November 6, 2016 Workplace Violence Prevention Resources The Joint Commission has launched “Workplace Violence Prevention Resources,” an online resource center dedicated to ...

  5. Joint Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankles and toes. Other types of arthritis include gout or pseudogout. Sometimes, there is a mechanical problem ... for more information on osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and gout. How Common are Joint Problems? Osteoarthritis, which affects ...

  6. Economic conditions of military families.

    PubMed

    Hosek, James; Wadsworth, Shelley MacDermid

    2013-01-01

    For military children and their families, the economic news is mostly good. After a period of steady pay increases, James Hosek and Shelley MacDermid Wadsworth write, service members typically earn more than civilians with a comparable level of education. Moreover, they receive many other benefits that civilians often do not, including housing allowances, subsidized child care, tuition assistance, and top-of-the-line comprehensive health care. Of course, service members tend to work longer hours than civilians do, and they are exposed to hazards that civilians rarely, if ever, face. The extra pay they receive when they are deployed to combat zones helps their families cope financially but cannot alleviate the stress. Though service members are relatively well paid, the military lifestyle takes a toll on the earnings of their spouses. Chiefly because the military requires service members to move frequently, spouses' careers are regularly interrupted, and employers are hesitant to offer them jobs that require a large investment in training or a long learning curve. More military spouses than comparable civilian spouses are either unemployed or work fewer hours than they would like, and military spouses overall tend to earn less than their civilian counterparts. Despite the military's relatively high pay, some service members and their families--particularly among the junior enlisted ranks--report financial distress, and a handful even qualify for food stamps. Moreover, precisely because military pay tends to be higher than civilian pay, families may see a drop in income when a service member leaves the armed forces. Finally, the pay increases of recent years have slowed, and force cutbacks are coming; both of these factors will alter the financial picture for service members, possibly for the worse. PMID:25518691

  7. The Effects of Load Carriage and Muscle Fatigue on Lower-Extremity Joint Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, He; Frame, Jeff; Ozimek, Elicia; Leib, Daniel; Dugan, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Military personnel are commonly afflicted by lower-extremity overuse injuries. Load carriage and muscular fatigue are major stressors during military basic training. Purpose: To examine effects of load carriage and muscular fatigue on lower-extremity joint mechanics during walking. Method: Eighteen men performed the following tasks: unloaded…

  8. JELC-LITE: Unconventional Instructional Design for Special Operations Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Current special operations staff training is based on the Joint Event Life Cycle (JELC). It addresses operational level tasks in multi-week, live military exercises which are planned over a 12 to 18 month timeframe. As the military experiences changing global mission sets, shorter training events using distributed technologies will increasingly be needed to augment traditional training. JELC-Lite is a new approach for providing relevant training between large scale exercises. This new streamlined, responsive training model uses distributed and virtualized training technologies to establish simulated scenarios. It keeps proficiency levels closer to optimal levels -- thereby reducing the performance degradation inherent in periodic training. It can be delivered to military as well as under-reached interagency groups to facilitate agile, repetitive training events. JELC-Lite is described by four phases paralleling the JELC, differing mostly in scope and scale. It has been successfully used with a Theater Special Operations Command and fits well within the current environment of reduced personnel and financial resources.

  9. Operation DOMINIC II, Shots LITTLE FELLER II, JOHNIE BOY, SMALL BOY, LITTLE FELLER I, 7 July-17 July 1962. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ponton, J.; Maag, C.; Rohrer, S.; Shepanek, R.

    1983-01-31

    This report describes the activities of an estimated 3,000 DOD personnel, both military and civilian, in Operation DOMINIC II, the eighth peacetime series of nuclear weapons tests, conducted in Nevada from 7 July through 17 July 1962. Activities engaging DOD personnel included the Exercise IVY FLATS troop maneuver, joint DASA and AEC scientific experiments to evaluate the effects of the nuclear devices, and air support.

  10. MilitaryKidsConnect: Web-based prevention services for military children.

    PubMed

    Blasko, Kelly A

    2015-08-01

    Military children often present with psychological health concerns related to their experience of deployments, reintegration, and frequent moves common in military life. MilitaryKidsConnect is a Department of Defense (DoD) Web site designed to enhance the coping of military children in the context of their military life experience. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of the Web site as a resource that provides psychoeducation, coping strategies, and peer support to military children. PMID:26213795

  11. Military Apprenticeships in the US: An Implementation Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Devlin; Lerman, Robert I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Apprenticeships in the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, which operate under the United Services Military Apprenticeship Program (USMAP), now account for about 20 percent of all registered apprentices in the USA. The purpose of this paper is to draw on interviews and focus groups to examine the strengths and limitations of USMAP,…

  12. U.S. Army Corrosion Office's storage and quality requirements for military MEMS program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III; Skelton, D. R.

    2007-04-01

    As the Army transforms into a more lethal, lighter and agile force, the technologies that support these systems must decrease in size while increasing in intelligence. Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are one such technology that the Army and DOD will rely on heavily to accomplish these objectives. Conditions for utilization of MEMS by the military are unique. Operational and storage environments for the military are significantly different than those found in the commercial sector. Issues unique to the military include; high G-forces during gun launch, extreme temperature and humidity ranges, extended periods of inactivity (20 years plus) and interaction with explosives and propellants. The military operational environments in which MEMS will be stored or required to function are extreme and far surpass any commercial operating conditions. Security and encryption are a must for all MEMS communication, tracking, or data reporting devices employed by the military. Current and future military applications of MEMS devices include safety and arming devices, fuzing devices, various guidance systems, sensors/detectors, inertial measurement units, tracking devices, radio frequency devices, wireless Radio Frequency Identifications (RFIDs) and network systems, GPS's, radar systems, mobile base systems and information technology. MEMS embedded into these weapons systems will provide the military with new levels of speed, awareness, lethality, and information dissemination. The system capabilities enhanced by MEMS will translate directly into tactical and strategic military advantages.

  13. Military space station implications. Study project

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, G.D.; Skirvin, G.D.; Wilson, G.R.

    1987-03-23

    Justifying the relevancy of a Manned Military Space Station (MMSS) and subsequently proposing its deployment to capitalize upon the United States' national security interests is the essence and purpose of this group study project. The MMSS is intended to perform a two-fold purpose: (1) facilitate military peacetime operations while simultaneously supporting and promoting civilian space initiatives; and, (2) act as a force multiplier for space and terrestrial force operations in the event of conventional, theater nuclear, and/or strategic nuclear war. Data to support the future value of the MMSS was obtained from individual and group research using unclassified sources such as professional journals, books, US Air Force Staff College reference material, and information from the US Air Force space coordinating staff in Washington, DC. The importance of space to our future and especially of a MMSS by America's national leaders and its people has yet to be fully appreciated and/or realized. The significance of space and its nexus to the United States' national security has been growing dramatically in importance since the launching of the Sputnik in 1957 by Russian. Space, as the forth dimension, cannot and should not be understated in importance as it relates to commercialism, deterrence to war, and to the stability of world order.

  14. 32 CFR 536.77 - Applicable law for claims under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) The United States will only be liable for the portion of loss or damage attributable to the fault of the United States or its employees. Joint and several liability is inapplicable. (v) No allowance will... ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military...

  15. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education. Builders School, Ceramic Tile Setting 3-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, for individualized or group instruction on ceramic tile setting, was developed from military sources for use in vocational education. The course provides students with skills in mortar preparation, surface preparation, tile layout planning, tile setting, tile cutting, and the grouting of tile joints. Both theory and shop assignments…

  16. Environmental Space Situational Awareness and Joint Space Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, K.; France, M.

    It is well known that successful military operations rely on our ability to effectively integrate weather information into the planning and execution of land, air and sea operations. What is not so well known are the implications of environmental effects on space capabilities and the subsequent impact on the delivery of joint space effects to the warfighter. This paper provides an overview of the how space systems and missions are impacted by the environment and how AFSPC plans to effectively integrate environmental effects information into space operations in the context of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and delivery of space effects to the warfighter. The desired end state of environmental SSA is the effective application of environmental SSA information-that is, to mitigate negative impacts on and improve performance of our space systems, and exploit potential space environment impacts on enemy systems. SSA is foundational to the success of the space superiority mission and effectively characterizing environmental effects is a critical part of that foundation. Space superiority operations ensure the continued delivery of space force enhancement to the military campaign, while denying those same advantages to the enemy. When SSA is successfully and sufficiently achieved, example results are a maintenance of space superiority, reduced "Fog of War" for commanders, lowered risk of space fratricide, rapid assessment of attacks on all blue, gray, or red space systems, and a shortened kill chain and targeting cycle. From a Defensive Counterspace (DCS) perspective, confirming or eliminating the environment as a factor enables us to respond in a much more effective way to protect our systems. From an offensive perspective, superior knowledge provides potential to exploit environmental effects on enemy space capabilities. To achieve a credible environmental SSA capability requires a system of systems (SoS) approach that includes three system components. Like a three

  17. A Call to Duty: Educational Policy and School Reform Addressing the Needs of Children from Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esqueda, Monica Christina; Astor, Ron Avi; De Pedro, Kris M. Tunac

    2012-01-01

    More than 90% of the nation's 1.2 million military children attend civilian-operated public schools. Education researchers, however, often overlook the educational experiences and needs of military children attending civilian-operated public schools (i.e., schools that are administered by and under the purview of local education agencies). This…

  18. Department of Defense Joint Robotics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscano, Michael

    1999-07-01

    The goal of the Joint Robotics Program (JRP) is to develop and field a family of unmanned ground vehicle systems for a range of military applications in accordance with user requirements. The program's structure calls for fielding first generation systems, maturing requisite technology and upgrading capabilities in an evolutionary manner. In the near term, acquisition programs emphasize teleoperation for battlefield environments, more autonomous functioning for structured environments, and extensive opportunities for users to operate UGVs. Semi-autonomous mobility in unstructured environments is the main thrust of the JRP technology base. Recent successes with prototypical countermine systems in Bosnia, as well as soldiers' and Marines' experimentation with reconnaissance unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) have led to an explosion of requirements in other mission areas. Users are developing requirements for UGVs that: convoy with manned vehicles; carry and deliver supplies; carry and employ weapons; can be carried in a backpack and reconnoiter inside multi-story buildings. The JRP has made considerable progress over its ten year existence, and is poised to provide our Armed Forces with a 'leap-ahead' capability in the 21st Century.

  19. Department of Defense Joint Robotics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscano, Michael

    2000-07-01

    The objective of the Joint Robotics Program (JRP) is to conduct research, development, acquisition and fielding within the domain of unmanned ground vehicle systems for a wide range of military applications. The program is structured to field first generation systems, mature promising technologies and then upgrade capabilities by means of an evolutionary strategy. In the near term, acquisition programs emphasize teleoperation over diverse terrain, more autonomous functioning for structured environments, and extensive opportunities for users to operate UGV's. Autonomous mobility in unstructured environments i sthe main thrust of the JRP technology base. Recently, the Demo III program held a highly successful demonstration of autonomous mobility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD. Other successes with prototypical countermine systems in Bosnia, as well as soldiers' and Marines' experimentation with reconnaissance unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) continue to engender requirements in other areas. Users are developing requirements for UGGVs that convoy with manned vehicles; carry and deliver supplies; carry and employ weapons; can be carried in a backpack and conduct reconnaissance inside multi-story buildings. The overall progress of the JRP is reflected in the fact that Services have identified procurement funding to buy UGVs. The author will update the conference on the considerable progress of the JRP, which is preparing to provide our Armed Forces with a lead-ahead capability for the 21st Century.

  20. Military Career Guide: Employment and Training Opportunities in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Military Entrance Processing Command (DOD), North Chicago, IL.

    This copiously illustrated guide is a single reference source for the diverse employment and training opportunities in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. It is divided into two major sections. The first section contains descriptions of 134 enlisted military occupations and provides information regarding the aptitudes needed…

  1. 49 CFR 192.233 - Miter joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Miter joints. 192.233 Section 192.233... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.233 Miter joints. (a) A miter joint on steel pipe to be operated at a pressure that produces a hoop stress of...

  2. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the leg in the military.

    PubMed

    Dunn, John C; Waterman, Brian R

    2014-10-01

    CECS is a common source of lower extremity disability among young athletic cohorts and military personnel. The five cardinal symptoms are pain, tightness, cramps, weakness, and diminished sensation. History and clinical examination remain the hallmarks for identifying CECS, although ICP measurements during exercise stress testing may be used to confirm diagnosis. Nonsurgical management is generally unsuccessful, although gait retraining may have benefits in selected individuals. When conservative measures have failed, operative management may be considered with fascial release of all affected compartments. Although clinical success has been documented in civilian cohorts, the results of surgical treatment in military service members have been far less reliable. Only approximately half of the military service members experience complete resolution of symptoms and at least 25% are unable to return to full duty. PMID:25280617

  3. Promoting Behavior-Based Energy Efficiency in Military Housing

    SciTech Connect

    AH McMakin; EL Malone; RE Lundgren

    1999-09-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) helps agencies reduce the cost of doing business through energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of solar and other renewable energy. As a large energy user, the U.S. military has been one of the government sectors of focus. Several military installations have shown substantial energy savings in past years. Most of these efficiency projects, however, have focused primarily on physical upgrades, technologies, and purchasing habits. Furthermost projects have focused on administrative and operational areas of energy use. Military residential housing, in particular, has received little formal attention for energy efficiency involving behaviors of the residents themselves. Behavior-based change is a challenging, but potentially fruitful area for energy conservation programs. However, behavioral change involves links with values, social networks and organizations, and new ways of thinking about living patterns. This handbook attempts to fill a gap by offering guidance for promoting such efforts.

  4. Influence of Military Training and Standardized Nutrition in Military Unit on Soldiers' Nutritional Status and Physical Fitness.

    PubMed

    Tomczak, Andrzej; Bertrandt, Jerzy; Kłos, Anna; Kłos, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    Tomczak, A, Bertrandt, J, Kłos, A, and Kłos, K. Influence of military training and standardized nutrition in military unit on soldiers' nutritional status and physical fitness. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2774-2780, 2016-Despite suspension of conscription in Polish Army, trainings of soldiers are still carried out. It is expected that they will be effective and will contribute to obtaining optimum level of psychophysical efficiency that enables fulfillment of military tasks. Total of 60 soldiers took part in the study. During the 9-month military service, soldiers had 200 hours of physical training and basic military training (shooting, drill, anti-chemical training, topography, general tactics, and military equipment operation). The training lasted 8 hours everyday. To assess fitness level, 4 trials were done: long jump, pull-ups, sit-ups, and 1,000 m run. Evaluation of food was based on the analysis of full board menus using the "Tables of composition and nutritional value of food products." Energy value was assessed, and content of basic nutrients was calculated. Assessment of nutritional status was based on anthropometric measurements, such as body height, body mass, and thickness of 4 selected skinfolds. Body height and body mass were the basis for the body mass index calculation. Soldiers serving in the mechanized infantry unit, after completing the training, got better results only in 1,000 m run (from 250.3 to 233.61 seconds). During the research, an average energy value of a daily food ration planned for consumption was 4,504 kcal. This value consisted of 13.2% of energy from protein, 31.9% of energy from fat, and 54.9% from carbohydrates. In the course of military service, percentage of subjects indicating overweight increased from 10.2 to 25.4%.

  5. Increasing military social work knowledge: an evaluation of learning outcomes.

    PubMed

    Forgey, Mary Ann; Young, Sharon L

    2014-02-01

    Service members and veterans face a myriad of health, mental health, and social challenges stemming from the combat and operational stressors experienced during deployment and the challenges ofreintegration to civilian life. To intervene effectively with this population, social workers must be knowledgeable about these issues and the cultural context within which they occur. Although schools of social work across the country are developing course work in military social work, little is known about the learning outcomes of these courses. This article describes a military social work course that was developed to increase student preparedness to work with a military or veteran population and the learning outcomes achieved. Using a quasi-experimental pre-post design, this study compared the learning outcomes of students enrolled in the course with a group of students who had not taken the course. To measure this knowledge, the authors developed a 50-item Military Social Work Knowledge Scale for the study. Significant differences between pre- and posttest scores were found for the social work students enrolled in the course. Specific areas of knowledge that increased for the class participants included knowledge about cultural sensitivity to military populations and knowledge about service and advocacy frameworks.

  6. Dissimilar metals joint evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, M. E.; Apodaca, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    Dissimilar metals tubular joints between 2219-T851 aluminum alloy and 304L stainless steel were fabricated and tested to evaluate bonding processes. Joints were fabricated by four processes: (1) inertia (friction) weldings, where the metals are spun and forced together to create the weld; (2) explosive welding, where the metals are impacted together at high velocity; (3) co-extrusion, where the metals are extruded in contact at high temperature to promote diffusion; and (4) swaging, where residual stresses in the metals after a stretching operation maintain forced contact in mutual shear areas. Fifteen joints of each type were prepared and evaluated in a 6.35 cm (2.50 in.) O.D. size, with 0.32 cm (0.13 in.) wall thickness, and 7.6 cm (3.0 in) total length. The joints were tested to evaluate their ability to withstand pressure cycle, thermal cycle, galvanic corrosion and burst tests. Leakage tests and other non-destructive test techniques were used to evaluate the behavior of the joints, and the microstructure of the bond areas was analyzed.

  7. Analysis of NSTX TF Joint Voltage Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    R, Woolley

    2005-10-07

    This report presents findings of analyses of recorded current and voltage data associated with 72 electrical joints operating at high current and high mechanical stress. The analysis goal was to characterize the mechanical behavior of each joint and thus evaluate its mechanical supports. The joints are part of the toroidal field (TF) magnet system of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) pulsed plasma device operating at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Since there is not sufficient space near the joints for much traditional mechanical instrumentation, small voltage probes were installed on each joint and their voltage monitoring waveforms have been recorded on sampling digitizers during each NSTX ''shot''.

  8. Supporting Students from Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossen, Eric; Carter, Courtney D.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, more than 800,000 parents of school-age children have been deployed by the U.S. military. Many have deployed more than once and for extended periods, often longer than a year. As a result, increasing numbers of students experience significant distress on a daily basis and are at increased risk for behavioral problems, decreased…

  9. Soviet military strategy in space

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.L.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the Soviet military space effort from its infancy in the 1950s to the spy craft and anti-satellite systems of today. It describes in detail the Soviet equivalents of the U.S. Star Wars program and explains technical and political issues in laymen's terms. A full text of major arms control agreements completes the volume.

  10. The Caltech Political Military Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, E. S.; And Others

    The Caltech political military exercise (PME) is a game in which players assume roles of leaders of various countries and attempt to act as they think these leaders would in a time of international crises. The main purposes of the exercise are (1) to provide students with an experience in crisis diplomacy and policy formation, and (2) to provide a…

  11. Literacy Instruction in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Thomas M.

    Despite the fact that military careers require much higher levels of literacy than do comparable civilian careers, the range of literacy levels of enlistees is roughly representative of the abilities found amoung high school graduates. In response to the need to raise the literacy levels of their personnel, the Armed Forces have paid increasing…

  12. Military Deployments: Evaluating Teacher Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed method study examined the possible influence of a military deployment online tutorial on teacher knowledge. DoDEA and public school teachers were the two groups used for the study. From this exploratory study, the researcher also wanted to explore if teachers would find professional development provided in an online tutorial relevant…

  13. Pastoral Care and Counseling with Military Families.

    PubMed

    Moon, Zachary

    2016-06-01

    The complex human experience of military service and the stress suffered by millions of military families each time a loved one deploys present unique challenges and opportunities in providing pastoral care and counseling. War and military service impact many facets of our society, as well as generational and interpersonal relationships. This article speaks to both academic and practitioner communities, and provides a vision for effective pastoral care and counseling with military families drawing on resources from family systems theory. PMID:27281760

  14. Pastoral Care and Counseling with Military Families.

    PubMed

    Moon, Zachary

    2016-06-01

    The complex human experience of military service and the stress suffered by millions of military families each time a loved one deploys present unique challenges and opportunities in providing pastoral care and counseling. War and military service impact many facets of our society, as well as generational and interpersonal relationships. This article speaks to both academic and practitioner communities, and provides a vision for effective pastoral care and counseling with military families drawing on resources from family systems theory.

  15. Obesity and the US Military Family

    PubMed Central

    Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Sbrocco, Tracy; Theim, Kelly R.; Cohen, L. Adelyn; Mackey, Eleanor R.; Stice, Eric; Henderson, Jennifer L.; McCreight, Sarah J.; Bryant, Edny J.; Stephens, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review discusses the current knowledge and future directions regarding obesity within the US military family (i.e., active-duty servicemembers, as well as military spouses, children, retirees, and veterans). The increasing rates of overweight and obesity within the US military adversely impact military readiness, limit recruitment, and place a significant financial burden on the Department of Defense. Design and Methods The following topics are reviewed: 1) The prevalence of and the financial, physical, and psychological costs associated with overweight in military communities; 2) military weight regulations, and challenges faced by the military family related to overweight and disordered eating; 3) the continued need for rigorous program evaluations and new intervention development. Results Overweight and its associated sequelae impact the entire military family. Military families share many similarities with their civilian counterparts, but they face unique challenges (e.g., stress related to deployments and relocations). Although the military has weight management resources, there is an urgent need for rigorous program evaluation and the development of enhanced obesity prevention programs across the lifespan of the military family–several of which are proposed herein. Conclusions Interdisciplinary and collaborative research efforts and team-based interventions will continue to inform understanding of obesity treatment and prevention within military and civilian populations. PMID:23836452

  16. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  17. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  18. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  19. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  20. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  1. Occupations: Military--Civilian Occupational Source Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armed Forces Vocational Testing Group, Universal City, TX.

    Information on enlisted military occupations is offered in the source book to arrive at a comprehensive statement of job tasks in the military service and their similarities to jobs in civilian life. Basic information about five areas of the U.S. military services (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) focuses on their military…

  2. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10...

  3. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter...

  4. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter...

  5. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... CERTAIN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RETIREMENT PROGRAMS Split Benefits § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior...

  6. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter...

  7. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10...

  8. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10...

  9. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... CERTAIN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RETIREMENT PROGRAMS Split Benefits § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior...

  10. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter...

  11. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10...

  12. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter...

  13. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10...

  14. Support for Military Families and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoshmand, Lisa Tsoi; Hoshmand, Andrea L.

    2007-01-01

    This is a call for community psychologists to engage in research, consultation, and program development and evaluation in supporting military families and communities. Barriers to such involvement are identified and discussed. It is argued that the needs of military families and communities cannot be ignored when military and civilian communities…

  15. Suicide and the Military Justice System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lande, Raymond G.

    1992-01-01

    Notes that U.S. military policies emphasize humanitarian approach to issue of suicide, yet military law may view suicidal behavior as deviant and may prosecute suicide attempters. Cites convictions of soldiers for attempted and assisted suicides. Reviews recent court decisions and suggests revisions in military law. (Author/NB)

  16. The Barracks Subculture of Military School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliakov, R. Iu.

    2011-01-01

    The subcultures that develop among military students have a powerful influence on their values and behavior, and in some situations are more influential than the official, military culture. Any attempt to improve levels of discipline in the military cannot afford to ignore these subcultures. [This article was translated by Kim Braithwaite.

  17. US Military Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training Programs and Careers of Military Child Psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Weston, Christina G; Dougherty, Joseph G; Nelson, Suzie C; Baker, Matthew J; Chow, Jennifer C

    2015-08-01

    Military child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) fellowship programs offer educational experiences universal to all civilian training programs in the USA. They also offer unique training opportunities not found in civilian CAP fellowships in order to prepare graduates to serve the needs of military families. Military-specific curricula and exposures prepare trainees to address various issues faced by military families, in contending with frequent military moves, parental deployments, and disrupted social ties. Curricula are also designed to provide the psychiatrist with a greater understanding of the rigors of military service. CAP training and subsequent assignments prepare military psychiatrists for diverse career paths in the military environment. CAP military careers often include duties in addition to treating patients. Administrative roles, academic teaching positions, as well as school consultation positions are all career options available to military CAP.

  18. Laundry joint venture.

    PubMed

    Giancola, D; Voyvodich, M

    1984-12-01

    Many hospitals are concerned about the loss of control which is associated with contracting for linen service. On the the hand, many laundries do not have the resources or experience to serve hospitals in a comprehensive and trouble-free manner. In many communities a joint venture, such as the one described here, can successfully combine the interests of the hospital and laundry communities without causing the hospitals to lose control of the service and without requiring the laundry operator to have detailed knowledge of hospital operations. As more hospitals opt for contract service, and if this service is to be provided at the lowest total cost, the hospitals and the laundries must come to grips with the problems surrounding the laundry-hospital interface. A joint venture, such as that described here, is one way to accomplish this.

  19. Operational Space Weather in USAF Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithtro, C.; Quigley, S.

    2006-12-01

    Most education programs offering space weather courses are understandably and traditionally heavily weighted with theoretical space physics that is the basis for most of what is researched and modeled. While understanding the theory is a good and necessary grounding for anyone working the field of space weather, few military or commercial jobs employ such theory in real-time operations. The operations sites/centers are much more geared toward use of applied theory-resultant models, tools and products. To ensure its operations centers personnel, commanders, real-time system operators and other customers affected by the space environment are educated on available and soon-to-be operational space weather models and products, the USAF has developed applicable course/lecture material taught at various institutions to include the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) and the Joint Weather Training Complex (335th/TRS/OUA). Less frequent training of operational space weather is available via other venues that will be discussed, and associated course material is also being developed for potential use at the National Security Space Institute (NSSI). This presentation provides an overview of the programs, locations, courses and material developed and/or taught by or for USAF personnel dealing with operational space weather. It also provides general information on student research project results that may be used in operational support, along with observations regarding logistical and professional benefits of teaching such non-theoretical/non-traditional material.

  20. The DoD Joint Pathology Center as a Resource for Researchers.

    PubMed

    Butler, David A; Baker, Thomas P

    2015-10-01

    The Department of Defense's Joint Pathology Center (JPC) is the world's largest collection of human pathology specimens, comprising some 7.4 million accessions. The biorepository, which began during the Civil War as a collection of materials obtained from medical and surgical procedures performed by Army physicians, houses specimens and associated data obtained for diagnostic purposes. It also holds several collections of specimens from military personnel who shared a common, service-related exposure or medical condition. This article, which is excerpted and adapted from the 2012 Institute of Medicine report "Future Uses of the Department of Defense JPC Biorepository,"1 summarizes information on the repository, its past uses, and the future operational issues and challenges that the JPC faces as it develops a concept of operations that will allow it to move forward as a resource for researchers. PMID:26444897

  1. Military parachuting injuries: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C; Craig, S C

    1999-01-01

    This article is a literature review of the aspects of military parachuting related to occupational medicine and focuses on 'conventional' military static line parachuting using a round parachute. The analysis of injuries resulting from military parachuting provide an excellent example of military occupational medicine practice. The techniques of military parachuting are described in order to illustrate the potential mechanisms of injury, and a number of 'classical' parachuting injuries are described. Finally some recommendations are made for the recording of parachute injuries which would assist in the international comparison of injury rates and anatomical distribution. PMID:10451583

  2. Use of Dynamic Models and Operational Architecture to Solve Complex Navy Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grande, Darby; Black, J. Todd; Freeman, Jared; Sorber, TIm; Serfaty, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The United States Navy established 8 Maritime Operations Centers (MOC) to enhance the command and control of forces at the operational level of warfare. Each MOC is a headquarters manned by qualified joint operational-level staffs, and enabled by globally interoperable C41 systems. To assess and refine MOC staffing, equipment, and schedules, a dynamic software model was developed. The model leverages pre-existing operational process architecture, joint military task lists that define activities and their precedence relations, as well as Navy documents that specify manning and roles per activity. The software model serves as a "computational wind-tunnel" in which to test a MOC on a mission, and to refine its structure, staffing, processes, and schedules. More generally, the model supports resource allocation decisions concerning Doctrine, Organization, Training, Material, Leadership, Personnel and Facilities (DOTMLPF) at MOCs around the world. A rapid prototype effort efficiently produced this software in less than five months, using an integrated process team consisting of MOC military and civilian staff, modeling experts, and software developers. The work reported here was conducted for Commander, United States Fleet Forces Command in Norfolk, Virginia, code N5-0LW (Operational Level of War) that facilitates the identification, consolidation, and prioritization of MOC capabilities requirements, and implementation and delivery of MOC solutions.

  3. Operations other than war: Requirements for analysis tools research report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D.S. III

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the research effort to determine the requirements for new or improved analysis tools to support decisions at the strategic and operational levels for military Operations Other than War (OOTW). The work was performed for the Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Command (USCINCPAC). The data collection was based on workshops attended by experts in OOTWs: analysis personnel from each of the Combatant Commands, the Services, the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), the Joint Staff, and other knowledgeable personnel. Further data were gathered from other workshops and conferences and from the literature. The results of this research begin with the creation of a taxonomy of OOTWs: categories of operations, attributes of operations, and tasks requiring analytical support. The tasks are connected to the Joint Staff`s Universal Joint Task List (UJTL). Historical OOTWs are analyzed to produce frequency distributions by category and responsible CINC. The analysis products are synthesized into a list of requirements for analytical tools and definitions of the requirements. The report concludes with a timeline or roadmap for satisfying the requirements.

  4. Chemical Ingredients of Cordyceps militaris

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms, including Cordyceps militaris, have received attention in Korea because of their biological activities. In the fruiting body and in corpus of C. militaris, the total free amino acid content was 69.32 mg/g and 14.03 mg/g, respectively. In the fruiting body, the most abundant amino acids were lysine, glutamic acid, proline and threonine. The fruiting body was rich in unsaturated fatty acids, which comprised about 70% of the total fatty acids. The most abundant unsaturated acid was linoleic acid. There were differences in adenosine and cordycepin contents between the fruiting body and the corpus. The adenosine concentration was 0.18% in the fruiting body and 0.06% in the corpus, and the cordycepin concentration was 0.97% in the fruiting body and 0.36% in the corpus. PMID:23997632

  5. Military vaccines in today's environment.

    PubMed

    Schmaljohn, Connie S; Smith, Leonard A; Friedlander, Arthur M

    2012-08-01

    The US military has a long and highly distinguished record of developing effective vaccines against pathogens that threaten the armed forces. Many of these vaccines have also been of significant benefit to civilian populations around the world. The current requirements for force protection include vaccines against endemic disease threats as well as against biological warfare or bioterrorism agents, to include novel or genetically engineered threats. The cost of vaccine development and the modern regulatory requirements for licensing vaccines have strained the ability of the program to maintain this broad mission. Without innovative vaccine technologies, streamlined regulatory strategies, and coordinating efforts for use in civilian populations where appropriate, the military vaccine development program is in jeopardy. PMID:22854669

  6. Organizational commitment of military physicians.

    PubMed

    Demir, Cesim; Sahin, Bayram; Teke, Kadir; Ucar, Muharrem; Kursun, Olcay

    2009-09-01

    An individual's loyalty or bond to his or her employing organization, referred to as organizational commitment, influences various organizational outcomes such as employee motivation, job satisfaction, performance, accomplishment of organizational goals, employee turnover, and absenteeism. Therefore, as in other sectors, employee commitment is crucial also in the healthcare market. This study investigates the effects of organizational factors and personal characteristics on organizational commitment of military physicians using structural equation modeling (SEM) on a self-report, cross-sectional survey that consisted of 635 physicians working in the 2 biggest military hospitals in Turkey. The results of this study indicate that professional commitment and organizational incentives contribute positively to organizational commitment, whereas conflict with organizational goals makes a significantly negative contribution to it. These results might help develop strategies to increase employee commitment, especially in healthcare organizations, because job-related factors have been found to possess greater impact on organizational commitment than personal characteristics. PMID:19780367

  7. Military assistance in complex emergencies: what have we learned since the Kurdish relief effort?

    PubMed

    Sharp, T W; Wightman, J M; Davis, M J; Sherman, S S; Burkle, F M

    2001-01-01

    After the success of relief efforts to the displaced Kurdish population in northern Iraq following the Gulf War, many in the US military and the international relief community saw military forces as critical partners in the response to future complex emergencies (CEs). However, successes in subsequent military involvement in Somalia, Rwanda, the former Yugoslavia, and other CEs proved more elusive and raised many difficult issues. A review of these operations reinforces some basic lessons that must be heeded if the use of military forces in humanitarian relief is to be successful. Each CE is unique, thus, each military mission must be clearly defined and articulated. Armed forces struggle to provide both security and humanitarian relief, particularly when aggressive peace enforcement is required. Significant political and public support is necessary for military involvement and success. Military forces cannot execute humanitarian assistance missions on an ad hoc basis, but must continue to develop doctrine, policy and procedures in this area and adequately train, supply, and equip the units that will be involved in humanitarian relief. Militaries not only must cooperate and coordinate extensively with each other, but also with the governmental and non-governmental humanitarian relief organizations that will be engaged for the long term. PMID:12090199

  8. PRIMUS: autonomous driving robot for military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Ingo

    2000-07-01

    This article describes the government experimental program PRIMUS (PRogram of Intelligent Mobile Unmanned Systems) and the achieved results of phase C demonstrated in summer 1999 on a military prooving ground. In this program there shall be shown the autonomous driving on an unmanned robot in open terrain. The most possible degree of autonomy shall be reached with today's technology to get a platform for different missions. The goal is to release the soldier from high dangerous tasks, to increase the performance and to come to a reduction of personnel and costs with unmanned systems. In phase C of the program two small tracked vehicles (Digitized Wiesel 2, airtransportable by CH53) are used. One as a robot vehicle the other as a command & control system. The Wiesel 2 is configured as a drive by wire-system and therefore well suited for the adaption of control computers. The autonomous detection and avoidance of obstacles in unknown, not cooperative environment is the main task. For navigation and orientation a sensor package is integrated. To detect obstacles the scene in the driving corridor of the robot is scanned 4 times per second by a 3D- Range image camera (LADAR). The measured 3D-range image is converted into a 2D-obstacle map and used as input for calculation of an obstacle free path. The combination of local navigation (obstacle avoidance) and global navigation leads to a collission free driving in open terrain to a predefined goal point with a velocity of up to 25km/h. A contour tracker with a TV-camera as sensor is also implemented which allows to follow contours (e.g. edge of a meadow) or to drive on paved or unpaved roads with a velocity up to 50km/h. In addition to these autonomous driving modes the operator in the command & control station can drive the robot by remote control. All the functions were successfully demonstrated in the summer 1999 on a military prooving ground. During a mission example the robot vehicle covered a distance of several

  9. OLED study for military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barre, F.; Chiquard, A.; Faure, S.; Landais, L.; Patry, P.

    2005-07-01

    The presentation deals with some applications of OLED displays in military optronic systems, which are scheduled by SAGEM DS (Defence and Security). SAGEM DS, one of the largest group in the defence and security market, is currently investigating OLED Technologies for military programs. This technology is close from being chosen for optronic equipment such as future infantry night vision goggles, rifle-sight, or, more generally, vision enhancement systems. Most of those applications requires micro-display with an active matrix size below 1". Some others, such as, for instance, ruggedized flat displays do have a need for higher active matrix size (1,5" to 15"). SAGEM DS takes advantages of this flat, high luminance and emissive technology in highly integrated systems. In any case, many requirements have to be fulfilled: ultra-low power consumption, wide viewing angle, good pixel to pixel uniformity, and satisfactory behaviour in extreme environmental conditions.... Accurate measurements have been achieved at SAGEM DS on some micro display OLEDs and will be detailed: luminance (over 2000 cd/m2 achieved), area uniformity and pixel to pixel uniformity, robustness at low and high temperature (-40°C to +60°C), lifetime. These results, which refer to military requirements, provide a valuable feedback representative of the state of the art OLED performances.

  10. Requirements and applications for robotic servicing of military space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledford, Otto C., Jr.; Bennett, Rodney G.

    1992-01-01

    The utility of on-orbit servicing of spacecraft has been demonstrated by NASA several times using shuttle-based astronaut EVA. There has been interest in utilizing on-orbit servicing for military space systems as well. This interest has been driven by the increasing reliance of all branches of the military upon space-based assets, the growing numbers, complexity, and cost of those assets, and a desire to normalize support policies for space-based operations. Many military satellites are placed in orbits which are unduly hostile for astronaut operations and/or cannot be reached by the shuttle. In addition, some of the projected tasks may involve hazardous operations. This has led to a focus on robotic systems, instead of astronauts, for the basis of projected servicing systems. This paper describes studies and activities which will hopefully lead to on-orbit servicing being one of the tools available to military space systems designers and operators. The utility of various forms of servicing has been evaluated for present and projected systems, critical technologies have been identified, and strategies for the development and insertion of this technology into operational systems have been developed. Many of the projected plans have been adversely affected by budgetary restrictions and evolving architectures, but the fundamental benefits and requirements are well understood. A method of introducing servicing capabilities in a manner which has a low impact on the system designer and does not require the prior development of an expensive infrastructure is discussed. This can potentially lead to an evolutionary implementation of the full technology.

  11. New business with the new military.

    PubMed

    Apgar, Mahlon; Keane, John M

    2004-09-01

    A $200 billion market has appeared on your business horizon, but you may not have noticed it. It's the U.S. military--the new U.S. military. Virtually all aspects of the military are changing to ensure it can fight unpredictable threats while sustaining the infrastructure needed to support and train forces. The military is turning to non-traditional business partners to meet a wide range of needs, from health care to housing to information technology. The Defense Department is yielding its monopoly on every aspect of national security and adopting a more businesslike model in which the military's warfighting capabilities are supported through outsourcing and business alliances. Civilians are replacing military personnel in many noncombat roles. Military functions with corporate equivalents are candidates for outsourcing and privatization. Market standards are replacing the heavy customization that has locked many companies out of this marketplace. The authors have participated in the transformation process from different perspectives--one civilian, the other military. Together, they highlight the prospects that transformation is creating for companies outside the traditional defense industry and reveal paths to success in this complex market. They also present six principles for doing business with the military that require persistence, integrity, and a willingness to master the intricacies of a distinctive culture. By understanding the logic of military transformation, executives can identify and create vast new business opportunities. And by mastering the six principles, they can build profitable long-term relationships. PMID:15449854

  12. New business with the new military.

    PubMed

    Apgar, Mahlon; Keane, John M

    2004-09-01

    A $200 billion market has appeared on your business horizon, but you may not have noticed it. It's the U.S. military--the new U.S. military. Virtually all aspects of the military are changing to ensure it can fight unpredictable threats while sustaining the infrastructure needed to support and train forces. The military is turning to non-traditional business partners to meet a wide range of needs, from health care to housing to information technology. The Defense Department is yielding its monopoly on every aspect of national security and adopting a more businesslike model in which the military's warfighting capabilities are supported through outsourcing and business alliances. Civilians are replacing military personnel in many noncombat roles. Military functions with corporate equivalents are candidates for outsourcing and privatization. Market standards are replacing the heavy customization that has locked many companies out of this marketplace. The authors have participated in the transformation process from different perspectives--one civilian, the other military. Together, they highlight the prospects that transformation is creating for companies outside the traditional defense industry and reveal paths to success in this complex market. They also present six principles for doing business with the military that require persistence, integrity, and a willingness to master the intricacies of a distinctive culture. By understanding the logic of military transformation, executives can identify and create vast new business opportunities. And by mastering the six principles, they can build profitable long-term relationships.

  13. Effect of deployment on the occurrence of child maltreatment in military and nonmilitary families.

    PubMed

    Rentz, E Danielle; Marshall, Stephen W; Loomis, Dana; Casteel, Carri; Martin, Sandra L; Gibbs, Deborah A

    2007-05-15

    War has a profound emotional impact on military personnel and their families, but little is known about how deployment-related stress impacts the occurrence of child maltreatment in military families. This time-series analysis of Texas child maltreatment data from 2000 to 2003 examined changes in the occurrence of child maltreatment in military and nonmilitary families over time and the impact of recent deployment increases. The rate of occurrence of substantiated maltreatment in military families was twice as high in the period after October 2002 (the 1-year anniversary of the September 11th attacks) compared with the period prior to that date (rate ratio = 2.15, 95% confidence interval: 1.85, 2.50). Among military personnel with at least one dependent, the rate of child maltreatment in military families increased by approximately 30% for each 1% increase in the percentage of active duty personnel departing to (rate ratio = 1.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.20, 1.37) or returning from (rate ratio = 1.31, 95% confidence interval: 1.16, 1.48) operation-related deployment. These findings indicate that both departures to and returns from operational deployment impose stresses on military families and likely increase the rate of child maltreatment. Intervention programs should be implemented to mitigate family dysfunction in times of potential stress.

  14. Model describing the effect of employment of the United States military in a complex emergency.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Donald S

    2005-01-01

    The end of the Cold War vastly altered the worldwide political landscape. With the loss of a main competitor, the United States (US) military has had to adapt its strategic, operational, and tactical doctrines to an ever-increasing variety of non-traditional missions, including humanitarian operations. Complex emergencies (CEs) are defined in this paper from a political and military perspective, various factors that contribute to their development are described, and issues resulting from the employment of US military forces are discussed. A model was developed to illustrate the course of a humanitarian emergency and the potential impact of a military response. The US intervention in Haiti, Northern Iraq, Kosovo, Somalia, Bosnia, and Rwanda serve as examples. A CE develops when there is civil conflict, loss of national governmental authority, a mass population movement, and massive economic failure, each leading to a general decline in food security. The military can alleviate a CE in four ways: (1) provide security for relief efforts; (2) enforce negotiated settlements; (3) provide security for non-combatants; and/or (4) employ logistical capabilities. The model incorporates Norton and Miskel's taxonomy of identifying failing states and helps illustrate the factors that lead to a CE. The model can be used to determine if and when military intervention will have the greatest impact. The model demonstrates that early military intervention and mission assignment within the core competencies of the forces can reverse the course of a CE. Further study will be needed to verify the model.

  15. Model describing the effect of employment of the United States military in a complex emergency.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Donald S

    2005-01-01

    The end of the Cold War vastly altered the worldwide political landscape. With the loss of a main competitor, the United States (US) military has had to adapt its strategic, operational, and tactical doctrines to an ever-increasing variety of non-traditional missions, including humanitarian operations. Complex emergencies (CEs) are defined in this paper from a political and military perspective, various factors that contribute to their development are described, and issues resulting from the employment of US military forces are discussed. A model was developed to illustrate the course of a humanitarian emergency and the potential impact of a military response. The US intervention in Haiti, Northern Iraq, Kosovo, Somalia, Bosnia, and Rwanda serve as examples. A CE develops when there is civil conflict, loss of national governmental authority, a mass population movement, and massive economic failure, each leading to a general decline in food security. The military can alleviate a CE in four ways: (1) provide security for relief efforts; (2) enforce negotiated settlements; (3) provide security for non-combatants; and/or (4) employ logistical capabilities. The model incorporates Norton and Miskel's taxonomy of identifying failing states and helps illustrate the factors that lead to a CE. The model can be used to determine if and when military intervention will have the greatest impact. The model demonstrates that early military intervention and mission assignment within the core competencies of the forces can reverse the course of a CE. Further study will be needed to verify the model. PMID:16295164

  16. Acromioclavicular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, J R

    1998-04-01

    The acromioclavicular joint is commonly involved in athletic injuries. Most commonly, a sprain to the joint occurs with variability in the amount of ligamentous damage and displacement that occurs. In all but the most severe dislocations, treatment consists of initial sling immobilization and early functional rehabilitation. The outcome is usually excellent with full return of function following these injuries. The rarer types (IV, V, and VI) require operative reduction and fixation. Distal clavicle fractures are related injuries, which many times disrupt the stabilizing ligaments of the acromioclavicular joint. Many can be treated nonoperatively, but there are several subtypes that should be considered for early fixation to reduce complications of pain and shoulder dysfunction. An atraumatic, overuse condition, which is becoming more prevalent and seems related to weight training, is osteolysis of the distal clavicle. There is insidious onset of shoulder pain with symptoms and signs consistent with acromioclavicular pathology. Activity modification is the best method of controlling symptoms. Failure of the conservative approach necessitates operative excision of the distal clavicle.

  17. Lifting the Veil of Military Secrecy. Study Guide. Episode #723. America's Defense Monitor, Educational TV for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizzo, Claudia

    This program examines the pros and cons of military secrecy in the absence of significant enemies. The United States is still buying weapons and conducting military operations under a veil of secrecy established during the Cold War. Many would argue such secrecy is unnecessary in light of recent world developments. The study guide offers questions…

  18. Residual mosquito barrier treatments on U.S. military camouflage netting in a southern California desert environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treating perimeters of vegetation with residual insecticides for protection from mosquito vectors has potential for U.S. military force health protection. However, for current U.S. military operations in hot-arid environments with little or no vegetation, residual applications on portable artificial...

  19. DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program – Joint Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Don Williams

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation's electrical generation capability.

  20. Dengue fever among U.S. military personnel--Haiti, September-November, 1994.

    PubMed

    1994-11-25

    Since September 19, 1994, approximately 20,000 U. S. military personnel have been deployed to Haiti as part of Operation Uphold Democracy. To monitor the occurrence of mosquitoborne illnesses (including dengue fever [DF] and malaria) among deployed military personnel, on September 19 the U. S. Army established a surveillance system for febrile illness. Before deployment, all military personnel were instructed to take antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, either chloroquine phosphate (500 mg weekly) or doxycycline (100 mg daily). This report summarizes surveillance findings for September 19-November 4.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Swords into plowshares: Military geology and national security projects

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    Military geology and national security projects are often comparable, achieving their rai-son d`etre in support of national goals, military operations, and/or systems-all for vital national interests. The application of Geoscience to these ends, especially engineering geology, has occurred from pole to pole and included every conceivable environment and natural condition. In the conduct of such projects, the Geosciences have advanced, and vice versa. Desert trafficability, most notably regarding playa surfaces, is both temporary and variable and not a persistent condition as some early authors believed. Playas in Australia, Iran, and the US show that saline efflorescence is removed following surface water dissolution and subsequent deflation, resulting in very hard crusts. Magadiite, a hydrous sodium silicate and possible precursor of bedded chert, was first discovered in North America at Alkali Lake, OR, during a military project. Pleistocene Lake Trinity, a small and mostly buried evaporate basin in the northern Jornada del Muerto, NM, was discovered during exploratory drilling in support of a military test program.

  2. Review of mobile health technology for military mental health.

    PubMed

    Shore, Jay H; Aldag, Matt; McVeigh, Francis L; Hoover, Ronald L; Ciulla, Robert; Fisher, Ashley

    2014-08-01

    Mental health problems pose challenges for military veterans, returning service members, and military family members including spouses and children. Challenges to meeting mental health needs include improving access to care and improving quality of care. Mobile Health, or "mHealth," can help meet these needs in the garrison and civilian environments. mHealth brings unique capabilities to health care provision through the use of mobile device technologies. This report identifies high-priority mHealth technology development considerations in two categories. First, priority considerations specific to mental health care provision include safety, privacy, evidence-based practice, efficacy studies, and temperament. Second, priority considerations broadly applicable to mHealth include security, outcomes, ease of use, carrier compliance, hardware, provider perspectives, data volume, population, regulation, command policy, and reimbursement. Strategic planning for the advancement of these priority considerations should be coordinated with stated Department of Defense capability needs to maximize likelihood of adoption. This report also summarizes three leading, military programs focused on mHealth projects in mental health, The Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, The Military Operational Medicine Research Program, United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, and The National Center for Telehealth and Technology.

  3. Review of mobile health technology for military mental health.

    PubMed

    Shore, Jay H; Aldag, Matt; McVeigh, Francis L; Hoover, Ronald L; Ciulla, Robert; Fisher, Ashley

    2014-08-01

    Mental health problems pose challenges for military veterans, returning service members, and military family members including spouses and children. Challenges to meeting mental health needs include improving access to care and improving quality of care. Mobile Health, or "mHealth," can help meet these needs in the garrison and civilian environments. mHealth brings unique capabilities to health care provision through the use of mobile device technologies. This report identifies high-priority mHealth technology development considerations in two categories. First, priority considerations specific to mental health care provision include safety, privacy, evidence-based practice, efficacy studies, and temperament. Second, priority considerations broadly applicable to mHealth include security, outcomes, ease of use, carrier compliance, hardware, provider perspectives, data volume, population, regulation, command policy, and reimbursement. Strategic planning for the advancement of these priority considerations should be coordinated with stated Department of Defense capability needs to maximize likelihood of adoption. This report also summarizes three leading, military programs focused on mHealth projects in mental health, The Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, The Military Operational Medicine Research Program, United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, and The National Center for Telehealth and Technology. PMID:25102529

  4. [Sanitary service of West Special Military District on the eve and in the first days of the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945].

    PubMed

    Shelepov, A M; Ishutin, O S; Leonik, S I

    2011-06-01

    This article evaluates military and political situation in the world and operational-strategic environment on the West Theater of operations on the eve of the Great Patriotic War (1941-1945). We analyze structure and overall condition of sanitary service of West Special Military District of the Workers and Peasants Red Army and causes of failure of mobilization, organization and deployment of military units and establishments from the beginning of aggression of Fascist Germany to the Soviet Union.

  5. [Sanitary service of West Special Military District on the eve and in the first days of the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945].

    PubMed

    Shelepov, A M; Ishutin, O S; Leonik, S I

    2011-06-01

    This article evaluates military and political situation in the world and operational-strategic environment on the West Theater of operations on the eve of the Great Patriotic War (1941-1945). We analyze structure and overall condition of sanitary service of West Special Military District of the Workers and Peasants Red Army and causes of failure of mobilization, organization and deployment of military units and establishments from the beginning of aggression of Fascist Germany to the Soviet Union. PMID:21899072

  6. Essays on strategy: hostage rescue planning; maritime theater nuclear capability; strategic psychological operations

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, R.F.; Thomas, R.E.; Kriesel, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The essays in the volume won recognition in the 1984 Joint Chiefs of Staff Strategy Essay Competition. The volume contains three essays. The author of the first essay considers the requirements for successful planning of hostage rescues, specifically reviewing the Son Tay raid, the Mayaguez crisis, the Entebbe rescue, and the Iranian hostage rescue attempt. The author of the second essay looks at the US Navy's capability for maritime theater nuclear warfare, identifying problems and recommending improvements. The author of the third essay finds the United States lacking a national-level mechanism for coordinating military psychological operations and proposes a way to remedy the problem.

  7. Heavy vehicle automation: transitioning from civilian to military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misener, James A.; Shladover, Steven E.; Empey, Dan; Tan, Han-Shue

    2001-09-01

    We describe potential military robotics applications for the heavy vehicle automation and driver assistance research that has been conducted on at the California Partners for Advanced Transit and Highways (PATH). Specifically, we summarize the state of vehicle automation research at PATH by beginning with a short description of automated platoon operations with eight light duty passenger vehicles. Then we focus on automation of a Class 8 Freightliner Model FLD 125 tractor with 45-ft trailer, and lateral driver assist installed in a 10-wheel International snowplow. We also discuss full automation plans for a Kodiak 4000-ton/hour rotary snowblower, two 40-ft New Flyer buses, one 60-ft New Flyer articulated bus, and three Freightliner Century tractor-trailer combinations. We discuss benefits for civilian applications - congestion relief, driver safety, and fuel economy/emissions reductions. We then follow with a discussion of the benefits from potential military spin-ons which include, as dual-use applications, driver safety and fuel economy/emissions. We end by discussing the additional military benefit in the conduct of tactical resupply operations, where vehicles of similar weight class and performance as those experimented by PATH can be used in automated convoys with savings in manpower and survivability in addition to improved mission operations.

  8. Research on 6R Military Logistics Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Wan; Wen, Wang

    The building of military logistics network is an important issue for the construction of new forces. This paper has thrown out a concept model of 6R military logistics network model based on JIT. Then we conceive of axis spoke y logistics centers network, flexible 6R organizational network, lean 6R military information network based grid. And then the strategy and proposal for the construction of the three sub networks of 6Rmilitary logistics network are given.

  9. Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, S.; Barnett, J.; Burman, K.; Hambrick, J.; Westby, R.

    2010-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) recognizes the strategic importance of energy to its mission, and is working to reduce energy consumption and enhance energy self-sufficiency by drawing on local clean energy sources. A joint initiative formed between DoD and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to address military energy use led to a task force to examine the potential for net zero energy military installations, which would produce as much energy on site as they consume in buildings, facilities, and fleet vehicles. This report presents an assessment and planning process to examine military installations for net zero energy potential. Net Zero Energy Installation Assessment (NZEIA) presents a systematic framework to analyze energy projects at installations while balancing other site priorities such as mission, cost, and security.

  10. Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imtiaz, Kauser

    2011-01-01

    Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool (comBAT) is an Excel/VB-based bolted joint analysis/optimization program that lays out a systematic foundation for an inexperienced or seasoned analyst to determine fastener size, material, and assembly torque for a given design. Analysts are able to perform numerous what-if scenarios within minutes to arrive at an optimal solution. The program evaluates input design parameters, performs joint assembly checks, and steps through numerous calculations to arrive at several key margins of safety for each member in a joint. It also checks for joint gapping, provides fatigue calculations, and generates joint diagrams for a visual reference. Optimum fastener size and material, as well as correct torque, can then be provided. Analysis methodology, equations, and guidelines are provided throughout the solution sequence so that this program does not become a "black box:" for the analyst. There are built-in databases that reduce the legwork required by the analyst. Each step is clearly identified and results are provided in number format, as well as color-coded spelled-out words to draw user attention. The three key features of the software are robust technical content, innovative and user friendly I/O, and a large database. The program addresses every aspect of bolted joint analysis and proves to be an instructional tool at the same time. It saves analysis time, has intelligent messaging features, and catches operator errors in real time.

  11. The military and the transition to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kelty, Ryan; Kleykamp, Meredith; Segal, David R

    2010-01-01

    Ryan Kelty, Meredith Kleykamp, and David Segal examine the effect of military service on the transition to adulthood. They highlight changes since World War II in the role of the military in the lives of young adults, focusing especially on how the move from a conscription to an all-volunteer military has changed the way military service affects youths' approach to adult responsibilities. The authors note that today's all-volunteer military is both career-oriented and family-oriented, and they show how the material and social support the military provides to young servicemen and women promotes responsible membership in family relationships and the wider community. As a result, they argue, the transition to adulthood, including economic independence from parents, is more stable and orderly for military personnel than for their civilian peers. At the same time, they stress that serving in the military in a time of war holds dangers for young adults. The authors examine four broad areas of military service, focusing in each on how men and women in uniform today make the transition to adulthood. They begin by looking at the social characteristics of those who serve, especially at differences in access to the military and its benefits by socio-demographic characteristics, such as age, gender, race and ethnicity, social class, and sexual orientation. Military service also has important effects on family formation, including the timing of marriage and parenthood, family structure, and the influence of military culture on families. Family formation among servicemen and women, the authors observe, is earlier and more stable than among civilians of the same age. The authors then consider the educational and employment consequences of service. Finally, they scrutinize the dangers of military service during times of war and examine the physical and psychological effects of wartime military service. They also note the sexual trauma endured both by male and female military

  12. Satellite Power System (SPS) military applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozeroff, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The potential military role, both offensive and defensive, of a Satellite Power System (SPS) is examined. A number of potential military support possibilities are described. An SPS with military capabilities may have a strong negative impact on international relations if it is not internationalized. The SPS satellite would be vulnerable to military action of an enemy with good space capability, but would experience little or no threat from saboteurs or terrorists, except via the ground controls. The paper concludes with an outline of some of the key issues involved, and a number of recommendations for future study, including some areas for long term efforts.

  13. Thank You for Your Service: Military Initiatives on College Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kristin Bailey

    2014-01-01

    Military students and their dependents arrive on college campuses with a diverse array of academic goals and support needs. A military friendly college understands that military students are transitioning from the professional military environment to the workforce, and academic work is part of that transition. A military friendly college is not…

  14. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  15. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  16. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  17. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  18. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  19. 32 CFR 635.17 - Military Police Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Military Police Report. 635.17 Section 635.17... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.17 Military Police Report. (a... received or observed by military police. (2) Serve as a record of all military police and military...

  20. 32 CFR 635.17 - Military Police Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military Police Report. 635.17 Section 635.17... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.17 Military Police Report. (a... received or observed by military police. (2) Serve as a record of all military police and military...

  1. 32 CFR 635.17 - Military Police Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Military Police Report. 635.17 Section 635.17... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.17 Military Police Report. (a... received or observed by military police. (2) Serve as a record of all military police and military...

  2. 32 CFR 635.17 - Military Police Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military Police Report. 635.17 Section 635.17... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.17 Military Police Report. (a... received or observed by military police. (2) Serve as a record of all military police and military...

  3. 32 CFR 635.17 - Military Police Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Military Police Report. 635.17 Section 635.17... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.17 Military Police Report. (a... received or observed by military police. (2) Serve as a record of all military police and military...

  4. A Guide to the Study and Use of Military History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessup, John E., Jr.; Coakley, Robert W.

    This study guide on military history is intended for use with the young officer just entering upon a military career. There are four major sections to the guide. Part one discusses the scope and value of military history, presents a perspective on military history, and examines essentials of a study program. The study of military history has both…

  5. Training MSSW Students for Military Social Work Practice and Doctoral Students in Military Resilience Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuMars, Tyler; Bolton, Kristin; Maleku, Arati; Smith-Osborne, Alexa

    2015-01-01

    The demand for social workers with military-related practice and research experience exceeds the current supply. To advance military social work education, we developed an interlevel master's of science in social work (MSSW) field practicum and doctoral research practicum that provides military social work field experiences and contributes to…

  6. Project VALOR: design and methods of a longitudinal registry of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in combat-exposed veterans in the Afghanistan and Iraqi military theaters of operations.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Raymond C; Marx, Brian P; Maserejian, Nancy N; Holowka, Darren W; Gates, Margaret A; Sleeper, Lynn A; Vasterling, Jennifer J; Kang, Han K; Keane, Terence M

    2012-03-01

    Few studies have investigated the natural history of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Project VALOR (Veterans' After-discharge Longitudinal Registry) was designed as a longitudinal patient registry assessing the course of combat-related PTSD among 1600 male and female Veterans who served in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) in Afghanistan or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Aims of the study include investigating patterns and predictors of progression or remission of PTSD and treatment utilization. The study design was based on recommendations from the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research for longitudinal disease registries and used a pre-specified theoretical model to select the measurement domains for data collection and interpretation of forthcoming results. The registry will include 1200 male and female Veterans with a recent diagnosis of PTSD in the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) electronic medical record and a comparison group of 400 Veterans without a medical record-based PTSD diagnosis, to also allow for case-control analyses. Data are collected from administrative databases, electronic medical records, a self-administered questionnaire, and a semi-structured diagnostic telephone interview. Project VALOR is a unique and timely registry study that will evaluate the clinical course of PTSD, psychosocial correlates, and health outcomes in a carefully selected cohort of returning OEF/OIF Veterans.

  7. A global range military transport: The ostrich

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguiar, John; Booker, Cecilia; Hoffman, Eric; Kramar, James; Manahan, Orlando; Serranzana, Ray; Taylor, Mike

    1993-01-01

    Studies have shown that there is an increasing need for a global range transport capable of carrying large numbers of troops and equipment to potential trouble spots throughout the world. The Ostrich is a solution to this problem. The Ostrich is capable of carrying 800,000 pounds 6,500 n.m. and returning with 15 percent payload, without refueling. With a technology availability date in 2010 and an initial operating capability of 2015, the aircraft incorporates many advanced technologies including laminar flow control, composite primary structures, and a unique multibody design. By utilizing current technology, such as using McDonnell Douglas C-17 fuselage for the outer fuselages on the Ostrich, the cost for the aircraft was reduced. The cost of the Ostrich per aircraft is $1.2 billion with a direct operating cost of $56,000 per flight hour. The Ostrich will provide a valuable service as a logistical transport capable of rapidly projecting a significant military force or humanitarian aid anywhere in the world.

  8. Circadian rhythm desynchronosis in military deployments: a review of current strategies.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, C F; Bisson, R U; French, J

    1995-06-01

    The combined problems of changing work schedules and work places are not uncommon in military operations. For example, during the Persian Gulf War, many military units underwent short notice transmeridian deployment with immediate commencement of 24-h operations upon arrival. Some of these individuals likely suffered from circadian desynchronosis, blunting their effectiveness. The United States Air Force approved limited use of one short acting hypnotic medication to assist aircrew sleep disorders in the operational theater and, until recently, one stimulant medication to enhance alertness. Multiple theoretical strategies for circadian rhythm management are available. However, many U.S. Air Force flight surgeons are not trained on how best to use medications in combination with other circadian rhythm strategies. We present a condensed review of current human circadian rhythm coping strategies pertinent to military operations.

  9. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  10. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  11. Military needs and forecast, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstayn, Alan B.

    1986-01-01

    FORECAST 2 has accomplished its objectives of identifying high leverage technologies for corporate Air Force review. Implementation is underway with emphasis on restructuring existing programs and programming resources in the FY88 BES/FY89 POM. Many joint service/agency opportunities exist.

  12. The Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) Mission System (JMS) and the Advanced Research, Collaboration, and Application Development Environment (ARCADE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runco, A.; Echeverry, J.; Kim, R.; Sabol, C.; Zetocha, P.; Murray-Krezan, J.

    2014-09-01

    The JSpOC Mission System is a modern service-oriented architecture (SOA) infrastructure with increased process automation and improved tools to enhance Space Situational Awareness (SSA). The JMS program has already delivered Increment 1 in April 2013 as initial capability to operations. The programs current focus, Increment 2, will be completed by 2016 and replace the legacy Space Defense Operations Center (SPADOC) and Astrodynamics Support Workstation (ASW) capabilities. Post 2016, JMS Increment 3 will continue to provide additional SSA and C2 capabilities that will require development of new applications and procedures as well as the exploitation of new data sources with more agility. In 2012, the JMS Program Office entered into a partnership with AFRL/RD (Directed Energy) and AFRL/RV (Space Vehicles) to create the Advanced Research, Collaboration, and Application Development Environment (ARCADE). The purpose of the ARCADE is to: (1) serve as a centralized testbed for all research and development (R&D) activities related to JMS applications, including algorithm development, data source exposure, service orchestration, and software services, and provide developers reciprocal access to relevant tools and data to accelerate technology development, (2) allow the JMS program to communicate user capability priorities and requirements to developers, (3) provide the JMS program with access to state-of-the-art research, development, and computing capabilities, and (4) support market research efforts by identifying outstanding performers that are available to shepherd into the formal transition process. AFRL/RV and AFRL/RD have created development environments at both unclassified and classified levels that together allow developers to develop applications and work with data sources. The unclassified ARCADE utilizes the Maui high performance computing (HPC) Portal, and can be accessed using a CAC or Kerberos using Yubikey. This environment gives developers a sandbox

  13. Industry looks at military exceptionally high frequency bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, F. L.

    1982-10-01

    Various programs and systems in the developing EHF communications band usage, including satellites, are examined. Commercial systems, built by companies which also hold military contracts, are beginning to feature capabilities formerly reserved for the military, in order to meet increased demands for voice, video, and data links. The C-band, from 4-6 GHz is becoming oversubscribed, leading to the implementation of the Ku-band, from 11-14 GHz. Saturation of these bands is expected to occur in the early 1990s. The Japanese have been experimenting with the 20/30 THz bands since 1976, the Italians are planning the Italsat, and ESA is developing the L-Sat, all in the same frequency bands. NASA explored the region partially with the ATS-6 spacecraft, but funding has lagged. Plans exist for an Advanced Communications Technology Satellite, operating up to 50 GHz, to be launched in 1987 and function for two years. It is suggested that military users may benefit from leasing dedicated commercial satellite channels, while the commercial operators will profit from greater guaranteed use of the equipment.

  14. Investigating Team Learning in a Military Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veestraeten, Marlies; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2014-01-01

    As teams have become fundamental parts of today's organisations, the need for these teams to function and learn efficiently and effectively is widely emphasised. Also in military contexts team learning is vital. The current article examines team learning behaviour in military teams as it aims to cross-validate a team learning model that was…

  15. Military GP training-the future.

    PubMed

    Herod, T P; Johnson, G A

    2013-01-01

    There is clearly a significant step from being a well-supported GP Registrar to being a fully independent GP in the NHS and this is even more apparent for a newly qualified Military GP There are many additional duties and responsibilities placed upon a Military GP that the current training curriculum and exams do not cover and which must be learnt post-CCT, whilst undertaking independent practice for the first time. Having a Military First 5 initiative for support during this time would no doubt be of some use, but having a dedicated period of training to re-militarise newly qualified Military GPs would provide an opportunity to improve and make more efficient the initial transition from training to independent practice. In the long term, incorporating as much as possible of this proposed period of post-CCT Military training into a 4th year of GP training would be the ideal. However, discussions between Surgeon General, the Defence Deanery and the RCGP would be required to define which training elements would be acceptable to be incorporated and there will no doubt be some aspects (e.g. weapons handling) that might be deemed unacceptable by the RCGP, and thus a period of post-CCT Military training may still be a key component of a longer term solution. The options for enhancing Military GP training warrant thorough exploration as they have the potential to provide significant benefit not only for future trainees but also for the military in general.

  16. Conning Our Kids into Military Combat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashford, Ellie

    2005-01-01

    There are some school leaders who believe that the military offers just one more option for students to consider. Others, however, think that military recruiters are too aggressive and that the privacy of students should be better protected. The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) gives the armed services unprecedented access to potential recruits at…

  17. Military Expenditure and Socio-Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Nicole

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between military expenditure and the stimulation of aggregate demand, inflation, investment, trade balance, foreign exchange, the improvement of taxation, and employment creation and industrialization in the Third World is analyzed. To some extent military expenditure does promote economic growth, but it does not automatically…

  18. 32 CFR 724.215 - Military representation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military representation. 724.215 Section 724.215 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Authority/Policy for Departmental Discharge Review § 724.215 Military representation....

  19. 32 CFR 724.215 - Military representation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military representation. 724.215 Section 724.215 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Authority/Policy for Departmental Discharge Review § 724.215 Military representation....

  20. 32 CFR 724.215 - Military representation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military representation. 724.215 Section 724.215 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Authority/Policy for Departmental Discharge Review § 724.215 Military representation....

  1. 32 CFR 724.215 - Military representation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military representation. 724.215 Section 724.215 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Authority/Policy for Departmental Discharge Review § 724.215 Military representation....

  2. 32 CFR 724.215 - Military representation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military representation. 724.215 Section 724.215 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Authority/Policy for Departmental Discharge Review § 724.215 Military representation....

  3. Unlocking Insights about Military Children and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandra, Anita; London, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    As this issue of the "Future of Children" makes clear, there is much yet to learn about military children and their families. A big part of the reason, write Anita Chandra and Andrew London, is the lack of sufficiently robust sources of data. Until more and better data are collected about military families, Chandra and London say, it…

  4. Pending crisis in Russian civil military relations

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D.Y.

    1997-10-01

    A key issue in the study of civil-military relations has been how to create a military sufficiently strong to ensure security from external threats while simultaneously preventing the military from using its preponderance of power in the domestic arena. This dilemma arises from the fear engendered by a large armed force created to combat foreign threats, but which is also inherently a threat to the society that created it. In Russia, however, the question is not how the civilian leadership can keep the military out of politics, but how the military can keep the leadership from politicizing the armed forces. The Russian military has no interest in resolving Russia`s domestic political problems. It is a professional military that prefers to leave politics to the politicians, and to carry out its mission of defending the nation against external attack. But the lack of responsible central leadership and the poor state of the economy are driving the military toward involvement in domestic politics if for no other reason than to ensure its own survival.

  5. Sociological Research in a Military School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ignat'ev, V. V.

    2008-01-01

    What is the content of a system of sociological support for the administration of a higher military educational institution, and what problems are involved? From October 2006 to February 2007, instructors in the department of the humanities and the social-economic disciplines at Eisk F. M. Komarov Higher Military Aviation School (EVVAU) carried…

  6. Reforming the Military Health Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slackman, Joel

    Serious problems beset the military's extensive system of health care: rising budgetary costs, dissatisfaction among its beneficiaries, and inadequate readiness for war. This report was written at the request of the House Committee on Armed Services to examine some of these issues. It looks at a range of possible reforms in the military health…

  7. Military Deployment and Elementary Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Terri; Dunham, Mardis; Lyons, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the impact that military deployment has upon academic achievement of elementary school students. TerraNova test scores of 137 fourth and fifth grade students in two elementary schools with a high proportion of military dependent children were examined for two consecutive years. Although the academic test performance fell…

  8. Optimal Compensating Wages for Military Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrell, Scott E.; West, James E.

    2005-01-01

    The current U.S. military pay structure offers inequitable and inefficient wages across locations. Military personnel are paid less competitive wages in high-cost and/or low-amenity locations compared to low-cost and/or high-amenity locations. This pay system results in unequal reenlistment rates across locations, which leads to production…

  9. The Demographics of Military Children and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clever, Molly; Segal, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Since the advent of the all-volunteer force in the 1970s, marriage, parenthood, and family life have become commonplace in the U.S. military among enlisted personnel and officers alike, and military spouses and children now outnumber service members by a ratio of 1.4 to 1. Reviewing data from the government and from academic and nonacademic…

  10. 75 FR 3448 - Federal Advisory Committee; Military Leadership Diversity Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Military Leadership Diversity Commission AGENCY... the Military Leadership Diversity Commission (hereafter referred to as the Commission) on January 15... leadership position with either a Military Department command or combatant command; (b) a retired general...

  11. 32 CFR 9.2 - Establishment of Military Commissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM § 9.2 Establishment of Military Commissions. In accordance with the President's Military...

  12. Wireless networks of opportunity in support of secure field operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehle, Roy H.; Lewis, Mark

    1997-02-01

    Under funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) for joint military and law enforcement technologies, demonstrations of secure information transfer in support of law enforcement and military operations other than war, using wireless and wired technology, were held in September 1996 at several locations in the United States. In this paper, the network architecture, protocols, and equipment supporting the demonstration's scenarios are presented, together with initial results, including lessons learned and desired system enhancements. Wireless networks of opportunity encompassed in-building (wireless-LAN), campus-wide (Metricom Inc.), metropolitan (AMPS cellular, CDPD), and national (one- and two-way satellite) systems. Evolving DARPA-sponsored packet radio technology was incorporated. All data was encrypted, using multilevel information system security initiative (MISSI)FORTEZZA technology, for carriage over unsecured and unclassified commercial networks. The identification and authentication process inherent in the security system permitted logging for database accesses and provided an audit trail useful in evidence gathering. Wireless and wireline communications support, to and between modeled crisis management centers, was demonstrated. Mechanisms for the guarded transport of data through the secret-high military tactical Internet were included, to support joint law enforcement and crisis management missions. A secure World Wide Web (WWW) browser forms the primary, user-friendly interface for information retrieval and submission. The WWW pages were structured to be sensitive to the bandwidth, error rate, and cost of the communications medium in use (e.g., the use of and resolution for graphical data). Both still and motion compressed video were demonstrated, along with secure voice transmission from laptop computers in the field. Issues of network bandwidth, airtime costs, and deployment status are discussed.

  13. Comparing the surgical timelines of military and civilians traumatic lower limb amputations

    PubMed Central

    Staruch, R.M.T.; Jackson, P.C.; Hodson, J.; Yim, G.; Foster, M.A.; Cubison, T.; Jeffery, S.L.A.

    2016-01-01

    The care and challenges of injured service have been well documented in the literature from a variety of specialities. The aim of this study was to analyse the surgical timelines of military and civilian traumatic amputees and compare the surgical and resuscitative interventions. A retrospective review of patient notes was undertaken. Military patients were identified from the Joint Theatre Trauma Registry (JTTR) in 2009. Civilian patients were identified using the hospital informatics database. Patient demographics, treatment timelines as well as surgical and critical care interventions were reviewed. In total 71 military patients sustained traumatic amputations within this time period. This represented 11% of the total injury demographic in 2009. Excluding upper limb amputees 46 patients sustained lower extremity amputations. These were investigated further. In total 21 civilian patients were identified in a 7-year period. Analysis revealed there was a statistically significant difference between patient age, ITU length of stay, blood products used and number of surgical procedures between military and civilian traumatic amputees. This study identified that military patients were treated for longer in critical care and required more surgical interventions for their amputations. Despite this, their time to stump closure and length of stay were not statistically different compared to civilian patients. Such observations reflect the importance of an Orthoplastic approach, as well as daily surgical theatre co-ordination and weekly multi-disciplinary meetings in providing optimal care for these complex patients. This study reports the epidemiological observed differences between two lower limb trauma groups. PMID:26958343

  14. Acoustic intensity near a high-powered military jet aircraft.

    PubMed

    Stout, Trevor A; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    The spatial variation in vector acoustic intensity has been calculated between 100 and 3000 Hz near a high-performance military aircraft. With one engine of a tethered F-22A Raptor operating at military power, a tetrahedral intensity probe was moved to 27 locations in the geometric near and mid-fields to obtain the frequency-dependent intensity vector field. The angles of the maximum intensity region rotate from aft to sideline with increasing frequency, becoming less directional above 800 Hz. Between 100 and 400 Hz, which are principal radiation frequencies, the ray-traced dominant source region rapidly contracts and moves upstream, approaching nearly constant behavior by 1000 Hz. PMID:26233049

  15. Acoustic intensity near a high-powered military jet aircraft.

    PubMed

    Stout, Trevor A; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    The spatial variation in vector acoustic intensity has been calculated between 100 and 3000 Hz near a high-performance military aircraft. With one engine of a tethered F-22A Raptor operating at military power, a tetrahedral intensity probe was moved to 27 locations in the geometric near and mid-fields to obtain the frequency-dependent intensity vector field. The angles of the maximum intensity region rotate from aft to sideline with increasing frequency, becoming less directional above 800 Hz. Between 100 and 400 Hz, which are principal radiation frequencies, the ray-traced dominant source region rapidly contracts and moves upstream, approaching nearly constant behavior by 1000 Hz.

  16. Spacesuit mobility knee joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure suit mobility joints are for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit in which low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are required. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics and includes linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and includes a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  17. Spacesuit mobility joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Joints for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit which have low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are described. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics. Linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli are featured. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  18. The Massive Bleeding after the Operation of Hip Joint Surgery with the Acquired Haemorrhagic Coagulation Factor XIII(13) Deficiency: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Akio; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu; Mogami, Atsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Two women, aged 81 and 61, became haemorrhagic after surgery. Their previous surgeries were uneventful with no unexpected bleeding observed. Blood tests prior to the current surgeries indicated normal values including those related to coagulation. There were no problems with the current surgeries prior to leaving the operating room. At 3 hours after the surgery, the 81-year-old patient had an outflow of the drain at 1290 grams and her blood pressure decreased. She had disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The 61-year-old woman had repeated haemorrhages after her current surgery for a long time. Their abnormal haemorrhages were caused by a deficiency of coagulation factor XIII(13). The mechanism of haemorrhagic coagulation factor XIII(13) deficiency is not understood, and it is a rare disorder. The only diagnostic method to detect this disorder is to measure factor XIII(13) activity in the blood. In this paper, we used Arabic and Roman numerals at the same time to avoid confusion of coagulation factor XIII(13) with coagulation factor VIII(8) that causes hemophilia A. PMID:23533879

  19. The Rationale for Joint Mobilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhardt, Sandy

    This paper presents an overview of the functions of connective tissue and the mechanisms of joint injury and contracture formation in relation to therapeutic exercise. The components of connective tissue operation are explained, including fibroblasts, macrophages, plasma cells, and collagen. An examination of the histology of connective tissue as…

  20. Environmental information for military planning.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Victoria; Croft, Darryl; Knight, Ashley

    2013-07-01

    A study was conducted to consider the implications of presenting Environmental Information (EI; information on current environmental features including weather, topography and visibility maps) for military planning to the growing audience of non-technical users; to provide guidance for ensuring usability and for development of a suitable EI interface, and to produce an EI concept interface mock-up to demonstrate initial design ideas. Knowledge was elicited from current EI users and providers regarding anticipated use of EI by non-specialists. This was combined with human factors and cognition expertise to produce guidance for data usability and development of an EI interface. A simple mock-up of an EI concept interface was developed. Recommendations for further development were made including application of the guidance derived, identification of a user test-bed and development of business processes. PMID:23290260