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Sample records for joint nerve blocks

  1. Nerve Blocks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sometimes the needle has to be inserted fairly deep to reach the nerve causing your problem. This ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  2. Transition from nerve blocks to periarticular injections and emerging techniques in total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D

    2014-10-01

    The emergence of procedure-specific multimodal pain management regimens that provide effective control of postoperative pain, while markedly reducing the amount of opioid medication required, has been one of the most important advances in hip and knee replacement in recent years. When peripheral nerve blockade first became widely available for inclusion in multimodal regimens, it was viewed as a revolution in the management of postoperative pain. This approach, however, is costly and has some important limitations, including an increased incidence of falls. For many patients, peripheral nerve blocks can now be replaced by a periarticular injection with EXPAREL® (bupivacaine liposome injectable suspension), an extended-release anesthetic infiltrated by the surgeon as part of a multimodal pain regimen. EXPAREL® offers some important clinical and administrative benefits over nerve blocks. Preliminary data from a pilot study comparing the relative effectiveness of EXPAREL® versus sciatic nerve blockade has shown a noticeable reduction in average pain scores at rest with EXPAREL® following both hip and knee arthroplasty, as well as a reduction in the 6- to 12-hour pain score following hip arthroplasty. There was also a significant reduction in opioid use with EXPAREL®, as well as a $411 reduction in the cost of total knee arthroplasty and a $348 reduction in the cost of total hip arthroplasty.

  3. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  4. Nerve blocks for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Shah, Atit

    2014-10-01

    Nerve blocks are often performed as therapeutic or palliative interventions for pain relief. However, they are often performed for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. When considering nerve blocks for chronic pain, clinicians must always consider the indications, risks, benefits, and proper technique. Nerve blocks encompass a wide variety of interventional procedures. The most common nerve blocks for chronic pain and that may be applicable to the neurosurgical patient population are reviewed in this article. This article is an introduction and brief synopsis of the different available blocks that can be offered to a patient.

  5. Inferior alveolar nerve block: Alternative technique

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Kannan, R.; Kumar, N. Senthil

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is a technique of dental anesthesia, used to produce anesthesia of the mandibular teeth, gingivae of the mandible and lower lip. The conventional IANB is the most commonly used the nerve block technique for achieving local anesthesia for mandibular surgical procedures. In certain cases, however, this nerve block fails, even when performed by the most experienced clinician. Therefore, it would be advantageous to find an alternative simple technique. Aim and Objective: The objective of this study is to find an alternative inferior alveolar nerve block that has a higher success rate than other routine techniques. To this purpose, a simple painless inferior alveolar nerve block was designed to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in Oral surgery department of Vinayaka Mission's dental college Salem from May 2009 to May 2011. Five hundred patients between the age of 20 years and 65 years who required extraction of teeth in mandible were included in the study. Out of 500 patients 270 were males and 230 were females. The effectiveness of the IANB was evaluated by using a sharp dental explorer in the regions innervated by the inferior alveolar, lingual, and buccal nerves after 3, 5, and 7 min, respectively. Conclusion: This study concludes that inferior alveolar nerve block is an appropriate alternative nerve block to anesthetize inferior alveolar nerve due to its several advantages. PMID:25885503

  6. Fall Risk Associated with Continuous Peripheral Nerve Blocks Following Knee and Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Finn, Daphna M; Agarwal, Rishi R; Ilfeld, Brian M; Madison, Sarah J; Ball, Scott T; Ferguson, Eliza J; Morgan, Anya C; Morris, Beverly A

    2016-01-01

    Combined scientific advances in pharmaceutical agents, perineural blocks, and pump delivery capabilities such as those used with continuous peripheral nerve blocks have demonstrated advantages in pain management for patients undergoing joint arthroplasty. This report documents the incidence of falls increased after the implementation of a continuous peripheral nerve block program for patients undergoing knee and hip arthroplasty in an academic medical center.

  7. Magnetic resonance neurography-guided nerve blocks for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jan; Chhabra, Avneesh; Wang, Kenneth C; Carrino, John A

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography - guided nerve blocks and injections describe a techniques for selective percutaneous drug delivery, in which limited MR neurography and interventional MR imaging are used jointly to map and target specific pelvic nerves or muscles, navigate needles to the target, visualize the injected drug and detect spread to confounding structures. The procedures described, specifically include nerve blocks of the obturator nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, pudendal nerve, posterior femoral cutaneous nerve, sciatic nerve, ganglion impar, sacral spinal nerve, and injection into the piriformis muscle.

  8. Provocative sacroiliac joint maneuvers and sacroiliac joint block are unreliable for diagnosing sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Labat, Jean-Jacques; Le Goff, Benoît; Gouin, François; Maugars, Yves

    2006-01-01

    Mapping studies of pain elicited by injections into the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) suggest that sacroiliac joint syndrome (SIJS) may manifest as low back pain, sciatica, or trochanteric pain. Neither patient-reported symptoms nor provocative SIJ maneuvers are sensitive or specific for SIJS when SIJ block is used as the diagnostic gold standard. This has led to increasing diagnostic use of SIJ block, a procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into the joint under arthrographic guidance. However, several arguments cast doubt on the validity of SIJ block as a diagnostic gold standard. Thus, the effects of two consecutive blocks are identical in only 60% of cases, and the anesthetic diffuses out of the joint in 61% of cases, often coming into contact with the sheaths of the adjacent nerve trunks or roots, including the lumbosacral trunk (which may contribute to pain in the groin or thigh) and the L5 and S1 nerve roots. These data partly explain the limited specificity of SIJ block for the diagnosis of SIJS and the discordance between the pain elicited by the arthrography injection and the response to the block. The limitations of provocative maneuvers and SIJ blocks may stem in part from a contribution of extraarticular ligaments to the genesis of pain believed to originate within the SIJs. These ligaments include the expansion of the iliolumbar ligaments, the dorsal and ventral sacroiliac ligaments, the sacrospinous ligaments, and the sacrotuberous ligaments (sacroiliac joint lato-sensu). They play a role in locking or in allowing motion of the SIJs. Glucocorticoids may diffuse better than anesthetics within these ligaments. Furthermore, joint fusion may result in ligament unloading.

  9. Pudendal nerve block for vaginal birth.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Pudendal nerve block is a safe and effective pain relief method for vaginal birth. Providing analgesia to the vulva and anus, it is used for operative vaginal birth and subsequent repair, late second stage pain relief with spontaneous vaginal birth, repair of complex lacerations, or repair of lacerations in women who are unable to achieve adequate or satisfactory pain relief during perineal repair with local anesthesia. Key to its efficacy is the knowledge of pudendal nerve anatomy, the optimal point of infiltration of local anesthetic, and an understanding of the amount of time necessary to effect adequate analgesia.

  10. Combined KHFAC + DC nerve block without onset or reduced nerve conductivity after block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Manfred; Vrabec, Tina; Wainright, Jesse; Bhadra, Niloy; Bhadra, Narendra; Kilgore, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC) waveforms have been shown to provide peripheral nerve conductivity block in many acute and chronic animal models. KHFAC nerve block could be used to address multiple disorders caused by neural over-activity, including blocking pain and spasticity. However, one drawback of KHFAC block is a transient activation of nerve fibers during the initiation of the nerve block, called the onset response. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using charge balanced direct current (CBDC) waveforms to temporarily block motor nerve conductivity distally to the KHFAC electrodes to mitigate the block onset-response. Approach. A total of eight animals were used in this study. A set of four animals were used to assess feasibility and reproducibility of a combined KHFAC + CBDC block. A following randomized study, conducted on a second set of four animals, compared the onset response resulting from KHFAC alone and combined KHFAC + CBDC waveforms. To quantify the onset, peak forces and the force-time integral were measured during KHFAC block initiation. Nerve conductivity was monitored throughout the study by comparing muscle twitch forces evoked by supra-maximal stimulation proximal and distal to the block electrodes. Each animal of the randomized study received at least 300 s (range: 318-1563 s) of cumulative dc to investigate the impact of combined KHFAC + CBDC on nerve viability. Main results. The peak onset force was reduced significantly from 20.73 N (range: 18.6-26.5 N) with KHFAC alone to 0.45 N (range: 0.2-0.7 N) with the combined CBDC and KHFAC block waveform (p < 0.001). The area under the force curve was reduced from 6.8 Ns (range: 3.5-21.9 Ns) to 0.54 Ns (range: 0.18-0.86 Ns) (p < 0.01). No change in nerve conductivity was observed after application of the combined KHFAC + CBDC block relative to KHFAC waveforms. Significance. The distal application of CBDC can significantly reduce or even

  11. Ultrasound guided nerve block for breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Diéguez, P; Casas, P; López, S; Fajardo, M

    2016-03-01

    The breast surgery has undergone changes in recent years, encouraging new initiatives for the anaesthetic management of these patients in order to achieve maximum quality and rapid recovery. The fundamental tool that has allowed a significant improvement in the progress of regional anaesthesia for breast disease has been ultrasound, boosting the description and introduction into clinical practice of interfascial chest wall blocks, although the reference standard is still the paravertebral block. It is very likely that these blocks will change the protocols in the coming years. A review is presented of the anatomy of the breast region, description of nerve blocks and techniques, as well as their indications, all according to published articles and the opinion of the authors based on their experience.

  12. Physiological and pharmacologic aspects of peripheral nerve blocks

    PubMed Central

    Vadhanan, Prasanna; Tripaty, Debendra Kumar; Adinarayanan, S.

    2015-01-01

    A successful peripheral nerve block not only involves a proper technique, but also a thorough knowledge and understanding of the physiology of nerve conduction and pharmacology of local anesthetics (LAs). This article focuses on what happens after the block. Pharmacodynamics of LAs, underlying mechanisms of clinically observable phenomena such as differential blockade, tachyphylaxis, C fiber resistance, tonic and phasic blockade and effect of volume and concentration of LAs. Judicious use of additives along with LAs in peripheral nerve blocks can prolong analgesia. An entirely new group of drugs-neurotoxins has shown potential as local anesthetics. Various methods are available now to prolong the duration of peripheral nerve blocks. PMID:26330722

  13. Physiological and pharmacologic aspects of peripheral nerve blocks.

    PubMed

    Vadhanan, Prasanna; Tripaty, Debendra Kumar; Adinarayanan, S

    2015-01-01

    A successful peripheral nerve block not only involves a proper technique, but also a thorough knowledge and understanding of the physiology of nerve conduction and pharmacology of local anesthetics (LAs). This article focuses on what happens after the block. Pharmacodynamics of LAs, underlying mechanisms of clinically observable phenomena such as differential blockade, tachyphylaxis, C fiber resistance, tonic and phasic blockade and effect of volume and concentration of LAs. Judicious use of additives along with LAs in peripheral nerve blocks can prolong analgesia. An entirely new group of drugs-neurotoxins has shown potential as local anesthetics. Various methods are available now to prolong the duration of peripheral nerve blocks.

  14. Different clinical electrodes achieve similar electrical nerve conduction block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boger, Adam; Bhadra, Narendra; Gustafson, Kenneth J.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. We aim to evaluate the suitability of four electrodes previously used in clinical experiments for peripheral nerve electrical block applications. Approach. We evaluated peripheral nerve electrical block using three such clinical nerve cuff electrodes (the Huntington helix, the Case self-sizing Spiral and the flat interface nerve electrode) and one clinical intramuscular electrode (the Memberg electrode) in five cats. Amplitude thresholds for the block using 12 or 25 kHz voltage-controlled stimulation, onset response, and stimulation thresholds before and after block testing were determined. Main results. Complete nerve block was achieved reliably and the onset response to blocking stimulation was similar for all electrodes. Amplitude thresholds for the block were lowest for the Case Spiral electrode (4 ± 1 Vpp) and lower for the nerve cuff electrodes (7 ± 3 Vpp) than for the intramuscular electrode (26 ± 10 Vpp). A minor elevation in stimulation threshold and reduction in stimulus-evoked urethral pressure was observed during testing, but the effect was temporary and did not vary between electrodes. Significance. Multiple clinical electrodes appear suitable for neuroprostheses using peripheral nerve electrical block. The freedom to choose electrodes based on secondary criteria such as ease of implantation or cost should ease translation of electrical nerve block to clinical practice.

  15. Permanent nerve damage from inferior alveolar nerve blocks: a current update.

    PubMed

    Pogrel, M Anthony

    2012-10-01

    Permanent nerve involvement has been reported following inferior alveolar nerve blocks. This study provides an update on cases reported to one unit in the preceding six years. Lidocaine was associated with 25 percent of cases, articaine with 33 percent of cases, and prilocaine with 34 percent of cases. It does appear that inferior alveolar nerve blocks can cause permanent nerve damage with any local anesthetic, but the incidences may vary.

  16. Can We Perform Distal Nerve Block Instead of Brachial Plexus Nerve Block Under Ultrasound Guidance for Hand Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Ince, Ilker; Aksoy, Mehmet; Celik, Mine

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Distal nerve blocks are used in the event of unsuccessful blocks as rescue techniques. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the sufficiency for anesthesia of distal nerve block without the need for deep sedation or general anesthesia. The secondary purpose was to compare block performance times, block onset times, and patient and surgeon satisfaction. Materials and Methods: Patients who underwent hand surgery associated with the innervation area of the radial and median nerves were included in the study. Thirty-four patients who were 18–65 years old and American Society of Anesthesiologists grade I–III and who were scheduled for elective hand surgery under conscious nerve block anesthesia were randomly included in an infraclavicular block group (Group I, n=17) or a radial plus median block group (Group RM, n=17). The block performance time, block onset time, satisfaction of the patient and surgeon, and number of fentanyl administrations were recorded. Results: The numbers of patients who needed fentanyl administration and conversion to general anesthesia were the same in Group I and Group RM and there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05). The demographics, surgery times, tourniquet times, block perfomance times, and patient and surgeon satisfaction of the groups were similar and there were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05). There was a statistically significant difference in block onset times between the groups (p<0.05). Conclusions: Conscious hand surgery can be performed under distal nerve block anesthesia safely and successfully. PMID:28149139

  17. Suprascapular nerve block in chronic shoulder pain: are the radiologists better?

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, E; Smith, M; Wetherall, M; Lott, C; Slavotinek, J; FitzGerald, O; Ahern, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Suprascapular nerve block is a safe and effective treatment for chronic shoulder pain in arthritis, which can be performed either by direct imaging (CT guided) or in the clinic using anatomical landmarks to determine needle placement. Objective: To compare a CT guided versus an anatomical landmark approach in a randomised, single blind trial examining the efficacy of suprascapular nerve block for shoulder pain in patients with degenerative joint/rotator cuff disease. Methods: 67 patients with chronic shoulder pain from degenerative disease participated in the trial. 77 shoulders were randomised. The group randomised to receive the block through the anatomical landmark approach received a single suprascapular nerve block. Those in the CT guided group received an injection of methylprednisolone acetate and a smaller volume of bupivacaine around the suprascapular nerve. The patients were followed up for 12 weeks by a "blinded" observer and reviewed at weeks 1, 4, and 12 after the injection. Results: Significant improvements were seen in all pain scores and disability in the shoulders receiving both types of nerve block, with no significant differences in the improvement in pain and disability between the two approaches at any time. Improvements in pain and disability scores were clinically and statistically significant. No significant adverse effects occurred in either group. Patient satisfaction scores for pain relief using either approach were high. Conclusion: The CT guided control and landmark approaches to performing suprascapular nerve blocks result in similar significant and prolonged pain and disability reductions; both approaches are safe. PMID:15308514

  18. Workup and Management of Persistent Neuralgia following Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Weyker, Paul David; Webb, Christopher Allen-John; Pham, Thoha M.

    2016-01-01

    Neurological injuries following peripheral nerve blocks are a relatively rare yet potentially devastating complication depending on the type of lesion, affected extremity, and duration of symptoms. Medical management continues to be the treatment modality of choice with multimodal nonopioid analgesics as the cornerstone of this therapy. We report the case of a 28-year-old man who developed a clinical common peroneal and lateral sural cutaneous neuropathy following an uncomplicated popliteal sciatic nerve block. Workup with electrodiagnostic studies and magnetic resonance neurography revealed injury to both the femoral and sciatic nerves. Diagnostic studies and potential mechanisms for nerve injury are discussed. PMID:26904304

  19. Differential fiber-specific block of nerve conduction in mammalian peripheral nerves using kilohertz electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogi A; Butera, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    Kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) has been shown to induce repeatable and reversible nerve conduction block in animal models. In this study, we characterized the ability of KES stimuli to selectively block specific components of stimulated nerve activity using in vivo preparations of the rat sciatic and vagus nerves. KES stimuli in the frequency range of 5-70 kHz and amplitudes of 0.1-3.0 mA were applied. Compound action potentials were evoked using either electrical or sensory stimulation, and block of components was assessed through direct nerve recordings and muscle force measurements. Distinct observable components of the compound action potential had unique conduction block thresholds as a function of frequency of KES. The fast component, which includes motor activity, had a monotonically increasing block threshold as a function of the KES frequency. The slow component, which includes sensory activity, showed a nonmonotonic block threshold relationship with increasing KES frequency. The distinct trends with frequency of the two components enabled selective block of one component with an appropriate choice of frequency and amplitude. These trends in threshold of the two components were similar when studying electrical stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve, electrical stimulation and responses of the vagus nerve, and sensorimotor stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve. This differential blocking effect of KES on specific fibers can extend the applications of KES conduction block to selective block and stimulation of neural signals for neuromodulation as well as selective control of neural circuits underlying sensorimotor function.

  20. Essential regional nerve blocks for the dermatologist: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Davies, T; Karanovic, S; Shergill, B

    2014-12-01

    Following on from Part 1 of the series (regional nerve blocks for the face and scalp), we guide the clinician through the anatomy and cutaneous innervation of the digits, wrist and ankle, providing a practical step-by-step guide to regional nerve blockade of these areas.

  1. Essential regional nerve blocks for the dermatologist: part 1.

    PubMed

    Davies, T; Karanovic, S; Shergill, B

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this two-part series is to provide an up-to-date review of essential regional nerve blocks for dermatological practice. In Part 1, we give a concise overview of local anaesthetics and their potential complications, as well as the relevant anatomy and cutaneous innervation of the face and scalp. This culminates in a step-by-step practical guide to performing each nerve block.

  2. [Supraclavicular block during elbow joint surgeries in children].

    PubMed

    Kadnikov, O Iu; Morozova, L N; Stepanenko, S M

    2011-01-01

    The regional methods of analgesia are the "golden standard" of choice during trauma surgeries. The supraclavicular block of the bracheal plexus is the method of choice during the cubital joint surgeries. The purpose of the study is to improve the effectiveness of anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for surgical interventions on the cubital joint in children by developing and implementing the clinical practice of peripheral blockade of the brachial plexus by the supraclavicular access. The study included 40 children aged 5 to 12 years. The children rated as ASA I, came to the clinic on an emergency basis with cubital joint bones injuries. All the children were had surgeries on the cubital joint (closed and open repositions with osteosynthesis) with balanced regional anesthesia, the main analgesic component of which was supraclavicular brachial plexus block (by Kulenkampf-Fursaev technique). The supraclavicular block was performed in conditions of psychological comfort of the child. For the means of premedication age appropriate doses of seduxen or midazolam were intravenously administered. Intraoperative sedation was conducted by the re-introduction of benzodiazepines, and ketamine (up to 1 mg/kg/h). During the study period, the effective intraoperative analgesia, provided by supraclavicular blockade of peripheral nerves, was observed in 31 children. In 9 patients the blockade could be found to be incomplete at the second stage of the surgery (reposition). For this reason, it took the additional administration of tramal in a dose of 2 mg/kg and deepening of sedation with ketamine up to the dose of 2 mg/kg/h. The duration of effective postoperative analgesia due to long-acting local anesthetic (0.5% solution of naropin) was 8-9 hours. There were no complications registered as a result of supraclavicular. Thus, this study proves that the supraclavicular brachial plexus block provides effective intra and postoperative analgesia in trauma operations on the cubital

  3. Reversible Nerve Conduction Block Using Kilohertz Frequency Alternating Current

    PubMed Central

    Kilgore, Kevin L.; Bhadra, Niloy

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The features and clinical applications of balanced-charge kilohertz frequency alternating currents (KHFAC) are reviewed. Preclinical studies of KHFAC block have demonstrated that it can produce an extremely rapid and reversible block of nerve conduction. Recent systematic analysis and experimentation utilizing KHFAC block has resulted in a significant increase in interest in KHFAC block, both scientifically and clinically. Materials and Methods We review the history and characteristics of KHFAC block, the methods used to investigate this type of block, the experimental evaluation of block, and the electrical parameters and electrode designs needed to achieve successful block. We then analyze the existing clinical applications of high frequency currents, comparing the early results with the known features of KHFAC block. Results Although many features of KHFAC block have been characterized, there is still much that is unknown regarding the response of neural structures to rapidly fluctuating electrical fields. The clinical reports to date do not provide sufficient information to properly evaluate the mechanisms that result in successful or unsuccessful treatment. Conclusions KHFAC nerve block has significant potential as a means of controlling nerve activity for the purpose of treating disease. However, early clinical studies in the use of high frequency currents for the treatment of pain have not been designed to elucidate mechanisms or allow direct comparisons to preclinical data. We strongly encourage the careful reporting of the parameters utilized in these clinical studies, as well as the development of outcome measures that could illuminate the mechanisms of this modality. PMID:23924075

  4. Kilohertz frequency nerve block enhances anti-inflammatory effects of vagus nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Yogi A.; Saxena, Tarun; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.; Butera, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Efferent activation of the cervical vagus nerve (cVN) dampens systemic inflammatory processes, potentially modulating a wide-range of inflammatory pathological conditions. In contrast, afferent cVN activation amplifies systemic inflammatory processes, leading to activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the sympathetic nervous system through the greater splanchnic nerve (GSN), and elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Ideally, to clinically implement anti-inflammatory therapy via cervical vagus nerve stimulation (cVNS) one should selectively activate the efferent pathway. Unfortunately, current implementations, in animal and clinical investigations, activate both afferent and efferent pathways. We paired cVNS with kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) nerve block to preferentially activate efferent pathways while blocking afferent pathways. Selective efferent cVNS enhanced the anti-inflammatory effects of cVNS. Our results demonstrate that: (i) afferent, but not efferent, cVNS synchronously activates the GSN in a dose-dependent manner; (ii) efferent cVNS enabled by complete afferent KES nerve block enhances the anti-inflammatory benefits of cVNS; and (iii) incomplete afferent KES nerve block exacerbates systemic inflammation. Overall, these data demonstrate the utility of paired efferent cVNS and afferent KES nerve block for achieving selective efferent cVNS, specifically as it relates to neuromodulation of systemic inflammation. PMID:28054557

  5. Ultrasonography Evaluation of Vulnerable Vessels Around Cervical Nerve Roots During Selective Cervical Nerve Root Block

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of vulnerable blood vessels around cervical nerve roots before cervical nerve root block in the clinical setting. Methods This retrospective study included 74 patients with cervical radiculopathy who received an ultrasonography-guided nerve block at an outpatient clinic from July 2012 to July 2014. Before actual injection of the steroid was performed, we evaluated the vulnerable blood vessels around each C5, C6, and C7 nerve root of each patient's painful side, with Doppler ultrasound. Results Out of 74 cases, the C5 level had 2 blood vessels (2.7%), the C6 level had 4 blood vessels (5.45%), and the C7 level had 6 blood vessels (8.11%) close to each targeted nerve root. Moreover, the C5 level had 2 blood vessels (2.7%), the C6 level 5 blood vessels (6.75%), and the C7 level had 4 blood vessels (5.45%) at the site of an imaginary needle's projected pathway to the targeted nerve root, as revealed by axial transverse ultrasound imaging with color Doppler imaging. In total, the C5 level had 4 blood vessels (5.45%), the C6 level 9 blood vessels (12.16%), and the C7 level 10 had blood vessels (13.51%) either at the targeted nerve root or at the site of the imaginary needle's projected pathway to the targeted nerve root. There was an unneglectable prevalence of vulnerable blood vessels either at the targeted nerve root or at the site of the needle' projected pathway to the nerve root. Also, it shows a higher prevalence of vulnerable blood vessels either at the targeted nerve root or at the site of an imaginary needle's projected pathway to the nerve root as the spinal nerve root level gets lower. Conclusion To prevent unexpected critical complications involving vulnerable blood vessel injury during cervical nerve root block, it is recommended to routinely evaluate for the presence of vulnerable blood vessels around each cervical nerve root using Doppler ultrasound imaging before the cervical nerve root block, especially for the lower

  6. Peripheral nerve blocks in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Patzkowski, Michael S

    2016-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an inherited disorder of collagen production that results in multiorgan dysfunction. Patients with hypermobility type display skin hyperextensibility and joint laxity, which can result in chronic joint instability, dislocation, peripheral neuropathy, and severe musculoskeletal pain. A bleeding diathesis can be found in all subtypes of varying severity despite a normal coagulation profile. There have also been reports of resistance to local anesthetics in these patients. Several sources advise against the use of regional anesthesia in these patients citing the 2 previous features. There have been reports of successful neuraxial anesthesia, but few concerning peripheral nerve blocks, none of which describe nerves of the lower extremity. This report describes 2 cases of successful peripheral regional anesthesia in the lower extremity. In case 1, a 16-year-old adolescent girl with hypermobility type presented for osteochondral grafting of tibiotalar joint lesions. She underwent a popliteal sciatic (with continuous catheter) and femoral nerve block under ultrasound guidance. She proceeded to surgery and tolerated the procedure under regional block and intravenous sedation. She did not require any analgesics for the following 15 hours. In case 2, an 18-year-old woman with hypermobility type presented for medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction for chronic patella instability. She underwent a saphenous nerve block above the knee with analgesia in the distribution of the saphenous nerve lasting for approximately 18 hours. There were no complications in either case. Prohibitions against peripheral nerve blocks in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type, appear unwarranted.

  7. Bupivacaine and ropivacaine: comparative effects on nerve conduction block.

    PubMed

    Bariskaner, H; Ayaz, M; Guney, F B; Dalkilic, N; Guney, O

    2007-06-01

    Unlike other drugs which act in the region of the synapse, local anesthetics are agents that reversibly block the generation and conduction of nerve impulses along a nerve fiber. This study aims to investigate the comparative inhibitions of bupivacaine and ropivacaine on the frog sciatic nerve. Isolated nerves were transferred to the nerve chamber which includes Ringer's solution. The nerves were stimulated by standard square wave pulse protocols and the responses were recorded with conventional systems. Bupivacaine (n = 8) and ropivacaine (n = 8) were administered in the nerve chamber bath with cumulative concentrations (10(-9) to 10(-3) M) and the effects were monitored for variable time periods (5, 10 and 15 min). Both bupivacaine and ropivacaine significantly depressed the compound action potential (CAP) parameters in a dose-dependent (p < 0.05) and reversible manner. Difference in the effects of these two drugs was detectable only when the dose (> or =10(-5) M) and exposure time (15 min) were increased. Percent inhibitions in maximum derivatives and latency-period measurements have shown that ropivacaine is not only fast but also much more powerful in conduction block for longer and higher doses. Bupivacaine, on the other hand, is effective in the group of fibers with relatively slower conduction velocity for all the measured doses and time periods. In conclusion, ropivacaine has a sensory specific side of action, when compared with the bupivacaine.

  8. Ultrasound and electrical nerve stimulation-guided S1 nerve root block.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaki; Mikawa, Yasuhito; Matuda, Akiko

    2013-10-01

    A selective lumbosacral nerve root block is generally is performed under X-ray fluoroscopy, which has the disadvantage of radiation exposure and the need for fluoroscopy equipment. In this study, we assessed the effectiveness of ultrasound and nerve stimulation-guided S1 nerve root block on 37 patients with S1 radicular syndrome. With the patient in a prone position, an ultrasound scan was performed by placing the probe parallel to the body axis. The needle was pointed slightly medial from the lateral side of the probe and advanced toward a hyperechoic area in the sacral foramina with ultrasound guidance. Contrast medium was then injected and its dispersion confirmed by fluoroscopy. The acquired contrast images were classified into intraneural, perineural, and paraneural patterns. The significance of differences in the effect of the block among the contrast image patterns was analyzed. After nerve block, decreased sensation at the S1 innervated region and pain relief was achieved in all patients. No significant difference was noted in the effect of the block between perineural and paraneural patterns. In conclusion, this technique provided reliable S1 nerve root block in patients with S1 radicular syndrome and minimized radiation exposure.

  9. An audit of peripheral nerve blocks for hand surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J. M.; Inglefield, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    A prospective audit of 140 median, radial and ulnar blocks, given for 70 hand operations is described. The surgery was completed successfully in every patient. A further injection of local anaesthetic was required in 13 operations. Four patients experienced severe tourniquet pain. The results of the audit have shown that if a careful technique is used, a wide range of minor hand operations can be performed under regional nerve block. PMID:8215147

  10. Nerve Stimulator versus Ultrasound-Guided Femoral Nerve Block; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Forouzan, Arash; Masoumi, Kambiz; Motamed, Hasan; Gousheh, Mohammad Reza; Rohani, Akram

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Pain control is the most important issue in emergency department management of patients with femoral bone fractures. The present study aimed to compare the procedural features of ultrasonography and nerve stimulator guided femoral nerve block in this regard. Method: In this randomized clinical trial, patients with proximal femoral fractures presenting to emergency department were randomly divided into two groups of ultrasonography or nerve stimulator guided femoral block and compared regarding success rate, procedural time, block time, and need for rescue doses of morphine sulfate, using SPSS 20. Results: 50 patients were randomly divided into two groups of 25 (60% male). The mean age of studied patients was 35.14 ± 12.95 years (19 – 69). The two groups were similar regarding age (p= 0.788), sex (p = 0.564), and initial pain severity (p = 0.513). In 2 cases of nerve stimulator guided block, loss of pinprick sensation did not happen within 30 minutes of injection (success rate: 92%; p = 0.490). Ultrasonography guided nerve block cases had significantly lower procedural time (8.06 ± 1.92 vs 13.60 ± 4.56 minutes; p < 0.001) and lower need for rescue doses of opioid (2.68 ± 0.74 vs 5.28 ± 1.88 minutes; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Ultrasonography and nerve stimulator guided femoral block had the same success rate and block duration. However, the ultrasonography guided group had lower procedure time and lower need for rescue doses of morphine sulfate. Therefore, ultrasonography guided femoral block could be considered as an available, safe, rapid, and efficient method for pain management of femoral fracture in emergency department.

  11. Use of digital nerve blocks to provide anaesthetic relief.

    PubMed

    Summers, Anthony

    2011-09-01

    This article discusses the various techniques that nurses can use to perform digital nerve blocks, which are some of the most common procedures undertaken by emergency practitioners treating patients with finger injuries. In covering the advantages and disadvantages of each technique, it focuses primarily on the digits of the hand, but the techniques can also be performed on toes.

  12. Simulation of spinal nerve blocks for training anesthesiology residents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blezek, Daniel J.; Robb, Richard A.; Camp, Jon J.; Nauss, Lee A.; Martin, David P.

    1998-06-01

    Deep nerve regional anesthesiology procedures, such as the celiac plexus block, are challenging to learn. The current training process primarily involves studying anatomy and practicing needle insertion is cadavers. Unfortunately, the training often continues on the first few patients subjected to the care of the new resident. To augment the training, we have developed a virtual reality surgical simulation designed to provide an immersive environment in which an understanding of the complex 3D relationships among the anatomic structures involved can be obtained and the mechanics of the celiac block procedure practiced under realistic conditions. Study of the relevant anatomy is provided by interactive 3D visualization of patient specific data nd the practice simulated using a head mounted display, a 6 degree of freedom tracker, and a haptic feedback device simulating the needle insertion. By training in a controlled environment, the resident may practice procedures repeatedly without the risks associated with actual patient procedures, and may become more adept and confident in the ability to perform nerve blocks. The resident may select a variety of different nerve block procedures to practice, and may place the virtual patient in any desired position and orientation. The preliminary anatomic models used in the simulation have been computed from the Visible Human Male; however, patient specific models may be generated from patient image data, allowing the physician to evaluate, plan, and practice difficult blocks and/or understand variations in anatomy before attempting the procedure on any specific patient.

  13. Electrical conduction block in large nerves: high-frequency current delivery in the nonhuman primate.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, D Michael; Ethier, Christian; Foldes, Emily L; Oby, Emily R; Tyler, Dustin; Bauman, Matt; Bhadra, Niloy; Miller, Lee; Kilgore, Kevin L

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies have made significant progress toward the clinical implementation of high-frequency conduction block (HFB) of peripheral nerves. However, these studies were performed in small nerves, and questions remain regarding the nature of HFB in large-diameter nerves. This study in nonhuman primates shows reliable conduction block in large-diameter nerves (up to 4.1 mm) with relatively low-threshold current amplitude and only moderate nerve discharge prior to the onset of block.

  14. Comparative analysis between direct Conventional Mandibular nerve block and Vazirani-Akinosi closed mouth Mandibular nerve block technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sobhan; Tripathy, Ramanupam; Sabhlok, Samrat; Panda, Pankaj Kumar; Patnaik, Satyabrata

    2012-11-01

    Introduction: Over the years different techniques have been developed for achieving mandibular nerve anaesthesia. The main aim of our study was to carry out comparison and clinical efficacy of mandibular nerve anaesthesia by Direct Conventional technique with that of Vazirani-Akinosi mandibular nerve block technique.Materials and Methods: 50 adult patients requiring surgical extraction of premolars, mandibular first, second and third molars were selected randomly to receive Direct Conventional technique and Vazirani- Akinosi technique for nerve block alternatively.Results: No statistically significant differences were observed regarding complete lip anaesthesia at 5 minutes and 10 minutes, nerves anaesthetized with single injection, effectiveness of anaesthesia, supplementary injections and complications in both the techniques. However, onset of lip anaesthesia was found to be faster in Vazirani-Akinosi technique, patients experienced less pain during the Vazirani-Akinosi technique as compared to the Direct Conventional technique. Post injection complication complications were less in the VaziraniAkinosi Technique.Conclusions: Except for faster onset of lip anaesthesia, less pain during injection and fewer post injection complications in Vazirani-Akinosi technique all other parameters were of same efficacy as Direct Conventional technique. This has strong clinical applications as in cases with limited mouth opening, apprehensive patients Vazirani-Akinosi technique is the indicated technique of choice.

  15. Modeling Electric Fields of Peripheral Nerve Block Needles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, James Ch.; Ramirez, Jason G.

    2005-11-01

    Peripheral nerve blocks present an alternative to general anesthesia in certain surgical procedures and a means of acute pain relief through continuous blockades. They have been shown to decrease the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting, reduce oral narcotic side effects, and improve sleep quality. Injecting needles, which carry small stimulating currents, are often used to aid in locating the target nerve bundle. With this technique, muscle responses indicate needle proximity to the corresponding nerve bundle. Failure rates in first injection attempts prompted our study of electric field distributions. Finite difference methods were used to solve for the electric fields generated by two widely used needles. Differences in geometry between needles are seen to effect changes in electric field and current distributions. Further investigations may suggest needle modifications that result in a reduction of initial probing failures.

  16. Modeling Electric Fields of Peripheral Nerve Block Needles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, James Ch.; Anderson, Norman E.; Meisel, Mark W.; Ramirez, Jason G.; Kayser Enneking, F.

    2006-03-01

    Peripheral nerve blocks present an alternative to general anesthesia in certain surgical procedures and a means of acute pain relief through continuous blockades. They have been shown to decrease the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting, reduce oral narcotic side effects, and improve sleep quality. Injecting needles, which carry small stimulating currents, are often used to aid in locating the target nerve bundle. With this technique, muscle responses indicate needle proximity to the corresponding nerve bundle. Failure rates in first injection attempts prompted our study of electric field distributions. Finite difference methods were used to solve for the electric fields generated by two widely used needles. Geometric differences in the needles effect variations in their electric field and current distributions. Further investigations may suggest needle modifications that result in a reduction of initial probing failures.

  17. Nerve conduction block using combined thermoelectric cooling and high frequency electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, D Michael; Foldes, Emily L; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L

    2010-10-30

    Conduction block of peripheral nerves is an important technique for many basic and applied neurophysiology studies. To date, there has not been a technique which provides a quickly initiated and reversible "on-demand" conduction block which is both sustainable for long periods of time and does not generate activity in the nerve at the onset of the conduction block. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of a combined method of nerve block which utilizes two well established nerve blocking techniques in a rat and cat model: nerve cooling and electrical block using high frequency alternating currents (HFAC). This combined method effectively makes use of the contrasting features of both nerve cooling and electrical block using HFAC. The conduction block was initiated using nerve cooling, a technique which does not produce nerve "onset response" firing, a prohibitive drawback of HFAC electrical block. The conduction block was then readily transitioned into an electrical block. A long-term electrical block is likely preferential to a long-term nerve cooling block because nerve cooling block generates large amounts of exhaust heat, does not allow for fiber diameter selectivity and is known to be unsafe for prolonged delivery.

  18. Effectiveness of Greater Occipital Nerve Blocks in Migraine Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    İNAN, Nurten; İNAN, Levent E.; COŞKUN, Özlem; TUNÇ, Tuğba; İLHAN, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral nerve blocks have been used in primary headache treatment since a long time. In this study, we aimed to examine the efficiency of greater occipital nerve (GON) block in migraine prophylaxis. Methods Data from migraine without aura patients who had GON block were collected and divided into two groups: Group PGON (n=25), which included patients who were under medical prophylaxis and had GON block, and Group GON (n=53), which included patients who had only GON blocks. Migraine was diagnosed using International Headache Society (IHS) classification. Data of 78 patients were analyzed. Headache attack frequency, headache duration, and severity were compared between and within groups in a 3-month follow-up period. Results The decrease in headache parameters after GON block in both groups was significantly similar. Headache attack frequency decreased from 15.73±7.21 (pretreatment) to 4.52±3.61 (3rd month) in Group GON and from 13.76±8.07 to 3.28±2.15 in Group PGON (p<0.05). Headache duration decreased from 18.51±9.43 to 8.02±5.58 at 3rd month in Group GON and from 15.20±9.16 to 7.20±4.16 in Group PGON (p<0.05). Headache severity decreased from 8.26±1.32 to 5.16±2.64 in Group GON and from 8.08±0.90 to 5.96±1.20 in Group PGON (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in 3rd month after treatment (p>0.05). Conclusion This study showed significant decreases in headache parameters in both groups. As GON blocks were performed in patients unresponsive to medical prophylaxis, a decrease in the headache parameters in Group PGON similar to that in Group GON can be attributed to GON blocks. Consequently, these results show that repeated GON blocks with local anesthetic can be an effective alternative treatment in migraine patients who are unresponsive to medical prophylaxis or who do not prefer to use medical prophylaxis. PMID:28360765

  19. Anesthetic technique for inferior alveolar nerve block: a new approach

    PubMed Central

    PALTI, Dafna Geller; de ALMEIDA, Cristiane Machado; RODRIGUES, Antonio de Castro; ANDREO, Jesus Carlos; LIMA, José Eduardo Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective pain control in Dentistry may be achieved by local anesthetic techniques. The success of the anesthetic technique in mandibular structures depends on the proximity of the needle tip to the mandibular foramen at the moment of anesthetic injection into the pterygomandibular region. Two techniques are available to reach the inferior alveolar nerve where it enters the mandibular canal, namely indirect and direct; these techniques differ in the number of movements required. Data demonstrate that the indirect technique is considered ineffective in 15% of cases and the direct technique in 1329% of cases. Objective Objective: The aim of this study was to describe an alternative technique for inferior alveolar nerve block using several anatomical points for reference, simplifying the procedure and enabling greater success and a more rapid learning curve. Materials and Methods A total of 193 mandibles (146 with permanent dentition and 47 with primary dentition) from dry skulls were used to establish a relationship between the teeth and the mandibular foramen. By using two wires, the first passing through the mesiobuccal groove and middle point of the mesial slope of the distolingual cusp of the primary second molar or permanent first molar (right side), and the second following the oclusal plane (left side), a line can be achieved whose projection coincides with the left mandibular foramen. Results The obtained data showed correlation in 82.88% of cases using the permanent first molar, and in 93.62% of cases using the primary second molar. Conclusion This method is potentially effective for inferior alveolar nerve block, especially in Pediatric Dentistry. PMID:21437463

  20. Augmented reality guidance system for peripheral nerve blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedlake, Chris; Moore, John; Rachinsky, Maxim; Bainbridge, Daniel; Wiles, Andrew D.; Peters, Terry M.

    2010-02-01

    Peripheral nerve block treatments are ubiquitous in hospitals and pain clinics worldwide. State of the art techniques use ultrasound (US) guidance and/or electrical stimulation to verify needle tip location. However, problems such as needle-US beam alignment, poor echogenicity of block needles and US beam thickness can make it difficult for the anesthetist to know the exact needle tip location. Inaccurate therapy delivery raises obvious safety and efficacy issues. We have developed and evaluated a needle guidance system that makes use of a magnetic tracking system (MTS) to provide an augmented reality (AR) guidance platform to accurately localize the needle tip as well as its projected trajectory. Five anesthetists and five novices performed simulated nerve block deliveries in a polyvinyl alcohol phantom to compare needle guidance under US alone to US placed in our AR environment. Our phantom study demonstrated a decrease in targeting attempts, decrease in contacting of critical structures, and an increase in accuracy of 0.68 mm compared to 1.34mm RMS in US guidance alone. Currently, the MTS uses 18 and 21 gauge hypodermic needles with a 5 degree of freedom sensor located at the needle tip. These needles can only be sterilized using an ethylene oxide process. In the interest of providing clinicians with a simple and efficient guidance system, we also evaluated attaching the sensor at the needle hub as a simple clip-on device. To do this, we simultaneously performed a needle bending study to assess the reliability of a hub-based sensor.

  1. Treatment of great auricular neuralgia with real-time ultrasound-guided great auricular nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Younghoon; Kim, Saeyoung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: The great auricular nerve can be damaged by the neck surgery, tumor, and long-time pressure on the neck. But, great auricular neuralgia is very rare condition. It was managed by several medication and landmark-based great auricular nerve block with poor prognosis. Patient concerns: A 25-year-old man presented with a pain in the left lateral neck and auricle. Diagnosis: He was diagnosed with great auricular neuralgia. Interventions: His pain was not reduced by medication. Therefore, the great auricular nerve block with local anesthetics and steroid was performed under ultrasound guidance. Outcomes: Ultrasound guided great auricular nerve block alleviated great auricular neuralgia. Lessons: This medication-resistant great auricular neuralgia was treated by the ultrasound guided great auricular nerve block with local anesthetic agent and steroid. Therefore, great auricular nerve block can be a good treatment option of medication resistant great auricular neuralgia. PMID:28328811

  2. Real-time ultrasound-guided comparison of adductor canal block and psoas compartment block combined with sciatic nerve block in laparoscopic knee surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Messeha, Medhat M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lumbar plexus block, combined with a sciatic nerve block, is an effective locoregional anesthetic technique for analgesia and anesthesia of the lower extremity. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results outcome of the adductor canal block versus the psoas compartment block combined with sciatic nerve block using real time ultrasound guidance in patients undergoing elective laparoscopic knee surgeries. Patients and Methods: Ninety patients who were undergoing elective laparoscopic knee surgeries were randomly allocated to receive a sciatic nerve block in addition to lumbar plexus block using either an adductor canal block (ACB) or a posterior psoas compartment approach (PCB) using 25 ml of bupivacine 0.5% with adrenaline 1:400,000 injection over 2-3 minutes while observing the distribution of the local anesthetic in real time. Successful nerve block was defined as a complete loss of pinprick sensation in the region that is supplied by the three nerves along with adequate motor block, 30 minutes after injection. The degree of motor block was evaluated 30 minutes after the block procedure. The results of the present study showed that the real time ultrasound guidance of PCB is more effective than ACB approach. Although the sensory blockade of the femoral nerve achieved equally by both techniques, the LFC and OBT nerves were faster and more effectively blocked with PCB technique. Also PCB group showed significant complete sensory block without need for general anesthesia, significant decrease in the post-operative VAS and significant increase time of first analgesic requirement as compared to the ACB group. Result and Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that blockade of lumber plexus by psoas compartment block is more effective in complete sensory block without general anesthesia supplementation in addition to decrease post-operative analgesic requirement than adductor canal block. PMID:27212766

  3. Anesthetic Efficacy of Bupivacaine Solutions in Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Maria Cristina; Ranali, José; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; de Oliveira, Patrícia Cristine; Ambrosano, Glaúcia Maria Bovi; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 2 bupivacaine solutions. Twenty-two volunteers randomly received in a crossover, double-blinded manner 2 inferior alveolar nerve blocks with 1.8 mL of racemic bupivacaine and a mixture of 75% levobupivacaine and 25% dextrobupivacaine, both 0.5% and with 1 : 200,000 epinephrine. Before and after the injection, the first mandibular pre-molar was evaluated every 2 minutes until no response to the maximal output (80 reading) of the pulp tester and then again every 20 minutes. Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon paired test and the paired t test. No differences were found between the solutions for onset and duration of pulpal anesthesia and duration of soft tissue anesthesia (P > .05). It was concluded that the solutions have similar anesthetic efficacy. PMID:16596912

  4. The Anatomic Relationship of the Tibial Nerve to the Common Peroneal Nerve in the Popliteal Fossa: Implications for Selective Tibial Nerve Block in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Eric R.; Vydyanathan, Amaresh; Gritsenko, Karina; Shaparin, Naum; Singh, Nair; Downie, Sherry A.

    2017-01-01

    Background. A recently described selective tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease presents a viable alternative to sciatic nerve block for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In this two-part investigation, we describe the effects of a tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease. Methods. In embalmed cadavers, after the ultrasound-guided dye injection the dissection revealed proximal spread of dye within the paraneural sheath. Consequentially, in the clinical study twenty patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty received the ultrasound-guided selective tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease, which also resulted in proximal spread of local anesthetic. A sensorimotor exam was performed to monitor the effect on the peroneal nerve. Results. In the cadaver study, dye was observed to spread proximal in the paraneural sheath to reach the sciatic nerve. In the clinical observational study, local anesthetic was observed to spread a mean of 4.7 + 1.9 (SD) cm proximal to popliteal crease. A negative correlation was found between the excess spread of local anesthetic and bifurcation distance. Conclusions. There is significant proximal spread of local anesthetic following tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease with possibility of the undesirable motor blocks of the peroneal nerve. PMID:28260964

  5. Different Learning Curves for Axillary Brachial Plexus Block: Ultrasound Guidance versus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Luyet, C.; Schüpfer, G.; Wipfli, M.; Greif, R.; Luginbühl, M.; Eichenberger, U.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the learning of the skills needed to perform ultrasound- or nerve stimulator-guided peripheral nerve blocks. The aim of this study was to compare the learning curves of residents trained in ultrasound guidance versus residents trained in nerve stimulation for axillary brachial plexus block. Ten residents with no previous experience with using ultrasound received ultrasound training and another ten residents with no previous experience with using nerve stimulation received nerve stimulation training. The novices' learning curves were generated by retrospective data analysis out of our electronic anaesthesia database. Individual success rates were pooled, and the institutional learning curve was calculated using a bootstrapping technique in combination with a Monte Carlo simulation procedure. The skills required to perform successful ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block can be learnt faster and lead to a higher final success rate compared to nerve stimulator-guided axillary brachial plexus block. PMID:21318138

  6. Ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block vs continuous fascia iliaca compartment block for hip replacement in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bin; He, Miao; Cai, Guang-Yu; Zou, Tian-Xiao; Zhang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block are 2 traditional anesthesia methods in orthopedic surgeries, but it is controversial which method is better. The objective of this study was to compare the practicality, efficacy, and complications of the 2 modalities in hip replacement surgery in the elderly and to assess the utility of a novel cannula-over-needle set. Methods: In this prospective, randomized controlled clinical investigation, 60 elderly patients undergoing hip replacement were randomly assigned to receive either continuous femoral nerve block or continuous fascia iliaca compartment block. After ultrasound-guided nerve block, all patients received general anesthesia for surgery and postoperative analgesia through an indwelling cannula. Single-factor analysis of variance was used to compare the outcome variables between the 2 groups. Results: There was a significant difference between the 2 groups in the mean visual analog scale scores (at rest) at 6 hours after surgery: 1.0 ± 1.3 in the femoral nerve block group vs 0.5 ± 0.8 in the fascia iliaca compartment block group (P < 0.05). The femoral nerve block group had better postoperative analgesia on the medial aspect of the thigh, whereas the fascia iliaca compartment block group had better analgesia on the lateral aspect of the thigh. There were no other significant differences between the groups. Conclusions: Both ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block with the novel cannula-over-needle provide effective anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for elderly hip replacement patients. PMID:27759633

  7. Adductor canal block versus femoral nerve block combined with sciatic nerve block as an anesthetic technique for hindfoot and ankle surgery

    PubMed Central

    Joe, Han Bum; Choo, Ho Sik; Yoon, Ji Sang; Oh, Sang Eon; Cho, Jae Ho; Park, Young Uk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A femoral nerve block (FNB) in combination with a sciatic nerve block (SNB) is commonly used for anesthesia and analgesia in patients undergoing hindfoot and ankle surgery. The effects of FNB on motor function, related fall risk, and rehabilitation are controversial. An adductor canal block (ACB) potentially spares motor fibers in the femoral nerve, but the comparative effect on hindfoot and ankle surgeries between the 2 approaches is not yet well defined. We hypothesized that compared to FNB, ACB would cause less weakness in the quadriceps and produce similar pain scores during and after the operation. Methods: Sixty patients scheduled for hindfoot and ankle surgeries (arthroscopy, Achilles tendon surgery, or medial ankle surgery) were stratified randomized for each surgery to receive an FNB (FNB group) or an ACB (ACB group) combined with an SNB. The primary outcome was the visual analog scale (VAS) pain score at each stage. Secondary outcomes included quadriceps strength, time profiles (duration of the block procedure, time to full anesthesia and time to full recovery), patients’ analgesic requirements, satisfaction, and complications related to peripheral nerve blocks such as falls, neurologic symptoms, and local anesthetic systemic toxicity were evaluated. The primary outcome was tested for the noninferiority of ACB to FNB, and the other outcomes were tested for the superiority of each variable between the groups. Results: A total of 31 patients received an ACB and 29 received an FNB. The VAS pain scores of the ACB group were not inferior during and after the operation compared to those of the FNB group. At 30 minutes and 2 hours after anesthesia, patients who received an ACB had significantly higher average dynamometer readings than those who received a FNB (34.2 ± 20.4 and 30.4 ± 23.7 vs 1.7 ± 3.7 and 2.3 ± 7.4, respectively), and the results were similar at 24 and 48 hours after anesthesia. There were no differences

  8. Characterization of high capacitance electrodes for the application of direct current electrical nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Vrabec, Tina; Bhadra, Niloy; Wainright, Jesse; Bhadra, Narendra; Franke, Manfred; Kilgore, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Direct current (DC) can briefly produce a reversible nerve conduction block in acute experiments. However, irreversible reactions at the electrode–tissue interface have prevented its use in both acute and chronic settings. A high capacitance material (platinum black) using a charge-balanced waveform was evaluated to determine whether brief DC block (13 s) could be achieved repeatedly (>100 cycles) without causing acute irreversible reduction in nerve conduction. Electrochemical techniques were used to characterize the electrodes to determine appropriate waveform parameters. In vivo experiments on DC motor conduction block of the rat sciatic nerve were performed to characterize the acute neural response to this novel nerve block system. Complete nerve motor conduction block of the rat sciatic nerve was possible in all experiments, with the block threshold ranging from −0.15 to −3.0 mA. DC pulses were applied for 100 cycles with no nerve conduction reduction in four of the six platinum black electrodes tested. However, two of the six electrodes exhibited irreversible conduction degradation despite charge delivery that was within the initial Q (capacitance) value of the electrode. Degradation of material properties occurred in all experiments, pointing to a possible cause of the reduction in nerve conduction in some platinum black experiments. PMID:26358242

  9. Characterization of high capacitance electrodes for the application of direct current electrical nerve block.

    PubMed

    Vrabec, Tina; Bhadra, Niloy; Wainright, Jesse; Bhadra, Narendra; Franke, Manfred; Kilgore, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Direct current (DC) can briefly produce a reversible nerve conduction block in acute experiments. However, irreversible reactions at the electrode-tissue interface have prevented its use in both acute and chronic settings. A high capacitance material (platinum black) using a charge-balanced waveform was evaluated to determine whether brief DC block (13 s) could be achieved repeatedly (>100 cycles) without causing acute irreversible reduction in nerve conduction. Electrochemical techniques were used to characterize the electrodes to determine appropriate waveform parameters. In vivo experiments on DC motor conduction block of the rat sciatic nerve were performed to characterize the acute neural response to this novel nerve block system. Complete nerve motor conduction block of the rat sciatic nerve was possible in all experiments, with the block threshold ranging from -0.15 to -3.0 mA. DC pulses were applied for 100 cycles with no nerve conduction reduction in four of the six platinum black electrodes tested. However, two of the six electrodes exhibited irreversible conduction degradation despite charge delivery that was within the initial Q (capacitance) value of the electrode. Degradation of material properties occurred in all experiments, pointing to a possible cause of the reduction in nerve conduction in some platinum black experiments .

  10. A Novel CT-Guided Transpsoas Approach to Diagnostic Genitofemoral Nerve Block and Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Parris, David; Fischbein, Nancy; Mackey, Sean; Carroll, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Background Inguinal hernia repair is associated with a high incidence of chronic postsurgical pain. This pain may be caused by injury to the iliohypogastric, ilioinguinal, or genitofemoral nerves. It is often difficult to identify the specific source of the pain, in part, because these nerves are derived from overlapping nerve roots and closely colocalize in the area of surgery. It is therefore technically difficult to selectively block these nerves individually proximal to the site of surgical injury. In particular, the genitofemoral nerve is retroperitoneal before entering the inguinal canal, a position that puts anterior approaches to the proximal nerve at risk of transgressing into the peritoneum. We report a computed tomography (CT)-guided transpsoas technique to selectively block the genitofemoral nerve for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes while avoiding injury to the nearby ureter and intestines. Case A 39-year-old woman with chronic lancinating right groin pain after inguinal hernia repair underwent multiple pharmacologic interventions and invasive procedures without relief. Using CT and Stimuplex nerve stimulator guidance, the genitofemoral nerve was localized on the anterior surface of the psoas muscle and a diagnostic block with local anesthetic block was performed. The patient had immediate relief of her symptoms for 36 hours, confirming the diagnosis of genitofemoral neuralgia. She subsequently underwent CT-guided radiofrequency and phenol ablation of the genitofemoral nerve but has not achieved long-term analgesia. Conclusion CT-guided transpsoas genitofemoral nerve block is a viable option for safely and selectively blocking the genitofemoral nerve for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes proximal to injury caused by inguinal surgery. PMID:20546515

  11. Femoral versus Multiple Nerve Blocks for Analgesia after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Stav, Anatoli; Reytman, Leonid; Sevi, Roger; Stav, Michael Yohay; Powell, Devorah; Dor, Yanai; Dudkiewicz, Mickey; Bayadse, Fuaz; Sternberg, Ahud; Soudry, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background The PROSPECT (Procedure-Specific Postoperative Pain Management) Group recommended a single injection femoral nerve block in 2008 as a guideline for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty. Other authors have recommended the addition of sciatic and obturator nerve blocks. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve is also involved in pain syndrome following total knee arthroplasty. We hypothesized that preoperative blocking of all four nerves would offer superior analgesia to femoral nerve block alone. Methods This is a prospective, randomized, controlled, and observer-blinded clinical study. A total of 107 patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a femoral nerve block group, a multiple nerve block group, and a control group. All patients were treated postoperatively using patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with morphine. Pain intensity at rest, during flexion and extension, and morphine consumption were compared between groups over three days. Results A total of 90 patients completed the study protocol. Patients who received multiple nerve blocks experienced superior analgesia and had reduced morphine consumption during the postoperative period compared to the other two groups. Pain intensity during flexion was significantly lower in the “blocks” groups versus the control group. Morphine consumption was significantly higher in the control group. Conclusions Pain relief after total knee arthroplasty immediately after surgery and on the first postoperative day was significantly superior in patients who received multiple blocks preoperatively, with morphine consumption significantly lower during this period. A preoperative femoral nerve block alone produced partial and insufficient analgesia immediately after surgery and on the first postoperative day. (Clinical trial registration number (NIH): NCT01303120) PMID:28178436

  12. [Interventions on facet joints. Techniques of facet joint injection, medial branch block and radiofrequency ablation].

    PubMed

    Artner, J; Klessinger, S

    2015-10-01

    Fluoroscopy-guided interventions on facet joints have been used for decades for the symptomatic management of pain in spinal disorders. A large number of imaging techniques are used to achieve a precise and safe needle placement in interventional procedures. Pulsed fluoroscopy is one of the most widely used and well-accepted tools for these procedures. This article presents a technical overview of commonly used fluoroscopy-guided interventions on the facet joints of the cervical and lumbar spine, such as facet joint injection, blockade of the medial nerve branches and radiofrequency ablation.

  13. Kilohertz Electrical Stimulation Nerve Conduction Block: Effects of Electrode Surface Area.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogi A; Kim, Brian S; Rountree, William S; Butera, Robert J

    2017-03-17

    Kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) induces repeatable and reversible conduction block of nerve activity and is a potential therapeutic option for various diseases and disorders resulting from pathological or undesired neurological activity. However successful translation of KES nerve block to clinical applications is stymied by many unknowns such as the relevance of the onset response, acceptable levels of waveform contamination, and optimal electrode characteristics. We investigated the role of electrode geometric surface area on the KES nerve block threshold using 20 and 40 kHz current-controlled sinusoidal KES. Electrodes were electrochemically characterized and used to characterize typical KES waveforms and electrode charge characteristics. KES nerve block amplitudes, onset duration, and recovery of normal conduction after delivery of KES were evaluated along with power requirements for effective KES nerve block. Results from this investigation demonstrate that increasing electrode geometric surface area provides for a more power efficient KES nerve block. Reductions in block threshold by increased electrode surface area were found to be KESfrequency dependent, with block thresholds and average power consumption reduced by >2x with 20 kHz KES waveforms and >3x for 40 kHz KES waveforms.

  14. The efficacy of combined regional nerve blocks in awake orotracheal fiberoptic intubation

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Sharan, Radhe; Jain, Payal; Bala, Anju; Ranjana; Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Aims of Study: To evaluate the efficacy, hemodynamic changes, and patient comfort during awake fiberoptic intubation done under combined regional blocks. Materials and Methods: In the present observational study, 50 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists ( ASA) Grade I–II, Mallampati Grade I–IV were given nerve blocks - bilateral glossopharyngeal nerve block, bilateral superior laryngeal nerve block, and recurrent laryngeal nerve block before awake fiberoptic intubation using 2% lidocaine. Results: Procedure was associated with minimal increases in hemodynamic parameters during the procedure and until 3 min after it. Most of the intubations were being carried out within 3 min. Patient comfort was satisfactory with 90% of patients having favorable grades. Discussion: The most common cause of mortality and serious morbidity due to anesthesia is from airway problems. One-third of all anesthetic deaths are due to failure to intubate and ventilate. Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation under local anesthesia is now an accepted technique for managing such situations. In awake patient's anatomy, muscle tone, airway protection, and ventilation are preserved, but it is essential to sufficiently anesthetize the upper airway before the performance of awake fiberoptic bronchoscope-guided intubation to ensure patient comfort and cooperation for which in our study we used the nerve block technique. Conclusion: A properly performed technique of awake fiberoptic intubation done under combined regional nerve blocks provides good intubating conditions, patient comfort and safety and results in minimal hemodynamic changes. PMID:27212757

  15. Transsacral S2-S4 nerve block for vaginal pain due to pudendal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Cok, Oya Yalcin; Eker, H Evren; Cok, Tayfun; Akin, Sule; Aribogan, Anis; Arslan, Gulnaz

    2011-01-01

    Pudendal neuralgia is a type of neuropathic pain experienced predominantly while sitting, and causes a substantial decrease in quality of life in affected patients. Pudendal nerve block is a diagnostic and therapeutic option for pudendal neuralgia. Transsacral block at S2 through S4 results in pudendal nerve block, which is an option for successful relief of pain due to pudendal nerve injury. Herein is reported blockade of S2 through S4 using lidocaine and methylprednisolone for successful treatment of pudendal neuralgia in 2 patients with severe chronic vaginal pain. The patients, aged 44 and 58 years, respectively, were referred from the Gynecology Department to the pain clinic because of burning, stabbing, electric shock-like, unilateral pain localized to the left portion of the vagina and extending to the perineum. Their initial pain scores were 9 and 10, respectively, on a numeric rating scale. Both patients refused pudendal nerve block using classical techniques. Therefore, diagnostic transsacral S2-S4 nerve block was performed using lidocaine 1%, and was repeated using lidocaine 1% and methylprednisolone 80 mg after confirming block efficiency as demonstrated by an immediate decrease in pain scores. After 1 month, pain scores were 1 and 0, respectively, and both patients were free of pain at 6-month follow up. It is suggested that blockade of S2 through S4 using lidocaine and methylprednisolone is an effective treatment option in patients with chronic pudendal neuralgia when traditional pudendal nerve block is not applicable.

  16. Effect of differential nerve block on inhibition of the monosynaptic reflex by vibration in man

    PubMed Central

    Moddel, G.; Best, B.; Ashby, P.

    1977-01-01

    The differential nerve block produced by ischaemia has been used in an attempt to identify the afferent nerve fibres responsible for vibratory inhibition of the monosynaptic reflex in man. It is concluded that the inhibition arises mainly from receptors in the lower leg and is carried by myelinated afferent fibres larger than A-delta. PMID:599354

  17. Intercostal nerves block for mastectomy in two patients with advanced breast malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kolawole, Israel K; Adesina, Michael D; Olaoye, Iyiade O

    2006-03-01

    Regional anesthesia is recognized as an alternative to general anesthesia for modern breast cancer surgery. Various techniques of block have been described. Each has its unique problems. Regional anesthesia was chosen for simple mastectomy in two patients with advanced breast malignancy, due to compromised pulmonary status resulting from widespread malignant infiltration of both lungs. We used intercostal nerves block. The block was supplemented with an infraclavicular infiltration to interrupt the branches of the superficial cervical plexus that provide sensation to the upper chest wall and subcutaneous infiltration in the midline to block the nerve supply from the contralateral side. Anesthesia was generally effective and the operations were uneventful. Both patients and surgeons expressed satisfaction. We conclude that where patients have significant comorbidities that make general anesthesia undesirable, the use of intercostal nerves block remains a safe and reliable anesthetic option that allows the patient access to surgery for simple mastectomy.

  18. Medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve injury after brachial plexus block: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mi Jin; Byun, Ha Young; Lee, Chang Hee; Moon, Seung Won; Oh, Min-Kyun; Shin, Heesuk

    2013-12-01

    Medial antebrachial cutaneous (MABC) nerve injury associated with iatrogenic causes has been rarely reported. Local anesthesia may be implicated in the etiology of such injury, but has not been reported. Two patients with numbness and painful paresthesia over the medial aspect of the unilateral forearm were referred for electrodiagnostic study, which revealed MABC nerve lesion in each case. The highly selective nature of the MABC nerve injuries strongly suggested that they were the result of direct nerve injury by an injection needle during previous brachial plexus block procedures. Electrodiagnostic studies can be helpful in evaluating cases of sensory disturbance after local anesthesia. To our knowledge, these are the first documented cases of isolated MABC nerve injury following ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  19. Infra-orbital nerve block anesthesia–extended coverage using intra-oral ‘molar approach’

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Nautiyal, Vijay P; Sharma, Praveen; Sharma, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    The maxillary teeth are supplied by the anterior, middle and posterior superior alveolar nerves. The anterior and middle superior alveolar (AMSA) nerves exit the skull from the infra-orbital foramen, where they can be blocked for procedures on the maxillary anteriors and premolars. Sometimes, the middle superior alveolar nerve has a variant course and is not blocked by the conventional block technique. A new technique has been described for blocking the AMSA nerves, keeping in view the alternate pathway of the middle superior alveolar nerve. PMID:25756021

  20. Primary Payer Status is Associated with the Use of Nerve Block Placement for Ambulatory Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tighe, Patrick J.; Brennan, Meghan; Moser, M.; Boezaart, Andre P.; Bihorac, Azra

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although more than 30 million patients in the United States undergo ambulatory surgery each year, it remains unclear what percentage of these patients receive a perioperative nerve block. We reviewed data from the 2006 National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery (NSAS) to determine the demographic, socioeconomic, geographic, and clinical factors associated with the likelihood of nerve block placement for ambulatory orthopedic surgery. The primary outcome of interest was the association between primary method of payment and likelihood of nerve block placement. Additionally, we examined the association between type of surgical procedures, patient demographics, and hospital characteristics with the likelihood of receiving a nerve block. Methods This cross-sectional study reviewed 6,000 orthopedic anesthetics from the 2006 NSAS dataset, which accounted for over 3.9 million orthopedic anesthetics when weighted. The primary outcome of this study addressed the likelihood of receiving a nerve block for orthopedic ambulatory surgery according to the patient’s primary method of payment. Secondary endpoints included differences in demographics, surgical procedures, side effects, complications, recovery profile, anesthesia staffing model, and total perioperative charges in those with and without nerve block. Results Overall, 14.9% of anesthetics in this sample involved a peripheral nerve block. Length of time in postoperative recovery, total perioperative time, and total charges were less for those receiving nerve blocks. Patients were more likely to receive a nerve block if their procedures were performed in metropolitan service areas (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.19-2.91, p=0.007) or freestanding surgical facilities (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.74-2.96, p<0.0001), and if payment for their surgery was supported by government programs (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.01-6.21, p=0.048) or private insurance (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.12-6.13, p=0.03) versus self-pay or charity care. Conclusion For patients

  1. Importance of Vigilant Monitoring After Continuous Nerve Block: Lessons From a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Gopakumar Sudhakaran; Soliman, Loran Mounir; Maheshwari, Kamal; Esa, Wael Ali Sakr

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Continuous peripheral nerve block achieves good pain control. However, uncontrolled pain despite an effective block in the target areas of the nerve can be an early sign of ischemia. We report a case of iatrogenic injury to the axillary artery during shoulder surgery in a patient who had continuous supraclavicular block and demonstrate how vigilant monitoring helped the diagnosis and resulted in timely management of upper limb ischemia. Case Report A 58-year-old female underwent total revision surgery of her right shoulder under continuous supraclavicular block. Postoperatively, she complained of pain along the medial side of her forearm despite clinical evidence of nerve block. Continuous neurovascular monitoring and timely angiography confirmed axillary artery injury, and subsequent vascular repair saved the patient's limb. Conclusion Iatrogenic injuries to vessels or nerves sometimes occur during orthopedic surgical procedures. Regional anesthesia can mask and delay the onset of these symptoms. Postoperative monitoring and the ability to differentiate between the effects of local anesthetics and the body's response to ischemia are important for avoiding postoperative complications. This case report aims to improve awareness about the need for vigilant monitoring of the distal pulses after peripheral nerve blocks. PMID:23789016

  2. Skin and mucosal ischemia as a complication after inferior alveolar nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Aravena, Pedro Christian; Valeria, Camila; Nuñez, Nicolás; Perez-Rojas, Francisco; Coronado, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    The anesthetic block of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) is one of the most common techniques used in dental practice. The local complications are due to the failures on the anesthetic block or to anatomic variations in the tap site such as intravascular injection, skin ischemia and ocular problems. The aim of this article is to present a case and discuss the causes of itching and burning sensation, blanching, pain and face ischemia in the oral cavity during the IAN block. PMID:28182074

  3. Risk of Encountering Dorsal Scapular and Long Thoracic Nerves during Ultrasound-guided Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block with Nerve Stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Dong; Yu, Jae Yong; Shim, Junho; Heo, Hyun Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, ultrasound has been commonly used. Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) by posterior approach is more commonly used because anterior approach has been reported to have the risk of phrenic nerve injury. However, posterior approach also has the risk of causing nerve injury because there are risks of encountering dorsal scapular nerve (DSN) and long thoracic nerve (LTN). Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of encountering DSN and LTN during ultrasound-guided IBPB by posterior approach. Methods A total of 70 patients who were scheduled for shoulder surgery were enrolled in this study. After deciding insertion site with ultrasound, awake ultrasound-guided IBPB with nerve stimulator by posterior approach was performed. Incidence of muscle twitches (rhomboids, levator scapulae, and serratus anterior muscles) and current intensity immediately before muscle twitches disappeared were recorded. Results Of the total 70 cases, DSN was encountered in 44 cases (62.8%) and LTN was encountered in 15 cases (21.4%). Both nerves were encountered in 10 cases (14.3%). Neither was encountered in 21 cases (30.4%). The average current measured immediately before the disappearance of muscle twitches was 0.44 mA and 0.50 mA at DSN and LTN, respectively. Conclusions Physicians should be cautious on the risk of injury related to the anatomical structures of nerves, including DSN and LTN, during ultrasound-guided IBPB by posterior approach. Nerve stimulator could be another option for a safer intervention. Moreover, if there is a motor response, it is recommended to select another way to secure better safety. PMID:27413483

  4. A case report of complex auricular neuralgia treated with the great auricular nerve and facet blocks

    PubMed Central

    Eghtesadi, Marzieh; Leroux, Elizabeth; Vargas-Schaffer, Grisell

    2017-01-01

    Background The great auricular nerve is a cutaneous branch of the cervical plexus originating from the C2 and C3 spinal nerves. It innervates the skin over the external ear, the angle of the mandible and the parotid gland. It communicates with the ansa cervicalis. Great auricular neuralgia is rarely diagnosed in clinical practice and can be refractory. We present a new approach using ultrasound-guided nerve blocks. Case We present a case of a 41-year-old female with paroxysmal ear pain accompanied by dysautonomia, tingling in the tongue, dysphagia, dysarthria and abdominal symptoms. No significant findings were found on cervical and brain imaging. The patient responded partially to a great auricular nerve block. A combined approach using this block with facet block of C2 and C3 induced a more pronounced and prolonged benefit. Conclusion Great auricular neuralgia is not often encountered in practice and can be accompanied by symptoms originating from the ansa cervicalis network. A combined approach of nerve blocks can be considered in refractory cases. PMID:28255253

  5. Anesthetic efficacy of a combination of hyaluronidase and lidocaine with epinephrine in inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

    PubMed Central

    Ridenour, S.; Reader, A.; Beck, M.; Weaver, J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of a buffered lidocaine with epinephrine solution compared to a combination buffered lidocaine with epinephrine plus hyaluronidase solution in inferior alveolar nerve blocks. Thirty subjects randomly received an inferior alveolar nerve block using 1 of the 2 solutions at 2 separate appointments using a repeated-measures design. Mandibular anterior and posterior teeth were blindly pulp tested at 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes postinjection. No response from the subject to the maximum output (80 reading) of the pulp tester was used as the criterion for pulpal anesthesia. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive readings of 80 were obtained. A postoperative survey was used to measure pain and trismus. The results demonstrated 100% of the subjects had profound lip numbness with both solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. The anesthetic success rates for individual teeth ranged from 20 to 80%. There were no significant differences (P > .05) between the 2 solutions. However, the combination lidocaine/hyaluronidase solution resulted in a significant increase in postoperative pain and trismus. It was concluded that adding hyaluronidase to a buffered lidocaine solution with epinephrine did not statistically increase the incidence of pulpal anesthesia in inferior alveolar nerve blocks and, because of its potential tissue damaging effect, it should not be added to local anesthetic solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. PMID:11495405

  6. Neuroplasticity of Sensory and Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in the Painful Arthritic Joint

    PubMed Central

    Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Freeman, Katie T.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Coughlin, Kathleen; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Castaneda-Corral, Gabriela; Bloom, Aaron P.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Many forms of arthritis are accompanied by significant chronic joint pain. Here we studied whether there is significant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in the painful arthritic knee joint and whether nerve growth factor (NGF) drives this pathological reorganization. Methods A painful arthritic knee joint was produced by injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the knee joint of young adult mice. CFA-injected mice were then treated systemically with vehicle or anti-NGF antibody. Pain behaviors were assessed and at 28 days following the initial CFA injection, the knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), growth associated protein-43 (GAP43; sprouted nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), CD31 (endothelial cells) or CD68 (monocytes/macrophages). Results In CFA-injected mice, but not vehicle-injected mice, there was a significant increase in the density of CD68+ macrophages, CD31+ blood vessels, CGRP+, NF200+, GAP43+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium as well as joint pain-related behaviors. Administration of anti-NGF reduced these pain-related behaviors and the ectopic sprouting of nerve fibers, but had no significant effect on the increase in density of CD31+ blood vessels or CD68+ macrophages. Conclusions Ectopic sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers occurs in the painful arthritic joint and may be involved in the generation and maintenance of arthritic pain. PMID:22246649

  7. Pain management via Ultrasound-guided Nerve Block in Emergency Department; a Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Nejati, Amir; Teymourian, Houman; Behrooz, Leili; mohseni, Gholamreza

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Pain is the most common complaint of patients referring to emergency department (ED). Considering the importance of pain management in ED, this study aimed to investigate the efficacy and feasibility of ultrasound-guided nerve blocks in this setting. Methods: 46 patients who came to the ED with injured extremities were enrolled in the study and received either femoral, axillary or sciatic nerve block depending on their site of injury (1.5 mg Bupivacaine per kg of patient’s weight). Patients were asked about their level of pain before and after receiving the nerve block based on numerical rating scale. The difference between pre and post block pain severity was measured. Both patients and physicians were asked about their satisfaction with the nerve block in 5 tiered Likert scale. Results: 46 patients with the mean age of 37.5 ± 12.5 years (8-82 years) received ultrasound-guided nerve block (84.8% male). 6 Sciatic, 25 axillary, and 15 femoral nerve blocks were performed. Mean pain severity on NRS score at the time of admission was 8.1 ± 1.4, which reduced to 2.04 ± 2.06 after block. 25 (54.3%) patients were highly satisfied (Likert scale 5), 15 (32.6%) were satisfied (Likert scale 4), 3 (6.5%) were neutral and had no opinion (Likert scale 3), 1 (2.1%) was not satisfied (Likert scale 2), and 2 (4.3%) were highly unsatisfied (Likert scale 1). There was no significant difference among the satisfaction scores within the three block locations (p = 0.8). There was no significant difference in physicians’ level of satisfaction between the three block locations either (p = 0.9). 1 (2.1%) case of agitation and tachycardia and 1 (2.1%) case of vomiting were observed after the procedure. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided nerve block of extremities is a safe and effective method that can be used for pain management in the ED. It results in high levels of satisfaction among both patients and physicians.

  8. Selectivity of voluntary finger flexion during ischemic nerve block of the hand

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Karen T.; Schieber, Marc H.; McNulty, Penelope A.

    2009-01-01

    During ischemic nerve block of an extremity, the cortical representations of muscles proximal to the block are known to expand, increasing the overlap of different muscle representations. Such reorganization mimics that seen in actual amputees. We investigated whether such changes degrade voluntary control of muscles proximal to the block. Nine subjects produced brief, isometric flexion force selectively with each fingertip before, during, and after ischemic block at the wrist. We recorded the isometric force exerted at the distal phalanx of each digit, along with electromyographic (EMG) activity from intrinsic and extrinsic finger muscles. Despite paralysis of the intrinsic hand muscles, and associated decrements in the flexion forces exerted by the thumb, index, and little fingers, the selectivity of voluntary finger flexion forces and of EMG activity in the extrinsic finger muscles that generated these forces remained unchanged. Our observations indicate that during ischemic nerve block, reorganization does not eliminate or degrade motor representations of the temporarily deafferented and paralyzed fingers. PMID:18431564

  9. A Case of Pneumothorax after Phrenic Nerve Block with Guidance of a Nerve Stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Tüfek, Adnan; Tokgöz, Orhan; Karaman, Haktan

    2011-01-01

    Hiccups have more than 100 etiologies. The most common etiology has gastrointestinal origins, related mainly to gastric distention and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Intractable hiccups are rare but may present as a severe symptom of various diseases. Hiccups are mostly treated with non-invasive or pharmacological therapies. If these therapies fail, invasive methods should be used. Here, we present a patient on whom we performed a blockage of the phrenic nerve with the guidance of a nerve stimulator. The patient also had pneumothorax as a complication. Three hours after intervention, a tube thoracostomy was performed. One week later, the patient was cured and discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, a stimulator provides the benefit of localizing the phrenic nerve, which leads to diaphragmatic contractions. Patients with thin necks have more risk of pneumothorax during phrenic nerve location. PMID:21716608

  10. Hypoesthesia after IAN block anesthesia with lidocaine: management of mild to moderate nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sungjoo; Lee, Seung-Jong; Kim, Euiseong

    2012-01-01

    Hypoesthesia after an inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block does not commonly occur, but some cases are reported. The causes of hypoesthesia include a needle injury or toxicity of local anesthetic agents, and the incidence itself can cause stress to both dentists and patients. This case presents a hypoesthesia on mental nerve area followed by IAN block anesthesia with 2% lidocaine. Prescription of steroids for a week was performed and periodic follow up was done. After 1 wk, the symptoms got much better and after 4 mon, hypoesthesia completely disappeared. During this healing period, only early steroid medication was prescribed. In most cases, hypoesthesia is resolved within 6 mon, but being aware of etiology and the treatment options of hypoesthesia is important. Because the hypoesthesia caused by IAN block anesthesia is a mild to moderate nerve injury, early detection of symptom and prescription of steroids could be helpful for improvement of the hypoesthesia. PMID:23430216

  11. Obturator Nerve Block in Transurethral Resection of Bladder Tumor: A Comparative Study by two Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Singh, V. P.; Agarwal, Nidhi; Malhotra, M. K.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Sparing of obturator nerve is a common problem encountered during transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) under spinal anesthesia. Aims: To evaluate and compare obturator nerve block (ONB) by two different techniques during TURBT. Settings and Design: This is prospective observational study. Subjects and Methods: Forty adult male patients from the American Society of Anesthesiologists Class I–IV planned to undergo TURBT under spinal anesthesia were divided into two groups of twenty each. In one group, ONB was performed with nerve locator. In other group, transvesical nerve block was performed with a cystoscope. The primary endpoints of this study were the occurrence of adductor reflex, ability to resect the tumor, and number of surgical interruptions. A number of transfusions required and bladder perforation were the secondary endpoints. Results: There was statistically significant difference between the groups for resection without adductor jerk, resection with a minimal jerk, and unresectable with high-intensity adductor jerk. Bleeding was observed in both groups and one bladder perforation was encountered. Conclusions: We conclude that ONB, when administered along with spinal anesthesia for TURBT, is extremely safe and effective method of anesthesia to overcome adductor contraction. ONB with nerve locator appears to be more effective method compared to the transvesical nerve block. PMID:28298765

  12. Intractable sacroiliac joint pain treated with peripheral nerve field stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabortty, Shushovan; Kumar, Sanjeev; Gupta, Deepak; Rudraraju, Sruthi

    2016-01-01

    As many as 62% low back pain patients can have sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain. There is limited (to poor) evidence in regards to long-term pain relief with therapeutic intra-articular injections and/or conventional (heat or pulsed) radiofrequency ablations (RFAs) for SIJ pain. We report our pain-clinic experience with peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) for two patients of intractable SIJ pain. They had reported absence of long-term pain relief (pain relief >50% for at least 2 weeks postinjection and at least 3 months post-RFA) with SIJ injections and SIJ RFAs. Two parallel permanent 8-contact subcutaneous stimulating leads were implanted under the skin overlying their painful SIJ. Adequate stimulation in the entire painful area was confirmed. For implantable pulse generator placement, a separate subcutaneous pocket was made in the upper buttock below the iliac crest level ipsilaterally. During the pain-clinic follow-up period, the patients had reduced their pain medications requirements by half with an additional report of more than 50% improvement in their functional status. The first patient passed away 2 years after the PNFS procedure due to medical causes unrelated to his chronic pain. The second patient has been comfortable with PNFS-induced analgesic regimen during her pain-clinic follow-up during last 5 years. In summary, PNFS can be an effective last resort option for SIJ pain wherein conventional interventional pain techniques have failed, and analgesic medication requirements are escalating or causing unwarranted side-effects. PMID:27625495

  13. Peripheral nerve blocks as the sole anesthetic technique in a patient with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bang, Seung Uk; Kim, Yee Suk; Kwon, Woo Jin; Lee, Sang Mook; Kim, Soo Hyang

    2016-04-01

    General anesthesia and central neuraxial blockades in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy are associated with high risks of complications, including rhabdomyolysis, malignant hyperthermia, hemodynamic instability, and postoperative mechanical ventilation. Here, we describe peripheral nerve blocks as a safe approach to anesthesia in a patient with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy who was scheduled to undergo surgery. A 22-year-old male patient was scheduled to undergo reduction and internal fixation of a left distal femur fracture. He had been diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy at 5 years of age, and had no locomotive capability except for that of the finger flexors and toe extensors. He had developed symptoms associated with dyspnea 5 years before and required intermittent ventilation. We blocked the femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and parasacral plexus under ultrasound on the left leg. The patient underwent a successful operation using peripheral nerve blocks with no complications. In conclusion general anesthesia and central neuraxial blockades in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy are unsafe approaches to anesthesia because of hemodynamic instability and respiratory depression. Peripheral nerve blocks are the best way to reduce the risks of critical complications, and are a safe and feasible approach to anesthesia in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  14. Overlooked physical diagnoses in chronic pain patients involved in litigation, Part 2. The addition of MRI, nerve blocks, 3-D CT, and qualitative flow meter.

    PubMed

    Hendler, N; Bergson, C; Morrison, C

    1996-01-01

    This study followed 120 chronic pain patients referred to a multidisciplinary pain center. The referral diagnosis for many patients, such as "chronic pain," "psychogenic pain," or "lumbar strain," was frequently found to be incomplete or inaccurate (40%) following a multidisciplinary evaluation that used appropriate diagnostic studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nerve blocks, and qualitative flowmeter. Significant abnormalities were discovered in 76% of the diagnostic tests. An organic origin for pain was found in 98% of these patients. The patients were discharged with objective verification of diagnoses including facet disease, nerve entrapment, temporomandibular joint disease, thoracic outlet syndrome, and herniated discs.

  15. Medial pterygoid trismus (myospasm) following inferior alveolar nerve block: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward F

    2011-01-01

    A patient developed a medial pterygoid trismus (myospasm) the day after receiving three inferior alveolar nerve blocks and a routine restoration. She had a significantly restricted mouth opening and significant medial pterygoid muscle pain when she opened beyond the restriction; however, she had no swelling, lymphadenopathy, or fever. A medial pterygoid myospasm can occur secondary to an inferior alveolar nerve block. This disorder generally is treated by the application of heat, muscle stretches, analgesic and/or muscle relaxant ingestion, and a physical therapy referral. The severity of the disorder typically dictates the extent of therapy that is needed.

  16. Frequency dependent changes in mechanosensitivity of rat knee joint afferents after antidromic saphenous nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Just, S; Heppelmann, B

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of electrical saphenous nerve stimulation (14 V, 1-10 Hz) on the mechanosensitivity of rat knee joint afferents. The responses to passive joint rotations at defined torque were recorded from slowly conducting knee joint afferent nerve fibres (0.6-20.0 m/s). After repeated nerve stimulation with 1 Hz, the mechanosensitivity of about 79% of the units was significantly affected. The effects were most prominent at a torque close to the mechanical threshold. In about 46% of the examined nerve fibres a significant increase was obtained, whereas about 33% reduced their mechanosensitivity. The sensitisation was prevented by an application of 5 microM phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic receptor blocker, together with a neuropeptide Y receptor blocker. An inhibition of N-type Ca(2+) channels by an application of 1 microM omega-conotoxin GVIA caused comparable changes of the mechanosensitivity during the electrical stimulation. Electrical nerve stimulation with higher frequencies resulted in a further reduction of the mean response to joint rotations. After stimulation with 10 Hz, there was a nearly complete loss of mechanosensitivity.In conclusion, antidromic electrical nerve stimulation leads to a frequency dependent transient decrease of the mechanosensitivity. A sensitisation was only obtained at 1 Hz, but this effect may be based on the influence of sympathetic nerve fibres.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF RETROBULBAR AND AURICULOPALPEBRAL NERVE BLOCKS IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, J; Simeone, C; Gulland, F; Johnson, S

    2016-03-01

    Eye lesions are commonly observed in pinnipeds. Clinical assessment is challenging because animals are often blepharospastic and under inhalant anesthesia the globe rotates ventrally, making observation difficult. Retrobulbar and auriculopalpebral nerve block techniques have been developed in other species to alleviate these difficulties and allow for a more thorough ophthalmic exam. Ocular nerve block techniques were developed for California sea lions (CSLs) (Zalophus californianus) using lidocaine hydrochloride 2%. To develop the retrobulbar block, a variety of needle sizes, anatomic approaches, and volumes of methylene blue were injected into the orbits of 10 CSL cadavers. An optimal technique, based on desired distribution of methylene blue dye into periocular muscles and tissues, was determined to be a two-point (ventrolateral and ventromedial) transpalpebral injection with a 20-ga, 1 1/2-inch needle. This technique was then tested using lidocaine on 26 anesthetized animals prior to euthanasia, and on one case with clinical ocular disease. A dose of 4 mg/kg of lidocaine was considered ideal, with positive results and minimal complications. The retrobulbar block had a 76.9% rate of success (using 4 mg/kg of lidocaine), which was defined as the globe returning at least halfway to its central orientation with mydriasis. No systemic adverse effects were noted with this technique. The auriculopalpebral nerve block was also adapted for CSLs from techniques described in dogs, cattle, and horses. Lidocaine was injected (2-3 ml) by subcutaneous infiltration lateral to the orbital rim, where the auriculopalpebral nerve branch courses over the zygomatic arch. This block was used in five blepharospastic animals that were anesthetized for ophthalmic examinations. The auriculopalpebral nerve block was successful in 60% of the cases, which was defined as reduction or elimination of blepharospasm for up to 3 hr. Success appeared to be dependent more on the location of

  18. Bupivacaine-induced cellular entry of QX-314 and its contribution to differential nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Brenneis, C; Kistner, K; Puopolo, M; Jo, S; Roberson, DP; Sisignano, M; Segal, D; Cobos, EJ; Wainger, BJ; Labocha, S; Ferreirós, N; Hehn, C; Tran, J; Geisslinger, G; Reeh, PW; Bean, BP; Woolf, C J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Selective nociceptor fibre block is achieved by introducing the cell membrane impermeant sodium channel blocker lidocaine N-ethyl bromide (QX-314) through transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) channels into nociceptors. We screened local anaesthetics for their capacity to activate TRP channels, and characterized the nerve block obtained by combination with QX-314. Experimental Approach: We investigated TRP channel activation in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings, and cellular QX-314 uptake by MS. To characterize nerve block, compound action potential (CAP) recordings from isolated nerves and behavioural responses were analysed. Key Results: Of the 12 compounds tested, bupivacaine was the most potent activator of ruthenium red-sensitive calcium entry in DRG neurons and activated heterologously expressed TRPA1 channels. QX-314 permeated through TRPA1 channels and accumulated intracellularly after activation of these channels. Upon sciatic injections, QX-314 markedly prolonged bupivacaine's nociceptive block and also extended (to a lesser degree) its motor block. Bupivacaine's blockade of C-, but not A-fibre, CAPs in sciatic nerves was extended by co-application of QX-314. Surprisingly, however, this action was the same in wild-type, TRPA1-knockout and TRPV1/TRPA1-double knockout mice, suggesting a TRP-channel independent entry pathway. Consistent with this, high doses of bupivacaine promoted a non-selective, cellular uptake of QX-314. Conclusions and Implications: Bupivacaine, combined with QX-314, produced a long-lasting sensory nerve block. This did not require QX-314 permeation through TRPA1, although bupivacaine activated these channels. Regardless of entry pathway, the greatly extended duration of block produced by QX-314 and bupivacaine may be clinically useful. PMID:24117225

  19. A conduction block in sciatic nerves can be detected by magnetic motor root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Konoma, Yuko; Fujii, Kengo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-15

    Useful diagnostic techniques for the acute phase of sciatic nerve palsy, an entrapment neuropathy, are not well established. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the diagnostic utility of magnetic sacral motor root stimulation for sciatic nerve palsy. We analyzed the peripheral nerves innervating the abductor hallucis muscle using both electrical stimulations at the ankle and knee and magnetic stimulations at the neuro-foramina and conus medullaris levels in a patient with sciatic nerve palsy at the level of the piriformis muscle due to gluteal compression related to alcohol consumption. On the fourth day after onset, magnetic sacral motor root stimulation using a MATS coil (the MATS coil stimulation method) clearly revealed a conduction block between the knee and the sacral neuro-foramina. Two weeks after onset, needle electromyography supported the existence of the focal lesion. The MATS coil stimulation method clearly revealed a conduction block in the sciatic nerve and is therefore a useful diagnostic tool for the abnormal neurophysiological findings associated with sciatic nerve palsy even at the acute phase.

  20. Defining local nerve blocks for feline distal pelvic limb surgery: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Masataka; Lascelles, B Duncan X; Gerard, Mathew P

    2017-02-01

    Objectives Anatomical and methodological detail is lacking regarding local anesthetic peripheral nerve block techniques for distal pelvic limb surgery in cats. The aim of this study was to develop, describe and test nerve block methods based on cadaveric dissections and dye injections. Methods Ten pairs of feline pelvic limbs (n = 20) were dissected and the tibial nerve (T n.), common fibular (peroneal) nerve (CF n., and its two branches, the superficial fibular [peroneal] nerve [SpF n.] and the deep fibular [peroneal] nerve [DpF n.]) and the saphenous nerve (Sa n.) were identified. Based on these dissections, a 'distal crus block' (selective blockade of the CF n., T n. and Sa n.) and a 'distal pes block' (selective blockade of the SpF n., DpF n., T n. and Sa n.) were developed for surgical procedures in two different regions of the distal pelvic limb. Techniques were tested using new methylene blue (NMB) dye injections in feline pelvic limbs (n = 12). Using a 25 G × 5/8 inch needle and 1 ml syringe, 0.1 ml/kg of NMB dye solution was injected at the site of the CF n., and 0.05 ml/kg was injected at the sites of the SpF n., DpF n., Sa n. and T n. The length and circumference (fully or partially stained) of each stained nerve were measured. Results Positive staining of nerves was observed in 12/12 limbs. The lengths stained for the CF n., DpF n., SpF n., Sa n. and T n. were 27.19 ± 7.13, 20.39 ± 5.57, 22.82 ± 7.13, 30.89 ± 6.99 and 25.16 ± 8.09 mm, respectively. The nerves were fully stained in 12, 12, 10, 11 and 11 out of 12 limbs, respectively. Conclusions and relevance These two, three-point injection methods may be an effective perioperative analgesia technique for feline distal pelvic limb procedures.

  1. Ultrasound-Guided Proximal Suprascapular Nerve Block With Radiofrequency Lesioning for Patients With Malignancy-Associated Recalcitrant Shoulder Pain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Hung, Chen-Yu; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Yang, Rong-Sen; Sun, Wei-Zen; Lin, Chih-Peng

    2015-11-01

    The classic suprascapular nerve block has limitations, such as postural requirements and lack of direct nerve visualization. This series investigated the analgesic effect of ultrasound-guided supraclavicular suprascapular nerve blocks in patients with malignancy-associated shoulder pain. Ablative radiofrequency lesioning of the suprascapular nerve in 6 patients provided substantial pain relief. The mean distance from the suprascapular nerve to the brachial plexus was 8.05 mm, and the mean angle of needle entry was 20.6°. This approach appears to be effective in relieving malignancy-associated shoulder pain and is tolerated by patients unable to sit or lie prone.

  2. Induction of vasospastic attacks despite digital nerve block in Raynaud's disease and phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Freedman, R R; Mayes, M D; Sabharwal, S C

    1989-10-01

    Using a combination of environmental and local cooling, we induced vasospastic attacks of Raynaud's phenomenon in nine of 11 patients with idiopathic Raynaud's disease and in eight of 10 patients with scleroderma. Attacks were defined as occurring if two of the possible three color changes (pallor, cyanosis, and rubor) occurred, and serial photographs were scored by three independent raters. Two fingers on one hand were anesthetized by local injection of lidocaine, and the effectiveness of nerve blocks was verified by plethysmography. The frequency of vasospastic attacks in nerve-blocked fingers was not significantly different from that in the corresponding intact fingers on the contralateral hand. These findings show that the vasospastic attacks of Raynaud's disease and phenomenon can occur without the involvement of efferent digital nerves and argue against the etiologic role of sympathetic hyperactivity.

  3. High Flow Priapism in a Pediatric Patient after Circumcision with Dorsal Penile Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Fantony, Joseph J.; Routh, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the first documented case of high flow priapism after circumcision with dorsal penile nerve block. A 7-year-old male who had undergone circumcision three years before presented to our institution with a 3-year history of persistent nonpainful erections. Workup revealed a high flow priapism and, after discussion of the management options, the patient's family elected continued observation. PMID:27648333

  4. Hip hemiarthroplasty using major lower limb nerve blocks: A preliminary report of a case series

    PubMed Central

    Taha, Ahmad Muhammad; Ghoneim, Mohammed Abd-Elfttah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Major lower limb nerve blocks are relatively safe techniques. However, their efficacy for hip hemiarthroplasty is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of combined femoral, sciatic, obturator and lateral femoral cutaneous (LFC) nerve blocks in providing adequate anesthesia for hip hemiarthroplasty. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 patients with fracture neck femur; who underwent hip hemiarthroplasty, participated in this observational study. In the induction room, all patients received ultrasound-guided femoral, proximal obturator, LFC and parasacral sciatic nerve blocks in addition to local infiltration at the proximal site of the skin incision. Anesthesia was considered to be adequate only if the surgery was completed without any requirement for opioid administration. Results: All patients (100% [95% confidence interval, 86-100%]) had adequate anesthesia. Seventeen patients (85% [95% confidence interval, 63-96%] had mild discomfort during the reduction of the prosthetic femur head back into the hip socket; however, no supplementary analgesics were required. Conclusion: The combined femoral, sciatic, obturator and LFC nerve blocks in addition to local infiltration at the proximal site of skin incision could provide adequate anesthesia for hip hemiarthroplasty. Light sedation before reduction of the prosthetic femur head back into the hip socket is advisable. PMID:25191186

  5. Fixation of bilateral condylar fractures with maxillary and mandibular nerve blocks

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, S.; Sripriya, R.

    2015-01-01

    Mandibulo facial injuries present special problems to the anesthesiologist in terms of the difficult airway. Hence, if regional anesthesia could be possible, it necessarily removes the major concern with airway access. We present a case of bilateral mandibular condylar fracture dislocation with the maxillary and mandibular nerve blocks on both sides. The surgery went on smoothly without any perioperative problems. PMID:26417146

  6. Safety profile of sural nerve in posterolateral approach to the ankle joint: MRI study.

    PubMed

    Ellapparadja, Pregash; Husami, Yaya; McLeod, Ian

    2014-05-01

    The posterolateral approach to ankle joint is well suited for ORIF of posterior malleolar fractures. There are no major neurovascular structures endangering this approach other than the sural nerve. The sural nerve is often used as an autologous peripheral nerve graft and provides sensation to the lateral aspect of the foot. The aim of this paper is to measure the precise distance of the sural nerve from surrounding soft tissue structures so as to enable safe placement of skin incision in posterolateral approach. This is a retrospective image review study involving 64 MRI scans. All measurements were made from Axial T1 slices. The key findings of the paper is the safety window for the sural nerve from the lateral border of tendoachilles (TA) is 7 mm, 1.3 cm and 2 cm at 3 cm above ankle joint, at the ankle joint and at the distal tip of fibula respectively. Our study demonstrates the close relationship of the nerve in relation to TA and fibula in terms of exact measurements. The safety margins established in this study should enable the surgeon in preventing endangerment of the sural nerve encountered in this approach.

  7. 2,4-Dinitrophenol blocks neurodegeneration and preserves sciatic nerve function after trauma.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Rodrigo F Madeiro; Martinez, Ana M Blanco; Ferreira, Sergio T

    2010-05-01

    Preventing the harm caused by nerve degeneration is a major challenge in neurodegenerative diseases and in various forms of trauma to the nervous system. The aim of the current work was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a compound with newly recognized neuroprotective properties, on sciatic-nerve degeneration following a crush injury. Sciatic-nerve injury was induced by unilateral application of an aneurysm clip. Four groups of mice were used: uninjured, injured treated with vehicle (PBS), injured treated with two intraperitoneal doses of DNP (0.06 mg DNP/kg every 24 h), and injured treated with four doses of DNP (every 12 h). Animals were sacrificed 48 h post injury and both injured and uninjured (contralateral) sciatic nerves were processed for light and electron microscopy. Morphometric, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical analysis of injured nerves established that DNP prevented axonal degeneration, blocked cytoskeletal disintegration, and preserved the immunoreactivity of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Neuregulin 1 (Nrg1), proteins implicated in neuronal survival and myelination. Functional tests revealed preservation of limb function following injury in DNP-treated animals. Results indicate that DNP prevents nerve degeneration and suggest that it may be a useful small-molecule adjuvant in the development of novel therapeutic approaches in nerve injury.

  8. US-Guided Femoral and Sciatic Nerve Blocks for Analgesia During Endovenous Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, Saim Ceken, Kagan; Alimoglu, Emel; Sindel, Timur

    2013-02-15

    Endovenous laser ablation may be associated with significant pain when performed under standard local tumescent anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of femoral and sciatic nerve blocks for analgesia during endovenous ablation in patients with lower extremity venous insufficiency. During a 28-month period, ultrasound-guided femoral or sciatic nerve blocks were performed to provide analgesia during endovenous laser ablation in 506 legs and 307 patients. The femoral block (n = 402) was performed at the level of the inguinal ligament, and the sciatic block at the posterior midthigh (n = 124), by injecting a diluted lidocaine solution under ultrasound guidance. After the blocks, endovenous laser ablations and other treatments (phlebectomy or foam sclerotherapy) were performed in the standard fashion. After the procedures, a visual analogue pain scale (1-10) was used for pain assessment. After the blocks, pain scores were 0 or 1 (no pain) in 240 legs, 2 or 3 (uncomfortable) in 225 legs, and 4 or 5 (annoying) in 41 legs. Patients never experienced any pain higher than score 5. The statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between the pain scores of the right leg versus the left leg (p = 0.321) and between the pain scores after the femoral versus sciatic block (p = 0.7). Ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks may provide considerable reduction of pain during endovenous laser and other treatments, such as ambulatory phlebectomy and foam sclerotherapy. They may make these procedures more comfortable for the patient and easier for the operator.

  9. Interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging with a clinical linear array ultrasound probe for guiding nerve blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; West, Simeon J.; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate identification of tissue structures such as nerves and blood vessels is critically important for interventional procedures such as nerve blocks. Ultrasound imaging is widely used as a guidance modality to visualize anatomical structures in real-time. However, identification of nerves and small blood vessels can be very challenging, and accidental intra-neural or intra-vascular injections can result in significant complications. Multi-spectral photoacoustic imaging can provide high sensitivity and specificity for discriminating hemoglobin- and lipid-rich tissues. However, conventional surface-illumination-based photoacoustic systems suffer from limited sensitivity at large depths. In this study, for the first time, an interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging (IMPA) system was used to image nerves in a swine model in vivo. Pulsed excitation light with wavelengths in the ranges of 750 - 900 nm and 1150 - 1300 nm was delivered inside the body through an optical fiber positioned within the cannula of an injection needle. Ultrasound waves were received at the tissue surface using a clinical linear array imaging probe. Co-registered B-mode ultrasound images were acquired using the same imaging probe. Nerve identification was performed using a combination of B-mode ultrasound imaging and electrical stimulation. Using a linear model, spectral-unmixing of the photoacoustic data was performed to provide image contrast for oxygenated and de-oxygenated hemoglobin, water and lipids. Good correspondence between a known nerve location and a lipid-rich region in the photoacoustic images was observed. The results indicate that IMPA is a promising modality for guiding nerve blocks and other interventional procedures. Challenges involved with clinical translation are discussed.

  10. Pudendal Nerve Stimulation and Block by a Wireless Controlled Implantable Stimulator in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guangning; Wang, Jicheng; Shen, Bing; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the functionality of a wireless controlled implantable stimulator designed for stimulation and block of the pudendal nerve. Materials and Methods In 5 cats under α-chloralose anesthesia, the stimulator was implanted underneath the skin on the left side in the lower back along the sacral spine. Two tripolar cuff electrodes were implanted bilaterally on the pudendal nerves in addition to one bipolar cuff electrode that was implanted on the left side central to the tripolar cuff electrode. The stimulator provided high frequency (5-20 kHz) biphasic stimulation waveforms to the two tripolar electrodes and low frequency (1-100 Hz) rectangular pulses to the bipolar electrode. Bladder and urethral pressures were measured to determine the effects of pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) or block. Results The maximal (70-100 cmH2O) urethral pressure generated by 20 Hz PNS applied via the bipolar electrode was completely eliminated by the pudendal nerve block induced by the high frequency stimulation (6-15 kHz, 6-10 V) applied via the two tripolar electrodes. In a partially filled bladder 20-30 Hz PNS (2-8 V, 0.2 ms) but not 5 Hz stimulation applied via the bipolar electrode elicited a large sustained bladder contraction (45.9±13.4 to 52.0±22 cmH2O). During cystometry, the 5 Hz PNS significantly (P<0.05) increased bladder capacity to 176.5±27.1% of control capacity. Conclusions The wireless controlled implantable stimulator successfully generated the required waveforms for stimulation and block of pudendal nerve, which will be useful for restoring bladder functions after spinal cord injury (SCI). PMID:24320615

  11. Paravertebral cervical nerve block in a patient suffering from a Pancoast tumor.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Raquel; Pascual, Gabriel; Aguilar, José L; Atanassoff, Peter G

    2010-12-01

    In patients with aggressive tumors resistant to conventional pain treatment, regional anaesthesia frequently becomes an alternative therapy. Cervical paravertebral nerve block among several access options to the brachial plexus is barely ever used. We present a case with severe shoulder and upper extremity pain owing to an expanding Pancoast tumor exhibiting compression upon the brachial plexus. Continuous intrathecal morphine infusion and adjuvant treatment was not sufficient to render the patient pain-free. With the addition of paravertebral nerve blockade the patient's pain improved substantially, however without impacting his longevity.

  12. Anesthetic efficacy of lidocaine/meperidine for inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Bigby, Jason; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, single-blind study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of lidocaine with epinephrine to lidocaine plus meperidine with epinephrine for inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IAN) in patients with mandibular posterior teeth experiencing irreversible pulpitis. Forty-eight emergency patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth randomly received, in a single-blind manner, 36 mg of lidocaine with 18 mug epinephrine or 36 mg of lidocaine with 18 mug of epinephrine plus 36 mg meperidine with 18 mug epinephrine, using a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block. Endodontic access was begun 15 minutes after solution deposition, and all patients were required to have profound lip numbness. Success was defined as no or mild pain (visual analog scale recordings) upon endodontic access or initial instrumentation. The success rate for the inferior alveolar nerve block using the lidocaine solution was 26%, and for the lidocaine/meperidine solution, the success rate was 12%. There was no significant difference (p = 0.28) between the two solutions. In conclusion, for mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis, the addition of 36 mg of meperidine to a lidocaine solution administered in a conventional IAN block did not improve the success rate over a standard lidocaine solution.

  13. Comparison of peripheral nerve stimulator versus ultrasonography guided axillary block using multiple injection technique

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Sharma, DK; Sibi, Maj. E; Datta, Barun; Gogoi, Biraj

    2014-01-01

    Background: The established methods of nerve location were based on either proper motor response on nerve stimulation (NS) or ultrasound guidance. In this prospective, randomised, observer-blinded study, we compared ultrasound guidance with NS for axillary brachial plexus block using 0.5% bupivacaine with the multiple injection techniques. Methods: A total of 120 patients receiving axillary brachial plexus block with 0.5% bupivacaine, using a multiple injection technique, were randomly allocated to receive either NS (group NS, n = 60), or ultrasound guidance (group US, n = 60) for nerve location. A blinded observer recorded the onset of sensory and motor blocks, skin punctures, needle redirections, procedure-related pain and patient satisfaction. Results: The median (range) number of skin punctures were 2 (2–4) in group US and 3 (2–5) in group NS (P < 0.001). No differences were observed in the onset of sensory block in group NS (6.17 ± 1.22 min) and in group US (6.33 ± 0.48 min) (P = 0.16), and in onset of motor block (23.33 ± 1.26 min) in group US and (23.17 ± 1.79 min) in group NS; P > =0.27). Insufficient block was observed in three patient (5%) of group US and four patients (6.67%) of group NS (P > =0.35). Patient acceptance was similarly good in the two groups. Conclusion: Multiple injection axillary blocks with ultrasound guidance provided similar success rates and comparable incidence of complications as compared with NS guidance with 20 ml 0.5% bupivacaine. PMID:25624532

  14. ANATOMICAL RELATIONSHIP OF THE SUPRASCAPULAR NERVE TO THE CORACOID PROCESS, ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT AND ACROMION

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Gaspar, Eric Figueiredo; Siqueira, Karina Levy; Filho, Nivaldo Souza Cardozo; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish the anatomical relationship of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) located in the suprascapular notch, to the medial border of the base of the coracoid process, the acromial joint surface of the acromioclavicular joint and the anterolateral border of the acromion. Methods: We dissected 16 shoulders of 16 cadavers (9 males and 7 females). The distances from the suprascapular nerve (at its passage beneath the transverse ligament) to certain fixed points on the medial border of the base of the coracoid process, the acromial joint surface of the acromioclavicular joint, and the anterolateral border of the acromion were measured with the aid of calipers and correlated with age and sex. Cadavers with previous surgical interventions were excluded. Results: The mean measurements from the notch of the suprascapular nerve were: 3.9 cm to the medial border of the base of the coracoid process (ranging from 3.1 cm to 5.2 cm); 4.7 cm to the acromioclavicular joint (ranging from 3.9 cm to 5.2 cm); and 6.1 cm to the anterolateral border of the acromion (ranging from 5.7 cm to 6.8 cm). Conclusion: Accurate anatomical knowledge of the nerves of the anterior region of the shoulder is essential in order to avoid iatrogenic injuries and to achieve satisfactory results in surgical treatment for shoulder diseases, whether performed as open or arthroscopic procedures. PMID:27022551

  15. A comparative evaluation of anesthetic efficacy of articaine 4% and lidocaine 2% with anterior middle superior alveolar nerve block and infraorbital nerve block: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Suma Prahlad; Saraf, Prahlad Annappa; Kamatagi, Laxmikant; Hugar, Santosh; Tamgond, Shridevi; Patil, Jayakumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ideal maxillary injection should produce a rapid onset of profound pulpal anesthesia for multiple teeth from a single needle penetration. The main objective is to compare the efficacy of articaine 4% and lidocaine 2% and to compare anterior middle superior alveolar nerve block (AMSANB) and infraorbital nerve block (IONB) for anesthesia of maxillary teeth. Materials and Methods: Forty patients undergoing root canal treatment of maxillary anteriors and premolars were included and randomly divided into four groups of ten each. Group I: patients receiving AMSANB with articaine, Group II: Patients receiving IONB with articaine, Group III: Patients receiving AMSANB with lidocaine, Group IV: Patients receiving IONB with lidocaine. The scores of onset of anesthesia and pain perception were statistically analyzed. Results: Onset of action was fastest for articaine with AMSANB and slowest for lidocaine with IONB by Tukey's test. A significant change was observed in the electrical pulp test readings at onset and at 30 min by paired t-test. All patients experienced mild pain during the procedure recorded by visual analog scale. Conclusion: Articaine 4% proved to be more efficacious than lidocaine 2%, and AMSANB was more advantageous than IONB in securing anesthesia of maxillary anteriors and premolars. PMID:27994313

  16. Action potential propagation and propagation block by GABA in rat posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M B; Zhang, S J

    1995-01-01

    1. A theoretical model was developed to investigate action potential propagation in posterior pituitary nerve terminals. This model was then used to evaluate the efficacy of depolarizing and shunting GABA responses on action potential propagation. 2. Experimental data obtained from the posterior pituitary with patch clamp techniques were used to derive empirical expressions for the voltage and time dependence of the nerve terminal Na+ and K+ channels. The essential structure employed here was based on anatomical and cable data from the posterior pituitary, and consisted of a long cylindrical axon (diameter, 0.5 mm) with a large spherical swelling (diameter, 4-21 mm) in the middle. 3. In the absence of an inhibitory conductance, simulated action potentials propagated with high fidelity through the nerve terminal. Swellings could block propagation, but only when sizes exceeded those observed in the posterior pituitary. Adding axonal branches reduced the critical size only slightly. These results suggested that action potentials invade the entire posterior pituitary nerve terminal in the absence of inhibition or depression. 4. The addition of inhibitory conductance to a swelling caused simulated action potentials to fail at the swelling. Depolarizing inhibitory conductances were 1.6 times more effective than shunting inhibitory conductances in blocking propagation. 5. Inhibitory conductances within the range of experimentally observed magnitudes and localized to swellings in the observed range of sizes were too weak to block simulated action potentials. However, twofold enhancement of GABA responses by neurosteroid resulted in currents strong enough to block propagation in realistic swelling sizes. 6. GABA could block simulated propagation without neurosteroid enhancement provided that GABA was present throughout a region in the order of a few hundred micrometres. For this widespread inhibition depolarizing conductance was 2.2 times more effective than shunting

  17. Facial palsy after inferior alveolar nerve block: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, V; Arbab-Chirani, R; Tea, S H; Roux, M

    2010-11-01

    Bell's palsy is an idiopathic and acute, peripheral nerve palsy resulting in inability to control facial muscles on the affected side because of the involvement of the facial nerve. This study describes a case of Bell's palsy that developed after dental anaesthesia. A 34-year-old pregnant woman at 35 weeks of amenorrhea, with no history of systemic disease, was referred by her dentist for treatment of a mandibular left molar in pulpitis. An inferior alveolar nerve block was made prior to the access cavity preparation. 2h later, the patient felt the onset of a complete paralysis of the left-sided facial muscles. The medical history, the physical examination and the complementary exams led neurologists to the diagnosis of Bell's palsy. The treatment and results of the 1-year follow-up are presented and discussed. Bell's palsy is a rare complication of maxillofacial surgery or dental procedures, the mechanisms of which remain uncertain.

  18. Post-stimulation block of frog sciatic nerve by high-frequency (kHz) biphasic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangning; Xiao, Zhiying; Wang, Jicheng; Shen, Bing; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2017-04-01

    This study determined if high-frequency biphasic stimulation can induce nerve conduction block that persists after the stimulation is terminated, i.e., post-stimulation block. The frog sciatic nerve-muscle preparation was used in the study. Muscle contraction force induced by low-frequency (0.5 Hz) nerve stimulation was recorded to indicate the occurrence and recovery of nerve block induced by the high-frequency (5 or 10 kHz) biphasic stimulation. Nerve block was observed during high-frequency stimulation and after termination of the stimulation. The recovery from post-stimulation block occurred in two distinct phases. During the first phase, the complete block induced during high-frequency stimulation was maintained. The average maximal duration for the first phase was 107 ± 50 s. During the second phase, the block gradually or abruptly reversed. The duration of both first and second phases was dependent on stimulation intensity and duration but not frequency. Stimulation of higher intensity (1.4-2 times block threshold) and longer duration (5 min) produced the longest period (249 ± 58 s) for a complete recovery. Post-stimulation block can be induced by high-frequency biphasic stimulation, which is important for future investigations of the blocking mechanisms and for optimizing the stimulation parameters or protocols in clinical applications.

  19. Needle stylet with integrated optical fibers for spectroscopic contrast during peripheral nerve blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Adrien E.; van der Voort, Marjolein; Roggeveen, Stefan; Lucassen, Gerald; Bierhoff, Walter; Hendriks, Benno H. W.; Brynolf, Marcus; Holmström, Björn

    2011-07-01

    The effectiveness of peripheral nerve blocks is highly dependent on the accuracy at which the needle tip is navigated to the target injection site. Even when electrical stimulation is utilized in combination with ultrasound guidance, determining the proximity of the needle tip to the target region close to the nerve can be challenging. Optical reflectance spectroscopy could provide additional information about tissues that is complementary to these navigation methods. We demonstrate a novel needle stylet for acquiring spectra from tissue at the tip of a commercial 20-gauge needle. The stylet has integrated optical fibers that deliver broadband light to tissue and receive scattered light. Two spectrometers resolve the light that is received from tissue across the wavelength range of 500-1600 nm. In our pilot study, measurements are acquired from a postmortem dissection of the brachial plexus of a swine. Clear differences are observed between spectra acquired from nerves and those acquired from adjacent tissue structures. We conclude that spectra acquired with the stylet have the potential to increase the accuracy with which peripheral nerve blocks are performed.

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Obturator Nerve Block: A Focused Review on Anatomy and Updated Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Tatsuo; Kamibayashi, Takahiko

    2017-01-01

    This review outlines the anatomy of the obturator nerve and the indications for obturator nerve block (ONB). Ultrasound-guided ONB techniques and unresolved issues regarding these procedures are also discussed. An ONB is performed to prevent thigh adductor jerk during transurethral resection of bladder tumor, provide analgesia for knee surgery, treat hip pain, and improve persistent hip adductor spasticity. Various ultrasound-guided ONB techniques can be used and can be classified according to whether the approach is distal or proximal. In the distal approach, a transducer is placed at the inguinal crease; the anterior and posterior branches of the nerve are then blocked by two injections of local anesthetic directed toward the interfascial planes where each branch lies. The proximal approach comprises a single injection of local anesthetic into the interfascial plane between the pectineus and obturator externus muscles. Several proximal approaches involving different patient and transducer positions are reported. The proximal approach may be superior for reducing the dose of local anesthetic and providing successful blockade of the obturator nerve, including the hip articular branch, when compared with the distal approach. This hypothesis and any differences between the proximal ONB techniques need to be explored in future studies. PMID:28280738

  1. [Ultrasound-guided cutaneous intercostal branches nerves block: A good analgesic alternative for gallbladder open surgery].

    PubMed

    Fernández Martín, M T; López Álvarez, S; Mozo Herrera, G; Platero Burgos, J J

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the standard treatment for gallbladder diseases. However, there are still some patients for whom conversion to open surgery is required. This surgery can produce significant post-operative pain. Opioids drugs have traditionally been used to treat this pain, but side effects have led to seeking alternatives (plexus, nerve or fascia blocks or wound). The cases are presented of 4 patients subjected to ultrasound-guided intercostal branches blocks in the mid-axillary line from T6 to T12 with levobupivacaine as an analgesic alternative in open surgery of gallbladder, with satisfactory results.

  2. Management of exaggerated gagging in prosthodontic patients using glossopharyngeal nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Varsha; V, Yuvraj; Nair, Preeti P; Thomas, Shaji; Krishna, Akash; Cyriac, Sumeeth

    2011-01-01

    When gag reflex becomes abnormally active, it poses difficulty for the prosthodontists, as it hinders the process of fixed partial denture construction beginning with tooth preparation till impression making. In this case-report, the authors used a nerve block technique which is popular among anaesthetist and otolaryngologist, but is being applied in the field of prosthodontics for the first time, to tide over the difficulty. PMID:22679052

  3. Anterior and middle superior alveolar nerve block for anesthesia of maxillary teeth using conventional syringe

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Ignacio; Soto, Reinaldo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dental procedures in the maxilla typically require multiple injections and may inadvertently anesthetize facial structures and affect the smile line. To minimize these inconveniences and reduce the number of total injections, a relatively new injection technique has been proposed for maxillary procedures, the anterior and middle superior alveolar (AMSA) nerve block, which achieves pulpal anesthesia from the central incisor to second premolar through palatal approach with a single injection. The purpose of this article is to provide background information on the anterior and middle superior alveolar nerve block and demonstrate its success rates of pulpal anesthesia using the conventional syringe. Materials and Methods: Thirty Caucasian patients (16 men and 14 women) with an average age of 22 years-old, belonging to the School of Dentistry of Los Andes University, were selected. All the patients received an AMSA nerve block on one side of the maxilla using the conventional syringe, 1 ml of lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:100.000 was injected to all the patients. Results: The AMSA nerve block obtained a 66% anesthetic success in the second premolar, 40% in the first premolar, 60% in the canine, 23.3% in the lateral incisor, and 16.7% in the central incisor. Conclusions: Because of the unpredictable anesthetic success of the experimental teeth and variable anesthesia duration, the technique is disadvantageous for clinical application as the first choice, counting with other techniques that have greater efficacy in the maxilla. Although, anesthetizing the teeth without numbing the facial muscles may be useful in restorative dentistry. PMID:23559916

  4. Effect of a new local anesthetic buffering device on pain reduction during nerve block injections.

    PubMed

    Comerci, Andrew W; Maller, Steven C; Townsend, Richard D; Teepe, John D; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this double-blind, split-mouth, randomized human clinical study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new sodium bicarbonate local anesthetic buffering device (Onset) in reducing pain associated with dental injections. Twenty patients were given bilateral inferior alveolar (IA) and long buccal (LB) nerve block injections and asked to quantify the pain experienced during injection on a visual analog scale (0, no pain; 10, worst possible pain). One side of the mouth received standard-of-care injections of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. On the opposite side, after the buffering device was used to mix the components within the anesthetic carpule, patients received injections of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine buffered 9:1 with 8.4% sodium bicarbonate. The mean pain scores were 2.7 (SD, 1.3) for buffered and 2.7 (SD, 1.9) for unbuffered IA injections. The mean pain scores were 2.0 (SD, 1.4) for buffered and 2.7 (SD, 1.8) for unbuffered LB injections. The data were analyzed with a paired t test (α = 0.05), and no statistically significant difference was found between groups for IA (P = 0.94) or LB (P = 0.17) nerve block injections. In this study of patients receiving common dental nerve block injections, local anesthetic buffering technology did not significantly lessen pain compared to that experienced during a standard unbuffered injection.

  5. The Effect of 2 Injection Speeds on Local Anesthetic Discomfort During Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Melo, Marcelo Rodrigo; Sabey, Mark Jon Santana; Lima, Carla Juliane; de Almeida Souza, Liane Maciel; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This randomized double-blind crossover trial investigated the discomfort associated with 2 injection speeds, low (60 seconds) and slow (100 seconds), during inferior alveolar nerve block by using 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine. Three phases were considered: (a) mucosa perforation, (b) needle insertion, and (c) solution injection. Thirty-two healthy adult volunteers needing bilateral inferior alveolar nerve blocks at least 1 week apart were enrolled in the present study. The anesthetic procedure discomfort was recorded by volunteers on a 10-cm visual analog scale in each phase for both injection speeds. Comparison between the 2 anesthesia speeds in each phase was performed by paired t test. Results showed no statistically significant difference between injection speeds regarding perforation (P = .1016), needle placement (P = .0584), or speed injection (P = .1806). The discomfort in all phases was considered low. We concluded that the 2 injection speeds tested did not affect the volunteers' pain perception during inferior alveolar nerve blocks. PMID:26398126

  6. Glossopharyngeal Nerve Block versus Lidocaine Spray to Improve Tolerance in Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ortega Ramírez, Moisés; Linares Segovia, Benigno; García Cuevas, Marco Antonio; Sánchez Romero, Jorge Luis; Botello Buenrostro, Illich; Amador Licona, Norma; Guízar Mendoza, Juan Manuel; Guerrero Romero, Jesús Francisco; Vázquez Zárate, Víctor Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the Study. To compare the effect of glossopharyngeal nerve block with topical anesthesia on the tolerance of patients to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Methods. We performed a clinical trial in one hundred patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following two groups: (1) treatment with bilateral glossopharyngeal nerve block (GFNB) and intravenous midazolam or (2) treatment with topical anesthetic (TASS) and intravenous midazolam. We evaluated sedation, tolerance to the procedure, hemodynamic stability, and adverse symptoms. Results. We studied 46 men and 54 women, from 17 to 78 years of age. The procedure was reported without discomfort in 48 patients (88%) in the GFNB group and 32 (64%) in the TAAS group; 6 patients (12%) in GFNB group and 18 (36%) in TAAS group reported the procedure as little discomfort (χ2 = 3.95, P = 0.04). There was no difference in frequency of nausea (4% in both groups) and retching, 4% versus 8% for GFNB and TASS group, respectively (P = 0.55). Conclusions. The use of glossopharyngeal nerve block provides greater comfort and tolerance to the patient undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. It also reduces the need for sedation. PMID:23533386

  7. Glossopharyngeal Nerve Block versus Lidocaine Spray to Improve Tolerance in Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ortega Ramírez, Moisés; Linares Segovia, Benigno; García Cuevas, Marco Antonio; Sánchez Romero, Jorge Luis; Botello Buenrostro, Illich; Amador Licona, Norma; Guízar Mendoza, Juan Manuel; Guerrero Romero, Jesús Francisco; Vázquez Zárate, Víctor Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the Study. To compare the effect of glossopharyngeal nerve block with topical anesthesia on the tolerance of patients to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Methods. We performed a clinical trial in one hundred patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following two groups: (1) treatment with bilateral glossopharyngeal nerve block (GFNB) and intravenous midazolam or (2) treatment with topical anesthetic (TASS) and intravenous midazolam. We evaluated sedation, tolerance to the procedure, hemodynamic stability, and adverse symptoms. Results. We studied 46 men and 54 women, from 17 to 78 years of age. The procedure was reported without discomfort in 48 patients (88%) in the GFNB group and 32 (64%) in the TAAS group; 6 patients (12%) in GFNB group and 18 (36%) in TAAS group reported the procedure as little discomfort (χ (2) = 3.95, P = 0.04). There was no difference in frequency of nausea (4% in both groups) and retching, 4% versus 8% for GFNB and TASS group, respectively (P = 0.55). Conclusions. The use of glossopharyngeal nerve block provides greater comfort and tolerance to the patient undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. It also reduces the need for sedation.

  8. Efficacy of Bilateral Mental Nerve Block with Bupivacaine for Postoperative Pain Control in Mandibular Parasymphysis Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mesgarzadeh, Ali Hossein; Afsari, Hosein; Pourkhamne, Sohrab; Shahamfar, Mohamadreza

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Postoperative pain control is extremely important for both patients and surgeons; in this context, long-acting local anesthesia can play an important role after open reduction of maxillofacial fractures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of bilateral mental nerve block with bupivacaine on postoperative pain control in mandibular symphyseal fractures. Materials and methods. Fifty patients with pure mandibular symphyseal fractures were studied in two control and study groups. In contrast to the control group, the study group received bilateral mental nerve block with bupivacaine postoperatively. Patients were examined in relation to pain severity and opioid analgesic drug need sequences. Results. The study group needed significantly less opioid than the control group (P<0.01, U=141). The control and study groups were different in first opioid administration time. The control and study groups received first opioid dose in 0-2 and 2-4 hours, respectively. Conclusion. Bilateral mental nerve blocks with bupivacaine can reduce opioid analgesic need and it has a positive effect on postoperative pain control in mandibular symphyseal fractures. PMID:25346837

  9. Long-term neurological complications associated with surgery and peripheral nerve blockade: outcomes after 1065 consecutive blocks.

    PubMed

    Watts, S A; Sharma, D J

    2007-02-01

    Peripheral nerve blockade is gaining popularity as an analgesic option for both upper or lower limb surgery. Published evidence supports the improved efficacy of regional techniques when compared to conventional opioid analgesia. The incidence of neurological deficit after surgery associated with peripheral nerve block is unclear. This paper reports on neurological outcomes occurring after 1065 consecutive peripheral nerve blocks over a one-year period from a single institution. All patients receiving peripheral nerve blocks for surgery were prospectively followed for up to 12 months to determine the incidence and probable cause of any persistent neurological deficit. Formal independent neurological review and testing was undertaken as indicated. Thirteen patients reported symptoms that warranted further investigation. A variety of probable causes were identified, with peripheral nerve block being implicated in two cases (one resolved at nine months and one remaining persistent). Overall incidence of block-related neuropathy was 0.22%. Persistent postoperative neuropathy is a rare but serious complication of surgery associated with peripheral nerve block. Formal follow-up of all such blocks is recommended to assess causality and allow for early intervention.

  10. Nerve Blocks

    MedlinePlus

    ... mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams ...

  11. Addition of Dexamethasone and Buprenorphine to Bupivacaine Sciatic Nerve Block: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    YaDeau, Jacques T.; Paroli, Leonardo; Fields, Kara G.; Kahn, Richard L.; LaSala, Vincent R.; Jules-Elysee, Kethy M.; Kim, David H.; Haskins, Stephen C.; Hedden, Jacob; Goon, Amanda; Roberts, Matthew M.; Levine, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Sciatic nerve block provides analgesia after foot and ankle surgery, but block duration may be insufficient. We hypothesized that perineural dexamethasone and buprenorphine would reduce pain scores at 24 hours. Methods Ninety patients received ultrasound-guided sciatic (25 mL 0.25% bupivacaine) and adductor canal (10 mL 0.25% bupivacaine) blockade, with random assignment into 3 groups (30 patients per group): control blocks + intravenous dexamethasone (4 mg) (control); control blocks + intravenous buprenorphine (150 mcg) + intravenous dexamethasone (intravenous buprenorphine); nerve blocks containing buprenorphine + dexamethasone (perineural). Patients received mepivacaine neuraxial anesthesia and postoperative oxycodone / acetaminophen, meloxicam, pregabalin, and ondansetron. Patients and assessors were blinded to group assignment. The primary outcome was pain with movement at 24 hours. Results There was no difference in pain with movement at 24 hours (median score 0). However, the perineural group had longer block duration vs control (45.6 vs 30.0 hr). Perineural patients had lower scores for “worst pain” vs control (median 0 vs 2). Both intravenous buprenorphine and perineural groups were less likely to use opioids on the day after surgery, vs control (28.6%, 28.6%, 60.7%, respectively). Nausea after intravenous buprenorphine (but not perineural buprenorphine) was severe, frequent, and bothersome. Conclusions Pain scores were very low at 24 hours after surgery in the context of multimodal analgesia and were not improved by additives. However, perineural buprenorphine and dexamethasone prolonged block duration, reduced the worst pain experienced, and reduced opioid use. Intravenous buprenorphine caused troubling nausea and vomiting. Future research is needed to confirm and extend these observations. PMID:25974277

  12. Percutaneous sciatic nerve block with tramadol induces analgesia and motor blockade in two animal pain models

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, A.M.; Ashmawi, H.A.; Costa, L.S.; Posso, I.P.; Slullitel, A.

    2011-01-01

    Local anesthetic efficacy of tramadol has been reported following intradermal application. Our aim was to investigate the effect of perineural tramadol as the sole analgesic in two pain models. Male Wistar rats (280-380 g; N = 5/group) were used in these experiments. A neurostimulation-guided sciatic nerve block was performed and 2% lidocaine or tramadol (1.25 and 5 mg) was perineurally injected in two different animal pain models. In the flinching behavior test, the number of flinches was evaluated and in the plantar incision model, mechanical and heat thresholds were measured. Motor effects of lidocaine and tramadol were quantified and a motor block score elaborated. Tramadol, 1.25 mg, completely blocked the first and reduced the second phase of the flinching behavior test. In the plantar incision model, tramadol (1.25 mg) increased both paw withdrawal latency in response to radiant heat (8.3 ± 1.1, 12.7 ± 1.8, 8.4 ± 0.8, and 11.1 ± 3.3 s) and mechanical threshold in response to von Frey filaments (459 ± 82.8, 447.5 ± 91.7, 320.1 ± 120, 126.43 ± 92.8 mN) at 5, 15, 30, and 60 min, respectively. Sham block or contralateral sciatic nerve block did not differ from perineural saline injection throughout the study in either model. The effect of tramadol was not antagonized by intraperitoneal naloxone. High dose tramadol (5 mg) blocked motor function as well as 2% lidocaine. In conclusion, tramadol blocks nociception and motor function in vivo similar to local anesthetics. PMID:22183244

  13. Excitation block in a nerve fibre model owing to potassium-dependent changes in myelin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brazhe, A. R.; Maksimov, G. V.; Mosekilde, E.; Sosnovtseva, O. V.

    2011-01-01

    The myelinated nerve fibre is formed by an axon and Schwann cells or oligodendrocytes that sheath the axon by winding around it in tight myelin layers. Repetitive stimulation of a fibre is known to result in accumulation of extracellular potassium ions, especially between the axon and the myelin. Uptake of potassium leads to Schwann cell swelling and myelin restructuring that impacts the electrical properties of the myelin. In order to further understand the dynamic interaction that takes place between the myelin and the axon, we have modelled submyelin potassium accumulation and related changes in myelin resistance during prolonged high-frequency stimulation. We predict that potassium-mediated decrease in myelin resistance leads to a functional excitation block with various patterns of altered spike trains. The patterns are found to depend on stimulation frequency and amplitude and to range from no block (less than 100 Hz) to a complete block (greater than 500 Hz). The transitional patterns include intermittent periodic block with interleaved spiking and non-spiking intervals of different relative duration as well as an unstable regime with chaotic switching between the spiking and non-spiking states. Intermittent conduction blocks are accompanied by oscillations of extracellular potassium. The mechanism of conductance block based on myelin restructuring complements the already known and modelled block via hyperpolarization mediated by the axonal sodium pump and potassium depolarization. PMID:22419976

  14. Neurotoxicity Questions Regarding Common Peripheral Nerve Block Adjuvants in Combination with Local Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Joshua B.; Schott, Nicholas J.; Kentor, Michael L.; Williams, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Outline the analgesic role of perineural adjuvants for local anesthetic nerve block injections, and evaluate current knowledge regarding whether adjuvants modulate the neurocytologic properties of local anesthetics. Recent Findings Perineural adjuvant medications such as dexmedetomidine, clonidine, buprenorphine, dexamethasone, and midazolam play unique analgesic roles. The dosing of these medications to prevent neurotoxicity is characterized in various cellular and in vivo models. Much of this mitigation may be via reducing the dose of local anesthetic used while achieving equal or superior analgesia. Dose-concentration animal models have shown no evidence of deleterious effects. Clinical observations regarding blocks with combined bupivacaine-clonidine-buprenorphine-dexamethasone have shown beneficial effects on block duration and rebound pain without long-term evidence of neurotoxicity. In vitro and in vivo studies of perineural clonidine and dexmedetomidine show attenuation of perineural inflammatory responses generated by local anesthetics. Summary Dexmedetomidine added as a peripheral nerve blockade adjuvant improves block duration without neurotoxic properties. The combined adjuvants clonidine, buprenorphine, and dexamethasone do not appear to alter local anesthetic neurotoxicity. Midazolam significantly increases local anesthetic neurotoxicity in vitro, but when combined with clonidine-buprenorphine-dexamethasone (sans local anesthetic) produces no in vitro or in vivo neurotoxicity. Further larger-species animal testing and human trials will be required to reinforce the clinical applicability of these findings. PMID:26207854

  15. Transversus Abdominis Plane Versus Ilioinguinal and Iliohypogastric Nerve Blocks for Analgesia Following Open Inguinal Herniorrhaphy*

    PubMed Central

    Stav, Anatoli; Reytman, Leonid; Stav, Michael-Yohay; Troitsa, Anton; Kirshon, Mark; Alfici, Ricardo; Dudkiewicz, Mickey; Sternberg, Ahud

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that preoperative (pre-op) ultrasound (US)-guided posterior transversus abdominis plane block (TAP) and US-guided ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block (ILI+IHG) will produce a comparable analgesia after Lichtenstein patch tension-free method of open inguinal hernia repair in adult men. The genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve will be blocked separately. Methods This is a prospective, randomized, controlled, and observer-blinded clinical study. A total of 166 adult men were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a pre-op TAP group, a pre-op ILI+IHG group, and a control group. An intraoperative block of the genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve was performed in all patients in all three groups, followed by postoperative patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with morphine. The pain intensity and morphine consumption immediately after surgery and during the 24 hours after surgery were compared between the groups. Results A total of 149 patients completed the study protocol. The intensity of pain immediately after surgery and morphine consumption were similar in the two “block” groups; however, they were significantly decreased compared with the control group. During the 24 hours after surgery, morphine consumption in the ILI+IHG group decreased compared with the TAP group, as well as in each “block” group versus the control group. Twenty-four hours after surgery, all evaluated parameters were similar. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided ILI+IHG provided better pain control than US-guided posterior TAP following the Lichtenstein patch tension-free method of open inguinal hernia repair in men during 24 hours after surgery. (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01429480.) PMID:27487311

  16. Scaffolds from alternating block polyurethanes of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) with stimulation and guidance of nerve growth and better nerve repair than autograft.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuqing; Li, Linjing; Chen, Kevin C; Chen, Feiran; Liu, Xiangyu; Ye, Jianfu; Li, Wei; Xu, Kaitian

    2015-07-01

    Nerve repair scaffolds from novel alternating block polyurethanes (PUCL-alt-PEG) based on PCL and PEG without additional growth factors or proteins were prepared by a particle leaching method. The scaffolds have pore size 10-20 µm and porosity 92%. Mechanical tests showed that the polyurethane scaffolds have maximum loads of 5.97 ± 0.35 N and maximal stresses of 8.84 ± 0.5 MPa. Histocompatiblity of the nerve repair scaffolds was tested in a SD rat model for peripheral nerve defect treatment. Two types of treatments including PUCL-alt-PEG scaffolds and autografts were compared in rat model. After 32 weeks, bridging of a 12 mm defect gap by the regenerated nerve was observed in all rats. The nerve regeneration was systematically characterized by sciatic function index (SFI), electrophysiology, histological assessment including HE staining, immunohistochemistry, ammonia sliver staining, Masson's trichrome staining and TEM observation. Results revealed that nerve repair scaffolds from PUCL-alt-PEG exhibit better regeneration effects compared to autografts. Electrophysiological recovery was seen in 90% and 87% of rats in PUCL-alt-PEG and autograft groups respectively. Biodegradation in vitro and in vivo shows good degradation match of PUCL-alt-PEG scaffolds with nerve regeneration. It demonstrates that plain nerve repair scaffolds from PUCL-alt-PEG biomaterials can achieve peripheral nerve regeneration satisfactorily.

  17. Comparison of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Parasternal Block for Postoperative Pain Management after Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Nilgun Kavrut; Baki, Elif Dogan; Kavakli, Ali Sait; Sahin, Ayca Sultan; Ayoglu, Raif Umut; Karaveli, Arzu; Emmiler, Mustafa; Inanoglu, Kerem; Karsli, Bilge

    2016-01-01

    Background. Parasternal block and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) have been demonstrated to produce effective analgesia and reduce postoperative opioid requirements in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of TENS and parasternal block on early postoperative pain after cardiac surgery. Methods. One hundred twenty patients undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled in the present randomized, controlled prospective study. Patients were assigned to three treatment groups: parasternal block, intermittent TENS application, or a control group. Results. Pain scores recorded 4 h, 5 h, 6 h, 7 h, and 8 h postoperatively were lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. Total morphine consumption was also lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. It was also significantly lower in the TENS group than in the control group. There were no statistical differences among the groups regarding the extubation time, rescue analgesic medication, length of intensive care unit stay, or length of hospital stay. Conclusions. Parasternal block was more effective than TENS in the management of early postoperative pain and the reduction of opioid requirements in patients who underwent cardiac surgery through median sternotomy. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT02725229.

  18. Teaching alternatives to the standard inferior alveolar nerve block in dental education: outcomes in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Thomas M; Badovinac, Rachel; Shaefer, Jeffry

    2007-09-01

    Surveys were sent to Harvard School of Dental Medicine students and graduates from the classes of 2000 through 2006 to determine their current primary means of achieving mandibular anesthesia. Orthodontists and orthodontic residents were excluded. All subjects received clinical training in the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block and two alternative techniques (the Akinosi mandibular block and the Gow-Gates mandibular block) during their predoctoral dental education. This study tests the hypothesis that students and graduates who received training in the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block, the Akinosi mandibular block, and the Gow-Gates mandibular block will report more frequent current utilization of alternatives to the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block than clinicians trained in the conventional technique only. At the 95 percent confidence level, we estimated that between 3.7 percent and 16.1 percent (mean=8.5 percent) of clinicians trained in using the Gow-Gates technique use this injection technique primarily, and between 35.4 percent and 56.3 percent (mean=47.5 percent) of those trained in the Gow-Gates method never use this technique. At the same confidence level, between 0.0 percent and 3.8 percent (mean=0.0 percent) of clinicians trained in using the Akinosi technique use this injection clinical technique primarily, and between 62.2 percent and 81.1 percent (mean=72.3 percent) of those trained in the Akinosi method never use this technique. No control group that was completely untrained in the Gow-Gates or Akinosi techniques was available for comparison. However, we presume that zero percent of clinicians who have not been trained in a given technique will use the technique in clinical practice. The confidence interval for the Gow-Gates method excludes this value, while the confidence interval for the Akinosi technique includes zero percent. We conclude that, in the study population, formal clinical training in the Gow-Gates and

  19. Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers undergo sprouting and neuroma formation in the painful arthritic joint of geriatric mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although the prevalence of arthritis dramatically increases with age, the great majority of preclinical studies concerning the mechanisms that drive arthritic joint pain have been performed in young animals. One mechanism hypothesized to contribute to arthritic pain is ectopic nerve sprouting; however, neuroplasticity is generally thought to be greater in young versus old nerves. Here we explore whether sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers can undergo a significant ectopic nerve remodeling in the painful arthritic knee joint of geriatric mice. Methods Vehicle (saline) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected into the knee joint of 27- to 29-month-old female mice. Pain behaviors, macrophage infiltration, neovascularization, and the sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers were then assessed 28 days later, when significant knee-joint pain was present. Knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry by using antibodies raised against CD68 (monocytes/macrophages), PECAM (endothelial cells), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43; nerve fibers undergoing sprouting). Results At 4 weeks after initial injection, CFA-injected mice displayed robust pain-related behaviors (which included flinching, guarding, impaired limb use, and reduced weight bearing), whereas animals injected with vehicle alone displayed no significant pain-related behaviors. Similarly, in the CFA-injected knee joint, but not in the vehicle-injected knee joint, a remarkable increase was noted in the number of CD68+ macrophages, density of PECAM+ blood vessels, and density and formation of neuroma-like structures by CGRP+, NF200+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium and periosteum. Conclusions Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers that innervate the aged knee joint clearly maintain the capacity for robust

  20. Empirical Assessment of the Mean Block Volume of Rock Masses Intersected by Four Joint Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, Gian Luca

    2016-05-01

    The estimation of a representative value for the rock block volume ( V b) is of huge interest in rock engineering in regards to rock mass characterization purposes. However, while mathematical relationships to precisely estimate this parameter from the spacing of joints can be found in literature for rock masses intersected by three dominant joint sets, corresponding relationships do not actually exist when more than three sets occur. In these cases, a consistent assessment of V b can only be achieved by directly measuring the dimensions of several representative natural rock blocks in the field or by means of more sophisticated 3D numerical modeling approaches. However, Palmström's empirical relationship based on the volumetric joint count J v and on a block shape factor β is commonly used in the practice, although strictly valid only for rock masses intersected by three joint sets. Starting from these considerations, the present paper is primarily intended to investigate the reliability of a set of empirical relationships linking the block volume with the indexes most commonly used to characterize the degree of jointing in a rock mass (i.e. the J v and the mean value of the joint set spacings) specifically applicable to rock masses intersected by four sets of persistent discontinuities. Based on the analysis of artificial 3D block assemblies generated using the software AutoCAD, the most accurate best-fit regression has been found between the mean block volume (V_{{{{b}}_{{m}} }}) of tested rock mass samples and the geometric mean value of the spacings of the joint sets delimiting blocks; thus, indicating this mean value as a promising parameter for the preliminary characterization of the block size. Tests on field outcrops have demonstrated that the proposed empirical methodology has the potential of predicting the mean block volume of multiple-set jointed rock masses with an acceptable accuracy for common uses in most practical rock engineering applications.

  1. Pyomyositis of the iliacus muscle and pyogenic sacroiliitis after sacroiliac joint block -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Hyeon; Byon, Hyo-Jin; Jung, Hyun Jun; Cha, Young-Deog; Lee, Doo Ik

    2013-05-01

    Sacroiliac joint block can be performed for the diagnosis and treatment of sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Although sacroiliac joint block is a common procedure, complications have not been reported in detail. We report a case of iliacus pyomyositis and sacroiliac joint infection following a sacroiliac joint block. A 70-year-old female patient received sacroiliac joint blocks to relieve pelvic pain. The patient was admitted to the emergency room two days after the final sacroiliac joint block (SIJB) with the chief complaints of left pelvic pain corresponding to a visual analogue scale (VAS) score of 9 and fever. A pelvic MRI indicated a diagnosis of myositis. After 1 month of continuous antibiotic therapy, the patient's erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) level remained elevated. A (67)Ga SPECT/CT was done. Abnormal uptake was seen at the left sacroiliac joint (SIJ), and septic sacroiliitis was suspected. The CRP normalized to 0.29 mg/dl and the ESR decreased to 60 mm/hr, and the patient had no fever after 57 days of antibiotic therapy. She was directed for follow up at an outpatient clinic.

  2. A comparative study of direct mandibular nerve block and the Akinosi technique.

    PubMed

    Martínez González, José Ma; Benito Peña, Begoña; Fernández Cáliz, Fernando; San Hipólito Marín, Lara; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel

    2003-01-01

    A study is made of 56 patients subjected to lower molar extraction, comparing the efficacy of the Akinosi technique as an alternative to direct or conventional mandibular nerve block in two groups of 28 subjects each. The parameters evaluated were pain in response to puncture, percentage positive aspiration, latency, pain during the intervention and complications. Patient pain in response to puncture was comparatively less intense and frequent with the Akinosi technique. The latency to anesthesia was briefer with conventional mandibular block than with the Akinosi technique (2.9 versus 3.8 minutes). Pain during the intervention and the duration of the anesthetic effect were similar for both techniques. The patients anesthetized with the Akinosi technique required more buccal nerve reinforcement infiltrations to complete the procedure. The anesthetic failure rates were 10.7% and 17.8% for the conventional and Akinosi technique, respectively. It is concluded that while the Akinosi technique can be used to extract lower molars, direct mandibular block offers superior anesthetic performance.

  3. Sacro-Iliac Joint Sensory Block and Radiofrequency Ablation: Assessment of Bony Landmarks Relevant for Image-Guided Procedures.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Trevor J G; Roberts, Shannon L; Burnham, Robert S; Loh, Eldon; Agur, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided sensory block and radiofrequency ablation of the nerves innervating the sacro-iliac joint require readily identifiable bony landmarks for accurate needle/electrode placement. Understanding the relative locations of the transverse sacral tubercles along the lateral sacral crest is important for ultrasound guidance, as they demarcate the position of the posterior sacral network (S1-S3 ± L5/S4) innervating the posterior sacro-iliac joint. No studies were found that investigated the spatial relationships of these bony landmarks. The purpose of this study was to visualize and quantify the interrelationships of the transverse sacral tubercles and posterior sacral foramina to inform image-guided block and radiofrequency ablation of the sacro-iliac joint. The posterior and lateral surfaces of 30 dry sacra (15 M/15 F) were digitized and modeled in 3D and the distances between bony landmarks quantified. The relationships of bony landmarks (S1-S4) were not uniform. The mean intertubercular and interforaminal distances decreased from S1 to S4, whereas the distance from the lateral margin of the posterior sacral foramina to the transverse sacral tubercles increased from S1 to S3. The mean intertubercular distance from S1 to S3 was significantly (p < 0.05) larger in males. The interrelationships of the sacral bony landmarks should be taken into consideration when estimating the site and length of an image-guided strip lesion targeting the posterior sacral network.

  4. Long-term effect of ropivacaine nanoparticles for sciatic nerve block on postoperative pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi; Huang, Haizhen; Yang, Shaozhong; Huang, Shanshan; Guo, Jingxuan; Tang, Qi; Qi, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The analgesic effect of ropivacaine (Rop) for nerve block lasts only ~3–6 hours for single use. The aim of this study was to develop long-acting regional anesthetic Rop nanoparticles and investigate the effects of sciatic nerve block on postoperative pain in rats. Materials and methods Rop nanoparticles were developed using polyethylene glycol-co-polylactic acid (PELA). One hundred and twenty adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=30, each): Con (control group; 0.9% saline, 200 µL), PELA (PELA group; 10 mg), Rop (Rop group; 0.5%, 200 µL), and Rop-PELA (Rop-PELA group; 10%, 10 mg). Another 12 rats were used for the detection of Rop concentration in plasma. The mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were measured at 2 hours, 4 hours, 8 hours, 1 day, 2 days, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days after incision. The expression of c-FOS was determined by immunohistochemistry at 2 hours, 8 hours, 48 hours, and 7 days. Nerve and organ toxicities were also evaluated at 7 days. Results The duration of Rop absorption in the plasma of the Rop-PELA group was longer (>8 hours) than that of the Rop group (4 hours). Mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency in the Rop-PELA group were higher than that in other groups (4 hours–3 days). c-FOS expression in the Rop-PELA group was lower than that in the control group at 2 hours, 8 hours, and 48 hours and lower than that in the Rop group at 8 hours and 48 hours after paw incision. Slight foreign body reactions were observed surrounding the sciatic nerve at 7 days. No obvious pathophysiological change was found in the major organs after Rop-PELA administration at 7 days. Conclusion Rop-PELA provides an effective analgesia for nerve block over 3 days after single administration, and the analgesic mechanism might be mediated by the regulation of spinal c-FOS expression. However, its potential long-term tissue toxicity needs to be further investigated. PMID:27274236

  5. Catecholamine secretion and adrenal nerve activity in response to movements of normal and inflamed knee joints in cats.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, A; Sato, Y; Schmidt, R F

    1986-01-01

    The effects of articular stimulation on adrenal catecholamine secretion and adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were studied using halothane anaesthetized cats. Various natural passive movements were applied to the normal and inflamed knee joints. Rhythmic flexions and extensions as well as rhythmic inward and outward rotation of normal knee joints within their physiological range of motion did not change nerve activity or the secretion of adrenal catecholamines. Static outward rotation in the normal working range was also ineffective. However, as soon as this static rotation was extended into the noxious range, significant increases in both of these variables were elicited. In the acutely inflamed knee joint, various passive movements produced increases in both adrenal sympathetic and catecholamine secretion. Especially noteworthy was the finding that movements of the inflamed knee joint that were within the normal range of motion produced increases in all variables. Articularly induced increases in adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were diminished by severing various hind-limb somatic afferent nerves and abolished by complete denervation of the knee joint. Additionally, section of the adrenal sympathetic nerves eliminated the catecholamine secretion response. From these data it was concluded that the responses observed in these experiments were reflexes having an afferent limb in hind-limb nerves and an efferent limb in the adrenal sympathetic nerves. A contribution of supraspinal structures was suggested for the reflex responses of sympatho-adrenal medullary function evoked by knee joint stimulations, since spinal transection at the C2 level completely abolished the responses. PMID:3795070

  6. Alternating block polyurethanes based on PCL and PEG as potential nerve regeneration materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangyao; Li, Dandan; Niu, Yuqing; He, Tao; Chen, Kevin C; Xu, Kaitian

    2014-03-01

    Polyurethanes with regular and controlled block arrangement, i.e., alternating block polyurethanes (abbreviated as PUCL-alt-PEG) based on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL-diol) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was prepared via selectively coupling reaction between PCL-diol and diisocyanate end-capped PEG. Chemical structure, molecular weight, distribution, and thermal properties were systematically characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR, GPC, DSC, and TGA. Hydrophilicity was studied by static contact angle of H2O and CH2I2. Film surface was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscopy, and mechanical properties were assessed by universal test machine. Results show that alternating block polyurethanes give higher crystal degree, higher mechanical properties, and more hydrophilic and rougher (deep ravine) surface than their random counterpart, due to regular and controlled structure. Platelet adhesion illustrated that PUCL-alt-PEG has better hemocompatibility and the hemacompatibility was affected significantly by PEG content. Excellent hemocompatibility was obtained with high PEG content. CCK-8 assay and SEM observation revealed much better cell compatibility of fibroblast L929 and rat glial cells on the alternating block polyurethanes than that on random counterpart. Alternating block polyurethane PUC20-a-E4 with optimized composition, mechanical, surface properties, hemacompatibility, and highest cell growth and proliferation was achieved for potential use in nerve regeneration.

  7. Anesthetic efficacy of an infiltration in mandibular anterior teeth following an inferior alveolar nerve block.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Kenneth; Reader, Al; Beck, Mike; Meyers, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, blinded study was to measure the degree of pulpal anesthesia obtained with an inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block followed by an infiltration in mandibular anterior teeth. Through use of a repeated-measures design, 40 patients randomly received 3 injection combinations at 3 separate appointments: an IAN block followed by a mock lingual infiltration and a mock labial infiltration, an IAN block followed by a mock lingual infiltration and a labial infiltration, and an IAN block followed by a mock labial infiltration and a lingual infiltration. Each IAN block used 3.6 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, and each infiltration used 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine administered over the lateral incisor apex. Mandibular anterior teeth were blindly pulp tested at 2-minute cycles for 60 minutes following the IAN-infiltration injections. No response from the patient to the maximum output (80 reading) of the pulp tester was used as the criterion for pulpal anesthesia. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive 80 readings were obtained within 15 minutes and the 80 reading was sustained for 60 minutes. Anesthesia was considered a failure if 2 consecutive 80 readings were not obtained during the 60 minutes. The results of this study showed that 100% of the patients had lip numbness with all IAN blocks. For the lateral incisor, the success rate of the IAN block alone was 40% and the failure rate was 30%. For the IAN block plus labial infiltration, the success rate was 62% and the failure rate was 12% for the lateral incisor. There was a significant difference (P < .05) between the IAN block alone and the IAN block plus labial infiltration. In conclusion, a labial infiltration, over the lateral incisor apex, of 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine following an IAN block significantly improved pulpal anesthesia for the lateral incisor compared with the IAN block alone. PMID:15384292

  8. Development and validation of an equine nerve block simulator to supplement practical skills training in undergraduate veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Gunning, P; Smith, A; Fox, V; Bolt, D M; Lowe, J; Sinclair, C; Witte, T H; Weller, R

    2013-04-27

    Lameness is the most common presenting complaint in equine practice. Performing diagnostic nerve blocks is an integral part of any lameness work-up, and is therefore an essential skill for equine practitioners. However, the opportunities for veterinary students to practice this skill are limited. The aim of this study was to design and validate an equine nerve block simulator. It was hypothesised that the simulator would improve students' ability and enhance their confidence in performing nerve blocks. A simulator was built using an equine forelimb skeleton and building foam. Wire wool targets were placed under the foam in the positions corresponding to the anatomical location of the most palmar digital, abaxial and low four-point nerve blocks and attached to an electrical circuit. The circuit became complete when the operator placed a needle in the correct position and immediate audible feedback with a buzzer was provided. To validate the simulator, it was compared with two established teaching methods: cadaver training and theoretical training with a hand-out. Cadaver-trained students achieved the best results (73 per cent correct blocks), compared with simulator-trained students (71 per cent correct blocks), and a hand-out trained group (58 per cent correct blocks). Feedback obtained with a questionnaire showed that students enjoyed simulator training more, and that they felt more confident in performing diagnostic nerve blocks than the other two groups. The equine nerve block simulator provides a safe, cost-effective method to supplement the teaching of diagnostic analgesia to undergraduate veterinary students.

  9. Effect of Arm Positioning on Entrapment of Infraclavicular Nerve Block Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Rahul; Kendall, Mark C.; Nader, Antoun; Weeks, Jessica J.

    2017-01-01

    Continuous brachial plexus nerve block catheters are commonly inserted for postoperative analgesia after upper extremity surgery. Modifications of the insertion technique have been described to improve the safety of placing an infraclavicular brachial plexus catheter. Rarely, these catheters may become damaged or entrapped, complicating their removal. We describe a case of infraclavicular brachial plexus catheter entrapment related to differences in arm positioning during catheter placement and removal. Written authorization to obtain, use, and disclose information and images was obtained from the patient. PMID:28348896

  10. Adductor canal block versus femoral nerve block for total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Duan; Yang, Yang; Li, Qi; Tang, Shen-Li; Zeng, Wei-Nan; Xu, Jin; Xie, Tian-Hang; Pei, Fu-Xing; Yang, Liu; Li, Ling-Li; Zhou, Zong-Ke

    2017-01-01

    Femoral nerve blocks (FNB) can provide effective pain relief but result in quadriceps weakness with increased risk of falls following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Adductor canal block (ACB) is a relatively new alternative providing pure sensory blockade with minimal effect on quadriceps strength. The meta-analysis was designed to evaluate whether ACB exhibited better outcomes with respect to quadriceps strength, pain control, ambulation ability, and complications. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Wan Fang, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI) and the Cochrane Database were searched for RCTs comparing ACB with FNB after TKAs. Of 309 citations identified by our search strategy, 12 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Compared to FNB, quadriceps maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was significantly higher for ACB, which was consistent with the results regarding quadriceps strength assessed with manual muscle strength scale. Moreover, ACB had significantly higher risk of falling versus FNB. At any follow-up time, ACB was not inferior to FNB regarding pain control or opioid consumption, and showed better range of motion in comparison with FNB. ACB is superior to the FNB regarding sparing of quadriceps strength and faster knee function recovery. It provides pain relief and opioid consumption comparable to FNB and is associated with decreased risk of falls. PMID:28079176

  11. Neurotoxicity of perineural vs intraneural-extrafascicular injection of liposomal bupivacaine in the porcine model of sciatic nerve block.

    PubMed

    Damjanovska, M; Cvetko, E; Hadzic, A; Seliskar, A; Plavec, T; Mis, K; Vuckovic Hasanbegovic, I; Stopar Pintaric, T

    2015-12-01

    Liposomal bupivacaine is a prolonged-release local anaesthetic, the neurotoxicity of which has not yet been determined. We used quantitative histomorphometric and immunohistochemical analyses to evaluate the neurotoxic effect of liposomal bupivacaine after perineural and intraneural (extrafascicular) injection of the sciatic nerve in pigs. In this double-blind prospective randomised trial, 4 ml liposomal bupivacaine 1.3% was injected either perineurally (n = 5) or intraneurally extrafascicularly (n = 5). Intraneural-extrafascicular injection of saline (n = 5) was used as a control. After emergence from anaesthesia, neurological examinations were conducted over two weeks. After harvesting the sciatic nerves, no changes in nerve fibre density or myelin width indicative of nerve injury were observed in any of the groups. Intraneural injections resulted in longer sensory blockade than perineural (p < 0.003) without persistent motor or sensory deficit. Sciatic nerve block with liposomal bupivacaine in pigs did not result in histological evidence of nerve injury.

  12. Does Level of Response to SI Joint Block Predict Response to SI Joint Fusion?

    PubMed Central

    Cher, Daniel; Whang, Peter G.; Frank, Clay; Sembrano, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background The degree of pain relief required to diagnose sacroiliac joint (SIJ) dysfunction following a diagnostic SIJ block (SIJB) is not known. No gold standard exists. Response to definitive (i.e., accepted as effective) treatment might be a reference standard. Methods Subgroup analysis of 320 subjects enrolled in two prospective multicenter trials evaluating SIJ fusion (SIJF) in patients with SIJ dysfunction diagnosed by history, physical exam and standardized diagnostic SIJB. A 50% reduction in pain at 30 or 60 minutes following SIJB was considered confirmatory. The absolute and percentage improvements in Visual Analog Scale (VAS) SIJ pain and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores at 6 and 12 months after SIJF were correlated with the average acute improvement in SIJ pain with SIJB. Results The average pain reduction during the first hour after SIJB was 79.3%. Six months after SIJF, the overall mean VAS SIJ pain reduction was 50.9 points (0-100 scale) and the mean ODI reduction was 24.6 points. Reductions at 12 months after SIJF were similar. Examined in multiple ways, improvements in SIJ pain and ODI at 6 and 12 months did not correlate with SIJB findings. Conclusions The degree of pain improvement during SIJB did not predict improvements in pain or ODI scores after SIJF. A 50% SIJB threshold resulted in excellent post-SIJF responses. Using overly stringent selection criteria (i.e. 75%) to qualify patients for SIJF has no basis in evidence and would withhold a beneficial procedure from a substantial number of patients with SIJ dysfunction. Level of Evidence Level 1. Clinical Relevance The degree of pain improvement during an SIJ block does not predict the degree of pain improvement after SIJ fusion. PMID:26913224

  13. Rules to limp by: joint compensation conserves limb function after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Jay M; Chang, Young-Hui

    2013-10-23

    Locomotion persists across all manner of internal and external perturbations. The objective of this study was to identify locomotor compensation strategies in rodent models of peripheral nerve injury. We found that hip-to-toe limb length and limb angle was preferentially preserved over individual joint angles after permanent denervation of rat ankle extensor muscles. These findings promote further enquiry into the significance of limb-level function for neuromechanical control of legged locomotion.

  14. Modelling rock joint behavior from in situ block tests: implications for nuclear waste repository design

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, N.

    1982-09-01

    Simple, inexpensive index tests suitable for application to jointed core or jointed blocks of rock are described. These provide quantitative data on joint roughness, joint wall strength and residual friction angle, suitable for waste repository characterization. These three parameters form the basis of a new constitutive law of rock joint behavior which will enable numerical modellers to simulate the complete shear strength-displacement, dilation and closure of joints, including shear reversal and unloading cycles. Size effects are reviewed in detail and methods are developed for correcting the results of small scale tests to allow for limited sample size. The effects of shear displacement and dilation, normal closure and joint opening on permeability are modelled, so that fully coupled hydromechanical modelling can be achieved. The effects of extremely slow stress perturbations, periods of stick, and thermal loading on joint properties are also evaluated. The numerical modelling techniques are illustrated with numerous examples, and are validated against a large body of experimental data.

  15. Biepicondylar fracture dislocation of the elbow joint concomitant with ulnar nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Konya, M Nuri; Aslan, Ahmet; Sofu, Hakan; Yıldırım, Timur

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present a case of humeral biepicondylar fracture dislocation concomitant with ulnar nerve injury in a seventeen year-old male patient. Physical examination of our patient in the emergency room revealed a painful, edematous and deformed-looking left elbow joint. Hypoesthesia of the little finger was also diagnosed on the left hand. Radiological assessment ended up with a posterior fracture dislocation of the elbow joint accompanied by intra-articular loose bodies. Open reduction-Internal fixation of the fracture dislocation and ulnar nerve exploration were performed under general anesthesia at the same session as surgical treatment of our patient. Physical therapy and rehabilitation protocol was implemented at the end of two weeks post-operatively. Union of the fracture lines, as well as the olecranon osteotomy site, was achieved at the end of four months post-operatively. Ulnar nerve function was fully restored without any sensory or motor loss. Range of motion at the elbow joint was 20-120 degrees at the latest follow-up. PMID:23610759

  16. Biepicondylar fracture dislocation of the elbow joint concomitant with ulnar nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Konya, M Nuri; Aslan, Ahmet; Sofu, Hakan; Yıldırım, Timur

    2013-04-18

    In this article, we present a case of humeral biepicondylar fracture dislocation concomitant with ulnar nerve injury in a seventeen year-old male patient. Physical examination of our patient in the emergency room revealed a painful, edematous and deformed-looking left elbow joint. Hypoesthesia of the little finger was also diagnosed on the left hand. Radiological assessment ended up with a posterior fracture dislocation of the elbow joint accompanied by intra-articular loose bodies. Open reduction-Internal fixation of the fracture dislocation and ulnar nerve exploration were performed under general anesthesia at the same session as surgical treatment of our patient. Physical therapy and rehabilitation protocol was implemented at the end of two weeks post-operatively. Union of the fracture lines, as well as the olecranon osteotomy site, was achieved at the end of four months post-operatively. Ulnar nerve function was fully restored without any sensory or motor loss. Range of motion at the elbow joint was 20-120 degrees at the latest follow-up.

  17. Continuous Femoral Nerve Blocks: Varying Local Anesthetic Delivery Method (Bolus versus Basal) to Minimize Quadriceps Motor Block while Maintaining Sensory Block

    PubMed Central

    Charous, Matthew T.; Madison, Sarah J.; Suresh, J.; Sandhu, NavParkash S.; Loland, Vanessa J.; Mariano, Edward R.; Donohue, Michael C.; Dutton, Pascual H.; Ferguson, Eliza J.; Ilfeld, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Whether the method of local anesthetic administration for continuous femoral nerve blocks —basal infusion versus repeated hourly bolus doses —influences block effects remains unknown. Methods Bilateral femoral perineural catheters were inserted in volunteers (n = 11). Ropivacaine 0.1% was administered through both catheters concurrently: a 6-h continuous 5 ml/h basal infusion on one side and 6 hourly bolus doses on the contralateral side. The primary endpoint was the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the quadriceps femoris muscle at Hour 6. Secondary end points included quadriceps MVIC at other time points, hip adductor MVIC, and cutaneous sensation 2 cm medial to the distal quadriceps tendon in the 22 h following local anesthetic administration initiation. Results Quadriceps MVIC for limbs receiving 0.1% ropivacaine as a basal infusion declined by a mean (SD) of 84% (19) compared with 83% (24) for limbs receiving 0.1% ropivacaine as repeated bolus doses between baseline and Hour 6 (paired t test P = 0.91). Intrasubject comparisons (left vs. right) reflected a lack of difference as well: the mean basal-bolus difference in quadriceps MVIC at Hour 6 was −1.1% (95% CI −22.0 to 19.8%). The similarity did not reach our a priori threshold for concluding equivalence, which was the 95% CI falling within ± 20%. There were similar minimal differences in the secondary endpoints during local anesthetic administration. Conclusions This study did not find evidence to support the hypothesis that varying the method of local anesthetic administration —basal infusion versus repeated bolus doses —influences continuous femoral nerve block effects to a clinically significant degree. PMID:21394001

  18. Continuous Ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric Nerve Block for Groin Pain in a Breast-feeding Patient after Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Soo; Baik, Ji Seok; Ji, Young Tae

    2016-01-01

    Ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric (II/IH) nerve injury is one of the most common nerve injuries following pelvic surgery, especially with the Pfannenstiel incision. We present a case of intractable groin pain, successfully treated with a continuous II/IH nerve block. A 33-year-old woman, following emergency cesarean section due to cephalopelvic disproportion, presented numbness in left inguinal area and severe pain on the labia on the second postoperative day. The pain was burning, lancinating, and exacerbated by standing or movement. However, she didn't want to take additional medicine because of breast-feeding. A diagnostic II/IH nerve block produced a substantial decrease in pain. She underwent a continuous II/IH nerve block with a complete resolution of pain within 3 days. A continuous II/IH nerve block might be a goodoption for II/IH neuropathy with intractable groin pain in breast-feeding mothers without adverse drug reactions in their infants. PMID:27413486

  19. Cortisol and pain-related behavior in disbudded goat kids with and without cornual nerve block.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, L; De Luna, J B; Gamboa, D; Reyes, M; Sánchez, A; Terrazas, A; Rojas, S; Galindo, F

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cortisol and behavior were measured in disbudded goat kids with and without the use of cornual nerve block. A total of 45 kids were used in 5 experimental groups (n=9, males and females). Group LidoD was infiltrated with 1 mL of 2% lidocaine locally at the cornual branches of lacrimal and infratrochlear nerves, 15 min before thermal disbudding. Group Lido was similarly infiltrated and was not disbudded. In group Sim, the disbudding procedure was simulated. A control group (CD) was disbudded without lidocaine infiltration, and group SD was infiltrated with saline before disbudding. The cornual nerve block did not prevent the short-term increase in cortisol levels during and after disbudding. LidoD, CD and SD groups showed higher cortisol concentrations than Lido and Sim (p<0.05) during the first 20 min after the procedure. Frequency of vocalizations during the procedure was significantly different between groups and was higher in SD (29.6 ± 3.1; mean±SE) and CD (28.4 ± 3.1) than in Sim (16.6 ± 3.1; p<0.05). Infiltrating lidocaine did not decrease this response to disbudding (21.1 ± 3.1; p>0.05). Struggles tended to be higher in SD (16.5 ± 2.5), CD (17.8 ± 2.5) and LidoD (15.6 ± 2.5) than Sim (10.6 ± 2.5; p=0.1). The total behavioral response was different between groups (CD, 59.6 ± 6.8; LidoD, 52 ± 6.8; SD, 62.6 ± 6.8; Sim, 36.8 ± 6.8; p=0.05), and disbudded animals showed the strongest reactions (disbudded, 58.1 ± 3.9 vs non-disbudded, 36.8 ± 6.8; p=0.01). It was concluded that cornual nerve block (lacrimal and infratrochlear) using 2% lidocaine did not prevent pain during thermal disbudding of goat kids.

  20. Essential oil of Croton zehntneri and its main constituent anethole block excitability of rat peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Alves, Kerly Shamyra; Ferreira-da-Silva, Francisco Walber; Coelho-de-Souza, Andrelina Noronha; Albuquerque, Aline Alice Cavalcante; do Vale, Otoni Cardoso; Leal-Cardoso, José Henrique

    2015-03-01

    Croton zehntneri is an aromatic plant native to Northeast Brazil and employed by local people to treat various diseases. The leaves of this plant have a rich content of essential oil. The essential oil of C. zehntneri samples, with anethole as the major constituent and anethole itself, have been reported to have several pharmacological activities such as antispasmodic, cardiovascular, and gastroprotective effects and inducing the blockade of neuromuscular transmission and antinociception. Since several works have demonstrated that essential oils and their constituents block cell excitability and in view of the multiple effects of C. zehntneri essential oil and anethole on biological tissues, we undertook this investigation aiming to characterize and compare the effects of this essential oil and its major constituent on nerve excitability. Sciatic nerves of Wistar rats were used. They were mounted in a moist chamber, and evoked compound action potentials were recorded. Nerves were exposed in vitro to the essential oil of C. zehntneri and anethole (0.1-1 mg/mL) up to 180 min, and alterations in excitability (rheobase and chronaxie) and conductibility (peak-to-peak amplitude and conduction velocity) parameters of the compound action potentials were evaluated. The essential oil of C. zehntneri and anethole blocked, in a concentration-dependent manner with similar pharmacological potencies (IC50: 0.32 ± 0.07 and 0.22 ± 0.11 mg/mL, respectively), rat sciatic nerve compound action potentials. Strength-duration curves for both agents were shifted upward and to the right compared to the control curve, and the rheobase and chronaxie were increased following essential oil and anethole exposure. The time courses of the essential oil of C. zehntneri and anethole effects on peak-to-peak amplitude of compound action potentials followed an exponential decay and reached a steady state. The essential oil of C. zehntneri and anethole caused a similar reduction in

  1. Submucous tramadol increases the anesthetic efficacy of mepivacaine with epinephrine in inferior alveolar nerve block.

    PubMed

    Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario Alberto; Orozco-Solis, Mariana; Tobías-Azúa, Francisco Javier; Méndez-Gutiérrez, Elsa Patricia

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucous tramadol as adjuvant of mepivacaine with epinephrine in inferior alveolar nerve block. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical trial was conducted. Twenty healthy young volunteers were randomized into two treatment sequences using a series of random numbers. Sequence 1: Group A, 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine plus submucous tramadol 50mg (1mL of saline) and one week later Group B, 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine plus submucous placebo (1mL of saline). Sequence 2: Group B and one week later Group A. All treatments were administered 1min after that patient informed anesthesia of lower lip. We evaluated the duration of anesthesia of lower lip, anesthetic efficacy, and local and systemic adverse events. Anesthetic efficacy was better in group receiving submucous tramadol during the first 2h compared with group receiving submucous placebo (P<0.05). Submucous tramadol increased the anesthetic efficacy of mepivacaine with epinephrine of soft tissue in inferior alveolar nerve block.

  2. The addition of clonidine to bupivacaine in combined femoral-sciatic nerve block for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Couture, Darren J; Cuniff, Heather M; Maye, John P; Pellegrini, Joseph

    2004-08-01

    Clonidine has been shown to prolong sensory analgesia when given as an adjunct to peripheral nerve blocks but has not been evaluated when given in conjunction with a femoral-sciatic nerve block. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the addition of clonidine to a femoral-sciatic nerve block would prolong the duration of sensory analgesia in groups of patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. This prospective, randomized, double-blind investigation was performed on 64 subjects undergoing ACL reconstruction. Patients were assigned randomly to receive a femoral-sciatic nerve block using 30 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (control group) or 30 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine and 1 microg/kg of clonidine (experimental group). Variables measured included demographics, timed pain intensity measurements, postoperative analgesic consumption, duration of analgesia, and patient satisfaction. No significant differences were noted between groups for pain intensity scores, duration of sensory analgesia, postoperative analgesic requirements, or overall patient satisfaction. Both groups reported minimal amounts of postoperative pain and high analgesic satisfaction scores. Based on our results, we do not recommend the addition of clonidine to a femoral-sciatic nerve block when given to facilitate postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing ACL reconstruction.

  3. Continuous Femoral Nerve Blocks: Decreasing Local Anesthetic Concentration to Minimize Quadriceps Femoris Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Maria; Wang, Lu; Onibonoje, Olusegun K.; Parrett, Chad; Sessler, Daniel I.; Mounir-Soliman, Loran; Zaky, Sherif; Krebs, Viktor; Buller, Leonard T.; Donohue, Michael C.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.; Ilfeld, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Whether decreasing the local anesthetic concentration during a continuous femoral nerve block results in less quadriceps weakness remains unknown. Methods Preoperatively, bilateral femoral perineural catheters were inserted in patients undergoing bilateral knee arthroplasty (n = 36) at a single clinical center. Postoperatively, right-sided catheters were randomly assigned to receive perineural ropivacaine of either 0.1% (basal 12 mL/h; bolus 4 mL) or 0.4% (basal 3 mL/h; bolus 1 mL), with the left catheter receiving the alternative concentration/rate in an observer- and subject-masked fashion. The primary endpoint was the maximum voluntary isometric contraction of the quadriceps femoris muscles the morning of postoperative day 2. Equivalence of treatments would be concluded if the 95% confidence interval for the difference fell within the interval of −20% to 20%. Secondary endpoints included active knee extension, passive knee flexion, tolerance to cutaneous electrical current applied over the distal quadriceps tendon, dynamic pain scores, opioid requirements, and ropivacaine consumption. Results Quadriceps maximum voluntary isometric contraction for limbs receiving 0.1% ropivacaine was a mean (SD) of 13 (8) N·m, versus 12 (8) N·m for limbs receiving 0.4% [intra-subject difference of 3 (40) percentage points; 95% CI −10 to 17; p = 0.63]. Because the 95% confidence interval fell within prespecified tolerances, we conclude that the effect of the two concentrations were equivalent. Similarly, there were no statistically significant differences in secondary endpoints. Conclusions For continuous femoral nerve blocks, we found no evidence that local anesthetic concentration and volume influence block characteristics, suggesting that local anesthetic dose (mass) is the primary determinant of perineural infusion effects. PMID:22293719

  4. Comparison of Periodontal Ligament Injection and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Mandibular Primary Molars Pulpotomy: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haghgoo, Roza; Taleghani, Ferial

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block is a common technique for anesthesia of the primary mandibular molars. A number of disadvantages have been shown to be associated with this technique. Periodontal ligament (PDL) injection could be considered as an alternative to inferior alveolar nerve block. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PDL injection in the anesthesia of primary molar pulpotomy with mandibular block. Methods: This study was performed using a sequential double-blind randomized trial design. 80 children aged 3-7 years old who required pulpotomy in symmetrical mandibular primary molars were selected. The teeth of these children were anesthetized with periodontal injection on one side of the mandible and block on the other. Pulpotomy was performed on each patient during the same appointment. Signs of discomfort, including hand and body tension and eye movement, the verbal complaint and crying (SEM scale), were evaluated by a dental assistant who was blinded to the treatment allocation of the patients. Finally, the data were analyzed using the exact Fisher test and Pearson Chi-squared exact test. Results: Success rate was 88/75 and 91/25 in the PDL injection and nerve block groups, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the two techniques (P = 0.250). Conclusion: Results showed that PDL injection can be used as an alternative to nerve block in pulpotomy of the mandibular primary molars. PMID:26028895

  5. COORDINATED, MULTI-JOINT, FATIGUE-RESISTANT FELINE STANCE PRODUCED WITH INTRAFASCICULAR HIND LIMB NERVE STIMULATION

    PubMed Central

    Normann, R A; Dowden, B R; Frankel, M A; Wilder, A M; Hiatt, S D; Ledbetter, N M; Warren, D A; Clark, G A

    2012-01-01

    The production of graceful skeletal movements requires coordinated activation of multiple muscles that produce torques around multiple joints. The work described herein is focused on one such movement, stance, that requires coordinated activation of extensor muscles acting around the hip, knee and ankle joints. The forces evoked in these muscles by external stimulation all have a complex dependence on muscle length and shortening velocities, and some of these muscles are bi-articular. In order to recreate sit-to-stand maneuvers in the anesthetized feline, we excited the hind limb musculature using intrafascicular multielectrode stimulation (IFMS) of the muscular branch of the sciatic nerve, the femoral nerve, and the main branch of the sciatic nerve. Stimulation was achieved with either acutely or chronically implanted Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs) via subsets of electrodes 1) that activated motor units in the extensor muscles of the hip, knee, and ankle joints, 2) that were able to evoke large extension forces, and 3) that manifested minimal coactivation of the targeted motor units. Three hind limb force-generation strategies were investigated, including sequential activation of independent motor units to increase force, and interleaved or simultaneous IFMS of three sets of six or more USEA electrodes that excited the hip, knee, and ankle extensors. All force-generation strategies evoked stance, but the interleaved IFMS strategy also reduced muscle fatigue produced by repeated sit-to-stand maneuvers compared with fatigue produced by simultaneous activation of different motor neuron pools. These results demonstrate the use of interleaved IFMS as a means to recreate coordinated, fatigue-resistant multi-joint muscle forces in the unilateral hind limb. This muscle activation paradigm could provide a promising neuroprosthetic approach for the restoration of sit-to-stand transitions in individuals who are paralyzed by spinal cord injury, stroke, or disease. PMID

  6. Coordinated, multi-joint, fatigue-resistant feline stance produced with intrafascicular hind limb nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normann, R. A.; Dowden, B. R.; Frankel, M. A.; Wilder, A. M.; Hiatt, S. D.; Ledbetter, N. M.; Warren, D. A.; Clark, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    The production of graceful skeletal movements requires coordinated activation of multiple muscles that produce torques around multiple joints. The work described herein is focused on one such movement, stance, that requires coordinated activation of extensor muscles acting around the hip, knee and ankle joints. The forces evoked in these muscles by external stimulation all have a complex dependence on muscle length and shortening velocities, and some of these muscles are biarticular. In order to recreate sit-to-stand maneuvers in the anesthetized feline, we excited the hind limb musculature using intrafascicular multielectrode stimulation (IFMS) of the muscular branch of the sciatic nerve, the femoral nerve and the main branch of the sciatic nerve. Stimulation was achieved with either acutely or chronically implanted Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs) via subsets of electrodes (1) that activated motor units in the extensor muscles of the hip, knee and ankle joints, (2) that were able to evoke large extension forces and (3) that manifested minimal coactivation of the targeted motor units. Three hind limb force-generation strategies were investigated, including sequential activation of independent motor units to increase force, and interleaved or simultaneous IFMS of three sets of six or more USEA electrodes that excited the hip, knee and ankle extensors. All force-generation strategies evoked stance, but the interleaved IFMS strategy also reduced muscle fatigue produced by repeated sit-to-stand maneuvers compared with fatigue produced by simultaneous activation of different motor neuron pools. These results demonstrate the use of interleaved IFMS as a means to recreate coordinated, fatigue-resistant multi-joint muscle forces in the unilateral hind limb. This muscle activation paradigm could provide a promising neuroprosthetic approach for the restoration of sit-to-stand transitions in individuals who are paralyzed by spinal cord injury, stroke or disease.

  7. Role of intercostal nerve block in reducing postoperative pain following video-assisted thoracoscopy: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zulfiqar; Samad, Khalid; Ullah, Hameed

    2017-01-01

    Background: The main advantages of video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) include less post-operative pain, rapid recovery, less postoperative complications, shorter hospital stay and early discharge. Although pain intensity is less as compared to conventional thoracotomy but still patients experience upto moderate pain postoperatively. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and morphine sparing effect of intercostal nerve block in alleviating immediate post-operative pain in patients undergoing VATS. Materials and Methods: Sixty ASA I-III patients, aged between 16 to 60 years, undergoing mediastinal lymph node biopsy through VATS under general anaesthesia were randomly divided into two groups. The intercostal nerve block (ICNB group) received the block along with patient control intravenous analgesia (PCIA) with morphine, while control group received only PCIA with morphine for post-operative analgesia. Patients were followed for twenty four hours post operatively for intervention of post-operative pain in the recovery room and ward. Results: The pain was assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS) at 1, 6, 12 and 24 hours. There was a significant decrease in pain score and morphine consumption in ICNB group as compared to control group in first 6 hours postoperatively. There was no significant difference in pain scores and morphine consumption between the two groups after 6 hours. Conclusion: Patients receiving intercostal nerve block have better pain control and less morphine consumption as compared to those patients who did not receive intercostal nerve block in early (6 hours) post-operative period. PMID:28217054

  8. The Role of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorder.

    PubMed

    Awan, Kamran Habib; Patil, Shankargouda

    2015-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) constitutes of a group of diseases that functionally affect the masticatory system, including the muscles of mastication and temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A number of etiologies with specific treatment have been identified, including the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). The current paper presents a literature review on the use of TENS in the management of TMD patients. Temporomandibular joint disorder is very common disorder with approximately 75% of people showing some signs, while more than quarter (33%) having at least one symptom. An attempt to treat the pain should be made whenever possible. However, in cases with no defined etiology, starting with less intrusive and reversible techniques is prescribed. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is one such treatment modality, i.e. useful in the management of TMD. It comprises of controlled exposure of electrical current to the surface of skin, causing hyperactive muscles relaxation and decrease pain. Although the value of TENS to manage chronic pain in TMD patients is still controversial, its role in utilization for masticatory muscle pain is significant. However, an accurate diagnosis is essential to minimize its insufficient use. Well-controlled randomized trials are needed to determine the utilization of TENS in the management of TMD patients.

  9. Heightened motor and sensory (mirror-touch) referral induced by nerve block or topical anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura K; Gosavi, Radhika; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2013-08-01

    Mirror neurons allow us to covertly simulate the sensation and movement of others. If mirror neurons are sensory and motor neurons, why do we not actually feel this simulation- like "mirror-touch synesthetes"? Might afferent sensation normally inhibit mirror representations from reaching consciousness? We and others have reported heightened sensory referral to phantom limbs and temporarily anesthetized arms. These patients, however, had experienced illness or injury of the deafferented limb. In the current study we observe heightened sensory and motor referral to the face after unilateral nerve block for routine dental procedures. We also obtain double-blind, quantitative evidence of heightened sensory referral in healthy participants completing a mirror-touch confusion task after topical anesthetic cream is applied. We suggest that sensory and motor feedback exist in dynamic equilibrium with mirror representations; as feedback is reduced, the brain draws more upon visual information to determine- perhaps in a Bayesian manner- what to feel.

  10. Anesthetic Efficacy of Different Ropivacaine Concentrations for Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharrawy, Eman; Yagiela, John A

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted on 72 American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1 patients scheduled for extraction of a mandibular third molar after inferior alveolar nerve block. Each patient was randomly administered one of the following ropivacaine concentrations: 0.75%, 0.5%, 0.375%, or 0.25% (18 patients per group). Onset of block (mean ± SD) was rapid for both 0.75% (1.4 ± 0.4 minutes) and 0.5% (1.7 ± 0.5 minutes) ropivacaine but significantly slower for the 0.375% (4.2 ± 2.5 minutes) and 0.25% (10.7 ± 3.0 minutes) concentrations. Tooth extraction was performed successfully with the 0.5% and 0.75% concentrations, and supplemental injections were not required. Second injections, however, were required with 0.375% ropivacaine. Anesthesia was unsuccessful in 13 patients given 0.25% ropivacaine even after 3 injections. The mean durations of soft tissue anesthesia were 3.3 ± 0.3 hours and 3.0 ± 0.3 hours for the 0.75% and 0.5% concentrations, but significantly shorter with more dilute concentrations. The duration of analgesia showed a similar pattern, with the 0.75% and 0.5% concentrations producing prolonged analgesia of 6.0 ± 0.4 hours and 5.6 ± 0.4 hours. These results indicate that 0.5% and 0.75% concentrations were effective for intraoral nerve blockade, with both a rapid onset and prolonged duration of pain control. PMID:16722277

  11. Anesthetic efficacy of different ropivacaine concentrations for inferior alveolar nerve block.

    PubMed

    El-Sharrawy, Eman; Yagiela, John A

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted on 72 American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1 patients scheduled for extraction of a mandibular third molar after inferior alveolar nerve block. Each patient was randomly administered one of the following ropivacaine concentrations: 0.75%, 0.5%, 0.375%, or 0.25% (18 patients per group). Onset of block (mean +/- SD) was rapid for both 0.75% (1.4 +/- 0.4 minutes) and 0.5% (1.7 +/- 0.5 minutes) ropivacaine but significantly slower for the 0.375% (4.2 +/- 2.5 minutes) and 0.25% (10.7 +/- 3.0 minutes) concentrations. Tooth extraction was performed successfully with the 0.5% and 0.75% concentrations, and supplemental injections were not required. Second injections, however, were required with 0.375% ropivacaine. Anesthesia was unsuccessful in 13 patients given 0.25% ropivacaine even after 3 injections. The mean durations of soft tissue anesthesia were 3.3 +/- 0.3 hours and 3.0 +/- 0.3 hours for the 0.75% and 0.5% concentrations, but significantly shorter with more dilute concentrations. The duration of analgesia showed a similar pattern, with the 0.75% and 0.5% concentrations producing prolonged analgesia of 6.0 +/- 0.4 hours and 5.6 +/- 0.4 hours. These results indicate that 0.5% and 0.75% concentrations were effective for intraoral nerve blockade, with both a rapid onset and prolonged duration of pain control.

  12. Increased mitochondrial fission and volume density by blocking glutamate excitotoxicity protect glaucomatous optic nerve head astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ju, Won-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Young; Noh, You Hyun; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Lukas, Thomas J; Ellisman, Mark H; Weinreb, Robert N; Perkins, Guy A

    2015-05-01

    Abnormal structure and function of astrocytes have been observed within the lamina cribrosa region of the optic nerve head (ONH) in glaucomatous neurodegeneration. Glutamate excitotoxicity-mediated mitochondrial alteration has been implicated in experimental glaucoma. However, the relationships among glutamate excitotoxicity, mitochondrial alteration and ONH astrocytes in the pathogenesis of glaucoma remain unknown. We found that functional N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NRs) are present in human ONH astrocytes and that glaucomatous human ONH astrocytes have increased expression levels of NRs and the glutamate aspartate transporter. Glaucomatous human ONH astrocytes exhibit mitochondrial fission that is linked to increased expression of dynamin-related protein 1 and its phosphorylation at Serine 616. In BAC ALDH1L1 eGFP or Thy1-CFP transgenic mice, NMDA treatment induced axon loss as well as hypertrophic morphology and mitochondrial fission in astrocytes of the glial lamina. In human ONH astrocytes, NMDA treatment in vitro triggered mitochondrial fission by decreasing mitochondrial length and number, thereby reducing mitochondrial volume density. However, blocking excitotoxicity by memantine (MEM) prevented these alterations by increasing mitochondrial length, number and volume density. In glaucomatous DBA/2J (D2) mice, blocking excitotoxicity by MEM inhibited the morphological alteration as well as increased mitochondrial number and volume density in astrocytes of the glial lamina. However, blocking excitotoxicity decreased autophagosome/autolysosome volume density in both astrocytes and axons in the glial lamina of glaucomatous D2 mice. These findings provide evidence that blocking excitotoxicity prevents ONH astrocyte dysfunction in glaucomatous neurodegeneration by increasing mitochondrial fission, increasing mitochondrial volume density and length, and decreasing autophagosome/autolysosome formation. GLIA 2015;63:736-753.

  13. Increased Mitochondrial Fission and Volume Density by Blocking Glutamate Excitotoxicity Protect Glaucomatous Optic Nerve Head Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Won-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Young; Noh, You Hyun; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Lukas, Thomas J; Ellisman, Mark H; Weinreb, Robert N; Perkins, Guy A

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal structure and function of astrocytes have been observed within the lamina cribrosa region of the optic nerve head (ONH) in glaucomatous neurodegeneration. Glutamate excitotoxicity-mediated mitochondrial alteration has been implicated in experimental glaucoma. However, the relationships among glutamate excitotoxicity, mitochondrial alteration and ONH astrocytes in the pathogenesis of glaucoma remain unknown. We found that functional N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NRs) are present in human ONH astrocytes and that glaucomatous human ONH astrocytes have increased expression levels of NRs and the glutamate aspartate transporter. Glaucomatous human ONH astrocytes exhibit mitochondrial fission that is linked to increased expression of dynamin-related protein 1 and its phosphorylation at Serine 616. In BAC ALDH1L1 eGFP or Thy1-CFP transgenic mice, NMDA treatment induced axon loss as well as hypertrophic morphology and mitochondrial fission in astrocytes of the glial lamina. In human ONH astrocytes, NMDA treatment in vitro triggered mitochondrial fission by decreasing mitochondrial length and number, thereby reducing mitochondrial volume density. However, blocking excitotoxicity by memantine (MEM) prevented these alterations by increasing mitochondrial length, number and volume density. In glaucomatous DBA/2J (D2) mice, blocking excitotoxicity by MEM inhibited the morphological alteration as well as increased mitochondrial number and volume density in astrocytes of the glial lamina. However, blocking excitotoxicity decreased autophagosome/autolysosome volume density in both astrocytes and axons in the glial lamina of glaucomatous D2 mice. These findings provide evidence that blocking excitotoxicity prevents ONH astrocyte dysfunction in glaucomatous neurodegeneration by increasing mitochondrial fission, increasing mitochondrial volume density and length, and decreasing autophagosome/autolysosome formation. PMID:25557093

  14. Effect of postural changes on 3D joint angular velocity during starting block phase.

    PubMed

    Slawinski, Jean; Dumas, Raphaël; Cheze, Laurence; Ontanon, Guy; Miller, Christian; Mazure-Bonnefoy, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the effect of posture during sprint start. The aim of this study was to measure the effect of the modification of horizontal distance between the blocks during sprint start on three dimensional (3D) joint angular velocity. Nine trained sprinters started using three different starting positions (bunched, medium and elongated). They were equipped with 63 passive reflective markers, and an opto-electronic Motion Analysis system was used to collect the 3D marker trajectories. During the pushing phase on the blocks, norm of the joint angular velocity (NJAV), 3D Euler angular velocity (EAV) and pushing time on the blocks were calculated. The results demonstrated that the decrease of the block spacing induces an opposite effect on the angular velocity of joints of the lower and the upper limbs. The NJAV of the upper limbs is greater in the bunched start, whereas the NJAV of the lower limbs is smaller. The modifications of NJAV were due to a combination of the movement of the joints in the different degrees of freedom. The medium start seems to be the best compromise because it leads, in a short pushing time, to a combination of optimal joint velocities for upper and lower segments.

  15. Essential Oil of Ocimum basilicum L. and (-)-Linalool Blocks the Excitability of Rat Sciatic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Medeiros Venancio, Antonio; Ferreira-da-Silva, Francisco Walber; da Silva-Alves, Kerly Shamyra; de Carvalho Pimentel, Hugo; Macêdo Lima, Matheus; Fraga de Santana, Michele; Barreto Alves, Péricles; Batista da Silva, Givanildo; Leal-Cardoso, José Henrique; Marchioro, Murilo

    2016-01-01

    The racemate linalool and its levogyrus enantiomer [(-)-LIN] are present in many essential oils and possess several pharmacological activities, such as antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory. In this work, the effects of essential oil obtained from the cultivation of the Ocimum basilicum L. (EOOb) derived from Germplasm Bank rich in (-)-LIN content in the excitability of peripheral nervous system were studied. We used rat sciatic nerve to investigate the EOOb and (-)-LIN effects on neuron excitability and the extracellular recording technique was used to register the compound action potential (CAP). EOOb and (-)-LIN blocked the CAP in a concentration-dependent way and these effects were reversible after washout. EOOb blocked positive amplitude of 1st and 2nd CAP components with IC50 of 0.38 ± 0.2 and 0.17 ± 0.0 mg/mL, respectively. For (-)-LIN, these values were 0.23 ± 0.0 and 0.13 ± 0.0 mg/mL. Both components reduced the conduction velocity of CAP and the 2nd component seems to be more affected than the 1st component. In conclusion EOOb and (-)-LIN inhibited the excitability of peripheral nervous system in a similar way and potency, revealing that the effects of EOOb on excitability are due to the presence of (-)-LIN in the essential oil.

  16. Heparin blocks functional innervation of cultured human muscle by rat motor nerve.

    PubMed

    Marš, Tomaž; King, Michael P; Miranda, Armand F; Grubič, Zoran

    2000-01-01

    In vitro innervated human muscle is the only experimental model to study synaptogenesis of the neuromuscular junction in humans. Cultured human muscle never contracts spontaneously but will if innervated and therefore is a suitable model to study the effects of specific neural factors on the formation of functional neuromuscular contacts. Here, we tested the hypothesis that nerve derived factor agrin is essential for the formation of functional synapses between human myotubes and motoneurons growing from the explant of embryonic rat spinal cord. Agrin actions were blocked by heparin and the formation of functional neuromuscular contacts was quantitated. At a heparin concentration of 25 μg/ml, the number of functional contacts was significantly reduced. At higher concentrations, formation of such contacts was blocked completely. Except at the highest heparin concentrations (150 μg/ml) neuronal outgrowth was normal indicating that blockade of neuromuscular junction formation was not due to neuronal dysfunction. Our results are in accord with the concept that binding of neural agrin to the synaptic basal lamina is essential for the formation of functional neuromuscular junctions in the human muscle.

  17. Heparin blocks functional innervation of cultured human muscle by rat motor nerve.

    PubMed

    Mars, T; King, M P; Miranda, A F; Grubic, Z

    2000-01-01

    In vitro innervated human muscle is the only experimental model to study synaptogenesis of the neuromuscular junction in humans. Cultured human muscle never contracts spontaneously but will if innervated and therefore is a suitable model to study the effects of specific neural factors on the formation of functional neuromuscular contacts. Here, we tested the hypothesis that nerve derived factor agrin is essential for the formation of functional synapses between human myotubes and motoneurons growing from the explant of embryonic rat spinal cord. Agrin actions were blocked by heparin and the formation of functional neuromuscular contacts was quantitated. At a heparin concentration of 25 microg/ml, the number of functional contacts was significantly reduced. At higher concentrations, formation of such contacts was blocked completely. Except at the highest heparin concentrations (150 microg/ml) neuronal outgrowth was normal indicating that blockade of neuromuscular junction formation was not due to neuronal dysfunction. Our results are in accord with the concept that binding of neural agrin to the synaptic basal lamina is essential for the formation of functional neuromuscular junctions in the human muscle.

  18. Vagus nerve stimulation blocks vascular permeability following burn in both local and distal sites.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Pomales, Yan T; Krzyzaniak, Michael; Coimbra, Raul; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) can block the burn-induced systemic inflammatory response (SIRS). In this study we examined the potential for VNS to modulate vascular permeability (VP) in local sites (i.e. skin) and in secondary sites (i.e. lung) following burn. In a 30% total body surface area burn model, VP was measured using intravascular fluorescent dextran for quantification of the VP response in skin and lung. A peak in VP of the skin was observed 24h post-burn injury, that was blocked by VNS. Moreover, in the lung, VNS led to a reduction in burn-induced VP compared to sham-treated animals subjected to burn alone. The protective effects of VNS in this model were independent of the spleen, suggesting that the spleen was not a direct mediator of VNS. These studies identify a role for VNS in the regulation of VP in burns, with the translational potential of attenuating lung complications following burn.

  19. Sacro-Iliac Joint Sensory Block and Radiofrequency Ablation: Assessment of Bony Landmarks Relevant for Image-Guided Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Shannon L.; Burnham, Robert S.; Loh, Eldon; Agur, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided sensory block and radiofrequency ablation of the nerves innervating the sacro-iliac joint require readily identifiable bony landmarks for accurate needle/electrode placement. Understanding the relative locations of the transverse sacral tubercles along the lateral sacral crest is important for ultrasound guidance, as they demarcate the position of the posterior sacral network (S1–S3 ± L5/S4) innervating the posterior sacro-iliac joint. No studies were found that investigated the spatial relationships of these bony landmarks. The purpose of this study was to visualize and quantify the interrelationships of the transverse sacral tubercles and posterior sacral foramina to inform image-guided block and radiofrequency ablation of the sacro-iliac joint. The posterior and lateral surfaces of 30 dry sacra (15 M/15 F) were digitized and modeled in 3D and the distances between bony landmarks quantified. The relationships of bony landmarks (S1–S4) were not uniform. The mean intertubercular and interforaminal distances decreased from S1 to S4, whereas the distance from the lateral margin of the posterior sacral foramina to the transverse sacral tubercles increased from S1 to S3. The mean intertubercular distance from S1 to S3 was significantly (p < 0.05) larger in males. The interrelationships of the sacral bony landmarks should be taken into consideration when estimating the site and length of an image-guided strip lesion targeting the posterior sacral network. PMID:27747222

  20. A comparison between acute pressure block of the sciatic nerve and acupressure: methodology, analgesia, and mechanism involved

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Danping; Wang, Xiaolin; He, Jiman

    2013-01-01

    Acupressure is an alternative medicine methodology that originated in ancient China. Treatment effects are achieved by stimulating acupuncture points using acute pressure. Acute pressure block of the sciatic nerve is a newly reported analgesic method based on a current neuroscience concept: stimulation of the peripheral nerves increases the pain threshold. Both methods use pressure as an intervention method. Herein, we compare the methodology and mechanism of these two methods, which exhibit several similarities and differences. Acupressure entails variation in the duration of manipulation, and the analgesic effect achieved can be short-or long-term. The acute effect attained with acupressure presents a scope that is very different from that of the chronic effect attained after long-term treatment. This acute effect appears to have some similarities to that achieved with acute pressure block of the sciatic nerve, both in methodology and mechanism. More evidence is needed to determine whether there is a relationship between the two methods. PMID:23983488

  1. Ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block, a comparison with the conventional technique: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Khedkar, Sunita Milind; Bhalerao, Pradnya Milind; Yemul-Golhar, Shweta Rahul; Kelkar, Kalpana Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Background: The conventional technique of ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block may be associated with drug toxicity, block failure and needs large drug volume. The ultrasound-guided (USG) nerve block enables accurate needle positioning that may reduce the chances of drug toxicity, drug dose and block failure. Aim: In this study, we compared the onset and duration of the motor and sensory nerve block, the drug volume required and time to rescue analgesic between USG and conventional technique. Settings and Design: Sixty male patients aged between 18 and 60 years, belonging to American society of Anesthesiology I-II, scheduled for inguinal hernia repair were enrolled in this prospective study and were randomly allocated into two groups of thirty each by computerized method. Materials and Methods: Group A patients received hernia block by conventional method using 0.75% ropivacaine 15 ml, and Group B patients were given the block guided by ultrasound using 0.75% ropivacaine, till the nerves were surrounded on all sides by the drug. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using two independent sample t-tests for demographic and hemodynamic parameters. Nonparametric test (Mann-Whitney U-test) was used to find the significance between visual analog scale. Results: There was significantly early onset of sensory block in Group B 14.03 ± 2.82 min as compared to Group A 15.57 ± 1.52 min (P = 0.047). The onset of motor block was also earlier in Group B 19.40 ± 2.85 min as compared to Group A 20.67 ± 1.90 min. The time to rescue analgesia was more in Group B 7.22 ± 0.97 h as compared to Group A 6.80 ± 0.70 h (P = 0.062). The volume of drug required was less with ultrasound guided block. Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided hernia block thus has the advantage of early onset, less dose requirement and increase in time to rescue analgesia. PMID:26240549

  2. Effect of prostate volume on the peripheral nerve block anesthesia in the prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yang; Huang, Tian-bao; Gu, Xiao; Zhou, Guang-Chen; Lu, Sheng-Ming; Tao, Hua-Zhi; Liu, Bi-De; Ding, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of periprostatic nerve block (PNB) in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy on different prostate volume. Methods: A total of 568 patients received prostate biopsy in our hospital from May 2013 to September 2015 and were retrospectively studied. All patients were divided into local anesthesia group (LAG) and nerve block group (NBG). Then each group was subdivided into 4 subgroups (20–40, 40–60, 60–100, and >100 mL groups) according to different prostate volume range. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and visual numeric scale (VNS) were used to assess the patient's pain and quantify their satisfaction. The scores and complications were compared between the groups. Results: The age and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level before biopsy had no significant differences at intergroup or intragroup level. The VAS scores were significantly lower in the NBG than those in the LAG in terms of prostate volume (1 (1–2) versus 2 (1–3), 2 (1–3) versus 2 (2–4), 2 (2–3) versus 3 (2–5), 4 (3–5) versus 5 (4–7), all P < 0.05). Conversely, the VNS scores were higher in the NBG (4 (3–4) versus 3.5 (3–4), 3 (3–4) versus 3 (3–3), 3 (2–4) versus 3 (2–3), 2 (2–2) versus 1 (1–2), all P < 0.05). Patients with smaller prostate volume undergoing PNB or local anesthesia experienced significantly lower pain and higher satisfaction scores than those with large prostate. Whether in PNB or local anesthesia group, patients with large prostate volume had more chance to have hematuria, hemospermia, urinary retention than smaller one except infection (P < 0.05). Those complications had no significant differences between LAG and NBG (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Compared with local anesthesia, ultrasound-guided PNB has superior analgesic effect and equal safety, but for patients with a large prostate volume, the analgesic effect is inefficient. PMID:27428215

  3. Comparative evaluation of femoral nerve block and intravenous fentanyl for positioning during spinal anaesthesia in surgery of femur fracture

    PubMed Central

    Jadon, Ashok; Kedia, Sunil Kumar; Dixit, Shreya; Chakraborty, Swastika

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spinal anaesthesia is the preferred technique to fix fracture of the femur. Extreme pain does not allow ideal positioning for this procedure. Intravenous fentanyl and femoral nerve block are commonly used techniques to reduce the pain during position for spinal anaesthesia however; results are conflicting regarding superiority of femoral nerve block over intravenous fentanyl. Aims: We conducted this study to compare the analgesic effect provided by femoral nerve block (FNB) and intra- venous (IV) fentanyl prior to positioning for central neuraxial block in patients undergoing surgery for femur fracture. Patients and Methods: In this randomized prospective study 60 patients scheduled for fracture femur operation under spinal were included. Patients were distributed in two groups through computer generated random numbers table; Femoral nerve block group (FNB) and Intravenous fentanyl group (FENT). In FNB group patients received FNB guided by a peripheral nerve stimulator (Stimuplex; B Braun, Melsungen, AG) 5 minutes prior to positioning. 20mL, 1.5% lidocaine with adrenaline (1:200,000) was injected incrementally after a negative aspiration test. Patients in the fentanyl group received injection fentanyl 1 μg/kg IV 5 mins prior to positioning. Spinal block was performed and pain scores before and during positioning were recorded. Statistical analysis was done with Sigmaplot version-10 computer software. Student t-test was applied to compare the means and P < 0.05 was taken as significant. Results: VAS during positioning in group FNB: 0.57 ± 0.31 versus FENT 2.53 ± 1.61 (P = 0.0020). Time to perform spinal anesthesia in group FNB: 15.33 ± 1.64 min versus FENT 19.56 ± 3.09 min (P = 0.000049). Quality of patient positioning for spinal anesthesia in group FNB 2.67± 0.606 versus FENT 1.967 ± 0.85 (P = 0.000027). Patient acceptance was less in group FENT (P = 0.000031). Conclusion: Femoral nerve block provides better analgesia, patient satisfaction and

  4. Efficacy and complications associated with a modified inferior alveolar nerve block technique. A randomized, triple-blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Montserrat-Bosch, Marta; Nogueira-Magalhães, Pedro; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the efficacy and complication rates of two different techniques for inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANB). Study Design: A randomized, triple-blind clinical trial comprising 109 patients who required lower third molar removal was performed. In the control group, all patients received an IANB using the conventional Halsted technique, whereas in the experimental group, a modified technique using a more inferior injection point was performed. Results: A total of 100 patients were randomized. The modified technique group showed a significantly higher onset time in the lower lip and chin area, and was frequently associated to a lingual electric discharge sensation. Three failures were recorded, 2 of them in the experimental group. No relevant local or systemic complications were registered. Conclusions: Both IANB techniques used in this trial are suitable for lower third molar removal. However, performing an inferior alveolar nerve block in a more inferior position (modified technique) extends the onset time, does not seem to reduce the risk of intravascular injections and might increase the risk of lingual nerve injuries. Key words:Dental anesthesia, inferior alveolar nerve block, lidocaine, third molar, intravascular injection. PMID:24608204

  5. Whole limb kinematics are preferentially conserved over individual joint kinematics after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Chang, Young-Hui; Auyang, Arick G; Scholz, John P; Nichols, T Richard

    2009-11-01

    Biomechanics and neurophysiology studies suggest whole limb function to be an important locomotor control parameter. Inverted pendulum and mass-spring models greatly reduce the complexity of the legs and predict the dynamics of locomotion, but do not address how numerous limb elements are coordinated to achieve such simple behavior. As a first step, we hypothesized whole limb kinematics were of primary importance and would be preferentially conserved over individual joint kinematics after neuromuscular injury. We used a well-established peripheral nerve injury model of cat ankle extensor muscles to generate two experimental injury groups with a predictable time course of temporary paralysis followed by complete muscle self-reinnervation. Mean trajectories of individual joint kinematics were altered as a result of deficits after injury. By contrast, mean trajectories of limb orientation and limb length remained largely invariant across all animals, even with paralyzed ankle extensor muscles, suggesting changes in mean joint angles were coordinated as part of a long-term compensation strategy to minimize change in whole limb kinematics. Furthermore, at each measurement stage (pre-injury, paralytic and self-reinnervated) step-by-step variance of individual joint kinematics was always significantly greater than that of limb orientation. Our results suggest joint angle combinations are coordinated and selected to stabilize whole limb kinematics against short-term natural step-by-step deviations as well as long-term, pathological deviations created by injury. This may represent a fundamental compensation principle allowing animals to adapt to changing conditions with minimal effect on overall locomotor function.

  6. Alternative to the inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia when placing mandibular dental implants posterior to the mental foramen.

    PubMed

    Heller, A A; Shankland, W E

    2001-01-01

    Local anesthesia block of the inferior alveolar nerve is routinely taught throughout dental education. This commonly used technique eliminates all somatosensory perception of the mandible, mandibular teeth, floor of the mouth, ipsilateral tongue, and all but the lateral (buccal) gingivae. Generally, the dentist or surgeon desires these structures to be anesthetized. However, in the placement of mandibular implants, it may be useful for the patient to be able to sense when the inferior alveolar nerve is in danger of being damaged, possibly producing permanent paresthesia. In this article, the technique of mandibular infiltration prior to mandibular implant placement in the mandible is discussed.

  7. Failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block among dental students and interns

    PubMed Central

    AlHindi, Maryam; Rashed, Bayan; AlOtaibi, Noura

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) among dental students and interns, causes of failure, investigate awareness of different IANB techniques, and to report IANB-associated complications. Methods: A 3-page questionnaire containing 13 questions was distributed to a random sample of 350 third to fifth years students and interns at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on January 2011. It included demographic questions (age, gender, and academic level) and questions on IANB failure frequency and reasons, actions taken to overcome the failure, and awareness of different anesthetic techniques, supplementary techniques, and complications. Results: Of the 250 distributed questionnaires, 238 were returned (68% response rate). Most (85.7%) of surveyed sample had experienced IANB failure once or twice. The participants attributed the failures most commonly (66.45%) to anatomical variations. The most common alternative technique used was intraligamentary injection (57.1%), although 42.8% of the sample never attempted any alternatives. Large portion of the samples stated that they either lacked both knowledge of and training for other techniques (44.9%), or that they had knowledge of them but not enough training to perform them (45.8%). Conclusion: To decrease IANB failure rates for dental students and interns, knowledge of landmarks, anatomical variation and their training in alternatives to IANB, such as the Gow-Gates and Akinosi techniques, both theoretically and clinically in the dental curriculum should be enhanced. PMID:26739980

  8. Occipital nerve block is effective in craniofacial neuralgias but not in idiopathic persistent facial pain.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, T P; Müller, P; Seedorf, H; Regelsberger, J; May, A

    2012-04-01

    Occipital nerve block (ONB) has been used in several primary headache syndromes with good results. Information on its effects in facial pain is sparse. In this chart review, the efficacy of ONB using lidocaine and dexamethasone was evaluated in 20 patients with craniofacial pain syndromes comprising 8 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, 6 with trigeminal neuropathic pain, 5 with persistent idiopathic facial pain and 1 with occipital neuralgia. Response was defined as an at least 50% reduction of original pain. Mean response rate was 55% with greatest efficacy in trigeminal (75%) and occipital neuralgia (100%) and less efficacy in trigeminal neuropathic pain (50%) and persistent idiopathic facial pain (20%). The effects lasted for an average of 27 days with sustained benefits for 69, 77 and 107 days in three patients. Side effects were reported in 50%, albeit transient and mild in nature. ONBs are effective in trigeminal pain involving the second and third branch and seem to be most effective in craniofacial neuralgias. They should be considered in facial pain before more invasive approaches, such as thermocoagulation or vascular decompression, are performed, given that side effects are mild and the procedure is minimally invasive.

  9. Temporary Nerve Block at Selected Digits Revealed Hand Motor Deficits in Grasping Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Carteron, Aude; McPartlan, Kerry; Gioeli, Christina; Reid, Emily; Turturro, Matt; Hahn, Barry; Benson, Cynthia; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral sensory feedback plays a crucial role in ensuring correct motor execution throughout hand grasp control. Previous studies utilized local anesthesia to deprive somatosensory feedback in the digits or hand, observations included sensorimotor deficits at both corticospinal and peripheral levels. However, the questions of how the disturbed and intact sensory input integrate and interact with each other to assist the motor program execution, and whether the motor coordination based on motor output variability between affected and non-affected elements (e.g., digits) becomes interfered by the local sensory deficiency, have not been answered. The current study aims to investigate the effect of peripheral deafferentation through digital nerve blocks at selective digits on motor performance and motor coordination in grasp control. Our results suggested that the absence of somatosensory information induced motor deficits in hand grasp control, as evidenced by reduced maximal force production ability in both local and non-local digits, impairment of force and moment control during object lift and hold, and attenuated motor synergies in stabilizing task performance variables, namely the tangential force and moment of force. These findings implied that individual sensory input is shared across all the digits and the disturbed signal from local sensory channel(s) has a more comprehensive impact on the process of the motor output execution in the sensorimotor integration process. Additionally, a feedback control mechanism with a sensation-based component resides in the formation process for the motor covariation structure. PMID:27932964

  10. Relationship between ventral lumbar disc protrusion and contrast medium leakage during sympathetic nerve block.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Toshiharu; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Takamori, Mina; Ogawa, Ken-Ichi; Goto, Takahisa

    2015-02-01

    Ventral disc protrusions have been neglected because they are asymptomatic. Lumbar sympathetic nerve block (LSNB) is one of the clinical choices for refractory low back pain treatment. Leakage of the contrast medium may occur and lead to complications, especially when using a neurolytic agent. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of 52 consecutive patients with refractory low back pain due to lumbar spinal canal stenosis who underwent LSNB, and graded ventral disc protrusion at the L1/2 to L5/S1 vertebral discs on a three-point scale (grade 0 = no protrusion, grade 1 = protrusion without migration, grade 2 = protrusion with migration). We also determined if there was leakage of contrast medium in LSNB. Ventral disc protrusion was observed in all patients, and 75 % (39/52) had grade 2 protrusion in the L1/2-L3/4 vertebral discs. Moreover, the incidence of contrast medium leakage was significantly higher at the vertebrae that had grade 2 protrusion than at those with less protrusion. We revealed a higher incidence of ventral disc protrusion of the lumbar vertebrae than previously reported, and that the incidence of leakage in LSNB increased when ventral disc protrusion was present. To avoid complications, attention should be paid to ventral disc protrusions before performing LSNB.

  11. Sciatic-femoral nerve block with bupivacaine in goats undergoing elective stifle arthrotomy.

    PubMed

    Adami, Chiara; Bergadano, Alessandra; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Stoffel, Michael H; Doherr, Marcus G; Spadavecchia, Claudia

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the sciatic-femoral nerve block (SFNB) in goats and to evaluate the peri-operative analgesia when the goats underwent stifle arthrotomy. The animals were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: groups 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 received 0.25%, 0.5% and 0.75% of bupivacaine, respectively, while group C (control group) received 0.9% NaCl. In all groups, the volume administered was 0.2 mL/kg. Intra-operatively, the proportion of animals receiving rescue propofol was significantly lower in groups 0.5 and 0.75, compared to group C. Post-operatively, the visual analogue scale (VAS) and total pain score were significantly higher in group C than in the other groups. Group 0.75 had the highest percentage of animals showing motor blockade. SFNB performed with bupivacaine resulted in better intra- and post-operative analgesia than SFNB performed with saline. Compared to the other concentrations, 0.5% bupivacaine resulted in satisfactory analgesia with acceptable side effects.

  12. Liposomal Bupivacaine vs Interscalene Nerve Block for Pain Control After Shoulder Arthroplasty: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Casey V; Albrecht, Matthew J; Petersen, Steve A; Srikumaran, Uma

    The aim of this study was to compare liposomal bupivacaine and interscalene nerve block (ISNB) for analgesia after shoulder arthroplasty. We compared 37 patients who received liposomal bupivacaine vs 21 who received ISNB after shoulder arthroplasty by length of hospital stay (LOS), opioid consumption, and postoperative pain. Pain was the same in both groups for time intervals of 1 hour and 8 to 14 hours postoperatively. Compared with ISNB patients, liposomal bupivacaine patients reported less pain at 18 to 24 hours (P = .001) and 27 to 36 hours (P = .029) and had lower opioid consumption on postoperative days 2 (P = .001) and 3 (P = .002). Mean LOS for liposomal bupivacaine patients was 46 ± 20 hours vs 57 ± 14 hours for ISNB patients (P = .012). Sixteen of 37 liposomal bupivacaine patients vs 2 of 21 ISNB patients were discharged on the first postoperative day (P = .010). Liposomal bupivacaine was associated with less pain, less opioid consumption, and shorter hospital stays after shoulder arthroplasty compared with ISNB.

  13. Management of pudendal neuralgia using ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency: a report of two cases and discussion of pudendal nerve block techniques.

    PubMed

    Hong, Myong-Joo; Kim, Yeon-Dong; Park, Jeong-Ki; Hong, Hyon-Joo

    2016-04-01

    Pudendal neuralgia is characterized by chronic pain or discomfort in the area innervated by the pudendal nerve, with no obvious cause. A successful pudendal nerve block is crucial for the diagnosis of pudendal neuralgia. Blind or fluoroscopy-guided pudendal nerve blocks have been conventionally used for diagnosis and treatment; however, ultrasound-guided pudendal nerve blocks were also reported recently. With regard to the achievement of long-term effects, although pulsed radiofrequency performed under fluoroscopic guidance has been reported, that performed under ultrasound guidance is not well reported. This report describes two cases of pudendal neuralgia that were successfully managed using ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency and presents a literature review of pudendal nerve block techniques. However, in the management of chronic neuropathic pain, physicians should keep in mind that the placebo effect related to invasive approaches must not be neglected.

  14. Study on molded joint by curable PE block insulation for XLPE insulating cable under extra high voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Toya, A.; Kurihara, M.; Shimomura, T.; Kondo, K.; Nakamura, S.; Kawahigashi, M.; Otaka, I.

    1996-04-01

    A block molded joint under extra high voltage made to drastically reduce installation time has been developed. Through its excellent performance, the joint is expected to be substituted for the extrusion molded joints which are widely used in 275kV-class XLPE cable for long distance power transmission.

  15. Effect of Combined Single-Injection Femoral Nerve Block and Patient-Controlled Epidural Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ae-Ryung; Choi, Duck-Hwan; Choi, Soo-Joo; Hahm, Tae-Soo; Kim, Ga-Hyun; Moon, Young-Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Total knee replacement is one of the most painful orthopedic procedures, and effective pain relief is essential for early mobility and discharge from hospital. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether addition of single-injection femoral nerve block to epidural analgesia would provide better postoperative pain control, compared to epidural analgesia alone, after total knee replacement. Materials and Methods Thirty-eight patients received a single-injection femoral nerve block with 0.25% levobupivacaine (30 mL) combined with epidural analgesia (femoral nerve block group) and 40 patients received epidural analgesia alone (control group). Pain intensity and volume of patient-controlled epidural analgesia medication and rescue analgesic requirements were measured in the first 48 hours after surgery at three time periods; 0-6 hours, 6-24 hours, and 24-48 hours. Also, side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and pruritus were evaluated. Results Median visual analog scale at rest and movement was significantly lower until 48 hours in the femoral nerve block group. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia volume was significantly lower throughout the study period, however, rescue analgesia requirements were significantly lower only up to 6 hours in the femoral nerve block group. The incidences of nausea and vomiting and rescue antiemetic requirement were significantly lower in the femoral nerve block group up to 6 hours. Conclusion The combination of femoral nerve block with epidural analgesia is an effective pain management regimen in patients undergoing unilateral total knee replacement. PMID:21155047

  16. Nerve Palsy after Total Hip Arthroplasty without Subtrochanteric Femoral Shortening Osteotomy for a Completely Dislocated Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Sonohata, Motoki; Kitajima, Masaru; Kawano, Shunsuke; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurological injuries are a rare but devastating complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to retrospectively determine the frequency of nerve palsy after THA without subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy in patients with a completely dislocated hip joint without pseudo-articulation between the femoral head and iliac bone. Methods: Between October 1999 and September 2001, nine primary THAs were performed for patients with a completely dislocated hip joint. The limb lengths, neurological abnormalities, and the extent of their neurological recovery were evaluated. Three THAs were combined with subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy, and six THAs were combined without subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy. Results: The mean length of the operation was 4.8 cm (range, 3.0-6.5 cm). Sciatic nerve palsy developed in four of the nine patients after THA. None of the cases with sciatic nerve palsy were combined with subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy. Three of four patients did not completely recover from sciatic nerve palsy. Conclusions: THA for patients with a completely dislocated hip was associated with a high risk of nerve palsy due to excessive limb lengthening; the potential for recovery from nerve palsy was observed to be poor. Subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy should be used in combination with THA in patients with a completely dislocated hip. PMID:28217204

  17. Clinical evaluation of inferior alveolar nerve block by injection into the pterygomandibular space anterior to the mandibular foramen.

    PubMed Central

    Takasugi, Y.; Furuya, H.; Moriya, K.; Okamoto, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (conventional technique) has potential risks of neural and vascular injuries. We studied a method of inferior alveolar nerve block by injecting a local anesthetic solution into the pterygomandibular space anterior to the mandibular foramen (anterior technique) with the purpose of avoiding such complications. The insertion angle of the anterior technique and the estimation of anesthesia in the anterior technique were examined. The predicted insertion angle measured on computed tomographic images was 60.1 +/- 7.1 degrees from the median, with the syringe end lying on the contralateral mandibular first molar, and the insertion depth was approximately 10 mm. We applied the anterior technique to 100 patients for mandibular molar extraction and assessed the anesthetic effects. A success rate of 74% was obtained. This is similar to that reported for the conventional technique but without the accompanying risks for inferior alveolar neural and vascular complications. Images Figure 2 PMID:11432177

  18. Coordination between catch connective tissue and muscles through nerves in the spine joint of the sea urchin Diadema setosum.

    PubMed

    Motokawa, Tatsuo; Fuchigami, Yoshiro

    2015-03-01

    Echinoderms have catch connective tissues that change their stiffness as a result of nervous control. The coordination between catch connective tissue and muscles was studied in the spine joint of the sea urchin Diadema setosum. Spine joints are equipped with two kinds of effector: spine muscles and a kind of catch connective tissue, which is called the catch apparatus (CA). The former is responsible for spine movements and the latter for maintenance of spine posture. Diadema show a shadow reaction in which they wave spines when a shadow falls on them, which is a reflex involving the radial nerves. Dynamic mechanical tests were performed on the CA in a joint at which the muscles were severed so as not to interfere with the mechanical measurements. The joint was on a piece of the test that contained other spines and a radial nerve. Darkening of the preparation invoked softening of the CA and spine waving (the shadow reaction). Electrical stimulation of the radial nerve invoked a similar response. These responses were abolished after the nerve pathways from the radial nerve to spines had been cut. A touch applied to the CA stiffened it and the adjacent spines inclined toward the touched CA. A touch to the base of the adjacent spine softened the CA and the spines around the touched spine inclined towards it. The softening of the CA can be interpreted as a response that reduces the resistance of the ligaments to spine movements. Our results clearly show coordination between catch connective tissue and muscles through nerves.

  19. Factors Associated With Risk of Neurologic Complications After Peripheral Nerve Blocks: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Sondekoppam, Rakesh V; Tsui, Ban C H

    2017-02-01

    The onset of neurologic complications after regional anesthesia is a complex process and may result from an interaction of host, agent, and environmental risk factors. The purpose of this systematic review was examine the qualitative evidence relating to various risk factors implicated in neurologic dysfunction after peripheral nerve block (PNB). The MEDLINE, OVID, and EMBASE databases were primary sources for literature. Cochrane, LILACS, DARE, IndMed, ERIC, NHS, and HTA via Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD; York University) databases were searched for additional unique results. Randomized controlled studies, case-control studies, cohort studies, retrospective reviews, and case reports/case series reporting neurologic outcomes after PNB were included. Relevant, good-quality systematic reviews were also eligible. Human and animal studies evaluating factors important for neurologic outcomes were assessed separately. Information on study design, outcomes, and quality was extracted and reviewed independently by the 2 review authors. An overall rating of the quality of evidence was assigned using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) criteria. Relevant full-text articles were separated based on type (prospective, retrospective, and nonhuman studies). Strengths of association were defined as high, moderate, inconclusive, or inadequate based on study quality and direction of association. The evidence from 77 human studies was reviewed to assess various host, agent, and environmental factors that have been implicated as possible risks. Most of the available evidence regarding the injurious effects of the 3 cardinal agents of mechanical insult, pressure, and neurotoxicity was extracted from animal studies (42 studies). Among the risk factors investigated in humans, block type had a strong association with neurologic outcome. Intraneural injection, which seems to occur commonly with PNBs, showed an inconsistent direction of

  20. Assessment of Anteroposterior Subpedicular Approach and Oblique Scotty Dog Subpedicular Approach for Selective Nerve Root Block

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yu-Cheng; Luo, Chi-An; Joey-Tan, Kit-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Background The technique used to administer a selective nerve root block (SNRB) varies depending on individual expertise. Both the anteroposterior (AP) subpedicular approach and oblique Scotty dog subpedicular approach are widely practiced. However, the literature does not provide a clear consensus regarding which approach is more suitable. Hence, we decided to analyse the procedural parameters and clinical outcomes following SNRBs using these two approaches. Methods Patients diagnosed with a single lumbar herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) refractory to conservative management but not willing for immediate surgery were selected for a prospective nonrandomized comparative study. An SNRB was administered as a therapeutic alternative using the AP subpedicular approach in one group (n = 25; mean age, 45 ± 5.4 years) and the oblique Scotty dog subpedicular approach in the other group (n = 22; mean age, 43.8 ± 4.7 years). Results were compared in terms of the duration of the procedure, the number of C-arm exposures, accuracy, pain relief, functional outcome and the duration of relief. Results Our results suggest that the oblique Scotty dog subpedicular approach took a significantly longer duration (p = 0.02) and a greater number of C-arm exposures (p = 0.001). But, its accuracy of needle placement was 95.5% compared to only 72% using the AP subpedicular approach (p = 0.03). There was no significant difference in terms of clinical outcomes between these approaches. Conclusions The AP subpedicular approach was simple and facile, but the oblique Scotty dog subpedicular approach was more accurate. However, a brief window period of pain relief was achieved irrespective of the approaching technique used. PMID:28261430

  1. The sensitivity of two-dimensional hindlimb joint kinematics analysis in assessing functional recovery in rats after sciatic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Amado, Sandra; Armada-da-Silva, Paulo A S; João, Filipa; Maurício, Ana C; Luís, Ana L; Simões, Maria J; Veloso, António P

    2011-12-01

    Walking analysis in the rat is increasingly used to assess functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. Here we assess the sensitivity and specificity of hindlimb joint kinematics measures during the rat gait early after sciatic nerve crush injury (DEN), after twelve weeks of recovery (REINN) and in sham-operated controls (Sham) using discriminant analysis. The analysis addressed gait spatiotemporal variables and hip, knee and ankle angle and angular velocity measures during the entire walking cycle. In DEN animals, changes affected all studied joints plus spatiotemporal parameters of gait. Both the spatiotemporal and ankle kinematics parameters recovered to normality within twelve weeks. At this time point, some hip and knee kinematics values were still abnormal when compared to sham controls. Discriminant models based on hip, knee and ankle kinematics displayed maximal sensitivity to identify DEN animals. However, the discriminant models based on spatiotemporal and ankle kinematics data showed a poor performance when assigning animals to the REINN and Sham groups. Models using hip and knee kinematics during walking showed the best sensitivity to recognize the reinnervated animals. The model construed on the basis of hip joint kinematics was the one combining highest sensitivity with robustness and high specificity. It is concluded that ankle joint kinematics fails in detecting minor functional deficits after long term recovery from sciatic nerve crush and extending the kinematic analysis during walking to the hip and knee joints improves the sensitivity of this functional test.

  2. Potassium channel blocking actions of beta-bungarotoxin and related toxins on mouse and frog motor nerve terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, E. G.; Harvey, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    1. beta-Bungarotoxin and other snake toxins with phospholipase activity augment acetylcholine release evoked from mouse motor nerve terminals before they produce blockade. This action of the toxins is independent of their phospholipase A2 activity, but the underlying mechanism for the facilitation of release is unclear. To determine whether the toxins affect ionic currents at motor nerve terminals, extracellular recordings were made from perineural sheaths of motor nerves innervating mouse triangularis sterni muscles. 2. Perineural waveforms had a characteristic shape, with two major negative deflections, the first being associated with nodal Na+ currents and the second with terminal K+ currents. Block of the K+ currents revealed a Ca2+-dependent component. 3. During the facilitatory phase of its action, beta-bungarotoxin (150 nM) reduced the second negative component of the perineural waveform by 30-50%. 4. The reduction could be a consequence of a decreased K+ ion contribution or of an increase in the current carried by Ca2+. As beta-bungarotoxin had similar effects in solutions which contained no added Ca2+, it is unlikely to be acting on the Ca2+ current. Also, it is unlikely to be blocking the Ca2+-activated K+ current, which is suppressed in zero Ca2+ conditions. 5. Other prejunctionally active snake toxins (taipoxin, notexin and crotoxin) had similar effects to those of beta-bungarotoxin, but a similar basic phospholipase of low toxicity from cobra venom had no effect. 6. Thus, beta-bungarotoxin and related toxins block a fraction of the K+ current in the motor nerve terminals of mouse preparations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3263160

  3. Combination of diagnostic medial calcaneal nerve block followed by pulsed radiofrequency for plantar fascitis pain: A new modality.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Deepak; Ahuja, Vanita

    2014-03-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is the most common cause of chronic heel pain which may be bilateral in 20 to 30% of patients. It is a very painful and disabling condition which can affect the quality of life. The management includes both pharmacological and operative procedures with no single proven effective treatment modality. In the present case series, we managed three patients with PF (one with bilateral PF). Following a diagnostic medial calcaneal nerve (MCN) block at its origin, we observed reduction in verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS) in all the three patients. Two patients has relapse of PF pain which was managed with MCN block followed with pulsed radio frequency (PRF). All the patients were pain-free at the time of reporting. This case series highlights the possible role of combination of diagnostic MCN block near its origin followed with PRF as a new modality in management of patients with PF.

  4. Fluoroscopically guided extraforaminal cervical nerve root blocks: analysis of epidural flow of the injectate with respect to needle tip position.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Kyle; Riew, K Daniel; Gilula, Louis A

    2014-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective evaluation of consecutively performed fluoroscopically guided cervical nerve root blocks. Objective To describe the incidence of injectate central epidural flow with respect to needle tip position during fluoroscopically guided extraforaminal cervical nerve root blocks (ECNRBs). Methods Between February 19, 2003 and June 11, 2003, 132 consecutive fluoroscopically guided ECNRBs performed with contrast media in the final injected material (injectate) were reviewed on 95 patients with average of 1.3 injections per patient. Fluoroscopic spot images documenting the procedure were obtained as part of standard quality assurance. An independent observer not directly involved in the procedures retrospectively reviewed the images, and the data were placed into a database. Image review was performed to determine optimal needle tip positioning for injectate epidural flow. Results Central epidural injectate flow was obtained in only 28.9% of injections with the needle tip lateral to midline of the lateral mass (zone 2). 83.8% of injectate went into epidural space when the needle tip was medial to midline of the lateral mass (zone 3). 100% of injectate flowed epidurally when the needle tip was medial to or at the medial cortex of the lateral mass (zone 4). There was no statistically significant difference with regards to central epidural flow and the needle tip position on lateral view. Conclusion To ensure central epidural flow with ECNRBs one must be prepared to pass the needle tip medial to midplane of the lateral mass or to medial cortex of the lateral mass. Approximately 16% of ECNRBs with needle tip medial to midline of the lateral mass did not flow into epidural space. One cannot claim a nerve block is an epidural block unless epidural flow of injectate is observed.

  5. Comparative Effects of Periarticular Multimodal Drug Injection and Single-Shot Femoral Nerve Block on Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty and Factors Influencing Their Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Kan, Hiroyuki; Hino, Manabu; Ichimaru, Shohei; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Amaya, Fumimasa; Sawa, Teiji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study compared the analgesic effects of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) and femoral nerve block (FNB) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and assessed factors associated with analgesia obtained by these two methods. Materials and Methods Study subjects included 66 patients (72 knees) who underwent TKA for osteoarthritis of the knee. Pain visual analogue scale (VAS), the amount of analgesics used, number of days to achieve 90° of flexion of the knee joint, date of initiating parallel-bar walking, range of motion of the knee joint at discharge, and adverse events were investigated. Results The VAS scores did not differ significantly between two groups, whereas the amount of analgesics used was significantly lower in the LIA group. Preoperative flexion contracture was significantly more severe in the LIA group with high VAS compared with low VAS. No serious adverse event occurred in the LIA or FNB group. Conclusions The lower analgesic usage in the LIA group than the FNB group indicates that the analgesic effect of LIA was greater than that of singleshot FNB after TKA. There were no serious complications in either group. The postoperative analgesic effect of LIA was smaller in patients with severe than less severe preoperative flexion contracture. PMID:27595078

  6. Effect of massage on the efficacy of the mental and incisive nerve block.

    PubMed

    Jaber, A; Whitworth, J M; Corbett, I P; Al-Baqshi, B; Jauhar, S; Meechan, J G

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this trial was to assess the effect of soft tissue massage on the efficacy of the mental and incisive nerve block (MINB). Thirty-eight volunteers received MINB of 2.2 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 80,000 epinephrine on 2 occasions. At one visit the soft tissue overlying the injection site was massaged for 60 seconds (active treatment). At the other visit the crowns of the mandibular premolar teeth were massaged (control treatment). Order of treatments was randomized. An electronic pulp tester was used to measure pulpal anesthesia in the ipsilateral mandibular first molar, a premolar, and lateral incisor teeth up to 45 minutes following the injection. The efficacy of pulp anesthesia was determined by 2 methods: (a) by quantifying the number of episodes with no response to maximal electronic pulp stimulation after each treatment, and (b) by quantifying the number of volunteers with no response to maximal pulp stimulation (80 reading) on 2 or more consecutive tests, termed anesthetic success. Data were analyzed by McNemar, Mann-Whitney, and paired-samples t tests. Anesthetic success was 52.6% for active and 42.1% for control treatment for lateral incisors, 89.5 and 86.8% respectively for premolars, and 50.0 and 42.1% respectively for first molars (P = .344, 1.0, and .508 respectively). There were no significant differences in the number of episodes of negative response to maximum pulp tester stimulation between active and control massage. A total of 131 episodes were recorded after both active and control massage in lateral incisors (McNemar test, P = 1.0), 329 (active) versus 316 (control) episodes in the premolars (McNemar test, P = .344), and 119 (active) versus 109 (control) episodes respectively for first molars (McNemar test, P = .444). Speed of anesthetic onset and discomfort did not differ between treatments. We concluded that soft tissue massage after MINB does not influence anesthetic efficacy.

  7. Greater occipital nerve blocks in the treatment of refractory chronic migraine: An observational report of nine cases

    PubMed Central

    Koçer, Abdulkadir

    2016-01-01

    AIM To report the effects of greater occipital nerve (GON) blocks on refractory chronic migraine headache. METHODS Nine patients who were receiving the conventionally accepted preventive therapies underwent treatment with repeated GON block to control chronic migraine resistant to other treatments. GON blocking with lidocaine and normal saline mixture was administered by the same physician at hospital once a month (for three times in total). Patients were assessed before the injection and every month thereafter for pain frequency and severity, number of times analgesics were used and any appearant side effects during a 6 mo follow-up. RESULTS Eight of nine patients reported a marked decrease in frequency and severity of migraine attacks in comparison to their baseline symptoms; one reported no significant change (not more than 50%) from baseline and did not accept the second injection. GON block resulted in considerable reduction in pain frequency and severity and need to use analgesics up to three months after the injection in the present cases. The patients did not report any adverse effects. CONCLUSION Hereby we noticed a remarkable success with refractory chronic migraine patients. We believe that this intervention can result in rapid relief of pain with the effects lasting for perhaps several weeks or even months. Further controlled clinical trials are warranted to evaluate the effect of GON block in the treatment of refractory migraine cases. PMID:27803914

  8. Effect of sublingual triazolam on the success of inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Matthew; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Drum, Melissa; Beck, Mike

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to determine the effect of the administration of sublingual triazolam on the success of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block in patients experiencing irreversible pulpitis. Fifty-eight emergency patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth randomly received, in a double-blind manner, an identical sublingual tablet of either 0.25 mg of triazolam or a placebo 30 minutes before administration of a conventional IAN block. Access was begun 15 minutes after completion of the IAN block, and all patients had profound lip numbness. Success was defined as no or mild pain (visual analog scale recordings) on access or initial instrumentation. The success rate for the IAN block was 43% with triazolam and 57% with the placebo, with no significant difference (P = .43) between the 2 groups. For mandibular posterior teeth, triazolam in a sublingual dose of 0.25 mg did not result in an increase in success of the IAN block in patients with irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, when using conscious sedation, profound local anesthesia is still required to eliminate the sensation of pain during endodontic treatment for patients with irreversible pulpitis.

  9. Effects of perineural administration of dexmedetomidine in combination with bupivacaine in a femoral-sciatic nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Helal, Safaa M.; Eskandr, Ashraf M.; Gaballah, Khaled M.; Gaarour, Ihab S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: Perineural administration of dexmedetomidine, a α2-adrenoceptor agonist, prolongs the duration of analgesia. We hypothesized that adding dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine would prolong postoperative analgesia after below knee surgery. Materials and Methods: After ethical approval, 60 patients scheduled for below knee surgery under combined femoral-sciatic nerve block were randomly allocated into two groups to have their block performed using bupivacaine 0.5% alone (group B) or bupivacaine 0.5% combined with 100 μg bupivacaine-dexmedetomidine (group BD). Motor and sensory block onset times; durations of blockades and analgesia were recorded. Results: Sensory and motor block onset times were shorter by 20% in group BD than in group B (P < 0.01). Sensory and motor blockade durations were longer in group BD (+45% and +40%, respectively) than in group B (P < 0.01). Duration of analgesia was longer in group BD by 75% than in group B (P < 0.01). Systolic, diastolic arterial blood pressure levels, and heart rate were significantly less in group BD, six patients in group BD, and no patients in group B developed bradycardia (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The addition of dexmedetomidine 100 μg to bupivacaine 0.5% during ultrasound-guided combined femoral and sciatic block for below knee surgery was associated with a prolonged duration of analgesia. However, this may be associated with significant bradycardia requiring treatment. PMID:26955305

  10. Effects of applying nerve blocks to prevent postherpetic neuralgia in patients with acute herpes zoster: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Lee, Jae Young; Choi, Seong Soo; Cheong, Yu Seon; Kwon, Koo; Yoon, Syn Hae

    2017-01-01

    Background Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a common and painful complication of acute herpes zoster. In some cases, it is refractory to medical treatment. Preventing its occurrence is an important issue. We hypothesized that applying nerve blocks during the acute phase of herpes zoster could reduce PHN incidence by attenuating central sensitization and minimizing nerve damage and the anti-inflammatory effects of local anesthetics and steroids. Methods This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates the efficacy of using nerve blocks to prevent PHN. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov and KoreaMed databases without language restrictions on April, 30 2014. We included all randomized controlled trials performed within 3 weeks after the onset of herpes zoster in order to compare nerve blocks vs active placebo and standard therapy. Results Nine trials were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Nerve blocks reduced the duration of herpes zoster-related pain and PHN incidence of at 3, 6, and 12 months after final intervention. Stellate ganglion block and single epidural injection did not achieve positive outcomes, but administering paravertebral blockage and continuous/repeated epidural blocks reduced PHN incidence at 3 months. None of the included trials reported clinically meaningful serious adverse events. Conclusions Applying nerve blocks during the acute phase of the herpes zoster shortens the duration of zoster-related pain, and somatic blocks (including paravertebral and repeated/continuous epidural blocks) are recommended to prevent PHN. In future studies, consensus-based PHN definitions, clinical cutoff points that define successful treatment outcomes and standardized outcome-assessment tools will be needed. PMID:28119767

  11. Failure of articular process (zygaphophyseal) joint development as a cause of vertebral fusion (blocked vertebrae).

    PubMed Central

    Chandraraj, S

    1987-01-01

    Examination of congenitally fused (blocked) vertebrae in this study suggests that non-development of the joint between articular facets results in fusion of the vertebral arches which in turn leads to secondary fusion of the bodies and hypoplasia of the intervertebral discs. The presence of independent pedicles and transverse processes do not favour the concept that such an abnormality is the result of non-segmentation of the sclerotome. The condition is probably linked to a defect of an inductor substance which influences normal morphogenesis of the vertebral arch in the embryonic period. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3429327

  12. Comparison of Nerve Stimulation-guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block, Single Injection versus Four Injections: A Prospective Randomized Double-blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Badiger, Santoshi V.; Desai, Sameer N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: A variety of techniques have been described for the axillary block using nerve stimulator, either with single injection, two, three, or four separate injections. Identification of all the four nerves is more difficult and time-consuming than other methods. Aims: Aim of the present study is to compare success rate, onset, and duration of sensory and motor anesthesia of axillary block using nerve stimulator, either with single injection after identification of any one of the four nerves or four separate injections following identification of each of nerve. Setting and Design: Prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Patients undergoing forearm and hand surgeries under axillary block. Methodology: One hundred patients, aged 18–75 years, were randomly allocated into two groups of 50 each. Axillary block was performed under the guidance of nerve stimulator with a mixture of 18 ml of 1.5% lignocaine and 18 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. In the first group (n = 50), all 36 ml of local anesthetic was injected after the identification of motor response to any one of the nerves and in Group 2, all the four nerves were identified by the motor response, and 9 ml of local anesthetic was injected at each of the nerves. The success rate of the block, onset, and duration of sensory and motor block was assessed. Statistical Analysis: Categorical variables were compared using the Chi-square test, and continuous variables were compared using independent t-test. Results: The success rate of the block with four injection technique was higher compared to single-injection technique (84% vs. 56%, P = 0.02). Four injection groups had a faster onset of sensory and motor block and prolonged duration of analgesia compared to single-injection group (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the incidence of accidental arterial puncture and hemodynamic parameter between the groups. Conclusion: Identification of all the four nerves produced higher success rate and better

  13. LIDAR-based outcrop characterisation - joint classification, surface and block size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, David C.; Dietrich, Patrick; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2013-04-01

    Outcrops, in the first instance, only offer at best a 2-2.5D view of the available geological information, such as joints and fractures. In order to study geodynamic processes, it is necessary to calculate true values of, for example, fracture densities and block dimensions. We show how LIDAR-generated point-cloud data of outcrops can be used to delineate such geological surfaces. Our methods do not require the point-set to be meshed; instead we work with the original point cloud, thus avoiding meshing errors. In a first step we decompose the point-cloud into tiny volumes; in each volume we calculate the best fitting plane. An expert can then decide which of the planes are important (in an interactive density pole diagram) and classify them. Actual block surfaces are identified by applying a clustering algorithm to the mini-planes. Subsequently, we calculate the size of these surfaces. Finally we estimate the block size distribution within the outcrop by projecting the block surfaces into the rock volume. To assess the reproducibility of our results we show to which extent they depend on various parameters, such as the resolution of the LIDAR scan and algorithm parameters. In theory the results can be calculated at the site of measurement to ensure the LIDAR scan resolution is sufficient and if necessary rerun the scan with different parameters. We demonstrate our methods with LIDAR data that we produced in a sandstone quarry in Germany. The part of the outcrop which we measured with the LIDAR was out-of-reach for measurements with a geological compass, but our results correlate well with compass measurements from a different outcrop in the same quarry. Three main surfaces could be delineated from the point cloud: the bedding, and two major joint types. The three fabrics are almost orthogonal. Our statistical results suggest that blocks with a volume of several hundred liters can be expected regularly within the quarry. The results can be directly used to

  14. Automatic Segmentation and Probe Guidance for Real-Time Assistance of Ultrasound-Guided Femoral Nerve Blocks.

    PubMed

    Smistad, Erik; Iversen, Daniel Høyer; Leidig, Linda; Lervik Bakeng, Janne Beate; Johansen, Kaj Fredrik; Lindseth, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia can be challenging, especially for inexperienced physicians. The goal of the proposed methods is to create a system that can assist a user in performing ultrasound-guided femoral nerve blocks. The system indicates in which direction the user should move the ultrasound probe to investigate the region of interest and to reach the target site for needle insertion. Additionally, the system provides automatic real-time segmentation of the femoral artery, the femoral nerve and the two layers fascia lata and fascia iliaca. This aids in interpretation of the 2-D ultrasound images and the surrounding anatomy in 3-D. The system was evaluated on 24 ultrasound acquisitions of both legs from six subjects. The estimated target site for needle insertion and the segmentations were compared with those of an expert anesthesiologist. Average target distance was 8.5 mm with a standard deviation of 2.5 mm. The mean absolute differences of the femoral nerve and the fascia segmentations were about 1-3 mm.

  15. Quasi-trapezoidal pulses to selectively block the activation of intrinsic laryngeal muscles during vagal nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosato, M.; Yoshida, K.; Toft, E.; Struijk, J. J.

    2007-09-01

    The stimulation of the vagus nerve has been used as an anti-epileptic treatment for over a decade, and its use for depression and chronic heart failure is currently under investigation. Co-activation of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles may limit the clinical use of vagal stimulation, especially in the case of prolonged activation. To prevent this, the use of a selective stimulation paradigm has been tested in seven acute pig experiments. Quasi-trapezoidal pulses successfully blocked the population of the largest and fastest vagal myelinated fibers being responsible for the co-activation. The first response in the vagus compound action potential was reduced by 75 ± 22% (mean ± SD) and the co-activated muscle action potential by 67 ± 25%. The vagal bradycardic effects remained unchanged during the selective block, confirming the leading role of thin nerve fibers for the vagal control of the heart. Quasi-trapezoidal pulses may be an alternative to rectangular pulses in clinical vagal stimulation when the co-activation of laryngeal muscles must be avoided.

  16. The anesthetic considerations while performing supraclavicular brachial plexus block in emergency surgical patients using a nerve stimulator.

    PubMed

    Tantry, Thrivikrama Padur; Shetty, Pramal; Shetty, Rithesh; Shenoy, Sunil P

    2015-01-01

    Regional anesthesia is favored in patients who undergo emergency extremity (limb) surgery, and specifically so in the absence of fasting status. In the absence of ultrasonic guidance, the nerve stimulator still remains a valuable tool in performing a brachial block, but its use is difficult in an emergency surgical patient and greater cautious approach is essential. We identified the supraclavicular plexus by the nerve stimulation-motor response technique as follows. Anterior chest muscles contractions, diaphragmatic contraction, deltoid contractions, and posterior shoulder girdle muscle contractions when identified were taken as "negative response" with decreasing stimulating current. A forearm muscle contraction, especially "wrist flexion" and "finger flexion" at 0.5 mA of current was taken as "positive response." If no positive response was identified, the "elbow flexion" was considered as the final positive response for successful drug placement. The series of patients had difficulty for administering both general and regional anesthesia and we considered them as complex scenarios. The risk of the block failure was weighed heavily against the benefits of its success. The described series includes patients who had successful outcomes in the end and the techniques, merits, and risks are highlighted.

  17. The anesthetic considerations while performing supraclavicular brachial plexus block in emergency surgical patients using a nerve stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Tantry, Thrivikrama Padur; Shetty, Pramal; Shetty, Rithesh; Shenoy, Sunil P.

    2015-01-01

    Regional anesthesia is favored in patients who undergo emergency extremity (limb) surgery, and specifically so in the absence of fasting status. In the absence of ultrasonic guidance, the nerve stimulator still remains a valuable tool in performing a brachial block, but its use is difficult in an emergency surgical patient and greater cautious approach is essential. We identified the supraclavicular plexus by the nerve stimulation-motor response technique as follows. Anterior chest muscles contractions, diaphragmatic contraction, deltoid contractions, and posterior shoulder girdle muscle contractions when identified were taken as “negative response” with decreasing stimulating current. A forearm muscle contraction, especially “wrist flexion” and “finger flexion” at 0.5 mA of current was taken as “positive response.” If no positive response was identified, the “elbow flexion” was considered as the final positive response for successful drug placement. The series of patients had difficulty for administering both general and regional anesthesia and we considered them as complex scenarios. The risk of the block failure was weighed heavily against the benefits of its success. The described series includes patients who had successful outcomes in the end and the techniques, merits, and risks are highlighted. PMID:26417145

  18. Evidence-based guideline for neuropathic pain interventional treatments: Spinal cord stimulation, intravenous infusions, epidural injections and nerve blocks

    PubMed Central

    Mailis, Angela; Taenzer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Special Interest Group of the Canadian Pain Society has produced consensus-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain. The society aimed to generate an additional guideline for other forms of neuropathic pain treatments. OBJECTIVE: To develop evidence-based recommendations for neuropathic pain interventional treatments. METHODS: A task force was created and engaged the Institute of Health Economics in Edmonton, Alberta, to survey the literature pertaining to multiple treatments. Sufficient literature existed on four interventions only: spinal cord stimulation; epidural injections; intravenous infusions; and nerve blocks. A comprehensive search was conducted for systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials and evidence-based clinical practice guidelines; a critical review was generated on each topic. A modified United States Preventive Services Task Force tool was used for quality rating and grading of recommendations. RESULTS: Investigators reviewed four studies of spinal cord stimulation, 19 studies of intravenous infusions, 14 studies of epidural injections and 16 studies of nerve blocks that met the inclusion criteria. The task force chairs rated the quality of evidence and graded the recommendations. Feedback was solicited from the members of the task force. CONCLUSION: There is sufficient evidence to support recommendations for some of these interventions for selected neuropathic pain conditions. This evidence is, at best, moderate and is often limited or conflicting. Pain practitioners are encouraged to explore evidence-based treatment options before considering unproven treatments. Full disclosure of risks and benefits of the available options is necessary for shared decision making and informed consent. PMID:22606679

  19. The quaternary lidocaine derivative QX-314 in combination with bupivacaine for long-lasting nerve block: Efficacy, toxicity, and the optimal formulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qingshan; Yang, Xiaolin; Lv, Rong; Ma, Longxiang; Liu, Jin; Zhu, Tao; Zhang, Wensheng

    2017-01-01

    Objective The quaternary lidocaine derivative (QX-314) in combination with bupivacaine can produce long-lasting nerve blocks in vivo, indicating potential clinical application. The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy, safety, and the optimal formulation of this combination. Methods QX-314 and bupivacaine at different concentration ratios were injected in the vicinity of the sciatic nerve in rats; bupivacaine and saline served as controls (n = 6~10). Rats were inspected for durations of effective sensory and motor nerve blocks, systemic adverse effects, and histological changes of local tissues. Mathematical models were established to reveal drug-interaction, concentration-effect relationships, and the optimal ratio of QX-314 to bupivacaine. Results 0.2~1.5% QX-314 with 0.03~0.5% bupivacaine produced 5.8~23.8 h of effective nerve block; while 0.5% bupivacaine alone was effective for 4 h. No systemic side effects were observed; local tissue reactions were similar to those caused by 0.5% bupivacaine if QX-314 were used < 1.2%. The weighted modification model was successfully established, which revealed that QX-314 was the main active ingredient while bupivacaine was the synergist. The formulation, 0.9% QX-314 plus 0.5% bupivacaine, resulted in 10.1 ± 0.8 h of effective sensory and motor nerve blocks. Conclusion The combination of QX-314 and bupivacaine facilitated prolonged sciatic nerve block in rats with a satisfactory safety profile, maximizing the duration of nerve block without clinically important systemic and local tissue toxicity. It may emerge as an alternative approach to post-operative pain treatment. PMID:28334014

  20. Efficacy of magnesium as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in 3-in-1 nerve block for arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament repair

    PubMed Central

    Muthiah, Thilaka; Arora, Mahesh K; Trikha, Anjan; Sunder, Rani A; Prasad, Ganga; Singh, Preet M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Three-in-one and femoral nerve blocks are proven modalities for postoperative analgesia following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of magnesium (Mg) as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in 3-in-1 block for ACL reconstruction. Methods: Sixty patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were randomly allocated to Group I (3-in-1 block with 30 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine preceded by 1.5 ml of intravenous [IV] saline), Group II (3-in-1 block with 30 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine preceded by 1.5 ml of solution containing 150 mg Mg IV) or Group III (3-in-1 block with 30 ml containing 0.25% bupivacaine and 150 mg of Mg as adjuvant preceded by 1.5 ml of IV saline). Post-operatively, patients received morphine when visual analogue scale (VAS) score was ≥4. Quantitative parameters were compared using one-way ANOVA and Kruskal–Wallis test and qualitative data were analysed using Chi-square test. Results: Demographics, haemodynamic parameters, intra-operative fentanyl requirement, post-operative VAS scores and total morphine requirement were comparable between groups. Time to first analgesic requirement was significantly prolonged in Group III (789 ± 436) min compared to Group I (466 ± 290 min) and Group II (519 ± 274 min), (P = 0.02 and 0.05). Significantly less number of patients in Group III (1/20) received morphine in the first 6 h post-operatively, compared to Group I (8/20) and Group II (6/20) (P = 0.008 and 0.03). No side effects were observed. Conclusion: Mg as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in 3-in-1 block for ACL reconstruction significantly prolongs the time to first analgesic requirement and reduces the number of patients requiring morphine in the immediate post-operative period. PMID:27512165

  1. Scaffolds from block polyurethanes based on poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuqing; Chen, Kevin C; He, Tao; Yu, Wenying; Huang, Shuiwen; Xu, Kaitian

    2014-05-01

    Nerve guide scaffolds from block polyurethanes without any additional growth factors or protein were prepared using a particle leaching method. The scaffolds of block polyurethanes (abbreviated as PUCL-ran-EG) based on poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL-diol) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) possess highly surface-area porous for cell attachment, and can provide biochemical and topographic cues to enhance tissue regeneration. The nerve guide scaffolds have pore size 1-5 μm and porosity 88%. Mechanical tests showed that the polyurethane nerve guide scaffolds have maximum loads of 4.98 ± 0.35 N and maximum stresses of 6.372 ± 0.5 MPa. The histocompatibility efficacy of these nerve guide scaffolds was tested in a rat model for peripheral nerve injury treatment. Four types of guides including PUCL-ran-EG scaffolds, autograft, PCL scaffolds and silicone tubes were compared in the rat model. After 14 weeks, bridging of a 10 mm defect gap by the regenerated nerve was observed in all rats. The nerve regeneration was systematically characterized by sciatic function index (SFI), histological assessment including HE staining, immunohistochemistry, ammonia silver staining, Masson's trichrome staining and TEM observation. Results revealed that polyurethane nerve guide scaffolds exhibit much better regeneration behavior than PCL, silicone tube groups and comparable to autograft. Electrophysiological recovery was also seen in 36%, 76%, and 87% of rats in the PCL, PUCL-ran-EG, and autograft groups respectively, whilst 29.8% was observed in the silicone tube groups. Biodegradation in vitro and in vivo show proper degradation of the PUCL-ran-EG nerve guide scaffolds. This study has demonstrated that without further modification, plain PUCL-ran-EG nerve guide scaffolds can help peripheral nerve regeneration excellently.

  2. Effect of Dexmedetomidine as an Adjuvant to 0.75% Ropivacaine in Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block Using Nerve Stimulator: A Prospective, Randomized Double-blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Rashmi, H. D.; Komala, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ropivacaine, a newer local anesthetic (LA), has been increasingly used nowadays in different concentrations for peripheral nerve blocks. It has lesser cardiac toxicity and higher safety margin when compared to bupivacaine. Dexmedetomidine, a novel α2 agonist, is widely used as adjuvant to LA in peripheral nerve blocks to decrease the time of onset and increase the duration of the block. In this study, we evaluated the effect of dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant with 0.75% ropivacaine for interscalene brachial plexus block using nerve stimulator. Aim: This study aims to know the effect of using dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to 0.75% ropivacaine in interscalene brachial plexuses block using nerve stimulator. Settings and Designs: Sixty patients scheduled for elective orthopedic surgery of the upper limb under interscalene block were considered in this prospective randomized controlled double-blind study. The study population was randomly divided into two groups with thirty patients in each group by using computerized randomization. Materials and Methods: Group R received 30 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 0.5 ml normal saline and Group RD received 30 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 50 μg of dexmedetomidine. The onset of sensory and motor blocks, duration of sensory and motor block, and patient satisfaction score were observed. Results: Both the groups were comparable in demographic characteristics. The onset of the sensory and motor block is earlier and statistically significant in Group RD (P < 0.05) when compared to Group R. The duration of sensory and motor blockade were significantly prolonged in Group RD (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Addition of dexmedetomidine to 0.75% ropivacaine in interscalene brachial plexus block significantly shortened the time of onset of the block and prolongs the duration sensory and motor blockade. PMID:28298772

  3. Modified Leclerc blocking procedure with miniplates and temporal fascial flap for recurrent temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Ying, Binbin; Hu, Jing; Zhu, Songsong

    2013-05-01

    This study introduced the modified Leclerc blocking procedure with miniplate and temporal fascial flap for recurrent temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation and evaluated its clinical effects. Seven patients were treated by the modified Leclerc blocking procedure with miniplate and temporal fascial flap. The postoperative follow-up period ranged from half a year to 2 years to access the maximal mouth opening, TMJ disorder symptoms (pain and sound), and incidence of recurrence. No recurrence was observed in all of the 7 patients postoperatively. The mean preoperative and postoperative MMOs were 49.7 mm and 40.1 mm, respectively. There were 3 patients who reported the alleviation of pain and/or sound postoperatively. Two older patients with long-term course of disease reported no improvement of the TMJ symptoms in terms of pain and sound postoperatively. Our results showed that the modified Leclerc blocking procedure with miniplates and temporal fascial flap provided a more stable support for the condylar movement with less recurrence, suggesting that this operation could be a good alternative for the treatment of recurrent TMJ dislocation.

  4. Technique, Efficiency and Safety of Different Nerve Blocks for Analgesia in Laser Ablation and Sclerotherapy for Lower Limb Superficial Venous Insufficiency – A Multicentre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Binu; Sandhyala, Abhilash; Naiknaware, Kiran; Ray, Brijesh; Vijayakumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Laser ablation and sclerotherapy, as minimally invasive alternatives to surgery for varicose veins, have good efficacy, safety and cosmetic result. Some form of anaesthesia is generally used for pain control. Aim To describe the technique and evaluate the efficacy and safety of femoral, saphenous and sciatic nerve blocks in isolation or in combination for analgesia during laser ablation and sclerotherapy for lower limb varicose veins. Materials and Methods In this prospective observational study, over a period of 33 months, in 856 limbs of 681 patients with varicose veins, ultrasound guided femoral, saphenous and sciatic nerve blocks for analgesia were performed in 769, 808 and 52 instances respectively; following which, endovenous laser ablation, sclerotherapy or combination of both were carried out using standard practice. After completion of the procedure, Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAS) was used for pain assessment, and muscle weakness was assessed clinically. Results Nerve blocks could be successfully performed in all patients. Observed pain scores were 0 or 1 in 591 (69%), 2 or 3 in 214 (25%) and 4 in 51 (9%) legs with no score more than 4. Higher grades of pain were noted in femoral blocks during early stages of our learning curve. Mild to moderate muscle weakness was observed in 163 (2%) and 7 (13%) patients who underwent femoral and sciatic block respectively, which persisted for an average of two and a half hours and none beyond four and a half hours; saphenous nerve being a pure sensory nerve, did not cause motor weakness. Conclusion For analgesia during laser ablation and/or sclerotherapy of varicose veins, ultrasound guided nerve blocks can be easily and quickly performed. They provide excellent pain relief and comfort to the patient and to the operator; and they do not cause any additional complication. PMID:28050474

  5. Successive motor nerve blocks to identify the muscles causing a spasticity pattern: example of the arm flexion pattern.

    PubMed

    Genet, F; Schnitzler, A; Droz-Bartholet, F; Salga, M; Tatu, L; Debaud, C; Denormandie, P; Parratte, B

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum Toxin A has been the main treatment for spasticity since the beginning of the 1990s. Surprisingly, there is still no consensus regarding injection parameters or, importantly, how to determine which muscles to target to improve specific functions. The aim of this study was to develop a systematic approach to determine this, using the example of the arm flexion pattern. We first determined anatomical landmarks for selective motor block of the brachialis nerve, using 20 forearms from 10 fresh cadavers in Ecole Européenne de Chirurgie and a university-based dissection centre, Paris, France. We then carried out selective blocks of the motor nerves to the brachialis, brachioradialis and biceps brachii in patients with stroke with an arm flexion pattern, in a University Rehabilitation Hospital, Garches, France. We measured: the resting angle of the elbow angle in standing (manual goniometer), active and passive range of extension, and spasticity using the Held and Tardieu and the Modified Ashworth scales. Range of passive elbow extension was also measured with the shoulder in 90° of flexion. The resting angle of the elbow in standing decreased by 35.0° (from 87.6 ± 23.7 to 52.6 ± 24.2°) with inhibition of brachialis, by a further 3.9° (from 52.6 ± 24.2 to 48.7 ± 23.7°) with inhibition of brachioradialis and a further 14.5° (from 48.7 ± 23.7to 34.2 ± 20.7°) with inhibition of biceps brachii. These results were consistent with the clinical evaluation of passive elbow range of motion with the shoulder at 90°. Sequential blocking of the nerves to the three main elbow flexors revealed that the muscle that limited elbow extension the most, was brachialis. This muscle should be the main target to improve the arm flexion pattern. These results show that it is important not simply to inject the most superficial or powerful muscles to treat a spastic deformity. A comprehensive assessment is required. The strategy proposed in this paper should

  6. Articaine for supplemental buccal mandibular infiltration anesthesia in patients with irreversible pulpitis when the inferior alveolar nerve block fails.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Rachel; Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of the supplemental buccal infiltration injection of a cartridge of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in mandibular posterior teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis when the conventional inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block failed. Fifty-five emergency patients, diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth, received an IAN block and had moderate to severe pain on endodontic access. An infiltration of a cartridge of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine was administered buccal to the tooth requiring endodontic treatment. Success of the infiltration injection was defined as no pain or mild pain on endodontic access or instrumentation. The results showed that anesthetic success was obtained in 58% of the mandibular posterior teeth. We can conclude that when the IAN block fails to provide profound pulpal anesthesia, the supplemental buccal infiltration injection of a cartridge of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine would be successful 58% of the time for mandibular posterior teeth in patients presenting with irreversible pulpitis. Unfortunately, the modest success rate would not provide predictable pulpal anesthesia for all patients requiring profound anesthesia.

  7. Upper extremity nerve block: how can benefit, duration, and safety be improved? An update

    PubMed Central

    Brattwall, Metha; Jildenstål, Pether; Warrén Stomberg, Margareta; Jakobsson, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    Upper extremity blocks are useful as both sole anaesthesia and/or a supplement to general anaesthesia and they further provide effective postoperative analgesia, reducing the need for opioid analgesics. There is without doubt a renewed interest among anaesthesiologists in the interscalene, supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and axillary plexus blocks with the increasing use of ultrasound guidance. The ultrasound-guided technique visualising the needle tip and solution injected reduces the risk of side effects, accidental intravascular injection, and possibly also trauma to surrounding tissues. The ultrasound technique has also reduced the volume needed in order to gain effective block. Still, single-shot plexus block, although it produces effective anaesthesia, has a limited duration of postoperative analgesia and a number of adjuncts have been tested in order to prolong analgesia duration. The addition of steroids, midazolam, clonidine, dexmedetomidine, and buprenorphine has been studied, all being off-label when administered by perineural injection, and the potential neurotoxicity needs further study. The use of perineural catheters is an effective option to improve and prolong the postoperative analgesic effect. Upper extremity plexus blocks have an obvious place as a sole anaesthetic technique or as a powerful complement to general anaesthesia, reducing the need for analgesics and hypnotics intraoperatively, and provide effective early postoperative pain relief. Continuous perineural infusion is an effective option to prolong the effects and improve postoperative quality. PMID:27239291

  8. Adding dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block for amputation of lower limb in high-risk patient-a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Guang; Ding, Yan-Ling; Han, Ai-Ping; Hu, Chang-Qing; Hao, Shi; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Li, Yong-Wang; Liu, Hu; Han, Zhe; Guo, De-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The ischemia necrosis of limb frequently requires surgery of amputation. Lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block is an ideal intra-operative anesthetic and post-operative antalgic technique for patients of amputation, especially for high-risk patients who have severe cardio-cerebrovascular diseases. However, the duration of analgesia of peripheral nerve block is hardly sufficient to avoid the postoperative pain and the usage of opioids. In this case, a 79-year-old man, with multiple cerebral infarcts, congestive heart failure, atrial flutter and syncope, was treated with an above knee amputation because of ischemia necrosis of his left lower limb. Dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg was added to 0.33% ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block in this case for intra-operative anesthesia and post-operative analgesia. The sensory function was blocked fully for surgery and the duration of analgesia maintained 26 hours with haemodynamic stability and moderate sedation. The patient did not complain pain and require any supplementary analgesics after surgery. This case showed that adding 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block may be a feasible and safe technique for high-risk patients for lower limb surgery of amputation.

  9. Adding dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block for amputation of lower limb in high-risk patient-a case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Guang; Ding, Yan-Ling; Han, Ai-Ping; Hu, Chang-Qing; Hao, Shi; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Li, Yong-Wang; Liu, Hu; Han, Zhe; Guo, De-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The ischemia necrosis of limb frequently requires surgery of amputation. Lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block is an ideal intra-operative anesthetic and post-operative antalgic technique for patients of amputation, especially for high-risk patients who have severe cardio-cerebrovascular diseases. However, the duration of analgesia of peripheral nerve block is hardly sufficient to avoid the postoperative pain and the usage of opioids. In this case, a 79-year-old man, with multiple cerebral infarcts, congestive heart failure, atrial flutter and syncope, was treated with an above knee amputation because of ischemia necrosis of his left lower limb. Dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg was added to 0.33% ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block in this case for intra-operative anesthesia and post-operative analgesia. The sensory function was blocked fully for surgery and the duration of analgesia maintained 26 hours with haemodynamic stability and moderate sedation. The patient did not complain pain and require any supplementary analgesics after surgery. This case showed that adding 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block may be a feasible and safe technique for high-risk patients for lower limb surgery of amputation. PMID:26550393

  10. Trigeminal nerve block with alcohol for medically intractable classic trigeminal neuralgia: long-term clinical effectiveness on pain

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyung Ream; Chae, Yun Jeong; Lee, Jung Dong; Kim, Chan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Trigeminal nerve block (Tnb) with alcohol for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) may not be used widely as a percutaneous procedure for medically intractable TN in recent clinical work, because it has been considered having a limited duration of pain relief, a decrease in success rate and increase in complications on repeated blocks. Objectives: To evaluate the clinical outcome of the Tnb with alcohol in the treatment of medically intractable TN. Methods: Six hundred thirty-two patients were diagnosed with TN between March 2000 and February 2010. Four hundred sixty-five out of 632 underwent Tnb with alcohol under a fluoroscope. Pain relief duration were analyzed and compared in the individual branch blocks. Outcomes were compared between patients with and without a previous Tnb with alcohol. Results: Tnb with alcohol were performed in a total 710 (1st-465, 2nd-155, 3rd-55, 4th-23, 5th-8, 6th-4) cases for a series of consecutive 465 patients during the study period. Forty hundred sixty two out of the 465 patients experienced immediate complete pain relief (99%) at the first Tnb. Of the 465 patients, 218 patients (46.9%) did not require any further treatment after the first Tnb with alcohol during an entire study period. One hundred fifty nine (34.2 %) out of the 465 patients experienced recurring pain after the first block, among whom 155 patients received subsequent blocks, and the remaining 4 patients decided to take medication. According to the Kaplan-Meier analysis, the probabilities of remaining pain relief for 1, 2, 3, and 5 years after the procedures were 86.2%, 65.5%, 52.5%, and 33.4%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the probability of pain relief duration between patients with and without previous Tnb with alcohol. Median (95% CI) pain relief durations of the first and repeated blocks were 39 (36-51) and 37 (28-54) months, respectively. There was no significant difference in occurrence of complications between patients with and

  11. Multimodal periarticular injection vs continuous femoral nerve block after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective, crossover, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ng, Fu-Yuen; Ng, Jacobus Kwok-Fu; Chiu, Kwong-Yuen; Yan, Chun-Hoi; Chan, Chi-Wing

    2012-06-01

    This study compares the efficacy of pain control using continuous femoral nerve block (FNB) and multimodal periarticular soft tissue injection. This is a randomized, crossover, clinical trial. Sixteen patients having bilateral osteoarthritis of the knee scheduled for staged total knee arthroplasty were randomized to receive either FNB (0.2% ropivacaine), via indwelling catheter for 72 hours, or multimodal periarticular soft tissue injection in the first stage. In the second stage, they received the opposite treatment. The primary outcome measure was morphine consumption by patient-controlled analgesia in the first 72 hours postoperatively. Cumulative morphine consumption as well as rest pain and motion pain in the first 72 hours was comparable between the 2 groups. The functional outcomes did not differ significantly. We conclude that multimodal periarticular soft tissue injection provides comparable analgesia to continuous FNB after total knee arthroplasty.

  12. Successful treatment of Raynaud's syndrome in a lupus patient with continuous bilateral popliteal sciatic nerve blocks: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thuan; Amaro-Driedger, David; Mehta, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    Raynaud's syndrome has been treated medically and invasively, sometimes with regional anesthesia leading up to sympathectomy. We demonstrate that regional anesthesia was in this case a useful technique that can allow some patients to find temporary but significant relief from symptoms of Raynaud's syndrome exacerbation. We present a 43-year-old woman with Raynaud's syndrome secondary to lupus who was treated with bilateral popliteal nerve block catheters for ischemic pain and necrosis of her feet; this led to almost immediate resolution of her pain and return of color and function of her feet. While medical management should continue to be a front-line treatment for Raynaud's syndrome, regional anesthesia can be useful in providing rapid dissipation of symptoms and may thus serve as a viable option for short-term management of this syndrome.

  13. Topography of human ankle joint: focused on posterior tibial artery and tibial nerve

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-Im; Kim, Yi-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Most of foot pain occurs by the entrapment of the tibial nerve and its branches. Some studies have reported the location of the tibial nerve; however, textbooks and researches have not described the posterior tibial artery and the relationship between the tibal nerve and the posterior tibial artery in detail. The purpose of this study was to analyze the location of neurovascular structures and bifurcations of the nerve and artery in the ankle region based on the anatomical landmarks. Ninety feet of embalmed human cadavers were examined. All measurements were evaluated based on a reference line. Neurovascular structures were classified based on the relationship between the tibial nerve and the posterior tibial artery. The bifurcation of arteries and nerves were expressed by X- and Y-coordinates. Based on the reference line, 9 measurements were examined. The most common type I (55.6%), was the posterior tibial artery located medial to the tibial nerve. Neurovascular structures were located less than 50% of the distance between M and C from M at the reference line. The bifurcation of the posterior tibial artery was 41% in X-coordinate, -38% in Y-coordinate, and that of the tibial nerve was 48%, and -10%, respectively. Thirteen measurements and classification showed statistically significant differences between both sexes (P<0.05). It is determined the average position of neurovascular structures in the human ankle region and recorded the differences between the sexes and amongst the populations. These results would be helpful for the diagnosis and treatment of foot pain. PMID:26140224

  14. [Peripheral nerve block. An overview of new developments in an old technique].

    PubMed

    Graf, B M; Martin, E

    2001-05-01

    General anaesthesia and peripheral neuronal blockade are techniques which were introduced into clinical practice at the same time. Although general anaesthesia was accepted significantly faster due to effective new drugs and apparent ease of handling, neuronal blockade has recently gained great importance. The reasons are in particular newer aids such as industrially produced catheter sets, nerve stimulators and ultrasound guidance which have facilitated that these economical techniques can be used not only for intraoperative anaesthesia but also for perioperative analgesia without any major risks for the patients. In parallel to epidural anaesthesia a change of paradigms has recently taken place using catheter instead of single-shot techniques. This allows the loading dose of the local anaesthetics to be installed in a safe way, to reload the dose when intraoperatively required and to extend the analgesia perioperatively by this technique using lower concentrations of the same drugs or drug combinations. A great number of short, middle or long acting local anaesthetics are available to choose the right drug for any particular case. Short and middle acting drugs are characterised by a faster onset compared to long acting drugs, but toxic plasma levels are seen during long time application causing seizures or drowsiness or by using prilocaine methemoglobin. Therefore long acting local anaesthetics such as bupivacaine, ropivacaine or levobupivacaine are the first choice drugs for long time application via peripheral nerve catheters for perioperative anaesthesia and analgesia. By using low concentrations of these potent drugs even for a longer period of time, no toxic plasma levels are seen with the exception of artificial intravasal injections. Additives such as opioids and alpha 2-sympathomimetics are also used. While the use of opioids is controversial, alpha 2-sympathomimetics are able to accelerate the onset and to extend the duration of regional anaesthesia and

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Femoral and Sciatic Nerve Blocks for Repair of Tibia and Fibula Fractures in a Bennett's Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus)

    PubMed Central

    Campoy, Luis; Adami, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Locoregional anesthetic techniques may be a very useful tool for the anesthetic management of wallabies with injuries of the pelvic limbs and may help to prevent capture myopathies resulting from stress and systemic opioids' administration. This report describes the use of ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks in Bennett's wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) referred for orthopaedic surgery. Ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks were attempted at the femoral triangle and proximal thigh level, respectively. Whilst the sciatic nerve could be easily visualised, the femoral nerve could not be readily identified. Only the sciatic nerve was therefore blocked with ropivacaine, and methadone was administered as rescue analgesic. The ultrasound images were stored and sent for external review. Anesthesia and recovery were uneventful and the wallaby was discharged two days postoperatively. At the time of writing, it is challenging to provide safe and effective analgesia to Macropods. Detailed knowledge of the anatomy of these species is at the basis of successful locoregional anesthesia. The development of novel analgesic techniques suitable for wallabies would represent an important step forward in this field and help the clinicians dealing with these species to improve their perianesthetic management. PMID:27803817

  16. A simulation study of the combined thermoelectric extracellular stimulation of the sciatic nerve of the Xenopus laevis: the localized transient heat block.

    PubMed

    Mou, Zongxia; Triantis, Iasonas F; Woods, Virginia M; Toumazou, Christofer; Nikolic, Konstantin

    2012-06-01

    The electrical behavior of the Xenopus laevis nerve fibers was studied when combined electrical (cuff electrodes) and optical (infrared laser, low power sub-5 mW) stimulations are applied. Assuming that the main effect of the laser irradiation on the nerve tissue is the localized temperature increase, this paper analyzes and gives new insights into the function of the combined thermoelectric stimulation on both excitation and blocking of the nerve action potentials (AP). The calculations involve a finite-element model (COMSOL) to represent the electrical properties of the nerve and cuff. Electric-field distribution along the nerve was computed for the given stimulation current profile and imported into a NEURON model, which was built to simulate the electrical behavior of myelinated nerve fiber under extracellular stimulation. The main result of this study of combined thermoelectric stimulation showed that local temperature increase, for the given electric field, can create a transient block of both the generation and propagation of the APs. Some preliminary experimental data in support of this conclusion are also shown.

  17. Essential Oil of Ocimum basilicum L. and (−)-Linalool Blocks the Excitability of Rat Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros Venancio, Antonio; da Silva-Alves, Kerly Shamyra; de Carvalho Pimentel, Hugo; Macêdo Lima, Matheus; Fraga de Santana, Michele; Batista da Silva, Givanildo; Marchioro, Murilo

    2016-01-01

    The racemate linalool and its levogyrus enantiomer [(−)-LIN] are present in many essential oils and possess several pharmacological activities, such as antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory. In this work, the effects of essential oil obtained from the cultivation of the Ocimum basilicum L. (EOOb) derived from Germplasm Bank rich in (−)-LIN content in the excitability of peripheral nervous system were studied. We used rat sciatic nerve to investigate the EOOb and (−)-LIN effects on neuron excitability and the extracellular recording technique was used to register the compound action potential (CAP). EOOb and (−)-LIN blocked the CAP in a concentration-dependent way and these effects were reversible after washout. EOOb blocked positive amplitude of 1st and 2nd CAP components with IC50 of 0.38 ± 0.2 and 0.17 ± 0.0 mg/mL, respectively. For (−)-LIN, these values were 0.23 ± 0.0 and 0.13 ± 0.0 mg/mL. Both components reduced the conduction velocity of CAP and the 2nd component seems to be more affected than the 1st component. In conclusion EOOb and (−)-LIN inhibited the excitability of peripheral nervous system in a similar way and potency, revealing that the effects of EOOb on excitability are due to the presence of (−)-LIN in the essential oil. PMID:27446227

  18. The Position of Lingula as an Index for Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block Injection in 7-11-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Ezoddini Ardakani, Fatemeh; Bahrololoumi, Zahra; Zangouie Booshehri, Maryam; Navab Azam, Alireza; Ayatollahi, Fatemeh

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Inferior alveolar nerve block injection is one of the common intra oral anesthetic techniques, with a failure rate of 15-20%. The aim of this study was to evaluate the position of the lingula as an index for this injection. Materials and methods Thirty eight panoramic radiographs of 7–11 year old patients were analyzed and the distance between the lingula index and occlusal plane was measured. Then, lower alveolar nerve block injection was performed on 88 children. Finally, a visual analogue scale was used to measure the rate of pain in the patients. Results This distance increased with age and in children younger than nine years is −0.45 mm on the right side and −0.95 mm on the left side. This distance in children older than 9 years is −0.23 mm on the right side and 0.47 mm on the left side. The success rates of inferior alveolar nerve block injection based on lingual index were 49% on the right side and 53.8% on the left side. Conclusion As the lingual index has various positions and its distance from the occlusal plane increases with age, it is not an appropriate landmark for inferior alveolar nerve block injection. PMID:22991596

  19. Joint Diversity for the Block Diagonalization-Precoded Spatial Multiplexing System with Multiple Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghun; Kang, Hyunduk; Jeong, Byungjang

    In this paper, we propose a joint diversity algorithm for error-rate minimization in multi-user spatial multiplexing (SM) systems with block diagonalization (BD)-precoding. The proposed algorithm adapts or selects the user set, transmit antenna subset, and the number of streams by an exhaustive search over the available resources. The proposed algorithm makes use of the multi-user diversity (MUD) and the spatial diversity gains as well as the array gain through selecting the best set. Exhaustive search, however, imposes a heavy burden in terms of computational complexity which exponentially increases with the size of the total number of users, streams, and transmit antennas. For complexity reduction, we propose two suboptimal algorithms which reduce the search space by first selecting the best user or by both selecting the best user and fixing the number of streams. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithms improve error probability over the conventional algorithm due to their diversity improvement and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gains over the conventional algorithm. We also show that the suboptimal algorithms significantly reduce the computational complexity over exhaustive search with low-SNR loss.

  20. Anatomy of greater palatine foramen and canal and pterygopalatine fossa in Thais: considerations for maxillary nerve block.

    PubMed

    Methathrathip, D; Apinhasmit, W; Chompoopong, S; Lertsirithong, A; Ariyawatkul, T; Sangvichien, S

    2005-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the anatomy of the greater palatine foramen (GPF), greater palatine canal (GPC) and pterygopalatine fossa (PPF) with special reference to the blockage of the maxillary nerve. A correlation between the length of GPC and PPF and the heights of the orbit and the maxilla was also studied using simple linear regression analysis. The morphology of the GPF, GPC and PPF as well as heights of the orbit and the maxilla were assessed in 105 Thai skulls. The thickness of the mucosa over the GPF was also measured from the dissection of 55 cadavers. The results showed that most GPF appeared as an oval foramen located at the palatal aspect of the upper third molar. The GPF was 16.2+/-1.3 mm lateral to the median sagittal plane of the hard palate, 2.1+/-1.3 mm anterior to the posterior border of the hard palate and 5.1+/-1.3 mm from the greatest concavity of the distolateral margin of the hard palate. The mean length of GPC and PPF was 29.7+/-4.2 mm. The mean angles of the GPC in relation to the hard palate and the vertical plane were 57.9+/-5.8 degrees and 6.7+/-5.2 degrees , respectively. In attempting to insert a needle to reach the foramen rotundum through the GPF, 31.7% passed into the orbit while 8.7% passed into the brain. The mean thickness of the mucosa over GPF was 6.7+/-2.3 mm. Two models for estimating the depth of needle injection in maxillary nerve block have been developed as follows: Length of GPC and PPF=19.038+0.314 (orbital height) and length of GPC and PPF=21.204+0.187 (maxillary height). The calculated length combined with the mucosal thickness was the estimated depth of needle injection. In conclusion, our results concerning the GPF, GPC and PPF will provide the useful reference for clinicians to anesthetize the maxillary nerve with a greater degree of success.

  1. Tension neuropathy of the superficial peroneal nerve: associated conditions and results of release.

    PubMed

    Johnston, E C; Howell, S J

    1999-09-01

    We reviewed eight patients who sustained superficial peroneal nerve neuralgia after an inversion ankle sprain. Surgical exploration found anatomic abnormalities that tethered the nerve from movement during plantarflexion and inversion of the ankle. Most patients' pain improved dramatically after release and anterior transposition of the nerve. Seven joints also underwent arthroscopy, which showed intra-articular disease that was consistent with the original trauma. Five patients had reflex sympathetic dystrophy, three of which resolved after nerve release. Nerve conduction studies were not helpful. Careful physical examination and local nerve blocks were most important in making the diagnosis and prescribing treatment. All conservative measures should be exhausted before surgery is considered.

  2. Perineural Administration of Dexmedetomidine in Combination with Bupivacaine Enhances Sensory and Motor Blockade in Sciatic Nerve Block without Inducing Neurotoxicity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Brummett, Chad M.; Norat, Mary A.; Palmisano, John M.; Lydic, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Background The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that high-dose dexmedetomidine added to local anesthetic would increase the duration of sensory and motor blockade in a rat model of sciatic nerve blockade without causing nerve damage. Methods Thirty-one adult Sprague Dawley rats received bilateral sciatic nerve blocks with either 0.2 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and 0.5% bupivacaine plus 0.005% dexmedetomidine in the contralateral leg, or 0.2 ml of 0.005% dexmedetomidine and normal saline in the contralateral leg. Sensory and motor function were assessed by a blinded investigator every 30 minutes until the return of normal sensory and motor function. Sciatic nerves were harvested at either 24 hours or 14 days after injection and analyzed for perineural inflammation and nerve damage. Results High-dose dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine significantly enhanced the duration of sensory and motor blockade. Dexmedetomidine alone did not cause significant motor or sensory block. All of the nerves analyzed had normal axons and myelin at 24 hours and 14 days. Bupivacaine plus dexmedetomidine showed less perineural inflammation at 24 hours than the bupivacaine group when compared with the saline control. Conclusion The finding that high-dose dexmedetomidine can safely improve the duration of bupivacaine-induced antinociception following sciatic nerve blockade in rats is an essential first step encouraging future studies in humans. The dose of dexmedetomidine used in this study may exceed the sedative safety threshold in humans and could cause prolonged motor blockade, therefore future work with clinically relevant doses is necessary. PMID:18719449

  3. Structural evidence that botulinum toxin blocks neuromuscular transmission by impairing the calcium influx that normally accompanies nerve depolarization

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Taking advantage of the fact that nerve terminal mitochondria swell and sequester calcium during repetitive nerve stimulation, we here confirm that this change is caused by calcium influx into the nerve and use this fact to show that botulinum toxin abolishes such calcium influx. The optimal paradigm for producing the mitochondrial changes in normal nerves worked out to be 5 min of stimulation at 25 Hz in frog Ringer's solution containing five time more calcium than normal. Applying this same stimulation paradigm to botulinum-intoxicated nerves produced no mitochondrial changes at all. Only when intoxicated nerves were stimulated in 4-aminopyridine (which grossly exaggerates calcium currents in normal nerves) or when they were soaked in black widow spider venom (which is a nerve-specific calcium ionophore) could nerve mitochondria be induced to swell and accumulate calcium. These results indicate that nerve mitochondria are not damaged directly by the toxin and point instead to a primary inhibition of the normal depolarization- evoked calcium currents that accompany nerve activity. Because these currents normally provide the calcium that triggers transmitter secretion from the nerve, this demonstration of their inhibition helps to explain how botulinum toxin paralyzes. PMID:6259176

  4. A population pharmacokinetic model for the complex systemic absorption of ropivacaine after femoral nerve block in patients undergoing knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, François; Drolet, Pierre; Fallaha, Michel; Varin, France

    2012-12-01

    Because of its slow systemic absorption and flip-flop kinetics, ropivacaine's pharmacokinetics after a peripheral nerve block has never been thoroughly characterized. The purpose of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for ropivacaine after loco-regional administration and to identify patient characteristics that may influence the drug's absorption and disposition. Frequent plasma samples were taken up to 93 h after a 100 mg dose given as femoral block for postoperative analgesia in 15 orthopedic patients. Ropivacaine plasma concentration-time data were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling method. A one-compartment model with parallel inverse Gaussian and time-dependent inputs best described ropivacaine plasma concentration-time curves. Ropivacaine systemic absorption was characterized by a rapid phase (mean absorption time of 25 ± 4.8 min) followed by a much slower phase (half-life of 3.9 ± 0.65 h). Interindividual variability (IIV) for these parameters, 58 and 9 %, indicated that the initial absorption phase was more variable. The apparent volume of distribution (V/F = 77.2 ± 11.5 L, IIV = 26 %) was influenced by body weight (Δ 1.49 % per kg change) whereas the absorption rate constant (slower phase) of ropivacaine was affected by age (Δ 2.25 % per year change). No covariate effects were identified for the apparent clearance of the drug (CL/F =10.8 ± 1.0 L/h, 34  IIV = 34 %). These findings support our hypothesis that modeling a complex systemic absorption directly from plasma concentration-time curves exhibiting flip-flop kinetics is possible. Only the age-effect was considered as relevant for possible dosing adjustments.

  5. Cold bupivacaine versus magnesium sulfate added to room temperature bupivacaine in sonar-guided femoral and sciatic nerve block in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alzeftawy, Ashraf Elsayed; El-Daba, Ahmad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cooling of local anesthetic potentiates its action and increases its duration. Magnesium sulfate (MgSo4) added to local anesthetic prolongs the duration of anesthesia and postoperative analgesia with minimal side effects. Aim: The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to compare the effect of cold to 4°C bupivacaine 0.5% and Mg added to normal temperature (20–25°C) bupivacaine 0.5% during sonar-guided combined femoral and sciatic nerve blocks on the onset of sensory and motor block, intraoperative anesthesia, duration of sensory and motor block, and postoperative analgesia in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Patients and Methods: A total of 90 American Society of Anesthesiologists classes I and II patients who were scheduled to undergo elective ACL reconstruction were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly allocated to 3 equal groups to receive sonar-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. In Group I, 17 ml of room temperature (20–25°C) 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of room temperature saline were injected for each nerve block whereas in Group II, 17 ml of cold (4°C) 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of cold saline were injected for each nerve block. In Group III, 17 ml of room temperature 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of MgSo4 5% were injected for each nerve block. The onset of sensory and motor block was evaluated every 3 min for 30 min. Surgery was started after complete sensory and motor block were achieved. Intraoperatively, the patients were evaluated for heart rate and mean arterial pressure, rescue analgesic and sedative requirements plus patient and surgeon satisfaction. Postoperatively, hemodynamics, duration of analgesia, resolution of motor block, time to first analgesic, total analgesic consumption, and the incidence of side effects were recorded. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in demographic data, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and duration of

  6. Combination Therapy with Continuous Three-in-One Femoral Nerve Block and Periarticular Multimodal Drug Infiltration after Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tetsunaga, Tomoko; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Endo, Hirosuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Various postoperative pain relief modalities, including continuous femoral nerve block (CFNB), local infiltration analgesia (LIA), and combination therapy, have been reported for total knee arthroplasty. However, no studies have compared CFNB with LIA for total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of CFNB versus LIA after THA. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the postoperative outcomes of 93 THA patients (20 men, 73 women; mean age 69.2 years). Patients were divided into three groups according to postoperative analgesic technique: CFNB, LIA, or combined CFNB+LIA. We measured the following postoperative outcome parameters: visual analog scale (VAS) for pain at rest, supplemental analgesia, side effects, mobilization, length of hospital stay, and Harris Hip Score (HHS). Results. The CFNB+LIA group had significantly lower VAS pain scores than the CFNB and LIA groups on postoperative day 1. There were no significant differences among the three groups in use of supplemental analgesia, side effects, mobilization, length of hospital stay, or HHS at 3 months after THA. Conclusions. Although there were no clinically significant differences in outcomes among the three groups, combination therapy with CFNB and LIA provided better pain relief after THA than CFNB or LIA alone, with few side effects. PMID:28070159

  7. Anesthetic efficacy of articaine for inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with symptomatic versus asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Argueta-Figueroa, Liliana; Arzate-Sosa, Gabriel; Mendieta-Zeron, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to determine the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth and if individual patient factors, pulpal disease characteristics, and previous medication are correlated to local anesthetic success. A second objective was to determine the specificity and sensibility of a cold test for prediction of anesthetic success prior to endodontic treatment. Seventy patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth received 1.6 mL of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) using a metal guide. The anesthetic solution was injected with a computer-preprogrammed delivery system for local anesthesia. Endodontic access was begun 15 minutes after solution deposition; later, patients rated their discomfort using the visual analog scale (VAS). The success rate for the IA NB using articaine was 64.2% in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis and 86.9% in patients with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Cold test prior to root canal treatment had a specificity and sensibility of 12.5% and 87.1%, respectively. The anesthetic efficacy of articaine in irreversible pulpitis is moderately acceptable, and anesthetic success increases when the patient has been premedicated with NSAIDs. The cold test appears to be a favorable indicator for predicting anesthetic success.

  8. Bupivacaine Mandibular Nerve Block Affects Intraoperative Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in a Yucatan Miniature Swine Mandibular Condylectomy Model: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bova, Jonathan F.; da Cunha, Anderson F.; Stout, Rhett W.; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Alfi, David M.; Eisig, Sidney B.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Lopez, Mandi J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Aim The primary objective was to evaluate the effect of a bupivacaine mandibular nerve block on intraoperative blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in response to surgical stimulation and the need for systemic analgesics postoperatively. We hypothesized that a mandibular nerve block would decrease the need for systemic analgesics both intraoperatively and postoperatively. Materials and Methods Fourteen adult male Yucatan pigs were purchased. Pigs were chemically restrained with ketamine, midazolam, and dexmedetomidine and anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane inhalant anesthesia. Pigs were randomized to receive a mandibular block with either bupivacaine (bupivacaine group) or saline (control group). A nerve stimulator was used for administration of the block with observation of masseter muscle twitch to indicate the injection site. Invasive BP and HR were measured with the aid of an arterial catheter in eight pigs. A rescue analgesic protocol consisting of fentanyl and lidocaine was administered if HR or BP values increased 20% from baseline. Postoperative pain was quantified with a customized ethogram. HR and BP were evaluated at base line, pre-rescue, 10 and 20 min post-rescue. Results Pre-rescue mean BP was significantly increased (p = .001) for the bupivacaine group. Mean intraoperative HR was significantly lower (p = .044) in the bupivacaine versus saline group. All other parameters were not significant. Conclusion Addition of a mandibular nerve block to the anesthetic regimen in the miniature pig condylectomy model may improve variations in intraoperative BP and HR. This study establishes the foundation for future studies with larger animal numbers to confirm these preliminary findings. PMID:25394295

  9. A Self-Administered Method of Acute Pressure Block of Sciatic Nerves for Short-Term Relief of Dental Pain: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhao, Wanghong; Wang, Ye; Hu, Jiao; Chen, Qiu; Yu, Juncai; Wu, Bin; Huang, Rong; Gao, Jie; He, Jiman

    2014-01-01

    Objectives While stimulation of the peripheral nerves increases the pain threshold, chronic pressure stimulation of the sciatic nerve is associated with sciatica. We recently found that acute pressure block of the sciatic nerve inhibits pain. Therefore, we propose that, the pain pathology-causing pressure is chronic, not acute. Here, we report a novel self-administered method: acute pressure block of the sciatic nerves is applied by the patients themselves for short-term relief of pain from dental diseases. Design This was a randomized, single-blind study. Setting Hospital patients. Patients Patients aged 16–60 years with acute pulpitis, acute apical periodontitis, or pericoronitis of the third molar of the mandible experiencing pain ≥3 on the 11-point numerical pain rating scale. Interventions Three-minute pressure to sciatic nerves was applied by using the hands (hand pressure method) or by having the patients squat to force the thigh and shin as tightly as possible on the sandwiched sciatic nerve bundles (self-administered method). Outcomes The primary efficacy variable was the mean difference in pain scores from the baseline. Results One hundred seventy-two dental patients were randomized. The self-administered method produced significant relief from pain associated with dental diseases (P ≤ 0.001). The analgesic effect of the self-administered method was similar to that of the hand pressure method. Conclusions The self-administered method is easy to learn and can be applied at any time for pain relief. We believe that patients will benefit from this method. PMID:24400593

  10. Compression of the common peroneal nerve by intramuscular ganglion from the superior tibio-fibular joint.

    PubMed

    Muckart, R D

    1976-05-01

    Eight patients had symptoms from ganglia arising from the superior tibio-fibular joint with physical signs that resembled the anterior tibial and peroneal compartment syndromes. Five ganglia were in the peroneus longus muscle in which they produced only an ill-defined firmness. Histologically the ganglia showed much cellular activity which must not be mistaken for malignant change.

  11. Anesthetic efficacy of a repeated intraosseous injection given 30 min following an inferior alveolar nerve block/intraosseous injection.

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, J.; Reader, A.; Nist, R.; Beck, M.; Meyers, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether a repeated intraosseous (IO) injection would increase or prolong pulpal anesthesia, we measured the degree of anesthesia obtained by a repeated IO injection given 30 min following a combination inferior alveolar nerve block/intraosseous injection (IAN/IO) in mandibular second premolars and in first and second molars. Using a repeated-measures design, we randomly assigned 38 subjects to receive two combinations of injections at two separate appointments. The combinations were an IAN/IO injection followed approximately 30 min later by another IO injection of 0.9 ml of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and a combination IAN/IO injection followed approximately 30 min later by a mock IO injection. The second premolar, first molar, and second molar were blindly tested with an Analytic Technology pulp tester at 2-min cycles for 120 min postinjection. Anesthesia was considered successful when two consecutive readings of 80 were obtained. One hundred percent of the subjects had lip numbness with IAN/IO and with IAN/IO plus repeated IO techniques. Rates of anesthetic success for the IAN/IO and for the IAN/IO plus repeated IO injection, respectively, were 100% and 97% for the second premolar, 95% and 95% for the first molar, and 87% and 87% for the second molar. The repeated IO injection increased pulpal anesthesia for approximately 14 min in the second premolar and for 6 min in the first molar, but no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) were shown. In conclusion, the repeated IO injection of 0.9 ml of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine given 30 min following a combination IAN/IO injection did not significantly increase pulpal anesthesia in mandibular second premolars or in first and second molars. PMID:10483386

  12. Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block to Reduce Pain After Uterine Artery Embolization: Advanced Technique and Comparison to Epidural Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, Christoph A.; Hirzel, Florian C.; Gutzeit, Andreas; Zollikofer, Christoph L.; Hess, Thomas

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate a modified superior hypogastric nerve block (SHNB) to reduce pain after uterine artery embolization (UAE) compared to epidural anesthesia.Materials and methodsIn this retrospective study, the amount of opiate drugs needed after UAE was compared between SHNB and epidural anesthesia. Eighty one consecutive women (mean age: 43.67 years) were in the SHNB group and 27 consecutive women (mean age: 43.48 years) treated earlier at the same institution in the epidural anesthesia group. UAE was performed from a unilateral femoral artery approach using a 4F catheter. 500–700 or 700–900 μm trisacryl gelatine microspheres were used as embolic agents. The SHNB was performed by advancing a 21G from the abdominal wall below the umbilicus to the anterior portion of the 5th vertebral body. For optimal guidance a cranio-caudal tilt of 5°–15° was used. On a lateral view the correct contrast distribution in front of the vertebral body is confirmed. Then 20 ml local anesthesia (ropivacain 0.75 %) is injected. In case of an asymmetric right–left distribution the needle was repositioned.ResultsAll SHNB were successful without severe complications. The mean time for the SHNB was 4 min 38 s (2 min 38 s–9 min 27 s). The needle was repositioned in average 0.87 times. The opiate dose for the SHNB group was 19.33 ± 22.17 mg which was significantly lower. The average time to receive an opiate drug after SHNB was 4 h 41 min.ConclusionThe SHNB is a safe and minimally time-consuming way to reduce pain after UAE especially within the first 4 h.

  13. Prediction of hydraulic parameters from block joint inversion of magnetic resonance and vertical electric soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, T.; Müller-Petke, M.

    2012-04-01

    For assessing the impact of climate changes on salinity of coastal aquifers, numerical modelling needs to be done. As input, the spatial distribution of the parameters porosity, hydraulic conductivity and salt concentrations is needed. Airborne resistivity data are available that gives hints to fluid conductivity. Magnetic resonance soundings (MRS) can provide free water content directly yielding porosity, which in turn is needed for fluid conductivities and thus TDS concentrations. Furthermore, hydraulic conductivities can be retrieved by empirical relations using porosity and decay times. For having a unique model with all three primary parameters, vertical electrical and magnetic resonance soundings are inverted jointly using a block discretization. The MRS data were preprocessed using noise cancellation, despiking and a new gate integration scheme. Data errors were derived from fitting and include the effect of gating. Since the resistivity model affects the MRS inversion but demands an extensive kernel calculation, resistivity is updated only once. After inversion, a systematic model variation is done in order to retrieve confidence intervals of the primary and secondary parameters. We apply the methodology to several soundings at the North Sea Island Borkum, where the dynamics of the fresh/salt water interface is currently investigated. All soundings exhibit a very good data quality. One sounding close to a research borehole verifies the approach qualitatively. Another sounding was done to calibrate the petrophysical parameters using a pumping test. Finally, it is applied to a sounding in the flooding area. Whereas single MRS and VES data can be explained by a 3-layer and 4-layer model, respectively, a 5-layer model is needed to find a comprehensive model. Even though porosities are fairly constant, we can distinguish lithology and salinity due to the combination of resistivity and decay time. This case shows two fresh/salt water interfaces separated by a

  14. Nociceptive nerve activity in an experimental model of knee joint osteoarthritis of the guinea pig: effect of intra-articular hyaluronan application.

    PubMed

    Gomis, Ana; Miralles, Ana; Schmidt, Robert F; Belmonte, Carlos

    2007-07-01

    Nociceptive impulse activity was recorded extracellularly from single A delta and C primary afferents of the guinea pig's medial articular nerve after induction of an experimental osteoarthritis in the knee joint by partial medial menisectomy and transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (PMM+TACL). Also, the analgesic effects of intra-articular hyaluronan solutions were evaluated. Healthy, PMM+TACL operated, sham-operated (opening of the joint capsule without PMM and TACL surgery) and acutely inflamed (intra-articular kaolin-carrageenan, K-C) animals were used. The stimulus protocol consisted of torque meter-controlled, standardized innocuous and noxious inward and outward rotations of the joint. This stimulus protocol of 50 s duration was repeated every 5 min for 70 min. One day, one week and three weeks after PMM+TACL, the movement-evoked discharges of A delta articular afferents were increased significantly over values found in sham-operated animals. The discharges of C fibers were significantly augmented only one week after PMM+TACL surgery. Filling of the joint cavity with a high viscosity hyaluronan solution (hylan G-F 20, Synvisc) immediately and three days after surgery reduced significantly the enhanced nerve activity observed in joint afferent fibers one day and one week after surgery. Augmentation of movement-evoked discharges in K-C acutely inflamed knee joints was similar to that observed one week after PMM+TACL. Our results indicate that in the PMM+TACL model of osteoarthritis in guinea pigs, enhancement of nociceptive responses to joint movement was primarily associated to post-surgical inflammation. Intra-articular injection of an elastoviscous hyaluronan solution reduced the augmented nerve activity.

  15. Combination of general anesthesia and peripheral nerve block with low-dose ropivacaine reduces postoperative pain for several days after outpatient arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Benedikt; Mansur, Ashham; Hinz, José; Erlenwein, Joachim; Bauer, Martin; Bergmann, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Effective methods for postoperative pain relief are an important concern in outpatient surgery. For arthroscopies we combine a single-shot peripheral nerve block using low-volume, low-concentration ropivacaine with general anesthesia. We hypothesized that the patients would have less postoperative pain and be more rapidly home ready than after general anesthesia alone. Methods: Patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists I–III, 18–80 years old) scheduled for outpatient arthroscopy on the upper or lower extremity were randomized to have either a combination of peripheral nerve block and general anesthesia (NB + GA, study group) or general anesthesia alone (GA, control group). The relevant nerve was localized by ultrasound and 10 mL ropivacaine 0.2% was injected. General anesthesia was with propofol and remifentanil. Numeric rating scales were used to assess pain and patient satisfaction in the recovery room, on the evening of surgery, and on the following 2 days. Results: A total of 120 patients participated in the study (NB + GA: 61; GA: 59). The percentage of patients reporting relevant pain in the recovery room were 0% versus 44% (P < 0.001), on the evening after surgery 3% versus 80% (P < 0.001), and on days 1 and 2 postsurgery 12% versus 73% and 12% versus 64% (NB + GA vs GA, respectively). Median time to home discharge was NB + GA 34.5 min (range 15–90) versus GA 55 min (20–115) (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The combination of a peripheral nerve block with low-dose ropivacaine and general anesthesia reduced postoperative pain compared with general anesthesia alone for several days after outpatient arthroscopy. It also shortened the time to home discharge. PMID:28178149

  16. Comparative efficacy of ropivacaine and levobupivacaine in combined femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerve block with adjuvant magnesium for post-operative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Prakash; Agarwal, Munisha; Verma, Uttam Chandra; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Patients with burns may require multiple surgeries, but poor general condition and underlying protein energy malnutrition make them unsuitable candidates for general or spinal anaesthesia. This study evaluated the role of magnesium sulphate as an adjuvant with levobupivacaine and ropivacaine used in combined femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) blocks in burn patients with relative sparing of thigh portion. Methods: This prospective, randomised, double-blind study included 54 adult patients of 18–65 years age, undergoing split-thickness skin graft harvest from the thigh, allotted to three equal groups of 18 each. Group L patients received femoral nerve (FN) block with 15 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine and 8 mL for LFCN block; Group LM patients received 14 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine along with 1.0 mL of 15% magnesium sulphate for FN block, 7.5 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine with 0.5 mL of 15% of magnesium sulphate to LFCN block and Group R patients received 15 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine for FN block and 8 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine for LFCN block. Time to block onset and complete surgical block, duration of analgesia, total analgesic dose and the overall analgesia satisfaction score were measured in the first 24 h post-operatively. Quantitative data were analysed with ANOVA and qualitative data subjected to Chi-square tests. Intergroup comparison was performed with independent t-test. Results: The duration of post-operative analgesia did not differ with the addition of magnesium (P = 0.610). Time to onset of the block was significantly decreased with the addition of magnesium (P = 0.0341), but time to complete surgical block onset was similar across the groups. Conclusion: Both ropivacaine and levobupivacaine have good perioperative analgesic efficacy. Magnesium as an analgesia adjuvant with levobupivacaine does not prolong the duration of post-operative analgesia. PMID:27601742

  17. Inferior alveolar nerve block by injection into the pterygomandibular space anterior to the mandibular foramen: radiographic study of local anesthetic spread in the pterygomandibular space.

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Y.; Takasugi, Y.; Moriya, K.; Furuya, H.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the spread of local anesthetic solution in the inferior alveolar nerve block by the injection of local anesthetic solution into the pterygomandibular space anterior to the mandibular foramen (anterior technique). Seventeen volunteers were injected with 1.8 mL of a mixture containing lidocaine and contrast medium utilizing the anterior technique. The course of spread was traced by fluoroscopy in the sagittal plane, and the distribution area was evaluated by lateral cephalograms and horizontal computed tomography. The results indicate that the contrast medium mixture spreads rapidly in the pterygomandibular space to the inferior alveolar nerve in the subjects who exhibited inferior alveolar nerve block effect. We concluded that the anesthetic effect due to the anterior technique was produced by the rapid distribution of anesthetic solution in the pterygomandibular space toward the mandibular foramen, and individual differences in the time of onset of analgesia may be due to differences in the histologic perineural tissues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:11432178

  18. Comparison of periarticular anesthesia with liposomal bupivacaine with femoral nerve block for pain control after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu-qun; Chen, Xiang; Yu, Chen-chen; Weng, Cheng-wei; Wu, Yan-qin; Xiong, Jun-cheng; Xu, Shi-hao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Periarticular anesthesia (PAI) with liposomal bupivacaine (LB) and femoral nerve block (FNB) were 2 common type of pain management after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). There is no consensus about PAI with LB shows better clinical outcome than FNB. Thus, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety of PAI with LB and FNB for patients prepared for TKA. Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs from PubMed (1966-2017.2), EMBASE (1980-2017.2), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2017.2), Web of Science (1966-2017.2), and Chinese Wanfang database (1980-2017.2) were searched. Continuous outcomes including visual analogue scale (VAS) at 24, 48, and 72 hours, total morphine consumption, length of hospital, and range of motion (ROM) were reported as the weighted mean difference with 95% and confidence interval (CI) and discontinuous outcomes (the occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting [PONV]) were presented as relative risk with 95% CI. Random-effects model was adopted to analyze the relevant data. Results: According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 8 studies with 2407 patients were eligible and finally included in this meta-analysis (LB = 1114, FNB = 1293). There was no significant difference between VAS at 24, 4, and 72 hours, ROM, and the occurrence of PONV between PAI with LB group versus FNB group (P > 0.05). Compared with the FNB group, PAI with LB was associated with a significant decrease in length of hospital stay by 0.43 day (MD = −0.43; 95% CI −0.60 to −0.27; P = 0.001) and the total dose of total morphine consumption by (MD = −29.32; 95% CI −57.55 to −1.09; P = 0.042). Conclusions: The review of trials found that PAI with LB provided a significant beneficial effect over FNB in improving the pain or decreased the total morphine consumption in patients who underwent TKA. However, PAI with LB

  19. The Minimum Effective Dose of Lidocaine Needed to Block Evoked Potentials in the Sciatic Nerve of the Rat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    a higher concentration of sodium (Na+) ions extracellularly. This, along with the semi-permeable cell membrane, creates a resting membrane potential... sodium ions through voltage gated sodium channels located in the cellular membrane of a nerve (Stoelting, 1991). The anesthetics attach to a specific...receptor on the voltage gated sodium channels that respond to nerve impulses. Blockage of this flow of sodium ions will stop the membrane from

  20. Intermuscular pterygoid-temporal abscess following inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia–A computer tomography based navigated surgical intervention: Case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Jürgen; Reinbacher, Knut Ernst; Pau, Mauro; Feichtinger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) anesthesia is a common local anesthetic procedure. Although IANB anesthesia is known for its safety, complications can still occur. Today immediately or delayed occurring disorders following IANB anesthesia and their treatment are well-recognized. We present a case of a patient who developed a symptomatic abscess in the pterygoid region as a result of several inferior alveolar nerve injections. Clinical symptoms included diffuse pain, reduced mouth opening and jaw's hypomobility and were persistent under a first step conservative treatment. Since image-based navigated interventions have gained in importance and are used for various procedures a navigated surgical intervention was initiated as a second step therapy. Thus precise, atraumatic surgical intervention was performed by an optical tracking system in a difficult anatomical region. A symptomatic abscess was treated by a computed tomography-based navigated surgical intervention at our department. Advantages and disadvantages of this treatment strategy are evaluated. PMID:24987612

  1. Hydroxyapatite/collagen block with platelet rich plasma in temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a pilot study in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, D; Kumar, S; Dhasmana, S

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using preshaped hydroxyapatite/collagen condyles as carriers for platelet-rich plasma after gap arthroplasty in patients with temporomandibular ankylosis, to assess the aesthetic and functional outcomes, and to find out if neocondylar regeneration was possible. We studied 19 patients with temporomandibular joint ankylosis (25 joints), in whom preshaped hydroxyapatite/collagen condyles with platelet-rich plasma were fixed to the ramus with a titanium miniplate, and temporal fascia was placed in between. We evaluated the type of ankylosis, mouth opening before and after operation, deviation on mouth opening, lateral excursion, protrusion, postoperative anterior open bite, radiographic assessment, and complications. All patients showed appreciable improvements in mouth opening and excursion of the jaw. There were a few complications such as mild fever, and temporary involvement of the facial nerve, which improved with time. No open bite or recurrence was reported during the 18 months' follow up. Radiographic evaluation at 3 months showed a less opaque condyle, but the opacity at 18 months was more defined, suggesting a newly formed condyle. A preshaped hydroxyapatite/collagen condyle with platelet-rich plasma improves both aesthetics and function. However, a long term study is required to follow the growth patterns to see if the patients develop any facial deformity as they grow.

  2. Intravenous analgesia with opioids versus femoral nerve block with 0.2% ropivacaine as preemptive analgesic for fracture femur: A randomized comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvinder Pal; Kohli, Vaneet; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Femoral fractures are extremely painful and pain invariably worsens on any movement. Anesthesia for fracture femur surgery is usually provided by spinal block. This study was undertaken to compare the analgesic effects of femoral nerve block (FNB) using nerve stimulator with 0.2% ropivacaine (15 ml) and intravenous (I.V.) fentanyl before patient positioning for fracture femur surgery under spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, comparative study was conducted on 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients (18–60 years) scheduled for femur surgery under combined spinal epidural anesthesia. Patients in Group I (n = 30), were administered FNB using nerve stimulator with 0.2% ropivacaine (15 ml) and in Group II patients (n = 30), I.V. fentanyl 0.5 μg/kg was given as preemptive analgesia. Parameters observed included time to spinal anesthesia, intra-operative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) for any pain and postoperative epidural top-ups dosages. Results: Demographic profile was comparable in both the groups. VAS at 2 min in Group I was 5.63 and in Group II it was 8.00. Satisfaction score was better in Group I as compared to Group II patients. Time to administer subarachnoid block was 17.80 min in patients of Group I as compared to 25.03 min in Group II patients. Postoperatively, VAS scores were lower in Group I than Group II patients. The frequency of epidural top-ups was higher in Group II than in Group I patients. Conclusions: FNB is comparatively better in comparison to I.V. fentanyl when used as preemptive and postoperative analgesic in patients being operated for fracture femur. PMID:27212771

  3. The Comparison of Local Infiltration Analgesia with Peripheral Nerve Block following Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA): A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin; Zhu, Chunyan; Zan, Pengfei; Yu, Xiao; Liu, Jin; Sun, Qi; Li, Guodong

    2015-09-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is usually associated with severe post-operative pain, which can prevent rehabilitation of patients' knee function and influence the satisfaction of surgery. Local infiltration analgesia (LIA) is a method that has been applied in clinical practice recently. However, the clinical use of this method is still under discussion. In this paper, we systematically reviewed randomized clinical trails (RCTs) comparing LIA with peripheral nerve block (PNB) to verify the efficacy and safety of LIA. During the analysis, we strictly filtered papers and chose ones that had fewer disturbance variables. We also analyzed the heterogeneity. We conclude that when compared with PNB, pain control with LIA is at least comparable.

  4. The Effects of Blocking and Joint Control Training on Sequencing Visual Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Curtis W.; Meyer, Careen S.; Miguel, Caio F.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the effects of blocking on the accuracy of arranging visual stimuli in sequences as an attempt to assess whether verbal behavior mediates nonverbal performance. Across three experiments, college students were trained to echo and tact the names of abstract images vocally (Experiments 1 and 3) and with hand signs (Experiment 2), and…

  5. Onset Time of Nerve Block: A Comparison of Two Injection Locations in Patients Having Lower Leg/ Foot Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Strain of Muscle and/or Tendon of Lower Leg; Fracture of Lower Leg; Crushing Injury of Lower Leg; Fracture Malunion - Ankle and/or Foot; Disorder of Joint of Ankle and/or Foot; Complete Tear, Ankle and/or Foot Ligament; Pathological Fracture - Ankle and/or Foot; Loose Body in Joint of Ankle and/or Foot

  6. Phenol block for hip flexor muscle spasticity under ultrasonic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Koyama, H; Murakami, K; Suzuki, T; Suzaki, K

    1992-11-01

    Hip flexor spasticity, which is often associated with central nervous system (CNS) diseases, is a major impediment in rehabilitation. In order to cope with this problem, lumbar nerve blocking techniques developed by Meelhuysen and major and minor psoas muscle blocking techniques developed by Awad have been used in combination with physical therapies. Based on these techniques, we conducted major and minor psoas muscle phenol block (motor point block or intramuscular nerve block) under ultrasonic monitoring. Phenol block was conducted in nine patients with cerebral infarction (13 blocking procedures) and three with spinal cord injuries (six blocking procedures) while keeping them in a lateral position with the operation side upside. The beginning of the femoral nerves and part of the lumbar artery were visualized by ultrasound in some patients. As a result of the improvement of hip flexor spasticity, the range of hip joint motion (determined by the Mundale technique, prone hip extension and Thomas test) improved shortly after blocking. When physical therapy was conducted after blocking, improvement of skin care management was observed in eight cases, ability to keep in a stable sitting position in nine, improvement of a standing posture in three, increases in the ability to walk in two and alleviation of pain in three. Although nerve block is reported to result in hematoma, decreases in muscle force, pain, cystic/rectal disorders and hypogonadism, we have observed no such complication in our patients.

  7. Pulsed radiofrequency of the composite nerve supply to the knee joint as a new technique for relieving osteoarthritic pain: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Vas, Lakshmi; Pai, Renuka; Khandagale, Nishigandha; Pattnaik, Manorama

    2014-01-01

    We report a new technique for pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) of the entire nerve supply of the knee as an option in treating osteoarthritis (OA) of knee. We targeted both sensory and motor nerves supplying all the structures around the knee: joint, muscles, and skin to address the entire nociception and stiffness leading to peripheral and central sensitization in osteoarthritis. Ten patients with pain, stiffness, and loss of function in both knees were treated with ultrasonography (USG) guided PRF of saphenous, tibial, and common peroneal nerves along with subsartorial, peripatellar, and popliteal plexuses. USG guided PRF of the femoral nerve was also done to address the innervation of the quadriceps muscle. Assessment of pain (Numerical Rating Scale [NRS], pain DETECT, knee function [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index- WOMAC]) were documented pre and post PRF at 3 and 6 months. Knee radiographs (Kellgren-Lawrence [K-L] grading) were done before PRF and one week later. All the patients showed a sustained improvement of NRS, pain DETECT, and WOMAC at 3 and 6 months. The significant improvement of patellar position and tibio-femoral joint space was concordant with the patient's reporting of improvement in stiffness and pain. The sustained pain relief and muscle relaxation enabled the patients to optimize physiotherapy thereby improving endurance training to include the daily activities of life. We conclude that OA knee pain is a product of neuromyopathy and that PRF of the sensory and motor nerves appeared to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive technique. The reduction of pain and stiffness improved the knee function and probably reduced the peripheral and central sensitization.

  8. Anaesthetic Efficacy of 4% Articaine Mandibular Buccal Infiltration Compared To 2% Lignocaine Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Children with Irreversible Pulpitis

    PubMed Central

    P, Mytri

    2015-01-01

    Background Lidocaine is the gold standard anaesthetic solution that has been used since its inception into dentistry till date. Around 80% of failures have been reported when lignocaine has been used for inferior alveolar nerve block in children and adults with irreversible pulpitis. There is a need to use newer drugs which are available which have been reported to be effective like lignocaine, such as articaine. Although articaine has been used in adults, literature supporting its use in children is sparse. Aim The purpose of this study is to compare the anaesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine buccal infiltration and 2% lignocaine inferior alveolar nerve block in children with irreversible pulpitis. It also aims to assess the need for supplemental intrapulpal injections. Materials and Methods This study was designed as a randomized double-blind cross over trial comparing the anaesthetic effectiveness of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in buccal infiltration and 2% lignocaine IAN block anaesthesia. The study subject and the pediatric dentist performing the pulpectomy procedures were blinded to the study. A sample size of 40 subjects in the age group of 5-8 y was included in the study. Results The onset of anaesthesia with 4% articaine was faster as compared to 2% lignocaine. The duration of anaesthesia with articaine infiltration was shorter. The need for supplemental injection in the articaine group was less. Conclusion Four percent articaine infiltration can be used in children with irreversible pulpitis. It can be used to replace the IAN block in children thereby reducing the post anaesthetic complications like lip biting. PMID:26023647

  9. Comparison of effectiveness of 4% articaine associated with 1: 100,000 or 1: 200,000 epinephrine in inferior alveolar nerve block.

    PubMed Central

    Tófoli, Giovana Radomille; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; de Oliveira, Patrícia Cristine; Volpato, Maria Cristina; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Ranali, José

    2003-01-01

    This comparative study using 20 healthy volunteers evaluated the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine in association with 2 different concentrations of epinephrine, 1:200,000 (G1) and 1:100,000 (G2). The first premolars were tested with a pulp tester to verify the anesthesia induced by the inferior alveolar nerve block. The following parameters were measured: period of latency (PL; interval between the end of anesthetic injection and absence of response to the maximum output--80 reading--of the pulp tester); complete pulpal anesthesia (CPA; period in which the subject had no response to maximal output of the pulp tester 80 reading); partial anesthesia (PA; interval between the first reading below 80 and the return to basal levels); and the anesthesia of the soft tissues (AST; period of time from onset of anesthesia until the return to normal sensation of the lip). The Wilcoxon test (alpha = 0.05) was used to analyze the data. No significant difference was found regarding PL (P = .47), CPA (P = .88), PA (P = .46), and AST (P = .85). The results indicated that both solutions presented the same clinical effectiveness in blocking the inferior alveolar nerve. PMID:14959904

  10. Improved perioperative analgesia with ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric nerve or transversus abdominis plane block for open inguinal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexiang; Wu, Tao; Terry, Marisa J.; Eldrige, Jason S.; Tong, Qiang; Erwin, Patricia J.; Wang, Zhen; Qu, Wenchun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric (II/IH) nerve and transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks have been increasingly utilized in patients for perioperative analgesia. We conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the clinical efficacy of ultrasound-guided II/IH nerve or TAP blocks for perioperative analgesia in patients undergoing open inguinal surgery. [Subjects and Methods] A systematic search was conducted of 7 databases from the inception to March 5, 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the clinical efficacy of ultrasound-guided vs. landmark-based techniques to perform II/IH nerve and TAP blocks in patients with open inguinal surgery were included. We constructed random effects models to pool the standardized mean difference (SMD) for continuous outcomes and the odds ratio (OR) for dichotomized outcomes. [Results] Ultrasound-guided II/IH nerve or TAP blocks were associated with a reduced use of intraoperative additional analgesia and a significant reduction of pain scores during day-stay. The use of rescue drugs was also significantly lower in the ultrasound-guided group. [Conclusion] The use of ultrasound-guidance to perform an II/IH nerve or a TAP block was associated with improved perioperative analgesia in patients following open inguinal surgery compared to landmark-based methods. PMID:27134411

  11. Bilateral hypermobility of ulnar nerves at the elbow joint with unilateral left ulnar neuropathy in a computer user: A case study.

    PubMed

    Lewańska, Magdalena; Grzegorzewski, Andrzej; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Occupational ulnar neuropathy at the elbow joint develops in the course of long term direct pressure on the nerve and a persistently flexed elbow posture, but first of all, it is strongly associated with "holding a tool in a certain position" repetitively. Therefore, computer work only in exceptional cases can be considered as a risk factor for the neuropathy. Ulnar hypermobility at the elbow might be one of the risk factors in the development of occupational ulnar neuropathy; however, this issue still remains disputable. As this condition is mostly of congenital origin, an additional factor, such as a direct acute or chronic professional or non-professional trauma, is needed for clinical manifestations. We describe a patient - a computer user with a right ulnar nerve complete dislocation and left ulnar nerve hypermobility, unaware of her anomaly until symptoms of left ulnar neuropathy occurred in the course of job exposure. The patient was exposed to repetitive long lasting pressure of the left elbow and forearm on the hard support on the cupboard and desk because of a non-ergonomically designed workplace. The additional coexistent congenital abnormal displacement of the ulnar nerve from the postcondylar groove during flexion at the elbow increased the possibility of its mechanical injury. We recognized left ulnar neuropathy at the ulnar groove as an occupational disease. An early and accurate diagnosis of any form of hypermobility of ulnar nerve, informing patients about it, prevention of an ulnar nerve injury as well as compliance with ergonomic rules are essential to avoid development of occupational and non-occupational neuropathy.

  12. Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS) Block 3.0 Communications Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. W.; Grant, K. D.; Ottinger, K.

    2015-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The JPSS program is the follow-on for both space and ground systems to the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA. The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and geophysical observations of the Earth. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS). Developed and maintained by Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services (IIS), the CGS is a globally distributed, multi-mission system serving NOAA, NASA and their national and international partners. The CGS has demonstrated its scalability and flexibility to incorporate multiple missions efficiently and with minimal cost, schedule and risk, while strengthening global partnerships in weather and environmental monitoring. In a highly successful international partnership between NOAA and the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), the CGS currently provides data routing from McMurdo Station in Antarctica to the EUMETSAT processing center in Darmstadt, Germany. Continuing and building upon that partnership, NOAA and EUMETSAT are collaborating on the development of a new path forward for the 2020's. One approach being explored is a concept of operations where each organization shares satellite downlink resources with the other. This paper will describe that approach, as well as modeling results that demonstrate its feasibility and expected performance.

  13. Marked loss of sympathetic nerve fibers in chronic Charcot foot of diabetic origin compared to ankle joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Franz-Xaver; Bobrik, Verena; Fassold, Alexander; Grifka, Joachim; Kessler, Sigurd; Straub, Rainer H

    2009-06-01

    The pathogenesis of Charcot foot is based on three disputed factors: (1) loss of neurotrophic influence, (2) microtraumatic lesions, and (3) neurovascular disturbances. These etiological causes were uncovered by clinicophysiological tests. However, no results of quantitative nerve density studies of sympathetic and sensory substance P-positive (SP+) nerve fibers are available. We studied the density of sympathetic and SP+ nerve fibers in three distinct areas of the tarsus. Fifteen patients with ankle osteoarthritis (OA) and 15 patients with diabetic Charcot foot were included. Patients with OA did not differ from those with Charcot foot in SP+ sensory nerve fiber density. However, at all three areas, the density of sympathetic nerve fibers was significantly lower in patients with Charcot foot compared to OA (p = 0.006). In addition, we found that the sympathetic nerve repellent factor semaphorin 3C was highly expressed in inflamed tissue in Charcot patients. In Charcot foot of diabetic origin a severe loss of sympathetic nerve fibers was observed. These findings in chronically inflamed Charcot foot lend support to the neurovascular theory in the late chronic phase, which probably depends on the inflammatory upregulation of nerve repellent factors.

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Intercostobrachial Nerve Block for Intercostobrachial Neuralgia in Breast Cancer Patients: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Wisotzky, Eric M; Saini, Vikramjeet; Kao, Cyrus

    2016-03-01

    This case series describes 3 cases in which ultrasound-guided intercostobrachial perineural injection was used for intercostobrachial neuralgia, a common cause of postmastectomy pain syndrome. All cases had undergone modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer. Two cases developed axillary and unilateral chest wall pain. The third case initially presented with axillary pain and lateral shoulder pain 1 year out from radical mastectomy. After a cervical epidural steroid injection, her lateral shoulder pain resolved, but she continued to have residual chest wall paresthesia. It was at this time, we decided to treat with an intercostobrachial nerve perineural injection. Injury to the intercostobrachial nerve is thought to be a common cause of postmastectomy pain. In our case series, all patients had pain relief after the intercostobrachial perineural injection. There is a relative dearth of published information on the treatment of postmastectomy pain and more specifically intercostobrachial neuralgia. We review the anatomy of the intercostobrachial nerve and its variants, etiologies of intercostobrachial neuralgia, and current indications and methods of an intercostobrachial perineural injection.

  15. Ultrasound-guided femoro-sciatic nerve block for post-operative analgesia after below knee orthopaedic surgeries under subarachnoid block: Comparison between clonidine and dexmedetomidine as adjuvants to levobupivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Sudarshan Kumar; Verma, Ravinder Kumar; Rana, Shelly; Singh, Jai; Gupta, Bhanu; Singh, Yuvraj

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The advent of ultrasonographic-guided techniques has led to increased interest in femoro-sciatic nerve block (FSNB) for lower limb surgeries. α2-agonists have been used recently as adjuvants to local anaesthetics in nerve blocks. We aimed to compare equal doses of clonidine or dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to levobupivacaine in FSNB for post-operative analgesia. Methods: Ninety patients scheduled to undergo below knee orthopaedic surgeries under subarachnoid block were divided into three groups: Group LL (n = 30) patients received 38 mL of 0.125% levobupivacaine with 2 mL normal saline, Group LD (n = 30) patients received 38 mL of 0.125% levobupivacaine with 0.5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine and Group LC (n = 30) received 38 mL of 0.125% levobupivacaine with 0.5 μg/kg clonidine in saline to make total drug volume of 40 mL. The primary and secondary outcome variables were duration of analgesia and rescue analgesic requirement, verbal rating score respectively. Continuous variables were analysed with analysis of variance or the Kruskal–Wallis test on the basis of data distribution. Categorical variables were analysed with the contingency table analysis and the Fisher's exact test. Results: Duration of analgesia was prolonged with dexmedetomidine (10.17 ± 2.40 h) and clonidine (7.31 ± 1.76 h) as compared to control (4.16 ± 1.04 h, P = 0.00). Significantly lower pain scores were observed in dexmedetomidine group as compared to clonidine up to 8 h post-operatively. Conclusion: Equal doses of clonidine or dexmedetomidine added to levobupivacaine prolonged the duration of analgesia, decreased requirement of rescue analgesia. Dexmedetomidine delays the requirement of rescue analgesics with better pain scores as compared to clonidine. PMID:27512164

  16. A Modified Posterolateral Approach for Radiofrequency Denervation of the Medial Branch of the Cervical Segmental Nerve in Cervical Facet Joint Pain Based on Anatomical Considerations.

    PubMed

    van Eerd, Maarten; Lataster, Arno; Sommer, Micha; Patijn, Jacob; van Kleef, Maarten

    2016-10-13

    The cervical facet joints, also called the zygapophyseal joints, are a potential source of neck pain (cervical facet joint pain). The cervical facet joints are innervated by the cervical medial branches (CMBs) of the cervical segmental nerves. Cervical facet joint pain has been shown to respond to multisegmental radiofrequency denervation of the cervical medial branches. This procedure is performed under fluoroscopic guidance. Currently, three approaches are described and used. Those three techniques of radiofrequency treatment of the CMBs, classified on the base of the needle trajectory toward the anatomical planes, are as follows: the posterolateral technique, the posterior technique, and the lateral technique. We describe the three techniques with their advantages and disadvantages. Anatomical studies providing a topographic anatomy of the course of the CMBs are reviewed. We developed a novel approach based on the observed strengths and weaknesses of the three currently used approaches and based on recent anatomical findings. With this fluoroscopic-guided approach, there is always bone (the facet column) in front of the needle, which makes it safer, and the insertion point is easier to determine without the risk of positioning the radiofrequency needle too dorsally.

  17. Strength and fracture toughness of heterogeneous blocks with joint lognormal modulus and failure strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimas, Leon S.; Veneziano, Daniele; Buehler, Markus J.

    2016-07-01

    We obtain analytical approximations to the probability distribution of the fracture strengths of notched one-dimensional rods and two-dimensional plates in which the stiffness (Young's modulus) and strength (failure strain) of the material vary as jointly lognormal random fields. The fracture strength of the specimen is measured by the elongation, load, and toughness at two critical stages: when fracture initiates at the notch tip and, in the 2D case, when fracture propagates through the entire specimen. This is an extension of a previous study on the elastic and fracture properties of systems with random Young's modulus and deterministic material strength (Dimas et al., 2015a). For 1D rods our approach is analytical and builds upon the ANOVA decomposition technique of (Dimas et al., 2015b). In 2D we use a semi-analytical model to derive the fracture initiation strengths and regressions fitted to simulation data for the effect of crack arrest during fracture propagation. Results are validated through Monte Carlo simulation. Randomness of the material strength affects in various ways the mean and median values of the initial strengths, their log-variances, and log-correlations. Under low spatial correlation, material strength variability can significantly increase the effect of crack arrest, causing ultimate failure to be a more predictable and less brittle failure mode than fracture initiation. These insights could be used to guide design of more fracture resistant composites, and add to the design features that enhance material performance.

  18. Role of addition of dexamethasone to lignocaine 2% with adrenaline in dental nerve blocks for third molar surgery: A prospective randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Saroj Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Context: Dexamethasone has been frequently used in oral surgical procedure and accepted by oral and maxillofacial surgeon community worldwide. However, this is the first clinical trial that used dexamethasone as adjuvant with lignocaine in dental nerve block (DNB). Aims: The purpose of this double-blind, randomized control trial (RCT) was to compare the effect of dexamethasone with normal saline (NS) in a lignocaine DNB. Settings and Design: This prospective, double-blind, RCT was carried out after obtaining approval from the Institutional Ethical Committee. Subjects and Methods: In forty patients, the present placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted; allocated randomly into two groups: study group (SG) or control group (CG). The single-dose submucosal dexamethasone or NS injection was administered immediately after 2% lignocaine with epinephrine 1:2,00,000 nerves block during mandibular third molar surgery (TMS). Visual analog scale score, number, and exact time nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were administered were used to measure postoperative analgesia in 2nd and 7th days. Statistical Analysis Used: All the data were entered into the Spreadsheet (Excel, Microsoft) and Chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test, Student's paired and unpaired t-test, and Fisher exact test were used. Results: This study found maximum duration of DNB in SG was 248.88 min and in CG was 175.44 min, whereas minimum duration in SG was 197 min and in CG was 140.78 min. Conclusions: Dexamethasone prolongs the action of lignocaine 2% in DNB for TMS. PMID:28299268

  19. Essential oil of Lippia alba and its main constituent citral block the excitability of rat sciatic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, D.G.; Sousa, S.D.G.; Silva, R.E.R.; Silva-Alves, K.S.; Ferreira-da-Silva, F.W.; Kerntopf, M.R.; Menezes, I.R.A.; Leal-Cardoso, J.H.; Barbosa, R.

    2015-01-01

    Lippia alba is empirically used for infusions, teas, macerates, and hydroalcoholic extracts because of its antispasmodic, analgesic, sedative, and anxiolytic effects. Citral is a mixture of trans-geranial and cis-neral and is the main constituent of L. alba essential oil and possesses analgesic, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and sedative effects. The present study evaluated the effects of the essential oil of L. alba (EOLa) and citral on compound action potentials (CAPs) in Wistar rat sciatic nerves. Both drugs inhibited CAP in a concentration-dependent manner. The calculated half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of peak-to-peak amplitude were 53.2 µg/mL and 35.00 µg/mL (or 230 µM) for EOLa and citral, respectively. Peak-to-peak amplitude of the CAP was significantly reduced by 30 µg/mL EOLa and 10 µg/mL citral. EOLa and citral (at 60 and 30 µg/mL, values close to their respective IC50 for CAP blockade) significantly increased chronaxy and rheobase. The conduction velocity of the first and second CAP components was statistically reduced to ∼86% of control with 10 µg/mL EOLa and ∼90% of control with 3 µg/mL citral. This study showed that EOLa inhibited nerve excitability and this effect can be explained by the presence of citral in its composition. Both EOLa and citral showed inhibitory actions at lower concentrations compared with other essential oils and constituents with local anesthetic activity. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that EOLa and citral are promising agents in the development of new drugs with local anesthetic activity. PMID:26132093

  20. Essential oil of Lippia alba and its main constituent citral block the excitability of rat sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Sousa, D G; Sousa, S D G; Silva, R E R; Silva-Alves, K S; Ferreira-da-Silva, F W; Kerntopf, M R; Menezes, I R A; Leal-Cardoso, J H; Barbosa, R

    2015-08-01

    Lippia alba is empirically used for infusions, teas, macerates, and hydroalcoholic extracts because of its antispasmodic, analgesic, sedative, and anxiolytic effects. Citral is a mixture of trans-geranial and cis-neral and is the main constituent of L. alba essential oil and possesses analgesic, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and sedative effects. The present study evaluated the effects of the essential oil of L. alba (EOLa) and citral on compound action potentials (CAPs) in Wistar rat sciatic nerves. Both drugs inhibited CAP in a concentration-dependent manner. The calculated half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of peak-to-peak amplitude were 53.2 µg/mL and 35.00 µg/mL (or 230 µM) for EOLa and citral, respectively. Peak-to-peak amplitude of the CAP was significantly reduced by 30 µg/mL EOLa and 10 µg/mL citral. EOLa and citral (at 60 and 30 µg/mL, values close to their respective IC50 for CAP blockade) significantly increased chronaxy and rheobase. The conduction velocity of the first and second CAP components was statistically reduced to ∼86% of control with 10 µg/mL EOLa and ∼90% of control with 3 µg/mL citral. This study showed that EOLa inhibited nerve excitability and this effect can be explained by the presence of citral in its composition. Both EOLa and citral showed inhibitory actions at lower concentrations compared with other essential oils and constituents with local anesthetic activity. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that EOLa and citral are promising agents in the development of new drugs with local anesthetic activity.

  1. Essential oil of croton nepetaefolius and its main constituent, 1,8-cineole, block excitability of rat sciatic nerve in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lima-Accioly, P M; Lavor-Porto, P R; Cavalcante, F S; Magalhães, P J C; Lahlou, S; Morais, S M; Leal-Cardoso, J H

    2006-12-01

    1. The effects of the essential oil of Croton nepetaefolius (EOCN) and its major constituent, 1,8-cineole, on the compound action potential (CAP) of nerve were investigated. 2. Experiments were performed in sciatic nerves dissected from Wistar rats, mounted in a moist chamber and stimulated at a frequency of 0.2 Hz, with electric pulses of 100 micros duration at 20-40 V. Evoked CAP were displayed on an oscilloscope and recorded on a computer. The CAP control parameters were as follows: peak-to-peak amplitude 8.1 +/- 0.6 mV (n = 15); conduction velocity 83.3 +/- 4.2 m/s (n = 15); chronaxie 58.0 +/- 6.8 msec (n = 6); and rheobase 2.8 +/- 0.1 V (n = 6). 3. Lower concentrations of EOCN (100 and 300 microg/mL) and 1,8-cineole (153 and 307 microg/mL; i.e. 1 and 2 mmol/L, respectively) had no significant effects on CAP control parameters throughout the entire recording period. However, at the end of 180 min exposure of the nerve to the drug, peak-to-peak amplitude was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced to 27.4 +/- 6.7 and 1.7 +/- 0.8% of control values by 500 and 1000 microg/mL EOCN, respectively (n = 6), and to 76.5 +/- 4.4, 70.0 +/- 3.9 and 14.8 +/- 4.1% of control values by 614, 920 and 1227 microg/mL (i.e. 4, 6 and 8 mmol/L) 1,8-cineole, respectively (n = 6). Regarding conduction velocity, at the end of the 180 min exposure period, this parameter was significantly reduced to 85.8 +/- 7.3 and 48.7 +/- 12.3% (n = 6) of control values by 500 and 1000 microg/mL EOCN, respectively, and to 86.4 +/- 4.5 and 76.1 +/- 5.2% (n = 6) by 920 and 1227 microg/mL 1,8-cineole, respectively. Chronaxie and rheobase were significantly increased by the higher concentrations of both EOCN and 1,8-cineole. 4. It is concluded that EOCN and its main constituent 1,8-cineole block nerve excitability in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect that was totally reversible with 1,8-cineole but not with EOCN. This suggests that other constituents of EOCN, in addition to 1,8-cineole, may contribute

  2. Topical airway anesthesia for awake fiberoptic intubation: Comparison between airway nerve blocks and nebulized lignocaine by ultrasonic nebulizer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Babita; Kohli, Santvana; Farooque, Kamran; Jalwal, Gopal; Gupta, Deepak; Sinha, Sumit; Chandralekha

    2014-01-01

    Overview: Awake fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB) guided intubation is the gold standard of airway management in patients with cervical spine injury. It is essential to sufficiently anesthetize the upper airway before the performance of awake FOB guided intubation in order to ensure patient comfort and cooperation. This randomized controlled study was performed to compare two methods of airway anesthesia, namely ultrasonic nebulization of local anesthetic and performance of airway blocks. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 adult patients with cervical spine injury were randomly allocated into two groups. Group L received airway anesthesia through ultrasonic nebulization of 10 ml of 4% lignocaine and Group NB received airway blocks (bilateral superior laryngeal and transtracheal recurrent laryngeal) each with 2 ml of 2% lignocaine and viscous lignocaine gargles. FOB guided orotracheal intubation was then performed. Hemodynamic variables at baseline and during the procedure, patient recall, vocal cord visibility, ease of intubation, coughing/gagging episodes, and signs of lignocaine toxicity were noted. Results: The observations did not reveal any significant differences in demographics or hemodynamic parameters at any time during the study. However, the time taken for intubation was significantly lower in Group NB as compared with the Group L. Group L had an increased number of coughing/gagging episodes as compared with Group NB. Vocal cord visibility and ease of intubation were better in patients who received airway blocks and hence the amount of supplemental lignocaine used was less in this group. Overall patient comfort was better in Group NB with fewer incidences of unpleasant recalls as compared with Group L. Conclusion: Upper airway blocks provide better quality of anesthesia than lignocaine nebulization as assessed by patient recall of procedure, coughing/gagging episodes, ease of intubation, vocal cord visibility, and time taken to intubate. PMID:25538514

  3. A prospective, randomized, double-blind study of the anesthetic efficacy of sodium bicarbonate buffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Michael; Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a double-blind manner, inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) blocks using a buffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine/sodium bicarbonate formulation and an unbuffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine formulation at 2 separate appointments spaced at least 1 week apart. An electric pulp tester was used in 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes to test for anesthesia of the first and second molars, premolars, and lateral and central incisors. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive 80 readings were obtained within 15 minutes, and the 80 reading was continuously sustained for 60 minutes. For the buffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine/sodium bicarbonate formulation, successful pulpal anesthesia ranged from 10-71%. For the unbuffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine formulation, successful pulpal anesthesia ranged from 10-72%. No significant differences between the 2 anesthetic formulations were noted. The buffered lidocaine formulation did not statistically result in faster onset of pulpal anesthesia or less pain during injection than did the unbuffered lidocaine formulation. We concluded that buffering a 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine with sodium bicarbonate, as was formulated in the current study, did not statistically increase anesthetic success, provide faster onset, or result in less pain of injection when compared with unbuffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for an IAN block.

  4. Successful use of stellate ganglion block and a new centrally acting analgesic with dual mode of action in a resistant temporomandibular joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gareth Peter; Tripathi, Shiva Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Stellate ganglion blocks have been shown to provide effective pain relief in a number of different conditions involving the upper body. This was demonstrated in a 65-year-old woman who had experienced severe debilitating pain in her left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the surrounding area of her face for over 10 years. The pain was unresponsive to indomethacin, carbamazepine, sodium valproate, gabapentin, lithium, melatonin and amitriptyline. She had also had four surgical procedures to the TMJ without success. The pain was partially responsive to Syndol tablets and pregabalin, although the use of pregabalin was limited by its adverse effects. The patient underwent 13 ultrasound guided stellate ganglion blocks over a 24-month period which demonstrated 90% pain relief for up to 10 weeks. Pulsed radio frequency lesioning showed no benefit over stellate ganglion block. More recently, tapentadol was found to be effective and this replaced the stellate ganglion blocks. PMID:24849638

  5. Management of acute postoperative pain with continuous intercostal nerve block after single port video-assisted thoracoscopic anatomic resection

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Wang, Kuo-Cheng; Liu, Hung-Pin; Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Wu, Ching-Yang; Liu, Yun-Hen; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Chao, Yin-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background Effective postoperative pain control for thoracic surgery is very important, not only because it reduces pulmonary complications but also because it accelerates the pace of recovery. Moreover, it increases patients’ satisfaction with the surgery. In this study, we present a simple approach involving the safe placement of intercostal catheter (ICC) after single port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) anatomic resection and we evaluate postoperative analgesic function with and without it. Methods We identified patients who underwent single port anatomic resection with ICC placed intraoperatively as a route for continuous postoperative levobupivacaine (0.5%) administration and retrospectively compared them with a group of single port anatomic resection patients without ICC. The operation time, postoperative day 0, 1, 2, 3 and discharge day pain score, triflow numbers, narcotic requirements, drainage duration and post-operative hospital stay were compared. Results In total, 78 patients were enrolled in the final analysis (39 patients with ICC and 39 without). We found patients with ICC had less pain sensation numerical rating scale (NRS) on postoperative day 0, 1 (P=0.023, <0.001) and better triflow performance on postoperative day 1 and 2 (P=0.015, 0.032). In addition, lower IV form morphine usage frequency and dosage (P=0.009, 0.017), shorter chest tube drainage duration (P=0.001) and postoperative stay (P=0.005) were observed in the ICC group. Conclusions Continuous intercostal nerve blockade by placing an ICC intraoperatively provides effective analgesia for patients undergoing single port VATS anatomic resection. This may be considered a viable alternative for postoperative pain management. PMID:28149550

  6. Polymer Coatings of Cochlear Implant Electrode Surface – An Option for Improving Electrode-Nerve-Interface by Blocking Fibroblast Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Hadler, C.; Aliuos, P.; Brandes, G.; Warnecke, A.; Bohlmann, J.; Dempwolf, W.; Menzel, H.; Lenarz, T.; Reuter, G.; Wissel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Overgrowth of connective tissue and scar formation induced by the electrode array insertion increase the impedance and, thus, diminish the interactions between neural probes as like cochlear implants (CI) and the target tissue. Therefore, it is of great clinical interest to modify the carrier material of the electrodes to improve the electrode nerve interface for selective cell adhesion. On one side connective tissue growth needs to be reduced to avoid electrode array encapsulation, on the other side the carrier material should not compromise the interaction with neuronal cells. The present in vitro-study qualitatively and quantitatively characterises the interaction of fibroblasts, glial cells and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) with ultrathin poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMAA), poly(2-ethyloxazoline) (PEtOx) and poly([2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammoniumchlorid) (PMTA) films immobilised onto glass surfaces using a photoreactive anchor layer. The layer thickness and hydrophilicity of the polymer films were characterised by ellipsometric and water contact angle measurement. Moreover the topography of the surfaces was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The neuronal and non-neuronal cells were dissociated from spiral ganglions of postnatal rats and cultivated for 48 h on top of the polymer coatings. Immunocytochemical staining of neuronal and intermediary filaments revealed that glial cells predominantly attached on PMTA films, but not on PDMAA and PEtOx monolayers. Hereby, strong survival rates and neurite outgrowth were only found on PMTA, whereas PDMAA and PEtOx coatings significantly reduced the SG neuron survival and neuritogenesis. As also shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) SGN strongly survived and retained their differentiated phenotype only on PMTA. In conclusion, survival and neuritogenesis of SGN may be associated with the extent of the glial cell growth. Since PMTA was the only of the polar polymers used in this study bearing

  7. Subperiosteal hematoma from peribulbar block during cataract surgery leading to optic nerve compression in a patient with parahemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Khokhar, Sudarshan; Nayak, Bhagabat; Patil, Bharat; Changole, Milind Devidas; Sinha, Gautam; Sharma, Reetika; Nayak, Lipika

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old male presented with gradual painless diminution of vision since childhood. Slit lamp examination revealed both eyes having congenital cataract. Right eye lens aspiration was performed but was uneventful, and he prepared for left eye surgery after 7 days. Immediately after giving a peribulbar block, a complete akinesia, tight eyelids, and stony hard eyeball was noted. An abaxial proptosis of 7 mm was noted. Lateral canthotomy and inferior cantholysis were done and proptosis reduced to 5 mm. Bleeding time–clotting time was normal. Proptosis worsened to 8 mm the next day. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan showed inferolateral subperiosteal hematoma, but drainage could not be performed due to prolonged prothrombin time and activated prothrombin time. Fresh frozen plasma was transfused. Tarsorrhaphy was performed for exposure keratopathy after his coagulation profile became normal. Hematology evaluation after 2 weeks detected factor V deficiency, and was diagnosed as Owren’s disease or parahemophilia. PMID:26664247

  8. Vagal nerve stimulation blocks interleukin 6-dependent synaptic hyperexcitability induced by lipopolysaccharide-induced acute stress in the rodent prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Oscos, Francisco; Peña, David; Housini, Mohammad; Cheng, Derek; Lopez, Diego; Borland, Michael S.; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto; Salgado, Humberto; D’Mello, Santosh; Kilgard, Michael P.; Rose-John, Stefan; Atzori, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The ratio between synaptic inhibition and excitation (sI/E) is a critical factor in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disease. We recently described a stress-induced interleukin-6 dependent mechanism leading to a decrease in sI/E in the rodent temporal cortex. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a similar mechanism takes place in the prefrontal cortex, and to elaborate strategies to prevent or attenuate it. We used aseptic inflammation (single acute injections of lipopolysaccharide, LPS, 10 mg/kg) as stress model, and patch-clamp recording on a prefrontal cortical slice preparation from wild-type rat and mice, as well as from transgenic mice in which the inhibitor of IL-6 trans-signaling sgp130Fc was produced in a brain-specific fashion (sgp130Fc mice). The anti-inflammatory reflex was activated either by vagal nerve stimulation or peripheral administration of the nicotinic α7 receptor agonist PHA543613. We found that the IL-6-dependent reduction in prefrontal cortex synaptic inhibition was blocked in sgp130Fc mice, or – in wild-type animals – upon application sgp130Fc. Similar results were obtained by activating the “anti-inflammatory reflex” – a neural circuit regulating peripheral immune response – by stimulation of the vagal nerve or through peripheral administration of the α7 nicotinic receptor agonist PHA543613. Our results indicate that the prefrontal cortex is an important potential target of IL-6 mediated trans-signaling, and suggest a potential new avenue in the treatment of a large class of hyperexcitable neuropsychiatric conditions, including epilepsy, schizophrenic psychoses, anxiety disorders, autism spectrum disorders, and depression. PMID:25128387

  9. Population pharmacokinetic model of free and total ropivacaine after transversus abdominis plane nerve block in patients undergoing liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Ollier, Edouard; Heritier, Fabrice; Bonnet, Caroline; Hodin, Sophie; Beauchesne, Brigitte; Molliex, Serge; Delavenne, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to develop a pharmacokinetic model in order to characterize the free and total ropivacaine concentrations after transversus abdominis plane block in a population of patients undergoing liver resection surgery. In particular, we evaluated the impact of the size of liver resection on ropivacaine pharmacokinetics. Methods This work is based on a single-centre, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Among the 39 patients included, 19 patients were randomized to the ropivacaine group. The free and total ropivacaine concentrations were measured in nine or 10 blood samples per patient. A pharmacokinetic model was built using a nonlinear mixed-effect modelling approach. Results The free ropivacaine concentrations remained under the previously published toxic threshold. A one-compartment model, including protein binding site with a first-order absorption, best described the data. The protein binding site concentration was considered as a latent variable. Bodyweight, the number of resected liver segments and postoperative fibrinogen evolution were, respectively, included in the calculation of the volume of distribution, clearance and binding site production rate. The resection of three or more liver segments was associated with a 53% decrease in the free ropivacaine clearance. Conclusions Although large liver resections were associated with lower free ropivacaine clearance, the ropivacaine pharmacokinetic profile remained within the safe range after this type of surgery. PMID:25557141

  10. Effect of Oral Premedication on the Efficacy of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Patients with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suparna Ganguly; Dubey, Sandeep; Kala, Shubham; Misuriya, Abhinav; Kataria, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is generally accepted that achieving complete anaesthesia with an Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block (IANB) in mandibular molars with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis is more challenging than for other teeth. Therefore, administration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents (NSAIDs) 1 hour prior to anaesthetic administration has been proposed as a means to increase the efficacy of the IANB in such patients. Aim The purpose of this prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was to determine the effect of administration of oral premedication with ketorolac (KETO) and diclofenac potassium (DP) on the efficacy of IANB in patients with irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods One hundred and fifty patients with irreversible pulpitis were evaluated preoperatively for pain using Heft Parker visual analogue scale, after which they were randomly divided into three groups. The subjects received identical tablets of ketorolac, diclofenac pottasium or cellulose powder (placebo), 1 hour prior to administration of IANB with 2% lidocaine containing 1:200 000 epinephrine. Lip numbness as well as positive and negative responses to cold test were ascertained. Additionally pain score of each patient was recorded during cavity preparation and root canal instrumentation. Success was defined as the absence of pain or mild pain based on the visual analog scale readings. The data was analysed using One-Way Anova, Post-Hoc Tukey pair wise, Paired T – Test and chi-square test. Trial Registery Number is 4722/2015 for this clinical trial study. Results There were no significant differences with respect to age (p =0.098), gender (p = 0.801) and pre-VAS score (DP-KETO p=0.645, PLAC-KETO p =0.964, PLAC-DP p = 0.801) between the three groups. All patients had subjective lip anaesthesia with the IAN blocks. Patients of all the three groups reported a significant decrease in active pain after local anaesthesia (p< 0.05). The post injection VAS Score was least in group

  11. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    PubMed Central

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the “non-progressing” and “progressing” glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection. PMID:25606299

  12. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-03-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

  13. Morphometric study on mandibular foramen and incidence of accessory mandibular foramen in mandibles of south Indian population and its clinical implications in inferior alveolar nerve block

    PubMed Central

    RaviVarman, C.; Manoranjitham, R.; Veeramuthu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The mandibular foramen is a landmark for procedures like inferior alveolar nerve block, mandibular implant treatment, and mandibular osteotomies. The present study was aimed to identify the precise location of the mandibular foramen and the incidence of accessory mandibular foramen in dry adult mandibles of South Indian population. The distance of mandibular foramen from the anterior border of the ramus, posterior border of the ramus, mandibular notch, base of the mandible, third molar, and apex of retromolar trigone was measured with a vernier caliper in 204 mandibles. The mean distance of mandibular foramen from the anterior border of ramus of mandible was 17.11±2.74 mm on the right side and 17.41±3.05 mm on the left side, from posterior border was 10.47±2.11 mm on the right side and 9.68±2.03 mm on the left side, from mandibular notch was 21.74±2.74 mm on the right side and 21.92±3.33 mm on the left side, from the base of the ramus was 22.33±3.32 mm on the right side and 25.35±4.5 mm on the left side, from the third molar tooth was 22.84±3.94 mm on the right side and 23.23±4.21 mm on the left side, from the apex of retromolar trigone was 12.27±12.13 mm on the right side and 12.13±2.35 mm on the left side. Accessory mandibular foramen was present in 32.36% of mandibles. Knowledge of location mandibular foramen is useful to the maxillofacial surgeons, oncologists and radiologists. PMID:28127498

  14. Articaine and mepivacaine buccal infiltration in securing mandibular first molar pulp anesthesia following mepivacaine inferior alveolar nerve block: A randomized, double-blind crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Gazal, Giath; Alharbi, Abdullah Muteb; Al-Samadani, Khalid HidayatAllah; Kanaa, Mohammad Dib

    2015-01-01

    Aims: A crossover double-blind, randomized study was designed to explore the efficacy of 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline buccal infiltration and 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline buccal infiltration following 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for testing pulp anesthesia of mandibular first molar teeth in adult volunteers. Materials and Methods: A total of 23 healthy adult volunteers received two regimens with at least 1-week apart; one with 4% articaine buccal infiltration and 2% mepivacaine IANB (articaine regimen) and another with 2% mepivacaine buccal infiltration supplemented to 2% mepivacaine IANB (mepivacaine regimen). Pulp testing of first molar tooth was electronically measured twice at baseline, then at intervals of 2 min for the first 10 min, then every 5 min until 45 min postinjection. Anesthetic success was considered when two consecutive maximal stimulation on pulp testing readings without sensation were obtained within 10 min and continuously sustained for 45 min postinjection. Results: In total, the number of no sensations to maximum pulp testing for first molar teeth were significantly higher after articaine regimen than mepivacaine during 45 min postinjection (267 vs. 250 episodes, respectively, P < 0.001), however, both articaine and mepivacaine buccal infiltrations are equally effective in securing anesthetic success for first molar pulp anesthesia when supplemented to mepivacaine IANB injections (P > 0.05). Interestingly, volunteers in the articaine regimen provided faster onset and longer duration (means 2.78 min, 42.22 min, respectively) than mepivacaine regimen (means 4.26 min, 40.74 min, respectively) for first molar pulp anesthesia (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Supplementary mepivacaine and articaine buccal infiltrations produced similar successful first molar pulp anesthesia following mepivacaine IANB injections in volunteers. Articaine buccal infiltration produced faster onset and

  15. Dorsal wrist joint pain in tetraplegic patients during and after rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yukihiro

    2003-03-01

    In a study of 42 tetraplegic patients, physiological, neurological, electrophysiological and radiological examinations were made in 11 patients with complete tetraplegia who had wrist pain after rehabilitation. Pain relief produced by a selective, posterior interosseous nerve lidocaine block indicated distal posterior interosseous nerve syndrome. This syndrome can sometimes be treated conservatively, but surgical excision was required after nerve scarification. Repetitive dorsiflexion, as in wheelchair handling, transfer and tenodesis-like movement, compresses the distal posterior interosseous nerve in some tetraplegic patients. Moreover, weakness of the wrist joint stabilizing muscles is likely to contribute to an increased weight load on the wrist joints. The aetiology of wrist pain in tetraplegia should be considered when there is carpal tunnel syndrome, Wartenberg syndrome, Kienböck syndrome or distal posterior interosseous nerve syndrome. The causes need to be adequately treated to reduce the negative impact of the resultant pain on carrying out the activities of daily life.

  16. Mountain building at northeastern boundary of Tibetan Plateau and craton reworking at Ordos block from joint inversion of ambient noise tomography and receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhen; Chen, Yongshun John

    2017-04-01

    We have obtained a high resolution 3-D crustal and uppermost mantle velocity model of the Ordos block and its surrounding areas by joint inversion of ambient noise tomography and receiver functions using seismic recordings from 320 stations. The resulting model shows wide-spread low velocity zone (Vs ≤ 3.4 km/s) in the mid-to-lower crust beneath northeastern Tibet Plateau, which may favor crustal ductile flow within the plateau. However, our model argues against the eastward crustal ductile flow beneath the Qinling belt from the Tibetan Plateau. We find high velocities in the middle part of Qinling belt which separate the low velocities in the mid-to-lower crust of the eastern Qinling belt from the low velocity zone in eastern Tibetan Plateau. More importantly, we observe significant low velocities and thickened lower crust at the Liupanshan thrust belt as the evidence for strong crustal shortening at this boundary between the northeastern Tibetan Plateau and Ordos block. The most important finding of our model is the upper mantle low velocity anomalies surrounding the Ordos block, particularly the one beneath the Trans North China Craton (TNCO) that is penetrating into the southern margin of the Ordos block for ∼100 km horizontally in the depth range of ∼70 km and at least 100 km. We propose an on-going lithospheric mantle reworking at the southernmost boundary of the Ordos block due to complicated mantle flow surrounding the Ordos block, that is, the eastward asthenospheric flow from the Tibet Plateau proposed by recent SKS study and mantle upwelling beneath the TNCO from mantle transition zone induced by the stagnant slabs of the subducted Pacific plate.

  17. The ultrastructure of the sensory nerve endings in the articular capsule of the knee joint of the domestic cat (Ruffini corpuscles and Pacinian corpuscles).

    PubMed Central

    Halata, Z

    1977-01-01

    Two types of mechanoreceptor have been found in the articular capsule of the knee joint of the domestic cat--Ruffini corpuscles and Pacinian corpuscles. Ruffini corpuscles are situated in the stratum fibrosum and consist of 2 to 6 cylinders. Each cylinder is made up of an afferent axon (diameter 3-4 micrometer), its swellings and terminal processes, Schwann cells enveloping the nerve swellings and terminal processes, endoneural connective tissue and a perineural capsule. The perineural capsule is incomplete in Ruffini corpuscles. The Pacinian corpuscles are 20 to 40 micrometer wide and 150-250 micrometer long. They are situated in groups of up to five at the boundary between the stratum synoviale and the stratum fibrosum. The afferent axon is myelinated (diameter 3-5 micrometer). Its terminal portion is inside the inner bulb which is formed of modified Schwann cells. Each corpuscle is enveloped by a perineural capsule (4-8 layers). The ultrastructure of the Pacinian corpuscles is compared with the ultrastructure of the skin receptors in the cat. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:604339

  18. Landmark-based versus ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric nerve blocks in the treatment of chronic postherniorrhaphy groin pain: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Trainor, Drew; Moeschler, Susan; Pingree, Matthew; Hoelzer, Brian; Wang, Zhen; Mauck, William; Qu, Wenchun

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic postherniorrhaphy groin pain (CPGP) is a debilitating condition, which is often refractory to conservative medical management. To our knowledge, there have been no studies directly comparing landmarked-based and ultrasound-guided approaches in this population. Objective To compare the effectiveness of landmark-based and ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric nerve blocks in the treatment of CPGP. Study design This is a retrospective chart review of patients who presented to our tertiary care pain medicine clinic with a diagnosis of CPGP. Inclusion criteria were the following: age >18 years, diagnosis of groin pain, and prior history of herniorrhaphy. Exclusion criteria included those who were seen for initial consultation but were lost to follow-up. Primary outcomes were 50% or greater reduction in pain on visual analog scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes were 30% or greater reduction in VAS pain score, changes in VAS pain scores, and reported complications. Results A total of 36 patients were included in the study. Of them, 20 patients underwent the landmark-based and 16 underwent the ultrasound-guided techniques. There was no significant difference in baseline demographics. The average VAS score preinjection was 7.08 in the landmark-based and 7.0 in the ultrasound-guided groups (P=0.65). A total of 14 patients (70%) in the landmark-based and eleven patients (79%) in the ultrasound-guided groups experienced at least a 50% reduction in VAS scores. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P=1.0), and no complications were noted. We also did not find a significant difference in terms of number of patients with 30% or greater reduction (P=0.71) and changes in VAS pain scores (P=0.64). No complications were reported in either group. Conclusion In our study, there was no statistically significant difference between the landmark-based and ultrasound-guided groups in terms of a reduction in VAS pain scores, and no

  19. Thermal contact resistance measurement of conduction cooled binary current lead joint block in cryocooler based self field I-V characterization facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Ananya; Das, Subrat Kumar; Agarwal, Anees Bano Pooja; Pradhan, Subrata

    2016-05-01

    In the present study thermal resistance of conduction cooled current lead joint block employing two different interfacial material namely AlN sheet and Kapton Film have been studied in the temperature range 5K-35K. In each case, the performance of different interlayer materials e.g. Indium foil for moderately pressurized contacts (contact pressure <1 MPa), and Apiezon N Grease, GE varnish for low pressurized contact (contact pressure <1 MPa) is studied. The performances of AlN joint with Indium foil and with Apeizon N Grease are studied and it is observed that the contact resistance reduces more with indium foil as compared to greased contact. The contact resistance measurements of Kapton film with Apiezon N grease and with GE varnish were also carried out in the same temperature range. A comparative study of AlN joint with Indium foil and Kapton with GE varnish as filler material is carried out to demonstrate better candidate material among Kapton and AlN for a particular filler material in the same temperature range.

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Genicular Nerve Thermal Radiofrequency Ablation for Chronic Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joshua; Weyker, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is one of the most common joint diseases affecting adults in the United States. For elderly patients with multiple medical comorbidities who do not wish to undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA), lifestyle modification, pharmacologic management, and injections are the mainstay of therapy. Previously, pain management interventions were limited to intra-articular joint injections and viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid. Fluoroscopic-guided techniques for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the genicular nerves have been previously described and a recent cadaveric study suggests that ultrasound-guided genicular nerve blocks can be performed accurately. We performed an ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of the genicular nerves in 88-year-old woman who had deferred surgical management given her age. Following successful ultrasound guided diagnostic genicular nerve blocks, she proceeded to RFA using the same ultrasound guided technique. The procedure resulted in significant pain relief and improvement in overall function for greater than 6 months. The use of ultrasound provides a relatively rapid and noninvasive method to directly visualize genicular nerves and surrounding vasculature. Our case suggests that, for genicular nerve blockade and RFA, ultrasound may be a useful alternative to fluoroscopy. Not only did the procedure result in significant pain relief that has persisted for greater than 6 months but also more importantly her function status and quality of life were improved. PMID:27822391

  1. Management of lumbar zygapophysial (facet) joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Falco, Frank JE; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    . RESULTS: Across all databases, 16 high quality diagnostic accuracy studies were identified. In addition, multiple studies assessed the influence of multiple factors on diagnostic validity. In contrast to diagnostic validity studies, therapeutic efficacy trials were limited to a total of 14 randomized controlled trials, assessing the efficacy of intraarticular injections, facet or zygapophysial joint nerve blocks, and radiofrequency neurotomy of the innervation of the facet joints. The evidence for the diagnostic validity of lumbar facet joint nerve blocks with at least 75% pain relief with ability to perform previously painful movements was level I, based on a range of level I to V derived from a best evidence synthesis. For therapeutic interventions, the evidence was variable from level II to III, with level II evidence for lumbar facet joint nerve blocks and radiofrequency neurotomy for long-term improvement (greater than 6 mo), and level III evidence for lumbosacral zygapophysial joint injections for short-term improvement only. CONCLUSION: This review provides significant evidence for the diagnostic validity of facet joint nerve blocks, and moderate evidence for therapeutic radiofrequency neurotomy and therapeutic facet joint nerve blocks in managing chronic low back pain. PMID:27190760

  2. Postoperative Analgesia Using Psoas Sheath Block Versus Three-in-One Block in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    were blocked and two cases where all nerves were blocked. Key Words: Regional Anesthesia; Lumbar Plexus Block, Postoperative Pain Management; Pre...and sciatic(Lumbar4-Sacral3). A "psoas sheath block" and a "three-in-one block" are two techniques used to block the lumbar plexus from which the...nerve blockade Operational definition. A regional anesthetic technique used to block transmission of the nerves of the lumbar plexus including the

  3. Joint compression/watermarking scheme using majority-parity guidance and halftoning-based block truncation coding.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing-Ming; Liu, Yun-Fu

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, a watermarking scheme, called majority-parity-guided error-diffused block truncation coding (MPG-EDBTC), is proposed to achieve high image quality and embedding capacity. EDBTC exploits the error diffusion to effectively reduce blocking effect and false contour which inherently exhibit in traditional BTC. In addition, the coding efficiency is significantly improved by replacing high and low means evaluation with extreme values substitution. The proposed MPG-EDBTC embeds a watermark simultaneously during compression by evaluating the parity value in a predefined parity-check region (PCR). As documented in the experimental results, the proposed scheme can provide good robustness, image quality, and processing efficiency. Finally, the proposed MPG-EDBTC is extended to embed multiple watermarks and achieves excellent image quality, robustness, and capacity. Nowadays, most multimedia is compressed before it is stored. It is more appropriate to embed information such as watermarks during compression. The proposed method has been proved to solve effectively the inherent problems in traditional BTC, and provide excellent performance in watermark embedding.

  4. Comparison of the Effect of Lidocaine versus a Lidocaine-Bupivacaine Combination in a Periprostatic Nerve Block Undergoing Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsy: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ali H.; Ziypak, Elif; Ziypak, Tevfik; Aksoy, Mehmet; Adanur, Senol; Kocakgol, Hüseyin; Demirdogen, Saban O.; Polat, Ozkan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To determine whether a combination of the long acting local anesthetic, bupivacaine, and lidocaine is better than lidocaine alone in the long-term pain control, which is a short-acting anesthetic. Materials and Methods In group 1, periprostatic nerve block was applied to both neurovascular areas with 2% lidocaine (5 ml) in an isotonic solution (5 ml). In group 2, the combination of 2% lidocaine (5 ml) and 5mg/ml bupivacaine (5 ml) was used for the PPNB. Results In the first 30 minutes the mean VAS scores of groups 1 and 2 were 2.1 ± 0.2 and 1.2 ± 0.1, respectively (p = 0.002). VAS scores of group II determined at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours after the biopsy were significantly lower since it was (p < 0.05). Conclusion While periprostatic nerve block for late phase pain control, applying a combination of a long-acting local anesthetic, such as bupivacaine, is effective in terms of pain control and patient comfort. PMID:27867334

  5. An Evaluation of 4% Prilocaine with 1:200,000 Epinephrine and 2% Mepivacaine with 1:20,000 Levonordefrin Compared with 2% Lidocaine with 1:100,000 Epinephrine for Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Hinkley, Stewart A.; Reader, Al; Beck, Mike; Meyers, William J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the degree of anesthesia obtained with 4% prilocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine and 2% mepivacaine with 1:20,000 levonordefrin compared with 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for inferior alveolar nerve block. Using a repeated measures design, 30 subjects randomly received an inferior alveolar injection using masked cartridges of each solution at three successive appointments. The first molar, first premolar, lateral incisor, and contralateral canine (control) were blindly tested with an Analytic Technology pulp tester at 3-min cycles for 50 min. Anesthetic success was defined as no subject response to the maximum output of the pulp tester (80 reading) within 16 min and maintenance of this reading for the remainder of the testing period. Although subjects felt numb subjectively, anesthetic success as defined here occurred in 46% to 57% of the molars, in 50% to 57% of the premolars, and in 21% to 36% of the lateral incisors. No statistically significant differences in onset, success, failure, or incidence were found among the solutions. We conclude that the three preparations are equivalent for inferior alveolar nerve block of 50-min duration. PMID:1814249

  6. Who Is at Risk for Heart Block?

    MedlinePlus

    ... degree heart block caused by an overly active vagus nerve. You have one vagus nerve on each side of your body. These nerves ... the way to your abdomen. Activity in the vagus nerve slows the heart rate. Rate This Content: NEXT >> ...

  7. Selective inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 blocks nerve growth factor to brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling and suppresses the development of and reverses already established pain behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Y; Yang, J

    2012-03-29

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in the development of pathological pain. Although it is known that nerve growth factor (NGF) induces BDNF mRNA through extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), whether ERK1/2 or ERK5, two closely related members of the ERK family, mediate this signal is still unclear because classical MEK inhibitors block both pathways. We studied the involvement of ERK-signaling in NGF induction of BDNF in PC12 cells, cultured dorsal root ganglia neurons, and in rats subjected to neuropathic pain models using ERK1/2- and ERK5-specific tools. Selective activation of ERK1/2 upregulated BDNF mRNA in PC12 cells, whereas selective ERK5 activation did not. AZD6244, a potent selective inhibitor of ERK1/2 activation, blocked NGF induction of BDNF mRNA in vitro suggesting that NGF induction of BDNF is mediated by ERK1/2. siRNA experiments indicated that both ERK1 or ERK2 can signal suggesting that both pathways must be blocked to prevent NGF-induced increase in BDNF mRNA. I.p. injection of AZD6244 prevented the development of pain in rats subjected to the chronic constriction injury and reversed already established pain in the spared nerve injury model. Immunohistochemical studies showed decreased phospho-ERK1/2-immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglia and BDNF immunoreactivity in ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn in the drug-treated rats. Our results suggest the possible use of AZD6244, already in human clinical trials as an anticancer agent, for the treatment of pathological pain.

  8. Pourfour Du Petit syndrome after interscalene block

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappji; Pai, Rohini B.; Rao, Raghavendra P.

    2013-01-01

    Interscalene block is commonly associated with reversible ipsilateral phrenic nerve block, recurrent laryngeal nerve block, and cervical sympathetic plexus block, presenting as Horner's syndrome. We report a very rare Pourfour Du Petit syndrome which has a clinical presentation opposite to that of Horner's syndrome in a 24-year-old male who was given interscalene block for open reduction and internal fixation of fracture upper third shaft of left humerus. PMID:23956726

  9. Pourfour Du Petit syndrome after interscalene block.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappji; Pai, Rohini B; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2013-04-01

    Interscalene block is commonly associated with reversible ipsilateral phrenic nerve block, recurrent laryngeal nerve block, and cervical sympathetic plexus block, presenting as Horner's syndrome. We report a very rare Pourfour Du Petit syndrome which has a clinical presentation opposite to that of Horner's syndrome in a 24-year-old male who was given interscalene block for open reduction and internal fixation of fracture upper third shaft of left humerus.

  10. The anatomical relationship between the position of the auriculotemporal nerve and mandibular condyle.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Paulo R B; de Vasconsellos, Henrique A; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Bastos, Ricardo L; Maia, Mey L T

    2003-07-01

    Head, neck, face, and ear pains are commonly associated with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Several theories have been proposed regarding the functional relationship of the TMJ and the associated structures, and how they might contribute to certain painful conditions. This study was conducted to determine the anatomic relationship of the auriculotemporal nerve to the middle meningeal artery and the mandibular condyle. Forty human cadaver temporomandibular joints were dissected to locate the precise position of the auriculotemporal nerve to the mandibular condyle. The study findings revealed a significant variation in the relationship of the auriculotemporal nerve to the middle meningeal artery. The auriculotemporal nerve was found to be between 10-13 mm inferior to the superior surface of the condyle and 1-2 mm posterior to the neck of the condyle. The nerve was not found to be in a position that would likely create an entrapment with adjacent tissues. These findings may assist the clinician to locate the most appropriate injection site for an auriculotemporal nerve block.

  11. Nickel dispersion and enrichment at the bottom of the regolith: formation of pimelite target-like ores in rock block joints (Koniambo Ni deposit, New Caledonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathelineau, Michel; Quesnel, Benoît; Gautier, Pierre; Boulvais, Philippe; Couteau, Clément; Drouillet, Maxime

    2016-02-01

    In New Caledonian Ni deposits, the richest Ni silicate ores occur in fractures within the bedrock and saprolite, generally several tens of meters to hundred meters below the present-day surface. Fracture-related Ni silicate ore accounts for high Ni grades, at least a few weight percent above the average exploited grade (2.5 %). These Ni-rich veins are affected by active dissolution-precipitation processes at the level of the water table. Ni in solution is precipitated as silicates in thin layer cementing joints. This mineralization is characterized by chemical and mineralogical concentric zoning with an outer green rim around an inner white zone composed, from the edge to the centre of the block, (i) a highly oxidized and altered zone, (ii) a green pure Ni-rich pimelite zone, (iii) a zone (limited to a few centimetres) with a mixture of Ni-poor kerolite and Ni-rich pimelite and intermediate colours and (iv) a large white Mg-kerolite mineralization zone. This study proposes that the concentric zonation results from evapo-precipitation process related to alternate periods of hydration and drying, induced by water table movements. This extensive dispersion of Ni in concentrically zoned ores can partly explain the rather monotonous Ni grade of the bulk exploitation at the base of the regolith with values between 2 and 3 wt%.

  12. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Review Date 6/1/2015 ...

  13. A comparison of two anesthesia methods for the surgical removal of maxillary third molars: PSA nerve block technique vs. local infiltration technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of PSA block injection with infiltration technique regarding local anesthesia for surgical extraction of upper third molar. Material and Methods: A prospective, intra individual, single-blind randomized controlled trial was designed to study the severity of pain during injection and after surgical extraction of the bilaterally and symmetrically similar upper third molar in a total of 53 patients, in addition to evaluating the need to repeat the injection and requirement of post operative anti-inflammatory tablets. Result: Although the average pain score for all studied times in PSA side was lower than the average pain score in infiltration technique, repeated statistical measures demonstrated that no significant pain reduction occurred in the two techniques. Conclusion: The both tested methods have the same statistic equivalence for the surgical extraction of maxillary third molars. Key words:Surgical extraction, maxillary third molars, PSA block, infiltration. PMID:24596629

  14. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society guideline on management of multifocal motor neuropathy. Report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society--first revision.

    PubMed

    2010-12-01

    A European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society consensus guideline on the definition, investigation, and treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) was published in 2006. The aim is to revise this guideline. Disease experts considered references retrieved from MEDLINE and Cochrane Systematic Reviews published between August 2004 and July 2009 and prepared statements that were agreed to in an iterative fashion. The Task Force agreed on Good Practice Points to define clinical and electrophysiological diagnostic criteria for MMN, investigations to be considered, and principal recommendations for treatment.

  15. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - common peroneal nerve; Peroneal nerve injury; Peroneal nerve palsy ... type of peripheral neuropathy (damage to nerves outside the brain ... nerve injuries. Damage to the nerve disrupts the myelin sheath ...

  16. Lidocaine versus ropivacaine for postoperative continuous paravertebral nerve blocks in patients undergoing laparoscopic bowel surgery: a randomized, controlled, double-blinded, pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Ghisi, Daniela; Fanelli, Andrea; Jouguelet-Lacoste, Julie; La Colla, Luca; Auroux, Anne-Sophie; Chelly, Jacques E

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Lidocaine could provide many advantages in continuous regional anesthesia techniques, including faster onset, greater titratability, and lower cost than long-acting local anesthetics. This prospective, randomized, double-blinded, pilot study is therefore intended to compare lidocaine to ropivacaine in bilateral continuous paravertebral blocks using a multimodal approach for postoperative pain management following laparoscopic bowel surgery. Methods Thirty-five ASA I–III consecutive patients undergoing elective laparoscopic bowel surgery and bilateral thoracic paravertebral continuous blocks were analyzed: bilateral thoracic paravertebral infusions of ropivacaine 0.2% (Group Ropi, n=18) or lidocaine 0.25% (Group Lido, n=17) were started at 7 mL/h in the postanesthesia care unit. For each patient, we collected numerical rating scores (NRS) for pain at rest and during movement at baseline, at postanesthesia care unit discharge, at 24 hours and 48 hours after the end of surgery, as well as hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia requirements, local anesthetic consumption, side effects, postoperative complications, and functional outcomes. Results No effect of group distribution on NRS scores for pain at rest or at movement (P=0.823 and P=0.146), nor on hydromorphone (P=0.635) or local anesthetic consumption (P=0.063) was demonstrated at any analyzed time point. Hospital length of stay and spontaneous ambulation were comparable between groups (P=0.636 and P=0.148). In the context of a multimodal approach, the two drugs showed comparable safety profiles. Discussion Lidocaine 0.25% and ropivacaine 0.2% provided similar analgesic profiles after elective abdominal surgeries, without any difference in terms of functional outcomes. The easier titratability of lidocaine together with its lower cost induced our clinical practice to definitely switch from ropivacaine to lidocaine for postoperative bilateral paravertebral continuous infusions. PMID

  17. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    PubMed

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia.

  18. Bone and Joint Problems Associated with Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... joint disorders. Certain factors, such as nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), arterial disease and obesity, may contribute to these ... ... osteodystrophy): Time for recognition. Osteoporosis International. 2016;27: ...

  19. Comparison of the effects of remifentanil-based general anesthesia and popliteal nerve block on postoperative pain and hemodynamic stability in diabetic patients undergoing distal foot amputation: A retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Young; Lee, Ki-Young; Bai, Sun Joon; Hong, Jung Hwa; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Jong Min; Kim, Shin Hyung

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is the most common cause of diabetes-associated nontraumatic lower extremity amputation. Most patients who undergo lower extremity amputation for a diabetic foot have had diabetes for a long time and suffer from multiorgan disorder; thus, it can be a challenge to ensure sufficient anesthetic and analgesic effects while maintaining stable hemodynamics. Recently, peripheral nerve block has gained popularity owing to its attenuating effects of systemic concerns. This retrospective observational study aimed to compare the effects of remifentanil-based general anesthesia (GEA) and popliteal nerve block (PNB) on postoperative pain and hemodynamic stability in diabetic patients undergoing distal foot amputation.A total of 59 consecutive patients with a diabetic foot who underwent distal foot amputation between January 2012 and May 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients received remifentanil-based GEA (GEA group, n = 32) or PNB (PNB group, n = 27). The primary outcomes were to evaluate postoperative analgesic effects and perioperative hemodynamics. Also, postoperative pulmonary complications and 6-month mortality were assessed as secondary outcomes.Significant differences in pain scores using numeric rating scale were observed between the groups in a linear mixed model analysis (PGroup×Time = 0.044). Even after post hoc analysis with the Bonferroni correction, the numeric rating scale scores were significantly lower in the PNB group. Furthermore, patients in the PNB group required less pethidine during the first 6 hours after surgery (27 ± 28 vs 9 ± 18 mg; P = 0.013). The GEA group had a lower mean blood pressure (Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.01), despite receiving more ephedrine (P < 0.001). Significantly more patients in the GEA group suffered from postoperative pneumonia and required the management in intensive care unit (P = 0.030 and 0.038, respectively). However, the groups did not differ in terms of

  20. A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Study of the Anesthetic Efficacy of Sodium Bicarbonate Buffered 2% Lidocaine With 1 : 100,000 Epinephrine in Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, Michael; Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a double-blind manner, inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) blocks using a buffered 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine/sodium bicarbonate formulation and an unbuffered 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine formulation at 2 separate appointments spaced at least 1 week apart. An electric pulp tester was used in 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes to test for anesthesia of the first and second molars, premolars, and lateral and central incisors. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive 80 readings were obtained within 15 minutes, and the 80 reading was continuously sustained for 60 minutes. For the buffered 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine/sodium bicarbonate formulation, successful pulpal anesthesia ranged from 10–71%. For the unbuffered 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine formulation, successful pulpal anesthesia ranged from 10–72%. No significant differences between the 2 anesthetic formulations were noted. The buffered lidocaine formulation did not statistically result in faster onset of pulpal anesthesia or less pain during injection than did the unbuffered lidocaine formulation. We concluded that buffering a 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine with sodium bicarbonate, as was formulated in the current study, did not statistically increase anesthetic success, provide faster onset, or result in less pain of injection when compared with unbuffered 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine for an IAN block. PMID:20553136

  1. Compliant joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Wayne D. (Inventor); Kerley, James J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A compliant joint is provided for prosthetic and robotic devices which permits rotation in three different planes. The joint provides for the controlled use of cable under motion. Perpendicular outer mounting frames are joined by swaged cables that interlock at a center block. Ball bearings allow for the free rotation of the second mounting frame relative to the first mounting frame within a predetermined angular rotation that is controlled by two stop devices. The cables allow for compliance at the stops and the cables allow for compliance in six degrees of freedom enabling the duplication or simulation of the rotational movement and flexibility of a natural hip or knee joint, as well as the simulation of a joint designed for a specific robotic component for predetermined design parameters.

  2. Determinations of PCB within a project to develop cleanup methods for PCB-containing elastic sealant used in outdoor joints between concrete blocks in buildings.

    PubMed

    Sundahl, M; Sikander, E; Ek-Olausson, B; Hjorthage, A; Rosell, L; Tornevall, M

    1999-08-01

    Determinations of PCB were carried out as part of a project aimed at developing cleanup methods for PCB-containing elastic sealant used in outdoor joints between concrete blocks. The goals of the project were to develop methods, which minimise the spread of PCB to the outdoor environment and to indoor air, and which keep the PCB levels as low as reasonably possible in the workplace environment whilst removing the elastic sealant. The following PCB determinations were carried out: (1) concentration in the elastic sealant; (2) concentration in the concrete close to the sealant; (3) concentration in soil; (4) concentration in the indoor air; and (5) concentration in the air in the workplace environment. The cleanup process consisted of a number of different steps: (1) cutting the elastic sealant with an oscillating knife; (2) grinding the concrete with a mechanical machine; (3) sawing the concrete with a mechanical saw and (4) cutting the concrete with a mechanical chisel. In all these different steps a high capacity vacuum cleaner connected to the machines was used. The elastic sealant contained 4.7 to 8.1% total PCB of a technical product with a composition most similar to Clophene A40. The concrete close to the sealant (first 2 mm) contained 0.12 and 1.7% total PCB at two different places. The pattern of the PCB in the concrete resembled that of the sealant. PCB concentrations in the soil from the ground close to the building were 0.1 and 0.3 ppm at two different places before the remedial action. The source of the PCB in the soil is most likely the sealant as the PCB pattern is similar for the two materials. The PCB levels in the workplace air at the beginning of the project, when the techniques were not fully developed, were generally above the occupational exposure limit of 10 micrograms m-3 (up to 120 micrograms m-3). Later when the techniques were optimised to better take care of dust and gases produced during the cutting and grinding etc., the levels were

  3. Transitional lumbosacral segment with unilateral transverse process anomaly (Castellvi type 2A) resulting in extraforaminal impingement of the spinal nerve: a pathoanatomical study of four specimens and report of two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jochen; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo

    2010-04-01

    The spinal nerve can be pinched between the transverse process of the fifth lumbar vertebra and the sacral ala. The patients are divided into two types: elderly persons with degenerative scoliosis and somewhat younger adults with isthmic spondylolisthesis. For the first time, we describe extraforaminal impingement of the spinal nerve in transitional lumbosacral segment with unilateral transverse process anomaly. Selective nerve root blocks were performed in two clinical cases. One patient underwent nerve root decompression via a posterior approach. One year after operation, this patient reported no radicular or lumbar pain. The pathoanatomical study demonstrated pseudoarthrosis between the transverse process and the ala of the sacrum and showed dysplastic facet joints at the level below the transitional vertebra in all specimens. Furthermore, we present the oldest illustration of this pathological condition, published in a book by Carl Wenzel in 1824. Extraforaminal entrapment of the spinal nerve in transitional lumbosacral segment with unilateral transverse process anomaly can cause radiculopathy, and osteophytes are the cause of the entrapment. Dysplastic facet joints on the level below the transitional vertebra could be one reason for "micromotion" resulting in pseudoarthrosis with osteophytes. Sciatica relief was obtained by means of selective nerve root blocks or posterior decompression via a dorsomedial approach.

  4. [The sacroiliac joint dysfunction: clinical manifestations, diagnostics and manual therapy].

    PubMed

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2005-01-01

    Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is one of the proved causes of sacroiliac joint syndrome. We are talking about the restricted mobility of sacrum opposite to ilium the type of "reversible blockage of movement". Main characteristics of dysfunction are as follows: restricted "joint play", referred pain, normal radiological finding, normal lab results and disappearance of clinical symptoms after deblocking of articular bodies. Pain from a blocked joint can be referred to lower back, buttocks, hip, groin, thigh, calf and lower part of abdomen. Dispersion of painful regions is a consequence of a complex and variable innervation of articular capsule. Blocked position of articular bodies and protracted tension of articular capsule causes a stimulus of nociceptors by which a capsule is protected. Nociceptive activity is manifested with referred pains in innervational region of stimulated sensitive nerves. In the article, besides the clinical manifestations, there is described a diagnostics and manual therapy of dysfunction. Springing tests by means of which a passive mobility ("joint play") is being tested, are most valuable in dysfunction diagnostics. Manual therapy (mobilization/manipulation) is indicated and efficacious with the patients suffering from dysfunction.

  5. Peripheral nerve catheters and local anesthetic infiltration in perioperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Christopher K; Mariano, Edward R; Kaye, Alan David; Lissauer, Jonathan; Mancuso, Kenneth; Prabhakar, Amit; Urman, Richard D

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters (PNCs) and local infiltration analgesia (LIA) represent valuable options for controlling perioperative pain. PNCs have been increasingly utilized to provide both surgical anesthesia and prolonged postoperative analgesia for a wide variety of procedures. PNCs can be more technically challenging to place than typical single-injection nerve blocks (SINB), and familiarity with the indications, contraindications, relevant anatomy, and appropriate technical skills is a prerequisite for the placement of any PNC. PNCs include risks of peripheral nerve injury, damage to adjacent anatomic structures, local anesthetic toxicity, intravascular injection, risks associated with motor block, risks of unnoticed injury to the insensate limb, and risks of sedation associated with PNC placement. In addition to these common risks, there are specific risks unique to each PNC insertion site. LIA strategies have emerged that seek to provide the benefit of targeted local anesthesia while minimizing collateral motor block and increasing the applicability of durable local anesthesia beyond the extremities. LIA involves the injection and/or infusion of a local anesthetic near the site of surgical incision to provide targeted analgesia. A wide variety of techniques have been described, including single-injection intraoperative wound infiltration, indwelling wound infusion catheters, and the recent high-volume LIA technique associated with joint replacement surgery. The efficacy of these techniques varies depending on specific procedures and anatomic locations. The recent incorporation of ultra-long-acting liposomal bupivacaine preparations has the potential to dramatically increase the utility of single-injection LIA. LIA represents a promising yet under-investigated method of postoperative pain control.

  6. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nerve Decompression Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Optic Nerve Decompression John Lee, MD Introduction Optic nerve decompression is a surgical procedure aimed at ...

  7. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... compressed in the elbow, a problem called cubital tunnel syndrome may result. When damage destroys the nerve ...

  8. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  9. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  10. [Ultrasound for peripheral neural block].

    PubMed

    Kefalianakis, F

    2005-03-01

    Ultrasound is well established in medicine. Unfortunately, ultrasound is still rarely used in the area of anesthesia. The purpose of the article is to illustrate the possibilities and limitations of ultrasound in regional anesthesia. The basic principles of ultrasound are the piezoelectric effect and the behaviour of acoustic waveforms in human tissue. Ultrasound imaging in medicine uses high frequency pulses of sound waves (2.5-10 MHz). The following images are built up from the reflected sounds. The ultrasound devices used in regional anesthesia (commonly by 10 MHz) deliver a two-dimensional view. The main step for a successful regional anaesthesia is to identify the exact position of the nerve. In addition, specific surface landmarks and the use of peripheral nerve stimulator help to detect the correct position of the needle. Nerves are demonstrated as an composition of hyperechogenic (white) and hypoechogenic (black) areas. The surrounding hyperechogenic parts are epi- and perineurium, the dark hypoechogenic part is the neural tissue. The composition of peripheral nerves are always similar, but the quantities of each part, of surrounding perineurium and nerval structures, differ. Further the imaging of nerves is significantly influenced by the angle of beam to the nerve and the surrounding anatomic structures. Only experience and correct interpretation make the ultrasound a valid method in clinical practice. Correct interpretation has to be learned by standardized education. Three examples of peripheral nerve blocks are described. The detection of nerves and the visualization of the correct spread of local anesthetics to the nerves are the main principles of effective ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, whereas closest proximity of the needle to the target nerve is not necessary. The described examples of ultrasound guidance for nerval block illustrates the specific procedures with reduced probability of nerval irritation, high success and low rate of

  11. Neuro-muscular junction block stimulator simulator.

    PubMed

    Sprick, Cyle

    2006-03-01

    Improved technology and higher fidelity are making medical simulations increasingly popular. A simulated peripheral nerve stimulator and thumb actuator has been developed for use with the SimMan Universal Patient Simulator. This device incorporates a handheld control box, a McKibben pneumatic muscle and articulated thumb, and a remote software interface for the simulation facilitator. The system simulates the action of a peripheral nerve stimulator on the ulnar nerve, and the effects of neuromuscular junction blocking agents on the thumb motion.

  12. SKLB023 Blocks Joint Inflammation and Cartilage Destruction in Arthritis Models via Suppression of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activation in Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Li, Xiuxia; Pei, Heying; Xiang, Mingli; Chen, Lijuan

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common arthritis and is mainly characterized by symmetric polyarticular joint disorders. Our previous study demonstrated a novel small molecule compound (Z)-N-(3-Chlorophenyl)-2-(4-((2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene) methyl) phenoxy) acet-amide (SKLB023) showed potently anti-arthritic effects in a rat arthritis model, however, the underlying mechanisms for this are largely unknown. Both NF-κB and macrophages were reported to play important roles in the pathologic processes of RA. The purposes of this study were to indicate whether NF-κB and macrophages contributed to anti-arthritic effects of SKLB023 in two experimental arthritis models. Our results showed that SKLB023 could significantly improve joint inflammation and cartilage destruction both in adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) models. We further found that the binding activation of NF-κB to DNA in joint tissues and RAW264.7 macrophages were suppressed by SKLB023. SKLB023 also inhibited the NF-κB activity in peritoneal macrophages by luciferase assay. Furthermore, the number of macrophages in synovial tissues was decreased after the treatment of different doses of SKLB023. The levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in plasma, and the levels of TNF-α, NO, and IL-1β in peritoneal macrophages were down-regulated by SKLB023. Finally, SKLB023 attenuated the expression of iNOS and COX-2 in vivo and suppressed the phosphorylations of components of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). These observations identify a novel function for SKLB023 as an inhibitor of NF-κB in macrophages of RA, highlighting that SKLB023 was a potential therapeutic strategy for RA. PMID:23431370

  13. Optic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lynn K

    2016-10-28

    Optic nerve diseases arise from many different etiologies including inflammatory, neoplastic, genetic, infectious, ischemic, and idiopathic. Understanding some of the characteristics of the most common optic neuropathies along with therapeutic approaches to these diseases is helpful in designing recommendations for individual patients. Although many optic neuropathies have no specific treatment, some do, and it is those potentially treatable or preventable conditions which need to be recognized in order to help patients regain their sight or develop a better understanding of their own prognosis. In this chapter several diseases are discussed including idiopathic intracranial hypertension, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathies, hereditary optic neuropathies, trauma, and primary tumors of the optic nerve. For each condition there is a presentation of the signs and symptoms of the disease, in some conditions the evaluation and diagnostic criteria are highlighted, and where possible, current therapy or past trials are discussed.

  14. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  15. Lumbosacral nerve root avulsion.

    PubMed

    Chin, C H; Chew, K C

    1997-01-01

    Lumbosacral nerve root avulsion is a rare clinical entity. Since the first description in 1955, only 35 cases have been reported. It is often associated with pelvic fractures and may be missed in the initial clinical examination as these patients usually present with multiple injuries. We present three such cases with clinical and radiological findings. These patients were involved in road traffic accidents. Two had fractures of the sacroiliac joint with diastasis of the symphysis pubis (Tile type C 1.2) and one had fractures of the public rami (Tile type B 2.1). All three had various degrees of sensory and motor deficit of the lower limbs. Lumbar myelogram shows characteristic pseudomeningoceles in the affected lumboscral region. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides an additional non-invasive modality to diagnose this condition.

  16. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... polyneuropathy Tibial nerve dysfunction Ulnar nerve dysfunction Any peripheral neuropathy can cause abnormal results. Damage to the spinal ... Herniated disk Lambert-Eaton syndrome Mononeuropathy Multiple ... azotemia Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sciatica ...

  17. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... not used to treat first-degree heart block. All types of heart block may increase your risk for other arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation (A-tre-al fih-brih-LA-shun). Talk with your doctor ...

  18. An anatomical evaluation of the serratus anterior plane block.

    PubMed

    Mayes, J; Davison, E; Panahi, P; Patten, D; Eljelani, F; Womack, J; Varma, M

    2016-09-01

    The serratus anterior plane block has been described for analgesia of the hemithorax. This study was conducted to determine the spread of injectate and investigate the anatomical basis of the block. Ultrasound-guided serratus anterior plane block was performed on six soft-fix embalmed cadavers. All cadavers received bilateral injections, on one side performed with 20 ml latex and on the other with 20 ml methylene blue. Subsequent dissection explored the extent of spread and nerve involvement. Photographs were taken throughout dissection. The intercostal nerves were involved on three occasions with dye, but not with latex. The lateral cutaneous branches of the intercostal nerve contained dye and latex on all occasions. The serratus plane block appears to be mediated through blockade of the lateral cutaneous branches of the intercostal nerves. Anatomically, serratus plane block does not appear to be equivalent to paravertebral block for rib fracture analgesia.

  19. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  20. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  1. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  2. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  3. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  4. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  5. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  6. Ultrasound-guided truncal blocks: A new frontier in regional anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Khemka, Rakhi; Datta, Taniya

    2016-01-01

    The practice of regional anaesthesia is rapidly changing with the introduction of ultrasound into the working domain of the anaesthesiologist. New techniques are being pioneered. Among the recent techniques, notable are the truncal blocks, for example, the transversus abdominis plane block, rectus sheath block, hernia block and quadratus lumborum block in the abdomen and the pectoral nerves (Pecs) block 1 and 2, serratus anterior plane block and intercostal nerve block. This narrative review covers the brief anatomical discourse along with technical description of the ultrasound-guided truncal blocks. PMID:27761032

  7. Acute traumatic anterior glenohumeral dislocation complicated by axillary nerve damage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Mohsen

    1998-01-01

    An elite soccer player presented with a classic acute anterior dislocation of the glenohumeral joint complicated by axillary nerve damage. The incidence, mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, conservative treatment and rehabilitation of the anterior glenohumeral joint dislocation and associated axillary nerve damage are discussed in this paper. ImagesFigure 3

  8. Auditory Evoked Potentials from the Frog Eighth Nerve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    ACCESSION NO. Brooks AFB, TX 78235-5301 62202F 7757 01 85 11. TITLE (I nclude Security Classification) (U) Auditory Evoked Potentials from the Frog Eighth...identify by block number) S FIELD jGROUP SUB-GROUP F6 07 Auditory Evoked Potential Eighth Nerve Frog 06 10 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary...and identify by block number) A method for recording evoked potentials from the eighth nerve of frogs using midline and lateral electrodes is described

  9. MELANOPHORE BANDS AND AREAS DUE TO NERVE CUTTING, IN RELATION TO THE PROTRACTED ACTIVITY OF NERVES

    PubMed Central

    Parker, G. H.

    1941-01-01

    1. When appropriate chromatic nerves are cut caudal bands, cephalic areas, and the pelvic fins of the catfish Ameiurus darken. In pale fishes all these areas will sooner or later blanch. By recutting their nerves all such blanched areas will darken again. 2. These observations show that the darkening of caudal bands, areas, and fins on cutting their nerves is not due to paralysis (Brücke), to the obstruction of central influences such as inhibition (Zoond and Eyre), nor to vasomotor disturbances (Hogben), but to activities emanating from the cut itself. 3. The chief agents concerned with the color changes in Ameiurus are three: intermedin from the pituitary gland, acetylcholine from the dispersing nerves (cholinergic fibers), and adrenalin from the concentrating nerves (adrenergic fibers). The first two darken the fish; the third blanches it. In darkening the dispersing nerves appear to initiate the process and to be followed and substantially supplemented by intermedin. 4. Caudal bands blanch by lateral invasion, cephalic areas by lateral invasion and internal disintegration, and pelvic fins by a uniform process of general loss of tint equivalent to internal disintegration. 5. Adrenalin may be carried in such an oil as olive oil and may therefore act as a lipohumor; it is soluble in water and hence may act as a hydrohumor. In lateral invasion (caudal bands, cephalic areas) it probably acts as a lipohumor and in internal disintegration (cephalic areas, pelvic fins) it probably plays the part of a hydrohumor. 6. The duration of the activity of dispersing nerves after they had been cut was tested by means of the oscillograph, by anesthetizing blocks, and by cold-blocks. The nerves of Ameiurus proved to be unsatisfactory for oscillograph tests. An anesthetizing block, magnesium sulfate, is only partly satisfactory. A cold-block, 0°C., is successful to a limited degree. 7. By means of a cold-block it can be shown that dispersing autonomic nerve fibers in Ameiurus can

  10. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  11. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  12. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  13. Study on Variant Anatomy of Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    V, Sangeetha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Sciatic Nerve (SN) is the nerve of the posterior compartment of thigh formed in the pelvis from the ventral rami of the L4 to S3 spinal nerves. It leaves the pelvis via the greater sciatic foramen below piriformis and divides into Common Peroneal Nerve (CPN) and Tibial Nerve (TN) at the level of the upper angle of the popliteal fossa. Higher division of the sciatic nerve is the most common variation where the TN and CPN may leave the pelvis through different routes. Such variation may lead to compression of the nerve and lead to Non-discogenic sciatica. Materials and Methods: Fifty lower limbs were used for the study from Department of Anatomy, J.J.M.M.C Davangere, Karnataka, India. Observation and Results: In our study on 25 cadavers (50 lower limbs), we have observed 4 (8 %) lower limbs high division of sciatic nerve was noted. High division of sciatic nerve in the back of thigh was noted in one specimen (2%), while high division within the pelvis was noted in 3 specimens (6%), while in 46 (92%) it occurred outside the pelvis. Conclusion: Knowledge regarding such variation and differences in the course of SN is important for the surgeons to plan for various surgical interventions pertaining to the gluteal region. The variant anatomy of SN may cause piriformis syndrome and failure of SN block. Hence present study is undertaken to know the level of division, exit, course, relationship to piriformis and variations in the branching pattern of SN. PMID:25302181

  14. Sonographic tracking of trunk nerves: essential for ultrasound-guided pain management and research

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Lin, Chih-Peng; Lin, Chia-Shiang; Wu, Wei-Ting; Karmakar, Manoj K; Özçakar, Levent

    2017-01-01

    Delineation of architecture of peripheral nerves can be successfully achieved by high-resolution ultrasound (US), which is essential for US-guided pain management. There are numerous musculoskeletal pain syndromes involving the trunk nerves necessitating US for evaluation and guided interventions. The most common peripheral nerve disorders at the trunk region include thoracic outlet syndrome (brachial plexus), scapular winging (long thoracic nerve), interscapular pain (dorsal scapular nerve), and lumbar facet joint syndrome (medial branches of spinal nerves). Until now, there is no single article systematically summarizing the anatomy, sonographic pictures, and video demonstration of scanning techniques regarding trunk nerves. In this review, the authors have incorporated serial figures of transducer placement, US images, and videos for scanning the nerves in the trunk region and hope this paper helps physicians familiarize themselves with nerve sonoanatomy and further apply this technique for US-guided pain medicine and research. PMID:28115867

  15. Optic Nerve Pit

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  16. [Plastic bolting device for the temporomandibular joint for treatment of hypermobility (Re-examination results of the first 28 cases)].

    PubMed

    Schmoker, R; Spiessl, B; Trzeciak, W

    1979-03-01

    Hypermobility of the mandibular condyle may only slightly be influenced by conservative treatment. On the other hand, all surgical methods, except the one described here include a risk factor concerning nerve or blood vessel damage. The present method limits, by plastic surgery, the joint mobility. 28 such operations were checked for results. The cases with recidivating luxation with trismus and blocking of the mandible reacted very favourably. The cases with habitual subluxation without trismus, and the cases with myofacial pain syndrome were not as favorable, objectively seen. Subjectively, however, the patients feel the operation is a success. Further investigation by control checking on late results is indicated.

  17. 30 CFR 36.24 - Engine joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine joints. 36.24 Section 36.24 Mineral... Construction and Design Requirements § 36.24 Engine joints. (a) Cylinder head. The joint between the cylinder head and block of the engine shall be fitted with a metal or metal-clad gasket satisfactory to...

  18. 30 CFR 36.24 - Engine joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine joints. 36.24 Section 36.24 Mineral... Construction and Design Requirements § 36.24 Engine joints. (a) Cylinder head. The joint between the cylinder head and block of the engine shall be fitted with a metal or metal-clad gasket satisfactory to...

  19. 24 CFR 570.308 - Joint requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Joint requests. 570.308 Section 570... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS Entitlement Grants § 570.308 Joint requests. (a) Joint requests and cooperation agreements. (1) Any urban county and any metropolitan...

  20. 24 CFR 570.308 - Joint requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Joint requests. 570.308 Section 570... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS Entitlement Grants § 570.308 Joint requests. (a) Joint requests and cooperation agreements. (1) Any urban county and any metropolitan...

  1. 24 CFR 570.308 - Joint requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Joint requests. 570.308 Section 570... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS Entitlement Grants § 570.308 Joint requests. (a) Joint requests and cooperation agreements. (1) Any urban county and any metropolitan...

  2. 24 CFR 570.308 - Joint requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Joint requests. 570.308 Section 570... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS Entitlement Grants § 570.308 Joint requests. (a) Joint requests and cooperation agreements. (1) Any urban county and any metropolitan...

  3. 24 CFR 570.308 - Joint requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint requests. 570.308 Section 570... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS Entitlement Grants § 570.308 Joint requests. (a) Joint requests and cooperation agreements. (1) Any urban county and any metropolitan...

  4. Neuromuscular block

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, W C

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions of the South American arrow poisons known as curares were reported by explorers in the 16th century, and their site of action in producing neuromuscular block was determined by Claude Bernard in the mid-19th century. Tubocurarine, the most important curare alkaloid, played a large part in experiments to determine the role of acetylcholine in neuromuscular transmission, but it was not until after 1943 that neuromuscular blocking drugs became established as muscle relaxants for use during surgical anaesthesia. Tubocurarine causes a number of unwanted effects, and there have been many attempts to replace it. The available drugs fall into two main categories: the depolarising blocking drugs and the nondepolarising blocking drugs. The former act by complex mixed actions and are now obsolete with the exception of suxamethonium, the rapid onset and brief duration of action of which remain useful for intubation at the start of surgical anaesthesia. The nondepolarising blocking drugs are reversible acetylcholine receptor antagonists. The main ones are the atracurium group, which possess a built-in self-destruct mechanism that makes them especially useful in kidney or liver failure, and the vecuronium group, which are especially free from unwanted side effects. Of this latter group, the compound rocuronium is of especial interest because its rapid onset of action allows it to be used for intubation, and there is promise that its duration of action may be rapidly terminated by a novel antagonist, a particular cyclodextrin, that chelates the drug, thereby removing it from the acetylcholine receptors. PMID:16402115

  5. Neuromuscular block.

    PubMed

    Bowman, W C

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions of the South American arrow poisons known as curares were reported by explorers in the 16th century, and their site of action in producing neuromuscular block was determined by Claude Bernard in the mid-19th century. Tubocurarine, the most important curare alkaloid, played a large part in experiments to determine the role of acetylcholine in neuromuscular transmission, but it was not until after 1943 that neuromuscular blocking drugs became established as muscle relaxants for use during surgical anaesthesia. Tubocurarine causes a number of unwanted effects, and there have been many attempts to replace it. The available drugs fall into two main categories: the depolarising blocking drugs and the nondepolarising blocking drugs. The former act by complex mixed actions and are now obsolete with the exception of suxamethonium, the rapid onset and brief duration of action of which remain useful for intubation at the start of surgical anaesthesia. The nondepolarising blocking drugs are reversible acetylcholine receptor antagonists. The main ones are the atracurium group, which possess a built-in self-destruct mechanism that makes them specially useful in kidney or liver failure, and the vecuronium group, which are specially free from unwanted side effects. Of this latter group, the compound rocuronium is of special interest because its rapid onset of action allows it to be used for intubation, and there is promise that its duration of action may be rapidly terminated by a novel antagonist, a particular cyclodextrin, that chelates the drug, thereby removing it from the acetylcholine receptors.

  6. Chord Panel Post, Vertical X Bracing & Horizontal Tie Joint ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord Panel Post, Vertical X Bracing & Horizontal Tie Joint Detail; Chord Joining Block & Spacer Block Detail; Cross Bracing Joint Detail; Chord Panel Post Diagonal & Horizontal Tie Joint Detail - Jackson Covered Bridge, Spanning Sugar Creek, CR 775N (Changed from Spanning Sugar Creek), Bloomingdale, Parke County, IN

  7. 31 CFR 500.556 - Joint bank accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Joint bank accounts. 500.556 Section..., Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 500.556 Joint bank accounts. Specific licenses are issued unblocking a portion of or all of a blocked joint bank account where a non-blocked applicant...

  8. Selective activation of the human tibial and common peroneal nerves with a flat interface nerve electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefer, M. A.; Freeberg, M.; Pinault, G. J. C.; Anderson, J.; Hoyen, H.; Tyler, D. J.; Triolo, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation has been shown effective in restoring basic lower extremity motor function in individuals with paralysis. We tested the hypothesis that a flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) placed around the human tibial or common peroneal nerve above the knee can selectively activate each of the most important muscles these nerves innervate for use in a neuroprosthesis to control ankle motion. Approach. During intraoperative trials involving three subjects, an eight-contact FINE was placed around the tibial and/or common peroneal nerve, proximal to the popliteal fossa. The FINE's ability to selectively recruit muscles innervated by these nerves was assessed. Data were used to estimate the potential to restore active plantarflexion or dorsiflexion while balancing inversion and eversion using a biomechanical simulation. Main results. With minimal spillover to non-targets, at least three of the four targets in the tibial nerve, including two of the three muscles constituting the triceps surae, were independently and selectively recruited in all subjects. As acceptable levels of spillover increased, recruitment of the target muscles increased. Selective activation of muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve was more challenging. Significance. Estimated joint moments suggest that plantarflexion sufficient for propulsion during stance phase of gait and dorsiflexion sufficient to prevent foot drop during swing can be achieved, accompanied by a small but tolerable inversion or eversion moment.

  9. Structure-Activity Relationship of Nerve-Highlighting Fluorophores

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Summer L.; Xie, Yang; Goodwill, Haley L.; Nasr, Khaled A.; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Madigan, Victoria J.; Siclovan, Tiberiu M.; Zavodszky, Maria; Tan Hehir, Cristina A.; Frangioni, John V.

    2013-01-01

    Nerve damage is a major morbidity associated with numerous surgical interventions. Yet, nerve visualization continues to challenge even the most experienced surgeons. A nerve-specific fluorescent contrast agent, especially one with near-infrared (NIR) absorption and emission, would be of immediate benefit to patients and surgeons. Currently, there are only three classes of small molecule organic fluorophores that penetrate the blood nerve barrier and bind to nerve tissue when administered systemically. Of these three classes, the distyrylbenzenes (DSBs) are particularly attractive for further study. Although not presently in the NIR range, DSB fluorophores highlight all nerve tissue in mice, rats, and pigs after intravenous administration. The purpose of the current study was to define the pharmacophore responsible for nerve-specific uptake and retention, which would enable future molecules to be optimized for NIR optical properties. Structural analogs of the DSB class of small molecules were synthesized using combinatorial solid phase synthesis and commercially available building blocks, which yielded more than 200 unique DSB fluorophores. The nerve-specific properties of all DSB analogs were quantified using an ex vivo nerve-specific fluorescence assay on pig and human sciatic nerve. Results were used to perform quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling and to define the nerve-specific pharmacophore. All DSB analogs with positive ex vivo fluorescence were tested for in vivo nerve specificity in mice to assess the effect of biodistribution and clearance on nerve fluorescence signal. Two new DSB fluorophores with the highest nerve to muscle ratio were tested in pigs to confirm scalability. PMID:24039960

  10. Optic Nerve Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Aijaz; Janecka, Ivo P.; Kapadia, Silloo; Johnson, Bruce L.; McVay, William

    1996-01-01

    The length of the optic nerves is a reflection of normal postnatal cranio-orbital development. Unilateral elongation of an optic nerve has been observed in two patients with orbital and skull base neoplasms. In the first case as compared to the patient's opposite, normal optic nerve, an elongated length of the involved optic nerve of 45 mm was present. The involved optic nerve in the second patient was 10 mm longer than the normal opposite optic nerve. The visual and extraocular function was preserved in the second patient. The first patient had only light perception in the affected eye. In this paper, the embryology, anatomy, and physiology of the optic nerve and its mechanisms of stretch and repair are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 13 PMID:17170975

  11. Assessment of nerve morphology in nerve activation during electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-10-01

    The distance between nerve and stimulation electrode is fundamental for nerve activation in Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation (TES). However, it is not clear the need to have an approximate representation of the morphology of peripheral nerves in simulation models and its influence in the nerve activation. In this work, depth and curvature of a nerve are investigated around the middle thigh. As preliminary result, the curvature of the nerve helps to reduce the simulation amplitude necessary for nerve activation from far field stimulation.

  12. Sympathetic nerves bridge the cross-transmission in hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuesheng; Hong, Wenyao; Tang, Yinda; Wu, Zhenghai; Shang, Ming; Zhang, Wenchuan; Zhong, Jun; Li, Shiting

    2012-05-23

    The pathophysiologic basis of hemifacial spasm is abnormal cross-transmission between facial nerve fibers. The author hypothesized that the demyelinated facial nerve fibers were connected with the sympathetic nerve fibers on the offending artery wall, and thus the latter function as a bridge in the cross-transmission circuit. This hypothesis was tested using a rat model of hemifacial spasm. A facial muscle response was recorded while the offending artery wall was electrically stimulated. The nerve fibers on the offending artery wall were blocked with lidocaine, or the superior cervical ganglion, which innervates the offending artery, was resected, and meanwhile the abnormal muscle response was monitored and analyzed. A waveform was recorded from the facial muscle when the offending artery wall was stimulated, named as "Z-L response". The latency of Z-L response was different from that of abnormal muscle response. When the nerve fibers on the offending artery wall were blocked by lidocaine, the abnormal muscle response disappeared gradually and recovered in 2h. The abnormal muscle response disappeared permanently after the sympathetic ganglion was resected. Our findings indicate that cross-transmission between the facial nerve fibers is bridged by the nerve fibers on the offending artery wall, probably sympathetic nerve fibers.

  13. [Intraneural ganglion of the peroneal nerve. A case report].

    PubMed

    Bischoff, J; Kortmann, K-B; Engelhardt, M

    2010-09-01

    This is a report of a 70-year-old patient with spontaneous pain of the dorsum area of the left foot. A few days later there was a sudden onset of foot drop. First, an idiopathic peroneal palsy was assessed but an MRI showed a cystic tumour near the fibular head. These findings resulted in the patient attending our clinic for surgical treatment. During the operation we found an intraneural ganglion of the deep peroneal nerve and the common peroneal nerve. There was no connection with the superior tibiofibular joint. The ganglion was therefore removed. Two months after the operation the patient reported an improvement of the pain but no improvement of movement of the foot. An intraneural ganglion of the peroneal nerve derives from the superior tibiofibular joint. Given access to the articular branch, the cyst typically spreads out proximally from the deep peroneal nerve to the common peroneal nerve and to the point of the sciatic nerve. The clinical symptoms are correlated with the extent of cyst propagation. Recommended therapy would include the ligation of the aricular branch, or synovectomy, or resection of the superior tibiofibular joint and decompression of the cyst.

  14. [Case of painful muscle spasm induced by thoracic vertebral fracture: successful treatment with lumbar sympathetic ganglia block].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Fumitaka; Kawai, Motoharu; Koga, Michiaki; Ogasawara, Jun-ichi; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Kanda, Takashi

    2008-10-01

    We report a 70-year-old man, who developed painful involuntary muscle contraction of the left leg after the lumbar discectomy, which exacerbated after a vertebral fracture of Th12. This involuntary movement was accompanied with the abnormal position of left leg simulating triple flexion response, and was induced by active or passive movement of his left knee and foot joints. Several drugs including benzodiazepines and dantrolene were ineffective, although treatment with baclofen or carbamazepine was effective. These findings suggest that hyperexcitability of the anterior horn cells following the disturbance of spinal inhibitory interneurons was involved. Electophysiological studies suggested the disturbance of left lumber nerve roots. The spinal root blocks from L3 to S1 were performed, after which the painful involuntary muscle spasm was resolved. The lumbar sympathetic ganglia block was also effective; suggesting that abnormal afferent neuronal input to spinal cord was caused by the nerve root trauma which triggered the formation of secondary abnormal network in the spine. Lumbar sympathetic ganglia block should be recommended to a therapeutic option for the refractory painful muscle spasm of the leg.

  15. NERVE GROWTH FACTOR MAINTAINS POTASSIUM CONDUCTANCE AFTER NERVE INJURY IN ADULT CUTANEOUS AFFERENT DORSAL ROOT GANGLION NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    EVERILL, B.; KOCSIS, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were used to study the effects of nerve growth factor on voltage-dependent potassium conductance in normal and axotomized identified large cutaneous afferent dorsal root ganglion neurons (48–50 μm diameter) many of which probably give rise to myelinated Aβ fibers. K-currents were isolated by blocking Na- and Ca-currents with appropriate ion replacement and channel blockers. Separation of current components was achieved on the basis of response to variation in conditioning voltage. Cutaneous afferents were labeled by the retrograde marker hydroxy-stilbamide (FluoroGold) which was injected into the skin of the foot. The sciatic nerve was either ligated or crushed with fine forceps five to seven days later. Neurons were dissociated 14–17 days after injury. The cut ends of the sciatic nerves were positioned into polyethylene tubes, which were connected to mini-osmotic pumps filled with either nerve growth factor or sterile saline. Control neurons displayed a prominent sustained K-current and the transient potassium currents “A” and “D”. Nerve ligation, which blocks target reconnection resulted in near 50% reduction of total outward current; isolated sustained K-current and transient A-current were reduced by a comparable amount. Nerve crush, which allows regeneration to peripheral targets and exposure of the regenerating nerve to the distal nerve segment, resulted in a small reduction in sustained K-current but no reduction in transient A-current compared to controls. Levels of transient A-current and sustained K-current were maintained at control levels after nerve growth factor treatment. These results indicate that the large reduction in transient A-current, and in sustained K-current, observed in cutaneous afferent cell bodies after nerve ligation is prevented by application of nerve growth factor. PMID:11008179

  16. Ulnar nerve entrapment neuropathy in the forearm.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, R N; Mark, M H; Patel, M R; Wiener, L M

    1984-07-01

    A 74-year-old male attorney developed rapidly progressive weakness of the fourth and fifth digits of the right hand with impairment of his grip and ability to perform cursive writing. Lancinating pain occurred spontaneously and was triggered by pressure along the ulnar border of the forearm about 5 cm proximal to the wrist crease. Nerve conduction studies revealed a complete electrical block to stimulation at a point 5 cm proximal to the wrist crease when recording from the abductor digiti minimi. Distal to this point, responses of normal amplitude and latency were recorded. Surgical exploration disclosed two fibrovascular bands coursing from the ulnar artery to the distal belly of the flexor carpi ulnaris, entrapping and grooving the ulnar nerve. Release of these bands resulted in reversal of the electrical block, complete relief of pain, and a full neurologic recovery during the ensuing six months.

  17. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be done include: CBC or blood differential C-reactive protein Joint x-ray Sedimentation rate ... chap 256. Schaible H-G. Joint pain: basic mechanisms. In: McMahon SB, Koltzenburg M, Tracey I, Turk ...

  18. Joint Interdiction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-09

    Purpose This publication has been prepared under the direction of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. It sets forth joint doctrine to govern the...governmental and nongovernmental organizations, multinational forces, and other interorganizational partners. It provides military guidance for the...exercise of authority by combatant commanders and other joint force commanders (JFCs), and prescribes joint doctrine for operations and training. It

  19. Joint Services Electronics Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-30

    AeSTRACT ( Coat nu an rever s e f n cessry and Identify by block number) , An annual report of the JSEP (Joint Services Electronics Program) in Electro...solid state electals in the following areas: (1) Use of silicides and regrown silicon as materials for interconnects, gate electrodes, and/or active...the gate " electrode and for the interconnect between devices. Recent work in our laboratory has shown that silicides and regrown silicon are very

  20. Joint Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  1. Accessory Upper Subscapular Nerve – The Neurotisation Tool

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Vishwajit Ravindra; Mandal, Rabindra Prasad; Kusuma, Harisha

    2016-01-01

    During the routine dissection classes for undergraduate students, uncommon variation in relation to the upper subscapular nerve of posterior cord of brachial plexus was observed. Normally upper subscapular nerve takes origin from the posterior cord, but in this case report, it arises in triplet fashion, just above the circumflex scapular artery. All these accessory nerves were supplying upper part of the subscapularis muscle. As per our knowledge, this is a rare variation of brachial plexus. Many variations are encountered in the formation of brachial plexus. The normal and the abnormal origin of nerves are important considering neurotisation surgeries as well as during the infraclavicular nerve block for various axillary and upper limb surgeries. PMID:27790416

  2. Interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging with a clinical ultrasound probe for discriminating nerves and tendons: an ex vivo pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Jean Martial; Xia, Wenfeng; West, Simeon J.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-11-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is an essential component of peripheral nerve blocks. While ultrasound (US) imaging is increasingly used as a guidance modality, it often provides insufficient contrast for identifying nerves from surrounding tissues such as tendons. Electrical nerve stimulators can be used in conjunction with US imaging for discriminating nerves from surrounding tissues, but they are insufficient to reliably prevent neural punctures, so that alternative methods are highly desirable. In this study, an interventional multispectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging system was used to directly compare the signal amplitudes and spectra acquired from nerves and tendons ex vivo, for the first time. The results indicate that the system can provide significantly higher image contrast for discriminating nerves and tendons than that provided by US imaging. As such, photoacoustic imaging could be valuable as an adjunct to US for guiding peripheral nerve blocks.

  3. Interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging with a clinical ultrasound probe for discriminating nerves and tendons: an ex vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mari, Jean Martial; Xia, Wenfeng; West, Simeon J; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2015-11-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is an essential component of peripheral nerve blocks. While ultrasound (US) imaging is increasingly used as a guidance modality, it often provides insufficient contrast for identifying nerves from surrounding tissues such as tendons. Electrical nerve stimulators can be used in conjunction with US imaging for discriminating nerves from surrounding tissues, but they are insufficient to reliably prevent neural punctures, so that alternative methods are highly desirable. In this study, an interventional multispectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging system was used to directly compare the signal amplitudes and spectra acquired from nerves and tendons ex vivo, for the first time. The results indicate that the system can provide significantly higher image contrast for discriminating nerves and tendons than that provided by US imaging. As such, photoacoustic imaging could be valuable as an adjunct to US for guiding peripheral nerve blocks.

  4. Temporomandibular joint chondrosarcoma: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a malignant tumor that originates from cartilaginous cells and is characterized by cartilage formation. Only 5% to 10% of chondrosarcoma occurs in the head and neck area, and it is uncommon in the temporomandibular joint area. This report describes an unusual case with a rare, large chondrosarcoma in a 47-year-old woman who presented with painless swelling and trismus. Computed tomography showed a large mass approximately 8.5×6.0 cm in size arising adjacent to the lateral pterygoid plate and condyle. There were features suggestive of bone resorption. The tumor was resected in a single block with perilesional tissues, and a great auricular nerve graft was performed because of facial nerve sacrifice. Microscopic examination of sections stained with H&E revealed chondrocytes with irregular nuclei and heterogeneous hyper chromatic tumor cells embedded in the chondrocyte lacuna. The diagnosis was a grade I chondrosarcoma. There was no evidence of recurrence at the 8-month follow-up, and a reconstruction surgery with fibular osteocutaneous free flap was performed. We report this unusual entity and a review of the literature. PMID:27847738

  5. Focused ultrasound effects on nerve action potential in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Vincent; Strichartz, Gary; Jolesz, Ferenc; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-01-01

    Minimally invasive applications of thermal and mechanical energy to selective areas of the human anatomy have led to significant advances in treatment of and recovery from typical surgical interventions. Image-guided focused ultrasound allows energy to be deposited deep into the tissue, completely noninvasively. There has long been interest in using this focal energy delivery to block nerve conduction for pain control and local anesthesia. In this study, we have performed an in vitro study to further extend our knowledge of this potential clinical application. The sciatic nerves from the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) were subjected to focused ultrasound (at frequencies of 0.661MHz and 1.986MHz) and to heated Ringer’s solution. The nerve action potential was shown to decrease in the experiments and correlated with temperature elevation measured in the nerve. The action potential recovered either completely, partially, or not at all, depending on the parameters of the ultrasound exposure. The reduction of the baseline nerve temperature by circulating cooling fluid through the sonication chamber did not prevent the collapse of the nerve action potential; but higher power was required to induce the same endpoint as without cooling. These results indicate that a thermal mechanism of focused ultrasound can be used to block nerve conduction, either temporarily or permanently. PMID:19647923

  6. Isolated marginal facial nerve paresis after TMJ discopexy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Reychler, H; Mahy, P

    2011-01-01

    Isolated marginal facial nerve paresis after TMJ discopexy: a case report. This is the first report of a transient, isolated marginal facial nerve paresis after temporomandibular joint arthrotomy. The paresis seems to have resulted from a crush lesion by Backhaus forceps, placed transcutaneously during the operation to distract the intra-articular space.

  7. Peripheral nerve surgery.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, I G

    1985-05-01

    In treating the three main surgical problems of peripheral nerves--nerve sheath tumors, entrapment neuropathies, and acute nerve injuries--the overriding consideration is the preservation and restoration of neurologic function. Because of this, certain other principles may need to be compromised. These include achieving a gross total excision of benign tumors, employing conservative therapy as long as a disease process is not clearly progressing, and delaying repair of a nerve transection until the skin wound has healed. Only three pathophysiologic processes need be considered: neurapraxia (focal segmental dymyelination), axonotmesis (wallerian degeneration caused by a lesion that does not disrupt fascicles of nerve fibers), and neurotmesis (wallerian degeneration caused by a lesion that interrupts fascicles). With nerve sheath tumors and entrapment neuropathies, the goal is minimize the extent to which neurapraxia progresses to axonotmesis. The compressive force is relieved without carrying out internal neurolysis, a procedure that is poorly tolerated, presumably because a degree of nerve ischemia exists with any long-standing compression. When the nerve has sustained blunt trauma (through acute compression, percussion, or traction), the result can be a total loss of function and an extensive neuroma-in-continuity (scarring within the nerve). However, the neural pathophysiology may amount to nothing more than axonotmesis. Although this lesion, in time, leads to full and spontaneous recovery, it must be differentiated from the neuroma-in-continuity that contains disrupted fascicles requiring surgery. Finally, with open nerve transection, the priority is to match the fascicles of the proximal stump with those of the distal stump, a goal that is best achieved if primary neurorrhaphy is carried out.

  8. Preoperative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for localizing superficial nerve paths.

    PubMed

    Natori, Yuhei; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ayato

    2015-12-01

    During surgery, peripheral nerves are often seen to follow unpredictable paths because of previous surgeries and/or compression caused by a tumor. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a serious complication that must be avoided, and preoperative evaluation of nerve paths is important for preventing it. In this study, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was used for an in-depth analysis of peripheral nerve paths. This study included 27 patients who underwent the TENS procedure to evaluate the peripheral nerve path (17 males and 10 females; mean age: 59.9 years, range: 18-83 years) of each patient preoperatively. An electrode pen coupled to an electrical nerve stimulator was used for superficial nerve mapping. The TENS procedure was performed on patients' major peripheral nerves that passed close to the surgical field of tumor resection or trauma surgery, and intraoperative damage to those nerves was apprehensive. The paths of the target nerve were detected in most patients preoperatively. The nerve paths of 26 patients were precisely under the markings drawn preoperatively. The nerve path of one patient substantially differed from the preoperative markings with numbness at the surgical region. During surgery, the nerve paths could be accurately mapped preoperatively using the TENS procedure as confirmed by direct visualization of the nerve. This stimulation device is easy to use and offers highly accurate mapping of nerves for surgical planning without major complications. The authors conclude that TENS is a useful tool for noninvasive nerve localization and makes tumor resection a safe and smooth procedure.

  9. Painful peripheral states and sympathetic blocks.

    PubMed Central

    Loh, L; Nathan, P W

    1978-01-01

    In various chronic painful states, the sympathetic nerve supply was blocked either by injecting the sympathetic chain and ganglia with local anaesthesia or by the injection of guanethidine during occlusion of the circulation. There was a striking relation between the presence of hyperpathia and the relief of pain by the blocks. The sympathetic block was unlikely to relieve the pain unless hyperpathia accompanied the pain; when hyperpathia was present, a sympathetic block relieved both the constant pain and the hyperpathia. The effectiveness of the guanethidine blocks shows that the pain and the hyperpathia are maintained by the emission of noradrenaline in the periphery. The facts related to the sympathetic system and sensibility are discussed. PMID:690645

  10. [The "3-in-1" block: myth or reality?].

    PubMed

    Cauhèpe, C; Oliver, M; Colombani, R; Railhac, N

    1989-01-01

    The technique described by Winnie in 1973 is supposed to provide a regional block of the femoral, femoral cutaneous, and obturator nerves by a single injection within the femoral nerve sheath. This study aimed to assess the diffusion spaces for the local anaesthetic solution used in this technique. The anatomical study included the dissection of 2 adult and 1 foetal cadavers. It was associated with a radiographic study in adult volunteers. About 20 to 60 ml of an isotonic radiographic contrast (iopamidol 150) were injected into the femoral nerve sheath located with the help of a nerve stimulator. Standard pelvic radiographs and computerised tomographic scans were carried out at the time of injection, and 30 min later. Two different unpredictable distributions were found; which were independent of the injected volume. One type consisted in an internal diffusion towards the psoas major muscle, the liquid thus reaching the three nerves. The other type was an external diffusion, in front of the iliacus muscle, the liquid never reaching the internal side of the psoas major muscle, and therefore the obturator nerve. The "3 in 1" block would therefore seem to be useful for those surgical acts requiring only a block of the femoral and femoral cutaneous nerves, i.e. those involving the anterior aspect of the thigh and knee, the femoral shaft, and the patella. On the other hand, its usefulness for surgery of the hip (dislocation, fractured neck of femur) is rather uncertain.

  11. Interventional radiology in bone and joint

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, M.; Laredo, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Recent radiologic procedures in bone and joints, some of which eliminate the need for surgery are exposed, including: trephine biopsies of the thoracic and lumbar spine, sacro-iliac joints, peripheral bones synovial membrane and soft tissues, using either fluoroscopic echographic or CT guidance - chemonucleolysis - vascular embolization of skeletal tumors and management of vertebral hemangiomas - selective steroid injection in a broad spectrum of diseases including vertebral facet syndrome, cervicobrachial nerve root pain, rotator cuff calcium deposit, bone cysts.

  12. Efficacy of Transversus Abdominis Plane Block and Rectus Sheath Block in Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Katsushi; Matsumura, Masakata; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Hoashi, Takahiko; Katsura, Nagato; Fukuda, Seijun; Shimizu, Kenji; Inada, Takuji; Sato, Masugi

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to assess the efficacy of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block and rectus sheath (RS) block in patients undergoing laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery. Few studies have addressed the efficacy and safety associated with TAP block and RS block for laparoscopic surgery. Thirty-two patients underwent laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery, either with TAP and RS block (Block+ group, n = 18) or without peripheral nerve block (Block− group, n = 14). Preoperatively, TAP and RS block were performed through ultrasound guidance. We evaluated postoperative pain control and patient outcomes. The mean postoperative hospital stays were 1.56 days (Block+ group) and 2.07 days (Block− group; range, 1–3 days in both groups; P = 0.0038). A total of 11 patients and 1 patient underwent day surgery in the Block+ and Block− groups, respectively (P = 0.0012). Good postoperative pain control was more commonly observed in the Block+ group than in the Block− group (P = 0.011). TAP and RS block was effective in reducing postoperative pain and was associated with a fast recovery in patients undergoing laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery. PMID:25875548

  13. 13. Sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Vanelderen, Pascal; Szadek, Karolina; Cohen, Steven P; De Witte, Jan; Lataster, Arno; Patijn, Jacob; Mekhail, Nagy; van Kleef, Maarten; Van Zundert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint accounts for approximately 16% to 30% of cases of chronic mechanical low back pain. Pain originating in the sacroiliac joint is predominantly perceived in the gluteal region, although pain is often referred into the lower and upper lumbar region, groin, abdomen, and/ or lower limb(s). Because sacroiliac joint pain is difficult to distinguish from other forms of low back pain based on history, different provocative maneuvers have been advocated. Individually, they have weak predictive value, but combined batteries of tests can help ascertain a diagnosis. Radiological imaging is important to exclude "red flags" but contributes little in the diagnosis. Diagnostic blocks are the diagnostic gold standard but must be interpreted with caution, because false-positive as well as false-negative results occur frequently. Treatment of sacroiliac joint pain is best performed in the context of a multidisciplinary approach. Conservative treatments address the underlying causes (posture and gait disturbances) and consist of exercise therapy and manipulation. Intra-articular sacroiliac joint infiltrations with local anesthetic and corticosteroids hold the highest evidence rating (1 B+). If the latter fail or produce only short-term effects, cooled radiofrequency treatment of the lateral branches of S1 to S3 (S4) is recommended (2 B+) if available. When this procedure cannot be used, (pulsed) radiofrequency procedures targeted at L5 dorsal ramus and lateral branches of S1 to S3 may be considered (2 C+).

  14. Pathophysiology of nerve regeneration and nerve reconstruction in burned patients.

    PubMed

    Coert, J Henk

    2010-08-01

    In extensive burns peripheral nerves can be involved. The injury to the nerve can be direct by thermal or electrical burns, but nerves can also be indirectly affected by the systemic reaction that follows the burn. Mediators will be released causing a neuropathy to nerves remote from the involved area. Involved mediators and possible therapeutic options will be discussed. In burned patients nerves can be reconstructed using autologous nerve grafts or nerve conduits. A key factor is an adequate wound debridement and a well-vascularized bed to optimize the outgrowth of the axons. Early free tissue transfers have shown promising results.

  15. Glossopharyngeal Nerve Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Puzzilli, F.; Mastronardi, L.; Agrillo, U.; Nardi, P.

    1999-01-01

    Complete resection with conservation of cranial nerves is the primary goal of contemporary surgery for lower cranial nerve tumors. We describe the case of a patient with a schwannoma of the left glossopharyngeal nerve, operated on in our Neurosurgical Unit. The far lateral approach combined with laminectomy of the posterior arch of C1 was done in two steps. The procedure allowed total tumor resection and was found to be better than classic unilateral suboccipital or combined supra- and infratentorial approaches. The advantages and disadvantages of the far lateral transcondylar approach, compared to the other more common approaches, are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171083

  16. A standardized method for 4D ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade and catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Clendenen, N J; Robards, C B; Clendenen, S R

    2014-01-01

    We present a standardized method for using four-dimensional ultrasound (4D US) guidance for peripheral nerve blocks. 4D US allows for needle tracking in multiple planes simultaneously and accurate measurement of the local anesthetic volume surrounding the nerve following injection. Additionally, the morphology and proximity of local anesthetic spread around the target nerve is clearly seen with the described technique. This method provides additional spatial information in real time compared to standard two-dimensional ultrasound.

  17. Temporohyoid osteoarthropathy and unilateral facial nerve paralysis in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Yadernuk, Lisa M.

    2003-01-01

    A 13-year-old broodmare was referred for weight loss and left facial nerve paralysis. Bilateral temporohyoid osteoarthropathy was diagnosed based on proliferation of the temporohyoid joints and stylohyoid bones on radiographs and guttural pouch endoscopy. The left side was more severely affected. Treatment resulted in little or no improvement. PMID:14703087

  18. Sonographic identification of peripheral nerves in the forearm

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Saundra A.; Derr, Charlotte; De Lucia, Anthony; Harris, Marvin; Closser, Zuheily; Miladinovic, Branko; Mhaskar, Rahul; Jorgensen, Theresa; Green, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Background: With the growing utilization of ultrasonography in emergency medicine combined with the concern over adequate pain management in the emergency department (ED), ultrasound guidance for peripheral nerve blockade in ED is an area of increasing interest. The medical literature has multiple reports supporting the use of ultrasound guidance in peripheral nerve blocks. However, to perform a peripheral nerve block, one must first be able to reliably identify the specific nerve before the procedure. Objective: The primary purpose of this study is to describe the number of supervised peripheral nerve examinations that are necessary for an emergency medicine physician to gain proficiency in accurately locating and identifying the median, radial, and ulnar nerves of the forearm via ultrasound. Methods: The proficiency outcome was defined as the number of attempts before a resident is able to correctly locate and identify the nerves on ten consecutive examinations. Didactic education was provided via a 1 h lecture on forearm anatomy, sonographic technique, and identification of the nerves. Participants also received two supervised hands-on examinations for each nerve. Count data are summarized using percentages or medians and range. Random effects negative binomial regression was used for modeling panel count data. Results: Complete data for the number of attempts, gender, and postgraduate year (PGY) training year were available for 38 residents. Nineteen males and 19 females performed examinations. The median PGY year in practice was 3 (range 1–3), with 10 (27%) in year 1, 8 (22%) in year 2, and 19 (51%) in year 3 or beyond. The median number (range) of required supervised attempts for radial, median, and ulnar nerves was 1 (0–12), 0 (0–10), and 0 (0–17), respectively. Conclusion: We can conclude that the maximum number of supervised attempts to achieve accurate nerve identification was 17 (ulnar), 12 (radial), and 10 (median) in our study. The only

  19. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  20. Optic Nerve Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... machines can help monitor and detect loss of optic nerve fibers. The Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) is a special ... keeping organized, you can establish a routine that works for you. Read more » Are You at Risk ...

  1. Axillary nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes Axillary nerve dysfunction is a form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ... Multiple mononeuropathy Muscle function loss Numbness and tingling Peripheral neuropathy Systemic Review Date 2/3/2015 Updated by: ...

  2. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tibial nerve dysfunction is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 76. Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  3. Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2014-06-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality.

  4. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where it crosses the elbow, so prolonged pressure on the elbow or entrapment ...

  5. Optic Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of optic nerve disorders, including: Glaucoma is a group of diseases that are the leading cause of blindness in the United States. Glaucoma usually happens when the fluid pressure inside the eyes slowly rises and damages the ...

  6. Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathies)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may include numbness or insensitivity to pain or temperature a tingling, burning, or prickling sensation sharp pains ... from working properly, the body cannot regulate its temperature as it should. Nerve damage can also cause ...

  7. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  8. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  9. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  10. Nerves and Tissue Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-21

    complete dependence on nerves. Organ culture of sciatic nerves, combined with an assay for axolotl transferrin developed earlier, allows quantitative study...axonal release of various unknown proteins. Combining this approach with the ELISA for quantitative measurement of axolotl transferrin developed with...light microscope autoradiographic analysis following binding of radiolabelled Tf. Studies of Tf synthesis will employ cDNA probes for axolotl Tf mRNA

  11. Traumatic facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Linda N; Lyford-Pike, Sofia; Boahene, Kofi Derek O

    2013-10-01

    Facial nerve trauma can be a devastating injury resulting in functional deficits and psychological distress. Deciding on the optimal course of treatment for patients with traumatic facial nerve injuries can be challenging, as there are many critical factors to be considered for each patient. Choosing from the great array of therapeutic options available can become overwhelming to both patients and physicians, and in this article, the authors present a systematic approach to help organize the physician's thought process.

  12. Lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy.

  13. Ceramic joints

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Bradley J.; Patten, Jr., Donald O.

    1991-01-01

    Butt joints between materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion are prepared having a reduced probability of failure of stress facture. This is accomplished by narrowing/tapering the material having the lower coefficient of thermal expansion in a direction away from the joint interface and not joining the narrow-tapered surface to the material having the higher coefficient of thermal expansion.

  14. Optic nerve aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lisi; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    We report a 55-year-old woman with optic nerve Aspergillosis. Aspergillus is an ubiquitous airborne saprophytic fungus. Inhaled Aspergillus conidia are normally eliminated in the immunocompetent host by innate immune mechanisms; however, in immunosuppressed patients, they can cause disease. The woman had a past medical history of hypertension and migraines. She presented 1 year prior to death with a new onset headache behind the left eye and later developed blurred vision and scotoma. A left temporal artery biopsy was negative for giant cell arteritis. One month prior to the current admission, she had an MRI showing optic nerve thickening with no other findings. Because of the visual loss and a positive antinuclear antibody test, she was given a trial of high dose steroids and while it significantly improved her headache, her vision did not improve. At autopsy, the left optic nerve at the level of the cavernous sinus and extending into the optic chiasm was enlarged in diameter and there was a 1.3 cm firm nodule surrounding the left optic nerve. Histologically, an abscess surrounded and involved the left optic nerve. Acute angle branching, angioinvasive fungal hyphae were identified on Grocott's methenamine silver stained sections, consistent with Aspergillus spp. No gross or microscopic evidence of systemic vasculitis or infection was identified in the body. The literature on optic nerve Aspergillosis is reviewed.

  15. Intercostal nerve blockade for evaluation of local anaesthetic agents.

    PubMed

    Bridenbaugh, P O

    1975-02-01

    Bilateral intercostal nerve block provides the opportunity to subject as many as 16 separate peripheral nerves in a single subject to known or unknown local anaesthetic agents in a variety of concentrations, volumes, and additives. It permits the observation of local (e.g., neuritis), clinical (e.g., onset and duration), and systemic (e.g., toxicity and blood concentration) effects of these variables. In double-blind studies, bilateral intercostal nerve block allows the use of each side of the trunk for comparison of two experimental drugs, a new drug against a standard, or two new drugs. Subtle differences in clinical properties as well as simultaneous blood concentrations may be detected in these studies. The advantages of this technique in evaluating local anaesthetic agents are primarily the use of a single subject as his own control while studying may separate peripheral nerves. This aids appreciably in limiting the variable of age, temperature, and perfusion, as well as techniques of administration and evaluation. The constancy of the anatomy of the intercostal nerve provides a highly reliable and reproducible block technique.

  16. [Spasm of the adductor muscles, pre-dislocation and dislocations of the hip joints in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. Clinical observations on aetiology, pathogenesis, therapy and rehabilitation. Part I: The effect of open myotenotomy of the gracilis muscle and of the long and short adductor muscles in connection with total extrapelvine resection of the obturator nerve, on the hip joints and static function (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fettweis, E

    1979-02-01

    Spasm and contraction of the adductor muscles involve, on the one hand, danger in respect of the development of a dislocation of the hip, and are a serious impediment to a walking ability on the other. Hence, surgery is often necessary. The article reports on the results of consequent weakening of the adductor muscles as a result of open myotenotomy in association with complete extrapelvine resection of the obturator nerve. 27 patients were subjected to surgery--in most cases bilaterally--at an age between 2 years and 5 months and 18 years, with a follow-up period of up to 15 years. The study does not include patients with spastic dislocation of the hip in whom this method was applied on the non-dislocated side and on the dislocated side in combination with iliopsoas tenotomy. This method makes it possible to achieve regression of existing defective positions of the hip joints. In a few cases, the valgus position of the neck of the femur was corrected to some extent. In two patients it was not possible to prevent the progress of a developing dislocation of the hip. These results show that, whereas the adductor muscles represent an essential factor for the occurrence of a spastic dislocation of the hip, other forces are most probably also involved. In the majority of cases, results were favourable in respect of the static function, although in some cases the success became evident after several years only, especially in mentally retarded patients and in apathetic individuals. Important for therapeutic success is the follow-up. The principles of its therapy are thoroughly discussed. Surgery is indicated only in special cases. Indications must be observed very strictly, since the risk of excessive weakening of the adductor muscles should not be underestimated.

  17. Dorsal clitoral nerve injury following transobturator midurethral sling

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Chailee F; Damitz, Lynn A; Gracely, Richard H; Mintz, Alice C; Zolnoun, Denniz A; Dellon, A Lee

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transobturator slings can be successfully used to treat stress urinary incontinence and improve quality of life through a minimally invasive vaginal approach. Persistent postoperative pain can occur and pose diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. Following a sling procedure, a patient complained of pinching clitoral and perineal pain. Her symptoms of localized clitoral pinching and pain became generalized over the ensuing years, eventually encompassing the entire left vulvovaginal region. Aim The aim of this study was to highlight the clinical utility of conventional pain management techniques used for the evaluation and management of patients with postoperative pain following pelvic surgery. Methods We described a prototypical patient with persistent pain in and around the clitoral region complicating the clinical course of an otherwise successful sling procedure. We specifically discussed the utility of bedside sensory assessment techniques and selective nerve blocks in the evaluation and management of this prototypical patient. Results Neurosensory assessments and a selective nerve block enabled us to trace the source of the patient’s pain to nerve entrapment along the dorsal nerve of the clitoris. We then utilized a nerve stimulator-guided hydrodissection technique to release the scar contracture Conclusion This case demonstrates that the dorsal nerve of the clitoris is vulnerable to injury directly and/or indirectly. Assimilation of a time-honored pain management construct for the evaluation and management of patients’ pain may improve outcomes while obviating the need for invasive surgery. PMID:27729812

  18. High-resolution measurement of electrically-evoked vagus nerve activity in the anesthetized dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Paul B.; Lubock, Nathan B.; Hincapie, Juan G.; Ruble, Stephen B.; Hamann, Jason J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Not fully understanding the type of axons activated during vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is one of several factors that limit the clinical efficacy of VNS therapies. The main goal of this study was to characterize the electrical recruitment of both myelinated and unmyelinated fibers within the cervical vagus nerve. Approach. In anesthetized dogs, recording nerve cuff electrodes were implanted on the vagus nerve following surgical excision of the epineurium. Both the vagal electroneurogram (ENG) and laryngeal muscle activity were recorded in response to stimulation of the right vagus nerve. Main results. Desheathing the nerve significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio of the ENG by 1.2 to 9.9 dB, depending on the nerve fiber type. Repeated VNS following nerve transection or neuromuscular block (1) enabled the characterization of A-fibers, two sub-types of B-fibers, and unmyelinated C-fibers, (2) confirmed the absence of stimulation-evoked reflex compound nerve action potentials in both the ipsilateral and contralateral vagus nerves, and (3) provided evidence of stimulus spillover into muscle tissue surrounding the stimulating electrode. Significance. Given the anatomical similarities between the canine and human vagus nerves, the results of this study provide a template for better understanding the nerve fiber recruitment patterns associated with VNS therapies.

  19. [New treatment for peripheral nerve defects: nerve elongation].

    PubMed

    Kou, Y H; Jiang, B G

    2016-10-18

    Peripheral nerve defects are still a major challenge in clinical practice, and the most commonly used method of treatment for peripheral nerve defects is nerve transplantation, which has certain limitations and shortcomings, so new repair methods and techniques are needed. The peripheral nerve is elongated in limb lengthening surgery without injury, from which we got inspirations and proposed a new method to repair peripheral nerve defects: peripheral nerve elongation. The peripheral nerve could beelongated by a certain percent, but the physiological change and the maximum elongation range were still unknown. This study discussed the endurance, the physiological and pathological change of peripheral nerve elongation in detail, and got a lot of useful data. First, we developed peripheral nerve extender which could match the slow and even extension of peripheral nerve. Then, our animal experiment result confirmed that the peripheral nerve had better endurance for chronic elongation than that of acute elongation and cleared the extensibility of peripheral nerve and the range of repair for peripheral nerve defects. Our result also revealed the histological basis and changed the rule for pathological physiology of peripheral nerve elongation: the most important structure foundation of peripheral nerve elongation was Fontana band, which was the coiling of nerve fibers under the epineurium, so peripheral nerve could be stretched for 8.5%-10.0% without injury because of the Fontana band. We confirmed that peripheral nerve extending technology could have the same repair effect as traditional nerve transplantation through animal experiments. Finally, we compared the clinical outcomes between nerve elongation and performance of the conventional method in the repair of short-distance transection injuries in human elbows, and the post-operative follow-up results demonstrated that early neurological function recovery was better in the nerve elongation group than in the

  20. Anterior Approach Total Ankle Arthroplasty: Superficial Peroneal Nerve Branches at Risk.

    PubMed

    McAlister, Jeffrey E; DeMill, Shyler L; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    In ankle arthroplasty, little attention has been given to intraoperative nerve injury and its postoperative sequelae. The aim of the present anatomic study was to determine the relationship of the superficial peroneal nerve to the standard anterior approach for total ankle arthroplasty. The superficial peroneal nerve was dissected in 10 below-the-knee cadaver specimens. The medial and intermediate dorsal cutaneous branches were identified. A needle was placed at the ankle joint. The following measurements were recorded: bifurcation into the medial and intermediate dorsal cutaneous branches, reference needle to the branches of the medial and intermediate superficial peroneal nerve, and the crossing branches of the medial dorsal cutaneous nerve. Two specimens (20%) had a medial dorsal cutaneous branch cross from medially to laterally. Eight specimens (80%) had a crossing branch of the medial dorsal cutaneous branch within 5 cm of the incision. No intermediate dorsal cutaneous branches were within the incision. The results from the present cadaver study suggest that during an anterior ankle approach, aberrant branches of the superficial peroneal nerve could require transection in 20% of patients at the joint level and ≤80% of patients with distal extension >35 mm from the ankle joint. The risk of injury to branches of the superficial peroneal nerve is substantial. The risk of nerve injury can be decreased with meticulous operative technique, smaller incisions, and the avoidance of aggressive retraction.

  1. Anatomical Variations in the Emergence of the Cutaneous Nerves from the Nerve Point in the Neck and Identification of the Landmarks to Locate the Nerve Point with Its Clinical Implications: A Cadaveric Study on South Indian Human Foetuses

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Chandni; D’souza, Antony Sylvan; Raythe, Biswabswabina

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The cutaneous nerves from the cervical plexuses are anaesthetized by using local anaesthetics for pain relief or when minor surgical operations are performed. Knowing the variations in these nerves is important for anaestheticists to administer an effective anaesthesia to a particular nerve. So, the aim of this study was to look for the variations in the emerging patterns of the cervical cutaneous nerves in the neck and to locate the nerve point in the neck by using the superficial landmarks. Materials and Methods: The neck was dissected in 16 foetal cadavers (total 32). The foetuses were divided into 2 groups, depending upon their ages- group 1 (13-24wks) and group 2 (24-38wks). The cervical cutaneous nerves were dissected. Measurements for locating the nerve point, were taken in both the groups. Results: The statistical analysis of the measurements was done. In group 1, the mean distances of the nerve point from the External Acoustic Meatus (EAM), on the right and left sides, were 2.06cm and1.85cm and in group 2, the distances on the right and left sides were 2.32cm and 2.08cm. The mean distance of the nerve point from the clavicle in group 1, on both the right and the left sides was 1.85cm, and in group 2, the mean distances on the right and left sides were 2.67cm and 2.62cm. The variations in the cutaneous nerves which emerged from the nerve point were recorded and photographed. Conclusion: These landmarks will help the anaestheticists in locating the nerve point. These variations in the branches of the cervical plexus should be known to the anaestheticists while they give anaesthesia to a particular nerve during a nerve block. PMID:23634386

  2. Innervation of the elbow joint: Is total denervation possible? A cadaveric anatomic study.

    PubMed

    De Kesel, Renata; Van Glabbeek, Francis; Mugenzi, Dominique; De Vos, Joris; Vermeulen, Katrien; Van Renterghem, Debbie; Bortier, Hilde; Schuind, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this anatomical study was to find out if total denervation of the elbow joint is technically feasible. The endbranches of the brachial plexus of eight fresh-frozen upper arm cadavers were dissected with optical loupe magnification. All major nerves of the upper limb (except the axillary and the medial brachial cutaneous nerve) give some terminal articular endbranches to the elbow. The articular endbranches arise from muscular endbranches, cutaneous endbranches, or arise straight from the main nerves of the brachial plexus. A topographic diagram was made of the different nerves innervating the elbow joint. The ulno-posterior part of the elbow is innervated by the ulnar nerve and some branches of medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. The radial-posterior part of the elbow is innervated exclusively by the radial nerve. The ulno-anterior part of the elbow is innervated by the median nerve and the musculocutaneous nerve. The radio-anterior part of the elbow is innervated by the radial nerve and the musculocutaneous nerve. These elbow innervation findings are relevant to both anatomical and clinical field as they provide evidence that the total denervation of the elbow joint is impossible. Nevertheless, partial denervation, like denervation of the lateral epicondyle or the ulnar part of elbow, is technically possible.

  3. The effect of ammonium sulfate injection on peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, J; Mackinnon, S E; Langer, J C; Hertl, M C; Hunter, D A; Tarasidis, G

    1997-08-01

    Local anesthetic drugs with prolonged nerve-block effect would have clinical application for postoperative or neuromatous pain relief. This study evaluated the possibility of peripheral nerve neurotoxicity by injection of 10 percent ammonium sulfate. Both intrafascicular and extrafascicular injection of 10 percent ammonium sulfate were tested in the rat sciatic nerve model. One percent lidocaine HCl, 5 percent phenol, and normal saline were similarly injected for comparison. Using histologic studies and motor function evaluation with walking-track analysis, 10 percent ammonium sulfate was found to be neurotoxic when it is injected intrafascicularly; however, extrafascicular injection of this drug did not cause significant nerve injury. The neurotoxicity of the 10 percent ammonium sulfate solution was intermediate between the neurotoxicity of 0.1 percent lidocaine hydrochloride and the marked neurotoxicity of 5 percent phenol solution.

  4. Perineural dexmedetomidine effects on sciatic nerve in rat.

    PubMed

    Yektaş, Abdulkadir; Çabalar, Murat; Sar, Mehmet; Alagöl, Ayşin; Çelik, Duygu Sultan; Yayla, Vildan; Tolga, Deniz

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that high dose dexmedetomidine would increase the duration of antinociception to a thermal stimulus in a rat model of sciatic nerve blockade without causing nerve damage. The rats were anesthetized with isoflurane. After electromyography (EMG) recordings, right sciatic nerves were explored and perineural injections were delivered: Group D (n=7), 40μgμgkg(-1) dexmedetomidine administration, Group II (n=6), (0.2mL) saline administration, Group III (n=2), only surgically exploration of the right sciatic nevre. Time to paw withdrawal latency (PAW) to a thermal stimulus for both paws and an assessment of motor function were measured every 30min after the nerve block until a return to baseline. The compound muscle action potential (CMAP) of right and left sciatic nerves were recorded 10 times per each nerve once more after perineural injections at 14 day. After EMG recordings, right and the part of left sciatic nerve were excised at a length of at minimum 15mm for histopathological examination. Comparison of right/left CMAP amplitude ratios before and 14 days after the procedure showed a statistically significant difference (p=0.000). There were no differences in perineural inflammation between the Group D, Group S, and Group E at 14 days.

  5. [Perineural dexmedetomidine effects on sciatic nerve in rat].

    PubMed

    Yektaş, Abdulkadir; Çabalar, Murat; Sar, Mehmet; Alagöl, Ayşin; Çelik, Duygu Sultan; Yayla, Vildan; Tolga, Deniz

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that high dose dexmedetomidine would increase the duration of antinociception to a thermal stimulus in a rat model of sciatic nerve blockade without causing nerve damage. The rats were anesthetized with isoflurane. After electromyography (EMG) recordings, right sciatic nerves were explored and perineural injections were delivered: Group D (n=7), 40μgμgkg(-1) dexmedetomidine administration, Group II (n=6), (0.2mL) saline administration, Group III (n=2), only surgically exploration of the right sciatic nevre. Time to paw withdrawal latency (PAW) to a thermal stimulus for both paws and an assessment of motor function were measured every 30min after the nerve block until a return to baseline. The compound muscle action potential (CMAP) of right and left sciatic nerves were recorded 10 times per each nerve once more after perineural injections at 14 day. After EMG recordings, right and the part of left sciatic nerve were excised at a length of at minimum 15mm for histopathological examination. Comparison of right/left CMAP amplitude ratios before and 14 days after the procedure showed a statistically significant difference (p=0.000). There were no differences in perineural inflammation between the Group D, Group S, and Group E at 14 days.

  6. Joint Commission

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content The Joint Commission Log In | Request Guest Access Forgot password? | Log In Help Contact Us | Careers | JCR Web Store | Press Room Search Home Accreditation Accreditation Ambulatory Health ...

  7. 31 CFR 515.551 - Joint bank accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Joint bank accounts. 515.551 Section..., Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.551 Joint bank accounts. (a) Specific licenses are issued unblocking a portion of or all of a joint bank account blocked by reason of the fact that one...

  8. 31 CFR 515.551 - Joint bank accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Joint bank accounts. 515.551 Section..., Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.551 Joint bank accounts. (a) Specific licenses are issued unblocking a portion of or all of a joint bank account blocked by reason of the fact that one...

  9. 31 CFR 515.551 - Joint bank accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Joint bank accounts. 515.551 Section..., Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.551 Joint bank accounts. (a) Specific licenses are issued unblocking a portion of or all of a joint bank account blocked by reason of the fact that one...

  10. 31 CFR 515.551 - Joint bank accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Joint bank accounts. 515.551 Section..., Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.551 Joint bank accounts. (a) Specific licenses are issued unblocking a portion of or all of a joint bank account blocked by reason of the fact that one...

  11. An abnormal clinical course of an ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block using 0.375% bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Sites, Brian D; Bertrand, Marc L; Gallagher, John D

    2006-09-01

    We report on the case of a reappearance of a supraclavicular nerve block after the apparent initiation of its resolution in a 21-year-old athlete undergoing repair of a valgus impaction syndrome of his right elbow. The patient's anesthetic management consisted of a supraclavicular nerve block and general anesthesia. The patient was discharged home with an apparent resolving nerve block. He returned to the hospital urgently when, at 7 hours after blockade, he lost all motor-sensory function in his arm. His workup ultimately yielded negative results, and the block resolved at 23 hours. In addition to documenting an abnormal course of a supraclavicular block, this case report questions the appropriateness of placing long-acting nerve blocks in outpatients.

  12. Barriers of the peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, Sirkku; Alanne, Maria; Peltonen, Juha

    2013-01-01

    This review introduces the traditionally defined anatomic compartments of the peripheral nerves based on light and electron microscopic topography and then explores the cellular and the most recent molecular basis of the different barrier functions operative in peripheral nerves. We also elucidate where, and how, the homeostasis of the normal human peripheral nerve is controlled in situ and how claudin-containing tight junctions contribute to the barriers of peripheral nerve. Also, the human timeline of the development of the barriers of the peripheral nerve is depicted. Finally, potential future therapeutic modalities interfering with the barriers of the peripheral nerve are discussed. PMID:24665400

  13. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  14. Posterior tibial nerve lesions in ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cugat, Ramon; Ares, Oscar; Cuscó, Xavier; Garcia, Montserrat; Samitier, Gonzalo; Seijas, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Ankle arthroscopy provides a minimally invasive approach to the diagnosis and treatment of certain ankle disorders. Neurological complications resulting from ankle arthroscopy have been well documented in orthopaedic and podiatric literature. Owing to the superficial location of the ankle joint and the abundance of overlying periarticular neurovascular structures, complications reported in ankle arthroscopy are greater than those reported for other joints. In particular, all reported neurovascular injuries following ankle arthroscopy have been the direct result of distractor pin or portal placement. The standard posteromedial portal has recognized risks because of the proximity of the posterior neurovascular structures. There can be considerable variability in the course of these portals and their proximity to the neurovascular structures. We found one report of intra-articular damage to the posterior tibial nerve as a result of ankle arthroscopy in the English-language literature and we report this paper as a second case described in the literature.

  15. Expression of neuropeptides and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) in cutaneous and mucosal nerve structures of the adult rat lower lip after mental nerve section.

    PubMed

    Verzè, L; Paraninfo, A; Viglietti-Panzica, C; Panzica, G C; Ramieri, G

    2003-01-01

    The reinnervation of the adult rat lower lip has been investigated after unilateral section of the mental nerve. Rats were sacrificed at 4, 7, 9, 14, 30, and 90 days after the operation. A further group of animals with section of the mental nerve and block of the alveolar nerve regeneration, was sacrificed at 14 days. Specimens were processed for immunocytochemistry with antibodies against PGP 9.5, GAP-43 or neuropeptides (CGRP, SP and VIP). Four days after nerve section, axonal degeneration seems evident in the mental nerve branches and inside skin and mucosa. GAP-43 immunoreactivity is intense in the mental nerve 7 days after nerve section and it reaches its maximal expression and distribution in peripheral nerve fibres at 14 days. At 30 days, the decline in its expression is associated with the increase of PGP9.5-, SP-, and CGRP immunopositivity. VIP is observed only in perivascular fibres at all times observed. Present results suggest that, after sensory denervation of the rat lip, nerve fibres in skin and mucosa remain at lower density than normal. The different time courses in the expression of neuropeptides and GAP-43 suggest a possible early involvement of GAP-43 in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  16. Genes and nerves.

    PubMed

    Dieu, Tam; Johnstone, Bruce R; Newgreen, Don F

    2005-04-01

    The unpredictability of a brachial plexus graft, a median nerve repair, or a facial-nerve reconstruction is well known. No matter how precise the technical skills, a perfect recovery from a peripheral-nerve lesion is elusive. To resolve this problem, understanding of the normal development of the peripheral nervous system is needed. Presently, the development of the innervation in the upper limb is complex and not fully understood. However, many of the genes involved in this process are now known, and the link between anatomy and genetics is becoming clearer. This short review aims to acquaint the clinical surgeon with some of the main genes. The principal steps in the establishment of neural circuits will be summarized, in particular, the specification and development of neurons and glia, the pathfinding of cells and axons towards their target, and the downstream molecules that control the circuitry of these neurons.

  17. Focal conduction block in a case of tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Diogo F; Scremin, Luciano; Zúniga, Sérgio F; Oh, Shin J

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) with focal conduction block across the tarsal tunnel (TT). A 46-year-old woman had pain in the left foot, sensory loss on the plantar surface, and positive Tinel sign over the TT. TTS was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan and surgery. Motor nerve conduction studies showed focal conduction block across the TT. Conduction block has rarely been reported in TTS. In this case, conduction block provides evidence for focal demyelination as the primary pathological process in TTS.

  18. [Lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease].

    PubMed

    Shi, J G; Xu, X M; Sun, J C; Wang, Y; Guo, Y F; Yang, H S; Kong, Q J; Yang, Y; Shi, G D; Yuan, W; Jia, L S

    2017-03-21

    Objective: To define a novel disease-lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease, and propose the diagnostic criteria, while capsule surgery was performed and evaluated in the preliminary study. Methods: From June 2016 to December 2016, a total of 30 patients (22 male and 8 female; mean age of 55.1±9.7 years) with lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease were included in Department of Spine Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, the Second Military Medical University.Lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease was defined as axial hypertension of nerve root and spinal cord caused by congenital anomalies, which could be accompanied by other lesions as lumbar disc herniation, spinal cord stenosis or spondylolisthesis, or aggravated by iatrogenic lesions, resulting in neurological symptoms.This phenomenon is similar to a stretched string, the higher tension on each end the louder sound.Meanwhile, the shape of lumbosacral spine looks like a bow, thus, the disease is nominated as lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease.All the patients underwent capsule surgery and filled out Owestry disability index (ODI) and Tempa scale for kinesiophobia (TSK) before and after surgery. Results: The mean surgery time was (155±36) min, (4.3±0.4) segments were performed surgery.The pre-operative VAS, TSK and ODI scores were (7.6±0.8), (52.0±10.3) and (68.4±12.7), respectively.The post-operative VAS, TSK and ODI scores were (3.3±0.4), ( 24.6±5.2) and (32.1±7.4)(P<0.05, respectively), respectively. Conclusion: The definition and diagnostic criteria of lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease was proposed.Capsule surgery was an effective strategy with most patients acquired excellent outcomes as symptoms relieved and quality of life improved.

  19. Automatic segmentation of nerve structures in ultrasound images using Graph Cuts and Gaussian processes.

    PubMed

    Gil González, Julián; Álvarez, Mauricio A; Orozco, Álvaro A

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral Nerve Blocking (PNB), is a procedure used for performing regional anesthesia, that comprises the administration of anesthetic in the proximity of a nerve. Several techniques have been used with the purpose of locating nerve structures when the PNB procedure is performed: anatomical surface landmarks, elicitation of paresthesia, nerve stimulation and ultrasound imaging. Among those, ultrasound imaging has gained great attention because it is not invasive and offers an accurate location of the nerve and the structures around it. However, the segmentation of nerve structures in ultrasound images is a difficult task for the specialist, since such images are affected by echo perturbations and speckle noise. The development of systems for the automatic segmentation of nerve structures can aid the specialist for locating nerve structures accurately. In this paper we present a methodology for the automatic segmentation of nerve structures in ultrasound images. An initial step is carried out using Graph Cut segmentation in order to generate regions of interest; we then use machine learning techniques with the aim of segmenting the nerve structure; here, a specific non-linear Wavelet transform is used for the feature extraction stage, and Gaussian processes for the classification step. The methodology performance is measured in terms of accuracy and the dice coefficient. Results show that the implemented methodology can be used for automatically segmenting nerve structures.

  20. Management of the elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Heim, M; Beeton, K; Blamey, G; Goddard, N

    2012-07-01

    The elbow is a complex joint that is prone to bleeding episodes. These features as well as the close proximity of the ulnar nerve and the need to use the elbow in many activities of daily living can lead to a range of symptoms including recurrent bleeds, pain, instability or loss of range of movement and nerve compression. Conservative management includes splinting and proprioceptive retraining monitored by a physiotherapist who is a musculoskeletal expert in hemophilia care. In the event that conservative measures are not successful a range of surgical options may be indicated including elbow replacement. These approaches continue to be evaluated in both the short and long term in order to determine the most effective treatment for the symptomatic elbow.

  1. Nerve Transfers in Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ida K

    2016-05-01

    Hand and upper extremity function is instrumental to basic activities of daily living and level of independence in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Nerve transfer surgery is a novel and alternate approach for restoring function in SCI. This article discusses the biologic basis of nerve transfers in SCI, patient evaluation, management, and surgical approaches. Although the application of this technique is not new; recent case reports and case series in the literature have increased interest in this field. The challenges are to improve function, achieve maximal gains in function, avoid complications, and to primum non nocere.

  2. MODELING UNDERGROUND STRUCTURE VULNERABILITY IN JOINTED ROCK

    SciTech Connect

    R. SWIFT; D. STEEDMAN

    2001-02-01

    The vulnerability of underground structures and openings in deep jointed rock to ground shock attack is of chief concern to military planning and security. Damage and/or loss of stability to a structure in jointed rock, often manifested as brittle failure and accompanied with block movement, can depend significantly on jointed properties, such as spacing, orientation, strength, and block character. We apply a hybrid Discrete Element Method combined with the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics approach to simulate the MIGHTY NORTH event, a definitive high-explosive test performed on an aluminum lined cylindrical opening in jointed Salem limestone. Representing limestone with discrete elements having elastic-equivalence and explicit brittle tensile behavior and the liner as an elastic-plastic continuum provides good agreement with the experiment and damage obtained with finite-element simulations. Extending the approach to parameter variations shows damage is substantially altered by differences in joint geometry and liner properties.

  3. Acute Respiratory Distress Following Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Block

    PubMed Central

    Guirguis, Maged; Karroum, Rami; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Mounir-Soliman, Loran

    2012-01-01

    Background Brachial plexus blocks have become very common for patients undergoing upper extremity surgery. We report a case in which the patient developed ipsilateral phrenic nerve paralysis and acute respiratory failure following supraclavicular nerve block. Case Report A 61-year-old female diabetic, morbidly obese patient presented for a repeat debridement of necrotizing fasciitis on her left arm. She received a left-sided supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Within a few minutes, the patient began to experience acute dyspnea, anxiety, and oxygen saturation of 90%. Breath sounds were diminished in the left hemithorax. Arterial blood gases revealed evidence of acute respiratory acidosis. The chest x-ray was normal. After induction, we intubated the patient. Subsequent arterial blood gases showed marked improvement in respiratory acidosis. We believed left phrenic nerve paralysis to be the cause of the distress. The patient was extubated in the surgical intensive care unit the following day, and infusion of ropivacaine 0.2% was started. The catheter was removed afterward secondary to its occlusion. Conclusion Phrenic nerve injury leading to respiratory distress is a rare complication of supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Anesthesiologists should be ready for emergency intubation when performing this kind of block. PMID:22778683

  4. Activation of PAR2 receptors sensitizes primary afferents and causes leukocyte rolling and adherence in the rat knee joint

    PubMed Central

    Russell, FA; Schuelert, N; Veldhoen, VE; Hollenberg, MD; McDougall, JJ

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose The PAR2 receptors are involved in chronic arthritis by mechanisms that are as yet unclear. Here, we examined PAR2 activation in the rat knee joint. Experimental Approach PAR2 in rat knee joint dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells at L3-L5, retrogradely labelled with Fluoro-gold (FG) were demonstrated immunohistochemically. Electrophysiological recordings from knee joint nerve fibres in urethane anaesthetized Wistar rats assessed the effects of stimulating joint PAR2 with its activating peptide, 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 (1–100 nmol·100 μL−1, via close intra-arterial injection). Fibre firing rate was recorded during joint rotations before and 15 min after administration of PAR2 activating peptide or control peptide. Leukocyte kinetics in the synovial vasculature upon PAR2 activation were followed by intravital microscopy for 60 min after perfusion of 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 or control peptide. Roles for transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) or neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors in the PAR2 responses were assessed using the selective antagonists, SB366791 and RP67580 respectively. Key Results PAR2 were expressed in 59 ± 5% of FG-positive DRG cells; 100 nmol 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 increased joint fibre firing rate during normal and noxious rotation, maximal at 3 min (normal; 110 ± 43%, noxious; 90 ± 31%). 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 also significantly increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion over 60 min. All these effects were blocked by pre-treatment with SB366791 and RP67580 (P < 0.05 compared with 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 alone). Conclusions and Implications PAR2 receptors play an acute inflammatory role in the knee joint via TRPV1- and NK1-dependent mechanisms involving both PAR2-mediated neuronal sensitization and leukocyte trafficking. PMID:22849826

  5. 3D ultrasound estimation of the effective volume for popliteal block at the level of division.

    PubMed

    Sala-Blanch, X; Franco, J; Bergé, R; Marín, R; López, A M; Agustí, M

    2017-03-01

    Local anaesthetic injection between the tibial and commmon peroneal nerves within connective tissue sheath results in a predictable diffusion and allows for a reduction in the volume needed to achieve a consistent sciatic popliteal block. Using 3D ultrasound volumetric acquisition, we quantified the visible volume in contact with the nerve along a 5cm segment.

  6. Ultrasound-guided bilateral combined inguinal femoral and subgluteal sciatic nerve blocks for simultaneous bilateral below-knee amputations due to bilateral diabetic foot gangrene unresponsive to peripheral arterial angioplasty and bypass surgery in a coagulopathic patient on antiplatelet therapy with a history of percutaneous coronary intervention for ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Sung Hye; Lee, Jonghoon; Kim, Jong Hae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Patients on antiplatelet therapy following percutaneous coronary intervention can become coagulopathic due to infection. Performing regional anesthesia for bilateral surgery in such cases is challenging. We report a case of successful combined inguinal femoral and subgluteal sciatic nerve blocks (CFSNBs) for simultaneous bilateral below-knee amputations in a coagulopathic patient on antiplatelet therapy. Methods: A 70-year-old male patient presented with pain in both feet due to diabetic foot syndrome. The condition could not be managed by open amputations of the toes at the metatarsal bones and subsequent antibiotic therapy. Computed tomographic angiography showed significant stenosis in the arteries supplying the lower limbs, indicating atherosclerotic gangrene in both feet. Balloon angioplasty and bypass surgery with subsequent debridements with application of negative-pressure wound therapy and additional open amputations did not improve the patient's clinical condition: his leukocyte counts and C-reactive protein levels were above the normal range, and his prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times were increased. Results: Simultaneous bilateral below-knee amputations were performed under ultrasound-guided CFSNBs. Following left CFSNBs using 45 mL of a local anesthetic mixture (1:1 ratio of 1.0% mepivacaine and 0.75% ropivacaine), the left below-knee amputation was performed for 76 minutes. Subsequently, under right CFSNBs using 47 mL of the local anesthetic mixture, the right below-knee amputation proceeded for 85 minutes. Throughout each surgery, dexmedetomidine was continuously administered, and a sensory blockade was well maintained in both limbs. The patient did not complain of pain due to regression of the first CFSNBs during the second surgery. The CFSNBs successfully prevented tourniquet pain. Local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST) and hemodynamic instability due to tourniquet deflation and administration of

  7. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePlus

    ... and toxins. Some cranial nerve disorders interfere with eye movement. Eye movement is controlled by 3 pairs of muscles. These ... be able to move their eyes normally. How eye movement is affected depends on which nerve is affected. ...

  8. The action of knee joint afferents and the concomitant influence of cutaneous (sural) afferents on the discharge of triceps surae gamma-motoneurones in the cat.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, P H; Davey, N J; Ferrell, W R; Baxendale, R H

    1996-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of group II joint afferents of the posterior articular nerve (PAN) to the knee evoked short-latency facilitation and/or inhibition of the background discharge of gastrocnemius-soleus (GS) gamma-motoneurones in decerebrated spinal cats. The latencies of these responses were consistent with mediation via segmental oligosynaptic spinal pathways. In addition, a longer-latency facilitation was frequently observed. Mechanical non-noxious stimulation of the skin within the field of innervation of the sural nerve, on the lateral aspect of the heel, suppressed the short-latency facilitation, but not the inhibition or long-latency facilitation. Brief mechanical indentation of the posterior aspect of the knee joint capsule could elicit facilitation or inhibition of gamma-motoneurones. Facilitation, but not inhibition, was blocked by anaesthesia or section of the PAN. Both actions could be suppressed by mechanical stimulation of the heel. We conclude that GS gamma-motoneurones receive both facilitatory and inhibitory segmental inputs from group II articular afferents arising in the knee joint. Cutaneous afferents from the sural field exert a selective inhibitory influence over the facilitation of fusimotor discharge by articular afferents.

  9. Nerve Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    MedlinePlus

    ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath (“insulation”) Figure 2: Nerve repair with realignment of bundles © ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath insulation Figure 2 - Nerve repair with realignment of bundles ...

  10. Effects of intranasal cocaine on sympathetic nerve discharge in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, T N; Grayburn, P A; Snyder, R W; Hansen, J; Chavoshan, B; Landau, C; Lange, R A; Hillis, L D; Victor, R G

    1997-01-01

    Cocaine-induced cardiovascular emergencies are mediated by excessive adrenergic stimulation. Animal studies suggest that cocaine not only blocks norepinephrine reuptake peripherally but also inhibits the baroreceptors, thereby reflexively increasing sympathetic nerve discharge. However, the effect of cocaine on sympathetic nerve discharge in humans is unknown. In 12 healthy volunteers, we recorded blood pressure and sympathetic nerve discharge to the skeletal muscle vasculature using intraneural microelectrodes (peroneal nerve) during intranasal cocaine (2 mg/kg, n = 8) or lidocaine (2%, n = 4), an internal local anesthetic control, or intravenous phenylephrine (0.5-2.0 microg/kg, n = 4), an internal sympathomimetic control. Experiments were repeated while minimizing the cocaine-induced rise in blood pressure with intravenous nitroprusside to negate sinoaortic baroreceptor stimulation. After lidocaine, blood pressure and sympathetic nerve discharge were unchanged. After cocaine, blood pressure increased abruptly and remained elevated for 60 min while sympathetic nerve discharge initially was unchanged and then decreased progressively over 60 min to a nadir that was only 2+/-1% of baseline (P < 0.05); however, plasma venous norepinephrine concentrations (n = 5) were unchanged up to 60 min after cocaine. Sympathetic nerve discharge fell more rapidly but to the same nadir when blood pressure was increased similarly with phenylephrine. When the cocaine-induced increase in blood pressure was minimized (nitroprusside), sympathetic nerve discharge did not decrease but rather increased by 2.9 times over baseline (P < 0.05). Baroreflex gain was comparable before and after cocaine. We conclude that in conscious humans the primary effect of intranasal cocaine is to increase sympathetic nerve discharge to the skeletal muscle bed. Furthermore, sinoaortic baroreflexes play a pivotal role in modulating the cocaine-induced sympathetic excitation. The interplay between these

  11. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging of nerves with a clinical ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is of great importance during many ultrasound-guided clinical procedures, including nerve blocks and prostate biopsies. It can be challenging to visualise nerves with conventional ultrasound imaging, however. One of the challenges is that nerves can have very similar appearances to nearby structures such as tendons. Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of near-infrared optical spectroscopy for differentiating nerves and adjacent tissues, as this modality can be sensitive to optical absorption of lipids that are present in intra- and extra-neural adipose tissue and in the myelin sheaths. These studies were limited to point measurements, however. In this pilot study, a custom photoacoustic system with a clinical ultrasound imaging probe was used to acquire multi-spectral photoacoustic images of nerves and tendons from swine ex vivo, across the wavelength range of 1100 to 1300 nm. Photoacoustic images were processed and overlaid in colour onto co-registered conventional ultrasound images that were acquired with the same imaging probe. A pronounced optical absorption peak centred at 1210 nm was observed in the photoacoustic signals obtained from nerves, and it was absent in those obtained from tendons. This absorption peak, which is consistent with the presence of lipids, provides a novel image contrast mechanism to significantly enhance the visualization of nerves. In particular, image contrast for nerves was up to 5.5 times greater with photoacoustic imaging (0.82 +/- 0.15) than with conventional ultrasound imaging (0.148 +/- 0.002), with a maximum contrast of 0.95 +/- 0.02 obtained in photoacoustic mode. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of photoacoustic imaging to improve clinical outcomes in ultrasound-guided interventions in regional anaesthesia and interventional oncology.

  12. Optic nerve hypoplasia in children.

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, S. M.; Dutton, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is characterised by a diminished number of optic nerve fibres in the optic nerve(s) and until recently was thought to be rare. It may be associated with a wide range of other congenital abnormalities. Its pathology, clinical features, and the conditions associated with it are reviewed. Neuroendocrine disorders should be actively sought in any infant or child with bilateral ONH. Early recognition of the disorder may in some cases be life saving. Images PMID:2191713

  13. The role of the superior laryngeal nerve in esophageal reflexes.

    PubMed

    Lang, I M; Medda, B K; Jadcherla, S; Shaker, R

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in the following esophageal reflexes: esophago-upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contractile reflex (EUCR), esophago-lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation reflex (ELIR), secondary peristalsis, pharyngeal swallowing, and belch. Cats (N = 43) were decerebrated and instrumented to record EMG of the cricopharyngeus, thyrohyoideus, geniohyoideus, and cricothyroideus; esophageal pressure; and motility of LES. Reflexes were activated by stimulation of the esophagus via slow balloon or rapid air distension at 1 to 16 cm distal to the UES. Slow balloon distension consistently activated EUCR and ELIR from all areas of the esophagus, but the distal esophagus was more sensitive than the proximal esophagus. Transection of SLN or proximal recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLN) blocked EUCR and ELIR generated from the cervical esophagus. Distal RLN transection blocked EUCR from the distal cervical esophagus. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus except the most proximal few centimeters activated secondary peristalsis, and SLN transection had no effect on secondary peristalsis. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus inconsistently activated pharyngeal swallows, and SLN transection blocked generation of pharyngeal swallows from all levels of the esophagus. Slow distension of the esophagus inconsistently activated belching, but rapid air distension consistently activated belching from all areas of the esophagus. SLN transection did not block initiation of belch but blocked one aspect of belch, i.e., inhibition of cricopharyngeus EMG. Vagotomy blocked all aspects of belch generated from all areas of esophagus and blocked all responses of all reflexes not blocked by SLN or RLN transection. In conclusion, the SLN mediates all aspects of the pharyngeal swallow, no portion of the secondary peristalsis, and the EUCR and ELIR generated from the proximal esophagus. Considering that SLN is not

  14. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Abscess Diabetes Mononeuropathy Multiple mononeuropathy Myelin Peripheral neuropathy Polyarteritis nodosa Systemic Tumor Review Date 1/5/ ... Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Leg Injuries and Disorders Peripheral Nerve Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  15. Nerves and Tissue Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    axolotl limbs are transected the concentration of transferrin in the distal limb tissue declines rapidly and limb regeneration stops. These results...transferrin binding and expression of the transferrin gene in cells of axolotl peripheral nerve indicate that both uptake and synthesis of this factor occur

  16. Impact of order of movement on nerve strain and longitudinal excursion: a biomechanical study with implications for neurodynamic test sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nee, Robert J; Yang, Chich-Haung; Liang, Chung-Chao; Tseng, Guo-Fang; Coppieters, Michel W

    2010-08-01

    It is assumed that strain in a nerve segment at the end of a neurodynamic test will be greatest if the joint nearest that nerve segment is moved first in the neurodynamic test sequence. To test this assumption, the main movements of the median nerve biased neurodynamic test were applied in three different sequences to seven fresh-frozen human cadavers. Strain and longitudinal excursion were measured in the median nerve at the distal forearm. Strain and relative position of the nerve at the end of a test did not differ between sequences. The nerve was subjected to higher levels of strain for a longer duration during the sequence where wrist extension occurred first. The pattern of excursion was different for each sequence. The results highlight that order of movement does not affect strain or relative position of the nerve at the end of a test when joints are moved through comparable ranges of motion. When used clinically, different neurodynamic sequences may still change the mechanical load applied to a nerve segment. Changes in load may occur because certain sequences apply increased levels of strain to the nerve for a longer time period, or because sequences differ in ranges of joint motions.

  17. β2-adrenergic signal transduction plays a detrimental role in subchondral bone loss of temporomandibular joint in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Kai; Niu, Li-Na; Li, Qi-hong; Ren, Gao-tong; Zhao, Chang-ming; Liu, Yun-dong; Tay, Franklin R.; Wang, Mei-qing

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested whether activation of the sympathetic tone by aberrant joint loading elicits abnormal subchondral bone remodeling in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. Abnormal dental occlusion was created in experimental rats, which were then intraperitoneally injected by saline, propranolol or isoproterenol. The norepinephrine contents, distribution of sympathetic nerve fibers, expression of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) and remodeling parameters in the condylar subchondral bone were investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from condylar subchondral bones were harvested for comparison of their β-ARs, pro-osteoclastic gene expressions and pro-osteoclastic function. Increases in norepinephrine level, sympathetic nerve fiber distribution and β2-AR expression were observed in the condylar subchondral bone of experimental rats, together with subchondral bone loss and increased osteoclast activity. β-antagonist (propranolol) suppressed subchondral bone loss and osteoclast hyperfunction while β-agonist (isoproterenol) exacerbated those responses. MSCs from experimental condylar subchondral bone expressed higher levels of β2-AR and RANKL; norepinephrine stimulation further increased their RANKL expression and pro-osteoclastic function. These effects were blocked by inhibition of β2-AR or the PKA pathway. RANKL expression by MSCs decreased after propranolol administration and increased after isoproterenol administration. It is concluded that β2-AR signal-mediated subchondral bone loss in TMJ osteoarthritisis associated with increased RANKL secretion by MSCs. PMID:26219508

  18. Degenerative Joint Diseases and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Mariella; Skaper, Stephen D; Coaccioli, Stefano; Varrassi, Giustino; Paladini, Antonella

    2016-12-31

    Rheumatic and joint diseases, as exemplified by osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, are among the most widespread painful and disabling pathologies across the globe. Given the continuing rise in life expectancy, their prevalence is destined to grow. Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, is, in particular, on its way to becoming the fourth leading cause of disability worldwide by 2020, with the rising incidence of obesity in addition to age being important factors. It is estimated that 25% of osteoarthritic individuals are unable to perform daily activities. Accompanying osteoarthritis is rheumatoid arthritis, which is a chronic systemic disease that often causes pain and deformity. At least 50% of those affected are unable to remain gainfully employed within 10 years of disease onset. A growing body of evidence now points to inflammation, locally and more systemically, as a promoter of damage to joints and bones, as well as joint-related functional deficits. The pathogenesis underlying joint diseases remains unclear; however, it is currently believed that cross-talk between cartilage and subchondral bone-and loss of balance between these two structures in joint diseases-is a critical element. This view is amplified by the presence of mast cells, whose dysregulation is associated with alterations of junction structures (cartilage, bone, synovia, matrix, nerve endings, and blood vessels). In addition, persistent activation of mast cells facilitates the development of spinal neuroinflammation mediated through their interaction with microglia. Unfortunately, current treatment strategies for rheumatic and articular disease are symptomatic and do little to limit disease progression. Research now should be directed at therapeutic modalities that target osteoarticular structural elements and thereby delaying disease progression and joint replacement.

  19. Human Joint Articulation and Motion-Resistive Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    eWantinue Got ,ewrse it nescwery end identify by block number) a .GRoUP sue. to Biomechanics, elbow complex, joint kinematics, joint sinus, joint restoring...necessary and identify by Maock number) Three-dimensional joint kinematics and motion resistive properties were measured for tUse shioulder, hip and elbow ...HUMAN HUMERO- ELBOW COMPLEX... 83 5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 83 5.2 Determination of the Humero- elbow Complex Sinus

  20. Quadratus lumborum block for femoral–femoral bypass graft placement

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kunitaro; Mitsuda, Shingo; Tokumine, Joho; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Moriyama, Kumi; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Atherosclerosis has a complex etiology that leads to arterial obstruction and often results in inadequate perfusion of the distal limbs. Patients with atherosclerosis can have severe complications of this condition, with widespread systemic manifestations, and the operations undertaken are often challenging for anesthesiologists. Case report: A 79-year-old woman with chronic heart failure and respiratory dysfunction presented with bilateral gangrene of the distal lower extremities with obstruction of the left common iliac artery due to atherosclerosis. Femoral–femoral bypass graft and bilateral foot amputations were planned. Spinal anesthesia failed due to severe scoliosis and deformed vertebrae. General anesthesia was induced after performing multiple nerve blocks including quadratus lumborum, sciatic nerve, femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and obturator nerve blocks. However, general anesthesia was abandoned because of deterioration in systemic perfusion. The surgery was completed; the patient remained comfortable and awake without the need for further analgesics. Conclusion: Quadratus lumborum block may be a useful anesthetic technique to perform femoral–femoral bypass. PMID:27583851

  1. Intramuscular nerve distribution patterns of anterior forearm muscles in children: a guide for botulinum toxin injection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fangjiu; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xie, Xiadan; Yang, Shengbo; Xu, Yan; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) can relieve muscle spasticity by blocking axon terminals acetylcholine release at the motor endplate (MEP) and is the safest and most effective agent for the treatment of muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. In order to achieve maximum effect with minimum effective dose of BoNT, one needs to choose an injection site as near to the MEP zone as possible. This requires a detailed understanding about the nerve terminal distributions within the muscles targeted for BoNT injection. This study focuses on BoNT treatment in children with muscle spasms caused by cerebral palsy. Considering the differences between children and adults in anatomy, we used child cadavers and measured both the nerve entry points and nerve terminal sense zones in three deep muscles of the anterior forearm: flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), flexor pollicis longus (FPL), and pronator quadratus (PQ). We measured the nerve entry points by using the forearm midline as a reference and demonstrated intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones by using a modified Sihler's nerve staining technique. The locations of the nerve entry points and that of the nerve terminal dense zones in the muscles were compared. We found that all nerve entry points are away from the corresponding intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones. Simply selecting nerve entry points as the sites for BoNT injection may not be an optimal choice for best effects in blocking muscle spasm. We propose that the location of the nerve terminal dense zones in each individual muscle should be used as the optimal target sites for BoNT injection when treating muscle spasms in children with cerebral palsy.

  2. Intramuscular nerve distribution patterns of anterior forearm muscles in children: a guide for botulinum toxin injection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fangjiu; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xie, Xiadan; Yang, Shengbo; Xu, Yan; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) can relieve muscle spasticity by blocking axon terminals acetylcholine release at the motor endplate (MEP) and is the safest and most effective agent for the treatment of muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. In order to achieve maximum effect with minimum effective dose of BoNT, one needs to choose an injection site as near to the MEP zone as possible. This requires a detailed understanding about the nerve terminal distributions within the muscles targeted for BoNT injection. This study focuses on BoNT treatment in children with muscle spasms caused by cerebral palsy. Considering the differences between children and adults in anatomy, we used child cadavers and measured both the nerve entry points and nerve terminal sense zones in three deep muscles of the anterior forearm: flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), flexor pollicis longus (FPL), and pronator quadratus (PQ). We measured the nerve entry points by using the forearm midline as a reference and demonstrated intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones by using a modified Sihler’s nerve staining technique. The locations of the nerve entry points and that of the nerve terminal dense zones in the muscles were compared. We found that all nerve entry points are away from the corresponding intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones. Simply selecting nerve entry points as the sites for BoNT injection may not be an optimal choice for best effects in blocking muscle spasm. We propose that the location of the nerve terminal dense zones in each individual muscle should be used as the optimal target sites for BoNT injection when treating muscle spasms in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:28078019

  3. Sensory disturbances of buccal and lingual nerve by muscle compression: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alvira-González, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several studies on cadavers dissection have shown that collateral branches of the trigeminal nerve cross muscle bundles on their way, being a possible etiological factor of some nerve disturbances. Case Report A 45-year-old man attended to the Temporomandibular Joint and Orofacial Pain Unit of the Master of Oral Surgery and Implantology in Hospital Odontològic of Barcelona University, referring tingling in the left hemifacial región and ipsilateral lingual side for one year, with discomfort when shaving or skin compression. Discussion Several branches of the trigeminal nerve follow a path through the masticatory muscles, being the lingual nerve and buccal nerve the most involved. The hyperactivity of the muscle bundles that are crossed by nerve structures generates a compression that could explain certain orofacial neuropathies (numbness and / or pain) in which a clear etiologic factor can not be identified. Key words:Buccal nerve, paresthesia, idiopathic trigeminal sensory neuropathy. PMID:26855715

  4. Intracellular calcium buffering declines in aging adrenergic nerves.

    PubMed

    Tsai, H; Hewitt, C W; Buchholz, J N; Duckles, S P

    1997-01-01

    Stimulation-evoked norepinephrine release from rat tail artery adrenergic nerves increased with advancing age in the Fischer-344 rat when function of norepinephrine uptake mechanisms and prejunctional alpha-2 adrenoceptors were blocked. When calcium channels were bypassed with the ionophore, ionomycin (4 microM), norepinephrine release from aged nerves (20 months) was still elevated as compared to 6-month-old nerves. Norepinephrine release stimulated by high K+ was also higher in 20-month nerves. The intracellular calcium chelator, 1,2 bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetomethylester (BAPTA/AM), was used to determine whether age-related increases in norepinephrine release could be reversed with the addition of an artificial intracellular calcium buffer. Exposure to BAPTA/AM decreased stimulation-evoked norepinephrine release in both old and young tail arteries; however, the effect was significantly greater in older arteries. When mitochondrial calcium uptake was compromised using the uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, dinitrophenol, BAPTA caused a further decrease in stimulation-evoked norepinephrine release in 20-month tail arteries with much less effect in 6-month-old nerves. These results suggest that intracellular calcium buffering is less efficient in older nerves.

  5. Hypermobile joints

    MedlinePlus

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Joint Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an ...

  6. Branching Patterns of Medial and Inferior Calcaneal Nerves Around the Tarsal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom Suk; Choung, Phil Woo; Kwon, Soon Wook; Rhyu, Im Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the bifurcation pattern of the tibial nerve and its branches. Methods Eleven legs of seven fresh cadavers were dissected. The reference line for the bifurcation point of tibial nerve branches was an imaginary horizontal line passing the tip of the medial malleolus. The distances between the reference line and the bifurcation points were measured. The bifurcation branching patterns were categorized as type I, the pattern in which the medial calcaneal nerve (MCN) branched most proximally; type II, the pattern in which the three branches occurred at the same point; and type III, in which MCN branched most distally. Results There were seven cases (64%) of type I, three cases (27%) of type III, and one case (9%) of type II. The median MCN branching point was 0.2 cm (range, -1 to 3 cm). The median bifurcation points of the lateral plantar nerves and inferior calcaneal nerves was -0.6 cm (range, -1.5 to 1 cm) and -2.5 cm (range, -3.5 to -1 cm), respectively. Conclusion MCN originated from the tibial nerve in most cases, and plantar nerves were bifurcated below the medial malleolus. In all cases, inferior calcaneal nerves originated from the lateral plantar nerve. These anatomical findings could be useful for performing procedures, such as nerve block or electrophysiologic studies. PMID:25750872

  7. Reflections on the contributions of Harvey Cushing to the surgery of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Patel, Neal; Nahed, Brian Vala; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Spinner, Robert J

    2011-05-01

    By the time Harvey Cushing entered medical school, nerve reconstruction techniques had been developed, but peripheral nerve surgery was still in its infancy. As an assistant surgical resident influenced by Dr. William Halsted, Cushing wrote a series of reports on the use of cocaine for nerve blocks. Following his residency training and a hiatus to further his clinical interests and intellectual curiosity, he traveled to Europe and met with a variety of surgeons, physiologists, and scientists, who likely laid the groundwork for Cushing's increased interest in peripheral nerve surgery. Returning to The Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1901, he began documenting these surgeries. Patient records preserved at Yale's Cushing Brain Tumor Registry describe Cushing's repair of ulnar and radial nerves, as well as his exploration of the brachial plexus for nerve repair or reconstruction. The authors reviewed Harvey Cushing's cases and provide 3 case illustrations not previously reported by Cushing involving neurolysis, nerve repair, and neurotization. Additionally, Cushing's experience with facial nerve neurotization is reviewed. The history, physical examination, and operative notes shed light on Cushing's diagnosis, strategy, technique, and hence, his surgery on peripheral nerve injury. These contributions complement others he made to surgery of the peripheral nervous system dealing with nerve pain, entrapment, and tumor.

  8. Soluble complement receptor 1 protects the peripheral nerve from early axon loss after injury.

    PubMed

    Ramaglia, Valeria; Wolterman, Ruud; de Kok, Maryla; Vigar, Miriam Ann; Wagenaar-Bos, Ineke; King, Rosalind Helen Mary; Morgan, Brian Paul; Baas, Frank

    2008-04-01

    Complement activation is a crucial early event in Wallerian degeneration. In this study we show that treatment of rats with soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1), an inhibitor of all complement pathways, blocked both systemic and local complement activation after crush injury of the sciatic nerve. Deposition of membrane attack complex (MAC) in the nerve was inhibited, the nerve was protected from axonal and myelin breakdown at 3 days after injury, and macrophage infiltration and activation was strongly reduced. We show that both classical and alternative complement pathways are activated after acute nerve trauma. Inhibition of the classical pathway by C1 inhibitor (Cetor) diminished, but did not completely block, MAC deposition in the injured nerve, blocked myelin breakdown, inhibited macrophage infiltration, and prevented macrophage activation at 3 days after injury. However, in contrast to sCR1 treatment, early signs of axonal degradation were visible in the nerve, linking MAC deposition to axonal damage. We conclude that sCR1 protects the nerve from early axon loss after injury and propose complement inhibition as a potential therapy for the treatment of diseases in which axon loss is the main cause of disabilities.

  9. Gangliosides are functional nerve cell ligands for myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), an inhibitor of nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Alka A; Patel, Himatkumar V; Fromholt, Susan E; Heffer-Lauc, Marija; Vyas, Kavita A; Dang, Jiyoung; Schachner, Melitta; Schnaar, Ronald L

    2002-06-11

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) binds to the nerve cell surface and inhibits nerve regeneration. The nerve cell surface ligand(s) for MAG are not established, although sialic acid-bearing glycans have been implicated. We identify the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as specific functional ligands for MAG-mediated inhibition of neurite outgrowth from primary rat cerebellar granule neurons. MAG-mediated neurite outgrowth inhibition is attenuated by (i) neuraminidase treatment of the neurons; (ii) blocking neuronal ganglioside biosynthesis; (iii) genetically modifying the terminal structures of nerve cell surface gangliosides; and (iv) adding highly specific IgG-class antiganglioside mAbs. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth inhibition is mimicked by highly multivalent clustering of GD1a or GT1b by using precomplexed antiganglioside Abs. These data implicate the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as functional MAG ligands and suggest that the first step in MAG inhibition is multivalent ganglioside clustering.

  10. Paediatric medial epicondyle fracture without elbow dislocation associated with intra-articular ulnar nerve entrapment.

    PubMed

    Elbashir, Mohamed; Domos, Peter; Latimer, Mark

    2015-11-05

    Elbow fractures are not uncommon in children, and some are associated with neurovascular injuries. Having a nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation is rare and was not described in the literature. Here, we have reported probably the first case of an ulnar nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation. A 9-year-old female presented to the emergency department after falling off a monkey bar. She had a painful, swollen and tender right elbow with no history or clinical signs of an elbow dislocation but had complete ulnar nerve palsy. She was managed initially with analgesia and plaster application and was taken directly to the operating theatre. Examination under anaesthesia revealed no elbow joint instability. The ulnar nerve was found entrapped between the trochlea and proximal ulna, intra-articularly. The medial epicondyle was also found avulsed from the humerus, with an incarcerated medial epicondylar fragment in the elbow joint.

  11. Paediatric medial epicondyle fracture without elbow dislocation associated with intra-articular ulnar nerve entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Elbashir, Mohamed; Domos, Peter; Latimer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Elbow fractures are not uncommon in children, and some are associated with neurovascular injuries. Having a nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation is rare and was not described in the literature. Here, we have reported probably the first case of an ulnar nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation. A 9-year-old female presented to the emergency department after falling off a monkey bar. She had a painful, swollen and tender right elbow with no history or clinical signs of an elbow dislocation but had complete ulnar nerve palsy. She was managed initially with analgesia and plaster application and was taken directly to the operating theatre. Examination under anaesthesia revealed no elbow joint instability. The ulnar nerve was found entrapped between the trochlea and proximal ulna, intra-articularly. The medial epicondyle was also found avulsed from the humerus, with an incarcerated medial epicondylar fragment in the elbow joint. PMID:26546588

  12. Nerve root replantation.

    PubMed

    Carlstedt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic avulsion of nerve roots from the spinal cord is a devastating event that usually occurs in the brachial plexus of young adults following motor vehicle or sports accidents or in newborn children during difficult childbirth. A strategy to restore motor function in the affected arm by reimplanting into the spinal cord the avulsed ventral roots or autologous nerve grafts connected distally to the avulsed roots has been developed. Surgical outcome is good and useful recovery in shoulder and proximal arm muscles occurs. Pain is alleviated with motor recovery but sensory improvement is poor when only motor conduits have been reconstructed. In experimental studies, restoration of sensory connections with general improvement in the outcome from this surgery is pursued.

  13. Testing block subdivision algorithms on block designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Natalie; Patterson, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Integrated land use-transportation models predict future transportation demand taking into account how households and firms arrange themselves partly as a function of the transportation system. Recent integrated models require parcels as inputs and produce household and employment predictions at the parcel scale. Block subdivision algorithms automatically generate parcel patterns within blocks. Evaluating block subdivision algorithms is done by way of generating parcels and comparing them to those in a parcel database. Three block subdivision algorithms are evaluated on how closely they reproduce parcels of different block types found in a parcel database from Montreal, Canada. While the authors who developed each of the algorithms have evaluated them, they have used their own metrics and block types to evaluate their own algorithms. This makes it difficult to compare their strengths and weaknesses. The contribution of this paper is in resolving this difficulty with the aim of finding a better algorithm suited to subdividing each block type. The proposed hypothesis is that given the different approaches that block subdivision algorithms take, it's likely that different algorithms are better adapted to subdividing different block types. To test this, a standardized block type classification is used that consists of mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories. A statistical method is used for finding a better algorithm and the probability it will perform well for a given block type. Results suggest the oriented bounding box algorithm performs better for warped non-uniform sites, as well as gridiron and fragmented uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel areas and widths. The Generalized Parcel Divider 1 algorithm performs better for gridiron non-uniform sites. The Straight Skeleton algorithm performs better for loop and lollipop networks as well as fragmented non-uniform and warped uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel shapes and patterns.

  14. Intra-articular peroneal nerve incarceration following multi-ligament knee injury.

    PubMed

    Alhoukail, Amro; Panu, Anukul; Olson, Jaret; Jomha, Nadr M

    2015-10-01

    Knee dislocation with a common peroneal nerve injury is a serious problem. A case of multi-ligamentous knee injury with the unusual and interesting finding of a common peroneal nerve rupture incarcerated within the knee joint is presented. MRI and arthroscopic images are used to document this occurrence. To date, there are no published reports of a similar finding in the English orthopaedic literature. Level of evidence IV.

  15. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  16. Reactive microglia after taste nerve injury: comparison to nerve injury models of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Dianna L; Finger, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    The chorda tympani (CT), which innervates taste buds on the anterior portion of the tongue, is susceptible to damage during inner ear surgeries. Injury to the CT causes a disappearance of taste buds, which is concurrent with significant microglial responses at central nerve terminals in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS). The resulting taste disturbances that can occur may persist for months or years, long after the nerve and taste buds have regenerated. These persistent changes in taste sensation suggest alterations in central functioning and may be related to the microglial responses. This is reminiscent of nerve injuries that result in chronic pain, where microglial reactivity is essential in maintaining the altered sensation (i.e., pain). In these models, methods that diminish microglial responses also diminish the corresponding pain behavior. Although the CT nerve does not contain nociceptive pain fibers, the microglial reactivity after CT damage is similar to that described in pain models. Therefore, methods that decrease microglial responses in pain models were used here to test if they could also affect microglial reactivity after CT injury. Treatment with minocycline, an antibiotic that dampens pain responsive microglia, was largely ineffective in diminishing microglial responses after CT injury. In addition, signaling through the toll-like 4 receptor (TLR4) does not seem to be required after CT injury as blocking or deleting TLR4 had no effect on microglial reactivity. These results suggest that microglial responses following CT injury rely on different signaling mechanisms than those described in nerve injuries resulting in chronic pain.

  17. Sensory nerve conduction and nociception in the equine lower forelimb during perineural bupivacaine infusion along the palmar nerves

    PubMed Central

    Zarucco, Laura; Driessen, Bernd; Scandella, Massimiliano; Cozzi, Francesca; Cantile, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study lateral palmar nerve (LPN) and medial palmar nerve (MPN) morphology and determine nociception and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) following placement of continuous peripheral nerve block (CPNB) catheters along LPN and MPN with subsequent bupivacaine (BUP) infusion. Myelinated nerve fiber distribution in LPN and MPN was examined after harvesting nerve specimens in 3 anesthetized horses and processing them for morphometric analysis. In 5 sedated horses, CPNB catheters were placed along each PN in both forelimbs. Horses then received in one forelimb 3 mL 0.125% BUP containing epinephrine 1:200 000 and 0.04% NaHCO3 per catheter site followed by 2 mL/h infusion over a 6-day period, while in the other forelimb equal amounts of saline (SAL) solution were administered. The hoof withdrawal response (HWR) threshold during pressure loading of the area above the dorsal coronary band was determined daily in both forelimbs. On day 6 SNCV was measured under general anesthesia of horses in each limb’s LPN and MPN to detect nerve injury, followed by CPNB catheter removal. The SNCV was also recorded in 2 anesthetized non-instrumented horses (sham controls). In both LPN and MPN myelinated fiber distributions were bimodal. The fraction of large fibers (>7 μm) was greater in the MPN than LPN (P < 0.05). Presence of CPNB catheters and SAL administration did neither affect measured HWR thresholds nor SNCVs, whereas BUP infusion suppressed HWRs. In conclusion, CPNB with 0.125% BUP provides pronounced analgesia by inhibiting sensory nerve conduction in the distal equine forelimb. PMID:21197231

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase-14 both sheds cell surface neuronal glial antigen 2 (NG2) proteoglycan on macrophages and governs the response to peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Tasuku; Remacle, Albert G; Angert, Mila; Shubayev, Igor; Shiryaev, Sergey A; Liu, Huaqing; Dolkas, Jennifer; Chernov, Andrei V; Strongin, Alex Y; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2015-02-06

    Neuronal glial antigen 2 (NG2) is an integral membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed by vascular pericytes, macrophages (NG2-Mφ), and progenitor glia of the nervous system. Herein, we revealed that NG2 shedding and axonal growth, either independently or jointly, depended on the pericellular remodeling events executed by membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP/MMP-14). Using purified NG2 ectodomain constructs, individual MMPs, and primary NG2-Mφ cultures, we demonstrated for the first time that MMP-14 performed as an efficient and unconventional NG2 sheddase and that NG2-Mφ infiltrated into the damaged peripheral nervous system. We then characterized the spatiotemporal relationships among MMP-14, MMP-2, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 in sciatic nerve. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2-free MMP-14 was observed in the primary Schwann cell cultures using the inhibitory hydroxamate warhead-based MP-3653 fluorescent reporter. In teased nerve fibers, MMP-14 translocated postinjury toward the nodes of Ranvier and its substrates, laminin and NG2. Inhibition of MMP-14 activity using the selective, function-blocking DX2400 human monoclonal antibody increased the levels of regeneration-associated factors, including laminin, growth-associated protein 43, and cAMP-dependent transcription factor 3, thereby promoting sensory axon regeneration after nerve crush. Concomitantly, DX2400 therapy attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity associated with nerve crush in rats. Together, our findings describe a new model in which MMP-14 proteolysis regulates the extracellular milieu and presents a novel therapeutic target in the damaged peripheral nervous system and neuropathic pain.

  19. Evaluation of the antinociceptive effects of lidocaine and bupivacaine on the tail nerves of healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuo; Chai, Yunfei; Gong, Chunyu; Du, Guizhi; Liu, Jin; Yang, Jing

    2013-07-01

    This study was designed to develop a simple and effective model of tail nerve block without general anaesthesia and surgical incision, to assist in exploring and studying new local anaesthetics. Tail nerves of adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were blocked by injecting 1% lidocaine and 0.5% bupivacaine, respectively. To evaluate the tail nerve block model, the effects of tail nerve blocks induced by two classical local anaesthetics were assessed and compared by recording disappearance and recovery time of thermal and mechanical nociception. The results showed that thermal and mechanical nociception of the tail disappeared after application of local anaesthetics but were unchanged by normal saline. No abnormal results were found in both the 3-day observation period and the pathological study, and pain thresholds of all rats recovered fully. We have thus developed an easily operated, reliable and reversible model of tail nerve block for conscious rats that can be used to evaluate efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of new local anaesthetics and additives.

  20. Joint Warrior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-04

    hour per response , including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...reflect my own personal views and are not necessarily endorsed by the NWC or the Department of the Navy. 14. ABSTRACT The way we fight wars has been...evolving over thousands of years. Today, the U.S. Navy, finds itself in the post- modern area of war fighting . Joint warfare is the latest

  1. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Robert; Dailey, Travis; Duncan, Kelsey; Abel, Naomi; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27983642

  2. Nerve regeneration in nerve grafts conditioned by vibration exposure.

    PubMed

    Bergman, S; Widerberg, A; Danielsen, N; Lundborg, G; Dahlin, L B

    1995-01-01

    Regeneration distances were studied in nerves from vibration-exposed limbs. One hind limb of anaesthetized rats was attached to a vibration exciter and exposed to vibration (80 Hz/32 m/s2) for 5 h/day for 2 or 5 days. Seven days after the latest vibration period a 10-mm long nerve graft was taken from the vibrated sciatic nerve and sutured into a corresponding defect in the con-tralateral sciatic nerve and vice versa, thereby creating two different models within the same animal: (i) regeneration from a freshly transected unvibrated nerve into a vibrated graft and (ii) regeneration from a vibrated nerve into a fresh nerve graft (vibrated recipient side). Four, 6 or 8 days postoperatively (p.o.) the distances achieved by the regenerating axons were determined using the pinch reflex test. Two days of vibration did not influence the regeneration, but 5 days of vibration reduced the initial delay period and a slight reduction of regeneration rate was observed. After 5 days of vibration an increased regeneration distance was observed in both models at day 4 p.o. and at day 6 p.o. in vibrated grafts. This study demonstrates that vibration can condition peripheral nerves and this may be caused by local changes in the peripheral nerve trunk and in the neuron itself.

  3. Massive hemothorax: A rare complication after supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shiv Kumar; Katyal, Surabhi; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    Plexus block is the preferred anesthesia plan for upper limb surgeries. Among the known complications, hematoma formation following the vascular trauma is often occur but this complication is frequently underreported. We present a case where a massive hemothorax developed post operatively in a patient who underwent resection of giant cell tumor of the right hand radius bone followed by arthroplasty under brachial plexus block using supraclavicular approach. This case report attempts to highlight the essence of remaining vigilant postoperatively for first initial days after brachial plexus block, especially after failed or multiple attempts. Ultrasound guided technique in combination with nerve stimulator has proven to be more reliable and safer than traditional techniques.

  4. 47 CFR 27.1325 - Resolution of disputes after grant of the upper 700 MHz D block license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 700 MHz D Block licensee, the Operating Company, the Network Assets Holder and the Public Safety... Security Bureau and the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau are delegated joint responsibility...

  5. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  6. Robotic phrenic nerve harvest: a feasibility study in a pig model.

    PubMed

    Porto de Melo, P; Miyamoto, H; Serradori, T; Ruggiero Mantovani, G; Selber, J; Facca, S; Xu, W-D; Santelmo, N; Liverneaux, P

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to report on the feasibility of robotic phrenic nerve harvest in a pig model. A surgical robot (Da Vinci S™ system, Intuitive Surgical(®), Sunnyvale, CA) was installed with three ports on the pig's left chest. The phrenic nerve was transected distally where it enters the diaphragm. The phrenic nerve harvest was successfully performed in 45 minutes without major complications. The advantages of robotic microsurgery for phrenic nerve harvest are the motion scaling up to 5 times, elimination of physiological tremor, and free movement of joint-equipped robotic arms. Robot-assisted neurolysis may be clinically useful for harvesting the phrenic nerve for brachial plexus reconstruction.

  7. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  8. Variant slips of psoas and iliacus muscles, with splitting of the femoral nerve.

    PubMed

    Spratt, J D; Logan, B M; Abrahams, P H

    1996-01-01

    In bilateral dissections of 68 cadavers, four examples were found unilaterally of variant slips of iliacus and psoas major muscles. In three of them the femoral nerve was pierced by the variant slip. One of these variants was a previously undocumented accessory slip of iliacus, originating from the iliolumbar ligament, passing inferiorly anterior to iliacus, and traversing the femoral nerve; its tendon split to be attached proximally to the lesser trochanter of the femur and distally to an unknown insertion. Such anomalies might cause tension on the femoral nerve resulting in referred pain to the hip and knee joints and to the lumbar dermatomes L2,3 and 4.

  9. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... 314. This combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, most pain relievers used for surgical procedures block activity in ...

  10. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. Nerves on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. D.; Shaver, M. L.; Batra, P.; Brown, K.

    1989-01-01

    Nerves are often visualized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the soft tissues on the chest and shoulder girdle. To learn the reasons for the contrast between the nerves and adjacent tissues, the authors obtained a fresh specimen containing part of the brachial plexus nerves from the left axilla and compared MRI with x-ray projections and photomicrographs of histologic sections. The results suggest that the high signals from the nerves stand out in contrast to the low signals from their rich vascular supply. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6A Figure 6B Figure 7 PMID:2733051

  12. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    PubMed

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  13. Development of Alkali Activated Geopolymer Masonry Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, K.; Radhakrishna; Sasalatti, Vinod

    2016-09-01

    Cement masonry units are not considered as sustainable since their production involves consumption of fuel, cement and natural resources and therefore it is essential to find alternatives. This paper reports on making of geopolymer solid & hollow blocks and masonry prisms using non conventional materials like fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) and manufactured sand and curing at ambient temperature. They were tested for water absorption, initial rate of water absorption, dry density, dimensionality, compressive, flexural and bond-strength which were tested for bond strength with and without lateral confinement, modulus of elasticity, alternative drying & wetting and masonry efficiency. The properties of geopolymer blocks were found superior to traditional masonry blocks and the masonry efficiency was found to increase with decrease in thickness of cement mortar joints. There was marginal difference in strength between rendered and unrendered geopolymer masonry blocks. The percentage weight gain after 7 cycles was less than 6% and the percentage reduction in strength of geopolymer solid blocks and hollow blocks were 26% and 28% respectively. Since the properties of geopolymer blocks are comparatively better than the traditional masonry they can be strongly recommended for structural masonry.

  14. Joint Warfighting Science and Technology Plan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    of the Extended Range MLRS rocket to a 3 mil system. The BAT Preplanned Product Improved ( BAT P3I) will be delivered by Army TACMS Block II, the...extended range Block IIa missiles, and MLRS rockets. BAT P3I utilizes acoustics, millimeter wave, and imaging infrared seekers while expanding the BAT ...target mode prior to impact. The BAT P3I is currently in the Dem Val Phase with two competing seeker concepts. The Air Force and Army are jointly

  15. Accessory nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Olarte, M; Adams, D

    1977-11-01

    After apparently uncomplicated excision of benign lesions in the posterior cervical triangle, two patients had shoulder pain. In one, neck pain and trapezius weakness were not prominent until one month after surgery. Inability to elevate the arm above the horizontal without externally rotating it, and prominent scapular displacement on arm abduction, but not on forward pushing movements, highlighted the trapezius dysfunction and differentiated it from serratus anterior weakness. Spinal accessory nerve lesions should be considered when minor surgical procedures, lymphadenitis, minor trauma, or tumours involved the posterior triangle of the neck.

  16. Blocked Tear Duct

    MedlinePlus

    Blocked tear duct Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff When you have a blocked tear duct, your tears can't drain normally, leaving you ... in the tear drainage system. A blocked tear duct is common in newborns. The condition usually gets ...

  17. An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst: a case example and an anatomical explanation to support the articular theory within cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Capek, Stepan; Koutlas, Ioannis G; Strasia, Rhys P; Amrami, Kimberly K; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    The authors describe the case of an intraneural ganglion cyst involving a cranial nerve (V3), which was found to have a joint connection in support of an articular origin within the cranial nerves. An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst was incidentally discovered on a plain radiograph prior to edentulation. It was resected from within the mandibular canal with no joint connection perceived at surgery. Histologically, the cyst was confirmed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. Reinterpretation of the preoperative CT scan showed the cyst arising from the temporomandibular joint. This case is consistent with the articular (synovial) theory of intraneural ganglion cysts. An anatomical explanation and potential joint connection are provided for this case as well as several other cases of intraneural cysts in the literature, and thus unifying cranial nerve involvement with accepted concepts of intraneural ganglion cyst formation and propagation.

  18. Total Spinal Block after Thoracic Paravertebral Block

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Palabıyık, Onur

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) can be performed with or without general anaesthesia for various surgical procedures. TPVB is a popular anaesthetic technique due to its low side effect profile and high analgesic potency. We used 20 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine for a single injection of unilateral TPVB at the T7 level with neurostimulator in a 63 year old patient with co-morbid disease who underwent cholecystectomy. Following the application patient lost consciousness, and was intubated. Haemodynamic instability was normalised with rapid volume replacement and vasopressors. Anaesthetic drugs were stopped at the end of the surgery and muscle relaxant was antagonised. Return of mucle strenght was shown with neuromuscular block monitoring. Approximately three hours after TPVB, spontaneous breathing started and consciousness returned. A total spinal block is a rare and life-threatening complication. A total spinal block is a complication of spinal anaesthesia, and it can also occur after peripheral blocks. Clinical presentation is characterised by hypotension, bradicardia, apnea, and cardiac arrest. An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is life saving. In this case report, we want to present total spinal block after TPVB. PMID:27366387

  19. Heart Rate Changes in Response to Mechanical Pressure Stimulation of Skeletal Muscles Are Mediated by Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Hotta, Harumi

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of mechanoreceptors in skeletal muscles such as contraction and stretch elicits reflexive autonomic nervous system changes which impact cardiovascular control. There are pressure-sensitive mechanoreceptors in skeletal muscles. Mechanical pressure stimulation of skeletal muscles can induce reflex changes in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure, although the neural mechanisms underlying this effect are unclear. We examined the contribution of cardiac autonomic nerves to HR responses induced by mechanical pressure stimulation (30 s, ~10 N/cm(2)) of calf muscles in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Animals were artificially ventilated and kept warm using a heating pad and lamp, and respiration and core body temperature were maintained within physiological ranges. Mechanical stimulation was applied using a stimulation probe 6 mm in diameter with a flat surface. Cardiac sympathetic and vagus nerves were blocked to test the contribution of the autonomic nerves. For sympathetic nerve block, bilateral stellate ganglia, and cervical sympathetic nerves were surgically sectioned, and for vagus nerve block, the nerve was bilaterally severed. In addition, mass discharges of cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve were electrophysiologically recorded. Mechanical stimulation increased or decreased HR in autonomic nerve-intact rats (range: -56 to +10 bpm), and the responses were negatively correlated with pre-stimulus HR (r = -0.65, p = 0.001). Stimulation-induced HR responses were markedly attenuated by blocking the cardiac sympathetic nerve (range: -9 to +3 bpm, p < 0.0001) but not the vagus nerve (range: -75 to +30 bpm, p = 0.17). In the experiments with cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve activity recordings, mechanical stimulation increased, or decreased the frequency of sympathetic nerve activity in parallel with HR (r = 0.77, p = 0.0004). Furthermore, the changes in sympathetic nerve activity were negatively correlated with its tonic level (r = -0.62, p = 0.0066). These

  20. Heart Rate Changes in Response to Mechanical Pressure Stimulation of Skeletal Muscles Are Mediated by Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Hotta, Harumi

    2017-01-01

    Stimulation of mechanoreceptors in skeletal muscles such as contraction and stretch elicits reflexive autonomic nervous system changes which impact cardiovascular control. There are pressure-sensitive mechanoreceptors in skeletal muscles. Mechanical pressure stimulation of skeletal muscles can induce reflex changes in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure, although the neural mechanisms underlying this effect are unclear. We examined the contribution of cardiac autonomic nerves to HR responses induced by mechanical pressure stimulation (30 s, ~10 N/cm2) of calf muscles in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Animals were artificially ventilated and kept warm using a heating pad and lamp, and respiration and core body temperature were maintained within physiological ranges. Mechanical stimulation was applied using a stimulation probe 6 mm in diameter with a flat surface. Cardiac sympathetic and vagus nerves were blocked to test the contribution of the autonomic nerves. For sympathetic nerve block, bilateral stellate ganglia, and cervical sympathetic nerves were surgically sectioned, and for vagus nerve block, the nerve was bilaterally severed. In addition, mass discharges of cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve were electrophysiologically recorded. Mechanical stimulation increased or decreased HR in autonomic nerve-intact rats (range: −56 to +10 bpm), and the responses were negatively correlated with pre-stimulus HR (r = −0.65, p = 0.001). Stimulation-induced HR responses were markedly attenuated by blocking the cardiac sympathetic nerve (range: −9 to +3 bpm, p < 0.0001) but not the vagus nerve (range: −75 to +30 bpm, p = 0.17). In the experiments with cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve activity recordings, mechanical stimulation increased, or decreased the frequency of sympathetic nerve activity in parallel with HR (r = 0.77, p = 0.0004). Furthermore, the changes in sympathetic nerve activity were negatively correlated with its tonic level (r = −0.62, p = 0

  1. Angiotensin II, sympathetic nerve activity and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Seto, Sai-Wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity has been reported to be increased in both humans and animals with chronic heart failure. One of the mechanisms believed to be responsible for this phenomenon is increased systemic and cerebral angiotensin II signaling. Plasma angiotensin II is increased in humans and animals with chronic heart failure. The increase in angiotensin II signaling enhances sympathetic nerve activity through actions on both central and peripheral sites during chronic heart failure. Angiotensin II signaling is enhanced in different brain sites such as the paraventricular nucleus, the rostral ventrolateral medulla and the area postrema. Blocking angiotensin II type 1 receptors decreases sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex when therapy is administered to the paraventricular nucleus. Injection of an angiotensin receptor blocker into the area postrema activates the sympathoinhibitory baroreflex. In peripheral regions, angiotensin II elevates both norepinephrine release and synthesis and inhibits norepinephrine uptake at nerve endings, which may contribute to the increase in sympathetic nerve activity seen in chronic heart failure. Increased circulating angiotensin II during chronic heart failure may enhance the sympathoexcitatory chemoreflex and inhibit the sympathoinhibitory baroreflex. In addition, increased circulating angiotensin II can directly act on the central nervous system via the subfornical organ and the area postrema to increase sympathetic outflow. Inhibition of angiotensin II formation and its type 1 receptor has been shown to have beneficial effects in chronic heart failure patients.

  2. Endoscopic decompression for intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of endoscopic decompression surgery for intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression in the lumbar spine. Methods The records from seventeen consecutive patients treated with endoscopic posterior decompression without fusion for intaforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression in the lumbar spine (7 males and 10 females, mean age: 67.9 ± 10.7 years) were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical procedures consisted of lateral or translaminal decompression with or without discectomy. The following items were investigated: 1) the preoperative clinical findings; 2) the radiologic findings including MRI and computed tomography-discography; and 3) the surgical outcome as evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale for lower back pain (JOA score). Results All patients had neurological findings compatible with a radiculopathy, such as muscle weakness and sensory disturbance. MRI demonstrated the obliteration of the normal increased signal intensity fat in the intervertebral foramen. Ten patients out of 14 who underwent computed tomography-discography exhibited disc protrusion or herniation. Selective nerve root block was effective in all patients. During surgery, 12 patients were found to have a protruded disc or herniation that compressed the nerve root. Sixteen patients reported pain relief immediately after surgery. Conclusions Intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression is a rare but distinct pathological condition causing severe radiculopathy. Endoscopic decompression surgery is considered to be an appropriate and less invasive surgical option. PMID:21439083

  3. Stimulation of phrenic nerve activity by an acetylcholine releasing drug: 4-aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Folgering, H; Rutten, J; Agoston, S

    1979-03-16

    The effect of the acetylcholine releaser 4-aminopyridine on ventilation was studied by recording and quantifying the efferent phrenic nerve activity in 40 paralysed and vagotomized cats; with arterial Po2, PCO2 and pH kept constant. 4-Aminopyridine, given intravenously or in the vertebral artery, stimulates the phrenic nerve activity in a dose dependent manner. The stimulatory effects of 4-aminopyridine on the phrenic nerve activity could be abolished completely by administration of high doses of atropine. We conclude that 4-aminopyridine, which is used clinically for the reversal of a neuromuscular block, stimulates the phrenic nerve activity. Since the role of cholinergic mechanisms in the central chemoreception has been well established, the effect on the phrenic nerve activity is most probably by an increased release of acetylcholine at the site of the central chemoreceptors.

  4. The Space Block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Ciba-Geigy Corporation's "Space Block," technically known as TDT-177-51 Ren Shape epoxy model block, is a two-foot by two-foot by five- inch plastic block from which master models of the Space Shuttle protective tiles are cut by NC machines. Space Block is made of epoxy resin with low viscosity and slow curing time, enabling the large block to cure uniformly without cracking. Rockwell International uses master models of Shuttle tiles to check accuracy of NC machines accurately by comparing model dimensions with specifications. New epoxy resins are attracting broad interest as a replacement for traditional materials used in modeling auto, aerospace or other parts.

  5. Long thoracic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wiater, J M; Flatow, E L

    1999-11-01

    Injury to the long thoracic nerve causing paralysis or weakness of the serratus anterior muscle can be disabling. Patients with serratus palsy may present with pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation, and scapular winging with medial translation of the scapula, rotation of the inferior angle toward the midline, and prominence of the vertebral border. Long thoracic nerve dysfunction may result from trauma or may occur without injury. Fortunately, most patients experience a return of serratus anterior function with conservative treatment, but recovery may take as many as 2 years. Bracing often is tolerated poorly. Patients with severe symptoms in whom 12 months of conservative treatment has failed may benefit from surgical reconstruction. Although many surgical procedures have been described, the current preferred treatment is transfer of the sternal head of the pectoralis major tendon to the inferior angle of the scapula reinforced with fascia or tendon autograft. Many series have shown good to excellent results, with consistent improvement in function, elimination of winging, and reduction of pain.

  6. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at ...

  7. Congenital complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, B.; Sheikh, Z.; Cibils, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital complete heart block in utero has become diagnosed more frequently with the clinical use of fetal echocardiography. The fetus with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic or may develop congestive heart failure. Congenital complete heart block is more frequently seen in infants of mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus, both clinically manifested and subclinical systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antibodies (SS-A and SS-B antibodies). At birth, the neonate with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic and may not require a pacemaker to increase the heart rate. The indications for a pacemaker in neonates with complete heart block have been discussed. Both in-utero and neonatal management of congenital complete heart block are discussed to manage congestive heart failure in a fetus. Four patients with congenital complete heart block are presented covering a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management both in the fetal and neonatal period. Images Figure 1 PMID:8961692

  8. Modification of the peripheral nerve disturbance in ciguatera poisoning in rats with lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J; Flowers, A E; Capra, M F

    1993-07-01

    Electrophysiological studies were performed on the ventral tail nerve of adult rats following intraperitoneal injection of a crude extract of ciguatoxin from known toxic fish flesh. Ciguatoxin induced significant slowing of both mixed and motor nerve conduction velocities and also significant reductions in both motor and mixed nerve amplitudes. Both absolute and supernormal periods were significantly prolonged together with an increase in the magnitude of the supernormal response. These electrophysiological disturbances were modified or blocked by intraperitoneal lidocaine. These findings suggest that lidocaine may have a potential therapeutic application in the treatment of the neurological disturbance in acute ciguatera poisoning in humans.

  9. Multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy presenting as a peripheral nerve tumor.

    PubMed

    Allen, David C; Smallman, Clare A; Mills, Kerry R

    2006-09-01

    A man with multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM), or Lewis-Sumner syndrome, presented with a progressive left lumbosacral plexus lesion resembling a neurofibroma. After 7 years he developed a left ulnar nerve lesion with conduction block in its upper segment. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin improved the symptoms and signs of both lesions. We conclude that inflammatory neuropathy must be considered in the differential diagnosis of peripheral nerve tumors, and that unifocal lesions may precede multifocal involvement in MADSAM by several years. In addition, we discuss the clinical features in 9 patients attending a specialist peripheral nerve clinic and review the literature.

  10. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  11. Neuromas of the calcaneal nerves.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Dellon, A L

    2001-11-01

    A neuroma of a calcaneal nerve has never been reported. A series of 15 patients with heel pain due to a neuroma of a calcaneal nerve are reviewed. These patients previously had either a plantar fasciotomy (n = 4), calcaneal spur removal (n = 2), ankle fusion (n = 2), or tarsal tunnel decompression (n = 7). Neuromas occurred on calcaneal branches that arose from either the posterior tibial nerve (n = 1), lateral plantar nerve (n = 1), the medial plantar nerve (n = 9), or more than one of these nerves (n = 4). Operative approach was through an extended tarsal tunnel incision to permit identification of all calcaneal nerves. The neuroma was resected and implanted into the flexor hallucis longus muscle. Excellent relief of pain occurred in 60%, and good relief in 33%. One patient (17%) had no improvement and required resection of the lateral plantar nerve. Awareness that the heel may be innervated by multiple calcaneal branches suggests that surgery for heel pain of neural origin employ a surgical approach that permits identification of all possible calcaneal branches.

  12. Utilization of Facet Joint and Sacroiliac Joint Interventions in Medicare Population from 2000 to 2014: Explosive Growth Continues!

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-10-01

    Increasing utilization of interventional techniques in managing chronic spinal pain, specifically facet joint interventions and sacroiliac joint injections, is a major concern of healthcare policy makers. We analyzed the patterns of utilization of facet and sacroiliac joint interventions in managing chronic spinal pain. The results showed significant increase of facet joint interventions and sacroiliac joint injections from 2000 to 2014 in Medicare FFS service beneficiaries. Overall, the Medicare population increased 35 %, whereas facet joint and sacroiliac joint interventions increased 313.3 % per 100,000 Medicare population with an annual increase of 10.7 %. While the increases were uniform from 2000 to 2014, there were some decreases noted for facet joint interventions in 2007, 2010, and 2013, whereas for sacroiliac joint injections, the decreases were noted in 2007 and 2013. The increases were for cervical and thoracic facet neurolysis at 911.5 % compared to lumbosacral facet neurolysis of 567.8 %, 362.9 % of cervical and thoracic facet joint blocks, 316.9 % of sacroiliac joints injections, and finally 227.3 % of lumbosacral facet joint blocks.

  13. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  14. Primary afferent depolarization of muscle afferents elicited by stimulation of joint afferents in cats with intact neuraxis and during reversible spinalization.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, J; Eguibar, J R; Jiménez, I; Schmidt, R F; Rudomin, P

    1993-11-01

    1. In the anesthetized and artificially ventilated cat, stimulation of the posterior articular nerve (PAN) with low strengths (1.2-1.4 x T) produced a small negative response (N1) in the cord dorsum of the lumbosacral spinal cord with a mean onset latency of 5.2 ms. Stronger stimuli (> 1.4 x T) produced two additional components (N2 and N3) with longer latencies (mean latencies 7.5 and 15.7 ms, respectively), usually followed by a slow positivity lasting 100-150 ms. With stimulus strengths above 10 x T there was in some experiments a delayed response (N4; mean latency 32 ms). 2. Activation of posterior knee joint nerve with single pulses and intensities producing N1 responses only, usually produced no dorsal root potentials (DRPs), or these were rather small. Stimulation with strengths producing N2 and N3 responses produced distinct DRPs. Trains of pulses were clearly more effective than single pulses in producing DRPs, even in the low-intensity range. 3. Cooling the thoracic spinal cord to block impulse conduction, increased the DRPs and the N3 responses produced by PAN stimulation without significantly affecting the N2 responses. Reversible spinalization also increased the DRPs produced by stimulation of cutaneous nerves. In contrast, the DRPs produced by stimulation of group I afferents from flexors were reduced. 4. Conditioning electrical stimulation of intermediate and high-threshold myelinated fibers in the PAN depressed the DRPs produced by stimulation of group I muscle and of cutaneous nerves. 5. Analysis of the intraspinal threshold changes of single Ia and Ib fibers has provided evidence that stimulation of intermediate and high threshold myelinated fibers in the posterior knee joint nerve inhibits the primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of Ia fibers, and may either produce PAD or inhibit the PAD in Ib fibers, in the same manner as stimulation of cutaneous nerves. In 7/16 group I fibers the inhibition of the PAD was increased during reversible

  15. Nerve glue for upper extremity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tse, Raymond; Ko, Jason H

    2012-11-01

    Nerve glue is an attractive alternative to sutures to improve the results of nerve repair. Improved axon alignment, reduced scar and inflammation, greater and faster reinnervation, and better functional results have been reported with the use of nerve glue. The different types of nerve glue and the evidence to support or oppose their use are reviewed. Although the ideal nerve glue has yet to be developed, fibrin sealants can be used as nerve glue in select clinical situations. Technology to allow suture-free nerve repair is one development that can potentially improve functional nerve recovery and the outcomes of upper extremity reconstruction.

  16. Facial nerve rerouting in skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Parhizkar, Nooshin; Hiltzik, David H; Selesnick, Samuel H

    2005-08-01

    Facial nerve rerouting techniques were developed to facilitate re-section of extensive tumors occupying the skull base. Facial nerve rerouting has its own limitations and risks, requiring microsurgical expertise, additional surgical time, and often some degree of facial nerve paresis. This article presents different degrees of anterior and posterior facial nerve rerouting, techniques of facial nerve rerouting, and a comprehensive review of outcomes. It then reviews anatomic and functional preservation of the facial nerve in acoustic neuroma resection, technical aspects of facial nerve dissection, intracranial facial nerve repair options, and outcomes for successful acoustic neuroma surgery.

  17. Truncal blocks for perioperative pain management: a review of the literature and evolving techniques.

    PubMed

    Go, Ramon; Huang, Yolanda Y; Weyker, Paul D; Webb, Christopher Aj

    2016-10-01

    As the American healthcare system continues to evolve and reimbursement becomes tied to value-based incentive programs, perioperative pain management will become increasingly important. Regional anesthetic techniques are only one component of a successful multimodal pain regimen. In recent years, the use of peripheral and paraneuraxial blocks to provide chest wall and abdominal analgesia has gained popularity. When used within a multimodal regimen, truncal blocks may provide similar analgesia when compared with other regional anesthetic techniques. While there are other reviews that cover this topic, our review will also highlight the emerging role for serratus plane blocks, pectoral nerve blocks and quadratus lumborum blocks in providing thoracic and abdominal analgesia.

  18. Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Chrona, Eleni; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Damigos, Dimitrios; Batistaki, Chrysanthi

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES) is a commonly underdiagnosed and undertreated chronic state of pain. This syndrome is characterized by the entrapment of the cutaneous branches of the lower thoracoabdominal intercostal nerves at the lateral border of the rectus abdominis muscle, which causes severe, often refractory, chronic pain. This narrative review aims to identify the possible therapeutic strategies for the management of the syndrome. Seventeen studies about ACNES therapy were reviewed; of them, 15 were case–control studies, case series, or case reports, and two were randomized controlled trials. The presently available management strategies for ACNES include trigger point injections (diagnostic and therapeutic), ultrasound-guided blocks, chemical neurolysis, and surgical neurectomy, in combination with systemic medication, as well as some emerging techniques, such as radiofrequency ablation and neuromodulation. An increased awareness of the syndrome and the use of specific diagnostic criteria for its recognition are required to facilitate an early and successful management. This review compiles the proposed management strategies for ACNES. PMID:28144159

  19. Muscle, reflex and central components in the control of the ankle joint in healthy and spastic man.

    PubMed

    Sinkjaer, T

    1997-01-01

    healthy and spastic persons, we found a mechanically strong stretch reflex in the isometric, contracted muscles during sitting. This posed the question; how is the reflex regulated during more functional motor tasks. This was dealt with by studying the H-reflex during isometric ramp contractions and during walking in healthy and spastic persons. In the healthy subjects the H-reflex was modulated in consistency with a task dependent control. In the spastic patients the H-reflex lacked a task dependent modulation. In consistency with earlier findings it was suggested that the decreased modulation could have been caused by decreased control of the pre-synaptic inhibition of the Ia terminals or a change in recruitment gain. To test if the stretch reflex behaved as the H-reflex, the short latency stretch reflex was investigated during walking. Here we found that the stretch reflex was strongly modulated during a step in healthy subjects as seen for the H-reflex, but when comparing the stretch reflex at matched excitation levels (same background EMGs) during standing and walking, no task-specific reflex modulation was found except the one relating to the excitation level. Therefore, the results emphasise that at least during walking and standing it is not always possible to draw conclusions about the stretch reflex based on observations of the H-reflex. When investigating the modulation of the short latency stretch reflex during walking in spastic patients, we found that the stretch reflex modulation was impaired in spastic patients at least to the extent demonstrated earlier for the H-reflex. The passive stiffness of the ankle joint was at the same time increased in the patients. At matched ankle extensor contraction levels, stretch responses were compared before and after reversible block of the common peroneal nerve and during an attempted, voluntary, fictive dorsiflexion after common peroneal nerve block. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  20. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Sunita; Lee, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSMs) grow slowly and, if untreated, patients may have stable visual function for up to several years. Treatment of an ONSM may lead to vision loss (radiation retinopathy or optic neuropathy). Therefore, observation is recommended for a patient with ONSM and relatively preserved visual acuity, color vision, pupils, and visual fields. Follow-up every 4 to 6 months initially is recommended extending to annual examinations if visual function and tumor size remain stable for a few years. Neuroimaging can be repeated every 12 months. An undisputed decline in visual function or any intracranial extension warrants treatment of the ONSM. The treatment of choice for a tumor confined to the orbit is stereotactic fractionated radiation. Stereotactic fractionated radiation uses multiple small doses of radiation using tight margins. A reasonable alternative, three-dimensional conformal fractionated radiation uses computed tomography-guided planning but usually requires wider margins. Conventional radiation uses much wider margins and would not be recommended for treatment of ONSM. The radiation can be administered during 5 to 6 weeks in 28 daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy/fraction to a total of 50.4 to 56 Gy. Many patients have improvement or stabilization of their visual function. Gamma knife radiosurgery does not have a role in ONSM because the required dose is toxic to the optic nerve. A tumor that extends intracranially may be treated with fractionated radiation if any vision remains. Surgical excision can be considered for significant intracranial extension but this often leads to complete vision loss in the ipsilateral eye. A blind, disfigured eye also may be treated with en bloc surgical resection of the meningioma.