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Sample records for joint time-frequency domain

  1. A Robust Image Watermarking in the Joint Time-Frequency Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Mahmut; Akan, Aydın; Çekiç, Yalçın

    2010-12-01

    With the rapid development of computers and internet applications, copyright protection of multimedia data has become an important problem. Watermarking techniques are proposed as a solution to copyright protection of digital media files. In this paper, a new, robust, and high-capacity watermarking method that is based on spatiofrequency (SF) representation is presented. We use the discrete evolutionary transform (DET) calculated by the Gabor expansion to represent an image in the joint SF domain. The watermark is embedded onto selected coefficients in the joint SF domain. Hence, by combining the advantages of spatial and spectral domain watermarking methods, a robust, invisible, secure, and high-capacity watermarking method is presented. A correlation-based detector is also proposed to detect and extract any possible watermarks on an image. The proposed watermarking method was tested on some commonly used test images under different signal processing attacks like additive noise, Wiener and Median filtering, JPEG compression, rotation, and cropping. Simulation results show that our method is robust against all of the attacks.

  2. Joint Estimation of Time-Frequency Signature and DOA Based on STFD for Multicomponent Chirp Signals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ziyue; Liu, Congfeng

    2014-01-01

    In the study of the joint estimation of time-frequency signature and direction of arrival (DOA) for multicomponent chirp signals, an estimation method based on spatial time-frequency distributions (STFDs) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, array signal model for multicomponent chirp signals is presented and then array processing is applied in time-frequency analysis to mitigate cross-terms. According to the results of the array processing, Hough transform is performed and the estimation of time-frequency signature is obtained. Subsequently, subspace method for DOA estimation based on STFD matrix is achieved. Simulation results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. PMID:27382610

  3. A Joint Time-Frequency and Matrix Decomposition Feature Extraction Methodology for Pathological Voice Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoraani, Behnaz; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2009-12-01

    The number of people affected by speech problems is increasing as the modern world places increasing demands on the human voice via mobile telephones, voice recognition software, and interpersonal verbal communications. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology for automatic pattern classification of pathological voices. The main contribution of this paper is extraction of meaningful and unique features using Adaptive time-frequency distribution (TFD) and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF). We construct Adaptive TFD as an effective signal analysis domain to dynamically track the nonstationarity in the speech and utilize NMF as a matrix decomposition (MD) technique to quantify the constructed TFD. The proposed method extracts meaningful and unique features from the joint TFD of the speech, and automatically identifies and measures the abnormality of the signal. Depending on the abnormality measure of each signal, we classify the signal into normal or pathological. The proposed method is applied on the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI) voice disorders database which consists of 161 pathological and 51 normal speakers, and an overall classification accuracy of 98.6% was achieved.

  4. Gearbox fault diagnosis based on time-frequency domain synchronous averaging and feature extraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengli; Tang, Jiong

    2016-04-01

    Gearbox is one of the most vulnerable subsystems in wind turbines. Its healthy status significantly affects the efficiency and function of the entire system. Vibration based fault diagnosis methods are prevalently applied nowadays. However, vibration signals are always contaminated by noise that comes from data acquisition errors, structure geometric errors, operation errors, etc. As a result, it is difficult to identify potential gear failures directly from vibration signals, especially for the early stage faults. This paper utilizes synchronous averaging technique in time-frequency domain to remove the non-synchronous noise and enhance the fault related time-frequency features. The enhanced time-frequency information is further employed in gear fault classification and identification through feature extraction algorithms including Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA), Multilinear Principal Component Analysis (MPCA), and Locally Linear Embedding (LLE). Results show that the LLE approach is the most effective to classify and identify different gear faults.

  5. Comparison of pulse and SFCW GPR in time, frequency and wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pue, Jan; Van De Vijver, Ellen; Cornelis, Wim; Van Meirvenne, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems operating in the time- or frequency domain are two fundamentally different concepts, pursuing the same objective: non-invasive characterization of the subsurface. The aim of this study is to compare the performance of these two GPR systems in the time, frequency and wavelet domain. The time domain GPR investigated is the Utilityscan DF. This is a ground coupled GPR with a digital dual-frequency antenna (300 and 800 MHz). The Geoscope GS3F and VX1213 antenna array from 3DRadar is the frequency domain GPR used in this comparison. It is an air coupled stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) GPR with a frequency bandwidth from 200 MHz to 3000 MHz. Using data from several test sites of various soil types, the data is evaluated in the time domain, the frequency domain and the wavelet domain. Each of these domains contains specific information regarding the data quality. Presenting the data in the time domain, allows visualizing the subsurface reflections. This makes it visible how strong the data is affected by internal interference, ringing and other noise. To compensate for the attenuation of the signal in time, automatic gain control is applied. The maximum of this gain function indicates the time where the signal is attenuated completely and noise becomes more dominant, corresponding with the maximal penetration depth of the different GPR systems. In the frequency domain, the data allows to investigate which frequencies contain most valuable information and which ones are affected by noise. Finally, by performing a wavelet transformation the data is transformed to the time-frequency domain. Due to frequency dependent attenuation of electromagnetic signals in the soil, low frequencies will be more dominant in deeper layers, and high frequencies will not be present anymore. This is determining for the range resolution of the data throughout the traveltime of the signal. This work is a contribution to COST Action TU1208 "Civil

  6. Visualization and analysis of modulated pulses in magnetic resonance by joint time-frequency representations.

    PubMed

    Köcher, S S; Heydenreich, T; Glaser, S J

    2014-10-17

    We study the utility of joint time-frequency representations for the analysis of shaped or composite pulses for magnetic resonance. Such spectrograms are commonly used for the visualization of shaped laser pulses in optical spectroscopy. This intuitive representation provides additional insight compared to conventional approaches, which exclusively show either temporal or spectral information. We focus on the short-time Fourier transform, which provides not only amplitude but also phase information. The approach is illustrated for broadband inversion pulses, multiple quantum excitation and broadband heteronuclear decoupling. The physical interpretation and validity of the approach is discussed.

  7. Statistical significance of task related deep brain EEG dynamic changes in the time-frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Chládek, J; Brázdil, M; Halámek, J; Plešinger, F; Jurák, P

    2013-01-01

    We present an off-line analysis procedure for exploring brain activity recorded from intra-cerebral electroencephalographic data (SEEG). The objective is to determine the statistical differences between different types of stimulations in the time-frequency domain. The procedure is based on computing relative signal power change and subsequent statistical analysis. An example of characteristic statistically significant event-related de/synchronization (ERD/ERS) detected across different frequency bands following different oddball stimuli is presented. The method is used for off-line functional classification of different brain areas. PMID:24109865

  8. Joint Time-Frequency-Space Classification of EEG in a Brain-Computer Interface Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Gary N. Garcia; Ebrahimi, Touradj; Vesin, Jean-Marc

    2003-12-01

    Brain-computer interface is a growing field of interest in human-computer interaction with diverse applications ranging from medicine to entertainment. In this paper, we present a system which allows for classification of mental tasks based on a joint time-frequency-space decorrelation, in which mental tasks are measured via electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. The efficiency of this approach was evaluated by means of real-time experimentations on two subjects performing three different mental tasks. To do so, a number of protocols for visualization, as well as training with and without feedback, were also developed. Obtained results show that it is possible to obtain good classification of simple mental tasks, in view of command and control, after a relatively small amount of training, with accuracies around 80%, and in real time.

  9. Real-time frequency-domain fiber optic sensor for intra-arterial blood oxygen measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcala, J. R.; Scott, Ian L.; Parker, Jennifer W.; Atwater, Beauford W.; Yu, Clement; Fischer, Russell; Bellingrath, K.

    1993-05-01

    A real time frequency domain phosphorimeter capable of measuring precise and accurate excited state lifetimes for determining oxygen is described. This frequency domain instrument does not make use of cross correlation techniques traditionally used in frequency domain fluorometers. Instead, the electrical signal from the detector is filtered to contain only the first several harmonics. This filtered signal is then sampled and averaged over a few thousand cycles. The absolute phase and absolute modulation of each sampled harmonic of the excitation and of the luminescence is computed by employing fast Fourier transform algorithms. The phase delay and the modulation ratio is then calculated at each harmonic frequency. A least squares fit is performed in the frequency domain to obtain the lifetimes of discrete exponentials. Oxygen concentrations are computed from these lifetimes. Prototypes based on these techniques were built employing commercially available components. Results from measurements in saline solution and in the arterial blood of dogs show that oxygen concentrations can be determined reproducibly. The system drift is less than 1% in over 100 hours of continuous operation. The performance of fiber optic sensors was evaluated in dogs over a period of 10 hours. The sensors tracked changes in arterial oxygen tension over the course of the experiment without instabilities. The overall response of the system was about 90 seconds. The update time was 3 seconds.

  10. Wavelet-transform-based time-frequency domain reflectometry for reduction of blind spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sin Ho; Park, Jin Bae; Choi, Yoon Ho

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, wavelet-transform-based time-frequency domain reflectometry (WTFDR) is proposed to reduce the blind spot in reflectometry. TFDR has a blind spot problem when the time delay between the reference signal and the reflected signal is short enough compared with the time duration of the reference signal. To solve the blind spot problem, the wavelet transform (WT) is used because the WT has linearity. Using the characteristics of the WT, the overlapped reference signal at the measured signal can be separated and the blind spot is reduced by obtaining the difference of the wavelet coefficients for the reference and reflected signals. In the proposed method, the complex wavelet is utilized as a mother wavelet because the reference signal in WTFDR has a complex form. Finally, the computer simulations and the real experiments are carried out to confirm the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed method.

  11. Non-stationary frequency domain system identification using time-frequency representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanlin; Kareem, Ahsan

    2016-05-01

    System properties of buildings and bridges may vary with time due to temperature changes, aging or extreme loadings. To identify these time-varying system properties, this study proposes a new output-only non-stationary system identification (SI) framework based on instantaneous or marginal spectra derived from the time-frequency representation, e.g., short time Fourier or wavelet transform. Spectra derived from these time-frequency representations are very popular in tracking time-varying frequencies; however, they have seldom been used to identify the time-varying damping ratio because a short window needed to capture the time-varying information amplifies the bandwidth significantly, which may lead to considerably overestimating the damping ratio. To overcome this shortcoming, this study modifies the theoretical frequency response function (FRF) to explicitly account for the windowing effect, and therefore enables SI directly using instantaneous or marginal spectra derived from the wavelet or short time Fourier transform. The response spectrum estimated using the short time window and the modified FRF are both influenced by the same time window, thus the instantaneous or time-localized marginal spectrum of response can be fitted to the modified FRF to identify frequency and damping ratio at each time instant. This spectral-based SI framework can reliably identify damping in time-varying systems under non-stationary excitations. The efficacy of the proposed framework is demonstrated by both numerical and full-scale examples, and also compared to the time-domain SI method, stochastic subspace identification (SSI), since the time-domain SI approaches and their extensions are popular in identifying time-varying systems utilizing recursive algorithms or moving windows.

  12. UWB micro-doppler radar for human gait analysis using joint range-time-frequency representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yazhou; Fathy, Aly E.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel, standalone ultra wideband (UWB) micro-Doppler radar sensor that goes beyond simple range or micro-Doppler detection to combined range-time-Doppler frequency analysis. Moreover, it can monitor more than one human object in both line-of-sight (LOS) and through wall scenarios, thus have full human objects tracking capabilities. The unique radar design is based on narrow pulse transceiver, high speed data acquisition module, and wideband antenna array. For advanced radar post-data processing, joint range-time-frequency representation has been performed. Characteristics of human walking activity have been analyzed using the radar sensor by precisely tracking the radar object and acquiring range-time-Doppler information simultaneously. The UWB micro-Doppler radar prototype is capable of detecting Doppler frequency range from -180 Hz to +180 Hz, which allows a maximum target velocity of 9 m/s. The developed radar sensor can also be extended for many other applications, such as respiration and heartbeat detection of trapped survivors under building debris.

  13. Joint Time/Frequency Analysis and Design of Spiral Antennas and Arrays for Ultra-Wideband Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmansouri, Mohamed Ali

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) systems transmit and receive extremely short pulses, permitting the corresponding antennas to distort their shape. Thus the design of an antenna for a UWB system plays an important role for the reliability and quality of communication. A UWB antenna design coalesces both the determination of conventional frequency domain parameters and the analysis of time domain response into a single overarching system requirement. While the former is needed to ensure system's sensitivity, the later is critical to minimize pulse distortion. Well-designed spiral antennas are known for their almost frequency independent characteristics; thus they are viable candidates for UWB systems from the frequency-domain side. However, due to their fundamental principles of operation, they are dispersive and arguments were made they should not be used for pulsed UWB applications (time-domain side). The presented research unequivocally proves that spiral antennas and various derivatives thereof, including arrays, can be excellent candidates for multi-functional time/frequency domain systems. A complete framework for joint frequency and time domain characterization of planar spiral antennas in UWB communication systems is developed first. By utilizing theory, simulations, and experiments, all essential to the analysis frameworks, the various hypotheses are comprehensively treated and relevant conclusions are established. The dispersion and pulse distortion of the conventional spiral antennas are characterized in the radiation and system modes and conclusions regarding the effects of geometrical parameters such as number of arms, mode of operations, etc., on time- and frequency-domain performance are derived for the first time. A method based on controlling the spiral's growth rate and input pulse shape is demonstrated as an effective approach to reduce the pulse distortion. Theoretical pre-distortion compensation method based on a frequency-dependent delay removal technique

  14. Measurement of load impedance in power cables using wavelet-transform-based time-frequency domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sin Ho; Park, Jin Bae; Choi, Yoon Ho

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, wavelet-transform-based time-frequency domain reflectometry (WTFDR) is proposed for load impedance measurement. In order to measure the load impedance, the energy of the measured signal in the time-frequency domain, the phase difference between the reference signal and the reflected signal, the characteristic impedance, and the attenuation factor of the measured cable must all be known. Since the complex wavelet transform is composed of real and imaginary parts, the phase difference is easily obtained using the ratio of the real coefficient to the imaginary coefficient. In addition, the wavelet energy denotes the sum of the square of the modulus of the wavelet transform and describes the energy of the measured signal in the time and frequency domains. To accurately determine the characteristic impedance and attenuation factors, the power cable should be estimated as a coaxial cable. Using WTFDR with the complex mother wavelet and the estimated power cable, the load impedance can be obtained simply and accurately. Finally, real experiments for the evaluation of various load impedances are carried out to confirm the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed method compared to the conventional time-frequency domain reflectometry.

  15. A method for efficient fractional sample delay generation for real-time frequency-domain beamformers

    SciTech Connect

    Breeding, J.E.; Karnowski, T.P.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents an efficient method for fractional delay filter generation for frequency-domain beamformers. A common misunderstanding regarding frequency-domain beamforming is that any fractional time shift can be achieved using the delay property of the discrete Fourier transform (DFT). Blind application of the DFT delay property introduces circular convolution errors that may adversely affect the beam`s time series. The method presented avoids these errors while enabling real-time processing.

  16. EEG biometric identification: a thorough exploration of the time-frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelPozo-Banos, Marcos; Travieso, Carlos M.; Weidemann, Christoph T.; Alonso, Jesús B.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Although interest in using electroencephalogram (EEG) activity for subject identification has grown in recent years, the state of the art still lacks a comprehensive exploration of the discriminant information within it. This work aims to fill this gap, and in particular, it focuses on the time-frequency representation of the EEG. Approach. We executed qualitative and quantitative analyses of six publicly available data sets following a sequential experimentation approach. This approach was divided in three blocks analysing the configuration of the power spectrum density, the representation of the data and the properties of the discriminant information. A total of ten experiments were applied. Main results. Results show that EEG information below 40 Hz is unique enough to discriminate across subjects (a maximum of 100 subjects were evaluated here), regardless of the recorded cognitive task or the sensor location. Moreover, the discriminative power of rhythms follows a W-like shape between 1 and 40 Hz, with the central peak located at the posterior rhythm (around 10 Hz). This information is maximized with segments of around 2 s, and it proved to be moderately constant across montages and time. Significance. Therefore, we characterize how EEG activity differs across individuals and detail the optimal conditions to detect subject-specific information. This work helps to clarify the results of previous studies and to solve some unanswered questions. Ultimately, it will serve as guide for the design of future biometric systems.

  17. Deriving Lifetime Maps in the Time/Frequency Domain of Coherent Structures in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan

    2008-01-01

    The lifetimes of coherent structures are derived from data correlated over a 3 sensor array sampling streamwise sidewall pressure at high Reynolds number (> 10(exp 8)). The data were acquired at subsonic, transonic and supersonic speeds aboard a Tupolev Tu-144. The lifetimes are computed from a variant of the correlation length termed the lifelength. Characteristic lifelengths are estimated by fitting a Gaussian distribution to the sensors cross spectra and are shown to compare favorably with Efimtsov s prediction of correlation space scales. Lifelength distributions are computed in the time/frequency domain using an interval correlation technique on the continuous wavelet transform of the original time data. The median values of the lifelength distributions are found to be very close to the frequency averaged result. The interval correlation technique is shown to allow the retrieval and inspection of the original time data of each event in the lifelength distributions, thus providing a means to locate and study the nature of the coherent structure in the turbulent boundary layer. The lifelength data are converted to lifetimes using the convection velocity. The lifetime of events in the time/frequency domain are displayed in Lifetime Maps. The primary purpose of the paper is to validate these new analysis techniques so that they can be used with confidence to further characterize the behavior of coherent structures in the turbulent boundary layer.

  18. Joint discrepancy evaluation of an existing steel bridge using time-frequency and wavelet-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walia, Suresh Kumar; Patel, Raj Kumar; Vinayak, Hemant Kumar; Parti, Raman

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study is to bring out the errors introduced during construction which are overlooked during the physical verification of the bridge. Such errors can be pointed out if the symmetry of the structure is challenged. This paper thus presents the study of downstream and upstream truss of newly constructed steel bridge using time-frequency and wavelet-based approach. The variation in the behavior of truss joints of bridge with variation in the vehicle speed has been worked out to determine their flexibility. The testing on the steel bridge was carried out with the same instrument setup on both the upstream and downstream trusses of the bridge at two different speeds with the same moving vehicle. The nodal flexibility investigation is carried out using power spectral density, short-time Fourier transform, and wavelet packet transform with respect to both the trusses and speed. The results obtained have shown that the joints of both upstream and downstream trusses of the bridge behave in a different manner even if designed for the same loading due to constructional variations and vehicle movement, in spite of the fact that the analytical models present a simplistic model for analysis and design. The difficulty of modal parameter extraction of the particular bridge under study increased with the increase in speed due to decreased excitation time.

  19. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-01-01

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. PMID:27322266

  20. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-01-01

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. PMID:27322266

  1. Comparison of air-launched and ground-coupled configurations of SFCW GPR in time, frequency and wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Vijver, Ellen; De Pue, Jan; Cornelis, Wim; Van Meirvenne, Marc

    2015-04-01

    A stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) ground penetrating radar (GPR) system produces waveforms consisting of a sequence of sine waves with linearly increasing frequency. By adopting a wide frequency bandwidth, SFCW GPR systems offer an optimal resolution at each achievable measurement depth. Furthermore, these systems anticipate an improved penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as compared to time-domain impulse GPRs, because energy is focused in one single frequency at a time and the phase and amplitude of the reflected signal is recorded for each discrete frequency step. However, the search for the optimal practical implementation of SFCW GPR technology to fulfil these theoretical advantages is still ongoing. In this study we compare the performance of a SFCW GPR system for air-launched and ground-coupled antenna configurations. The first is represented by a 3d-Radar Geoscope GS3F system operated with a V1213 antenna array. This array contains 7 transmitting and 7 receiving antennae resulting in 13 measurement channels at a spacing of 0.075 m and providing a total scan width of 0.975 m. The ground-coupled configuration is represented by 3d-Radar's latest-generation SFCW system, GeoScope Mk IV, operated with a DXG1212 antenna array. With 6 transmitting and 5 receiving antennae this array provides 12 measurement channels and an effective scan width of 0.9 m. Both systems were tested on several sites representative of various application environments, including a test site with different road specimens (Belgian Road Research Centre) and two test areas in different agricultural fields in Flanders, Belgium. For each test, data acquisition was performed using the full available frequency bandwidth of the systems (50 to 3000 MHz). Other acquisition parameters such as the frequency step and dwell time were varied in different tests. Analyzing the data of the different tests in time, frequency and wavelet domain allows to evaluate different performance

  2. Joint time-frequency analysis of EEG signals based on a phase-space interpretation of the recording process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testorf, M. E.; Jobst, B. C.; Kleen, J. K.; Titiz, A.; Guillory, S.; Scott, R.; Bujarski, K. A.; Roberts, D. W.; Holmes, G. L.; Lenck-Santini, P.-P.

    2012-10-01

    Time-frequency transforms are used to identify events in clinical EEG data. Data are recorded as part of a study for correlating the performance of human subjects during a memory task with pathological events in the EEG, called spikes. The spectrogram and the scalogram are reviewed as tools for evaluating spike activity. A statistical evaluation of the continuous wavelet transform across trials is used to quantify phase-locking events. For simultaneously improving the time and frequency resolution, and for representing the EEG of several channels or trials in a single time-frequency plane, a multichannel matching pursuit algorithm is used. Fundamental properties of the algorithm are discussed as well as preliminary results, which were obtained with clinical EEG data.

  3. Measuring Multi-Joint Stiffness during Single Movements: Numerical Validation of a Novel Time-Frequency Approach

    PubMed Central

    Piovesan, Davide; Pierobon, Alberto; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents and validates a Time-Frequency technique for measuring 2-dimensional multijoint arm stiffness throughout a single planar movement as well as during static posture. It is proposed as an alternative to current regressive methods which require numerous repetitions to obtain average stiffness on a small segment of the hand trajectory. The method is based on the analysis of the reassigned spectrogram of the arm's response to impulsive perturbations and can estimate arm stiffness on a trial-by-trial basis. Analytic and empirical methods are first derived and tested through modal analysis on synthetic data. The technique's accuracy and robustness are assessed by modeling the estimation of stiffness time profiles changing at different rates and affected by different noise levels. Our method obtains results comparable with two well-known regressive techniques. We also test how the technique can identify the viscoelastic component of non-linear and higher than second order systems with a non-parametrical approach. The technique proposed here is very impervious to noise and can be used easily for both postural and movement tasks. Estimations of stiffness profiles are possible with only one perturbation, making our method a useful tool for estimating limb stiffness during motor learning and adaptation tasks, and for understanding the modulation of stiffness in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22448233

  4. Unsaturated zone characterization in soil through transient wetting and drying using GPR joint time-frequency analysis and grayscale images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, W. L.; Kou, S. C.; Poon, C. S.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryThis paper describes an experimental method to characterize the soil's unsaturated zone by constructing a scenario in which transient downward water infiltration took place from the topsoil to the bottom soil continuously. During the water infiltration, GPR waveforms and side-view grayscale images of the soil column were simultaneously and continuously captured. The GPR wavelets associated with the wetting front were analyzed using short time fourier transform (STFT) algorithm. The downward wetting front and the stretch of unsaturated transition zone decelerated and eased the wetting front's reflection in the time domain; as well as reduced the peak frequency and attenuated the frequency spectra in the frequency domain. The subsequent drying process further attenuated but accelerated the wetting front's reflection in both time and frequency domains. These observations were correlated with the image pixel profiles, from which GPR velocity profiles at different lapsed times were generated after computation via a complex refractive index model (CRIM). The CRIM method is entirely non-invasive and not only offers very detailed measurement of the water saturation profile of the transition zone in laboratory scale, but also is potentially useful for the further study of a variety of vadose zone properties.

  5. High Order Statistics and Time-Frequency Domain to Classify Heart Sounds for Subjects under Cardiac Stress Test

    PubMed Central

    Moukadem, Ali; Schmidt, Samuel; Dieterlen, Alain

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of classification of the first and the second heart sounds (S1 and S2) under cardiac stress test. The main objective is to classify these sounds without electrocardiogram (ECG) reference and without taking into consideration the systolic and the diastolic time intervals criterion which can become problematic and useless in several real life settings as severe tachycardia and tachyarrhythmia or in the case of subjects being under cardiac stress activity. First, the heart sounds are segmented by using a modified time-frequency based envelope. Then, to distinguish between the first and the second heart sounds, new features, named αopt, β, and γ, based on high order statistics and energy concentration measures of the Stockwell transform (S-transform) are proposed in this study. A study of the variation of the high frequency content of S1 and S2 over the HR (heart rate) is also discussed. The proposed features are validated on a database that contains 2636 S1 and S2 sounds corresponding to 62 heart signals and 8 subjects under cardiac stress test collected from healthy subjects. Results and comparisons with existing methods in the literature show a large superiority for our proposed features. PMID:26089957

  6. Dry contact fingertip ECG-based authentication system using time, frequency domain features and support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karan; Singhvi, Akshit; Pathangay, Vinod

    2015-08-01

    Acquiring fingertip ECG (electrocardiogram) signal using dry contact electrodes is challenging due to the presence of noise and interference by EMG (electromyogram) potentials. In this paper, we propose a method for using the fingertip ECG signal for biometric authentication. The noisy segments of the signal are segmented out using a variance-based heuristic and the clean signal is used for subsequent processing. By applying baseline correction and band pass filtering, the filtered signal is used for beat feature extraction. The features are used to train a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Experimental results are presented to show the optimum filter parameters and feature sets for best classification performance. The performance of the proposed method with the optimum parameters was evaluated on a public domain CYBHi dataset with 126 subjects and the beat level EER of 3.4% was obtained.

  7. Dry contact fingertip ECG-based authentication system using time, frequency domain features and support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karan; Singhvi, Akshit; Pathangay, Vinod

    2015-08-01

    Acquiring fingertip ECG (electrocardiogram) signal using dry contact electrodes is challenging due to the presence of noise and interference by EMG (electromyogram) potentials. In this paper, we propose a method for using the fingertip ECG signal for biometric authentication. The noisy segments of the signal are segmented out using a variance-based heuristic and the clean signal is used for subsequent processing. By applying baseline correction and band pass filtering, the filtered signal is used for beat feature extraction. The features are used to train a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Experimental results are presented to show the optimum filter parameters and feature sets for best classification performance. The performance of the proposed method with the optimum parameters was evaluated on a public domain CYBHi dataset with 126 subjects and the beat level EER of 3.4% was obtained. PMID:26736315

  8. Perceived arousal of facial expressions of emotion modulates the N170, regardless of emotional category: Time domain and time-frequency dynamics.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Pedro R; Ferreira-Santos, Fernando; Chaves, Pedro L; Paiva, Tiago O; Barbosa, Fernando; Marques-Teixeira, João

    2016-01-01

    Findings concerning the emotional modulation of the N170 component of the visual event-related potential are mixed. In the present report we tested the hypothesis that the emotional modulation of the N170 may be driven by the perceived emotional arousal of the stimuli, rather than by specific emotional categories. Fifty-four participants viewed facial expressions of anger, disgust, fear and happiness, plus low arousal neutral faces. All emotional categories were matched in arousal, while stimuli within each category varied parametrically in this dimension. The modulation of the electrocortical activity on the N170 time-window was analyzed in the time domain and via time-frequency decomposition. The effects of emotion and arousal were analyzed separately. In the time domain N170 amplitudes co-varied parametrically with perceived arousal, regardless of emotional category. This modulation was linearly associated with the power of the theta, alpha, and beta frequency bands. Moreover, fear was associated with a trend for increased N170 amplitudes, enhanced alpha power, and increased broad band inter-trial phase coherence. These results support the views that a) the activity in N170 time window is fundamentally modulated by perceived arousal, b) the modulation of the N170 may be the product of an increased evoked response, rather than the result of phase resetting processes, and c) facial expressions of fear retain some processing primacy, that may be related to their increased value as environmental cues. PMID:26659012

  9. Precambrian basement control on joint domains in northwestern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, S.L.; Armstrong, W.B.; Kulander, B.R.

    1986-08-01

    Joint attitudes in Upper Silurian and Lower Devonian carbonates in northwestern Ohio reveal a marked north-south-trending joint domain boundary in Lucas and Wood Counties. East of the domain boundary, first-formed systematic joints trend N45/sup 0/W; west of this boundary, first-formed systematics trend N40/sup 0/E. The line of change in joint trends follows the Lucas County monocline-Bowling Green fault complex and the projected position of the Grenville front from the Canadian shield. Basement well information and gravity and magnetic data indicate a major change in Precambrian rock types across the domain boundary that is coincident with the projected position of the Grenville front. Observed joint patterns are interpreted to result from extensional tectonics associated with the evolution of the Findlay arch and Michigan basin. Recurrent movements on the Bowling Green fault during the early and middle Paleozoic may have been caused by reactivation of Grenville-age faults, which ultimately localized the joint domain boundary along the Lucas County monocline-Bowling Green fault trend.

  10. Time-Frequency Data Reduction for Event Related Potentials: Combining Principal Component Analysis and Matching Pursuit

    PubMed Central

    Aviyente, Selin; Bernat, Edward M.; Malone, Stephen M.; Iacono, William G.

    2010-01-01

    Joint time-frequency representations offer a rich representation of event related potentials (ERPs) that cannot be obtained through individual time or frequency domain analysis. This representation, however, comes at the expense of increased data volume and the difficulty of interpreting the resulting representations. Therefore, methods that can reduce the large amount of time-frequency data to experimentally relevant components are essential. In this paper, we present a method that reduces the large volume of ERP time-frequency data into a few significant time-frequency parameters. The proposed method is based on applying the widely-used matching pursuit (MP) approach, with a Gabor dictionary, to principal components extracted from the time-frequency domain. The proposed PCA-Gabor decomposition is compared with other time-frequency data reduction methods such as the time-frequency PCA approach alone and standard matching pursuit methods using a Gabor dictionary for both simulated and biological data. The results show that the proposed PCA-Gabor approach performs better than either the PCA alone or the standard MP data reduction methods, by using the smallest amount of ERP data variance to produce the strongest statistical separation between experimental conditions. PMID:20730031

  11. Time-frequency filtering for classifying targets in nonstationary clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomatam, Vikram Thiruneermalai; Loughlin, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Classifying underwater targets from their sonar backscatter is often complicated by induced or self-noise (i.e. clutter, reverberation) arising from the scattering of the sonar pulse from non-target objects. Because clutter is inherently nonstationary, and because the propagation environment can induce nonstationarities as well, in addition to any nonstationarities / time-varying spectral components of the target echo itself, a joint phase space approach to target classification has been explored. In this paper, we apply a previously developed minimum mean square time-frequency spectral estimation method to design a bank of time-frequency filters from training data to distinguish targets from clutter. The method is implemented in the ambiguity domain in order to reduce computational requirements. In this domain, the optimal filter (more commonly called a "kernel" in the time-frequency literature) multiples the ambiguity function of the received signal, and then the mean squared distance to each target class is computed. Simulations demonstrate that the class-specific optimal kernel better separates each target from the clutter and other targets, compared to a simple mean-squared distance measure with no kernel processing.

  12. Comparison of optimization-algorithm based feature extraction from time data or time-frequency data for target recognition purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strifors, H. C.; Abrahamson, S.; Andersson, T.; Gaunaurd, G. C.

    2006-05-01

    Ultra-wideband ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems have proved useful for extracting and displaying information for target recognition purposes. Target signatures whether in the time, frequency, or joint time-frequency domains, will substantially depend on the target's burial conditions such as the type of soil, burial depth, and the soil's moisture content. That dependence can be utilized for target recognition purposes as we have demonstrated previously. The signature template of each target was computed in the time-frequency domain from the returned echo when the target was buried at a known depth in the soil with a known moisture content. Then, for any returned echo the relative difference between the similarly computed target signature and a selected signature template was computed. A global optimization method together with our (approximate) target translation method (TTM) that signature difference, chosen as object function, was minimized by adjusting the depth and moisture content, now taken to be unknown parameters. The template that gave the smallest value of the minimized object function for the returned echo was taken as target classification and the corresponding values of the depth and moisture parameters as estimates of the target's burial conditions. This optimization technique can also be applied to time-series data, avoiding the need for time-frequency analysis. It is then of interest to evaluate the relative merits of time data and time-frequency data for target recognition. Such a comparison is here preformed using signals returned from dummy mines buried underground. The results of the analysis serve to assess the intrinsic worth of data in the time domain and in the time-frequency domain for identifying subsurface targets using a GPR. The targets are buried in a test field at the Swedish Explosive Ordnance Disposal and Demining Center (SWEDEC) at Eksjo, Sweden.

  13. Time-frequency component analysis of somatosensory evoked potentials in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Yang, Jun-Lin; Chan, Shing-Chow; Luk, Keith Dip-Kei; Hu, Yong

    2009-01-01

    Background Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) signal usually contains a set of detailed temporal components measured and identified in a time domain, giving meaningful information on physiological mechanisms of the nervous system. The purpose of this study is to measure and identify detailed time-frequency components in normal SEP using time-frequency analysis (TFA) methods and to obtain their distribution pattern in the time-frequency domain. Methods This paper proposes to apply a high-resolution time-frequency analysis algorithm, the matching pursuit (MP), to extract detailed time-frequency components of SEP signals. The MP algorithm decomposes a SEP signal into a number of elementary time-frequency components and provides a time-frequency parameter description of the components. A clustering by estimation of the probability density function in parameter space is followed to identify stable SEP time-frequency components. Results Experimental results on cortical SEP signals of 28 mature rats show that a series of stable SEP time-frequency components can be identified using the MP decomposition algorithm. Based on the statistical properties of the component parameters, an approximated distribution of these components in time-frequency domain is suggested to describe the complex SEP response. Conclusion This study shows that there is a set of stable and minute time-frequency components in SEP signals, which are revealed by the MP decomposition and clustering. These stable SEP components have specific localizations in the time-frequency domain. PMID:19203394

  14. Spectroscopy by joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkulmowski, Maciej; Tamborski, Szymon; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2015-03-01

    We present the methodology for spectroscopic examination of absorbing media being the combination of Spectral Optical Coherence Tomography and Fourier Transform Spectroscopy. The method bases on the joint Spectral and Time OCT computational scheme and simplifies data analysis procedure as compared to the mostly used windowing-based Spectroscopic OCT methods. The proposed experimental setup is self-calibrating in terms of wavelength-pixel assignment. The performance of the method in measuring absorption spectrum was checked with the use of the reflecting phantom filled with the absorbing agent (indocyanine green). The results show quantitative accordance with the controlled exact results provided by the reference method.

  15. Time-frequency featured co-movement between the stock and prices of crude oil and gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shupei; An, Haizhong; Gao, Xiangyun; Huang, Xuan

    2016-02-01

    The nonlinear relationships among variables caused by the hidden frequency information complicate the time series analysis. To shed more light on this nonlinear issue, we examine their relationships in joint time-frequency domain with multivariate framework, and the analyses in the time domain and frequency domain serve as comparisons. The daily Brent oil prices, London gold fixing price and Shanghai Composite index from January 1991 to September 2014 are adopted as example. First, they have long-term cointegration relationship in time domain from holistic perspective. Second, the Granger causality tests in different frequency bands are heterogeneous. Finally, the comparison between results from wavelet coherence and multiple wavelet coherence in the joint time-frequency domain indicates that in the high (1-14 days) and medium frequency (14-128 days) bands, the combination of Brent and gold prices has stronger correlation with the stock. In the low frequency band (256-512 days), year 2003 is the structure broken point before which Brent and oil are ideal choice for hedging the risk of the stock market. Thus, this paper offers more details between the Chinese stock market and the commodities markets of crude oil and gold, which suggests that the decisions for different time and frequencies should consider the corresponding benchmark information.

  16. Demultiplexing based on frequency-domain joint decision MMA for MDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caili, Gong; Li, Li; Guijun, Hu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a demultiplexing method based on frequency-domain joint decision multi-modulus algorithm (FD-JDMMA) for mode division multiplexing (MDM) system. The performance of FD-JDMMA is compared with frequency-domain multi-modulus algorithm (FD-MMA) and frequency-domain least mean square (FD-LMS) algorithm. The simulation results show that FD-JDMMA outperforms FD-MMA in terms of BER and convergence speed in the cases of mQAM (m=4, 16 and 64) formats. And it is also demonstrated that FD-JDMMA achieves better BER performance and converges faster than FD-LMS in the cases of 16QAM and 64QAM. Furthermore, FD-JDMMA maintains similar computational complexity as the both equalization algorithms.

  17. Noise reduction combining time-frequency epsilon-filter and M-transform.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomomi; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces noise reduction combining time-frequency epsilon-filter (TF epsilon-filter) and time-frequency M-transform (TF M-transform). Musical noise is an offensive noise generated due to noise reduction in the time-frequency domain such as spectral subtraction and TF epsilon-filter. It has a deleterious effect on speech recognition. To solve the problem, M-transform is introduced. M-transform is a linear transform based on M-sequence. The method combining the time-domain epsilon-filter (TD epsilon-filter) and time-domain M-transform (TD M-transform) can reduce not only white noise but also impulse noise. Musical noise is isolated in the time-frequency domain, which is similar to impulse noise in the time domain. On these prospects, this paper aims to reduce musical noise by improving M-transform for the time-frequency domain. Noise reduction by using TD M-transform and the TD epsilon-filter is first explained to clarify its features. Then, an improved method applying M-transform to the time-frequency domain, namely TF M-transform, is described. Noise reduction combining the TF epsilon-filter and TF M-transform is also proposed. The proposed method can reduce not only high-level nonstationary noise but also musical noise. Experimental results are also given to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method.

  18. Brain connectivity study of joint attention using frequency-domain optical imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Ujwal; Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-02-01

    Autism is a socio-communication brain development disorder. It is marked by degeneration in the ability to respond to joint attention skill task, from as early as 12 to 18 months of age. This trait is used to distinguish autistic from nonautistic populations. In this study, diffuse optical imaging is being used to study brain connectivity for the first time in response to joint attention experience in normal adults. The prefrontal region of the brain was non-invasively imaged using a frequency-domain based optical imager. The imaging studies were performed on 11 normal right-handed adults and optical measurements were acquired in response to joint-attention based video clips. While the intensity-based optical data provides information about the hemodynamic response of the underlying neural process, the time-dependent phase-based optical data has the potential to explicate the directional information on the activation of the brain. Thus brain connectivity studies are performed by computing covariance/correlations between spatial units using this frequency-domain based optical measurements. The preliminary results indicate that the extent of synchrony and directional variation in the pattern of activation varies in the left and right frontal cortex. The results have significant implication for research in neural pathways associated with autism that can be mapped using diffuse optical imaging tools in the future.

  19. Texture characterization for joint compression and classification based on human perception in the wavelet domain.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Gamal; Black, John; Panchanathan, Sethuraman

    2006-06-01

    Today's multimedia applications demand sophisticated compression and classification techniques in order to store, transmit, and retrieve audio-visual information efficiently. Over the last decade, perceptually based image compression methods have been gaining importance. These methods take into account the abilities (and the limitations) of human visual perception (HVP) when performing compression. The upcoming MPEG 7 standard also addresses the need for succinct classification and indexing of visual content for efficient retrieval. However, there has been no research that has attempted to exploit the characteristics of the human visual system to perform both compression and classification jointly. One area of HVP that has unexplored potential for joint compression and classification is spatial frequency perception. Spatial frequency content that is perceived by humans can be characterized in terms of three parameters, which are: 1) magnitude; 2) phase; and 3) orientation. While the magnitude of spatial frequency content has been exploited in several existing image compression techniques, the novel contribution of this paper is its focus on the use of phase coherence for joint compression and classification in the wavelet domain. Specifically, this paper describes a human visual system-based method for measuring the degree to which an image contains coherent (perceptible) phase information, and then exploits that information to provide joint compression and classification. Simulation results that demonstrate the efficiency of this method are presented. PMID:16764265

  20. Computer-aided classification of rheumatoid arthritis in finger joints using frequency domain optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, C. D.; Kim, H. K.; Netz, U.; Blaschke, S.; Zwaka, P. A.; Mueller, G. A.; Beuthan, J.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2009-02-01

    Novel methods that can help in the diagnosis and monitoring of joint disease are essential for efficient use of novel arthritis therapies that are currently emerging. Building on previous studies that involved continuous wave imaging systems we present here first clinical data obtained with a new frequency-domain imaging system. Three-dimensional tomographic data sets of absorption and scattering coefficients were generated for 107 fingers. The data were analyzed using ANOVA, MANOVA, Discriminant Analysis DA, and a machine-learning algorithm that is based on self-organizing mapping (SOM) for clustering data in 2-dimensional parameter spaces. Overall we found that the SOM algorithm outperforms the more traditional analysis methods in terms of correctly classifying finger joints. Using SOM, healthy and affected joints can now be separated with a sensitivity of 0.97 and specificity of 0.91. Furthermore, preliminary results suggest that if a combination of multiple image properties is used, statistical significant differences can be found between RA-affected finger joints that show different clinical features (e.g. effusion, synovitis or erosion).

  1. Joint Electrical and Time Domain Electromagnetism (TDEM) Data Inversion Applied to the Super Sauze Earthflow (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutz, Myriam; Albouy, Yves; Guerin, Roger; Maquaire, Olivier; Vassal, Jacques; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Descloitres, Marc

    In order to evaluate the risk of an earthflow to evolve abruptly into torrential surge, knowledge of its internal structure is necessary. This study deals with the internal structure of the Super Sauze earthflow developed in black marls in the southern French Alps. Difficulties in this study area are a rough topography, surface heterogeneities and a large thickness variability of the earthflow mass. These conditions hamper the application of geotechnical methods as a preferred investigation mean. Moreover, they pose problems to geophysical investigations and their interpretation.This paper shows the advantage offered by the joint inversion of Time Domain ElectroMagne-tism data (TDEM) and data obtained from Direct Current soundings (DC). The results of the joint inversions are checked using geotechnical data. The internal structure of the earthflow interpreted on the basis of joint inversion data is comparable to that obtained from geotechnical results. Moreover, contrary to separate electrical and TDEM inversions, a satisfactory joint inversion model can be derived without supplying additional a priori information.

  2. Multipixel system for gigahertz frequency-domain optical imaging of finger joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netz, Uwe J.; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2008-03-01

    Frequency-domain optical imaging systems have shown great promise for characterizing blood oxygenation, hemodynamics, and other physiological parameters in human and animal tissues. However, most of the frequency domain systems presented so far operate with source modulation frequencies below 150MHz. At these low frequencies, their ability to provide accurate data for small tissue geometries such as encountered in imaging of finger joints or rodents is limited. Here, we present a new system that can provide data up to 1GHz using an intensity modulated charged coupled device camera. After data processing, the images show the two-dimensional distribution of amplitude and phase of the light modulation on the finger surface. The system performance was investigated and test measurements on optical tissue phantoms were taken to investigate whether higher frequencies yield better signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). It could be shown that local changes in optical tissue properties, as they appear in the initial stages of rheumatoid arthritis in a finger joint, are detectable by simple image evaluation, with the range of modulation frequency around 500MHz proving to yield the highest SNR.

  3. Optimized Paraunitary Filter Banks for Time-Frequency Channel Diagonalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Ziyang; Hunziker, Thomas; Dahlhaus, Dirk

    2010-12-01

    We adopt the concept of channel diagonalization to time-frequency signal expansions obtained by DFT filter banks. As a generalization of the frequency domain channel representation used by conventional orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing receivers, the time-frequency domain channel diagonalization can be applied to time-variant channels and aperiodic signals. An inherent error in the case of doubly dispersive channels can be limited by choosing adequate windows underlying the filter banks. We derive a formula for the mean-squared sample error in the case of wide-sense stationary uncorrelated scattering (WSSUS) channels, which serves as objective function in the window optimization. Furthermore, an enhanced scheme for the parameterization of tight Gabor frames enables us to constrain the window in order to define paraunitary filter banks. We show that the design of windows optimized for WSSUS channels with known statistical properties can be formulated as a convex optimization problem. The performance of the resulting windows is investigated under different channel conditions, for different oversampling factors, and compared against the performance of alternative windows. Finally, a generic matched filter receiver incorporating the proposed channel diagonalization is discussed which may be essential for future reconfigurable radio systems.

  4. Complexity in congestive heart failure: A time-frequency approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Santo; Palit, Sanjay K.; Mukherjee, Sayan; Ariffin, MRK; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2016-03-01

    Reconstruction of phase space is an effective method to quantify the dynamics of a signal or a time series. Various phase space reconstruction techniques have been investigated. However, there are some issues on the optimal reconstructions and the best possible choice of the reconstruction parameters. This research introduces the idea of gradient cross recurrence (GCR) and mean gradient cross recurrence density which shows that reconstructions in time frequency domain preserve more information about the dynamics than the optimal reconstructions in time domain. This analysis is further extended to ECG signals of normal and congestive heart failure patients. By using another newly introduced measure—gradient cross recurrence period density entropy, two classes of aforesaid ECG signals can be classified with a proper threshold. This analysis can be applied to quantifying and distinguishing biomedical and other nonlinear signals.

  5. Time-frequency analysis using sidelobe apodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gabriel

    2001-11-01

    Time-frequency techniques have been successfully used in the analysis of non-stationary signals. Several approaches have been proposed that address concerns such as Time-Frequency (TF) resolution and the elimination of cross-terms. In this work, a TF technique based on the use of Spatially Variant Apodization (SVA) is introduced that focuses on the detection of non-stationary signals that consists of several components that have different amplitudes. The SVA approach is applied to the Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) to detect small intensity components that are buried in high sidelobes of other components. Resolution using the SVA is better than the resolution obtained using the STFT with non-rectangular windows. Synthesis can be performed using the overlap-add method. Because of the implementation of the SVA, the modified STFT using sidelobe apodization can have good resolution, detect small intensity components, and show no cross terms in the TF plane, given that stationarity can be assumed using an appropriate window length in the STFT.

  6. High-resolution time-frequency distributions for fall detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Moeness G.; Zhang, Yimin D.; Boashash, Boualem

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we examine the role of high-resolution time-frequency distributions (TFDs) of radar micro-Doppler signatures for fall detection. The work supports the recent and rising interest in using emerging radar technology for elderly care and assisted living. Spectrograms have been the de facto joint-variable signal representation, depicting the signal power in both time and frequency. Although there have been major advances in designing quadratic TFDs which are superior to spectrograms in terms of detailing the local signal behavior, the contributions of these distributions in the area of human motion classifications and their offerings in enhanced feature extractions have not yet been properly evaluated. The main purpose of this paper is to show the effect of using high-resolution TFD kernels, in lieu of spectrogram, on fall detection. We focus on the extended modified B-distribution (EMBD) and exploit the level of details it provides as compared with the coarse and smoothed time-frequency signatures offered by spectrograms.

  7. Reducing noise in the time-frequency representation using sparsity promoting kernel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokanović, Branka; Amin, Moeness G.; Zhang, Yimin D.

    2014-05-01

    Missing samples in the time domain introduce noise-like artifacts in the ambiguity domain due to their de facto zero values assumed by the bilinear transform. These artifacts clutter the dual domain of the time-frequency signal representation and obscures the time-frequency signature of single and multicomponent signals. In order to suppress the artifacts influence, we formulate a problem based on the sparsity aware kernel. The proposed kernel design is more robust to the artifacts caused by the missing samples.

  8. Visualization of EEG using time-frequency distributions.

    PubMed

    Stiber, B Z; Sato, S

    1997-12-01

    The EEG is a time-varying or nonstationary signal. Frequency and amplitude are two of its significant characteristics, and are valuable clues to different states of brain activity. Detection of these temporal features is important in understanding EEGs. Commonly, spectrograms and AR models are used for EEG analysis. However, their accuracy is limited by their inherent assumption of stationarity and their trade-off between time and frequency resolution. We investigate EEG signal processing using existing compound kernel time-frequency distributions (TFDs). By providing a joint distribution of signal intensity at any frequency along time, TFDs preserve details of the temporal structure of the EEG waveform, and can extract its time-varying frequency and amplitude features. We expect that this will have significant implications for EEG analysis and medical diagnosis.

  9. Time-Frequency Analysis of the Dispersion of Lamb Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the velocity dispersion of Lamb modes is important for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods used in detecting and locating flaws in thin plates and in determining their elastic stiffness coefficients. Lamb mode dispersion is also important in the acoustic emission technique for accurately triangulating the location of emissions in thin plates. In this research, the ability to characterize Lamb mode dispersion through a time-frequency analysis (the pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution) was demonstrated. A major advantage of time-frequency methods is the ability to analyze acoustic signals containing multiple propagation modes, which overlap and superimpose in the time domain signal. By combining time-frequency analysis with a broadband acoustic excitation source, the dispersion of multiple Lamb modes over a wide frequency range can be determined from as little as a single measurement. In addition, the technique provides a direct measurement of the group velocity dispersion. The technique was first demonstrated in the analysis of a simulated waveform in an aluminum plate in which the Lamb mode dispersion was well known. Portions of the dispersion curves of the A(sub 0), A(sub 1), S(sub 0), and S(sub 2)Lamb modes were obtained from this one waveform. The technique was also applied for the analysis of experimental waveforms from a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite plate. Measurements were made both along, and perpendicular to the fiber direction. In this case, the signals contained only the lowest order symmetric and antisymmetric modes. A least squares fit of the results from several source to detector distances was used. Theoretical dispersion curves were calculated and are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results.

  10. SAR imagery of moving targets: application of time-frequency distributions for estimating motion parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimovich, Alexander M.; Peckham, C. D.; Teti, Joseph G., Jr.

    1994-06-01

    It is well known that targets moving along track within a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) field of view are imaged as defocused objects. The SAR stripmap mode is tuned to stationary ground targets and the mismatch between the SAR processing parameters and the target motion parameters causes the energy to spill over to adjacent image pixels, thus not only hindering target feature extraction, but also reducing the probability of detection. The problem can be remedied by generating the image using a filter matched to the actual target motion parameters, effectively focusing the SAR image on the target. For a fixed rate of motion the target velocity can be estimated from the slope of the Doppler frequency characteristic. The processing is carried out on the range compressed data but before azimuth compression. The problem is similar to the classical problem of estimating the instantaneous frequency of a linear FM signal (chirp). This paper investigates the application of three different time-frequency analysis techniques to estimate the instantaneous Doppler frequency of range compressed SAR data. In particular, we compare the Wigner-Ville distribution, the Gabor expansion and the Short-Time Fourier transform with respect to their performance in noisy SAR data. Criteria are suggested to quantify the performance of each method in the joint time- frequency domain. It is shown that these methods exhibit sharp signal-to-noise threshold effects, i.e., a certain SNR below which the accuracy of the velocity estimation deteriorates rapidly. It is also shown that the methods differ with respect to their representation of the SAR data.

  11. Time frequency analyses of vibrations of wind turbine towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chi-Luen; Hsu, Keng-Tseng; Cheng, Chia-Chi; Yu, Chih-Peng; Lai, Jiunnren

    2015-04-01

    Transient vibrations of the tower supporting a horizontal-axis wind turbine were recorded using a microwave interferometer. Variations in dominant frequencies have been reported in the previous study. Signal analyses aiming to uncouple different frequency components were performed using reassigned spectrogram, a time-frequency representation based on time-corrected short time Fourier transform. Optimal resolutions in both time and frequency domains were first investigated using synthetic signals. The goal was to seek out the favorable combinations of window size and overlapping portions of adjacent windows for a data sequence at a given sampling rate. The dominant frequency found in reassigned spectrogram agrees with that obtained using Fourier spectrum of the same transient measurements of the wind turbine tower under investigation.

  12. Physics based modeling for time-frequency damage classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debejyo; Soni, Sunilkumar; Wei, Jun; Kovvali, Narayan; Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia; Cochran, Douglas; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2008-03-01

    We have recently proposed a method for classifying waveforms from healthy and damaged structures in a structural health monitoring framework. This method is based on the use of hidden Markov models with preselected feature vectors obtained from the time-frequency based matching pursuit decomposition. In order to investigate the performance of the classifier for different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), we simulate the response of a lug joint sample with different crack lengths using finite element modeling (FEM). Unlike experimental noisy data, the modeled data is noise free. As a result, different levels of noise can be added to the modeled data in order to obtain the true performance of the classifier under additive white Gaussian noise. We use the finite element package ABAQUS to simulate a lug joint sample with different crack lengths and piezoelectric sensor signals. A mesoscale internal state variable damage model defines the progressive damage and is incorporated in the macroscale model. We furthermore use a hybrid method (boundary element-finite element method) to model wave reflection as well as mode conversion of the Lamb waves from the free edges and scattering of the waves from the internal defects. The hybrid method simplifies the modeling problem and provides better performance in the analysis of high stress gradient problems.

  13. Postural tachycardia syndrome: time frequency mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, V.; Novak, P.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Low, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Orthostatic tachycardia is common but its specificity remains uncertain. Our preliminary work suggested that using autonomic function testing in conjunction with time-frequency mapping (TFM), it might be possible to characterize a subset of the postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), that is due to a restricted autonomic neuropathy. We describe 20 patients (17 women and 3 men, aged 14-43 years) with florid POTS and 20 controls (14 women and 6 men, aged 20-41 years). Autonomic failure was quantified by its distribution (cardiovagal, adrenergic and sudomotor) and severity, a symptom profile was generated, and spectral indices, based on modified Wigner distribution during rest and head-up tilt (80 degrees) were evaluated. During tilt-up POTS patients differed from controls by an excessive heart rate (> 130 bpm) (P < 0.001), and higher diastolic pressure (P < 0.01). During rest, cardiovagal oscillations (at respiratory frequencies [RF]) and slow rhythms at nonrespiratory frequencies (NONRF) (from 0.01 to 0.07 Hz) in R-R intervals (RRI) (P < 0.01) were reduced. Both RF and NONRF rhythms in RRI were further blunted with tilt-up (P < 0.001). Slow adrenergic vasomotor rhythms in blood pressure (BP) (approximately 0.07 Hz) surged with tilt-up and returned to normal levels afterwards. The index of sympatho-vagal balance (NONRF-Systolic BP (SBP)/RF-RRI) was dramatically increased in POTS (P < 0.001). Distal postganglionic sudomotor failure was observed, and impairment of the BP responses to the Valsalva maneuver (phase II) suggested peripheral adrenergic dysfunction. Persistent orthostatic dizziness, tiredness, gastrointestinal symptoms and palpitations were common in POTS patients. It is possible to identify a subset of POTS patients who have a length-dependent autonomic neuropathy, affecting the peripheral adrenergic and cardiovagal fibers, with relative preservation of cardiac adrenergic fibers.

  14. Maximum-likelihood methods for array processing based on time-frequency distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yimin; Mu, Weifeng; Amin, Moeness G.

    1999-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel time-frequency maximum likelihood (t-f ML) method for direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation for non- stationary signals, and compares this method with conventional maximum likelihood DOA estimation techniques. Time-frequency distributions localize the signal power in the time-frequency domain, and as such enhance the effective SNR, leading to improved DOA estimation. The localization of signals with different t-f signatures permits the division of the time-frequency domain into smaller regions, each contains fewer signals than those incident on the array. The reduction of the number of signals within different time-frequency regions not only reduces the required number of sensors, but also decreases the computational load in multi- dimensional optimizations. Compared to the recently proposed time- frequency MUSIC (t-f MUSIC), the proposed t-f ML method can be applied in coherent environments, without the need to perform any type of preprocessing that is subject to both array geometry and array aperture.

  15. Enhanced joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography for quantitative flow velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Julia; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Recently, a new method called joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography (STdOCT) for flow velocity measurement in spectral domain OCT (SD OCT) was presented. This method analyzes the detected timeresolved interference fringe spectra by using a two-dimensional fast Fourier transformation (2D FFT) to determine directly the Doppler frequency shift instead of calculating the phase difference at each depth position of adjacent A-scans. There, it was found that STdOCT is more robust for measurements with low signal to noise ratio than the classic phase-resolved Doppler OCT (DOCT) making it attractive first for imaging fast flow velocities at which a strong Doppler angle dependent signal damping occurs due to interference fringe washout and second for investigating large blood vessels with a big diameter and a highly damped signal of blood with increasing depth due to strong scattering and absorption in the near-infrared wavelength range. In the present study, we would like to introduce an enhanced algorithm for STdOCT permitting a more precise flow velocity measurement in comparison to the conventional STdOCT. The new method determines the amplitude of the broadened Doppler frequency shift by calculating the center of gravity via the complex analytical signal as a result of the second FFT instead of detecting the maximum intensity signal. Furthermore, the comparison with phase-resolved DOCT was done experimentally by using a flow phantom consisting of a 1% Intralipid emulsion and a 320 μm glass capillary. As a result, the enhanced STdOCT and DOCT processed data are completely equivalent.

  16. Time-frequency-aspect analysis and visualization of acoustic scattering from elastic shells submerged in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Timothy J.

    2000-05-01

    The solutions for acoustic scattering from objects in separable geometries along with the associated fluid- structure interactions are well established. Closed-form solutions to these problems have either interpretations such as resonance scattering theory, or some limiting situations that provide insight into the physical processes that occur. In contrast, most acoustical scattering problems do not have closed-form solutions. Numerical solutions, like finite and boundary element methods, allow researchers to obtain solutions from scattering problems with more complicated geometries; unfortunately, these methods of solution are limited in that they lack the kind of interpretation that provides insight into the physical processes that occur. It is only through the systematic analysis of the large volume of data produced by numerical solutions that this insight is gained. One way to gain this insight is to analyze the monostatic dependence of echoes in the time-frequency domain. However, traditional three-dimensional graphical analysis of time-frequency signals that vary as a function of a third parameter (the monostatic dependence) does not display all of the signals' information content because two marginals, of this distribution (the time and frequency representations) contain information that is lost in the visual representation of the time-frequency domain. This information is lost because the uncertainty principal prevents simultaneous display of the time and frequency information via a time-frequency transform, and because humans do not possess the innate ability to perform the transforms that extract the information. The problem of how to systematically analyze monostatic scattering data in the time-frequency domain and how to visually display all of the data's information content is overcome by introducing a time-frequency-parameter graphical analysis technique. This technique is applied to farfield acoustic scattering from finite, elastic, cylindrical

  17. [EMD Time-Frequency Analysis of Raman Spectrum and NIR].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-yu; Fang, Yi-ming; Tan, Feng; Tong, Liang; Zhai, Zhe

    2016-02-01

    This paper analyzes the Raman spectrum and Near Infrared Spectrum (NIR) with time-frequency method. The empirical mode decomposition spectrum becomes intrinsic mode functions, which the proportion calculation reveals the Raman spectral energy is uniform distributed in each component, while the NIR's low order intrinsic mode functions only undertakes fewer primary spectroscopic effective information. Both the real spectrum and numerical experiments show that the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) regard Raman spectrum as the amplitude-modulated signal, which possessed with high frequency adsorption property; and EMD regards NIR as the frequency-modulated signal, which could be preferably realized high frequency narrow-band demodulation during first-order intrinsic mode functions. The first-order intrinsic mode functions Hilbert transform reveals that during the period of empirical mode decomposes Raman spectrum, modal aliasing happened. Through further analysis of corn leaf's NIR in time-frequency domain, after EMD, the first and second orders components of low energy are cut off, and reconstruct spectral signal by using the remaining intrinsic mode functions, the root-mean-square error is 1.001 1, and the correlation coefficient is 0.981 3, both of these two indexes indicated higher accuracy in re-construction; the decomposition trend term indicates the absorbency is ascending along with the decreasing to wave length in the near-infrared light wave band; and the Hilbert transform of characteristic modal component displays, 657 cm⁻¹ is the specific frequency by the corn leaf stress spectrum, which could be regarded as characteristic frequency for identification. PMID:27209743

  18. [EMD Time-Frequency Analysis of Raman Spectrum and NIR].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-yu; Fang, Yi-ming; Tan, Feng; Tong, Liang; Zhai, Zhe

    2016-02-01

    This paper analyzes the Raman spectrum and Near Infrared Spectrum (NIR) with time-frequency method. The empirical mode decomposition spectrum becomes intrinsic mode functions, which the proportion calculation reveals the Raman spectral energy is uniform distributed in each component, while the NIR's low order intrinsic mode functions only undertakes fewer primary spectroscopic effective information. Both the real spectrum and numerical experiments show that the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) regard Raman spectrum as the amplitude-modulated signal, which possessed with high frequency adsorption property; and EMD regards NIR as the frequency-modulated signal, which could be preferably realized high frequency narrow-band demodulation during first-order intrinsic mode functions. The first-order intrinsic mode functions Hilbert transform reveals that during the period of empirical mode decomposes Raman spectrum, modal aliasing happened. Through further analysis of corn leaf's NIR in time-frequency domain, after EMD, the first and second orders components of low energy are cut off, and reconstruct spectral signal by using the remaining intrinsic mode functions, the root-mean-square error is 1.001 1, and the correlation coefficient is 0.981 3, both of these two indexes indicated higher accuracy in re-construction; the decomposition trend term indicates the absorbency is ascending along with the decreasing to wave length in the near-infrared light wave band; and the Hilbert transform of characteristic modal component displays, 657 cm⁻¹ is the specific frequency by the corn leaf stress spectrum, which could be regarded as characteristic frequency for identification.

  19. Denoising of Ictal EEG Data Using Semi-Blind Source Separation Methods Based on Time-Frequency Priors.

    PubMed

    Hajipour Sardouie, Sepideh; Bagher Shamsollahi, Mohammad; Albera, Laurent; Merlet, Isabelle

    2015-05-01

    Removing muscle activity from ictal ElectroEncephaloGram (EEG) data is an essential preprocessing step in diagnosis and study of epileptic disorders. Indeed, at the very beginning of seizures, ictal EEG has a low amplitude and its morphology in the time domain is quite similar to muscular activity. Contrary to the time domain, ictal signals have specific characteristics in the time-frequency domain. In this paper, we use the time-frequency signature of ictal discharges as a priori information on the sources of interest. To extract the time-frequency signature of ictal sources, we use the Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) method. Then, we propose two time-frequency based semi-blind source separation approaches, namely the Time-Frequency-Generalized EigenValue Decomposition (TF-GEVD) and the Time-Frequency-Denoising Source Separation (TF-DSS), for the denoising of ictal signals based on these time-frequency signatures. The performance of the proposed methods is compared with that of CCA and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) approaches for the denoising of simulated ictal EEGs and of real ictal data. The results show the superiority of the proposed methods in comparison with CCA and ICA. PMID:25095269

  20. Time-frequency beamforming for nondestructive evaluations of plate using ultrasonic Lamb wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Je-Heon; Kim, Yong-Joe

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to detect structural defect locations in a plate by exciting the plate with a specific ultrasonic Lamb wave and recording reflective wave signals using a piezoelectric transducer array. For the purpose of eliminating the effects of the direct excitation signals as well as the boundary-reflected wave signals, it is proposed to improve a conventional MUSIC beamforming procedure by processing the measured signals in the time-frequency domain. In addition, a normalized, damped, cylindrical 2-D steering vector is proposed to increase the spatial resolution of time-frequency MUSIC power results. A cross-shaped array is selected to further improve the spatial resolution and to avoid mirrored virtual image effects. Here, it is experimentally demonstrated that the proposed time-frequency MUSIC beamforming procedure can be used to identify structural defect locations on an aluminum plate by distinguishing the defect-induced waves from the excitation-generated and boundary-reflected waves.

  1. An application of multidimensional time-frequency analysis as a base for the unified watermarking approach.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, Srdjan; Orovic, Irena; Zaric, Nikola

    2010-03-01

    A watermarking approach based on multidimensional time-frequency analysis is proposed. It represents a unified concept that can be used for different types of data such as audio, speech signals, images or video. Time-frequency analysis is employed for speech signals, while space/spatial-frequency analysis is used for images. Their combination is applied for video signals. Particularly, we focus on the 2-D case: space/spatial-frequency based image watermarking procedure that will be subsequently extended to video signal. A method that selects coefficients for watermarking by estimating the local frequency content is proposed. In order to provide watermark imperceptibility, the nonstationary filtering is used to model the watermark which corresponds to the host signal components. Furthermore, the watermark detection within the multidimensional time-frequency domain is proposed. The efficiency and robustness of the procedure in the presence of various attacks is proven experimentally. PMID:20172773

  2. Time-frequency analysis of event-related potentials: a brief tutorial.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Christoph S; Rach, Stefan; Vosskuhl, Johannes; Strüber, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) reflect cognitive processes and are usually analyzed in the so-called time domain. Additional information on cognitive functions can be assessed when analyzing ERPs in the frequency domain and treating them as event-related oscillations (EROs). This procedure results in frequency spectra but lacks information about the temporal dynamics of EROs. Here, we describe a method-called time-frequency analysis-that allows analyzing both the frequency of an ERO and its evolution over time. In a brief tutorial, the reader will learn how to use wavelet analysis in order to compute time-frequency transforms of ERP data. Basic steps as well as potential artifacts are described. Rather than in terms of formulas, descriptions are in textual form (written text) with numerous figures illustrating the topics. Recommendations on how to present frequency and time-frequency data in journal articles are provided. Finally, we briefly review studies that have applied time-frequency analysis to mismatch negativity paradigms. The deviant stimulus of such a paradigm evokes an ERO in the theta frequency band that is stronger than for the standard stimulus. Conversely, the standard stimulus evokes a stronger gamma-band response than does the deviant. This is interpreted in the context of the so-called match-and-utilization model. PMID:24194116

  3. Joint entropy for space and spatial frequency domains estimated from psychometric functions of achromatic discrimination.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Vladímir de Aquino; Souza, Givago da Silva; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Rodrigues, Anderson Raiol; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima

    2014-01-01

    We used psychometric functions to estimate the joint entropy for space discrimination and spatial frequency discrimination. Space discrimination was taken as discrimination of spatial extent. Seven subjects were tested. Gábor functions comprising unidimensionalsinusoidal gratings (0.4, 2, and 10 cpd) and bidimensionalGaussian envelopes (1°) were used as reference stimuli. The experiment comprised the comparison between reference and test stimulithat differed in grating's spatial frequency or envelope's standard deviation. We tested 21 different envelope's standard deviations around the reference standard deviation to study spatial extent discrimination and 19 different grating's spatial frequencies around the reference spatial frequency to study spatial frequency discrimination. Two series of psychometric functions were obtained for 2%, 5%, 10%, and 100% stimulus contrast. The psychometric function data points for spatial extent discrimination or spatial frequency discrimination were fitted with Gaussian functions using the least square method, and the spatial extent and spatial frequency entropies were estimated from the standard deviation of these Gaussian functions. Then, joint entropy was obtained by multiplying the square root of space extent entropy times the spatial frequency entropy. We compared our results to the theoretical minimum for unidimensional Gábor functions, 1/4π or 0.0796. At low and intermediate spatial frequencies and high contrasts, joint entropy reached levels below the theoretical minimum, suggesting non-linear interactions between two or more visual mechanisms. We concluded that non-linear interactions of visual pathways, such as the M and P pathways, could explain joint entropy values below the theoretical minimum at low and intermediate spatial frequencies and high contrasts. These non-linear interactions might be at work at intermediate and high contrasts at all spatial frequencies once there was a substantial decrease in joint

  4. Time-frequency analysis of spike-wave discharges using a modified wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Bosnyakova, Daria; Gabova, Alexandra; Kuznetsova, Galina; Obukhov, Yuri; Midzyanovskaya, Inna; Salonin, Dmitrij; van Rijn, Clementina; Coenen, Anton; Tuomisto, Leene; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

    2006-06-30

    The continuous Morlet wavelet transform was used for the analysis of the time-frequency pattern of spike-wave discharges (SWD) as can be recorded in a genetic animal model of absence epilepsy (rats of the WAG/Rij strain). We developed a new wavelet transform that allows to obtain the time-frequency dynamics of the dominating rhythm during the discharges. SWD were analyzed pre- and post-administration of certain drugs. SWD recorded predrug demonstrate quite uniform time-frequency dynamics of the dominant rhythm. The beginning of the discharge has a short period with the highest frequency value (up to 15 Hz). Then the frequency decreases to 7-9 Hz and frequency modulation occurs during the discharge in this range with a period of 0.5-0.7 s. Specific changes of SWD time-frequency dynamics were found after the administration of psychoactive drugs, addressing different brain mediator and modulator systems. Short multiple SWDs appeared under low (0.5 mg/kg) doses of haloperidol, they are characterized by a fast frequency decrease to 5-6 Hz at the end of every discharge. The frequency of the dominant frequency of SWD was not stable in long lasting SWD after 1.0 mg/kg or more haloperidol: then two periodicities were found. Long lasting SWD seen after the administration of vigabatrin showed a stable frequency of the discharge. The EEG after Ketamin showed a distinct 5 s quasiperiodicity. No clear changes of time-frequency dynamics of SWD were found after perilamine. It can be concluded that the use of the modified Morlet wavelet transform allows to describe significant parameters of the dynamics in the time-frequency domain of the dominant rhythm of SWD that were not previously detected.

  5. Robust Multi-Network Clustering via Joint Cross-Domain Cluster Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Cheng, Wei; Tong, Hanghang; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Network clustering is an important problem that has recently drawn a lot of attentions. Most existing work focuses on clustering nodes within a single network. In many applications, however, there exist multiple related networks, in which each network may be constructed from a different domain and instances in one domain may be related to instances in other domains. In this paper, we propose a robust algorithm, MCA, for multi-network clustering that takes into account cross-domain relationships between instances. MCA has several advantages over the existing single network clustering methods. First, it is able to detect associations between clusters from different domains, which, however, is not addressed by any existing methods. Second, it achieves more consistent clustering results on multiple networks by leveraging the duality between clustering individual networks and inferring cross-network cluster alignment. Finally, it provides a multi-network clustering solution that is more robust to noise and errors. We perform extensive experiments on a variety of real and synthetic networks to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of MCA. PMID:27239167

  6. Separation of Intercepted Multi-Radar Signals Based on Parameterized Time-Frequency Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W. L.; Xie, J. W.; Wang, H. M.; Sheng, C.

    2016-09-01

    Modern radars use complex waveforms to obtain high detection performance and low probabilities of interception and identification. Signals intercepted from multiple radars overlap considerably in both the time and frequency domains and are difficult to separate with primary time parameters. Time-frequency analysis (TFA), as a key signal-processing tool, can provide better insight into the signal than conventional methods. In particular, among the various types of TFA, parameterized time-frequency analysis (PTFA) has shown great potential to investigate the time-frequency features of such non-stationary signals. In this paper, we propose a procedure for PTFA to separate overlapped radar signals; it includes five steps: initiation, parameterized time-frequency analysis, demodulating the signal of interest, adaptive filtering and recovering the signal. The effectiveness of the method was verified with simulated data and an intercepted radar signal received in a microwave laboratory. The results show that the proposed method has good performance and has potential in electronic reconnaissance applications, such as electronic intelligence, electronic warfare support measures, and radar warning.

  7. The Separate, Relative, and Joint Effects of Employee Job Performance Domains on Supervisors' Willingness to Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapierre, Laurent M.; Bonaccio, Silvia; Allen, Tammy D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to further elucidate how employees should behave at work to increase their chances of being mentored by their immediate supervisor. To that end, we experimentally tested how three domains of employee performance [task performance (TP), organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) targeting the supervisor, and…

  8. Precision frequency synthesizing sources with excellent time/frequency performances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Liren; Lin, Hai

    1994-01-01

    Precision frequency synthesizing sources are needed in the time / frequency measuring system, atomic frequency standards, telemetry, communication, and radar systems. This kind of frequency synthesizing source possesses high frequency accuracy and excellent long term and short term frequency stability. Several precision frequency synthesizing sources developed by Beijing Institute of Radio Metrology and Measurement (BIRMM) which have been successfully applied to the time / frequency measuring system, atomic frequency standards system, and radar system are described. In addition, the working principle, implementation approach, and the main technical specifications of the frequency synthesizing sources are also given.

  9. Electrocardiogram Signal and Linear Time-Frequency Transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, B. T.

    2014-12-01

    The diagnostic analysis of non-stationary multi component signals such as electrocardiogram (ECG) involves the use of time-frequency transforms. So, the application of time-frequency transforms to an ECG signal is an important problem of research. In this paper, initially, linear transforms like short time Fourier transform, continuous wavelet transforms, s-transform etc. are revisited. Then the application of these transforms to normal and abnormal ECG signals is illustrated. It has been observed that s-transform provides better time and frequency resolution compared to other linear transforms. The fractional Fourier transform provides rotation to the spectrogram representation.

  10. Detailed Vibration Analysis of Pinion Gear with Time-Frequency Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Marianne; Pryor, Anna H.; Lewicki, David G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the authors show a detailed analysis of the vibration signal from the destructive testing of a spiral bevel gear and pinion pair containing seeded faults. The vibration signal is analyzed in the time domain, frequency domain and with four time-frequency transforms: the Short Time Frequency Transform (STFT), the Wigner-Ville Distribution with the Choi-Williams kernel (WV-CW), the Continuous Wavelet' Transform (CWT) and the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Vibration data of bevel gear tooth fatigue cracks, under a variety of operating load levels and damage conditions, are analyzed using these methods. A new metric for automatic anomaly detection is developed and can be produced from any systematic numerical representation of the vibration signals. This new metric reveals indications of gear damage with all of the time-frequency transforms, as well as time and frequency representations, on this data set. Analysis with the CWT detects changes in the signal at low torque levels not found with the other transforms. The WV-CW and CWT use considerably more resources than the STFT and the DWT. More testing of the new metric is needed to determine its value for automatic anomaly detection and to develop fault detection methods for the metric.

  11. A joint watermarking/encryption algorithm for verifying medical image integrity and authenticity in both encrypted and spatial domains.

    PubMed

    Bouslimi, D; Coatrieux, G; Roux, Ch

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new joint watermarking/encryption algorithm for the purpose of verifying the reliability of medical images in both encrypted and spatial domains. It combines a substitutive watermarking algorithm, the quantization index modulation (QIM), with a block cipher algorithm, the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), in CBC mode of operation. The proposed solution gives access to the outcomes of the image integrity and of its origins even though the image is stored encrypted. Experimental results achieved on 8 bits encoded Ultrasound images illustrate the overall performances of the proposed scheme. By making use of the AES block cipher in CBC mode, the proposed solution is compliant with or transparent to the DICOM standard.

  12. A joint watermarking/encryption algorithm for verifying medical image integrity and authenticity in both encrypted and spatial domains.

    PubMed

    Bouslimi, D; Coatrieux, G; Roux, Ch

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new joint watermarking/encryption algorithm for the purpose of verifying the reliability of medical images in both encrypted and spatial domains. It combines a substitutive watermarking algorithm, the quantization index modulation (QIM), with a block cipher algorithm, the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), in CBC mode of operation. The proposed solution gives access to the outcomes of the image integrity and of its origins even though the image is stored encrypted. Experimental results achieved on 8 bits encoded Ultrasound images illustrate the overall performances of the proposed scheme. By making use of the AES block cipher in CBC mode, the proposed solution is compliant with or transparent to the DICOM standard. PMID:22256213

  13. Comparison of Signals from Gravitational Wave Detectors with Instantaneous Time-Frequency Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroeer, A.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J.

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy relies on the use of multiple detectors, so that coincident detections may distinguish real signals from instrumental artifacts, and also so that relative timing of signals can provide the sky position of sources. We show that the comparison of instantaneous time-frequency and time-amplitude maps provided by the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) can be used effectively for relative signal timing of common signals, to discriminate between the case of identical coincident signals and random noise coincidences and to provide a classification of signals based on their time-frequency trajectories. The comparison is done with a X(sup 2) goodness-offit method which includes contributions from both the instantaneous amplitude and frequency components of the HHT to match two signals in the time domain. This approach naturally allows the analysis of waveforms with strong frequency modulation.

  14. Comparison of signals from gravitational wave detectors with instantaneous time-frequency maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeer, A.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J.

    2011-08-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy relies on the use of multiple detectors, so that coincident detections may distinguish real signals from instrumental artifacts, and also so that relative timing of signals can provide the sky position of sources. We show that the comparison of instantaneous time-frequency and time-amplitude maps provided by the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) can be used effectively for relative signal timing of common signals, to discriminate between the case of identical coincident signals and random noise coincidences and to provide a classification of signals based on their time-frequency trajectories. The comparison is done with a χ2 goodness-of-fit method which includes contributions from both the instantaneous amplitude and frequency components of the HHT to match two signals in the time domain. This approach naturally allows the analysis of waveforms with strong frequency modulation.

  15. Character Recognition Method by Time-Frequency Analyses Using Writing Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tatsuhito; Katsura, Seiichiro

    With the development of information and communication technology, personal verification becomes more and more important. In the future ubiquitous society, the development of terminals handling personal information requires the personal verification technology. The signature is one of the personal verification methods; however, the number of characters is limited in the case of the signature and therefore false signature is used easily. Thus, personal identification is difficult from handwriting. This paper proposes a “haptic pen” that extracts the writing pressure, and shows a character recognition method by time-frequency analyses. Although the figures of characters written by different amanuenses are similar, the differences appear in the time-frequency domain. As a result, it is possible to use the proposed character recognition for personal identification more exactly. The experimental results showed the viability of the proposed method.

  16. Time-frequency analysis for parametric and non-parametric identification of nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank Pai, P.

    2013-04-01

    This paper points out the differences between linear and nonlinear system identification tasks, shows that time-frequency analysis is most appropriate for nonlinearity identification, and presents advanced signal processing techniques that combine time-frequency decomposition and perturbation methods for parametric and non-parametric identification of nonlinear dynamical systems. Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is a recent data-driven adaptive time-frequency analysis technique that combines the use of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and Hilbert transform (HT). Because EMD does not use predetermined basis functions and function orthogonality for component extraction, HHT provides more concise component decomposition and more accurate time-frequency analysis than the short-time Fourier transform and wavelet transform for extraction of system characteristics and nonlinearities. However, HHT's accuracy seriously suffers from the end effect caused by the discontinuity-induced Gibbs' phenomenon. Moreover, because HHT requires a long set of data obtained by high-frequency sampling, it is not appropriate for online frequency tracking. This paper presents a conjugate-pair decomposition (CPD) method that requires only a few recent data points sampled at a low-frequency for sliding-window point-by-point adaptive time-frequency analysis and can be used for online frequency tracking. To improve adaptive time-frequency analysis, a methodology is developed by combining EMD and CPD for noise filtering in the time domain, reducing the end effect, and dissolving other mathematical and numerical problems in time-frequency analysis. For parametric identification of a nonlinear system, the methodology processes one steady-state response and/or one free damped transient response and uses amplitude-dependent dynamic characteristics derived from perturbation analysis to determine the type and order of nonlinearity and system parameters. For non-parametric identification, the methodology

  17. Robust Pilot Decontamination Based on Joint Angle and Power Domain Discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Haifan; Cottatellucci, Laura; Gesbert, David; Muller, Ralf R.; He, Gaoning

    2016-06-01

    We address the problem of noise and interference corrupted channel estimation in massive MIMO systems. Interference, which originates from pilot reuse (or contamination), can in principle be discriminated on the basis of the distributions of path angles and amplitudes. In this paper we propose novel robust channel estimation algorithms exploiting path diversity in both angle and power domains, relying on a suitable combination of the spatial filtering and amplitude based projection. The proposed approaches are able to cope with a wide range of system and topology scenarios, including those where, unlike in previous works, interference channel may overlap with desired channels in terms of multipath angles of arrival or exceed them in terms of received power. In particular we establish analytically the conditions under which the proposed channel estimator is fully decontaminated. Simulation results confirm the overall system gains when using the new methods.

  18. Time-frequency representation measurement based on temporal Fourier transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suen, Yifan; Xiao, Shaoqiu; Hao, Sumin; Zhao, Xiaoxiang; Xiong, Yigao; Liu, Shenye

    2016-10-01

    We propose a new scheme to physically realize the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) of chirped optical pulse using time-lens array that enables us to get time-frequency representation without using FFT algorithm. The time-lens based upon the four-wave mixing is used to perform the process of temporal Fourier transformation. Pump pulse is used for both providing the quadratic phase and being the window function of STFT. The idea of STFT is physically realized in our scheme. Simulations have been done to investigate performance of the time-frequency representation scheme (TFRS) in comparison with STFT using FFT algorithm. Optimal measurement of resolution in time and frequency has been discussed.

  19. Time-Frequency Approach for Stochastic Signal Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Ripul; Akula, Aparna; Kumar, Satish; Sardana, H. K.

    2011-10-20

    The detection of events in a stochastic signal has been a subject of great interest. One of the oldest signal processing technique, Fourier Transform of a signal contains information regarding frequency content, but it cannot resolve the exact onset of changes in the frequency, all temporal information is contained in the phase of the transform. On the other hand, Spectrogram is better able to resolve temporal evolution of frequency content, but has a trade-off in time resolution versus frequency resolution in accordance with the uncertainty principle. Therefore, time-frequency representations are considered for energetic characterisation of the non-stationary signals. Wigner Ville Distribution (WVD) is the most prominent quadratic time-frequency signal representation and used for analysing frequency variations in signals.WVD allows for instantaneous frequency estimation at each data point, for a typical temporal resolution of fractions of a second. This paper through simulations describes the way time frequency models are applied for the detection of event in a stochastic signal.

  20. Weak-coherent-state-based time-frequency quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yequn; Djordjevic, Ivan B.; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2015-11-01

    We study large-alphabet quantum key distribution (QKD) based on the use of weak-coherent states and the time-frequency uncertainty relation. The large alphabet is achieved by dividing time and spectrum into M bins resulting in a frame similar to traditional pulse-position modulation (in time domain). However, the non-uniform occurrence of a photon prepared in a time/frequency bin creates the space for eavesdropping. By analysis, we show that a new intercept-resend attack strategy exists, which is stronger than that has been reported in the literature and hence the secret key rate of time-frequency QKD (TF-QKD) can be more tightly bounded. We then analyse the secret key rates of TF-QKD under various practical issues, such as channel loss, background noise, jitter and atmospheric turbulence in order to better understand the applicability of TF-QKD. Further, we discuss the information reconciliation for TF-QKD. Specifically, we investigate the layered coding scheme for TF-QKD based on quasi-cyclic low-density parity-check codes against jitter and atmospheric turbulence. By simulation, we demonstrate that information reconciliation can be efficiently achieved.

  1. Detection of time-frequency relations between geodetic and geophysical excitation functions of polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzeszotko, A.; Kosek, W.; Popinski, W.

    2009-09-01

    The redistribution of mass in the atmosphere, oceans and hydrology and the changes of the wind and ocean currents velocities are important sources of polar motion excitation. Relations between the geodetic excitation function and the effective angular momentum functions of the atmosphere, oceans and hydrology are examined in the time-frequency domain by means of coherence and phase synchronization. Coherence may be interpreted as a correlation coefficient between oscillations with the same frequencies present in two time series whereas phase synchronization allow to investigate the phase agreement between these oscillations.

  2. Human Time-Frequency Acuity Beats the Fourier Uncertainty Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Jacob N.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2013-01-01

    The time-frequency uncertainty principle states that the product of the temporal and frequency extents of a signal cannot be smaller than 1/(4π). We study human ability to simultaneously judge the frequency and the timing of a sound. Our subjects often exceeded the uncertainty limit, sometimes by more than tenfold, mostly through remarkable timing acuity. Our results establish a lower bound for the nonlinearity and complexity of the algorithms employed by our brains in parsing transient sounds, rule out simple “linear filter” models of early auditory processing, and highlight timing acuity as a central feature in auditory object processing.

  3. Adaptive time-frequency parametrization of epileptic spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durka, Piotr J.

    2004-05-01

    Adaptive time-frequency approximations of signals have proven to be a valuable tool in electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis and research, where it is believed that oscillatory phenomena play a crucial role in the brain’s information processing. This paper extends this paradigm to the nonoscillating structures such as the epileptic EEG spikes, and presents the advantages of their parametrization in general terms such as amplitude and half-width. A simple detector of epileptic spikes in the space of these parameters, tested on a limited data set, gives very promising results. It also provides a direct distinction between randomly occurring spikes or spike/wave complexes and rhythmic discharges.

  4. Human time-frequency acuity beats the Fourier uncertainty principle.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, Jacob N; Magnasco, Marcelo O

    2013-01-25

    The time-frequency uncertainty principle states that the product of the temporal and frequency extents of a signal cannot be smaller than 1/(4 π). We study human ability to simultaneously judge the frequency and the timing of a sound. Our subjects often exceeded the uncertainty limit, sometimes by more than tenfold, mostly through remarkable timing acuity. Our results establish a lower bound for the nonlinearity and complexity of the algorithms employed by our brains in parsing transient sounds, rule out simple "linear filter" models of early auditory processing, and highlight timing acuity as a central feature in auditory object processing.

  5. Short-time fractional Fourier methods for the time-frequency representation of chirp signals.

    PubMed

    Capus, Chris; Brown, Keith

    2003-06-01

    The fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) provides a valuable tool for the analysis of linear chirp signals. This paper develops two short-time FrFT variants which are suited to the analysis of multicomponent and nonlinear chirp signals. Outputs have similar properties to the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) but show improved time-frequency resolution. The FrFT is a parameterized transform with parameter, a, related to chirp rate. The two short-time implementations differ in how the value of a is chosen. In the first, a global optimization procedure selects one value of a with reference to the entire signal. In the second, a values are selected independently for each windowed section. Comparative variance measures based on the Gaussian function are given and are shown to be consistent with the uncertainty principle in fractional domains. For appropriately chosen FrFT orders, the derived fractional domain uncertainty relationship is minimized for Gaussian windowed linear chirp signals. The two short-time FrFT algorithms have complementary strengths demonstrated by time-frequency representations for a multicomponent bat chirp, a highly nonlinear quadratic chirp, and an output pulse from a finite-difference sonar model with dispersive change. These representations illustrate the improvements obtained in using FrFT based algorithms compared to the STFT.

  6. Accelerometry based classification of walking patterns using time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Ambikairajah, Eliathamby; Lovell, Nigel H; Celler, Branko G

    2007-01-01

    In this work, 33 dimensional time-frequency domain features were developed and evaluated to detect five different human walking patterns from data acquired using a triaxial accelerometer attached at the waist above the iliac spine. 52 subjects were asked to walk on a flat surface along a corridor, walk up and down a flight of a stairway and walk up and down a constant gradient slope, in an unsupervised manner. Time-frequency domain features of acceleration data in anterior-posterior (AP), medio-lateral (ML) and vertical (VT) direction were developed. The acceleration signal in each direction was decomposed to six detailed signals at different wavelet scales by using the wavelet packet transform. The rms values and standard deviations of the decomposed signals at scales 5 to 2 corresponding to the 0.78-18.75 Hz frequency band were calculated. The energies in the 0.39-18.75 Hz frequency band of acceleration signal in AP, ML and VT directions were also computed. The back-end of the system was a multi-layer perceptron (MLP) Neural Networks (NNs) classifier. Overall classification accuracies of 88.54% and 92.05% were achieved by using a round robin (RR) and random frame selecting (RFS) train-test method respectively for the five walking patterns. PMID:18003104

  7. Fault detection in rotor bearing systems using time frequency techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, N. Harish; Sekhar, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Faults such as misalignment, rotor cracks and rotor to stator rub can exist collectively in rotor bearing systems. It is an important task for rotor dynamic personnel to monitor and detect faults in rotating machinery. In this paper, the rotor startup vibrations are utilized to solve the fault identification problem using time frequency techniques. Numerical simulations are performed through finite element analysis of the rotor bearing system with individual and collective combinations of faults as mentioned above. Three signal processing tools namely Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT), Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) and Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT) are compared to evaluate their detection performance. The effect of addition of Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) on three time frequency techniques is presented. The comparative study is focused towards detecting the least possible level of the fault induced and the computational time consumed. The computation time consumed by HHT is very less when compared to CWT based diagnosis. However, for noisy data CWT is more preferred over HHT. To identify fault characteristics using wavelets a procedure to adjust resolution of the mother wavelet is presented in detail. Experiments are conducted to obtain the run-up data of a rotor bearing setup for diagnosis of shaft misalignment and rotor stator rubbing faults.

  8. The Application of Time-Frequency Methods to HUMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, Anna H.; Mosher, Marianne; Lewicki, David G.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the study of four time-frequency transforms applied to vibration signals and presents a new metric for comparing them for fault detection. The four methods to be described and compared are the Short Time Frequency Transform (STFT), the Choi-Williams Distribution (WV-CW), the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) and the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Vibration data of bevel gear tooth fatigue cracks, under a variety of operating load levels, are analyzed using these methods. The new metric for automatic fault detection is developed and can be produced from any systematic numerical representation of the vibration signals. This new metric reveals indications of gear damage with all of the methods on this data set. Analysis with the CWT detects mechanical problems with the test rig not found with the other transforms. The WV-CW and CWT use considerably more resources than the STFT and the DWT. More testing of the new metric is needed to determine its value for automatic fault detection and to develop methods of setting the threshold for the metric.

  9. Degraded Time-Frequency Acuity to Time-Reversed Notes

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheim, Jacob N.; Isakov, Pavel; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2013-01-01

    Time-reversal symmetry breaking is a key feature of many classes of natural sounds, originating in the physics of sound production. While attention has been paid to the response of the auditory system to “natural stimuli,” very few psychophysical tests have been performed. We conduct psychophysical measurements of time-frequency acuity for stylized representations of “natural”-like notes (sharp attack, long decay) and the time-reversed versions of these notes (long attack, sharp decay). Our results demonstrate significantly greater precision, arising from enhanced temporal acuity, for such sounds over their time-reversed versions, without a corresponding decrease in frequency acuity. These data inveigh against models of auditory processing that include tradeoffs between temporal and frequency acuity, at least in the range of notes tested and suggest the existence of statistical priors for notes with a sharp-attack and a long-decay. We are additionally able to calculate a minimal theoretical bound on the sophistication of the nonlinearities in auditory processing. We find that among the best studied classes of nonlinear time-frequency representations, only matching pursuit, spectral derivatives, and reassigned spectrograms are able to satisfy this criterion. PMID:23799012

  10. Time-frequency methods for signal analysis in wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalista, Karel; Liska, Jindrich

    2015-11-01

    Since wind turbines became one of the most often source of renewable energy, appropriate health and condition monitoring systems are required. Especially proper monitoring of offshore plants is very significant because the accessibility is difficult and inspections are very costly. In comparison with conventional rotating machine vibration monitoring, where steady conditions and stationary signal are usually assumed, the wind turbines are characterized by unsteady conditions due to variable rotational speed. Hence the vibration signal is non-stationary and interpretation of signal signatures may be more complex. The common approach to analyze such non-stationary signals is the use of a time-frequency method, usually Short-Time Fourier Transform, which is the most popular one due to its simplicity. Nevertheless, there are other methods which can give a different view at the analyzed data and provide new information. This article investigates the potential use of some other time-frequency methods, namely Wavelet Transform, Wigner-Ville distribution and Hilbert-Huang transform in wind plants monitoring systems and apply these methods to real measured data with additional simulated bearing fault signal. Finally, the mentioned methods are compared based on computational complexity, readability and interpretability. Though the last two criteria are very subjective, Short-Time Fourier Transform was finally chosen as the most effective method followed by Wavelet Transform.

  11. Automatic classification of minelike targets buried underground using time-frequency signatures extracted by a stepped-frequency radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strifors, Hans C.; Gustafsson, Anders; Abrahamson, Steffan; Gaunaurd, Guillermo C.

    2001-10-01

    Ultra-wideband radar systems are feasible for extracting signature infor-ma-tion use-ful for target recognition purposes. An ultra-wideband radar system emits either an extremely short pulse, impulse, or a frequency modulated signal. The frequency content of the emitted signals is designed to match the size and kind of typical targets and environments. We investigate the backscattered echoes from selected targets that are extracted by a stepped-frequency continuous wave (SFCW) radar system playing the role of ground penetrating radar (GPR). The targets are metal and non-metal objects buried in dry sand. The SFCW radar transmits 55 different frequencies from 300 to 3,000 MHz in steps of 50 MHz. The duration of each frequency is about 100 ´s, which means that each transmitted waveform has an extremely narrow band. The in-phase (I) sampled signals and quadrature-phase (Q) sampled signals give information of both the amplitude and phase of the signal returned from the target. As a result a complex-valued line spectrum of the target is obtained that can be used for synthesizing real-valued repetitive waveforms, using the inverse Fourier transform. We analyze synthe-sized back-scat-tered echoes from each target in the joint time-frequency domain us-ing a pseudo-Wigner distribution (PWD). A classification method that we developed previously using the fuzzy C-means clustering technique is then used to reduce the number and kind of fea-tures in the derived target signatures. Using a template for each member of the class the classifier decides the membership of a given target based on best fit of the templates measured by a cost function. We also address the problem of how to select suitable waveforms for the templates used by the classification algorithm.

  12. Time-frequency analysis of the bistatic acoustic scattering from a spherical elastic shell.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Shaun D; Sabra, Karim G; Zakharia, Manell E; Sessarego, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The development of low-frequency sonar systems, using, for instance, a network of autonomous systems in unmanned vehicles, provides a practical means for bistatic measurements (i.e., when the source and receiver are widely separated) allowing for multiple viewpoints of the target of interest. Time-frequency analysis, in particular, Wigner-Ville analysis, takes advantage of the evolution time dependent aspect of the echo spectrum to differentiate a man-made target, such as an elastic spherical shell, from a natural object of the similar shape. A key energetic feature of fluid-loaded and thin spherical shell is the coincidence pattern, also referred to as the mid-frequency enhancement (MFE), that results from antisymmetric Lamb-waves propagating around the circumference of the shell. This article investigates numerically the bistatic variations of the MFE with respect to the monostatic configuration using the Wigner-Ville analysis. The observed time-frequency shifts of the MFE are modeled using a previously derived quantitative ray theory by Zhang et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 91, 1862-1874 (1993)] for spherical shell's scattering. Additionally, the advantage of an optimal array beamformer, based on joint time delays and frequency shifts is illustrated for enhancing the detection of the MFE recorded across a bistatic receiver array when compared to a conventional time-delay beamformer.

  13. Time-frequency methods for structural health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pyayt, Alexander L; Kozionov, Alexey P; Mokhov, Ilya I; Lang, Bernhard; Meijer, Robert J; Krzhizhanovskaya, Valeria V; Sloot, Peter M A

    2014-03-12

    Detection of early warning signals for the imminent failure of large and complex engineered structures is a daunting challenge with many open research questions. In this paper we report on novel ways to perform Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of flood protection systems (levees, earthen dikes and concrete dams) using sensor data. We present a robust data-driven anomaly detection method that combines time-frequency feature extraction, using wavelet analysis and phase shift, with one-sided classification techniques to identify the onset of failure anomalies in real-time sensor measurements. The methodology has been successfully tested at three operational levees. We detected a dam leakage in the retaining dam (Germany) and "strange" behaviour of sensors installed in a Boston levee (UK) and a Rhine levee (Germany).

  14. Time-Frequency Methods for Structural Health Monitoring †

    PubMed Central

    Pyayt, Alexander L.; Kozionov, Alexey P.; Mokhov, Ilya I.; Lang, Bernhard; Meijer, Robert J.; Krzhizhanovskaya, Valeria V.; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of early warning signals for the imminent failure of large and complex engineered structures is a daunting challenge with many open research questions. In this paper we report on novel ways to perform Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of flood protection systems (levees, earthen dikes and concrete dams) using sensor data. We present a robust data-driven anomaly detection method that combines time-frequency feature extraction, using wavelet analysis and phase shift, with one-sided classification techniques to identify the onset of failure anomalies in real-time sensor measurements. The methodology has been successfully tested at three operational levees. We detected a dam leakage in the retaining dam (Germany) and “strange” behaviour of sensors installed in a Boston levee (UK) and a Rhine levee (Germany). PMID:24625740

  15. OFDM, Laurent operators, and time-frequency localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmer, Thomas

    2000-12-01

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) has gained considerable interest as an efficient technology for high- date-data transmission over wireless channels. The design of pulse shapes that are well-localized in the time-frequency plane is of great importance in order to combat intersymbol interference and interchannel interference caused by the mobile radio channel. Recently proposed methods to construct such well-localized functions are utilizing the link between OFDM and Gabor systems. We derive a theoretical framework that shows why and under which conditions these methods will yield well-localized pulse shapes. In our analysis we exploit the connection between Gabor systems, Laurent operators and the classical work of Gelfand, Raikov, and Shilov on commutative Banach algebras. In the language of Gabor analysis we derive a general condition under which the dual window and the canonical tight window inherit the decay properties of the analysis window.

  16. Time-frequency analysis of rhythmic masticatory muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Farella, Mauro; Palla, Sandro; Gallo, Luigi Maria

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate under laboratory conditions an algorithm for a time-frequency analysis of rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA). The algorithm baseband demodulated the electromyographic (EMG) signal to provide a frequency versus time representation. Using appropriate thresholds for frequency and power parameters, it was possible to automatically assess the features of RMMA without examiner interaction. The algorithm was first tested using synthetic EMG signals and then using real EMG signals obtained from the masticatory muscles of 11 human subjects who underwent well-defined rhythmic, static, and possible confounding oral tasks. The accuracy of detection was quantified by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves. Sensitivity and specificity values were > or =90% and > or =96%, respectively. The areas under the ROC curves were > or =95% (standard error +/-0.1%). The proposed approach represents a promising tool to effectively investigate rhythmical contractions of the masticatory muscles.

  17. Time-Frequency Analysis Reveals Pairwise Interactions in Insect Swarms.

    PubMed

    Puckett, James G; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2015-06-26

    The macroscopic emergent behavior of social animal groups is a classic example of dynamical self-organization, and is thought to arise from the local interactions between individuals. Determining these interactions from empirical data sets of real animal groups, however, is challenging. Using multicamera imaging and tracking, we studied the motion of individual flying midges in laboratory mating swarms. By performing a time-frequency analysis of the midge trajectories, we show that the midge behavior can be segmented into two distinct modes: one that is independent and composed of low-frequency maneuvers, and one that consists of higher-frequency nearly harmonic oscillations conducted in synchrony with another midge. We characterize these pairwise interactions, and make a hypothesis as to their biological function. PMID:26197145

  18. Time-frequency analysis of synthetic aperture radar signals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.

    1996-08-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has become an important tool for remote sensing of the environment. SAR is a set of digital signal processing algorithms that are used to focus the signal returned to the radar because radar systems in themselves cannot produce the high resolution images required in remote sensing applications. To reconstruct an image, several parameters must be estimated and the quality of output image depends on the degree of accuracy of these parameters. In this thesis, we derive the fundamental SAR algorithms and concentrate on the estimation of one of its critical parameters. We show that the common technique for estimating this particular parameter can sometimes lead to erroneous results and reduced quality images. We also employ time-frequency analysis techniques to examine variations in the radar signals caused by platform motion and show how these results can be used to improve output image quality.

  19. Time-Frequency Analysis Reveals Pairwise Interactions in Insect Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2015-06-01

    The macroscopic emergent behavior of social animal groups is a classic example of dynamical self-organization, and is thought to arise from the local interactions between individuals. Determining these interactions from empirical data sets of real animal groups, however, is challenging. Using multicamera imaging and tracking, we studied the motion of individual flying midges in laboratory mating swarms. By performing a time-frequency analysis of the midge trajectories, we show that the midge behavior can be segmented into two distinct modes: one that is independent and composed of low-frequency maneuvers, and one that consists of higher-frequency nearly harmonic oscillations conducted in synchrony with another midge. We characterize these pairwise interactions, and make a hypothesis as to their biological function.

  20. A multichannel time-frequency and multi-wavelet toolbox for uterine electromyography processing and visualisation.

    PubMed

    Batista, Arnaldo G; Najdi, Shirin; Godinho, Daniela M; Martins, Catarina; Serrano, Fátima C; Ortigueira, Manuel D; Rato, Raul T

    2016-09-01

    The uterine electromyogram, also called electrohysterogram (EHG), is an electrical signal generated by the uterine contractile activity. The EHG has been considered a promising biomarker for labour and preterm labour prediction, for which there is a demand for accurate estimation methods. Preterm labour is a significant public health concern and one of the major causes of neonatal mortality and morbidity [1]. Given the non-stationary properties of the EHG signal, time-frequency domain analysis can be used. For real life signals it is not generally possible to determine a priori the suitable quadratic time-frequency kernel or the appropriate wavelet family and relative parameters, regarding, for instance, the adequate detection of the signal frequency variation in time. There has been a lack of a comprehensive software tool for the selection of the appropriate time frequency representation of a multichannel EHG signal and extraction of relevant spectral and temporal information. The presented toolbox (Uterine Explorer) has been specifically designed for the EHG analysis and exploration in view of the characterisation of its components. The starting point is the multichannel scalogram or spectrogram representation from which frequency and time marginals, instantaneous frequency and bandwidth are obtained as EHG features. From this point the detected components undergo parametric and non-parametric spectral estimation and wavelet packet analysis. Intrauterine pressure estimation (IUP) is obtained using the Teager, RMS, wavelet marginal and Hilbert operators over the EHG. This toolbox has been tested to build up a dictionary of 288 EHG components [2], useful for research in preterm labour prediction. PMID:27474810

  1. A multichannel time-frequency and multi-wavelet toolbox for uterine electromyography processing and visualisation.

    PubMed

    Batista, Arnaldo G; Najdi, Shirin; Godinho, Daniela M; Martins, Catarina; Serrano, Fátima C; Ortigueira, Manuel D; Rato, Raul T

    2016-09-01

    The uterine electromyogram, also called electrohysterogram (EHG), is an electrical signal generated by the uterine contractile activity. The EHG has been considered a promising biomarker for labour and preterm labour prediction, for which there is a demand for accurate estimation methods. Preterm labour is a significant public health concern and one of the major causes of neonatal mortality and morbidity [1]. Given the non-stationary properties of the EHG signal, time-frequency domain analysis can be used. For real life signals it is not generally possible to determine a priori the suitable quadratic time-frequency kernel or the appropriate wavelet family and relative parameters, regarding, for instance, the adequate detection of the signal frequency variation in time. There has been a lack of a comprehensive software tool for the selection of the appropriate time frequency representation of a multichannel EHG signal and extraction of relevant spectral and temporal information. The presented toolbox (Uterine Explorer) has been specifically designed for the EHG analysis and exploration in view of the characterisation of its components. The starting point is the multichannel scalogram or spectrogram representation from which frequency and time marginals, instantaneous frequency and bandwidth are obtained as EHG features. From this point the detected components undergo parametric and non-parametric spectral estimation and wavelet packet analysis. Intrauterine pressure estimation (IUP) is obtained using the Teager, RMS, wavelet marginal and Hilbert operators over the EHG. This toolbox has been tested to build up a dictionary of 288 EHG components [2], useful for research in preterm labour prediction.

  2. A comparison between advanced time-frequency analyses of non-stationary magnetization dynamics in spin-torque oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siracusano, Giulio; Corte, Aurelio La

    2014-02-01

    We report re`sults of different time-frequency analyses (Wavelet and Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT)) of voltage measurements related to a spin-torque oscillator working in a regime of non-stationary dynamics. Our results indicate that the Wavelet analysis identifies the non-stationary magnetization dynamics revealing the existence of intermittent and independent excited modes while the HHT is able to accurately extract the time domain traces of each independent mode. Overall performance indicates a route for a complete characterization of time-frequency domain data of a STO, pointing out that the combined Wavelet-HHT methodology developed is general and can be also used for a variety of other different scenarios.

  3. Correcting Spatial Variance of RCM for GEO SAR Imaging Based on Time-Frequency Scaling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ze; Lin, Peng; Xiao, Peng; Kang, Lihong; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-07-14

    Compared with low-Earth orbit synthetic aperture radar (SAR), a geosynchronous (GEO) SAR can have a shorter revisit period and vaster coverage. However, relative motion between this SAR and targets is more complicated, which makes range cell migration (RCM) spatially variant along both range and azimuth. As a result, efficient and precise imaging becomes difficult. This paper analyzes and models spatial variance for GEO SAR in the time and frequency domains. A novel algorithm for GEO SAR imaging with a resolution of 2 m in both the ground cross-range and range directions is proposed, which is composed of five steps. The first is to eliminate linear azimuth variance through the first azimuth time scaling. The second is to achieve RCM correction and range compression. The third is to correct residual azimuth variance by the second azimuth time-frequency scaling. The fourth and final steps are to accomplish azimuth focusing and correct geometric distortion. The most important innovation of this algorithm is implementation of the time-frequency scaling to correct high-order azimuth variance. As demonstrated by simulation results, this algorithm can accomplish GEO SAR imaging with good and uniform imaging quality over the entire swath.

  4. Correcting Spatial Variance of RCM for GEO SAR Imaging Based on Time-Frequency Scaling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ze; Lin, Peng; Xiao, Peng; Kang, Lihong; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Compared with low-Earth orbit synthetic aperture radar (SAR), a geosynchronous (GEO) SAR can have a shorter revisit period and vaster coverage. However, relative motion between this SAR and targets is more complicated, which makes range cell migration (RCM) spatially variant along both range and azimuth. As a result, efficient and precise imaging becomes difficult. This paper analyzes and models spatial variance for GEO SAR in the time and frequency domains. A novel algorithm for GEO SAR imaging with a resolution of 2 m in both the ground cross-range and range directions is proposed, which is composed of five steps. The first is to eliminate linear azimuth variance through the first azimuth time scaling. The second is to achieve RCM correction and range compression. The third is to correct residual azimuth variance by the second azimuth time-frequency scaling. The fourth and final steps are to accomplish azimuth focusing and correct geometric distortion. The most important innovation of this algorithm is implementation of the time-frequency scaling to correct high-order azimuth variance. As demonstrated by simulation results, this algorithm can accomplish GEO SAR imaging with good and uniform imaging quality over the entire swath. PMID:27428974

  5. Correcting Spatial Variance of RCM for GEO SAR Imaging Based on Time-Frequency Scaling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ze; Lin, Peng; Xiao, Peng; Kang, Lihong; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Compared with low-Earth orbit synthetic aperture radar (SAR), a geosynchronous (GEO) SAR can have a shorter revisit period and vaster coverage. However, relative motion between this SAR and targets is more complicated, which makes range cell migration (RCM) spatially variant along both range and azimuth. As a result, efficient and precise imaging becomes difficult. This paper analyzes and models spatial variance for GEO SAR in the time and frequency domains. A novel algorithm for GEO SAR imaging with a resolution of 2 m in both the ground cross-range and range directions is proposed, which is composed of five steps. The first is to eliminate linear azimuth variance through the first azimuth time scaling. The second is to achieve RCM correction and range compression. The third is to correct residual azimuth variance by the second azimuth time-frequency scaling. The fourth and final steps are to accomplish azimuth focusing and correct geometric distortion. The most important innovation of this algorithm is implementation of the time-frequency scaling to correct high-order azimuth variance. As demonstrated by simulation results, this algorithm can accomplish GEO SAR imaging with good and uniform imaging quality over the entire swath. PMID:27428974

  6. Joint annotation of chromatin state and chromatin conformation reveals relationships among domain types and identifies domains of cell-type-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Libbrecht, Maxwell W; Ay, Ferhat; Hoffman, Michael M; Gilbert, David M; Bilmes, Jeffrey A; Noble, William Stafford

    2015-04-01

    The genomic neighborhood of a gene influences its activity, a behavior that is attributable in part to domain-scale regulation. Previous genomic studies have identified many types of regulatory domains. However, due to the difficulty of integrating genomics data sets, the relationships among these domain types are poorly understood. Semi-automated genome annotation (SAGA) algorithms facilitate human interpretation of heterogeneous collections of genomics data by simultaneously partitioning the human genome and assigning labels to the resulting genomic segments. However, existing SAGA methods cannot integrate inherently pairwise chromatin conformation data. We developed a new computational method, called graph-based regularization (GBR), for expressing a pairwise prior that encourages certain pairs of genomic loci to receive the same label in a genome annotation. We used GBR to exploit chromatin conformation information during genome annotation by encouraging positions that are close in 3D to occupy the same type of domain. Using this approach, we produced a model of chromatin domains in eight human cell types, thereby revealing the relationships among known domain types. Through this model, we identified clusters of tightly regulated genes expressed in only a small number of cell types, which we term "specific expression domains." We found that domain boundaries marked by promoters and CTCF motifs are consistent between cell types even when domain activity changes. Finally, we showed that GBR can be used to transfer information from well-studied cell types to less well-characterized cell types during genome annotation, making it possible to produce high-quality annotations of the hundreds of cell types with limited available data.

  7. Age-dependent increase of discoidin domain receptor 2 and matrix metalloproteinase 13 expression in temporomandibular joint cartilage of type IX and type XI collagen-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Lam, N. P.; Li, Y.; Waldman, A. B.; Brussiau, J.; Lee, P. L.; Olsen, B. R.; Xu, L.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that mutations in type IX and type XI collagens in mice caused osteoarthritis (OA)-like changes in knee and temporomandibular (TM) joints. We also found that the overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase 13 (Mmp-13) was probably due to the up-regulation of a collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 2 (Ddr2), which was responsible for knee cartilage degeneration in mutant mice. The objective of our study was to determine whether the expression of Mmp-3, Mmp-13 and Ddr2 was increased in OA-like TM joints in mutant mice using immunohistochemistry. We found that the staining for Ddr2, Mmp-13 and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments in tissue sections from 6 month-old mice was increased in TM joints of the mutant mice. In contrast, we found no difference in the staining for Mmp-3 amongst the two mutant mice and their wild-type littermates. We conclude that, similar to previous observations in knee joints, the overexpression of Ddr2 and Mmp-13 may be responsible for the OA-like change in TM joints in mutant mice. PMID:17125729

  8. Age-dependent increase of discoidin domain receptor 2 and matrix metalloproteinase 13 expression in temporomandibular joint cartilage of type IX and type XI collagen-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lam, N P; Li, Y; Waldman, A B; Brussiau, J; Lee, P L; Olsen, B R; Xu, L

    2007-06-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that mutations in type IX and type XI collagens in mice caused osteoarthritis (OA)-like changes in knee and temporomandibular (TM) joints. We also found that the overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase 13 (Mmp-13) was probably due to the up-regulation of a collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 2 (Ddr2), which was responsible for knee cartilage degeneration in mutant mice. The objective of our study was to determine whether the expression of Mmp-3, Mmp-13 and Ddr2 was increased in OA-like TM joints in mutant mice using immunohistochemistry. We found that the staining for Ddr2, Mmp-13 and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments in tissue sections from 6-month-old mice was increased in TM joints of the mutant mice. In contrast, we found no difference in the staining for Mmp-3 amongst the two mutant mice and their wild-type littermates. We conclude that, similar to previous observations in knee joints, the overexpression of Ddr2 and Mmp-13 may be responsible for the OA-like change in TM joints in mutant mice. PMID:17125729

  9. Sparse time-frequency decomposition based on dictionary adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Thomas Y; Shi, Zuoqiang

    2016-04-13

    In this paper, we propose a time-frequency analysis method to obtain instantaneous frequencies and the corresponding decomposition by solving an optimization problem. In this optimization problem, the basis that is used to decompose the signal is not known a priori. Instead, it is adapted to the signal and is determined as part of the optimization problem. In this sense, this optimization problem can be seen as a dictionary adaptation problem, in which the dictionary is adaptive to one signal rather than a training set in dictionary learning. This dictionary adaptation problem is solved by using the augmented Lagrangian multiplier (ALM) method iteratively. We further accelerate the ALM method in each iteration by using the fast wavelet transform. We apply our method to decompose several signals, including signals with poor scale separation, signals with outliers and polluted by noise and a real signal. The results show that this method can give accurate recovery of both the instantaneous frequencies and the intrinsic mode functions.

  10. Time frequency analysis of Jovian and Saturnian radio spectral patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Galopeau, Patrick H. M.; Al-Haddad, Emad; Lammer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Prominent radio spectral patterns were observed by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science experiment (RPWS) principally at Jupiter and Saturn. The spectral shapes are displayed in the usual dynamic spectra showing the flux density versus the time and the frequency. Those patterns exhibit well-organized shapes in the time-frequency plane connected with the rotation of the planet. We consider in this analysis the auroral emissions which occurred in the frequency range between 10 kHz and approximately 3 MHz. It concerns the Jovian hectometric emission (HOM) and the Saturnian kilometric radiation (SKR). We show in the case of Jupiter's HOM that the spectral patterns are well-arranged arc structures with curvatures depending on the Jovian rotation. Regarding the SKR emission, the spectral shapes exhibit generally complex patterns, and only sometimes arc structures are observed. We emphasize the curve alterations from vertex-early to vertex-late arcs (and vice versa) and we study their dependences, or not, on the planetary rotations. We also discuss the common physical process at the origin of the HOM and SKR emissions, specifically the spectral patterns created by the interaction between planetary satellites (e.g. Io or Dione) and the Jovian and Saturnian magnetospheres.

  11. Multiple linear regression to estimate time-frequency electrophysiological responses in single trials.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Zhang, Z G; Mouraux, A; Iannetti, G D

    2015-05-01

    Transient sensory, motor or cognitive event elicit not only phase-locked event-related potentials (ERPs) in the ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG), but also induce non-phase-locked modulations of ongoing EEG oscillations. These modulations can be detected when single-trial waveforms are analysed in the time-frequency domain, and consist in stimulus-induced decreases (event-related desynchronization, ERD) or increases (event-related synchronization, ERS) of synchrony in the activity of the underlying neuronal populations. ERD and ERS reflect changes in the parameters that control oscillations in neuronal networks and, depending on the frequency at which they occur, represent neuronal mechanisms involved in cortical activation, inhibition and binding. ERD and ERS are commonly estimated by averaging the time-frequency decomposition of single trials. However, their trial-to-trial variability that can reflect physiologically-important information is lost by across-trial averaging. Here, we aim to (1) develop novel approaches to explore single-trial parameters (including latency, frequency and magnitude) of ERP/ERD/ERS; (2) disclose the relationship between estimated single-trial parameters and other experimental factors (e.g., perceived intensity). We found that (1) stimulus-elicited ERP/ERD/ERS can be correctly separated using principal component analysis (PCA) decomposition with Varimax rotation on the single-trial time-frequency distributions; (2) time-frequency multiple linear regression with dispersion term (TF-MLRd) enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of ERP/ERD/ERS in single trials, and provides an unbiased estimation of their latency, frequency, and magnitude at single-trial level; (3) these estimates can be meaningfully correlated with each other and with other experimental factors at single-trial level (e.g., perceived stimulus intensity and ERP magnitude). The methods described in this article allow exploring fully non-phase-locked stimulus-induced cortical

  12. Multiple linear regression to estimate time-frequency electrophysiological responses in single trials

    PubMed Central

    Hu, L.; Zhang, Z.G.; Mouraux, A.; Iannetti, G.D.

    2015-01-01

    Transient sensory, motor or cognitive event elicit not only phase-locked event-related potentials (ERPs) in the ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG), but also induce non-phase-locked modulations of ongoing EEG oscillations. These modulations can be detected when single-trial waveforms are analysed in the time-frequency domain, and consist in stimulus-induced decreases (event-related desynchronization, ERD) or increases (event-related synchronization, ERS) of synchrony in the activity of the underlying neuronal populations. ERD and ERS reflect changes in the parameters that control oscillations in neuronal networks and, depending on the frequency at which they occur, represent neuronal mechanisms involved in cortical activation, inhibition and binding. ERD and ERS are commonly estimated by averaging the time-frequency decomposition of single trials. However, their trial-to-trial variability that can reflect physiologically-important information is lost by across-trial averaging. Here, we aim to (1) develop novel approaches to explore single-trial parameters (including latency, frequency and magnitude) of ERP/ERD/ERS; (2) disclose the relationship between estimated single-trial parameters and other experimental factors (e.g., perceived intensity). We found that (1) stimulus-elicited ERP/ERD/ERS can be correctly separated using principal component analysis (PCA) decomposition with Varimax rotation on the single-trial time-frequency distributions; (2) time-frequency multiple linear regression with dispersion term (TF-MLRd) enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of ERP/ERD/ERS in single trials, and provides an unbiased estimation of their latency, frequency, and magnitude at single-trial level; (3) these estimates can be meaningfully correlated with each other and with other experimental factors at single-trial level (e.g., perceived stimulus intensity and ERP magnitude). The methods described in this article allow exploring fully non-phase-locked stimulus-induced cortical

  13. Multiple linear regression to estimate time-frequency electrophysiological responses in single trials.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Zhang, Z G; Mouraux, A; Iannetti, G D

    2015-05-01

    Transient sensory, motor or cognitive event elicit not only phase-locked event-related potentials (ERPs) in the ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG), but also induce non-phase-locked modulations of ongoing EEG oscillations. These modulations can be detected when single-trial waveforms are analysed in the time-frequency domain, and consist in stimulus-induced decreases (event-related desynchronization, ERD) or increases (event-related synchronization, ERS) of synchrony in the activity of the underlying neuronal populations. ERD and ERS reflect changes in the parameters that control oscillations in neuronal networks and, depending on the frequency at which they occur, represent neuronal mechanisms involved in cortical activation, inhibition and binding. ERD and ERS are commonly estimated by averaging the time-frequency decomposition of single trials. However, their trial-to-trial variability that can reflect physiologically-important information is lost by across-trial averaging. Here, we aim to (1) develop novel approaches to explore single-trial parameters (including latency, frequency and magnitude) of ERP/ERD/ERS; (2) disclose the relationship between estimated single-trial parameters and other experimental factors (e.g., perceived intensity). We found that (1) stimulus-elicited ERP/ERD/ERS can be correctly separated using principal component analysis (PCA) decomposition with Varimax rotation on the single-trial time-frequency distributions; (2) time-frequency multiple linear regression with dispersion term (TF-MLRd) enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of ERP/ERD/ERS in single trials, and provides an unbiased estimation of their latency, frequency, and magnitude at single-trial level; (3) these estimates can be meaningfully correlated with each other and with other experimental factors at single-trial level (e.g., perceived stimulus intensity and ERP magnitude). The methods described in this article allow exploring fully non-phase-locked stimulus-induced cortical

  14. Time-frequency analysis of railway bridge response in forced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantero, Daniel; Ülker-Kaustell, Mahir; Karoumi, Raid

    2016-08-01

    This paper suggests the use of the Continuous Wavelet Transform in combination with the Modified Littlewood-Paley basis to analyse bridge responses exited by traversing trains. The analysis provides an energy distribution map in the time-frequency domain that offers a better resolution compared to previous published studies. This is demonstrated with recorded responses of the Skidträsk Bridge, a 36 m long composite bridge located in Sweden. It is shown to be particularly useful to understand the evolution of the energy content during a vehicle crossing event. With this information it is possible to distinguish the effect of several of the governing factors involved in the dynamic response including vehicle's speed and axle configuration as well as non-linear behaviour of the structure.

  15. Synchronization between EMG at Different Uterine Locations Investigated Using Time-Frequency Ridge Reconstruction: Comparison of Pregnancy and Labor Contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrien, Jérémy; Steingrimsdottir, Thora; Marque, Catherine; Karlsson, Brynjar

    2010-12-01

    The extraction of the frequency components of a signal can be useful for the characterization of the underlying system. One method for isolating a frequency component of a signal is by the extraction and reconstruction of the local maxima or ridge of its time-frequency representation. We compare here the performances of two well-known ridge reconstruction methods, namely the Carmona and Marseille methods, on synthetic signals as well as real electrohysterogram (EHG). We show that Carmona's method presents lower reconstruction errors. We then used the separately reconstructed frequency components of the EHG independently for labor prediction using a synchronization measure. We show that the proposed synchronization parameters present similar prediction rate to classical parameters obtained directly from the time-frequency representation but also seem to provide information complementary to the classical parameters and may thus improve the accuracy in labor prediction when they are used jointly.

  16. Radar classification of landmines by time-frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D.; Nguyen, L.; Gaunaurd, G.

    2007-04-01

    A flying platform illuminates a land mine field with mixtures of various landmines (i.e., buried, on the surface, plastic or metallic) and some "confusers", with an ultra-wideband (UWB) radar. The polarimetric echoes returned by the mine field are mapped into an overall synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image, which is then analyzed pixel-by-pixel by modern time-frequency (t-f) techniques. The t-f analysis of any echo from any of the individual scatterers in the mine field can be performed using a number of t-f distributions, which in turn generate two-dimensional plots of each such scatterer in t-f space. These plots are richer in information than those in the original SAR image, and they offer a larger variety of clues useful for the discrimination of each type of mine from the others or from the confusers. Several t-f distributions are employed in the study, and it is found that some are better than others for the present purpose of target detection and classification. From the images obtained we can conclude that the Pseudo-Wigner-Ville and the Choi-Williams distributions provide the best discrimination results. It is also found that the larger mines such as those denoted here as of "type-1" are the easiest to identify. Using the above-mentioned distributions it follows that the distinction between actual mines and clutter objects (or "confusers") becomes clearer, particularly when the latter objects are metallic. Numerous images generated in this study confirm the above conclusions.

  17. Time-frequency analyses of tide-gauge sensor data.

    PubMed

    Erol, Serdar

    2011-01-01

    The real world phenomena being observed by sensors are generally non-stationary in nature. The classical linear techniques for analysis and modeling natural time-series observations are inefficient and should be replaced by non-linear techniques of whose theoretical aspects and performances are varied. In this manner adopting the most appropriate technique and strategy is essential in evaluating sensors' data. In this study, two different time-series analysis approaches, namely least squares spectral analysis (LSSA) and wavelet analysis (continuous wavelet transform, cross wavelet transform and wavelet coherence algorithms as extensions of wavelet analysis), are applied to sea-level observations recorded by tide-gauge sensors, and the advantages and drawbacks of these methods are reviewed. The analyses were carried out using sea-level observations recorded at the Antalya-II and Erdek tide-gauge stations of the Turkish National Sea-Level Monitoring System. In the analyses, the useful information hidden in the noisy signals was detected, and the common features between the two sea-level time series were clarified. The tide-gauge records have data gaps in time because of issues such as instrumental shortcomings and power outages. Concerning the difficulties of the time-frequency analysis of data with voids, the sea-level observations were preprocessed, and the missing parts were predicted using the neural network method prior to the analysis. In conclusion the merits and limitations of the techniques in evaluating non-stationary observations by means of tide-gauge sensors records were documented and an analysis strategy for the sequential sensors observations was presented.

  18. Time-Frequency Analyses of Tide-Gauge Sensor Data

    PubMed Central

    Erol, Serdar

    2011-01-01

    The real world phenomena being observed by sensors are generally non-stationary in nature. The classical linear techniques for analysis and modeling natural time-series observations are inefficient and should be replaced by non-linear techniques of whose theoretical aspects and performances are varied. In this manner adopting the most appropriate technique and strategy is essential in evaluating sensors’ data. In this study, two different time-series analysis approaches, namely least squares spectral analysis (LSSA) and wavelet analysis (continuous wavelet transform, cross wavelet transform and wavelet coherence algorithms as extensions of wavelet analysis), are applied to sea-level observations recorded by tide-gauge sensors, and the advantages and drawbacks of these methods are reviewed. The analyses were carried out using sea-level observations recorded at the Antalya-II and Erdek tide-gauge stations of the Turkish National Sea-Level Monitoring System. In the analyses, the useful information hidden in the noisy signals was detected, and the common features between the two sea-level time series were clarified. The tide-gauge records have data gaps in time because of issues such as instrumental shortcomings and power outages. Concerning the difficulties of the time-frequency analysis of data with voids, the sea-level observations were preprocessed, and the missing parts were predicted using the neural network method prior to the analysis. In conclusion the merits and limitations of the techniques in evaluating non-stationary observations by means of tide-gauge sensors records were documented and an analysis strategy for the sequential sensors observations was presented. PMID:22163829

  19. Cross Time-Frequency Analysis for Combining Information of Several Sources: Application to Estimation of Spontaneous Respiratory Rate from Photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Peláez-Coca, M. D.; Orini, M.; Lázaro, J.; Bailón, R.; Gil, E.

    2013-01-01

    A methodology that combines information from several nonstationary biological signals is presented. This methodology is based on time-frequency coherence, that quantifies the similarity of two signals in the time-frequency domain. A cross time-frequency analysis method, based on quadratic time-frequency distribution, has been used for combining information of several nonstationary biomedical signals. In order to evaluate this methodology, the respiratory rate from the photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal is estimated. The respiration provokes simultaneous changes in the pulse interval, amplitude, and width of the PPG signal. This suggests that the combination of information from these sources will improve the accuracy of the estimation of the respiratory rate. Another target of this paper is to implement an algorithm which provides a robust estimation. Therefore, respiratory rate was estimated only in those intervals where the features extracted from the PPG signals are linearly coupled. In 38 spontaneous breathing subjects, among which 7 were characterized by a respiratory rate lower than 0.15 Hz, this methodology provided accurate estimates, with the median error {0.00; 0.98} mHz ({0.00; 0.31}%) and the interquartile range error {4.88; 6.59} mHz ({1.60; 1.92}%). The estimation error of the presented methodology was largely lower than the estimation error obtained without combining different PPG features related to respiration. PMID:24363777

  20. Highly sensitive index of sympathetic activity based on time-frequency spectral analysis of electrodermal activity.

    PubMed

    Posada-Quintero, Hugo F; Florian, John P; Orjuela-Cañón, Álvaro D; Chon, Ki H

    2016-09-01

    Time-domain indices of electrodermal activity (EDA) have been used as a marker of sympathetic tone. However, they often show high variation between subjects and low consistency, which has precluded their general use as a marker of sympathetic tone. To examine whether power spectral density analysis of EDA can provide more consistent results, we recently performed a variety of sympathetic tone-evoking experiments (43). We found significant increase in the spectral power in the frequency range of 0.045 to 0.25 Hz when sympathetic tone-evoking stimuli were induced. The sympathetic tone assessed by the power spectral density of EDA was found to have lower variation and more sensitivity for certain, but not all, stimuli compared with the time-domain analysis of EDA. We surmise that this lack of sensitivity in certain sympathetic tone-inducing conditions with time-invariant spectral analysis of EDA may lie in its inability to characterize time-varying dynamics of the sympathetic tone. To overcome the disadvantages of time-domain and time-invariant power spectral indices of EDA, we developed a highly sensitive index of sympathetic tone, based on time-frequency analysis of EDA signals. Its efficacy was tested using experiments designed to elicit sympathetic dynamics. Twelve subjects underwent four tests known to elicit sympathetic tone arousal: cold pressor, tilt table, stand test, and the Stroop task. We hypothesize that a more sensitive measure of sympathetic control can be developed using time-varying spectral analysis. Variable frequency complex demodulation, a recently developed technique for time-frequency analysis, was used to obtain spectral amplitudes associated with EDA. We found that the time-varying spectral frequency band 0.08-0.24 Hz was most responsive to stimulation. Spectral power for frequencies higher than 0.24 Hz were determined to be not related to the sympathetic dynamics because they comprised less than 5% of the total power. The mean value of time

  1. Highly sensitive index of sympathetic activity based on time-frequency spectral analysis of electrodermal activity.

    PubMed

    Posada-Quintero, Hugo F; Florian, John P; Orjuela-Cañón, Álvaro D; Chon, Ki H

    2016-09-01

    Time-domain indices of electrodermal activity (EDA) have been used as a marker of sympathetic tone. However, they often show high variation between subjects and low consistency, which has precluded their general use as a marker of sympathetic tone. To examine whether power spectral density analysis of EDA can provide more consistent results, we recently performed a variety of sympathetic tone-evoking experiments (43). We found significant increase in the spectral power in the frequency range of 0.045 to 0.25 Hz when sympathetic tone-evoking stimuli were induced. The sympathetic tone assessed by the power spectral density of EDA was found to have lower variation and more sensitivity for certain, but not all, stimuli compared with the time-domain analysis of EDA. We surmise that this lack of sensitivity in certain sympathetic tone-inducing conditions with time-invariant spectral analysis of EDA may lie in its inability to characterize time-varying dynamics of the sympathetic tone. To overcome the disadvantages of time-domain and time-invariant power spectral indices of EDA, we developed a highly sensitive index of sympathetic tone, based on time-frequency analysis of EDA signals. Its efficacy was tested using experiments designed to elicit sympathetic dynamics. Twelve subjects underwent four tests known to elicit sympathetic tone arousal: cold pressor, tilt table, stand test, and the Stroop task. We hypothesize that a more sensitive measure of sympathetic control can be developed using time-varying spectral analysis. Variable frequency complex demodulation, a recently developed technique for time-frequency analysis, was used to obtain spectral amplitudes associated with EDA. We found that the time-varying spectral frequency band 0.08-0.24 Hz was most responsive to stimulation. Spectral power for frequencies higher than 0.24 Hz were determined to be not related to the sympathetic dynamics because they comprised less than 5% of the total power. The mean value of time

  2. Sparse component analysis using time-frequency representations for operational modal analysis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shaoqian; Guo, Jie; Zhu, Changan

    2015-01-01

    Sparse component analysis (SCA) has been widely used for blind source separation(BSS) for many years. Recently, SCA has been applied to operational modal analysis (OMA), which is also known as output-only modal identification. This paper considers the sparsity of sources' time-frequency (TF) representation and proposes a new TF-domain SCA under the OMA framework. First, the measurements from the sensors are transformed to the TF domain to get a sparse representation. Then, single-source-points (SSPs) are detected to better reveal the hyperlines which correspond to the columns of the mixing matrix. The K-hyperline clustering algorithm is used to identify the direction vectors of the hyperlines and then the mixing matrix is calculated. Finally, basis pursuit de-noising technique is used to recover the modal responses, from which the modal parameters are computed. The proposed method is valid even if the number of active modes exceed the number of sensors. Numerical simulation and experimental verification demonstrate the good performance of the proposed method. PMID:25789492

  3. Matrix factorization to time-frequency distribution for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Huang, Shieh-Kung

    2016-04-01

    Structural health monitoring enables structural information to be acquired through sensing technology, and is of need to early detect problems and damages in structures. Health monitoring strategies are often realized through a combination of qualitative sensing systems and high-performance structural integrity assessment methods. Structural deviations can be then effectively identified by interpreting the raw sensor measurements using signal processing techniques. The objective of this study is to develop a new structural health monitoring method that applies a matrix factorization algorithm to a time-frequency representation of multi-channel signals measured from a structure. This method processes vibrational input and/or output responses of structures to improve raw data quality, to estimate structural responses, to derive signal features, and to detect structural variations. For example, the proposed method can reduce the signal noise by utilizing first few principle vectors to reconstruct the measured signals. For frequency-domain responses, this method can smooth the phase to obtain a better input-output relationship of a structure. Additionally, the method removes abnormal signals in time series, allowing better understanding of structural behavior. Due to communication loss, this method is able to recover lost data from other channel measurements in a structure. Moreover, the proposed method transforms the signal components into a specific domain and then yield meaningful characteristics. All these features are numerically verified using experimental data, and the proposed method permits more detailed investigation of structural behavior.

  4. Separating cognitive processes with principal components analysis of EEG time-frequency distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernat, Edward M.; Nelson, Lindsay D.; Holroyd, Clay B.; Gehring, William J.; Patrick, Christopher J.

    2008-08-01

    Measurement of EEG event-related potential (ERP) data has been most commonly undertaken in the time-domain, which can be complicated to interpret when separable activity overlaps in time. When the overlapping activity has distinct frequency characteristics, however, time-frequency (TF) signal processing techniques can be useful. The current report utilized ERP data from a cognitive task producing typical feedback-related negativity (FRN) and P300 ERP components which overlap in time. TF transforms were computed using the binomial reduced interference distribution (RID), and the resulting TF activity was then characterized using principal components analysis (PCA). Consistent with previous work, results indicate that the FRN was more related to theta activity (3-7 Hz) and P300 more to delta activity (below 3 Hz). At the same time, both time-domain measures were shown to be mixtures of TF theta and delta activity, highlighting the difficulties with overlapping activity. The TF theta and delta measures, on the other hand, were largely independent from each other, but also independently indexed the feedback stimulus parameters investigated. Results support the view that TF decomposition can greatly improve separation of overlapping EEG/ERP activity relevant to cognitive models of performance monitoring.

  5. Sparse Component Analysis Using Time-Frequency Representations for Operational Modal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shaoqian; Guo, Jie; Zhu, Changan

    2015-01-01

    Sparse component analysis (SCA) has been widely used for blind source separation(BSS) for many years. Recently, SCA has been applied to operational modal analysis (OMA), which is also known as output-only modal identification. This paper considers the sparsity of sources' time-frequency (TF) representation and proposes a new TF-domain SCA under the OMA framework. First, the measurements from the sensors are transformed to the TF domain to get a sparse representation. Then, single-source-points (SSPs) are detected to better reveal the hyperlines which correspond to the columns of the mixing matrix. The K-hyperline clustering algorithm is used to identify the direction vectors of the hyperlines and then the mixing matrix is calculated. Finally, basis pursuit de-noising technique is used to recover the modal responses, from which the modal parameters are computed. The proposed method is valid even if the number of active modes exceed the number of sensors. Numerical simulation and experimental verification demonstrate the good performance of the proposed method. PMID:25789492

  6. Trainees' Perceived Knowledge Gain Unrelated to the Training Domain: The Joint Action of Impression Management and Motives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiaburu, Dan S.; Huang, Jason L.; Hutchins, Holly M.; Gardner, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Trainees' knowledge gains represent an important outcome in human resource development. In this research, we tested a model examining the joint influence of social desirability (impression management, self-deception) and motives (need for power, need for approval) on trainees' self-reported knowledge gain. We conducted a study with…

  7. An Improved Time-Frequency Analysis Method in Interference Detection for GNSS Receivers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kewen; Jin, Tian; Yang, Dongkai

    2015-04-21

    In this paper, an improved joint time-frequency (TF) analysis method based on a reassigned smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution (RSPWVD) has been proposed in interference detection for Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In the RSPWVD, the two-dimensional low-pass filtering smoothing function is introduced to eliminate the cross-terms present in the quadratic TF distribution, and at the same time, the reassignment method is adopted to improve the TF concentration properties of the auto-terms of the signal components. This proposed interference detection method is evaluated by experiments on GPS L1 signals in the disturbing scenarios compared to the state-of-the-art interference detection approaches. The analysis results show that the proposed interference detection technique effectively overcomes the cross-terms problem and also preserves good TF localization properties, which has been proven to be effective and valid to enhance the interference detection performance of the GNSS receivers, particularly in the jamming environments.

  8. An Improved Time-Frequency Analysis Method in Interference Detection for GNSS Receivers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kewen; Jin, Tian; Yang, Dongkai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an improved joint time-frequency (TF) analysis method based on a reassigned smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution (RSPWVD) has been proposed in interference detection for Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In the RSPWVD, the two-dimensional low-pass filtering smoothing function is introduced to eliminate the cross-terms present in the quadratic TF distribution, and at the same time, the reassignment method is adopted to improve the TF concentration properties of the auto-terms of the signal components. This proposed interference detection method is evaluated by experiments on GPS L1 signals in the disturbing scenarios compared to the state-of-the-art interference detection approaches. The analysis results show that the proposed interference detection technique effectively overcomes the cross-terms problem and also preserves good TF localization properties, which has been proven to be effective and valid to enhance the interference detection performance of the GNSS receivers, particularly in the jamming environments. PMID:25905704

  9. An Improved Time-Frequency Analysis Method in Interference Detection for GNSS Receivers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kewen; Jin, Tian; Yang, Dongkai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an improved joint time-frequency (TF) analysis method based on a reassigned smoothed pseudo Wigner–Ville distribution (RSPWVD) has been proposed in interference detection for Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In the RSPWVD, the two-dimensional low-pass filtering smoothing function is introduced to eliminate the cross-terms present in the quadratic TF distribution, and at the same time, the reassignment method is adopted to improve the TF concentration properties of the auto-terms of the signal components. This proposed interference detection method is evaluated by experiments on GPS L1 signals in the disturbing scenarios compared to the state-of-the-art interference detection approaches. The analysis results show that the proposed interference detection technique effectively overcomes the cross-terms problem and also preserves good TF localization properties, which has been proven to be effective and valid to enhance the interference detection performance of the GNSS receivers, particularly in the jamming environments. PMID:25905704

  10. Time-Frequency Mixed-Norm Estimates: Sparse M/EEG imaging with non-stationary source activations

    PubMed Central

    Gramfort, A.; Strohmeier, D.; Haueisen, J.; Hämäläinen, M.; Kowalski, M.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) allow functional brain imaging with high temporal resolution. While solving the inverse problem independently at every time point can give an image of the active brain at every millisecond, such a procedure does not capitalize on the temporal dynamics of the signal. Linear inverse methods (Minimum-norm, dSPM, sLORETA, beamformers) typically assume that the signal is stationary: regularization parameter and data covariance are independent of time and the time varying signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Other recently proposed non-linear inverse solvers promoting focal activations estimate the sources in both space and time while also assuming stationary sources during a time interval. However such an hypothesis only holds for short time intervals. To overcome this limitation, we propose time-frequency mixed-norm estimates (TF-MxNE), which use time-frequency analysis to regularize the ill-posed inverse problem. This method makes use of structured sparse priors defined in the time-frequency domain, offering more accurate estimates by capturing the non-stationary and transient nature of brain signals. State-of-the-art convex optimization procedures based on proximal operators are employed, allowing the derivation of a fast estimation algorithm. The accuracy of the TF-MxNE is compared to recently proposed inverse solvers with help of simulations and by analyzing publicly available MEG datasets. PMID:23291276

  11. Multi-bearing defect detection with trackside acoustic signal based on a pseudo time-frequency analysis and Dopplerlet filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of train bearing defects based on the acoustic signal acquired by a trackside microphone plays a significant role in the transport system. However, the wayside acoustic signal suffers from the Doppler distortion due to the high moving speed and also contains the multi-source signals from different train bearings. This paper proposes a novel solution to overcome the two difficulties in trackside acoustic diagnosis. In the method a pseudo time-frequency analysis (PTFA) based on an improved Dopplerlet transform (IDT) is presented to acquire the time centers for different bearings. With the time centers, we design a series of Dopplerlet filters (DF) in time-frequency domain to work on the signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) gained by the short time Fourier transform (STFT). Then an inverse STFT (ISTFT) is utilized to get the separated signals for each sound source which means bearing here. Later the resampling method based on certain motion parameters eliminates the Doppler Effect and finally the diagnosis can be made effectively according to the envelope spectrum of each separated signal. With the effectiveness of the technique validated by both simulated and experimental cases, the proposed wayside acoustic diagnostic scheme is expected to be available in wayside defective bearing detection.

  12. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Huang, S L; Wang, S; Zhao, W

    2016-05-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert-Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. PMID:27250446

  13. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, S. L.; Wang, S.; Zhao, W.

    2016-05-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert-Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  14. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Huang, S L; Wang, S; Zhao, W

    2016-05-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert-Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  15. Non-invasive baroreflex sensitivity assessment using wavelet transfer function-based time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Keissar, K; Maestri, R; Pinna, G D; La Rovere, M T; Gilad, O

    2010-07-01

    A novel approach for the estimation of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is introduced based on time-frequency analysis of the transfer function (TF). The TF method (TF-BRS) is a well-established non-invasive technique which assumes stationarity. This condition is difficult to meet, especially in cardiac patients. In this study, the classical TF was replaced with a wavelet transfer function (WTF) and the classical coherence was replaced with wavelet transform coherence (WTC), adding the time domain as an additional degree of freedom with dynamic error estimation. Error analysis and comparison between WTF-BRS and TF-BRS were performed using simulated signals with known transfer function and added noise. Similar comparisons were performed for ECG and blood pressure signals, in the supine position, of 19 normal subjects, 44 patients with a history of previous myocardial infarction (MI) and 45 patients with chronic heart failure. This yielded an excellent linear association (R > 0.94, p < 0.001) for time-averaged WTF-BRS, validating the new method as consistent with a known method. The additional advantage of dynamic analysis of coherence and TF estimates was illustrated in two physiological examples of supine rest and change of posture showing the evolution of BRS synchronized with its error estimations and sympathovagal balance. PMID:20585147

  16. Time-frequency analysis of beach bacteria variations and its implication for recreational water quality modeling.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhongfu; Frick, Walter E

    2009-02-15

    This paper exploited the potential of the wavelet analysis in resolving beach bacteria concentration and candidate explanatory variables across multiple time scales with temporal information preserved. The wavelet transform of E. coli concentration and its explanatory variables observed at Huntington Beach, Ohio in 2006 exhibited well-defined patterns of different time scales, phases, and durations, which cannot be clearly shown in conventional time-domain analyses. If linear regression modeling is to be used for the ease of implementation and interpretation,the wavelet-transformed regression model reveals that low model residual can be realized through matching major patterns and their phase angles between E. coli concentration and its explanatory variables. The property of pattern matching for linear regression models can be adopted as a criterion for choosing useful predictors, while phase matching further explains why intuitively good variables such as wave height and onshore wind speed were excluded from the optimal models by model selection processes in Frick et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2008, 42,4818-4824). The phase angles defined by the wavelet analysis in the time-frequency domain can help identify the physical processes and interactions occurring between bacteria concentration and its explanatory variables. It was deduced, for this particular case, that wind events resulted in elevated E. coli concentration, wave height, and turbidity at the beach with a periodicity of 7-8 days. Wind events also brought about increased beach bacteria concentrations through large-scale current circulations in the lake with a period of 21 days. The time length for linear regression models with statistical robustness can also be deduced from the periods of the major patterns in bacteria concentration and explanatory variables, which explains and supplements the modeling efforts performed in (1).

  17. Sparse representation based on local time-frequency template matching for bearing transient fault feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo; Ding, Xiaoxi

    2016-05-01

    The transients caused by the localized fault are important measurement information for bearing fault diagnosis. Thus it is crucial to extract the transients from the bearing vibration or acoustic signals that are always corrupted by a large amount of background noise. In this paper, an iterative transient feature extraction approach is proposed based on time-frequency (TF) domain sparse representation. The approach is realized by presenting a new method, called local TF template matching. In this method, the TF atoms are constructed based on the TF distribution (TFD) of the Morlet wavelet bases and local TF templates are formulated from the TF atoms for the matching process. The instantaneous frequency (IF) ridge calculated from the TFD of an analyzed signal provides the frequency parameter values for the TF atoms as well as an effective template matching path on the TF plane. In each iteration, local TF templates are employed to do correlation with the TFD of the analyzed signal along the IF ridge tube for identifying the optimum parameters of transient wavelet model. With this iterative procedure, transients can be extracted in the TF domain from measured signals one by one. The final signal can be synthesized by combining the extracted TF atoms and the phase of the raw signal. The local TF template matching builds an effective TF matching-based sparse representation approach with the merit of satisfying the native pulse waveform structure of transients. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by practical defective bearing signals. Comparison results also show that the proposed method is superior to traditional methods in transient feature extraction.

  18. Recurrent Dominant Mutations Affecting Two Adjacent Residues in the Motor Domain of the Monomeric Kinesin KIF22 Result in Skeletal Dysplasia and Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Boyden, Eric D.; Campos-Xavier, A. Belinda; Kalamajski, Sebastian; Cameron, Trevor L.; Suarez, Philippe; Tanackovich, Goranka; Andria, Generoso; Ballhausen, Diana; Briggs, Michael D.; Hartley, Claire; Cohn, Daniel H.; Davidson, H. Rosemarie; Hall, Christine; Ikegawa, Shiro; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; König, Rainer; Megarbané, André; Nishimura, Gen; Lachman, Ralph S.; Mortier, Geert; Rimoin, David L.; Rogers, R. Curtis; Rossi, Massimiliano; Sawada, Hirotake; Scott, Richard; Unger, Sheila; Valadares, Eugenia Ribeiro; Bateman, John F.; Warman, Matthew L.; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Bonafé, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity, leptodactylic type (lepto-SEMDJL, aka SEMDJL, Hall type), is an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder that, in spite of being relatively common among skeletal dysplasias, has eluded molecular elucidation so far. We used whole-exome sequencing of five unrelated individuals with lepto-SEMDJL to identify mutations in KIF22 as the cause of this skeletal condition. Missense mutations affecting one of two adjacent amino acids in the motor domain of KIF22 were present in 20 familial cases from eight families and in 12 other sporadic cases. The skeletal and connective tissue phenotype produced by these specific mutations point to functions of KIF22 beyond those previously ascribed functions involving chromosome segregation. Although we have found Kif22 to be strongly upregulated at the growth plate, the precise pathogenetic mechanisms remain to be elucidated. PMID:22152678

  19. Micro-Doppler Signal Time-Frequency Algorithm Based on STFRFT.

    PubMed

    Pang, Cunsuo; Han, Yan; Hou, Huiling; Liu, Shengheng; Zhang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a time-frequency algorithm based on short-time fractional order Fourier transformation (STFRFT) for identification of a complicated movement targets. This algorithm, consisting of a STFRFT order-changing and quick selection method, is effective in reducing the computation load. A multi-order STFRFT time-frequency algorithm is also developed that makes use of the time-frequency feature of each micro-Doppler component signal. This algorithm improves the estimation accuracy of time-frequency curve fitting through multi-order matching. Finally, experiment data were used to demonstrate STFRFT's performance in micro-Doppler time-frequency analysis. The results validated the higher estimate accuracy of the proposed algorithm. It may be applied to an LFM (Linear frequency modulated) pulse radar, SAR (Synthetic aperture radar), or ISAR (Inverse synthetic aperture radar), for improving the probability of target recognition. PMID:27669265

  20. Radar signal analysis of ballistic missile with micro-motion based on time-frequency distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianming; Liu, Lihua; Yu, Hua

    2015-12-01

    The micro-motion of ballistic missile targets induces micro-Doppler modulation on the radar return signal, which is a unique feature for the warhead discrimination during flight. In order to extract the micro-Doppler feature of ballistic missile targets, time-frequency analysis is employed to process the micro-Doppler modulated time-varying radar signal. The images of time-frequency distribution (TFD) reveal the micro-Doppler modulation characteristic very well. However, there are many existing time-frequency analysis methods to generate the time-frequency distribution images, including the short-time Fourier transform (STFT), Wigner distribution (WD) and Cohen class distribution, etc. Under the background of ballistic missile defence, the paper aims at working out an effective time-frequency analysis method for ballistic missile warhead discrimination from the decoys.

  1. Micro-Doppler Signal Time-Frequency Algorithm Based on STFRFT.

    PubMed

    Pang, Cunsuo; Han, Yan; Hou, Huiling; Liu, Shengheng; Zhang, Nan

    2016-09-24

    This paper proposes a time-frequency algorithm based on short-time fractional order Fourier transformation (STFRFT) for identification of a complicated movement targets. This algorithm, consisting of a STFRFT order-changing and quick selection method, is effective in reducing the computation load. A multi-order STFRFT time-frequency algorithm is also developed that makes use of the time-frequency feature of each micro-Doppler component signal. This algorithm improves the estimation accuracy of time-frequency curve fitting through multi-order matching. Finally, experiment data were used to demonstrate STFRFT's performance in micro-Doppler time-frequency analysis. The results validated the higher estimate accuracy of the proposed algorithm. It may be applied to an LFM (Linear frequency modulated) pulse radar, SAR (Synthetic aperture radar), or ISAR (Inverse synthetic aperture radar), for improving the probability of target recognition.

  2. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-03-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

  3. Time-frequency spectral analysis of TMS-evoked EEG oscillations by means of Hilbert-Huang transform.

    PubMed

    Pigorini, Andrea; Casali, Adenauer G; Casarotto, Silvia; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Baselli, Giuseppe; Mariotti, Maurizio; Massimini, Marcello; Rosanova, Mario

    2011-06-15

    A single pulse of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) generates electroencephalogram (EEG) oscillations that are thought to reflect intrinsic properties of the stimulated cortical area and its fast interactions with other cortical areas. Thus, a tool to decompose TMS-evoked oscillations in the time-frequency domain on a millisecond timescale and on a broadband frequency range may help to understand information transfer across cortical oscillators. Some recent studies have employed algorithms based on the Wavelet Transform (WT) to study TMS-evoked EEG oscillations in healthy and pathological conditions. However, these methods do not allow to describe TMS-evoked EEG oscillations with high resolution in time and frequency domains simultaneously. Here, we first develop an algorithm based on Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) to compute statistically significant time-frequency spectra of TMS-evoked EEG oscillations on a single trial basis. Then, we compared the performances of the HHT-based algorithm with the WT-based one by applying both of them to a set of simulated signals. Finally, we applied both algorithms to real TMS-evoked potentials recorded in healthy or schizophrenic subjects. We found that the HHT-based algorithm outperforms the WT-based one in detecting the time onset of TMS-evoked oscillations in the classical EEG bands. These results suggest that the HHT-based algorithm may be used to study the communication between different cortical oscillators on a fine time scale.

  4. Advances on Empirical Mode Decomposition-based Time-Frequency Analysis Methods in Hydrocarbon Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. X.; Xue, Y. J.; Cao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical mode decomposition (EMD), which is a data-driven adaptive decomposition method and is not limited by time-frequency uncertainty spreading, is proved to be more suitable for seismic signals which are nonlinear and non-stationary. Compared with other Fourier-based and wavelet-based time-frequency methods, EMD-based time-frequency methods have higher temporal and spatial resolution and yield hydrocarbon interpretations with more statistical significance. Empirical mode decomposition algorithm has now evolved from EMD to Ensemble EMD (EEMD) to Complete Ensemble EMD (CEEMD). Even though EMD-based time-frequency methods offer many promising features for analyzing and processing geophysical data, there are some limitations or defects in EMD-based time-frequency methods. This presentation will present a comparative study on hydrocarbon detection using seven EMD-based time-frequency analysis methods, which include: (1) first, EMD combined with Hilbert transform (HT) as a time-frequency analysis method is used for hydrocarbon detection; and (2) second, Normalized Hilbert transform (NHT) and HU Methods respectively combined with HT as improved time-frequency analysis methods are applied for hydrocarbon detection; and (3) three, EMD combined with Teager-Kaiser energy (EMD/TK) is investigated for hydrocarbon detection; and (4) four, EMD combined with wavelet transform (EMDWave) as a seismic attenuation estimation method is comparatively studied; and (5) EEMD- and CEEMD- based time-frequency analysis methods used as highlight volumes technology are studied. The differences between these methods in hydrocarbon detection will be discussed. The question of getting a meaningful instantaneous frequency by HT and mode-mixing issues in EMD will be analysed. The work was supported by NSFC under grant Nos. 41430323, 41404102 and 41274128.

  5. Continuous-variable quantum computing in optical time-frequency modes using quantum memories.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Peter C; Kolthammer, W Steven; Nunn, Joshua; Barbieri, Marco; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-26

    We develop a scheme for time-frequency encoded continuous-variable cluster-state quantum computing using quantum memories. In particular, we propose a method to produce, manipulate, and measure two-dimensional cluster states in a single spatial mode by exploiting the intrinsic time-frequency selectivity of Raman quantum memories. Time-frequency encoding enables the scheme to be extremely compact, requiring a number of memories that are a linear function of only the number of different frequencies in which the computational state is encoded, independent of its temporal duration. We therefore show that quantum memories can be a powerful component for scalable photonic quantum information processing architectures.

  6. Time-Frequency Analysis of Beach Bacteria Variations and its Implication for Recreational Water Quality Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper explores the potential of time-frequency wavelet analysis in resolving beach bacteria concentration and possible explanatory variables across multiple time scales with temporal information still preserved. The wavelet scalograms of E. coli concentrations and the explan...

  7. Time-frequency analysis of nonlinear and non-stationary weak signals of corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Shanghe; Wei, Ming; Hu, Xiao Feng

    2013-03-01

    It is very useful to study the signals radiated from corona discharges for the purposes of high-voltage line monitoring. Time-frequency analysis can clearly reveal the time-varying spectrum characteristics of such signals, which is very useful for analyzing and processing the non-linear and non-stationary weak signals, such as the signals radiated from corona discharges. Several time-frequency analysis methods, such as the Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT), Wigner-Ville distribution and the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) and so on, are used in this paper. The simulation data with the same and different amplitudes are comparatively analyzed by these time-frequency distribution methods. It can be concluded that the time-frequency analysis method based on HHT is more efficient to identify and suitable for the non-linear and non-stationary weak signals.

  8. Time-frequency decomposition of click evoked otoacoustic emissions in children.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Biswal, Milan

    2016-05-01

    Determining the time-frequency distributions of click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) are scientifically and clinically relevant because of their relationship with cochlear mechanisms. This study investigated the time-frequency properties of CEOAEs in 5-10 year old children. In the first part, we examined the feasibility of the S transform to characterize the time-frequency features of CEOAEs. A synthetic signal with known gammatones was analyzed using the S transform, as well as a wavelet transform with the basis function used traditionally for CEOAE analysis. The S and wavelet transforms provided similar representations of the gammatones of the synthetic signal in the mid and high frequencies. However, the S transform yielded a slightly more precise time-frequency representation at low frequencies (500 and 707 Hz). In the second part, we applied the S transform to compare the time-frequency distribution of CEOAEs between adults and children. Several confounding variables, such as spontaneous emissions and potential efferent effects from the use of higher click rates, were considered for obtaining reliable CEOAE recordings. The results revealed that the emission level, level versus frequency plot, latency, and latency versus frequency plot in 5-10 year old children are adult-like. The time-frequency characteristics of CEOAEs in 5-10 year old children are consistent with the maturation of various aspects of cochlear mechanics, including the basal to apical transition. In sum, the description of the time-frequency features in children and the use of the S transform to decompose CEOAEs, are novel aspects of this study. The S transform can be used as an alternative approach to characterize the time-frequency distribution of CEOAEs.

  9. Perceptual effects of noise reduction by time-frequency masking of noisy speech.

    PubMed

    Brons, Inge; Houben, Rolph; Dreschler, Wouter A

    2012-10-01

    Time-frequency masking is a method for noise reduction that is based on the time-frequency representation of a speech in noise signal. Depending on the estimated signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), each time-frequency unit is either attenuated or not. A special type of a time-frequency mask is the ideal binary mask (IBM), which has access to the real SNR (ideal). The IBM either retains or removes each time-frequency unit (binary mask). The IBM provides large improvements in speech intelligibility and is a valuable tool for investigating how different factors influence intelligibility. This study extends the standard outcome measure (speech intelligibility) with additional perceptual measures relevant for noise reduction: listening effort, noise annoyance, speech naturalness, and overall preference. Four types of time-frequency masking were evaluated: the original IBM, a tempered version of the IBM (called ITM) which applies limited and non-binary attenuation, and non-ideal masking (also tempered) with two different types of noise-estimation algorithms. The results from ideal masking imply that there is a trade-off between intelligibility and sound quality, which depends on the attenuation strength. Additionally, the results for non-ideal masking suggest that subjective measures can show effects of noise reduction even if noise reduction does not lead to differences in intelligibility.

  10. Time-frequency patterns of somatosensory evoked potentials in predicting the location of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yazhou; Cui, Hongyan; Pu, Jiangbo; Luk, K D K; Hu, Yong

    2015-08-31

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were found to exhibit different time-frequency patterns after acute spinal cord injury (SCI) at different levels, which implies that changes of these patterns may be associated with the location of SCI. Based on this finding, we propose the hypothesis that there are information regarding the location of SCI contained in the time-frequency patterns of SEPs. Purpose of the present study is to verify this hypothesis by comparing the time-frequency patterns of SEPs after acute and chronic SCI at the same level. The study examined the distribution patterns of the time-frequency components (TFCs) of SEPs before and after acute and chronic injury at C5 level in the spinal cord. Experimental results of SEP recordings from 24 adult rats show that there are common areas in the time-frequency distributions of SEPs. The TFCs from both the acute injury group and the chronic injury group are located in these areas with no TFCs from the normal group. Findings suggest that these areas are likely to possess information concerning the site of neurological deficits in spinal cord while independent of the modality of injury. This study provides basis for identification of stable time-frequency patterns of SEPs after different types and locations of SCI, which will guide the development of SEP-based SCI location detection. PMID:26170248

  11. Blind source separation based on time-frequency morphological characteristics for rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Li, Xiukun

    2016-06-01

    Separation of the components of rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects is essential in obtaining the structural characteristics of such objects. To overcome the problem of rigid structures appearing to have the same spectral structure in the time domain, time-frequency Blind Source Separation (BSS) can be used in combination with image morphology to separate the rigid scattering components of different objects. Based on a highlight model, the separation of the rigid scattering structure of objects with time-frequency distribution is deduced. Using a morphological filter, different characteristics in a Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) observed for single auto term and cross terms can be simplified to remove any cross-term interference. By selecting time and frequency points of the auto terms signal, the accuracy of BSS can be improved. An experimental simulation has been used, with changes in the pulse width of the transmitted signal, the relative amplitude and the time delay parameter, in order to analyzing the feasibility of this new method. Simulation results show that the new method is not only able to separate rigid scattering components, but can also separate the components when elastic scattering and rigid scattering exist at the same time. Experimental results confirm that the new method can be used in separating the rigid scattering structure of underwater objects.

  12. Detection of epileptiform activity in EEG signals based on time-frequency and non-linear analysis.

    PubMed

    Gajic, Dragoljub; Djurovic, Zeljko; Gligorijevic, Jovan; Di Gennaro, Stefano; Savic-Gajic, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique for detection of epileptiform activity in EEG signals. After preprocessing of EEG signals we extract representative features in time, frequency and time-frequency domain as well as using non-linear analysis. The features are extracted in a few frequency sub-bands of clinical interest since these sub-bands showed much better discriminatory characteristics compared with the whole frequency band. Then we optimally reduce the dimension of feature space to two using scatter matrices. A decision about the presence of epileptiform activity in EEG signals is made by quadratic classifiers designed in the reduced two-dimensional feature space. The accuracy of the technique was tested on three sets of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals recorded at the University Hospital Bonn: surface EEG signals from healthy volunteers, intracranial EEG signals from the epilepsy patients during the seizure free interval from within the seizure focus and intracranial EEG signals of epileptic seizures also from within the seizure focus. An overall detection accuracy of 98.7% was achieved.

  13. Detection of epileptiform activity in EEG signals based on time-frequency and non-linear analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gajic, Dragoljub; Djurovic, Zeljko; Gligorijevic, Jovan; Di Gennaro, Stefano; Savic-Gajic, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique for detection of epileptiform activity in EEG signals. After preprocessing of EEG signals we extract representative features in time, frequency and time-frequency domain as well as using non-linear analysis. The features are extracted in a few frequency sub-bands of clinical interest since these sub-bands showed much better discriminatory characteristics compared with the whole frequency band. Then we optimally reduce the dimension of feature space to two using scatter matrices. A decision about the presence of epileptiform activity in EEG signals is made by quadratic classifiers designed in the reduced two-dimensional feature space. The accuracy of the technique was tested on three sets of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals recorded at the University Hospital Bonn: surface EEG signals from healthy volunteers, intracranial EEG signals from the epilepsy patients during the seizure free interval from within the seizure focus and intracranial EEG signals of epileptic seizures also from within the seizure focus. An overall detection accuracy of 98.7% was achieved. PMID:25852534

  14. Integrated Study of Time-Frequency Representations and Their Applications in Source Identification of Mechanical Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Min-Chun

    Three computation schemes of time-frequency representations have been developed and implemented to identify different components of mechanical noise emitted from the transmission system of electrical vehicles. This study explores the close relationships between three time-frequency representations, i. e. the spectrogram based on windowed Fourier transform, the Wigner-Ville distribution, and the smoothed Wigner-Ville distribution. One main purpose is to pursue the efficiency of computing the smoothed Wigner-Ville distribution of a dynamic signature. The revised scheme can tremendously reduce the computation time to a scale of around 1/90, compared with the original scheme. To assess the validation of these time-frequency representation schemes, firstly, four synthetic signals are designed and processed. Secondly, the developed time-frequency representations are applied to distinguish different spectral components of transmission noise, and identify their sources. This study takes an electrical scooter with a continuous variable transmission system as a test bench. The continuous-variable-transmission-belt noise, helical-gear whine noise, and fan noise can be clearly identified via the processing of the time-frequency representations. These obtained conclusions can be used as references for machine element modification to reduce annoying noise.

  15. Time-frequency analysis: a tool to discriminate artefacts from near-field optical data.

    PubMed

    Barchiesi, D

    2001-05-01

    Near-field optical data are non-stationary, which means that their spectral content varies with the position of the tip, due to both the scanning-probe recording process and the variations of the optical signal. Therefore time-frequency representations are potentially powerful tools for local characterization as they distribute the energy of the analysed signal over the time and frequency variables, and faithfully depict the signal local behaviour. In this paper, the time-frequency distributions are shown to be appropriate tools to analyse near-field optical data by using it first on simulated data, and second on experimental near-field optical images. Within this context, we observe that time-frequency analysis allows a possible separation of relevant optical signals from artefacts, especially in the usual case where the near-field optical signal is lower band than the feedback data.

  16. Time-frequency and advanced frequency estimation techniques for the investigation of bat echolocation calls.

    PubMed

    Kopsinis, Yannis; Aboutanios, Elias; Waters, Dean A; McLaughlin, Steve

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, techniques for time-frequency analysis and investigation of bat echolocation calls are studied. Particularly, enhanced resolution techniques are developed and/or used in this specific context for the first time. When compared to traditional time-frequency representation methods, the proposed techniques are more capable of showing previously unseen features in the structure of bat echolocation calls. It should be emphasized that although the study is focused on bat echolocation recordings, the results are more general and applicable to many other types of signal. PMID:20136233

  17. Time-frequency and advanced frequency estimation techniques for the investigation of bat echolocation calls.

    PubMed

    Kopsinis, Yannis; Aboutanios, Elias; Waters, Dean A; McLaughlin, Steve

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, techniques for time-frequency analysis and investigation of bat echolocation calls are studied. Particularly, enhanced resolution techniques are developed and/or used in this specific context for the first time. When compared to traditional time-frequency representation methods, the proposed techniques are more capable of showing previously unseen features in the structure of bat echolocation calls. It should be emphasized that although the study is focused on bat echolocation recordings, the results are more general and applicable to many other types of signal.

  18. Towards a new earthquake catalog for Ireland and its near offshore domains : a joint analysis of permanent and dense temporary seismic array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroucau, Pierre; Lebedev, Sergei

    2016-04-01

    Ireland is located on the European North Atlantic margin, at the northwesternmost edge of the Eurasian continent, several hundred kilometers away from the closest plate boundaries, namely the North Atlantic ridge and the Nubia-Eurasia convergence front. Its low level of seismicity, according to the number of events and magnitudes given by the existing catalogs, is thus expected. However, it still appears surprisingly low compared to neighboring domains, including Great Britain and, more generally, the rest of the Atlantic margin. One explanation might be that the events reported in those catalogs do not reflect the actual seismic activity of Ireland due to a lack, until recently, of permanent seismological stations on the Irish territory. Although the Irish National seismic Network (INSN) now consists of 6 stations, and despite a good station coverage of Britain, to the east, by the British Geological survey (BGS) stations, most of the earthquakes occurring in Ireland may still be missed because of their low magnitude. Here, we combine the waveform data recorded at permanent (INSN, BGS) stations with that from dense temporary array deployed in the past 5 years by the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (DIAS) and the University College Dublin (UCD). In addition to new arrival time data and new locations for already known catalog events, our analysis reveals newly detected earthquakes in Ireland, and sheds new light on the seismotectonics of this intraplate continental region. This sets the stage for joint earthquake relocation and 3D velocity model determination, which should lead to a better understanding of the relationships between the current seismic activity and the geological structure of the Irish lithosphere.

  19. Time-frequency characterization of rail corrugation under a combined auto-regressive and matched filter scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hory, C.; Bouillaut, L.; Aknin, P.

    2012-05-01

    Rail corrugation is an oscillatory mechanical wear of rail surface raising from the long-term interaction between rail and wheel. Signal processing approaches to corrugation monitoring, as recommended by the European standards for instance, are designed either in the mileage domain or in the wavelength domain. However a joint mileage and wavelength domain analysis of the monitoring data can provide crucial information about the simultaneous amplitude and wavelength modulations of the corrugation modes. It is proposed in this paper to perform such a mileage-wavelength domain analysis of rail corrugation using the class of Auto-Regressive-MAtched Filterbank (AR-MAFI) methods. We show that these methods assume a statistical model that fits the corrugation data. We discuss also the optimal parameter settings for the analysis of corrugation data. Experimental studies performed on data collected from the French RATP metro network show that the AR-MAFI methods outperform (in terms of readability and accuracy) the standard distance domain or wavelength domain methods in localizing and characterizing corrugation.

  20. Vibration Sensor Data Denoising Using a Time-Frequency Manifold for Machinery Fault Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Qingbo; Wang, Xiangxiang; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Vibration sensor data from a mechanical system are often associated with important measurement information useful for machinery fault diagnosis. However, in practice the existence of background noise makes it difficult to identify the fault signature from the sensing data. This paper introduces the time-frequency manifold (TFM) concept into sensor data denoising and proposes a novel denoising method for reliable machinery fault diagnosis. The TFM signature reflects the intrinsic time-frequency structure of a non-stationary signal. The proposed method intends to realize data denoising by synthesizing the TFM using time-frequency synthesis and phase space reconstruction (PSR) synthesis. Due to the merits of the TFM in noise suppression and resolution enhancement, the denoised signal would have satisfactory denoising effects, as well as inherent time-frequency structure keeping. Moreover, this paper presents a clustering-based statistical parameter to evaluate the proposed method, and also presents a new diagnostic approach, called frequency probability time series (FPTS) spectral analysis, to show its effectiveness in fault diagnosis. The proposed TFM-based data denoising method has been employed to deal with a set of vibration sensor data from defective bearings, and the results verify that for machinery fault diagnosis the method is superior to two traditional denoising methods. PMID:24379045

  1. Automated segmentation of linear time-frequency representations of marine-mammal sounds.

    PubMed

    Dadouchi, Florian; Gervaise, Cedric; Ioana, Cornel; Huillery, Julien; Mars, Jérôme I

    2013-09-01

    Many marine mammals produce highly nonlinear frequency modulations. Determining the time-frequency support of these sounds offers various applications, which include recognition, localization, and density estimation. This study introduces a low parameterized automated spectrogram segmentation method that is based on a theoretical probabilistic framework. In the first step, the background noise in the spectrogram is fitted with a Chi-squared distribution and thresholded using a Neyman-Pearson approach. In the second step, the number of false detections in time-frequency regions is modeled as a binomial distribution, and then through a Neyman-Pearson strategy, the time-frequency bins are gathered into regions of interest. The proposed method is validated on real data of large sequences of whistles from common dolphins, collected in the Bay of Biscay (France). The proposed method is also compared with two alternative approaches: the first is smoothing and thresholding of the spectrogram; the second is thresholding of the spectrogram followed by the use of morphological operators to gather the time-frequency bins and to remove false positives. This method is shown to increase the probability of detection for the same probability of false alarms.

  2. Vibration sensor data denoising using a time-frequency manifold for machinery fault diagnosis.

    PubMed

    He, Qingbo; Wang, Xiangxiang; Zhou, Qiang

    2013-12-27

    Vibration sensor data from a mechanical system are often associated with important measurement information useful for machinery fault diagnosis. However, in practice the existence of background noise makes it difficult to identify the fault signature from the sensing data. This paper introduces the time-frequency manifold (TFM) concept into sensor data denoising and proposes a novel denoising method for reliable machinery fault diagnosis. The TFM signature reflects the intrinsic time-frequency structure of a non-stationary signal. The proposed method intends to realize data denoising by synthesizing the TFM using time-frequency synthesis and phase space reconstruction (PSR) synthesis. Due to the merits of the TFM in noise suppression and resolution enhancement, the denoised signal would have satisfactory denoising effects, as well as inherent time-frequency structure keeping. Moreover, this paper presents a clustering-based statistical parameter to evaluate the proposed method, and also presents a new diagnostic approach, called frequency probability time series (FPTS) spectral analysis, to show its effectiveness in fault diagnosis. The proposed TFM-based data denoising method has been employed to deal with a set of vibration sensor data from defective bearings, and the results verify that for machinery fault diagnosis the method is superior to two traditional denoising methods.

  3. Inverse synthetic aperture radar processing using parametric time-frequency estimators Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V., LLNL

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes the work performed for the Office of the Chief of Naval Research (ONR) during the period of 1 September 1997 through 31 December 1997. The primary objective of this research was aimed at developing an alternative time-frequency approach which is recursive-in-time to be applied to the Inverse Synthethic Aperture Radar (ISAR) imaging problem discussed subsequently. Our short term (Phase I) goals were to: 1. Develop an ISAR stepped-frequency waveform (SFWF) radar simulator based on a point scatterer vehicular target model incorporating both translational and rotational motion; 2. Develop a parametric, recursive-in-time approach to the ISAR target imaging problem; 3. Apply the standard time-frequency short-term Fourier transform (STFT) estimator, initially to a synthesized data set; and 4. Initiate the development of the recursive algorithm. We have achieved all of these goals during the Phase I of the project and plan to complete the overall development, application and comparison of the parametric approach to other time-frequency estimators (STFT, etc.) on our synthesized vehicular data sets during the next phase of funding. It should also be noted that we developed a batch minimum variance translational motion compensation (TMC) algorithm to estimate the radial components of target motion (see Section IV). This algorithm is easily extended to recursive solution and will probably become part of the overall recursive processing approach to solve the ISAR imaging problem. Our goals for the continued effort are to: 1. Develop and extend a complex, recursive-in-time, time- frequency parameter estimator based on the recursive prediction error method (RPEM) using the underlying Gauss- Newton algorithms. 2. Apply the complex RPEM algorithm to synthesized ISAR data using the above simulator. 3. Compare the performance of the proposed algorithm to standard time-frequency estimators applied to the same data sets.

  4. [Evoked Potential Blind Extraction Based on Fractional Lower Order Spatial Time-Frequency Matrix].

    PubMed

    Long, Junbo; Wang, Haibin; Zha, Daifeng

    2015-04-01

    The impulsive electroencephalograph (EEG) noises in evoked potential (EP) signals is very strong, usually with a heavy tail and infinite variance characteristics like the acceleration noise impact, hypoxia and etc., as shown in other special tests. The noises can be described by a stable distribution model. In this paper, Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) and pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution (PWVD) time-frequency distribution based on the fractional lower order moment are presented to be improved. We got fractional lower order WVD (FLO-WVD) and fractional lower order PWVD (FLO-PWVD) time-frequency distribution which could be suitable for a stable distribution process. We also proposed the fractional lower order spatial time-frequency distribution matrix (FLO-STFM) concept. Therefore, combining with time-frequency underdetermined blind source separation (TF-UBSS), we proposed a new fractional lower order spatial time-frequency underdetermined blind source separation (FLO-TF-UBSS) which can work in a stable distribution environment. We used the FLO-TF-UBSS algorithm to extract EPs. Simulations showed that the proposed method could effectively extract EPs in EEG noises, and the separated EPs and EEG signals based on FLO-TF-UBSS were almost the same as the original signal, but blind separation based on TF-UBSS had certain deviation. The correlation coefficient of the FLO-TF-UBSS algorithm was higher than the TF-UBSS algorithm when generalized signal-to-noise ratio (GSNR) changed from 10 dB to 30 dB and a varied from 1. 06 to 1. 94, and was approximately e- qual to 1. Hence, the proposed FLO-TF-UBSS method might be better than the TF-UBSS algorithm based on second order for extracting EP signal under an EEG noise environment. PMID:26211238

  5. Quadratic Time-Frequency Analysis of Hydroacoustic Signals as Applied to Acoustic Emissions of Large Whales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bras, Ronan; Victor, Sucic; Damir, Malnar; Götz, Bokelmann

    2014-05-01

    In order to enrich the set of attributes in setting up a large database of whale signals, as envisioned in the Baleakanta project, we investigate methods of time-frequency analysis. The purpose of establishing the database is to increase and refine knowledge of the emitted signal and of its propagation characteristics, leading to a better understanding of the animal migrations in a non-invasive manner and to characterize acoustic propagation in oceanic media. The higher resolution for signal extraction and a better separation from other signals and noise will be used for various purposes, including improved signal detection and individual animal identification. The quadratic class of time-frequency distributions (TFDs) is the most popular set of time-frequency tools for analysis and processing of non-stationary signals. Two best known and most studied members of this class are the spectrogram and the Wigner-Ville distribution. However, to be used efficiently, i.e. to have highly concentrated signal components while significantly suppressing interference and noise simultaneously, TFDs need to be optimized first. The optimization method used in this paper is based on the Cross-Wigner-Ville distribution, and unlike similar approaches it does not require prior information on the analysed signal. The method is applied to whale signals, which, just like the majority of other real-life signals, can generally be classified as multicomponent non-stationary signals, and hence time-frequency techniques are a natural choice for their representation, analysis, and processing. We present processed data from a set containing hundreds of individual calls. The TFD optimization method results into a high resolution time-frequency representation of the signals. It allows for a simple extraction of signal components from the TFD's dominant ridges. The local peaks of those ridges can then be used for the signal components instantaneous frequency estimation, which in turn can be used as

  6. Ultrasonic method to evaluate the residual properties of thermally damaged sandstone based on time-frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Xu, Jin-yu; Liu, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of the residual properties of thermally damaged rocks is of vital importance for rock engineering. For this study, uniaxial compression experiments and ultrasonic tests were conducted on sandstone specimens which experienced temperature treatments of different levels, including 25, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000°C. Time-frequency analysis methods were applied to evaluate the deformation and strength properties of sandstone after being exposed to high temperature, confirming the effectiveness of the ultrasonic evaluation method. Linear correlations between the peak stress, deformation modulus and the longitudinal wave velocity confirm the effectiveness of ultrasonic time-domain properties in estimating the deformation behaviour of the thermally damaged sandstone. Synchronisation in the change of the peak stress and the kurtosis of frequency spectrum as temperature rises, defined in this paper to describe the spectrum distribution, as well as the centroid frequency, demonstrates the feasibility of ultrasonic frequency-domain properties in estimating the residual strength of the thermally damaged sandstone. The results have certain guiding significance for rock engineering in a high-temperature environment.

  7. Hydrocarbon Reservoir Prediction Using Bi-Gaussian S Transform Based Time-Frequency Analysis Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Z.; Chen, Y.; Liu, Y.; Liu, W.; Zhang, G.

    2015-12-01

    Among those hydrocarbon reservoir detection techniques, the time-frequency analysis based approach is one of the most widely used approaches because of its straightforward indication of low-frequency anomalies from the time-frequency maps, that is to say, the low-frequency bright spots usually indicate the potential hydrocarbon reservoirs. The time-frequency analysis based approach is easy to implement, and more importantly, is usually of high fidelity in reservoir prediction, compared with the state-of-the-art approaches, and thus is of great interest to petroleum geologists, geophysicists, and reservoir engineers. The S transform has been frequently used in obtaining the time-frequency maps because of its better performance in controlling the compromise between the time and frequency resolutions than the alternatives, such as the short-time Fourier transform, Gabor transform, and continuous wavelet transform. The window function used in the majority of previous S transform applications is the symmetric Gaussian window. However, one problem with the symmetric Gaussian window is the degradation of time resolution in the time-frequency map due to the long front taper. In our study, a bi-Gaussian S transform that substitutes the symmetric Gaussian window with an asymmetry bi-Gaussian window is proposed to analyze the multi-channel seismic data in order to predict hydrocarbon reservoirs. The bi-Gaussian window introduces asymmetry in the resultant time-frequency spectrum, with time resolution better in the front direction, as compared with the back direction. It is the first time that the bi-Gaussian S transform is used for analyzing multi-channel post-stack seismic data in order to predict hydrocarbon reservoirs since its invention in 2003. The superiority of the bi-Gaussian S transform over traditional S transform is tested on a real land seismic data example. The performance shows that the enhanced temporal resolution can help us depict more clearly the edge of the

  8. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  9. Kolmogorov-Smirnov like test for time-frequency Fourier spectrogram analysis in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraioli, Luigi; Armano, Michele; Audley, Heather; Congedo, Giuseppe; Diepholz, Ingo; Gibert, Ferran; Hewitson, Martin; Hueller, Mauro; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Korsakova, Natalia; Nofrarias, Miquel; Plagnol, Eric; Vitale, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    A statistical procedure for the analysis of time-frequency noise maps is presented and applied to LISA Pathfinder mission synthetic data. The procedure is based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov like test that is applied to the analysis of time-frequency noise maps produced with the spectrogram technique. The influence of the finite size windowing on the statistic of the test is calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation for 4 different windows type. Such calculation demonstrate that the test statistic is modified by the correlations introduced in the spectrum by the finite size of the window and by the correlations between different time bins originated by overlapping between windowed segments. The application of the test procedure to LISA Pathfinder data demonstrates the test capability of detecting non-stationary features in a noise time series that is simulating low frequency non-stationary noise in the system.

  10. Considering the influence of artificial environmental noise to study cough time-frequency features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hirtum, A.; Berckmans, D.

    2003-09-01

    In general the study of the cough mechanism and sound in both animal and human is performed by eliciting coughing in a reproducible way by nebulization of an irritating substance. Due to ventilation the controlled evaporation-protocol causes artificial noises from a mechanical origin. The resulting environmental low-frequency noises complicate cough time-frequency features. In order to optimize the study of the cough-sound the research described in this paper attempts on the one hand to characterize and model the environmental noises and on the other hand to evaluate the influence of the noise on the time-frequency representation for the intended cough sounds by comparing different de-noising approaches. Free field acoustic sound is continuously registered during 30 min citric acid cough-challenges on individual Belgian Landrace piglets and during respiratory infection experiments, with a duration of about 10 days, where room-ventilation was present.

  11. Time-frequency analysis for microwave reflectometry data processing in the HL-2A tokamak.

    PubMed

    Zhong, W L; Shi, Z B; Zou, X L; Ding, X T; Huang, X L; Dong, Y B; Liu, Z T; Xiao, W W; Ji, X Q; Cui, Z Y; Liu, Yi; Yan, L W; Yang, Q W; Duan, X R

    2011-10-01

    The Choi-Williams distribution (CWD) technique is introduced as a time-frequency tool for processing data measured from the new developed homodyne and the fixed frequency reflectometry in the HL-2A tokamak. The comparison between spectrogram and CWD for the simulated signal is presented. It indicates that the CWD can greatly improve the representation of the time-frequency content of the multi-components signal. Its effectiveness is demonstrated through two applications in HL-2A, which are the extraction of beat frequencies from the frequency modulated-continuous wave reflectometry (FM-CW) and the characterizing of the fluctuations. The density profile inversed from the group delay of the FM-CW and the density fluctuations deduced from the fixed-frequency reflectometry would be more reliable and accurate by using the CWD technique.

  12. Time-frequency analysis for microwave reflectometry data processing in the HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, W. L.; Shi, Z. B.; Zou, X. L.; Ding, X. T.; Huang, X. L.; Dong, Y. B.; Liu, Z. T.; Xiao, W. W.; Ji, X. Q.; Cui, Z. Y.; Liu, Yi; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.

    2011-10-01

    The Choi-Williams distribution (CWD) technique is introduced as a time-frequency tool for processing data measured from the new developed homodyne and the fixed frequency reflectometry in the HL-2A tokamak. The comparison between spectrogram and CWD for the simulated signal is presented. It indicates that the CWD can greatly improve the representation of the time-frequency content of the multi-components signal. Its effectiveness is demonstrated through two applications in HL-2A, which are the extraction of beat frequencies from the frequency modulated-continuous wave reflectometry (FM-CW) and the characterizing of the fluctuations. The density profile inversed from the group delay of the FM-CW and the density fluctuations deduced from the fixed-frequency reflectometry would be more reliable and accurate by using the CWD technique.

  13. Ecological prediction with nonlinear multivariate time-frequency functional data models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, Wen-Hsi; Wikle, Christopher K.; Holan, Scott H.; Wildhaber, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Time-frequency analysis has become a fundamental component of many scientific inquiries. Due to improvements in technology, the amount of high-frequency signals that are collected for ecological and other scientific processes is increasing at a dramatic rate. In order to facilitate the use of these data in ecological prediction, we introduce a class of nonlinear multivariate time-frequency functional models that can identify important features of each signal as well as the interaction of signals corresponding to the response variable of interest. Our methodology is of independent interest and utilizes stochastic search variable selection to improve model selection and performs model averaging to enhance prediction. We illustrate the effectiveness of our approach through simulation and by application to predicting spawning success of shovelnose sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River.

  14. Ion collision crosssection measurements in quadrupole ion traps using a time-frequency analysis method.

    PubMed

    He, Muyi; Guo, Dan; Chen, Yu; Xiong, Xingchuang; Fang, Xiang; Xu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a method for measuring ion collision crosssections (CCSs) was proposed through time-frequency analysis of ion trajectories in quadrupole ion traps. A linear ion trap with added high-order electric fields was designed and simulated. With the presence of high-order electric fields and ion-neutral collisions, ion secular motion frequency within the quadrupole ion trap will be a function of ion motion amplitude, thus a function of time and ion CCS. A direct relationship was then established between ion CCS and ion motion frequency with respect to time, which could be obtained through time-frequency analysis of ion trajectories (or ion motion induced image currents). To confirm the proposed theory, realistic ion trajectory simulations were performed, where the CCSs of bradykinin, angiotensin I and II, and ubiquitin ions were calculated from simulated ion trajectories. As an example, differentiation of isomeric ubiquitin ions was also demonstrated in the simulations. PMID:25319271

  15. Relationships Between the Performance of Time/Frequency Standards and Navigation/Communication Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellwig, H.; Stein, S. R.; Walls, F. L.; Kahan, A.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between system performance and clock or oscillator performance is discussed. Tradeoffs discussed include: short term stability versus bandwidth requirements; frequency accuracy versus signal acquisition time; flicker of frequency and drift versus resynchronization time; frequency precision versus communications traffic volume; spectral purity versus bit error rate, and frequency standard stability versus frequency selection and adjustability. The benefits and tradeoffs of using precise frequency and time signals are various levels of precision and accuracy are emphasized.

  16. Time-Frequency Characterization of Cerebral Hemodynamics of Migraine Sufferers as Assessed by NIRS Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Filippo; Rosati, Samanta; Liboni, William; Negri, Emanuela; Mana, Ornella; Allais, Gianni; Benedetto, Chiara

    2010-12-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive system for the real-time monitoring of the concentration of oxygenated ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) and reduced (HHb) hemoglobin in the brain cortex. [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] and HHb concentrations vary in response to cerebral autoregulation. Sixty-eight women (14 migraineurs without aura, 49 migraineurs with aura, and 5 controls) performed breath-holding and hyperventilation during NIRS recordings. Signals were processed using the Choi-Williams time-frequency transform in order to measure the power variation of the very-low frequencies (VLF: 20-40 mHz) and of the low frequencies (LF: 40-140 mHz). Results showed that migraineurs without aura present different LF and VLF power levels than controls and migraineurs with aura. The accurate power measurement of the time-frequency analysis allowed for the discrimination of the subjects' hemodynamic patterns. The time-frequency analysis of NIRS signals can be used in clinical practice to assess cerebral hemodynamics.

  17. Comparing the applications of EMD and EEMD on time-frequency analysis of seismic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Zhang, Mingcai; Yu, Qihao; Zhang, Huyuan

    2012-08-01

    The Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is a novel signal analysis method in seismic exploration. It integrates empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and classical Hilbert transform (HT), which can express the intrinsic essence using simple and understandable algorithm. But there is a serious mode mixing phenomenon in EMD. To solve the mode mixing problem, a noise-assisted data analysis method called ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is adopted instead of EMD. In this paper, the applications of EMD and EEMD on time-frequency analyzing behaviors were compared, and the results show that (1) EMD decomposes an original nonlinear and non-stationary signal into a series of simple intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), but with the mode mixing phenomenon. (2) EEMD skillfully solves the mode mixing problem by adding a white noise to the original signal. (3) The synthetic signal example reveals the remarkable ability of EEMD to decompose the signal into different IMFs and analyze the time-frequency distribution of the signal. (4) The time-frequency spectrum obtained by EEMD more realistically reflects the real geology than by EMD.

  18. Signal analysis by means of time-frequency (Wigner-type) distributions -- Applications to sonar and radar echoes

    SciTech Connect

    Gaunaurd, G.; Strifors, H.C.

    1996-09-01

    Time series data have been traditionally analyzed in either the time or the frequency domains. For signals with a time-varying frequency content, the combined time-frequency (TF) representations, based on the Cohen class of (generalized) Wigner distributions (WD`s) offer a powerful analysis tool. Using them, it is possible to: (1) trace the time-evolution of the resonance features usually present in a standard sonar cross section (SCS), or in a radar cross section (RCS) and (2) extract target information that may be difficult to even notice in an ordinary SCS or RCS. After a brief review of the fundamental properties of the WD, the authors discuss ways to reduce or suppress the cross term interference that appears in the WD of multicomponent systems. These points are illustrated with a variety of three-dimensional (3-D) plots of Wigner and pseudo-Wigner distributions (PWD), in which the strength of the distribution is depicted as the height of a Wigner surface with height scales measured by various color shades or pseudocolors. The authors also review studies they have made of the echoes returned by conducting or dielectric targets in the atmosphere, when they are illuminated by broadband radar pings. A TF domain analysis of these impulse radar returns demonstrates their superior informative content. These plots allow the identification of targets in an easier and clearer fashion than by the conventional RCS of narrowband systems. The authors show computed and measured plots of WD and PWD of various types of aircraft to illustrate the classification advantages of the approach at any aspect angle. They also show analogous results for metallic objects buried underground, in dielectric media, at various depths.

  19. Applications of time-frequency analysis to signals from manufacturing and machine monitoring sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Atlas, L.E.; Narayanan, S.B.; Bernard, G.D.

    1996-09-01

    Manufacturing industries are now demanding substantial increases in flexibility, productivity and reliability from their process machines as well as increased quality and value of their products. One important strategy to support this goal is sensor-based, on-line, real-time evaluation of key characteristics of both machines and products, throughout the manufacturing process. Recent advances in time-frequency (TF) analysis are particularly well suited to extracting key vibrational characteristics from monitoring sensors. Thus this paper presents applications of TF analysis to several important manufacturing and machine monitoring tasks, to show the value of these forms of digital signal processing applied to manufacturing.

  20. [An EMD based time-frequency distribution and its application in EEG analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobing; Chu, Meng; Qiu, Tianshuang; Bao, Haiping

    2007-10-01

    Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is a new time-frequency analytic method to analyze the nonlinear and the non-stationary signals. The key step of this method is the empirical mode decomposition (EMD), with which any complicated signal can be decomposed into a finite and small number of intrinsic mode functions (IMF). In this paper, a new EMD based method for suppressing the cross-term of Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) is developed and is applied to analyze the epileptic EEG signals. The simulation data and analysis results show that the new method suppresses the cross-term of the WVD effectively with an excellent resolution.

  1. Time-frequency representation of a highly nonstationary signal via the modified Wigner distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, T. F.; Jones, J. H.; Jong, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new signal analysis technique called the modified Wigner distribution (MWD) is presented. The new signal processing tool has been very successful in determining time frequency representations of highly non-stationary multicomponent signals in both simulations and trials involving actual Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high frequency data. The MWD departs from the classic Wigner distribution (WD) in that it effectively eliminates the cross coupling among positive frequency components in a multiple component signal. This attribute of the MWD, which prevents the generation of 'phantom' spectral peaks, will undoubtedly increase the utility of the WD for real world signal analysis applications which more often than not involve multicomponent signals.

  2. Cross Time-Frequency Analysis of Gastrocnemius Electromyographic Signals in Hypertensive and Nonhypertensive Subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Patrick; Krotish, Debra; Shin, Yong-June; Hirth, Victor

    2010-12-01

    The effects of hypertension are chronic and continuous; it affects gait, balance, and fall risk. Therefore, it is desirable to assess gait health across hypertensive and nonhypertensive subjects in order to prevent or reduce the risk of falls. Analysis of electromyography (EMG) signals can identify age related changes of neuromuscular activation due to various neuropathies and myopathies, but it is difficult to translate these medical changes to clinical diagnosis. To examine and compare geriatrics patients with these gait-altering diseases, we acquire EMG muscle activation signals, and by use of a timesynchronized mat capable of recording pressure information, we localize the EMG data to the gait cycle, ensuring identical comparison across subjects. Using time-frequency analysis on the EMG signal, in conjunction with several parameters obtained from the time-frequency analyses, we can determine the statistical discrepancy between diseases. We base these parameters on physiological manifestations caused by hypertension, as well as other comorbities that affect the geriatrics community. Using these metrics in a small population, we identify a statistical discrepancy between a control group and subjects with hypertension, neuropathy, diabetes, osteoporosis, arthritis, and several other common diseases which severely affect the geriatrics community.

  3. Spatially resolved time-frequency analysis of odour coding in the insect antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Marco; Weisz, Nathan; Antolini, Renzo; Haase, Albrecht

    2016-09-01

    Antennal lobes constitute the first neurophils in the insect brain involved in coding and processing of olfactory information. With their stereotyped functional and anatomical organization, they provide an accessible model with which to investigate information processing of an external stimulus in a neural network in vivo. Here, by combining functional calcium imaging with time-frequency analysis, we have been able to monitor the oscillatory components of neural activity upon olfactory stimulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of stimulus-induced oscillatory patterns in the honeybee antennal lobe, and to analyse the distribution of those patterns across the antennal lobe glomeruli. Fast two-photon calcium imaging reveals the presence of low-frequency oscillations, the intensity of which is perturbed by an incoming stimulus. Moreover, analysis of the spatial arrangement of this activity indicates that it is not homogeneous throughout the antennal lobe. On the contrary, each glomerulus displays an odorant-specific time-frequency profile, and acts as a functional unit of the oscillatory activity. The presented approach allows simultaneous recording of complex activity patterns across several nodes of the antennal lobe, providing the means to better understand the network dynamics regulating olfactory coding and leading to perception. PMID:27452956

  4. Noise resistant time frequency analysis and application in fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guangming; Chen, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Rolling element bearings are frequently used in rotary machinery, but they are also fragile mechanical parts. Hence, exact condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for them plays an important role in ensuring machinery's reliable running. Timely diagnosis of early bearing faults is desirable, but the early fault signatures are easily submerged in noise. In this paper, Wigner-Ville spectrum based on cyclic spectral density (CSWVS for a brief notation) is studied, which is able to represent the cyclostationary signals while reducing the masking effect of additive stationary noise. Both simulations and experiments show that CSWVS is a noise resistant time frequency analysis technique for extracting bearing fault patterns, when bearing signals are under influences of random noise and gear vibrations. The 3-D feature of the CSWVS is proved useful in extracting bearing fault pattern from gearbox vibration signals, where bearing signals are affected by gear meshing vibration and noise. Besides, CSWVS utilizes the second order cyclostationary property of the vibration signals produced by bearing distributed fault, and clearly extracts its fault features, which cannot be extracted by envelope analysis. To quantitatively describe the extent of bearing fault, Renyi information encoded in the time frequency diagram of CSWVS is studied. It is shown to be a more sensitive index to reflect bearing performance degradation, compared with the spectral entropy (SE), squared envelope spectrum entropy (SESE) and Renyi informations for WVD, PWVD, especially when SNR is low.

  5. An evaluation of objective measures for intelligibility prediction of time-frequency weighted noisy speech.

    PubMed

    Taal, Cees H; Hendriks, Richard C; Heusdens, Richard; Jensen, Jesper

    2011-11-01

    Existing objective speech-intelligibility measures are suitable for several types of degradation, however, it turns out that they are less appropriate in cases where noisy speech is processed by a time-frequency weighting. To this end, an extensive evaluation is presented of objective measure for intelligibility prediction of noisy speech processed with a technique called ideal time frequency (TF) segregation. In total 17 measures are evaluated, including four advanced speech-intelligibility measures (CSII, CSTI, NSEC, DAU), the advanced speech-quality measure (PESQ), and several frame-based measures (e.g., SSNR). Furthermore, several additional measures are proposed. The study comprised a total number of 168 different TF-weightings, including unprocessed noisy speech. Out of all measures, the proposed frame-based measure MCC gave the best results (ρ = 0.93). An additional experiment shows that the good performing measures in this study also show high correlation with the intelligibility of single-channel noise reduced speech. PMID:22087929

  6. Spatially resolved time-frequency analysis of odour coding in the insect antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Marco; Weisz, Nathan; Antolini, Renzo; Haase, Albrecht

    2016-09-01

    Antennal lobes constitute the first neurophils in the insect brain involved in coding and processing of olfactory information. With their stereotyped functional and anatomical organization, they provide an accessible model with which to investigate information processing of an external stimulus in a neural network in vivo. Here, by combining functional calcium imaging with time-frequency analysis, we have been able to monitor the oscillatory components of neural activity upon olfactory stimulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of stimulus-induced oscillatory patterns in the honeybee antennal lobe, and to analyse the distribution of those patterns across the antennal lobe glomeruli. Fast two-photon calcium imaging reveals the presence of low-frequency oscillations, the intensity of which is perturbed by an incoming stimulus. Moreover, analysis of the spatial arrangement of this activity indicates that it is not homogeneous throughout the antennal lobe. On the contrary, each glomerulus displays an odorant-specific time-frequency profile, and acts as a functional unit of the oscillatory activity. The presented approach allows simultaneous recording of complex activity patterns across several nodes of the antennal lobe, providing the means to better understand the network dynamics regulating olfactory coding and leading to perception.

  7. Applying matching pursuit decomposition time-frequency processing to UGS footstep classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Brett W.; Chung, Hugh; Dominguez, Alfonso; Sciacca, Jacob; Kovvali, Narayan; Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia; Allee, David R.

    2013-06-01

    The challenge of rapid footstep detection and classification in remote locations has long been an important area of study for defense technology and national security. Also, as the military seeks to create effective and disposable unattended ground sensors (UGS), computational complexity and power consumption have become essential considerations in the development of classification techniques. In response to these issues, a research project at the Flexible Display Center at Arizona State University (ASU) has experimented with footstep classification using the matching pursuit decomposition (MPD) time-frequency analysis method. The MPD provides a parsimonious signal representation by iteratively selecting matched signal components from a pre-determined dictionary. The resulting time-frequency representation of the decomposed signal provides distinctive features for different types of footsteps, including footsteps during walking or running activities. The MPD features were used in a Bayesian classification method to successfully distinguish between the different activities. The computational cost of the iterative MPD algorithm was reduced, without significant loss in performance, using a modified MPD with a dictionary consisting of signals matched to cadence temporal gait patterns obtained from real seismic measurements. The classification results were demonstrated with real data from footsteps under various conditions recorded using a low-cost seismic sensor.

  8. Aurally-adequate time-frequency analysis for scattered sound in auditoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Molly K.; Xiang, Ning; Kleiner, Mendel

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work was to apply an aurally-adequate time-frequency analysis technique to the analysis of sound scattering effects in auditoria. Time-frequency representations were developed as a motivated effort that takes into account binaural hearing, with a specific implementation of interaural cross-correlation process. A model of the human auditory system was implemented in the MATLAB platform based on two previous models [A. Härmä and K. Palomäki, HUTear, Espoo, Finland; and M. A. Akeroyd, A. Binaural Cross-correlogram Toolbox for MATLAB (2001), University of Sussex, Brighton]. These stages include proper frequency selectivity, the conversion of the mechanical motion of the basilar membrane to neural impulses, and binaural hearing effects. The model was then used in the analysis of room impulse responses with varying scattering characteristics. This paper discusses the analysis results using simulated and measured room impulse responses. [Work supported by the Frank H. and Eva B. Buck Foundation.

  9. Time-frequency analysis in optical coherence tomography for technical objects examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    StrÄ kowski, Marcin R.; Kraszewski, Maciej; Trojanowski, Michał; Pluciński, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is one of the most advanced optical measurement techniques for complex structure visualization. The advantages of OCT have been used for surface and subsurface defect detection in composite materials, polymers, ceramics, non-metallic protective coatings, and many more. Our research activity has been focused on timefrequency spectroscopic analysis in OCT. It is based on time resolved spectral analysis of the backscattered optical signal delivered by the OCT. The time-frequency method gives spectral characteristic of optical radiation backscattered or backreflected from the particular points inside the tested device. This provides more information about the sample, which are useful for further analysis. Nowadays, the applications of spectroscopic analysis for composite layers characterization or tissue recognition have been reported. During our studies we have found new applications of spectroscopic analysis. We have used this method for thickness estimation of thin films, which are under the resolution of OCT. Also, we have combined the spectroscopic analysis with polarization sensitive OCT (PS-OCT). This approach enables to obtain a multiorder retardation value directly and may become a breakthrough in PS-OCT measurements of highly birefringent media. In this work, we present the time-frequency spectroscopic algorithms and their applications for OCT. Also, the theoretical simulations and measurement validation of this method are shown.

  10. Time-frequency analysis of accelerometry data for detection of myoclonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Nijsen, Tamara M E; Aarts, Ronald M; Cluitmans, Pierre J M; Griep, Paul A M

    2010-09-01

    Four time-frequency and time-scale methods are studied for their ability of detecting myoclonic seizures from accelerometric data. Methods that are used are: the short-time Fourier transform (STFT), the Wigner distribution (WD), the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) using a Daubechies wavelet, and a newly introduced model-based matched wavelet transform (MOD). Real patient data are analyzed using these four time-frequency and time-scale methods. To obtain quantitative results, all four methods are evaluated in a linear classification setup. Data from 15 patients are used for training and data from 21 patients for testing. Using features based on the CWT and MOD, the success rate of the classifier was 80%. Using STFT or WD-based features, the classification success is reduced. Analysis of the false positives revealed that they were either clonic seizures, the onset of tonic seizures, or sharp peaks in "normal" movements indicating that the patient was making a jerky movement. All these movements are considered clinically important to detect. Thus, the results show that both CWT and MOD are useful for the detection of myoclonic seizures. On top of that, MOD has the advantage that it consists of parameters that are related to seizure duration and intensity that are physiologically meaningful. Furthermore, in future work, the model can also be useful for the detection of other motor seizure types. PMID:20667813

  11. Analysis of damped tissue vibrations in time-frequency space: a wavelet-based approach.

    PubMed

    Enders, Hendrik; von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Nigg, Benno M

    2012-11-15

    There is evidence that vibrations of soft tissue compartments are not appropriately described by a single sinusoidal oscillation for certain types of locomotion such as running or sprinting. This paper discusses a new method to quantify damping of superimposed oscillations using a wavelet-based time-frequency approach. This wavelet-based method was applied to experimental data in order to analyze the decay of the overall power of vibration signals over time. Eight healthy subjects performed sprinting trials on a 30 m runway on a hard surface and a soft surface. Soft tissue vibrations were quantified from the tissue overlaying the muscle belly of the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The new methodology determines damping coefficients with an average error of 2.2% based on a wavelet scaling factor of 0.7. This was sufficient to detect differences in soft tissue compartment damping between the hard and soft surface. On average, the hard surface elicited a 7.02 s(-1) lower damping coefficient than the soft surface (p<0.05). A power spectral analysis of the muscular vibrations occurring during sprinting confirmed that vibrations during dynamic movements cannot be represented by a single sinusoidal function. Compared to the traditional sinusoidal approach, this newly developed method can quantify vibration damping for systems with multiple vibration modes that interfere with one another. This new time-frequency analysis may be more appropriate when an acceleration trace does not follow a sinusoidal function, as is the case with multiple forms of human locomotion. PMID:22995145

  12. Generalized stepwise demodulation transform and synchrosqueezing for time-frequency analysis and bearing fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Juanjuan; Liang, Ming; Necsulescu, Dan-Sorin; Guan, Yunpeng

    2016-04-01

    The energy concentration level is an important indicator for time-frequency analysis (TFA). Weak energy concentration would result in time-frequency representation (TFR) diffusion and thus leading to ambiguous results or even misleading signal analysis results, particularly for nonstationary multicomponent signals. To improve the energy concentration level, this paper proposes a generalized stepwise demodulation transform (GSDT). The rationale of the proposed method is that (1) the generalized demodulation (GD) can map the original signal into an analytic signal with constant instantaneous frequency (IF) and improve the energy concentration level on time-frequency plane, and (2) focusing on a short window around the time instant of interest, a backward demodulation operation can recover the original frequency at the time instant without affecting the improved energy concentration level. By repeating the backward demodulation at every time instant of interest, the TFR of the entire signal can be attained with enhanced energy concentration level. With the GSDT, an iterative GSDT (IGSDT) is developed to analyze multicomponent signal that is subjected to different modulating sources for their constituent components. The IGSDT iteratively demodulates each constituent component to attain its TFR and the TFR of the whole signal is derived from superposing all the resulting TFRs of constituent components. The cross-term free and more energy concentrated TFR of the signal is, therefore, obtained, and the diffusion in the TFR can be reduced. The GSDT-based synchrosqueezing transform is also elaborated to further enhance the GSDT(IGSDT) yielded TFR. The effectiveness of the proposed method in TFA is tested using both simulated monocomponent and multicomponent signals. The application of the proposed method to bearing fault detection is explored. Bearing condition and fault pattern can be revealed by the proposed method resulting TFR. The main advantages of the proposed method

  13. Aesthetic appreciation: event-related field and time-frequency analyses

    PubMed Central

    Munar, Enric; Nadal, Marcos; Castellanos, Nazareth P.; Flexas, Albert; Maestú, Fernando; Mirasso, Claudio; Cela-Conde, Camilo J.

    2012-01-01

    Improvements in neuroimaging methods have afforded significant advances in our knowledge of the cognitive and neural foundations of aesthetic appreciation. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to register brain activity while participants decided about the beauty of visual stimuli. The data were analyzed with event-related field (ERF) and Time-Frequency (TF) procedures. ERFs revealed no significant differences between brain activity related with stimuli rated as “beautiful” and “not beautiful.” TF analysis showed clear differences between both conditions 400 ms after stimulus onset. Oscillatory power was greater for stimuli rated as “beautiful” than those regarded as “not beautiful” in the four frequency bands (theta, alpha, beta, and gamma). These results are interpreted in the frame of synchronization studies. PMID:22287948

  14. Improving resolution of crosswell seismic section based on time-frequency analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, H.; Li, Y.

    1994-12-31

    According to signal theory, to improve resolution of seismic section is to extend high-frequency band of seismic signal. In cross-well section, sonic log can be regarded as a reliable source providing high-frequency information to the trace near the borehole. In such case, what to do is to introduce this high-frequency information into the whole section. However, neither traditional deconvolution algorithms nor some new inversion methods such as BCI (Broad Constraint Inversion) are satisfied because of high-frequency noise and nonuniqueness of inversion results respectively. To overcome their disadvantages, this paper presents a new algorithm based on Time-Frequency Analysis (TFA) technology which has been increasingly received much attention as an useful signal analysis too. Practical applications show that the new method is a stable scheme to improve resolution of cross-well seismic section greatly without decreasing Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR).

  15. Aesthetic appreciation: event-related field and time-frequency analyses.

    PubMed

    Munar, Enric; Nadal, Marcos; Castellanos, Nazareth P; Flexas, Albert; Maestú, Fernando; Mirasso, Claudio; Cela-Conde, Camilo J

    2011-01-01

    Improvements in neuroimaging methods have afforded significant advances in our knowledge of the cognitive and neural foundations of aesthetic appreciation. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to register brain activity while participants decided about the beauty of visual stimuli. The data were analyzed with event-related field (ERF) and Time-Frequency (TF) procedures. ERFs revealed no significant differences between brain activity related with stimuli rated as "beautiful" and "not beautiful." TF analysis showed clear differences between both conditions 400 ms after stimulus onset. Oscillatory power was greater for stimuli rated as "beautiful" than those regarded as "not beautiful" in the four frequency bands (theta, alpha, beta, and gamma). These results are interpreted in the frame of synchronization studies. PMID:22287948

  16. Time-frequency response spectrum of rotational ground motion and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Wei; Luo, Qifeng

    2010-02-01

    The rotational seismic motions are estimated from one station records of the 1999 Jiji (Chi-Chi), Taiwan, earthquake based on the theory of elastic plane wave propagation. The time-frequency response spectrum (TFRS) of the rotational motions is calculated and its characteristics are analyzed, then the TFRS is applied to analyze the damage mechanism of one twelve-storey frame concrete structure. The results show that one of the ground motion components can not reflect the characteristics of the seismic motions completely; the characteristics of each component, especially rotational motions, need to be studied. The damage line of the structure and TFRS of ground motion are important for seismic design, only the TFRS of input seismic wave is suitable, the structure design is reliable.

  17. Estimation of body resonances from a time-frequency analysis of violin vibrato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellody, Maureen; Wakefield, Gregory H.

    1999-11-01

    We present a signal-based technique for evaluating a pole-zero representation of the resonant response of a violin instrument. This technique combines time-frequency signal analysis with system identification techniques to determine the pole-zero function that would account for amplitude modulation observed on the partials of violin notes performed with vibrato. Violin vibrato signals are analyzed with the modal distribution to obtain values of instantaneous amplitude and frequency for each partial. From these, input and output functions are synthesized and used to estimate the violin body's impulse response using an infinite impulse response (IIR) system identification procedure. In each case, the input and output functions share the same instantaneous frequency of the measured partial. However, the rapid amplitude variations are present only on the output function. We report on the location and spacing of these estimated resonances and discuss their relationship to those obtained from theoretical predictions and other measurement procedures.

  18. Time-frequency processing of track irregularities in high-speed train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jing; Lin, Jianhui; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Track irregularities are the main source of vehicle vibration. With the increase in the speed, the track irregularities have become a more significant issue of concerned. The axle box acceleration signals can be obtained for analyzing the track irregularities, but the signals are usually non-stationary and signal processing results are not normally satisfied with the ordinary way. Thus, time-frequency distribution analysis is proposed to use in this study. To minimize the cross-terms, a new method based on Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and Cohen's class distribution has been developed and advanced. This approach has been tested with three typical simulation signals and then applied to analyze the track irregularities. The result is consistent with the result from track inspection cars. This indicates this new algorithm is suitable for analyzing the track irregularities. It can be applied in rail irregularity measurement to compensate some shortages of the track inspection cars.

  19. Flutter of High-Speed Civil Transport Flexible Semispan Model: Time-Frequency Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chabalko, Christopher C.; Hajj, Muhammad R.; Silva, Walter A.

    2006-01-01

    Time/frequency analysis of fluctuations measured by pressure taps and strain gauges in the experimental studies of the flexible semispan model of a high-speed civil transport wing configuration is performed. The interest is in determining the coupling between the aerodynamic loads and structural motions that led to the hard flutter conditions and loss of the model. The results show that, away from the hard flutter point, the aerodynamic loads at all pressure taps near the wing tip and the structural motions contained the same frequency components. On the other hand, in the flow conditions leading to the hard flutter, the frequency content of the pressure fluctuations near the leading and trailing edges varied significantly. This led to contribution to the structural motions over two frequency ranges. The ratio of these ranges was near 2:1, which suggests the possibility of nonlinear structural coupling.

  20. Gear-box fault detection using time-frequency based methods

    SciTech Connect

    Odgaard, Peter F.; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2015-12-31

    Gear-box fault monitoring and detection is important for optimization of power generation and availability of wind turbines. The current industrial approach is to use condition monitoring systems, which runs in parallel with the wind turbine control system, using expensive additional sensors. An alternative would be to use the existing measurements which are normally available for the wind turbine control system. The usage of these sensors instead would cut down the cost of the wind turbine by not using additional sensors. One of these available measurements is the generator speed, in which changes in the gear-box resonance frequency can be detected. Two different time-frequency based approaches are presented in this paper. One is a filter based approach and the other is based on a Karhunen-Loeve basis. Both of them detects the gear-box fault with an acceptable detection delay.

  1. Time-frequency characterization of nonlinear normal modes and challenges in nonlinearity identification of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, P. Frank

    2011-10-01

    Presented here is a new time-frequency signal processing methodology based on Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) and a new conjugate-pair decomposition (CPD) method for characterization of nonlinear normal modes and parametric identification of nonlinear multiple-degree-of-freedom dynamical systems. Different from short-time Fourier transform and wavelet transform, HHT uses the apparent time scales revealed by the signal's local maxima and minima to sequentially sift components of different time scales. Because HHT does not use pre-determined basis functions and function orthogonality for component extraction, it provides more accurate time-varying amplitudes and frequencies of extracted components for accurate estimation of system characteristics and nonlinearities. CPD uses adaptive local harmonics and function orthogonality to extract and track time-localized nonlinearity-distorted harmonics without the end effect that destroys the accuracy of HHT at the two data ends. For parametric identification, the method only needs to process one steady-state response (a free undamped modal vibration or a steady-state response to a harmonic excitation) and uses amplitude-dependent dynamic characteristics derived from perturbation analysis to determine the type and order of nonlinearity and system parameters. A nonlinear two-degree-of-freedom system is used to illustrate the concepts and characterization of nonlinear normal modes, vibration localization, and nonlinear modal coupling. Numerical simulations show that the proposed method can provide accurate time-frequency characterization of nonlinear normal modes and parametric identification of nonlinear dynamical systems. Moreover, results show that nonlinear modal coupling makes it impossible to decompose a general nonlinear response of a highly nonlinear system into nonlinear normal modes even if nonlinear normal modes exist in the system.

  2. Time-frequency methods and voluntary ramped-frequency breathing: a powerful combination for exploration of human neurophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Stankovski, Tomislav; Cooke, William H.; Rudas, László; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally altered the timing of respiratory motoneuron activity as a means to modulate and better understand otherwise hidden human central neural and hemodynamic oscillatory mechanisms. We recorded the electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, tidal carbon dioxide concentrations, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in 13 healthy supine young men who gradually increased or decreased their breathing frequencies between 0.05 and 0.25 Hz over 9-min periods. We analyzed results with traditional time- and frequency-domain methods, and also with time-frequency methods (wavelet transform, wavelet phase coherence, and directional coupling). We determined statistical significance and identified frequency boundaries by comparing measurements with randomly generated surrogates. Our results support several major conclusions. First, respiration causally modulates both sympathetic (weakly) and vagal motoneuron (strongly) oscillations over a wide frequency range—one that extends well below the frequency of actual breaths. Second, breathing frequency broadly modulates vagal baroreflex gain, with peak gains registered in the low frequency range. Third, breathing frequency does not influence median levels of sympathetic or vagal activity over time. Fourth, phase relations between arterial pressure and sympathetic and vagal motoneurons are unaffected by breathing, and are therefore likely secondary to intrinsic responsiveness of these motoneurons to other synaptic inputs. Finally, breathing frequency does not affect phase coherence between diastolic pressure and muscle sympathetic oscillations, but it augments phase coherence between systolic pressure and R-R interval oscillations over a limited portion of the usual breathing frequency range. These results refine understanding of autonomic oscillatory processes and those physiological mechanisms known as the human respiratory gate. PMID:24114700

  3. Models of the Joint Structure of Domain-Related and Global Distress: Implications for the Reconciliation of Quality of Life and Mental Health Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, William; St-Arnaud, Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    Research on subjective wellbeing includes studies of both domain-related and global distress. The mental health literature, though, focuses almost exclusively on global distress. This seems to be partly due to a common belief that psychological distress, and the moods that comprise distress, necessarily lack referential content. However, if that…

  4. Multimilling-Insert Wear Assessment Using Non-Linear Virtual Sensor, Time-Frequency Distribution and Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James Li, C.; Tzeng, Tzong-Chyi

    2000-11-01

    The objective of this study is to establish a signal processing methodology that can infer the state of milling insert wear from translational vibration measured on the spindle housing of a milling machine. First, the tool wear signature in a translational vibration is accentuated by mapping the translational vibration into a torsional vibration using a previously identified non-linear relationship between the two, i.e. a virtual sensor. Second, a time-frequency distribution, i.e. a Choi-Williams distribution, is calculated from the torsional vibration. Third, scattering matrices and orthogonalisation are employed to identify the time-frequency components that are best correlated to the state of wear. Fourth, a neural network is trained to estimate the extent of wear from these critical time frequency components. The combination of the virtual sensor, time-frequency analysis and neural network is then validated with data obtained from real cutting tests.

  5. The local maxima method for enhancement of time-frequency map and its application to local damage detection in rotating machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obuchowski, Jakub; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Zimroz, Radosław

    2014-06-01

    In this paper a new method of fault detection in rotating machinery is presented. It is based on a vibration time series analysis in time-frequency domain. A raw vibration signal is decomposed via the short-time Fourier transform (STFT). The time-frequency map is considered as matrix (M×N) with N sub-signals with length M. Each sub-signal is considered as a time series and might be interpreted as energy variation for narrow frequency bins. Each sub-signal is processed using a novel approach called the local maxima method. Basically, we search for local maxima because they should appear in the signal if local damage in bearings or gearbox exists. Finally, information for all sub-signals is combined in order to validate impulsive behavior of energy. Due to random character of the obtained time series, each maximum occurrence has to be checked for its significance. If there are time points for which the average number of local maxima for all sub-signals is significantly higher than for the other time instances, then location of these maxima is “weighted” as more important (at this time instance local maxima create for a set of Δf a pattern on the time-frequency map). This information, called vector of weights, is used for enhancement of spectrogram. When vector of weights is applied for spectrogram, non-informative energy is suppressed while informative features on spectrogram are enhanced. If the distribution of local maxima on spectrogram creates a pattern of wide-band cyclic energy growth, the machine is suspected of being damaged. For healthy condition, the vector of the average number of maxima for each time point should not have outliers, aggregation of information from all sub-signals is rather random and does not create any pattern. The method is illustrated by analysis of very noisy both real and simulated signals.

  6. System identification through nonstationary data using Time-Frequency Blind Source Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanlin; Kareem, Ahsan

    2016-06-01

    Classical output-only system identification (SI) methods are based on the assumption of stationarity of the system response. However, measured response of buildings and bridges is usually non-stationary due to strong winds (e.g. typhoon, and thunder storm etc.), earthquakes and time-varying vehicle motions. Accordingly, the response data may have time-varying frequency contents and/or overlapping of modal frequencies due to non-stationary colored excitation. This renders traditional methods problematic for modal separation and identification. To address these challenges, a new SI technique based on Time-Frequency Blind Source Separation (TFBSS) is proposed. By selectively utilizing "effective" information in local regions of the time-frequency plane, where only one mode contributes to energy, the proposed technique can successfully identify mode shapes and recover modal responses from the non-stationary response where the traditional SI methods often encounter difficulties. This technique can also handle response with closely spaced modes which is a well-known challenge for the identification of large-scale structures. Based on the separated modal responses, frequency and damping can be easily identified using SI methods based on a single degree of freedom (SDOF) system. In addition to the exclusive advantage of handling non-stationary data and closely spaced modes, the proposed technique also benefits from the absence of the end effects and low sensitivity to noise in modal separation. The efficacy of the proposed technique is demonstrated using several simulation based studies, and compared to the popular Second-Order Blind Identification (SOBI) scheme. It is also noted that even some non-stationary response data can be analyzed by the stationary method SOBI. This paper also delineates non-stationary cases where SOBI and the proposed scheme perform comparably and highlights cases where the proposed approach is more advantageous. Finally, the performance of the

  7. Classification of Hazelnut Kernels by Using Impact Acoustic Time-Frequency Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkan, Habil; Ince, Nuri Firat; Tewfik, Ahmed H.; Yardimci, Yasemin; Pearson, Tom

    2007-12-01

    Hazelnuts with damaged or cracked shells are more prone to infection with aflatoxin producing molds ( Aspergillus flavus). These molds can cause cancer. In this study, we introduce a new approach that separates damaged/cracked hazelnut kernels from good ones by using time-frequency features obtained from impact acoustic signals. The proposed technique requires no prior knowledge of the relevant time and frequency locations. In an offline step, the algorithm adaptively segments impact signals from a training data set in time using local cosine packet analysis and a Kullback-Leibler criterion to assess the discrimination power of different segmentations. In each resulting time segment, the signal is further decomposed into subbands using an undecimated wavelet transform. The most discriminative subbands are selected according to the Euclidean distance between the cumulative probability distributions of the corresponding subband coefficients. The most discriminative subbands are fed into a linear discriminant analysis classifier. In the online classification step, the algorithm simply computes the learned features from the observed signal and feeds them to the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. The algorithm achieved a throughput rate of 45 nuts/s and a classification accuracy of 96% with the 30 most discriminative features, a higher rate than those provided with prior methods.

  8. Toward an EEG-based recognition of music liking using time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Hadjidimitriou, Stelios K; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2012-12-01

    Affective phenomena, as reflected through brain activity, could constitute an effective index for the detection of music preference. In this vein, this paper focuses on the discrimination between subjects' electroencephalogram (EEG) responses to self-assessed liked or disliked music, acquired during an experimental procedure, by evaluating different feature extraction approaches and classifiers to this end. Feature extraction is based on time-frequency (TF) analysis by implementing three TF techniques, i.e., spectrogram, Zhao-Atlas-Marks distribution and Hilbert-Huang spectrum (HHS). Feature estimation also accounts for physiological parameters that relate to EEG frequency bands, reference states, time intervals, and hemispheric asymmetries. Classification is performed by employing four classifiers, i.e., support vector machines, k-nearest neighbors (k -NN), quadratic and Mahalanobis distance-based discriminant analyses. According to the experimental results across nine subjects, best classification accuracy {86.52 (±0.76)%} was achieved using k-NN and HHS-based feature vectors ( FVs) representing a bilateral average activity, referred to a resting period, in β (13-30 Hz) and γ (30-49 Hz) bands. Activity in these bands may point to a connection between music preference and emotional arousal phenomena. Furthermore, HHS-based FVs were found to be robust against noise corruption. The outcomes of this study provide early evidence and pave the way for the development of a generalized brain computer interface for music preference recognition. PMID:23033323

  9. Time-Frequency Analysis of Rocket Nozzle Wall Pressures During Start-up Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baars, Woutijn J.; Tinney, Charles E.; Ruf, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01

    Surveys of the fluctuating wall pressure were conducted on a sub-scale, thrust- optimized parabolic nozzle in order to develop a physical intuition for its Fourier-azimuthal mode behavior during fixed and transient start-up conditions. These unsteady signatures are driven by shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions which depend on the nozzle pressure ratio and nozzle geometry. The focus however, is on the degree of similarity between the spectral footprints of these modes obtained from transient start-ups as opposed to a sequence of fixed nozzle pressure ratio conditions. For the latter, statistically converged spectra are computed using conventional Fourier analyses techniques, whereas the former are investigated by way of time-frequency analysis. The findings suggest that at low nozzle pressure ratios -- where the flow resides in a Free Shock Separation state -- strong spectral similarities occur between fixed and transient conditions. Conversely, at higher nozzle pressure ratios -- where the flow resides in Restricted Shock Separation -- stark differences are observed between the fixed and transient conditions and depends greatly on the ramping rate of the transient period. And so, it appears that an understanding of the dynamics during transient start-up conditions cannot be furnished by a way of fixed flow analysis.

  10. Toward an EEG-based recognition of music liking using time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Hadjidimitriou, Stelios K; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2012-12-01

    Affective phenomena, as reflected through brain activity, could constitute an effective index for the detection of music preference. In this vein, this paper focuses on the discrimination between subjects' electroencephalogram (EEG) responses to self-assessed liked or disliked music, acquired during an experimental procedure, by evaluating different feature extraction approaches and classifiers to this end. Feature extraction is based on time-frequency (TF) analysis by implementing three TF techniques, i.e., spectrogram, Zhao-Atlas-Marks distribution and Hilbert-Huang spectrum (HHS). Feature estimation also accounts for physiological parameters that relate to EEG frequency bands, reference states, time intervals, and hemispheric asymmetries. Classification is performed by employing four classifiers, i.e., support vector machines, k-nearest neighbors (k -NN), quadratic and Mahalanobis distance-based discriminant analyses. According to the experimental results across nine subjects, best classification accuracy {86.52 (±0.76)%} was achieved using k-NN and HHS-based feature vectors ( FVs) representing a bilateral average activity, referred to a resting period, in β (13-30 Hz) and γ (30-49 Hz) bands. Activity in these bands may point to a connection between music preference and emotional arousal phenomena. Furthermore, HHS-based FVs were found to be robust against noise corruption. The outcomes of this study provide early evidence and pave the way for the development of a generalized brain computer interface for music preference recognition.

  11. Detection of sudden structural damage using blind source separation and time-frequency approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morovati, V.; Kazemi, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    Seismic signal processing is one of the most reliable methods of detecting the structural damage during earthquakes. In this paper, the use of the hybrid method of blind source separation (BSS) and time-frequency analysis (TFA) is explored to detect the changes in the structural response data. The combination of the BSS and TFA is applied to the seismic signals due to the non-stationary nature of them. Firstly, the second-order blind identification technique is used to decompose the response signal of structural vibration into modal coordinate signals which will be mono-components for TFA. Then each mono-component signal is analyzed to extract instantaneous frequency of structure. Numerical simulations and a real-world seismic-excited structure with time-varying frequencies show the accuracy and robustness of the developed algorithm. TFA of extracted sources shows that used method can be successfully applied to structural damage detection. The results also demonstrate that the combined method can be used to identify the time instant of structural damage occurrence more sharply and effectively than by the use of TFA alone.

  12. The time-frequency characteristics of violin vibrato: modal distribution analysis and synthesis

    PubMed

    Mellody; Wakefield

    2000-01-01

    A high-resolution time-frequency distribution, the modal distribution, is applied to the study of violin vibrato. The analysis indicates that the frequency modulation induced by the motion of the stopped finger on the string is accompanied by a significant amplitude variation in each partial of that note. Amplitude and frequency estimates for each partial are extracted from the modal distribution of ten pitches that span the range of the violin instrument. The frequency modulation is well-represented by a single sinusoid with a mean rate of 5.9 Hz and a mean excursion of +/- 15.2 cents. A spectral decomposition of the amplitude envelopes of the partials shows that the peaks lie primarily at integer multiples of the vibrato rate. These amplitude and frequency estimates are used in an additive synthesis model to generate synthetic replicates of violin vibrato. Simple approximations to these estimates are created, and synthesized sounds using these are evaluated perceptually by seven subjects using discrimination, nonmetric multidimensional scaling (MDS), and sound quality scoring tasks. It is found that the absence of frequency modulation has little effect on the perceptual response to violin vibrato, while the absence of amplitude modulation causes marked changes in both sound quality and MDS results. Low-order spectral decompositions of the amplitude and frequency estimates also occupy the same perceptual space as the original recording for a subset of the pitches studied.

  13. Relation between deep bioluminescence and oceanographic variables: A statistical analysis using time-frequency decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, S.; Nerini, D.; Tamburini, C.

    2014-09-01

    We consider the statistical analysis of a 1.7-year high-frequency sampled time series, between 2009 and 2010, recorded at the ANTARES observatory in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea (2475 m depth). The objective was to estimate relationships between bioluminescence and environmental time series (temperature, salinity and current speed). As this entire dataset is characterized by non-linearity and non-stationarity, two time-frequency decomposition methods (wavelet and Hilbert-Huang) were used. These mathematical methods are dedicated to the analysis of a signal at various time and frequencies scales. This work propose some statistical tools dedicated to the study of relationships between two time series. Our study highlights three events of high bioluminescence activity in March 2009, December 2009 and March 2010. We demonstrate that the two events occurring in March 2009 and 2010 are correlated to the arrival of newly formed deep water masses at frequencies of approximately 4.8×10-7 (period of 24.1 days). In contrast, the event in December 2009 is only correlated with current speed at frequencies of approximately 1.9×10-6 (period of 6.0 days). The use of both wavelet and Hilbert-Huang transformations has proven to be successful for the analysis of multivariate time series. These methods are well-suited in a context of the increasing number of long time series recorded in oceanography.

  14. Time-frequency characterization of atrial fibrillation from surface ECG based on Hilbert-Huang transform.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z; Chen, Y; Pan, M

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, based on Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), we develop a new non-invasive time-frequency analysis method to characterize the dynamic behaviour of atrial fibrillation (AF) from surface ECG. We first extract f waves from single-lead ECG records of AF patients using PCA analysis. To capture the non-stationary behaviours of AF signals at different time scales, we use HHT to find the Hilbert spectrum and instantaneous frequency (IF) distribution of residual signals from principal component analysis. Two important feature variables, namely mean IF (mIF) and index of frequency stability over time (IS), are derived from the IF distribution, and in combination will be able to effectively discriminate two different AF types: self-terminating and non-terminating termination. The proposed AF signal decomposition and analysis method will help us efficiently differentiate individual AF patients, advance our understanding of AF mechanisms, and provide useful guidelines for improving administration of AF patients, especially paroxysmal AF.

  15. Phase retrieval and time-frequency methods in the measurement of ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    Recently several techniques have become available to measure the time- (or frequency-) dependent intensity and phase of ultrashort laser pulses. One of these, Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG), is rigorous and has achieved single-laser-shot operation. FROG combines the concepts of time-frequency analysis in the form of spectrogram generation (in order to create a two-dimensional problem), and uses a phase-retrieval-based algorithm to invert the experimental data to yield the intensity and phase of the laboratory laser pulse. In FROG it is easy to generate a spectrogram of the unknown signal, and inversion of the spectrogram to recover the signal is the main goal. Because the temporal width of a femtosecond laser pulse is much shorter than anything achievable by electronics, FROG uses the pulse to measure itself. In FROG, the laser pulse is split into two replicas of itself by a partially reflecting beamsplitter, and the two replicas interact with each other in a medium with an instantaneous nonlinear-optical response. This interaction generates a signal field that is then frequency-resolved using a spectrometer. The spectrum of the signal field is measured for all relevant values of the temporal delay between the two pulses. Here, the authors employ FROG and FROG related techniques to measure the time-dependent intensity and phase of an ultrashort laser pulse.

  16. Time-Frequency Characteristics of Tsunami Magnetic Signals from Four Pacific Ocean Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, N. R.; Manoj, C.; An, C.; Sugioka, H.; Toh, H.

    2016-07-01

    The recent deployment of highly sensitive seafloor magnetometers coinciding with the deep solar minimum has provided excellent opportunities for observing tsunami electromagnetic signals. These fluctuating signals (periods ranging from 10-20 min) are generally found to be within ± ˜ 1 nT and coincide with the arrival of the tsunami waves. Previous studies focused on tsunami electromagnetic characteristics, as well as modeling the signal for individual events. This study instead aims to provide the time-frequency characteristics for a range of tsunami signals and a method to separate the data's noise using additional data from a remote observatory. We focus on four Pacific Ocean events of varying tsunami signal amplitude: (1) the 2011 Tohoku, Japan event (M9.0), (2) the 2010 Chile event (M8.8), (3) the 2009 Samoa event (M8.0) and, (4) the 2007 Kuril Islands event (M8.1). We find possible tsunami signals in high-pass filtered data and successfully isolate the signals from noise using a cross-wavelet analysis. The cross-wavelet analysis reveals that the longer period signals precede the stronger, shorter period signals. Our results are very encouraging for using tsunami magnetic signals in warning systems.

  17. Time-frequency analysis of transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions in children exposed to carboplatin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Shaum; Bass, Johnnie; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Brennan, Rachel; Wilson, Matthew; Wu, Jianrong; Galindo, Carlos-Rodriguez; Paglialonga, Alessia; Tognola, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize and quantify time-frequency changes in transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) recorded in children diagnosed with retinoblastoma who were receiving carboplatin chemotherapy. A signal processing technique, the wavelet transform (WT), was used to analyze TEOAE waveforms in narrow-band frequency components. Ten children (aged 3-72 months) diagnosed with unilateral or bilateral retinoblastoma were enrolled in the study. TEOAEs were acquired from the children with linear sequences of 70 dB peak equivalent SPL clicks. After WT analysis, TEOAE energy, latency and normalized energy in the narrow-band frequency components were compared before and during carboplatin chemotherapy treatment (average dose 1693 mg/m2). On a group basis, no significant differences (p>0.05) in the TEOAE energy, latency or normalized energy before and after carboplatin treatment were observed. There were decreases in normalized energy on an individual basis in 10 out of 18 ears in the sample. Exposure to carboplatin chemotherapy did not cause significant changes in TEOAE energy, latency and normalized energy during treatment. However, long-term monitoring of hearing with measurements of TEOAEs is warranted, given the risks of delayed hearing loss in some children receiving carboplatin chemotherapy.

  18. The time-frequency characteristics of violin vibrato: modal distribution analysis and synthesis

    PubMed

    Mellody; Wakefield

    2000-01-01

    A high-resolution time-frequency distribution, the modal distribution, is applied to the study of violin vibrato. The analysis indicates that the frequency modulation induced by the motion of the stopped finger on the string is accompanied by a significant amplitude variation in each partial of that note. Amplitude and frequency estimates for each partial are extracted from the modal distribution of ten pitches that span the range of the violin instrument. The frequency modulation is well-represented by a single sinusoid with a mean rate of 5.9 Hz and a mean excursion of +/- 15.2 cents. A spectral decomposition of the amplitude envelopes of the partials shows that the peaks lie primarily at integer multiples of the vibrato rate. These amplitude and frequency estimates are used in an additive synthesis model to generate synthetic replicates of violin vibrato. Simple approximations to these estimates are created, and synthesized sounds using these are evaluated perceptually by seven subjects using discrimination, nonmetric multidimensional scaling (MDS), and sound quality scoring tasks. It is found that the absence of frequency modulation has little effect on the perceptual response to violin vibrato, while the absence of amplitude modulation causes marked changes in both sound quality and MDS results. Low-order spectral decompositions of the amplitude and frequency estimates also occupy the same perceptual space as the original recording for a subset of the pitches studied. PMID:10641668

  19. Solving the EEG inverse problem based on space-time-frequency structured sparsity constraints.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Candamil, Sebastián; Höhne, Johannes; Martínez-Vargas, Juan-David; An, Xing-Wei; Castellanos-Domínguez, German; Haufe, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    We introduce STOUT (spatio-temporal unifying tomography), a novel method for the source analysis of electroencephalograpic (EEG) recordings, which is based on a physiologically-motivated source representation. Our method assumes that only a small number of brain sources are active throughout a measurement, where each of the sources exhibits focal (smooth but localized) characteristics in space, time and frequency. This structure is enforced through an expansion of the source current density into appropriate spatio-temporal basis functions in combination with sparsity constraints. This approach combines the main strengths of two existing methods, namely Sparse Basis Field Expansions (Haufe et al., 2011) and Time-Frequency Mixed-Norm Estimates (Gramfort et al., 2013). By adjusting the ratio between two regularization terms, STOUT is capable of trading temporal for spatial reconstruction accuracy and vice versa, depending on the requirements of specific analyses and the provided data. Due to allowing for non-stationary source activations, STOUT is particularly suited for the localization of event-related potentials (ERP) and other evoked brain activity. We demonstrate its performance on simulated ERP data for varying signal-to-noise ratios and numbers of active sources. Our analysis of the generators of visual and auditory evoked N200 potentials reveals that the most active sources originate in the temporal and occipital lobes, in line with the literature on sensory processing. PMID:26048621

  20. Time-frequency composition of mosquito flight tones obtained using Hilbert spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Aldersley, Andrew; Champneys, Alan; Homer, Martin; Robert, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Techniques for estimating temporal variation in the frequency content of acoustic tones based on short-time fast Fourier transforms are fundamentally limited by an inherent time-frequency trade-off. This paper presents an alternative methodology, based on Hilbert spectral analysis, which is not affected by this weakness, and applies it to the accurate estimation of mosquito wing beat frequencies. Mosquitoes are known to communicate with one another via the sounds generated by their flapping wings. Active frequency modulation between pairs of mosquitoes is thought to take place as a precursor to courtship. Studying the acoustically-based interactions of mosquitoes therefore relies on an accurate representation of flight frequency as a time-evolving property, yet conventional Fourier spectrograms are unable to capture the rapid modulations in frequency that mosquito flight tones exhibit. The algorithms introduced in this paper are able to automatically detect and extract fully temporally resolved frequency information from audio recordings. Application of the technique to experimental recordings of single tethered mosquitoes in flight reveals corroboration with previous reported findings. The advantages of the method for animal communication studies are discussed, with particular attention given to its potential utility for studying pairwise mosquito interactions. PMID:25324097

  1. Time-frequency atoms-driven support vector machine method for bearings incipient fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruonan; Yang, Boyuan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Shibin; Chen, Xuefeng

    2016-06-01

    Bearing plays an essential role in the performance of mechanical system and fault diagnosis of mechanical system is inseparably related to the diagnosis of the bearings. However, it is a challenge to detect weak fault from the complex and non-stationary vibration signals with a large amount of noise, especially at the early stage. To improve the anti-noise ability and detect incipient fault, a novel fault detection method based on a short-time matching method and Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed. In this paper, the mechanism of roller bearing is discussed and the impact time frequency dictionary is constructed targeting the multi-component characteristics and fault feature of roller bearing fault vibration signals. Then, a short-time matching method is described and the simulation results show the excellent feature extraction effects in extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). After extracting the most relevance atoms as features, SVM was trained for fault recognition. Finally, the practical bearing experiments indicate that the proposed method is more effective and efficient than the traditional methods in weak impact signal oscillatory characters extraction and incipient fault diagnosis.

  2. Damage detection and quantification in a structural model under seismic excitation using time-frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chun-Kai; Loh, Chin-Hsiung; Wu, Tzu-Hsiu

    2015-04-01

    In civil engineering, health monitoring and damage detection are typically carry out by using a large amount of sensors. Typically, most methods require global measurements to extract the properties of the structure. However, some sensors, like LVDT, cannot be used due to in situ limitation so that the global deformation remains unknown. An experiment is used to demonstrate the proposed algorithms: a one-story 2-bay reinforce concrete frame under weak and strong seismic excitation. In this paper signal processing techniques and nonlinear identification are used and applied to the response measurements of seismic response of reinforced concrete structures subject to different level of earthquake excitations. Both modal-based and signal-based system identification and feature extraction techniques are used to study the nonlinear inelastic response of RC frame using both input and output response data or output only measurement. From the signal-based damage identification method, which include the enhancement of time-frequency analysis of acceleration responses and the estimation of permanent deformation using directly from acceleration response data. Finally, local deformation measurement from dense optical tractor is also use to quantify the damage of the RC frame structure.

  3. Time-frequency model for echo-delay resolution in wideband biosonar.

    PubMed

    Neretti, Nicola; Sanderson, Mark I; Intrator, Nathan; Simmons, James A

    2003-04-01

    A time/frequency model of the bat's auditory system was developed to examine the basis for the fine (approximately 2 micros) echo-delay resolution of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), and its performance at resolving closely spaced FM sonar echoes in the bat's 20-100-kHz band at different signal-to-noise ratios was computed. The model uses parallel bandpass filters spaced over this band to generate envelopes that individually can have much lower bandwidth than the bat's ultrasonic sonar sounds and still achieve fine delay resolution. Because fine delay separations are inside the integration time of the model's filters (approximately 250-300 micros), resolving them means using interference patterns along the frequency dimension (spectral peaks and notches). The low bandwidth content of the filter outputs is suitable for relay of information to higher auditory areas that have intrinsically poor temporal response properties. If implemented in fully parallel analog-digital hardware, the model is computationally extremely efficient and would improve resolution in military and industrial sonar receivers.

  4. Seismic random noise attenuation based on adaptive time-frequency peak filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xinhuan; Ma, Haitao; Li, Yue; Zeng, Qian

    2015-02-01

    Time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF) method uses a specific window with fixed length to recover band-limited signal in stationary random noise. However, the derivatives of signal such as seismic wavelets may change rapidly in some short time intervals. In this case, TFPF equipped with fixed window length will not provide an optimal solution. In this letter, we present an adaptive version of TFPF for seismic random noise attenuation. In our version, the improved intersection of confidence intervals combined with short-time energy criterion is used to preprocess the noisy signal. And then, we choose an appropriate threshold to divide the noisy signal into signal, buffer and noise. Different optimal window lengths are used in each type of segments. We test the proposed method on both synthetic and field seismic data. The experimental results illustrate that the proposed method makes the degree of amplitude preservation raise more than 10% and signal-to-noise (SNR) improve 2-4 dB compared with the original algorithm.

  5. Automated sleep stage identification system based on time-frequency analysis of a single EEG channel and random forest classifier.

    PubMed

    Fraiwan, Luay; Lweesy, Khaldon; Khasawneh, Natheer; Wenz, Heinrich; Dickhaus, Hartmut

    2012-10-01

    In this work, an efficient automated new approach for sleep stage identification based on the new standard of the American academy of sleep medicine (AASM) is presented. The propose approach employs time-frequency analysis and entropy measures for feature extraction from a single electroencephalograph (EEG) channel. Three time-frequency techniques were deployed for the analysis of the EEG signal: Choi-Williams distribution (CWD), continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT). Polysomnographic recordings from sixteen subjects were used in this study and features were extracted from the time-frequency representation of the EEG signal using Renyi's entropy. The classification of the extracted features was done using random forest classifier. The performance of the new approach was tested by evaluating the accuracy and the kappa coefficient for the three time-frequency distributions: CWD, CWT, and HHT. The CWT time-frequency distribution outperformed the other two distributions and showed excellent performance with an accuracy of 0.83 and a kappa coefficient of 0.76.

  6. 4D time-frequency representation for binaural speech signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhael, Raed; Szu, Harold H.

    2006-04-01

    Hearing is the ability to detect and process auditory information produced by the vibrating hair cilia residing in the corti of the ears to the auditory cortex of the brain via the auditory nerve. The primary and secondary corti of the brain interact with one another to distinguish and correlate the received information by distinguishing the varying spectrum of arriving frequencies. Binaural hearing is nature's way of employing the power inherent in working in pairs to process information, enhance sound perception, and reduce undesired noise. One ear might play a prominent role in sound recognition, while the other reinforces their perceived mutual information. Developing binaural hearing aid devices can be crucial in emulating the working powers of two ears and may be a step closer to significantly alleviating hearing loss of the inner ear. This can be accomplished by combining current speech research to already existing technologies such as RF communication between PDAs and Bluetooth. Ear Level Instrument (ELI) developed by Micro-tech Hearing Instruments and Starkey Laboratories is a good example of a digital bi-directional signal communicating between a PDA/mobile phone and Bluetooth. The agreement and disagreement of arriving auditory information to the Bluetooth device can be classified as sound and noise, respectively. Finding common features of arriving sound using a four coordinate system for sound analysis (four dimensional time-frequency representation), noise can be greatly reduced and hearing aids would become more efficient. Techniques developed by Szu within an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Blind Source Separation (BSS), Adaptive Wavelets Transform (AWT), and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) hold many possibilities to the improvement of acoustic segmentation of phoneme, all of which will be discussed in this paper. Transmitted and perceived acoustic speech signal will improve, as the binaural hearing aid will emulate two ears in sound

  7. High-Resolution Time-Frequency Spectrum-Based Lung Function Test from a Smartphone Microphone

    PubMed Central

    Thap, Tharoeun; Chung, Heewon; Jeong, Changwon; Hwang, Ki-Eun; Kim, Hak-Ryul; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a smartphone-based lung function test, developed to estimate lung function parameters using a high-resolution time-frequency spectrum from a smartphone built-in microphone is presented. A method of estimation of the forced expiratory volume in 1 s divided by forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) based on the variable frequency complex demodulation method (VFCDM) is first proposed. We evaluated our proposed method on 26 subjects, including 13 healthy subjects and 13 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, by comparing with the parameters clinically obtained from pulmonary function tests (PFTs). For the healthy subjects, we found that an absolute error (AE) and a root mean squared error (RMSE) of the FEV1/FVC ratio were 4.49% ± 3.38% and 5.54%, respectively. For the COPD patients, we found that AE and RMSE from COPD patients were 10.30% ± 10.59% and 14.48%, respectively. For both groups, we compared the results using the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and short-time Fourier transform (STFT), and found that VFCDM was superior to CWT and STFT. Further, to estimate other parameters, including forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), and peak expiratory flow (PEF), regression analysis was conducted to establish a linear transformation. However, the parameters FVC, FEV1, and PEF had correlation factor r values of 0.323, 0.275, and −0.257, respectively, while FEV1/FVC had an r value of 0.814. The results obtained suggest that only the FEV1/FVC ratio can be accurately estimated from a smartphone built-in microphone. The other parameters, including FVC, FEV1, and PEF, were subjective and dependent on the subject’s familiarization with the test and performance of forced exhalation toward the microphone. PMID:27548164

  8. High-Resolution Time-Frequency Spectrum-Based Lung Function Test from a Smartphone Microphone.

    PubMed

    Thap, Tharoeun; Chung, Heewon; Jeong, Changwon; Hwang, Ki-Eun; Kim, Hak-Ryul; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a smartphone-based lung function test, developed to estimate lung function parameters using a high-resolution time-frequency spectrum from a smartphone built-in microphone is presented. A method of estimation of the forced expiratory volume in 1 s divided by forced vital capacity (FEV₁/FVC) based on the variable frequency complex demodulation method (VFCDM) is first proposed. We evaluated our proposed method on 26 subjects, including 13 healthy subjects and 13 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, by comparing with the parameters clinically obtained from pulmonary function tests (PFTs). For the healthy subjects, we found that an absolute error (AE) and a root mean squared error (RMSE) of the FEV₁/FVC ratio were 4.49% ± 3.38% and 5.54%, respectively. For the COPD patients, we found that AE and RMSE from COPD patients were 10.30% ± 10.59% and 14.48%, respectively. For both groups, we compared the results using the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and short-time Fourier transform (STFT), and found that VFCDM was superior to CWT and STFT. Further, to estimate other parameters, including forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV₁), and peak expiratory flow (PEF), regression analysis was conducted to establish a linear transformation. However, the parameters FVC, FEV1, and PEF had correlation factor r values of 0.323, 0.275, and -0.257, respectively, while FEV₁/FVC had an r value of 0.814. The results obtained suggest that only the FEV1/FVC ratio can be accurately estimated from a smartphone built-in microphone. The other parameters, including FVC, FEV1, and PEF, were subjective and dependent on the subject's familiarization with the test and performance of forced exhalation toward the microphone. PMID:27548164

  9. A comparative study on hydrocarbon detection using three EMD-based time-frequency analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ya-juan; Cao, Jun-xing; Tian, Ren-fei

    2013-02-01

    Due to strong heterogeneity of marine carbonate reservoir, seismic signals become more complex, thus, it is very difficult for hydrocarbon detection. In hydrocarbon reservoir, there usually exist some changes in seismic wave energy and frequency. In their instantaneous spectrums there often exist such phenomena that show the characteristics of attenuation of high frequency energy and enhancement of low-frequency energy. The three EMD-based time-frequency analysis methods' instantaneous spectra all have certain oil and gas detection capability. In this paper, we introduced the Normalized Hilbert Transform (NHT) and a new method named the HU method for hydrocarbon detection. The model results in the Jingbian Gas Field which is located in the eastern Ordos Basin, China, show that NHT and HU methods can be adopted. They also detect the gas-bearing reservoir efficiently as the HHT method does. The three EMD-based methods, that is, the Hilbert-Huang transformation (HHT) and NHT and HU methods, were respectively applied to analyze the seismic data from the Jingbian Gas Field. Firstly, the seismic signals were decomposed into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method. The second IMF signal (IMF2) of the original seismic section better indicates the distribution of the reservoir. Information on hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir is mainly in IMF2. Secondly, the HHT, NHT and HU methods were respectively used to obtain different frequency division sections from IMF2. Hydrocarbon detection was realized from the energy distribution of the different frequency division sections with these three EMD-based methods. The practical application results show that the three EMD-based methods can all be employed to hydrocarbon detection. Frequency division section of IMF2 using NHT method was better for the seismic data from the Jingbian Gas Field than when using the HHT method and HU method.

  10. The Benefits of Using Time-Frequency Analysis with Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Austin P; Clayton, Dwight A

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in detection and resolution are always desired and needed. There are various instruments available for the inspection of concrete structures that can be used with confidence for detecting different defects. However, more often than not that confidence is heavily dependent on the experience of the operator rather than the clear, objective discernibility of the output of the instrument. The challenge of objective discernment is amplified when the concrete structures contain multiple layers of reinforcement, are of significant thickness, or both, such as concrete structures in nuclear power plants. We seek to improve and extend the usefulness of results produced using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) on data collected from thick, complex concrete structures. A secondary goal is to improve existing SAFT results, with regards to repeatedly and objectively identifying defects and/or internal structure of concrete structures. Towards these goals, we are applying the time-frequency technique of wavelet packet decomposition and reconstruction using a mother wavelet that possesses the exact reconstruction property. However, instead of analyzing the coefficients of each decomposition node, we select and reconstruct specific nodes based on the frequency band it contains to produce a frequency band specific time-series representation. SAFT is then applied to these frequency specific reconstructions allowing SAFT to be used to visualize the reflectivity of a frequency band and that band s interaction with the contents of the concrete structure. We apply our technique to data sets collected using a commercial, ultrasonic linear array (MIRA) from two 1.5m x 2m x 25cm concrete test specimens. One specimen contains multiple layers of rebar. The other contains honeycomb, crack, and rebar bonding defect analogs. This approach opens up a multitude of possibilities for improved detection, readability, and overall improved objectivity. We will focus on

  11. The benefits of using time-frequency analysis with synthetic aperture focusing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Austin E-mail: claytonda@ornl.gov; Clayton, Dwight E-mail: claytonda@ornl.gov

    2015-03-31

    Improvements in detection and resolution are always desired and needed. There are various instruments available for the inspection of concrete structures that can be used with confidence for detecting different defects. However, more often than not that confidence is heavily dependent on the experience of the operator rather than the clear, objective discernibility of the output of the instrument. The challenge of objective discernment is amplified when the concrete structures contain multiple layers of reinforcement, are of significant thickness, or both, such as concrete structures in nuclear power plants. We seek to improve and extend the usefulness of results produced using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) on data collected from thick, complex concrete structures. A secondary goal is to improve existing SAFT results, with regards to repeatedly and objectively identifying defects and/or internal structure of concrete structures. Towards these goals, we are applying the time-frequency technique of wavelet packet decomposition and reconstruction using a mother wavelet that possesses the exact reconstruction property. However, instead of analyzing the coefficients of each decomposition node, we select and reconstruct specific nodes based on the frequency band it contains to produce a frequency band specific time-series representation. SAFT is then applied to these frequency specific reconstructions allowing SAFT to be used to visualize the reflectivity of a frequency band and that band's interaction with the contents of the concrete structure. We apply our technique to data sets collected using a commercial, ultrasonic linear array (MIRA) from two 1.5m × 2m × 25cm concrete test specimens. One specimen contains multiple layers of rebar. The other contains honeycomb, crack, and rebar bonding defect analogs. This approach opens up a multitude of possibilities for improved detection, readability, and overall improved objectivity. We will focus on

  12. Applying Novel Time-Frequency Moments Singular Value Decomposition Method and Artificial Neural Networks for Ballistocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhbardeh, Alireza; Junnila, Sakari; Koivuluoma, Mikko; Koivistoinen, Teemu; Värri, Alpo

    2006-12-01

    As we know, singular value decomposition (SVD) is designed for computing singular values (SVs) of a matrix. Then, if it is used for finding SVs of an [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]-by-1 or 1-by- [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] array with elements representing samples of a signal, it will return only one singular value that is not enough to express the whole signal. To overcome this problem, we designed a new kind of the feature extraction method which we call ''time-frequency moments singular value decomposition (TFM-SVD).'' In this new method, we use statistical features of time series as well as frequency series (Fourier transform of the signal). This information is then extracted into a certain matrix with a fixed structure and the SVs of that matrix are sought. This transform can be used as a preprocessing stage in pattern clustering methods. The results in using it indicate that the performance of a combined system including this transform and classifiers is comparable with the performance of using other feature extraction methods such as wavelet transforms. To evaluate TFM-SVD, we applied this new method and artificial neural networks (ANNs) for ballistocardiogram (BCG) data clustering to look for probable heart disease of six test subjects. BCG from the test subjects was recorded using a chair-like ballistocardiograph, developed in our project. This kind of device combined with automated recording and analysis would be suitable for use in many places, such as home, office, and so forth. The results show that the method has high performance and it is almost insensitive to BCG waveform latency or nonlinear disturbance.

  13. The benefits of using time-frequency analysis with synthetic aperture focusing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Austin; Clayton, Dwight

    2015-03-01

    Improvements in detection and resolution are always desired and needed. There are various instruments available for the inspection of concrete structures that can be used with confidence for detecting different defects. However, more often than not that confidence is heavily dependent on the experience of the operator rather than the clear, objective discernibility of the output of the instrument. The challenge of objective discernment is amplified when the concrete structures contain multiple layers of reinforcement, are of significant thickness, or both, such as concrete structures in nuclear power plants. We seek to improve and extend the usefulness of results produced using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) on data collected from thick, complex concrete structures. A secondary goal is to improve existing SAFT results, with regards to repeatedly and objectively identifying defects and/or internal structure of concrete structures. Towards these goals, we are applying the time-frequency technique of wavelet packet decomposition and reconstruction using a mother wavelet that possesses the exact reconstruction property. However, instead of analyzing the coefficients of each decomposition node, we select and reconstruct specific nodes based on the frequency band it contains to produce a frequency band specific time-series representation. SAFT is then applied to these frequency specific reconstructions allowing SAFT to be used to visualize the reflectivity of a frequency band and that band's interaction with the contents of the concrete structure. We apply our technique to data sets collected using a commercial, ultrasonic linear array (MIRA) from two 1.5m × 2m × 25cm concrete test specimens. One specimen contains multiple layers of rebar. The other contains honeycomb, crack, and rebar bonding defect analogs. This approach opens up a multitude of possibilities for improved detection, readability, and overall improved objectivity. We will focus on

  14. Non-identical smoothing operators for estimating time-frequency interdependence in electrophysiological recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrkanoon, Saeid; Breakspear, Michael; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Boonstra, Tjeerd W.

    2013-12-01

    Synchronization of neural activity from distant parts of the brain is crucial for the coordination of cognitive activities. Because neural synchronization varies both in time and frequency, time-frequency (T-F) coherence is commonly employed to assess interdependences in electrophysiological recordings. T-F coherence entails smoothing the cross and power spectra to ensure statistical consistency of the estimate, which reduces its T-F resolution. This trade-off has been described in detail when the cross and power spectra are smoothed using identical smoothing operators, which may yield spurious coherent frequencies. In this article, we examine the use of non-identical smoothing operators for the estimation of T-F interdependence, i.e., phase synchronization is characterized by phase locking between signals captured by the cross spectrum and we may hence improve the trade-off by selectively smoothing the auto spectra. We first show that the frequency marginal density of the present estimate is bound within [0,1] when using non-identical smoothing operators. An analytic calculation of the bias and variance of present estimators is performed and compared with the bias and variance of standard T-F coherence using Monte Carlo simulations. We then test the use of non-identical smoothing operators on simulated data, whose T-F properties are known through construction. Finally, we analyze empirical data from eyes-closed surface electroencephalography recorded in human subjects to investigate alpha-band synchronization. These analyses show that selectively smoothing the auto spectra reduces the bias of the estimator and may improve the detection of T-F interdependence in electrophysiological data at high temporal resolution.

  15. Single-trial time-frequency analysis of electrocortical signals: baseline correction and beyond.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Xiao, P; Zhang, Z G; Mouraux, A; Iannetti, G D

    2014-01-01

    Event-related desynchronization (ERD) and synchronization (ERS) of electrocortical signals (e.g., electroencephalogram [EEG] and magnetoencephalogram) reflect important aspects of sensory, motor, and cognitive cortical processing. The detection of ERD and ERS relies on time-frequency decomposition of single-trial electrocortical signals, to identify significant stimulus-induced changes in power within specific frequency bands. Typically, these changes are quantified by expressing post-stimulus EEG power as a percentage of change relative to pre-stimulus EEG power. However, expressing post-stimulus EEG power relative to pre-stimulus EEG power entails two important and surprisingly neglected issues. First, it can introduce a significant bias in the estimation of ERD/ERS magnitude. Second, it confuses the contribution of pre- and post-stimulus EEG power. Taking the human electrocortical responses elicited by transient nociceptive stimuli as an example, we demonstrate that expressing ERD/ERS as the average percentage of change calculated at single-trial level introduces a positive bias, resulting in an overestimation of ERS and an underestimation of ERD. This bias can be avoided using a single-trial baseline subtraction approach. Furthermore, given that the variability in ERD/ERS is not only dependent on the variability in post-stimulus power but also on the variability in pre-stimulus power, an estimation of the respective contribution of pre- and post-stimulus EEG variability is needed. This can be achieved using a multivariate linear regression (MVLR) model, which could be optimally estimated using partial least square (PLS) regression, to dissect and quantify the relationship between behavioral variables and pre- and post-stimulus EEG activities. In summary, combining single-trial baseline subtraction approach with PLS regression can be used to achieve a correct detection and quantification of ERD/ERS. PMID:24084069

  16. Using wavelets to decompose the time frequency effects of monetary policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar-Conraria, Luís; Azevedo, Nuno; Soares, Maria Joana

    2008-05-01

    Central banks have different objectives in the short and long run. Governments operate simultaneously at different timescales. Many economic processes are the result of the actions of several agents, who have different term objectives. Therefore, a macroeconomic time series is a combination of components operating on different frequencies. Several questions about economic time series are connected to the understanding of the behavior of key variables at different frequencies over time, but this type of information is difficult to uncover using pure time-domain or pure frequency-domain methods. To our knowledge, for the first time in an economic setup, we use cross-wavelet tools to show that the relation between monetary policy variables and macroeconomic variables has changed and evolved with time. These changes are not homogeneous across the different frequencies.

  17. Garner Valley Vibroseis Data Processing Using Time-Frequency Filtering Techniques to Remove Unwanted Harmonics and External Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, N. E.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.; Lancelle, C.; Chalari, A.

    2015-12-01

    Time-frequency filtering techniques can greatly improve data quality when combined with frequency swept seismic sources (vibroseis) recorded by seismic arrays by removing unwanted source harmonics or external noise sources (e.g., cultural or ambient noise). A source synchronous filter (SSF) is a time-frequency filter which only passes a specified width frequency band centered on the time varying frequency of the seismic source. A source delay filter (SDF) is a time-frequency filter which only passes those frequencies from the source within a specified delay time range. Both of these time-frequency filters operate on the uncorrelated vibroseis data and allow separate analysis of the source fundamental frequency and each harmonic. In either technique, the time-frequency function of the source can be captured from the source encoder or specified using two or more time-frequency points. SSF and SDF were both used in the processing of the vibroseis data collected in the September 2013 seismic experiment conducted at the NEES@UCSB Garner Valley field site. Three vibroseis sources were used: a 45 kN shear shaker, a 450 N portable mass shaker, and a 26 kN vibroseis truck. Seismic signals from these sources were recorded by two lines of 1 and 3 component accelerometers and geophones, and the Silixa Ltd's intelligent Distributed Acoustic Sensing (iDASTM ) system connected to 762 m of trenched fiber optical cable in a larger rectangular area. SSF and SDF improved vibroseis data quality, simplified data interpretation, and allowed new analysis techniques. This research is part of the larger DOE's PoroTomo project (URL: http://geoscience.wisc.edu/feigl/porotomo).

  18. Time-frequency analysis of acoustic signals in the audio-frequency range generated during Hadfield's steel friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, S. A.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Smolin, A. Yu.; Dmitriev, A. I.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2010-07-01

    Time-frequency analysis of sound waves detected by a microphone during the friction of Hadfield’s steel has been performed using wavelet transform and window Fourier transform methods. This approach reveals a relationship between the appearance of quasi-periodic intensity outbursts in the acoustic response signals and the processes responsible for the formation of wear products. It is shown that the time-frequency analysis of acoustic emission in a tribosystem can be applied, along with traditional approaches, to studying features in the wear and friction process.

  19. Ground roll attenuation using SVD and time-frequency-wavenumber filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri Naghadeh, Diako; Morley, Christopher Keith

    2016-10-01

    Ground roll (GR) is a coherent noise phenomenon with high-amplitude and low-frequency patterns that conceal reflections. To create a correct velocity model, especially from medium to great depth, attenuation of the GR is unavoidable. To carry out attenuation and preserve a virgin data set, out of noise-cone singular value decomposition (SVD) and time-frequency-wavenumber (TFK) filters are used. Here four steps are introduced: (1) SVD, (2) FK filtering, (3) the Gabor transform (GT) and (4) a time-variant band-pass filter. SVD decomposes data into singular vectors and gives us the ability to have sub-images that relate to different singular values. The data set is reconstructed using first singular-vectors that relate to first singular-values, and include more signal and less noise. To preserve the reflection signal, the GR event is flattened using a forward normal move out correction (NMO) followed by the application of SVD to preserve 50% of the introduced events (to remove a part of the GR) and then finally reverse NMO is conducted. Although the FK filter is able to remove all of the GR energy based on the low velocity, the choice of low-dip for filtering causes high-amplitude smearing and distorts waveforms. Consequently, FK is applied to remove events with dips of more than 40 ≤ft(≤ft.{}\\text{ms}\\right/{}\\text{trace}\\right) . The results of SVD plus high-dip FK have some issues that are created by merging high-amplitude and low-frequency events at the apex of the noise cone with reflections. Since at shallow depth and near offsets primary reflections have a higher frequency than the GR, the GT was used to deduce the dominant frequency of the GR for different times. Based on the estimated noise frequency, a cone area was chosen to filter the remaining noise and detect reflection events. These procedures were applied on real shot gathers to show the results of GR attenuation.

  20. Study of the time-frequency characteristics of continuous gravity data sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimin, X.; Shi, C.; Lei, S.; Hongyan, L.

    2013-12-01

    The continuous gravity measurements contained much valuable signal which was maybe caused by internal and external change of the Earth, which offered abundant information to study activities of the Earth. In the past decades, researchers mostly focused on discussing the relationship between the gravity variation and geodynamical processes. Here we studied the temporal variation of the gravity field through the continuous gravity records. Our goal was to detect certain geophysical signal on the order of a few tens of micro-Gal from the gravity data sequence. The gravity data sequences were recorded by the Scintrex g-Phone relative gravimeters those were located at the numerous observation stations of mainland China which had well-controlled observation systems. We presented a two-step procedure to study the signal of gravity variation. Firstly, we developed a Linear Similarity filtering technique which could reduce the drift of gravity instrument effectively by using two relative gravimeters at the same station by the reason of the short-term liner drift feature of gravimeters. Based on the method above, we gained non-tidal gravity variation more accurate that contained much geophysical signal which was associated with geodynamical phenomena. Secondly, we employed the time-frequency analysis techniques to analyze the feature of different temporal variation signal and tried to find some periodic and non-periodic characteristics of the continuous gravity data sequence. Moreover, we compared the results to the mobile repeated gravity measurements on ground and acquired the spatial and temporal gravity variation at last. We also expected to find some anomaly signal related to the activities of tectogenesis and fault movement prior to the destructive earthquakes from the continuous gravity data sequence. Acknowledgment: We acknowledge the financial support of the Basic Scientific Research Foundation of Institute of Geophysics CEA (DQJB12B20, DQJB12C03 and DQJB12B14), the

  1. Time-frequency-wavenumber Decomposition To Investigate Seismic Wavefield: Application To The Annot Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schissele, E.; Cansi, Y.; Gaffet, S.

    Many observations and studies as well as numerical simulations have been done in order to completely understand the whole seismogram recorded during an earthquake. At regional distances, the seismic wavefield is strongly influenced by crustal hetero- geneities. The primary wavefield constituted by Pn, Pg, Sn, Sg, Rg, Lg.... phases is diffracted and refracted by these heterogeneities and hence forms the coda of the seis- mogram. But the different mechanisms of propagation in a heterogeneous medium are not fully understood. The identification of the different phases contributing to the coda seems to be essential to progress in the comprehension of the seismic wavefield propagation. Seismic arrays are then well-adapted tools since they provide the spatio-temporal evo- lution of the wavefield. In 1998, 4 small-scales arrays were deployed for 2 months around the Annot region, located in the southern French Alps. Each array was constituted by 9 short-period seismometers, recording frequencies greater than 0.2 Hz. Its aperture was 250 meters, with a minimal distance between 2 adjacent sensors of 20 meters. That allows us to study the seismic wavefield for very low wavelength without any problem of spatial aliasing. It will be interesting to characterize in terms of wavefield deformation the signature of the different kinds of heterogeneities (fault system, topographic relief, impedance contrast...) surrounding this area. We expect the primary wavefield to be diffracted or refracted by all these heterogeneities. A time-frequency-wavenumber technique which allows us to characterize the whole coherent part of the energy which prop- agates through the seismic array has been derived. Such a characterization involves, for each coherent wavelet, an estimate of: (i) an arrival time and a frequency content and (ii) an azimuth and an apparent velocity. This way, the principal phases will be described. What will be more interesting, is the extraction of the deterministic part of the

  2. Pg-pPg Time Delays from Sparse Networks Using the Time-Frequency Correlation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, F.; Lu, R.; Toksoz, M. N.

    2008-12-01

    The arrival times of primary phases generally produce poor estimates of focal depth, particularly for shallow events. While depth phases may be detected at teleseismic distances, no reliable methods currently exist for identifying regional depth phase time delays, such as Pg-pPg. Scattering from crustal heterogeneities obscures the Pg-pPg time delay by producing multiplicative noise within the Pg time window. The theory of Time Reversed Acoustics (TRA) states that the autocorrelation of Pg time windows produces a clear sidelobe at the Pg-pPg time delay. Using large Pg time windows (i.e. including more scattering) and stacking the autocorrelations from an array of receivers improves the reconstruction of the sidelobe at the Pg-pPg time delay. In this paper, we expand the TRA concept to develop the Time-Frequency Correlation (TFC) method for measuring Pg-pPg time delays, which incorporates signal-processing techniques used in Sonar and Radar applications. The TFC method applies a 2D correlation function in time delay and frequency delay to the analytic representation of each Pg time window. Stacking the 2D correlation functions better identifies the sidelobe at the Pg-pPg time delay. Tests of the TFC method on synthetic Pg time windows provide guidance in detecting the Pg-pPg time delays for events with different source time functions, focal depths, and scattering distributions. We apply the TFC method to measure Pg-pPg time delays for 33 local earthquakes from the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) catalog. We include only catalog events with the most accurate locations ('A'), catalog depths between 2 and 16 km (±2 km), and magnitudes between 3.0 and 6.0. For each event, the TFC method uses a station array that is sparse (N < 20), narrow aperture (Δθ < 90°), and located greater than 300 km from the catalog epicenter. The Pg-pPg time delays are converted to focal depths assuming vertical propagation within the SCEDC 3D model at each event

  3. Time-frequency optimization for discrimination between imagination of right and left hand movements based on two bipolar electroencephalography channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan; Chevallier, Sylvain; Wiart, Joe; Bloch, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    To enforce a widespread use of efficient and easy to use brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), the inter-subject robustness should be increased and the number of electrodes should be reduced. These two key issues are addressed in this contribution, proposing a novel method to identify subject-specific time-frequency characteristics with a minimal number of electrodes. In this method, two alternative criteria, time-frequency discrimination factor ( TFDF) and F score, are proposed to evaluate the discriminative power of time-frequency regions. Distinct from classical measures (e.g., Fisher criterion, r 2 coefficient), the TFDF is based on the neurophysiologic phenomena, on which the motor imagery BCI paradigm relies, rather than only from statistics. F score is based on the popular Fisher's discriminant and purely data driven; however, it differs from traditional measures since it provides a simple and effective measure for quantifying the discriminative power of a multi-dimensional feature vector. The proposed method is tested on BCI competition IV datasets IIa and IIb for discriminating right and left hand motor imagery. Compared to state-of-the-art methods, our method based on both criteria led to comparable or even better classification results, while using fewer electrodes (i.e., only two bipolar channels, C3 and C4). This work indicates that time-frequency optimization can not only improve the classification performance but also contribute to reducing the number of electrodes required in motor imagery BCIs.

  4. Identification of Damaged Wheat Kernels and Cracked-Shell Hazelnuts with Impact Acoustics Time-Frequency Patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new adaptive time-frequency (t-f) analysis and classification procedure is applied to impact acoustic signals for detecting hazelnuts with cracked shells and three types of damaged wheat kernels. Kernels were dropped onto a steel plate, and the resulting impact acoustic signals were recorded with ...

  5. Joint Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  6. Coseismic slip distribution of the 2015 Mw7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake from joint inversion of GPS and InSAR data for slip within a 3-D heterogeneous Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Sui; Masterlark, Timothy

    2016-05-01

    We derive a coseismic slip model of the 2015 Mw7.8 Gorkha earthquake on the basis of GPS and line-of-sight displacements from ALOS-2 descending interferograms, using Green's functions calculated with a 3-D finite element model (FEM). The FEM simulates a nonuniform distribution of elastic material properties and a precise geometric configuration of the irregular topographical surface. The rupturing fault is modeled as a low-angle and north dipping surface within the Main Frontal Thrust along the convergent margin of the Himalayas. The optimal model that inherits heterogeneous material properties provides a significantly better solution than that in a homogenous domain at the 95% confidence interval. The best fit solution for the domain having a nonuniform distribution of material properties reveals a rhombus-shaped slip zone of three composite asperities. Slip is primarily concentrated at a depth of 15 km with both dip-slip (maximum 6.54 m) and strike-slip (maximum 2.0 m) components, giving rise to a geodetic-based moment of 1.09 × 1021 Nm in general agreement with the seismological estimate. The optimal relative weights among GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) are deduced from a new method, MC-HVCE which combines a Monte Carlo search and a Helmert Method of Variance Components Estimation. This method determines the relative weights in a systemic approach which preserves the intrinsic solution smoothness. The joint solution is significantly better than those inverted from each individual data set. This methodology allows us to integrate multiple data sets of geodetic observations with seismic tomography, in an effort to achieve a better understanding of seismic ruptures within crustal heterogeneity.

  7. Point process time-frequency analysis of dynamic respiratory patterns during meditation practice.

    PubMed

    Kodituwakku, Sandun; Lazar, Sara W; Indic, Premananda; Chen, Zhe; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is largely mediated by the autonomic nervous system through its modulating influence on the heart beats. We propose a robust algorithm for quantifying instantaneous RSA as applied to heart beat intervals and respiratory recordings under dynamic breathing patterns. The blood volume pressure-derived heart beat series (pulse intervals, PIs) are modeled as an inverse Gaussian point process, with the instantaneous mean PI modeled as a bivariate regression incorporating both past PIs and respiration values observed at the beats. A point process maximum likelihood algorithm is used to estimate the model parameters, and instantaneous RSA is estimated via a frequency domain transfer function evaluated at instantaneous respiratory frequency where high coherence between respiration and PIs is observed. The model is statistically validated using Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit analysis, as well as independence tests. The algorithm is applied to subjects engaged in meditative practice, with distinctive dynamics in the respiration patterns elicited as a result. The presented analysis confirms the ability of the algorithm to track important changes in cardiorespiratory interactions elicited during meditation, otherwise not evidenced in control resting states, reporting statistically significant increase in RSA gain as measured by our paradigm.

  8. Detection of faults in rotating machinery using periodic time-frequency sparsity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yin; He, Wangpeng; Chen, Binqiang; Zi, Yanyang; Selesnick, Ivan W.

    2016-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of extracting periodic oscillatory features in vibration signals for detecting faults in rotating machinery. To extract the feature, we propose an approach in the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) domain where the periodic oscillatory feature manifests itself as a relatively sparse grid. To estimate the sparse grid, we formulate an optimization problem using customized binary weights in the regularizer, where the weights are formulated to promote periodicity. In order to solve the proposed optimization problem, we develop an algorithm called augmented Lagrangian majorization-minimization algorithm, which combines the split augmented Lagrangian shrinkage algorithm (SALSA) with majorization-minimization (MM), and is guaranteed to converge for both convex and non-convex formulation. As examples, the proposed approach is applied to simulated data, and used as a tool for diagnosing faults in bearings and gearboxes for real data, and compared to some state-of-the-art methods. The results show that the proposed approach can effectively detect and extract the periodical oscillatory features.

  9. Left ventricle motion estimation based on signal-dependent time-frequency representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Marco A.; Weiderpass, Heinar A.; Furuie, Sergio S.

    2003-05-01

    In current clinical practice, the noninvasive assessment of left ventricular deformation can be determined using all the principal imaging modalities, including contrast angiography, echocardiography, cine computed tomography, single photon emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, since the heart undergoes complex motion, proper characterization of its motion still remains an open and challenging research problem. A number of approaches for nonrigid motion analysis have been studied in the literature. Much of the effort has confined to estimate the displacement vector for each image point or optical flow. This is a challenging problem in image analysis because of a wide range of possible motions and the presence of noise in the image sets. In this work, we present an algorithm for computation of optical flow based on a signal-dependent radially Gaussian kernel that adapts over time. The adaptive kernel obtained from the proposed algorithm is used to estimate a 3D-frequency spectrum for a given pixel in a series of images. The orientation of the spectrum in the frequency domain is totally governed by the pixel velocity. In a recent contribution, a linear regression model is used over the spectrum to obtain the velocity components that are proportional to the pixel movement.

  10. Point process time-frequency analysis of respiratory sinus arrhythmia under altered respiration dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kodituwakku, Sandun; Lazar, Sara W; Indic, Premananda; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is largely mediated by the autonomic nervous system through its modulating influence on the heartbeat. We propose an algorithm for quantifying instantaneous RSA as applied to heart beat interval and respiratory recordings under dynamic respiration conditions. The blood volume pressure derived heart beat series (pulse intervals, PI) are modeled as an inverse gaussian point process, with the instantaneous mean PI modeled as a bivariate regression incorporating both past PI and respiration values observed at the beats. A point process maximum likelihood algorithm is used to estimate the model parameters, and instantaneous RSA is estimated by a frequency domain transfer function approach. The model is statistically validated using Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) goodness-of-fit analysis, as well as independence tests. The algorithm is applied to subjects engaged in meditative practice, with distinctive dynamics in the respiration patterns elicited as a result. Experimental results confirm the ability of the algorithm to track important changes in cardiorespiratory interactions elicited during meditation, otherwise not evidenced in control resting states.

  11. Classification of the intention to generate a shoulder versus elbow torque by means of a time frequency synthesized spatial patterns BCI algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jie; Yao, Jun; Dewald, Julius P. A.

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, we attempt to determine a subject's intention of generating torque at the shoulder or elbow, two neighboring joints, using scalp electroencephalogram signals from 163 electrodes for a brain-computer interface (BCI) application. To achieve this goal, we have applied a time-frequency synthesized spatial patterns (TFSP) BCI algorithm with a presorting procedure. Using this method, we were able to achieve an average recognition rate of 89% in four healthy subjects, which is comparable to the highest rates reported in the literature but now for tasks with much closer spatial representations on the motor cortex. This result demonstrates, for the first time, that the TFSP BCI method can be applied to separate intentions between generating static shoulder versus elbow torque. Furthermore, in this study, the potential application of this BCI algorithm for brain-injured patients was tested in one chronic hemiparetic stroke subject. A recognition rate of 76% was obtained, suggesting that this BCI method can provide a potential control signal for neural prostheses or other movement coordination improving devices for patients following brain injury.

  12. Time-Frequency Theta and Delta Measures Index Separable Components of Feedback Processing in a Gambling Task

    PubMed Central

    Bernat, Edward M.; Nelson, Lindsay D.; Baskin-Sommers, Arielle R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous work using gambling tasks indicate that the feedback negativity (FN) reflects primary or salient stimulus attributes (often gain vs. loss), whereas the feedback-P300 appears sensitive to secondary stimulus information. A recent time-frequency approach has characterized separable theta (3–7 Hz) and delta (0–3 Hz) feedback processes, independently sensitive to primary feedback attributes, specifically loss and gain outcomes respectively (Bernat et al., 2011). The current study extends this time-frequency work to evaluate both primary and secondary (relative outcome and outcome magnitude) feedback attributes. Consistent with previous reports, theta indexed an initial, lower-level response sensitive to the primary (most salient) feedback attributes (specifically losses), while delta was sensitive to both primary attributes (specifically gains) and assessed secondary stimulus features. PMID:25581491

  13. Time-frequency analysis of non-stationary fusion plasma signals using an improved Hilbert-Huang transform

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yangqing Tan, Yi; Xie, Huiqiao; Wang, Wenhao; Gao, Zhe

    2014-07-15

    An improved Hilbert-Huang transform method is developed to the time-frequency analysis of non-stationary signals in tokamak plasmas. Maximal overlap discrete wavelet packet transform rather than wavelet packet transform is proposed as a preprocessor to decompose a signal into various narrow-band components. Then, a correlation coefficient based selection method is utilized to eliminate the irrelevant intrinsic mode functions obtained from empirical mode decomposition of those narrow-band components. Subsequently, a time varying vector autoregressive moving average model instead of Hilbert spectral analysis is performed to compute the Hilbert spectrum, i.e., a three-dimensional time-frequency distribution of the signal. The feasibility and effectiveness of the improved Hilbert-Huang transform method is demonstrated by analyzing a non-stationary simulated signal and actual experimental signals in fusion plasmas.

  14. Signal existence verification (SEV) for GPS low received power signal detection using the time-frequency approach.

    PubMed

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Sun, Chih-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    The detection of low received power of global positioning system (GPS) signals in the signal acquisition process is an important issue for GPS applications. Improving the miss-detection problem of low received power signal is crucial, especially for urban or indoor environments. This paper proposes a signal existence verification (SEV) process to detect and subsequently verify low received power GPS signals. The SEV process is based on the time-frequency representation of GPS signal, and it can capture the characteristic of GPS signal in the time-frequency plane to enhance the GPS signal acquisition performance. Several simulations and experiments are conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed method for low received power signal detection. The contribution of this work is that the SEV process is an additional scheme to assist the GPS signal acquisition process in low received power signal detection, without changing the original signal acquisition or tracking algorithms.

  15. Time-frequency analysis of non-stationary fusion plasma signals using an improved Hilbert-Huang transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangqing; Tan, Yi; Xie, Huiqiao; Wang, Wenhao; Gao, Zhe

    2014-07-01

    An improved Hilbert-Huang transform method is developed to the time-frequency analysis of non-stationary signals in tokamak plasmas. Maximal overlap discrete wavelet packet transform rather than wavelet packet transform is proposed as a preprocessor to decompose a signal into various narrow-band components. Then, a correlation coefficient based selection method is utilized to eliminate the irrelevant intrinsic mode functions obtained from empirical mode decomposition of those narrow-band components. Subsequently, a time varying vector autoregressive moving average model instead of Hilbert spectral analysis is performed to compute the Hilbert spectrum, i.e., a three-dimensional time-frequency distribution of the signal. The feasibility and effectiveness of the improved Hilbert-Huang transform method is demonstrated by analyzing a non-stationary simulated signal and actual experimental signals in fusion plasmas.

  16. Definitions of non-stationary vibration power for time-frequency analysis and computational algorithms based upon harmonic wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, YongHwa; Kim, Kwang-joon

    2015-02-01

    While the vibration power for a set of harmonic force and velocity signals is well defined and known, it is not as popular yet for a set of stationary random force and velocity processes, although it can be found in some literatures. In this paper, the definition of the vibration power for a set of non-stationary random force and velocity signals will be derived for the purpose of a time-frequency analysis based on the definitions of the vibration power for the harmonic and stationary random signals. The non-stationary vibration power, defined as the short-time average of the product of the force and velocity over a given frequency range of interest, can be calculated by three methods: the Wigner-Ville distribution, the short-time Fourier transform, and the harmonic wavelet transform. The latter method is selected in this paper because band-pass filtering can be done without phase distortions, and the frequency ranges can be chosen very flexibly for the time-frequency analysis. Three algorithms for the time-frequency analysis of the non-stationary vibration power using the harmonic wavelet transform are discussed. The first is an algorithm for computation according to the full definition, while the others are approximate. Noting that the force and velocity decomposed into frequency ranges of interest by the harmonic wavelet transform are constructed with coefficients and basis functions, for the second algorithm, it is suggested to prepare a table of time integrals of the product of the basis functions in advance, which are independent of the signals under analysis. How to prepare and utilize the integral table are presented. The third algorithm is based on an evolutionary spectrum. Applications of the algorithms to the time-frequency analysis of the vibration power transmitted from an excitation source to a receiver structure in a simple mechanical system consisting of a cantilever beam and a reaction wheel are presented for illustration.

  17. Time-frequency demodulation analysis based on iterative generalized demodulation for fault diagnosis of planetary gearbox under nonstationary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Chen, Xiaowang; Liang, Ming; Ma, Fei

    2015-10-01

    The vibration signal of planetary gearboxes exhibits the characteristics of both amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM), and thus has a complex sideband structure. Time-varying speed and/or load will result in time variant characteristic frequency components. Since the modulating frequency is related to the gear fault characteristic frequency, the AM and FM parts each alone contains the information of the gear fault. We propose a time-frequency amplitude and frequency demodulation analysis metbhod to avoid the complex time-variant sideband analysis, and thereby identify the time-variant gear fault characteristic frequency. We enhance the time-frequency analysis via iterative generalized demodulation (IGD). The time-varying amplitude and frequency demodulated spectra have fine time-frequency resolution and are free of cross term interferences. They do not involve complex time-variant sidebands, thus considerably facilitating fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes under nonstationary conditions. The method is validated using both numerically simulated data and experimental signals.

  18. The Time-Frequency Signatures of Advanced Seismic Signals Generated by Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C. R.; Huang, C. J.; Lin, C. R.; Wang, C. C.; Kuo, B. Y.; Yin, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The seismic monitoring is expected to reveal the process of debris flow from the initial area to alluvial fan, because other field monitoring techniques, such as the video camera and the ultrasonic sensor, are limited by detection range. For this reason, seismic approaches have been used as the detection system of debris flows over the past few decades. The analysis of the signatures of the seismic signals in time and frequency domain can be used to identify the different phases of debris flow. This study dedicates to investigate the different stages of seismic signals due to debris flow, including the advanced signal, the main front, and the decaying tail. Moreover, the characteristics of the advanced signals forward to the approach of main front were discussed for the warning purpose. This study presents a permanent system, composed by two seismometers, deployed along the bank of Ai-Yu-Zi Creek in Nantou County, which is one of the active streams with debris flow in Taiwan. The three axes seismometer with frequency response of 7 sec - 200 Hz was developed by the Institute of Earth Sciences (IES), Academia Sinica for the purpose to detect debris flow. The original idea of replacing the geophone system with the seismometer technique was for catching the advanced signals propagating from the upper reach of the stream before debris flow arrival because of the high sensitivity. Besides, the low frequency seismic waves could be also early detected because of the low attenuation. However, for avoiding other unnecessary ambient vibrations, the sensitivity of seismometer should be lower than the general seismometer for detecting teleseism. Three debris flows with different mean velocities were detected in 2013 and 2014. The typical triangular shape was obviously demonstrated in time series data and the spectrograms of the seismic signals from three events. The frequency analysis showed that enormous debris flow bearing huge boulders would induce low frequency seismic

  19. Spot event detection along a large-scale sensor based on ultra-weak fiber Bragg gratings using time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Ricchiuti, Amelia Lavinia; Sales, Salvador

    2016-02-10

    A simple scheme for interrogating a 5 m long photonics device and its potential applications to quasi-distributed fiber sensing is proposed. The sensor consists of an array of 500 identical, very weak fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The gratings are 9 mm long and have been serially written in cascade along a single optical fiber. The measurement system is based on a combination of optical time domain reflectometry and frequency scanning of the interrogating pulse. The time-frequency analysis is performed by launching an optical pulse into the sensor and retrieving and analyzing the back-reflected signal. The measurement of the temperature, length, and position of spot events along the sensors is demonstrated with good accuracy. As both spatial and temperature resolution of the method depend on the input pulse duration, the system performance can be controlled and optimized by properly choosing the temporal duration of the interrogating pulse. A spatial resolution of 9 mm (ultimately dictated by one grating length) has been obtained with an 80 ps optical pulse, while a temperature resolution of less than 0.42 K has been demonstrated using a 500 ps incident pulse. The sensor proposed proves to be simple, robust, and polarization insensitive and alleviates the instrumentation complexity for distributed sensing applications.

  20. Spot event detection along a large-scale sensor based on ultra-weak fiber Bragg gratings using time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Ricchiuti, Amelia Lavinia; Sales, Salvador

    2016-02-10

    A simple scheme for interrogating a 5 m long photonics device and its potential applications to quasi-distributed fiber sensing is proposed. The sensor consists of an array of 500 identical, very weak fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The gratings are 9 mm long and have been serially written in cascade along a single optical fiber. The measurement system is based on a combination of optical time domain reflectometry and frequency scanning of the interrogating pulse. The time-frequency analysis is performed by launching an optical pulse into the sensor and retrieving and analyzing the back-reflected signal. The measurement of the temperature, length, and position of spot events along the sensors is demonstrated with good accuracy. As both spatial and temperature resolution of the method depend on the input pulse duration, the system performance can be controlled and optimized by properly choosing the temporal duration of the interrogating pulse. A spatial resolution of 9 mm (ultimately dictated by one grating length) has been obtained with an 80 ps optical pulse, while a temperature resolution of less than 0.42 K has been demonstrated using a 500 ps incident pulse. The sensor proposed proves to be simple, robust, and polarization insensitive and alleviates the instrumentation complexity for distributed sensing applications. PMID:26906375

  1. Ceramic joints

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Bradley J.; Patten, Jr., Donald O.

    1991-01-01

    Butt joints between materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion are prepared having a reduced probability of failure of stress facture. This is accomplished by narrowing/tapering the material having the lower coefficient of thermal expansion in a direction away from the joint interface and not joining the narrow-tapered surface to the material having the higher coefficient of thermal expansion.

  2. A new time-frequency method to reveal quantum dynamics of atomic hydrogen in intense laser pulses: Synchrosqueezing transform

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, Yae-lin; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Wu, Hau-tieng; Li, Peng-Cheng; Chu, Shih-I

    2014-11-15

    This study introduces a new adaptive time-frequency (TF) analysis technique, the synchrosqueezing transform (SST), to explore the dynamics of a laser-driven hydrogen atom at an ab initio level, upon which we have demonstrated its versatility as a new viable venue for further exploring quantum dynamics. For a signal composed of oscillatory components which can be characterized by instantaneous frequency, the SST enables rendering the decomposed signal based on the phase information inherited in the linear TF representation with mathematical support. Compared with the classical type of TF methods, the SST clearly depicts several intrinsic quantum dynamical processes such as selection rules, AC Stark effects, and high harmonic generation.

  3. Fault Detection in Gear Drives with Non-Stationary Rotational Speed-Part i: the Time-Frequency Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, G.; Ivanov, Yu Ye

    2003-09-01

    This paper deals with the recognition of faults in toothing during non-stationary start-up and run-down of gear drives. In the first part, this task will be solved by means of the time-frequency analysis. As a practical case study, we investigated a planetary gear for passenger cars. New exponental smoothing kernels which respect to the known-in-advance angular acceleration of gear drive were created. These kernels must be adapted in the case of an in-advance-unknown course of rotational speed.

  4. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health > The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Main Content Title: The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Description: The temporomandibular joint connects the lower ...

  5. Time-frequency distribution decomposition with applications to recognize the looseness state of the viscoelastic sandwich structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wang; Zhang, Zhousou; Qu, Jinxiu; Sun, Chuang

    2016-07-01

    In general, a vibration signal consists of several frequency modulation (FM) components. Every component contains different information, and can be characterized by its instantaneous amplitude (IA) and instantaneous phase (IP). In engineering applications, conventional time-frequency analysis methods and signal decomposition methods have shown their power in investigating features of the vibration signal. However, they are limited in resolution and it is hard to analyze these FM components individually. To overcome these deficiencies, a novel signal decomposition algorithm, named time-frequency distribution decomposition (TFDD), is proposed in this paper, which reconstructs one FM component of the signal at a time by estimating its IP and IA. The IA and IP are approximated by two polynomial functions respectively. One important advantage of TFDD is that it can directly extract the component we are interested in. Therefore, we can analyze the key component of the signal with little influence from other components. This will help us to characterize the vibration signal more deeply. Furthermore, it is very stable to noise. This is conductive to protecting the information of the vibration signal. The effectiveness of the TFDD is validated by a numerical simulation and the study of the vibration response signal collected from a viscoelastic sandwich structure (VSS). From the value of permutation entropy of the component extracted by TFDD, the looseness state of the VSS is recognized.

  6. Compliant joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Wayne D. (Inventor); Kerley, James J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A compliant joint is provided for prosthetic and robotic devices which permits rotation in three different planes. The joint provides for the controlled use of cable under motion. Perpendicular outer mounting frames are joined by swaged cables that interlock at a center block. Ball bearings allow for the free rotation of the second mounting frame relative to the first mounting frame within a predetermined angular rotation that is controlled by two stop devices. The cables allow for compliance at the stops and the cables allow for compliance in six degrees of freedom enabling the duplication or simulation of the rotational movement and flexibility of a natural hip or knee joint, as well as the simulation of a joint designed for a specific robotic component for predetermined design parameters.

  7. Joint Commission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sunday 1:00 CST, November 6, 2016 Workplace Violence Prevention Resources The Joint Commission has launched “Workplace Violence Prevention Resources,” an online resource center dedicated to ...

  8. Joint Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankles and toes. Other types of arthritis include gout or pseudogout. Sometimes, there is a mechanical problem ... for more information on osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and gout. How Common are Joint Problems? Osteoarthritis, which affects ...

  9. Use of Time-Frequency Analysis and Neural Networks for Mode Identification in a Wireless Software-Defined Radio Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandetto, Matteo; Guainazzo, Marco; Regazzoni, Carlo S.

    2004-12-01

    The use of time-frequency distributions is proposed as a nonlinear signal processing technique that is combined with a pattern recognition approach to identify superimposed transmission modes in a reconfigurable wireless terminal based on software-defined radio techniques. In particular, a software-defined radio receiver is described aiming at the identification of two coexistent communication modes: frequency hopping code division multiple access and direct sequence code division multiple access. As a case study, two standards, based on the previous modes and operating in the same band (industrial, scientific, and medical), are considered: IEEE WLAN 802.11b (direct sequence) and Bluetooth (frequency hopping). Neural classifiers are used to obtain identification results. A comparison between two different neural classifiers is made in terms of relative error frequency.

  10. A Sparsity-Based Approach to 3D Binaural Sound Synthesis Using Time-Frequency Array Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos, Maximo; Lopez, JoseJ; Spors, Sascha

    2010-12-01

    Localization of sounds in physical space plays a very important role in multiple audio-related disciplines, such as music, telecommunications, and audiovisual productions. Binaural recording is the most commonly used method to provide an immersive sound experience by means of headphone reproduction. However, it requires a very specific recording setup using high-fidelity microphones mounted in a dummy head. In this paper, we present a novel processing framework for binaural sound recording and reproduction that avoids the use of dummy heads, which is specially suitable for immersive teleconferencing applications. The method is based on a time-frequency analysis of the spatial properties of the sound picked up by a simple tetrahedral microphone array, assuming source sparseness. The experiments carried out using simulations and a real-time prototype confirm the validity of the proposed approach.

  11. Performance analysis for time-frequency MUSIC algorithm in presence of both additive noise and array calibration errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodja, Mohamed; Belouchrani, Adel; Abed-Meraim, Karim

    2012-12-01

    This article deals with the application of Spatial Time-Frequency Distribution (STFD) to the direction finding problem using the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC)algorithm. A comparative performance analysis is performed for the method under consideration with respect to that using data covariance matrix when the received array signals are subject to calibration errors in a non-stationary environment. An unified analytical expression of the Direction Of Arrival (DOA) error estimation is derived for both methods. Numerical results show the effect of the parameters intervening in the derived expression on the algorithm performance. It is particularly observed that for low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and high Signal to sensor Perturbation Ratio (SPR) the STFD method gives better performance, while for high SNR and for the same SPR both methods give similar performance.

  12. High-order harmonic generation by chirped and self-guided femtosecond laser pulses. II. Time-frequency analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tosa, V.; Kim, H.T.; Kim, I.J.; Nam, C.H.

    2005-06-15

    We present a time-dependent analysis of high-order harmonics generated by a self-guided femtosecond laser pulse propagating through a long gas jet. A three-dimensional model is used to calculate the harmonic fields generated by laser pulses, which only differ by the sign of their initial chirp. The time-frequency distributions of the single-atom dipole and harmonic field reveal the dynamics of harmonic generation in the cutoff. A time-dependent phase-matching calculation was performed, taking into account the self-phase modulation of the laser field. Good phase matching holds for only few optical cycles, being dependent on the electron trajectory. When the cutoff trajectory is phase matched, emitted harmonics are locked in phase and the emission intensity is maximized.

  13. RAPID COMMUNICATION: A novel time frequency-based 3D Lissajous figure method and its application to the determination of oxygen saturation from the photoplethysmogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addison, Paul S.; Watson, James N.

    2004-11-01

    We present a novel time-frequency method for the measurement of oxygen saturation using the photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals from a standard pulse oximeter machine. The method utilizes the time-frequency transformation of the red and infrared PPGs to derive a 3D Lissajous figure. By selecting the optimal Lissajous, the method provides an inherently robust basis for the determination of oxygen saturation as regions of the time-frequency plane where high- and low-frequency signal artefacts are to be found are automatically avoided.

  14. A multivariate time-frequency method to characterize the influence of respiration over heart period and arterial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orini, Michele; Bailón, Raquel; Laguna, Pablo; Mainardi, Luca T.; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2012-12-01

    Respiratory activity introduces oscillations both in arterial pressure and heart period, through mechanical and autonomic mechanisms. Respiration, arterial pressure, and heart period are, generally, non-stationary processes and the interactions between them are dynamic. In this study we present a methodology to robustly estimate the time course of cross spectral indices to characterize dynamic interactions between respiratory oscillations of heart period and blood pressure, as well as their interactions with respiratory activity. Time-frequency distributions belonging to Cohen's class are used to estimate time-frequency (TF) representations of coherence, partial coherence and phase difference. The characterization is based on the estimation of the time course of cross spectral indices estimated in specific TF regions around the respiratory frequency. We used this methodology to describe the interactions between respiration, heart period variability (HPV) and systolic arterial pressure variability (SAPV) during tilt table test with both spontaneous and controlled respiratory patterns. The effect of selective autonomic blockade was also studied. Results suggest the presence of common underling mechanisms of regulation between cardiovascular signals, whose interactions are time-varying. SAPV changes followed respiratory flow both in supine and standing positions and even after selective autonomic blockade. During head-up tilt, phase differences between respiration and SAPV increased. Phase differences between respiration and HPV were comparable to those between respiration and SAPV during supine position, and significantly increased during standing. As a result, respiratory oscillations in SAPV preceded respiratory oscillations in HPV during standing. Partial coherence was the most sensitive index to orthostatic stress. Phase difference estimates were consistent among spontaneous and controlled breathing patterns, whereas coherence was higher in spontaneous breathing

  15. A time-frequency analysis of the dynamics of cortical networks of sleep spindles from MEG-EEG recordings.

    PubMed

    Zerouali, Younes; Lina, Jean-Marc; Sekerovic, Zoran; Godbout, Jonathan; Dube, Jonathan; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Carrier, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Sleep spindles are a hallmark of NREM sleep. They result from a widespread thalamo-cortical loop and involve synchronous cortical networks that are still poorly understood. We investigated whether brain activity during spindles can be characterized by specific patterns of functional connectivity among cortical generators. For that purpose, we developed a wavelet-based approach aimed at imaging the synchronous oscillatory cortical networks from simultaneous MEG-EEG recordings. First, we detected spindles on the EEG and extracted the corresponding frequency-locked MEG activity under the form of an analytic ridge signal in the time-frequency plane (Zerouali et al., 2013). Secondly, we performed source reconstruction of the ridge signal within the Maximum Entropy on the Mean framework (Amblard et al., 2004), yielding a robust estimate of the cortical sources producing observed oscillations. Lastly, we quantified functional connectivity among cortical sources using phase-locking values. The main innovations of this methodology are (1) to reveal the dynamic behavior of functional networks resolved in the time-frequency plane and (2) to characterize functional connectivity among MEG sources through phase interactions. We showed, for the first time, that the switch from fast to slow oscillatory mode during sleep spindles is required for the emergence of specific patterns of connectivity. Moreover, we show that earlier synchrony during spindles was associated with mainly intra-hemispheric connectivity whereas later synchrony was associated with global long-range connectivity. We propose that our methodology can be a valuable tool for studying the connectivity underlying neural processes involving sleep spindles, such as memory, plasticity or aging.

  16. Time-frequency distribution properties of event-related potentials in mental fatigue induced by visual memory tasks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyang; Liu, Juntao; Gai, Shuping; Meyer, Kristina; Xu, Shengwei; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-09-28

    Prolonged periods of demanding cognitive tasks lead to an exhausted feeling known as mental fatigue. The neural underpinnings of mental fatigue are still under exploration. In the present study, we aimed to identify neurophysiological indicators of mental fatigue by studying the time-frequency distribution of the event-related potentials (ERPs) measured in N=26 adults in nonfatigued versus fatigued states. We were interested in the frontal theta and occipital alpha variations, which have shown consistent relationships with mental fatigue in previous studies. Furthermore, we expected differential changes in left and right electrodes, in line with previously detected lateralization effects in cognitive tasks. Mental fatigue was induced by a sustained two-back verbal visual memory task for 125 min and assessed using the Chalder Fatigue Scale. We applied a high-resolution time-frequency analysis method called smoothed pseudo Wigner Ville distribution and used regional integrals as indicators for changing trends of signal energy. Results showed an increase in ERP frontal theta energy (P=0.03) and a decrease in occipital alpha energy (P=0.028) when participants became mentally fatigued. The change in frontal theta was more pronounced in left electrode sites (P=0.032), hinting toward a differential fatigue effect in the two hemispheres. The results were discussed on the basis of previous lateralization studies with memory tasks and interpreted as an indicator of a causal relationship between the sustained task execution and the physiological changes. Our findings also suggest that the ERP signal energy variations in frontal theta and occipital alpha might be used as neural biomarkers to assess mental fatigue. PMID:27489099

  17. A time-frequency analysis of the dynamics of cortical networks of sleep spindles from MEG-EEG recordings

    PubMed Central

    Zerouali, Younes; Lina, Jean-Marc; Sekerovic, Zoran; Godbout, Jonathan; Dube, Jonathan; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Carrier, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Sleep spindles are a hallmark of NREM sleep. They result from a widespread thalamo-cortical loop and involve synchronous cortical networks that are still poorly understood. We investigated whether brain activity during spindles can be characterized by specific patterns of functional connectivity among cortical generators. For that purpose, we developed a wavelet-based approach aimed at imaging the synchronous oscillatory cortical networks from simultaneous MEG-EEG recordings. First, we detected spindles on the EEG and extracted the corresponding frequency-locked MEG activity under the form of an analytic ridge signal in the time-frequency plane (Zerouali et al., 2013). Secondly, we performed source reconstruction of the ridge signal within the Maximum Entropy on the Mean framework (Amblard et al., 2004), yielding a robust estimate of the cortical sources producing observed oscillations. Lastly, we quantified functional connectivity among cortical sources using phase-locking values. The main innovations of this methodology are (1) to reveal the dynamic behavior of functional networks resolved in the time-frequency plane and (2) to characterize functional connectivity among MEG sources through phase interactions. We showed, for the first time, that the switch from fast to slow oscillatory mode during sleep spindles is required for the emergence of specific patterns of connectivity. Moreover, we show that earlier synchrony during spindles was associated with mainly intra-hemispheric connectivity whereas later synchrony was associated with global long-range connectivity. We propose that our methodology can be a valuable tool for studying the connectivity underlying neural processes involving sleep spindles, such as memory, plasticity or aging. PMID:25389381

  18. Domain Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørner, Dines

    Before software can be designed we must know its requirements. Before requirements can be expressed we must understand the domain. So it follows, from our dogma, that we must first establish precise descriptions of domains; then, from such descriptions, “derive” at least domain and interface requirements; and from those and machine requirements design the software, or, more generally, the computing systems.

  19. Time-frequency Analysis of the Superorbital Modulation of the X-Ray Binary SMC X-1 Using the Hilbert-Huang Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Chou, Yi; Wu, Ming-Chya; Yang, Ting-Chang; Su, Yi-Hao

    2011-10-01

    The high-mass X-ray binary SMC X-1 exhibits a superorbital modulation with a dramatically varying period ranging between ~40 days and ~60 days. This research studies the time-frequency properties of the superorbital modulation of SMC X-1 based on the observations made by the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We analyzed the entire ASM database collected since 1996. The Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), developed for non-stationary and nonlinear time-series analysis, was adopted to derive the instantaneous superorbital frequency. The resultant Hilbert spectrum is consistent with the dynamic power spectrum as it shows more detailed information in both the time and frequency domains. The RXTE observations show that the superorbital modulation period was mostly between ~50 days and ~65 days, whereas it changed to ~45 days around MJD 50,800 and MJD 54,000. Our analysis further indicates that the instantaneous frequency changed to a timescale of hundreds of days between ~MJD 51,500 and ~MJD 53,500. Based on the instantaneous phase defined by HHT, we folded the ASM light curve to derive a superorbital profile, from which an asymmetric feature and a low state with barely any X-ray emissions (lasting for ~0.3 cycles) were observed. We also calculated the correlation between the mean period and the amplitude of the superorbital modulation. The result is similar to the recently discovered relationship between the superorbital cycle length and the mean X-ray flux for Her X-1.

  20. TIME-FREQUENCY ANALYSIS OF THE SUPERORBITAL MODULATION OF THE X-RAY BINARY SMC X-1 USING THE HILBERT-HUANG TRANSFORM

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Chou, Yi; Yang, Ting-Chang; Su, Yi-Hao; Wu, Ming-Chya E-mail: yichou@astro.ncu.edu.tw

    2011-10-20

    The high-mass X-ray binary SMC X-1 exhibits a superorbital modulation with a dramatically varying period ranging between {approx}40 days and {approx}60 days. This research studies the time-frequency properties of the superorbital modulation of SMC X-1 based on the observations made by the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We analyzed the entire ASM database collected since 1996. The Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), developed for non-stationary and nonlinear time-series analysis, was adopted to derive the instantaneous superorbital frequency. The resultant Hilbert spectrum is consistent with the dynamic power spectrum as it shows more detailed information in both the time and frequency domains. The RXTE observations show that the superorbital modulation period was mostly between {approx}50 days and {approx}65 days, whereas it changed to {approx}45 days around MJD 50,800 and MJD 54,000. Our analysis further indicates that the instantaneous frequency changed to a timescale of hundreds of days between {approx}MJD 51,500 and {approx}MJD 53,500. Based on the instantaneous phase defined by HHT, we folded the ASM light curve to derive a superorbital profile, from which an asymmetric feature and a low state with barely any X-ray emissions (lasting for {approx}0.3 cycles) were observed. We also calculated the correlation between the mean period and the amplitude of the superorbital modulation. The result is similar to the recently discovered relationship between the superorbital cycle length and the mean X-ray flux for Her X-1.

  1. 20 CFR 1002.104 - Is the employee required to accommodate his or her employer's needs as to the timing, frequency...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... concerns over the timing, frequency, or duration of the employee's service to the attention of the appropriate military authority. Regulations issued by the Department of Defense at 32 CFR 104.4...

  2. Wavelets, period-doubling, and time-frequency localization with application to organization of convection over the tropical western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weng, Hengyi; Lau, K.-M.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, preliminary results in using orthogonal and continuous wavelet transform (WT) to identify period doubling and time-frequency localization in both synthetic and real data are presented. First, the Haar WT is applied to synthetic time series derived from a simple nonlinear dynamical system- a first-order quadratic difference equation. Second, the complex Morlet WT is used to study the time-frequency localization of tropical convection based on a high-resolution Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite infrared (IR) radiance dataset. The Haar WT of the synthetic time series indicates the presence and distinct separation of multiple frequencies in a period-doubling sequence. The period-doubling process generates a multiplicity of intermediate frequencies, which are manifested in the nonuniformity in time with respect to the phase of oscillations in the lower frequencies. Wavelet transform also enables the detection of extremely weak signals in high-order subharmonics resulting from the period-doubling bifurcations. These signals are either undetected or considered statistically insignificant by traditional Fourier analysis. The Morlet WT of the IR radiance dataset indicates the presence of multiple timescales, which are localized in both frequency and time. There are two regimes in the variation of IR radiance, corresponding to the wet and dry periods. Multiple timescales, ranging from semidiurnal, diurnal, synoptic, to intraseasonal with embedding structures, are active in the wet regime. In particular, synoptic variability is more prominent during the wet phase of an intensive intraseasonal cycle. These are not only consistent with, but also show more details than, previous findings by using other techniques. The phase-locking relationships among the oscillations with different time-scales suggest that both synoptic and intraseasonal variations may be mixed oscillations due to the interaction of self-excited oscillations in the tropical

  3. Timing, frequency and environmental conditions associated with mainstem-tributary movement by a lowland river fish, golden perch (Macquaria ambigua).

    PubMed

    Koster, Wayne M; Dawson, David R; O'Mahony, Damien J; Moloney, Paul D; Crook, David A

    2014-01-01

    Tributary and mainstem connections represent important links for the movement of fish and other biota throughout river networks. We investigated the timing, frequency and environmental conditions associated with movements by adult golden perch (Macquaria ambigua) between the mainstem of the mid-Murray River and a tributary, the Goulburn River, in south-eastern Australia, using acoustic telemetry over four years (2007-2011). Fish were tagged and released in autumn 2007-2009 in the mid-Murray (n = 42) and lower Goulburn (n = 37) rivers within 3-6 km of the mid-Murray-lower Goulburn junction. 38% of tagged fish undertook mainstem-tributary movements, characterised mostly by temporary occupation followed by return of fish to the original capture river. Approximately 10% of tagged fish exhibited longer-term shifts between the mainstem and tributary. Movement of fish from the tributary into the mainstem occurred primarily during the spawning season and in some years coincided with the presence of golden perch eggs/larvae in drift samples in the mainstem. Many of the tributary-to-mainstem movements occurred during or soon after changes in flow. The movements of fish from the mainstem into the tributary were irregular and did not appear to be associated with spawning. The findings show that golden perch moved freely across the mainstem-tributary interface. This demonstrates the need to consider the spatial, behavioural and demographic interdependencies of aquatic fauna across geographic management units such as rivers.

  4. Timing, Frequency and Environmental Conditions Associated with Mainstem–Tributary Movement by a Lowland River Fish, Golden Perch (Macquaria ambigua)

    PubMed Central

    Koster, Wayne M.; Dawson, David R.; O’Mahony, Damien J.; Moloney, Paul D.; Crook, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Tributary and mainstem connections represent important links for the movement of fish and other biota throughout river networks. We investigated the timing, frequency and environmental conditions associated with movements by adult golden perch (Macquaria ambigua) between the mainstem of the mid-Murray River and a tributary, the Goulburn River, in south-eastern Australia, using acoustic telemetry over four years (2007–2011). Fish were tagged and released in autumn 2007–2009 in the mid-Murray (n = 42) and lower Goulburn (n = 37) rivers within 3–6 km of the mid-Murray-lower Goulburn junction. 38% of tagged fish undertook mainstem–tributary movements, characterised mostly by temporary occupation followed by return of fish to the original capture river. Approximately 10% of tagged fish exhibited longer-term shifts between the mainstem and tributary. Movement of fish from the tributary into the mainstem occurred primarily during the spawning season and in some years coincided with the presence of golden perch eggs/larvae in drift samples in the mainstem. Many of the tributary-to-mainstem movements occurred during or soon after changes in flow. The movements of fish from the mainstem into the tributary were irregular and did not appear to be associated with spawning. The findings show that golden perch moved freely across the mainstem–tributary interface. This demonstrates the need to consider the spatial, behavioural and demographic interdependencies of aquatic fauna across geographic management units such as rivers. PMID:24788137

  5. A time-frequency analysis approach for condition monitoring of a wind turbine gearbox under varying load conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadou, I.; Manson, G.; Staszewski, W. J.; Barszcz, T.; Worden, K.

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the condition monitoring of wind turbine gearboxes under varying operating conditions. Generally, gearbox systems include nonlinearities so a simplified nonlinear gear model is developed, on which the time-frequency analysis method proposed is first applied for the easiest understanding of the challenges faced. The effect of varying loads is examined in the simulations and later on in real wind turbine gearbox experimental data. The Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method is used to decompose the vibration signals into meaningful signal components associated with specific frequency bands of the signal. The mode mixing problem of the EMD is examined in the simulation part and the results in that part of the paper suggest that further research might be of interest in condition monitoring terms. For the amplitude-frequency demodulation of the signal components produced, the Hilbert Transform (HT) is used as a standard method. In addition, the Teager-Kaiser energy operator (TKEO), combined with an energy separation algorithm, is a recent alternative method, the performance of which is tested in the paper too. The results show that the TKEO approach is a promising alternative to the HT, since it can improve the estimation of the instantaneous spectral characteristics of the vibration data under certain conditions.

  6. Time-frequency analysis of stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions and their changes with efferent stimulation in guinea pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezina-Greene, Maria A.; Guinan, John J.

    2015-12-01

    To aid in understanding their origin, stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) were measured at a series of tone frequencies using the suppression method, both with and without stimulation of medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferents, in anesthetized guinea pigs. Time-frequency analysis showed SFOAE energy peaks in 1-3 delay components throughout the measured frequency range (0.5-12 kHz). One component's delay usually coincided with the phase-gradient delay. When multiple delay components were present, they were usually near SFOAE dips. Below 2 kHz, SFOAE delays were shorter than predicted from mechanical measurements. With MOC stimulation, SFOAE amplitude was decreased at most frequencies, but was sometimes enhanced, and all SFOAE delay components were affected. The MOC effects and an analysis of model data suggest that the multiple SFOAE delay components arise at the edges of the traveling-wave peak, not far basal of the peak. Comparisons with published guinea-pig neural data suggest that the short latencies of low-frequency SFOAEs may arise from coherent reflection from an organ-of-Corti motion that has a shorter group delay than the traveling wave.

  7. [Research on Time-frequency Characteristics of Magneto-acoustic Signal of Different Thickness Medium Based on Wave Summing Method].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunqi; Yin, Tao; Ma, Ren; Liu, Zhipeng

    2015-08-01

    Functional imaging method of biological electrical characteristics based on magneto-acoustic effect gives valuable information of tissue in early tumor diagnosis, therein time and frequency characteristics analysis of magneto-acoustic signal is important in image reconstruction. This paper proposes wave summing method based on Green function solution for acoustic source of magneto-acoustic effect. Simulations and analysis under quasi 1D transmission condition are carried out to time and frequency characteristics of magneto-acoustic signal of models with different thickness. Simulation results of magneto-acoustic signal were verified through experiments. Results of the simulation with different thickness showed that time-frequency characteristics of magneto-acoustic signal reflected thickness of sample. Thin sample, which is less than one wavelength of pulse, and thick sample, which is larger than one wavelength, showed different summed waveform and frequency characteristics, due to difference of summing thickness. Experimental results verified theoretical analysis and simulation results. This research has laid a foundation for acoustic source and conductivity reconstruction to the medium with different thickness in magneto-acoustic imaging.

  8. Time-frequency analysis of nonstationary vibration signals for deployable structures by using the constant-Q nonstationary gabor transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Yan, Shaoze; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Deployable structures have been widely used in on-orbit servicing spacecrafts, and the vibration properties of such structures have become increasingly important in the aerospace industry. The constant-Q nonstationary Gabor transform (CQ-NSGT) is introduced in this paper to accurately evaluate the variation in the frequency and amplitude of vibration signals along with time. First, an example signal is constructed on the basis of the vibration properties of deployable structures and is processed by the short-time Fourier transform, Wigner-Ville distribution, Hilbert-Huang transform, and CQ-NSGT. Results show that time and frequency resolutions are simultaneously fine only by employing CQ-NSGT. Subsequently, a zero padding operation is conducted to correct the calculation error at the end of the transform results. Finally, a set of experimental devices is constructed. The vibration signal of the experimental mode is processed by CQ-NSGT. On this basis, the experimental signal properties are discussed. This time-frequency method may be useful for formulating the dynamics for complex deployable structures.

  9. Timing, frequency and environmental conditions associated with mainstem-tributary movement by a lowland river fish, golden perch (Macquaria ambigua).

    PubMed

    Koster, Wayne M; Dawson, David R; O'Mahony, Damien J; Moloney, Paul D; Crook, David A

    2014-01-01

    Tributary and mainstem connections represent important links for the movement of fish and other biota throughout river networks. We investigated the timing, frequency and environmental conditions associated with movements by adult golden perch (Macquaria ambigua) between the mainstem of the mid-Murray River and a tributary, the Goulburn River, in south-eastern Australia, using acoustic telemetry over four years (2007-2011). Fish were tagged and released in autumn 2007-2009 in the mid-Murray (n = 42) and lower Goulburn (n = 37) rivers within 3-6 km of the mid-Murray-lower Goulburn junction. 38% of tagged fish undertook mainstem-tributary movements, characterised mostly by temporary occupation followed by return of fish to the original capture river. Approximately 10% of tagged fish exhibited longer-term shifts between the mainstem and tributary. Movement of fish from the tributary into the mainstem occurred primarily during the spawning season and in some years coincided with the presence of golden perch eggs/larvae in drift samples in the mainstem. Many of the tributary-to-mainstem movements occurred during or soon after changes in flow. The movements of fish from the mainstem into the tributary were irregular and did not appear to be associated with spawning. The findings show that golden perch moved freely across the mainstem-tributary interface. This demonstrates the need to consider the spatial, behavioural and demographic interdependencies of aquatic fauna across geographic management units such as rivers. PMID:24788137

  10. Time-frequency scale decomposition of tectonic tremor signals for space-time reconstruction of tectonic tremor sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, N.; Satriano, C.; Vilotte, J. P.; Bernard, P.; Obara, K.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic radiation associated with transient deformations along the faults and subduction interfaces encompasses a variety of events, i.e., tectonic tremors, low-frequency earthquakes (LFE), very low-frequency earthquakes (VLFs), and slow-slip events (SSE), with a wide range of seismic moment and characteristic durations. Characterizing in space and time the complex sources of these slow earthquakes, and their relationship with background seismicity and large earthquakes generation, is of great importance for understanding the physics and mechanics of the processes of active deformations along the plate interfaces. We present here first developments towards a methodology for: (1) extracting the different frequency and scale components of observed tectonic tremor signal, using advanced time-frequency and time-scale signal representation such as Gabor transform scheme based on, e.g. Wilson bases or Modified Discrete Cosine Transform (MDCT) bases; (2) reconstructing their corresponding potential sources in space and time, using the array method of Poiata et al. (2015). The methodology is assessed using a dataset of tectonic tremor episodes from Shikoku, Japan, recorded by the Hi-net seismic network operated by NIED. We illustrate its performance and potential in providing activity maps - associated to different scale-components of tectonic tremors - that can be analyzed statistically to improve our understanding of tremor sources and scaling, as well as their relation with the background seismicity.

  11. Recognition of speech in noise after application of time-frequency masks: Dependence on frequency and threshold parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sinex, Donal G.

    2013-01-01

    Binary time-frequency (TF) masks can be applied to separate speech from noise. Previous studies have shown that with appropriate parameters, ideal TF masks can extract highly intelligible speech even at very low speech-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Two psychophysical experiments provided additional information about the dependence of intelligibility on the frequency resolution and threshold criteria that define the ideal TF mask. Listeners identified AzBio Sentences in noise, before and after application of TF masks. Masks generated with 8 or 16 frequency bands per octave supported nearly-perfect identification. Word recognition accuracy was slightly lower and more variable with 4 bands per octave. When TF masks were generated with a local threshold criterion of 0 dB SNR, the mean speech reception threshold was −9.5 dB SNR, compared to −5.7 dB for unprocessed sentences in noise. Speech reception thresholds decreased by about 1 dB per dB of additional decrease in the local threshold criterion. Information reported here about the dependence of speech intelligibility on frequency and level parameters has relevance for the development of non-ideal TF masks for clinical applications such as speech processing for hearing aids. PMID:23556604

  12. Time-frequency characteristics and dynamics of sleep spindles in WAG/Rij rats with absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sitnikova, Evgenia; Hramov, Alexander E; Grubov, Vadim; Koronovsky, Alexey A

    2014-01-16

    In rat models of absence epilepsy, epileptic spike-wave discharges appeared in EEG spontaneously, and the incidence of epileptic activity increases with age. Spike-wave discharges and sleep spindles are known to share common thalamo-cortical mechanism, suggesting that absence seizures might affect some intrinsic properties of sleep spindles. This paper examines time-frequency EEG characteristics of anterior sleep spindles in non-epileptic Wistar and epileptic WAG/Rij rats at the age of 7 and 9 months. Considering non-stationary features of sleep spindles, EEG analysis was performed using Morlet-based continuous wavelet transform. It was found, first, that the average frequency of sleep spindles in non-epileptic Wistar rats was higher than in WAG/Rij (13.2 vs 11.2 Hz). Second, the instantaneous frequency ascended during a spindle event in Wistar rats, but it was constant in WAG/Rij. Third, in WAG/Rij rats, the number and duration of epileptic discharges increased in a period between 7 and 9 months of age, but duration and mean value of intra-spindle frequency did not change. In general, age-dependent aggravation of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats did not affect EEG properties of sleep spindles; it was suggested that pro-epileptic changes in thalamo-cortical network in WAG/Rij rats might prevent dynamic changes of sleep spindles that were detected in Wistar.

  13. Muscle fatigue during cross country sprint assessed by activation patterns and electromyographic signals time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Zory, R; Molinari, F; Knaflitz, M; Schena, F; Rouard, A

    2011-12-01

    The aims of this study were as follows: (i) analysis of activation patterns during the spurt of two heats of a cross country skiing sprint with the double poling technique and (ii) quantification of muscle fatigue of the investigated muscles. Eight elite skiers were tested and surface electromyographic signals (EMG) were recorded from seven muscles of the upper and lower limbs. For each subject and each muscle, the activation intervals were calculated for relying on a double-threshold statistical detector and the average rectified value was calculated on each activation interval. The detected activations were processed by a time-frequency algorithm in order to assess the progression of muscle fatigue. The EMG activation patterns and EMG amplitude highlighted no significant difference between the two spurts, despite a generally lower speed in the second spurt. The frequency analysis showed that upper body muscles are the first to be affected by fatigue and that clear signs of muscle fatigue appear right from the first spurt of the sprint simulation (i.e., biceps and triceps brachii) with a decrease in the instantaneous mean frequency. Biceps brachii activations and fatigue demonstrated the involvement of this muscle in propulsion.

  14. Brain dynamics in the comprehension of action-related language. A time-frequency analysis of mu rhythms.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Iván; de Vega, Manuel; León, Inmaculada; Bastiaansen, Marcel; Glen Lewis, Ashley; Magyari, Lilla

    2015-04-01

    EEG mu rhythms (8-13 Hz) recorded at fronto-central electrodes are generally considered as markers of motor cortical activity in humans, because they are modulated when participants perform an action, when they observe another's action or even when they imagine performing an action. In this study, we analyzed the time-frequency (TF) modulation of mu rhythms while participants read action language ("You will cut the strawberry cake"), abstract language ("You will doubt the patient's argument"), and perceptive language ("You will notice the bright day"). The results indicated that mu suppression at fronto-central sites is associated with action language rather than with abstract or perceptive language. Also, the largest difference between conditions occurred quite late in the sentence, while reading the first noun, (contrast Action vs. Abstract), or the second noun following the action verb (contrast Action vs. Perceptive). This suggests that motor activation is associated with the integration of words across the sentence beyond the lexical processing of the action verb. Source reconstruction localized mu suppression associated with action sentences in premotor cortex (BA 6). The present study suggests (1) that the understanding of action language activates motor networks in the human brain, and (2) that this activation occurs online based on semantic integration across multiple words in the sentence.

  15. Rolling element bearing defect detection using the generalized synchrosqueezing transform guided by time-frequency ridge enhancement.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Sanchez, Vinicio; Zurita, Grover; Cerrada Lozada, Mariela; Cabrera, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Healthy rolling element bearings are vital guarantees for safe operation of the rotating machinery. Time-frequency (TF) signal analysis is an effective tool to detect bearing defects under time-varying shaft speed condition. However, it is a challenging work dealing with defective characteristic frequency and rotation frequency simultaneously without a tachometer. For this reason, a technique using the generalized synchrosqueezing transform (GST) guided by enhanced TF ridge extraction is suggested to detect the existence of the bearing defects. The low frequency band and the resonance band are first chopped from the Fourier spectrum of the bearing vibration measurements. The TF information of the lower band component and the resonance band envelope are represented using short-time Fourier transform, where the TF ridge are extracted by harmonic summation search and ridge candidate fusion operations. The inverse of the extracted TF ridge is subsequently used to guide the GST mapping the chirped TF representation to the constant one. The rectified TF pictures are then synchrosqueezed as sharper spectra where the rotation frequency and the defective characteristic frequency can be identified, respectively. Both simulated and experimental signals were used to evaluate the present technique. The results validate the effectiveness of the suggested technique for the bearing defect detection.

  16. Scrolling the quantum optical frequency comb: one-way quantum computing with hybrid time-frequency entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Olivier; Wang, Pei; Alexander, Rafael; Chen, Moran; Sridhar, Niranjan; Menicucci, Nicolas

    2015-05-01

    On the heels of the experimental demonstrations of record-scale one-dimensional cluster-state entanglement--suitable for implementing single-qumode quantum computing gates--in the time domain and the frequency domain, we show here that both degrees of freedom can be combined to generate a two-dimensional square-grid cluster-state--suitable for universal quantum computing--from a single optical parametric oscillator. This method, the most compact yet, has the potential to reach 109 entangled qumodes, based on the current state of the art.

  17. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  18. Decoding a bistable percept with integrated time-frequency representation of single-trial local field potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhisong; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Liang, Hualou

    2008-12-01

    Bistable perception emerges when a stimulus under continuous view is perceived as the alternation of two mutually exclusive states. Such a stimulus provides a unique opportunity for understanding the neural basis of visual perception because it dissociates the perception from the visual input. In this paper we analyze the dynamic activity of local field potential (LFP), simultaneously collected from multiple channels in the middle temporal (MT) visual cortex of a macaque monkey, for decoding its bistable structure-from-motion (SFM) perception. Based on the observation that the discriminative information of neuronal population activity evolves and accumulates over time, we propose to select features from the integrated time-frequency representation of LFP using a relaxation (RELAX) algorithm and a sequential forward selection (SFS) algorithm with maximizing the Mahalanobis distance as the criterion function. The integrated-spectrogram based feature selection is much more robust and can achieve significantly better features than the instantaneous-spectrogram based feature selection. We exploit the support vector machines (SVM) classifier and the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier based on the selected features to decode the reported perception on a single trial basis. Our results demonstrate the excellent performance of the integrated-spectrogram based feature selection and suggest that the features in the gamma frequency band (30-100 Hz) of LFP within specific temporal windows carry the most discriminative information for decoding bistable perception. The proposed integrated-spectrogram based feature selection approach may have potential for a myriad of applications involving multivariable time series such as brain-computer interfaces (BCI).

  19. Improvement of orbit determination accuracy for Beidou Navigation Satellite System with Two-way Satellite Time Frequency Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chengpan; Hu, Xiaogong; Zhou, Shanshi; Guo, Rui; He, Feng; Liu, Li; Zhu, Lingfeng; Li, Xiaojie; Wu, Shan; Zhao, Gang; Yu, Yang; Cao, Yueling

    2016-10-01

    The Beidou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) manages to estimate simultaneously the orbits and clock offsets of navigation satellites, using code and carrier phase measurements of a regional network within China. The satellite clock offsets are also directly measured with Two-way Satellite Time Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT). Satellite laser ranging (SLR) residuals and comparisons with the precise ephemeris indicate that the radial error of GEO satellites is much larger than that of IGSO and MEO satellites and that the BDS orbit accuracy is worse than GPS. In order to improve the orbit determination accuracy for BDS, a new orbit determination strategy is proposed, in which the satellite clock measurements from TWSTFT are fixed as known values, and only the orbits of the satellites are solved. However, a constant systematic error at the nanosecond level can be found in the clock measurements, which is obtained and then corrected by differencing the clock measurements and the clock estimates from orbit determination. The effectiveness of the new strategy is verified by a GPS regional network orbit determination experiment. With the IGS final clock products fixed, the orbit determination and prediction accuracy for GPS satellites improve by more than 50% and the 12-h prediction User Range Error (URE) is better than 0.12 m. By processing a 25-day of measurement from the BDS regional network, an optimal strategy for the satellite-clock-fixed orbit determination is identified. User Equivalent Ranging Error is reduced by 27.6% for GEO satellites, but no apparent reduction is found for IGSO/MEO satellites. The SLR residuals exhibit reductions by 59% and 32% for IGSO satellites but no reductions for GEO and MEO satellites.

  20. An adaptation method to improve secret key rates of time-frequency QKD in atmospheric turbulence channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaole; Djordjevic, Ivan B.; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) channels can be characterized by random power fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence, which is known as scintillation. Weak coherent source based FSO quantum key distribution (QKD) systems suffer from the scintillation effect because during the deep channel fading the expected detection rate drops, which then gives an eavesdropper opportunity to get additional information about protocol by performing photon number splitting (PNS) attack and blocking single-photon pulses without changing QBER. To overcome this problem, in this paper, we study a large-alphabet QKD protocol, which is achieved by using pulse-position modulation (PPM)-like approach that utilizes the time-frequency uncertainty relation of the weak coherent photon state, called here TF-PPM-QKD protocol. We first complete finite size analysis for TF-PPM-QKD protocol to give practical bounds against non-negligible statistical fluctuation due to finite resources in practical implementations. The impact of scintillation under strong atmospheric turbulence regime is studied then. To overcome the secure key rate performance degradation of TF-PPM-QKD caused by scintillation, we propose an adaptation method for compensating the scintillation impact. By changing source intensity according to the channel state information (CSI), obtained by classical channel, the adaptation method improves the performance of QKD system with respect to the secret key rate. The CSI of a time-varying channel can be predicted using stochastic models, such as autoregressive (AR) models. Based on the channel state predictions, we change the source intensity to the optimal value to achieve a higher secret key rate. We demonstrate that the improvement of the adaptation method is dependent on the prediction accuracy.

  1. Temporal Features of Spike Trains in the Moth Antennal Lobe Revealed by a Comparative Time-Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Capurro, Alberto; Baroni, Fabiano; Kuebler, Linda S.; Kárpáti, Zsolt; Dekker, Teun; Lei, Hong; Hansson, Bill S.; Pearce, Timothy C.; Olsson, Shannon B.

    2014-01-01

    The discrimination of complex sensory stimuli in a noisy environment is an immense computational task. Sensory systems often encode stimulus features in a spatiotemporal fashion through the complex firing patterns of individual neurons. To identify these temporal features, we have developed an analysis that allows the comparison of statistically significant features of spike trains localized over multiple scales of time-frequency resolution. Our approach provides an original way to utilize the discrete wavelet transform to process instantaneous rate functions derived from spike trains, and select relevant wavelet coefficients through statistical analysis. Our method uncovered localized features within olfactory projection neuron (PN) responses in the moth antennal lobe coding for the presence of an odor mixture and the concentration of single component odorants, but not for compound identities. We found that odor mixtures evoked earlier responses in biphasic response type PNs compared to single components, which led to differences in the instantaneous firing rate functions with their signal power spread across multiple frequency bands (ranging from 0 to 45.71 Hz) during a time window immediately preceding behavioral response latencies observed in insects. Odor concentrations were coded in excited response type PNs both in low frequency band differences (2.86 to 5.71 Hz) during the stimulus and in the odor trace after stimulus offset in low (0 to 2.86 Hz) and high (22.86 to 45.71 Hz) frequency bands. These high frequency differences in both types of PNs could have particular relevance for recruiting cellular activity in higher brain centers such as mushroom body Kenyon cells. In contrast, neurons in the specialized pheromone-responsive area of the moth antennal lobe exhibited few stimulus-dependent differences in temporal response features. These results provide interesting insights on early insect olfactory processing and introduce a novel comparative approach for

  2. Seismic time-frequency analysis of the recent 2015 eruptive activity of Volcán de Colima, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Bracamontes, D. M.; Nava Pichardo, F. A.; Reyes Dávila, G. A.; Arámbula-Mendoza, R.; Martínez Fierros, A.; Ramírez Vázquez, A.; González Amezcua, M.

    2015-12-01

    Volcán de Colima is an andesitic stratovolcano located in western Mexico. It is considered the most active volcano in Mexico, with activity characterized mainly by intermittent effusive and explosive episodes. On July 10th-12th 2015, Volcán de Colima underwent its most intense eruptive phase since its Plinian eruption in 1913. A partial collapse of the dome and of the crater wall generated several pyroclastic flows, the largest of which reached almost 10 km to the south of the volcano. Lava flows along with incandescent rockfalls descended through various flanks of the volcanic edifice. Ashfall affected people up to 40 km from the volcano's summit. Inhabitants from the small villages closest to the volcano were evacuated and authorities sealed off a 12 km area. We present an overview of the seismic activity that preceded and accompanied this eruptive phase, with data from the closest broadband and short period seismic stations of the Volcán de Colima monitoring network. We focus on the search of temporal information within the spectral content of the seismic signals. We first employ common time-frequency representations such as Fourier and wavelet transforms, but we also apply more recent techniques proposed for the analysis of non-stationary signals, such as empirical mode decomposition and the synchrosqueezing transform. We present and discuss the performances of these various methods characterizing and quantifying spectral changes which could be used to forecast future eruptive events and to evaluate the course of volcanic processes during ongoing eruptions.

  3. Statistical properties and time-frequency analysis of temperature, salinity and turbidity measured by the MAREL Carnot station in the coastal waters of Boulogne-sur-Mer (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kbaier Ben Ismail, Dhouha; Lazure, Pascal; Puillat, Ingrid

    2016-10-01

    data. The Lomb-Scargle algorithm is adapted to unevenly-spaced data and is used as an alternative. The limits of the method are also set out. It was found that beyond 50% of missing measures, few significant frequencies are detected, several seasonalities are no more visible, and even a whole range of high frequency disappears progressively. Furthermore, two time-frequency decomposition methods, namely wavelets and Hilbert-Huang Transformation (HHT), are applied for the analysis of the entire dataset. Using the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT), some properties of the time series are determined. Then, the inertial wave and several low-frequency tidal waves are identified by the application of the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). Finally, EMD based Time Dependent Intrinsic Correlation (TDIC) analysis is applied to consider the correlation between two nonstationary time series.

  4. Sound Transmission at Pipe Joints.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servis, Dimitris C.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A model was developed using beam and plane wave theory to describe the sound transmission at pipe joints. This approach greatly simplifies the modelling of the pipe joint and the solution is presented in a manner which can be applied in both the Frequency and the Time domain, for the solution of acoustic and fluid dynamics problems related to pipe joint transmission. This form of modelling can be extended to describe a wide range of pipe joints and discontinuities and lend itself to the study of piping networks by incorporating its solution in existing models used to describe the performance of large systems. A variety of experimental techniques have been explored and applied for the measurement of the sound transmission at pipe joints. The model predictions were found to be in good agreement with experimental data and form the basis of a simple and effective method for the study of sound transmission at pipe joints.

  5. Method of joint frame synchronization and data-aided channel estimation for 100-Gb/s polarization-division multiplexing-single carrier frequency domain equalization coherent optical transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yun; Tan, Jun; Liu, Liu; He, Jing; Tang, Jin; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Jun; Li, Qiang; Xiao, Minlei

    2016-02-01

    To improve the performance of channel estimation (CE), a method of joint frame synchronization and data-aided CE using less training overhead is proposed. A 100-Gb/s polarization-division multiplexing coherent transmission system with quaternary phase-shift keying based on the proposed method is demonstrated by simulation. The simulation results show that the proposed method could achieve accurate timing offset and CE in the presence of strong amplified spontaneous emission noise.

  6. Joint Commission on rock properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A joint commission on Rock Properties for Petroleum Engineers (RPPE) has been established by the International Society of Rock Mechanics and the Society of Petroleum Engineers to set up data banks on the properties of sedimentary rocks encountered during drilling. Computer-based data banks of complete rock properties will be organized for sandstones (GRESA), shales (ARSHA) and carbonates (CARCA). The commission hopes to access data sources from members of the commission, private companies and the public domain.

  7. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  8. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  9. Joint services electronics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Leon, Jr.

    1992-11-01

    The report represents the fifteenth annual summary of The Ohio State University Joint Services Electronics Program (JSEP). The transfer of the compact range identification technology initiated under JSEP support for time domain studies continues to make large advances. We are also assisting Rockwell (Tulsa) to update their RCS facilities. This work is on a subcontract to the ESL from the Air Force. This has lead to involvement in the study of Ultra Wide Band radar systems. The research activities devoted to the Generalized Ray and Gaussian Beams continues. Our JSEP research continues to be expanded by external funding. This program is being expanded by use of such funds which are more focussed on the requirements of the sponsors which includes both the Air Force and the Navy. Our JSEP research continues to focus on electromagnetic related topics. There are four major electromagnetics areas that were pursued in the past year. The Diffraction Studies Work Unit has initiated research on a time domain version of the Uniform Theory of Diffraction. A second topic under the Diffraction Studies Work Unit involves further extensions of the generalized resistive boundary condition and the generalized impedance boundary condition. These have been applied to scattering from a chiral slab. A third topic of interest is the diffraction from a corner. A fourth task involves the reflection/diffraction of a Gaussian beam. This represents an approach to replace the usual ray optics solution for very complex geometries where the versatile ray optics solution becomes cumbersome.

  10. Spacesuit mobility knee joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure suit mobility joints are for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit in which low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are required. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics and includes linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and includes a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  11. Spacesuit mobility joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Joints for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit which have low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are described. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics. Linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli are featured. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  12. Joint spectrogram segmentation and ridge-extraction method for separating multimodal guided waves in long bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, ZhengGang; Xu, KaiLiang; Ta, DeAn; Wang, WeiQi

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves (GWs) can be used to evaluate long bones effectively because of the ability to provide the information of the whole bone. In this study, a joint spectrogram segmentation and ridge-extraction (JSSRE) method was proposed to separate multiple modes in long bones. First, the Gabor time-frequency transform was applied to obtain the spectrogram of multimodal signals. Then, a multi-class image segmentation algorithm was used to find the corresponding region of each mode in the spectrogram, including an improved watershed transform and a region growing procedure. Finally, the ridges were extracted and the time domain signals representing individual modes were reconstructed from these ridges in each region. The validations of this method were discussed by simulated multimodal signals with different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). The correlation coefficients between the original signals without noise and the reconstructed signals were calculated to analyze the results quantitatively. The results showed that the extracted ridges were in good agreement with generated theoretical dispersion curves, and the reconstructed signals were highly related to the original signals, even under the SNR=3 dB situation.

  13. Butt Joint Tool Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-12-06

    ITER Central Solenoid uses butt joints for connecting the pancakes in the CS module. The principles of the butt joining of the CICC were developed by the JAPT during CSMC project. The difference between the CSMC butt joint and the CS butt joint is that the CS butt joint is an in-line joint, while the CSMC is a double joint through a hairpin jumper. The CS butt joint has to carry the hoop load. The straight length of the joint is only 320 mm, and the vacuum chamber around the joint has to have a split in the clamp shell. These requirements are challenging. Fig.1 presents a CSMC joint, and Fig.2 shows a CS butt joint. The butt joint procedure was verified and demonstrated. The tool is capable of achieving all specified parameters. The vacuum in the end was a little higher than the target, which is not critical and readily correctable. We consider, tentatively that the procedure is established. Unexpectedly, we discover significant temperature nonuniformity in the joint cross section, which is not formally a violation of the specs, but is a point of concern. All testing parameters are recorded for QA purposes. We plan to modify the butt joining tool to improve its convenience of operation and provide all features necessary for production of butt joints by qualified personnel.

  14. Monitoring groundwater-surface water interaction using time-series and time-frequency analysis of transient three-dimensional electrical resistivity changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Slater, Lee D.; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Elwaseif, Mehrez

    2012-01-01

    Time-lapse resistivity imaging is increasingly used to monitor hydrologic processes. Compared to conventional hydrologic measurements, surface time-lapse resistivity provides superior spatial coverage in two or three dimensions, potentially high-resolution information in time, and information in the absence of wells. However, interpretation of time-lapse electrical tomograms is complicated by the ever-increasing size and complexity of long-term, three-dimensional (3-D) time series conductivity data sets. Here we use 3-D surface time-lapse electrical imaging to monitor subsurface electrical conductivity variations associated with stage-driven groundwater-surface water interactions along a stretch of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 near Richland, Washington, USA. We reduce the resulting 3-D conductivity time series using both time-series and time-frequency analyses to isolate a paleochannel causing enhanced groundwater-surface water interactions. Correlation analysis on the time-lapse imaging results concisely represents enhanced groundwater-surface water interactions within the paleochannel, and provides information concerning groundwater flow velocities. Time-frequency analysis using the Stockwell (S) transform provides additional information by identifying the stage periodicities driving groundwater-surface water interactions due to upstream dam operations, and identifying segments in time-frequency space when these interactions are most active. These results provide new insight into the distribution and timing of river water intrusion into the Hanford 300 Area, which has a governing influence on the behavior of a uranium plume left over from historical nuclear fuel processing operations.

  15. Pressure suit joint analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Webbon, B. W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A measurement system for simultaneously measuring torque and angular flexure in a pressure suit joint is described. One end of a joint under test is held rigid. A torque transducer is pivotably supported on the other movable end of a joint. A potentiometer is attached to the transducer by an arm. The wiper shaft of the potentiometer is gripped by a reference arm that rotates the wiper shaft the same angle as the flexure of joint. A signal is generated by the potentiometer which is representative of the joint flexure. A compensation circuit converts the output of the transducer to a signal representative of joint torque.

  16. Culture - joint fluid

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid culture ... fungi, or viruses grow. This is called a culture. If these germs are detected, other tests may ... is no special preparation needed for the lab culture. How to prepare for the removal of joint ...

  17. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  18. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  19. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002975.htm Hip joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hip joint replacement is surgery to replace all or part ...

  20. Multi-Sensor Detection with Particle Swarm Optimization for Time-Frequency Coded Cooperative WSNs Based on MC-CDMA for Underground Coal Mines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Linyuan; Han, Ruisong; Shao, Xiaotao

    2015-08-27

    In this paper, a wireless sensor network (WSN) technology adapted to underground channel conditions is developed, which has important theoretical and practical value for safety monitoring in underground coal mines. According to the characteristics that the space, time and frequency resources of underground tunnel are open, it is proposed to constitute wireless sensor nodes based on multicarrier code division multiple access (MC-CDMA) to make full use of these resources. To improve the wireless transmission performance of source sensor nodes, it is also proposed to utilize cooperative sensors with good channel conditions from the sink node to assist source sensors with poor channel conditions. Moreover, the total power of the source sensor and its cooperative sensors is allocated on the basis of their channel conditions to increase the energy efficiency of the WSN. To solve the problem that multiple access interference (MAI) arises when multiple source sensors transmit monitoring information simultaneously, a kind of multi-sensor detection (MSD) algorithm with particle swarm optimization (PSO), namely D-PSO, is proposed for the time-frequency coded cooperative MC-CDMA WSN. Simulation results show that the average bit error rate (BER) performance of the proposed WSN in an underground coal mine is improved significantly by using wireless sensor nodes based on MC-CDMA, adopting time-frequency coded cooperative transmission and D-PSO algorithm with particle swarm optimization.

  1. Multi-Sensor Detection with Particle Swarm Optimization for Time-Frequency Coded Cooperative WSNs Based on MC-CDMA for Underground Coal Mines

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingjing; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Linyuan; Han, Ruisong; Shao, Xiaotao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a wireless sensor network (WSN) technology adapted to underground channel conditions is developed, which has important theoretical and practical value for safety monitoring in underground coal mines. According to the characteristics that the space, time and frequency resources of underground tunnel are open, it is proposed to constitute wireless sensor nodes based on multicarrier code division multiple access (MC-CDMA) to make full use of these resources. To improve the wireless transmission performance of source sensor nodes, it is also proposed to utilize cooperative sensors with good channel conditions from the sink node to assist source sensors with poor channel conditions. Moreover, the total power of the source sensor and its cooperative sensors is allocated on the basis of their channel conditions to increase the energy efficiency of the WSN. To solve the problem that multiple access interference (MAI) arises when multiple source sensors transmit monitoring information simultaneously, a kind of multi-sensor detection (MSD) algorithm with particle swarm optimization (PSO), namely D-PSO, is proposed for the time-frequency coded cooperative MC-CDMA WSN. Simulation results show that the average bit error rate (BER) performance of the proposed WSN in an underground coal mine is improved significantly by using wireless sensor nodes based on MC-CDMA, adopting time-frequency coded cooperative transmission and D-PSO algorithm with particle swarm optimization. PMID:26343660

  2. Multi-Sensor Detection with Particle Swarm Optimization for Time-Frequency Coded Cooperative WSNs Based on MC-CDMA for Underground Coal Mines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Linyuan; Han, Ruisong; Shao, Xiaotao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a wireless sensor network (WSN) technology adapted to underground channel conditions is developed, which has important theoretical and practical value for safety monitoring in underground coal mines. According to the characteristics that the space, time and frequency resources of underground tunnel are open, it is proposed to constitute wireless sensor nodes based on multicarrier code division multiple access (MC-CDMA) to make full use of these resources. To improve the wireless transmission performance of source sensor nodes, it is also proposed to utilize cooperative sensors with good channel conditions from the sink node to assist source sensors with poor channel conditions. Moreover, the total power of the source sensor and its cooperative sensors is allocated on the basis of their channel conditions to increase the energy efficiency of the WSN. To solve the problem that multiple access interference (MAI) arises when multiple source sensors transmit monitoring information simultaneously, a kind of multi-sensor detection (MSD) algorithm with particle swarm optimization (PSO), namely D-PSO, is proposed for the time-frequency coded cooperative MC-CDMA WSN. Simulation results show that the average bit error rate (BER) performance of the proposed WSN in an underground coal mine is improved significantly by using wireless sensor nodes based on MC-CDMA, adopting time-frequency coded cooperative transmission and D-PSO algorithm with particle swarm optimization. PMID:26343660

  3. [Total temporomandibular joint prostheses].

    PubMed

    Zwetyenga, N; Amroun, S; Wajszczak, B-L; Moris, V

    2016-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is probably the most complex human joint. As in all joints, its prosthetic replacement may be indicated in selected cases. Significant advances have been made in the design of TMJ prostheses during the last three decades and the indications have been clarified. The aim of our work was to make an update on the current total TMJ total joint replacement. Indications, contraindications, prosthetic components, advantages, disadvantages, reasons for failure or reoperation, virtual planning and surgical protocol have been exposed.

  4. Joint Enrollment Report, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Iowa Department of Education collects information on joint enrollment in Iowa's 15 community colleges. Jointly enrolled students are high school students enrolled in community college credit coursework. Most jointly enrolled students enroll through Senior Year Plus (SYP) programs such as Postsecondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) and concurrent…

  5. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  6. Time, Frequency and Physical Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellwig, Helmut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes several developments in atomic clocks and frequency standards pointing out the feasibility and practicality in adopting a unified standard of time and frequency to replace other base standards of length, mass, and temperature. (GA)

  7. Joint custody: preliminary impressions.

    PubMed

    Awad, G A

    1983-02-01

    Joint custody is currently a popular and debatable issue. It is felt that some of the controversy is due to the lack of agreement on a definition. Following some examples of the differences in personal and judicial definitions of joint custody, a classification of custody is offered. Four types of custody arrangements are described: Absolute Sole Custody, Sole Custody, Non-Alternating Joint Custody (disputed and undisputed) and Alternating Joint Custody (disputed and undisputed). A critical review of the literature follows. Finally, clinical impressions about the two types of joint custody are discussed. PMID:6839267

  8. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis and temporomandibular joint hypermobility.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, P U; de Bont, L G; de Leeuw, R; Stegenga, B; Boering, G

    1993-10-01

    For studying the relationship between condylar hypermobility of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and osteoarthrosis (OA), 13 patients with bilateral condylar hypermobility were evaluated clinically and radiographically, 30 years after non-surgical treatment. The evaluation included range of motion, joint and muscle tenderness to palpation, joint sounds and masticatory function. Radiographs of the TMJs were evaluated for the absence or presence of degenerative changes. The hypermobile group (HG) was compared with a control group (CG) (n = 13). The CG was evaluated in the same way as the HG. Statistics included t-tests (to compare ranges of motion in the HG over time and to compare ranges of motion in HG and CG), non-parametric tests (to compare tenderness of muscles and joints, joint sounds, masticatory function and radiographic changes over time in the HG). The tests were also used to compare the same variables between the HG and CG group. The groups' only difference was the presence of radiographic signs of OA. In the HG the number of joints with radiographic degenerative changes increased significantly over time and was significantly higher than the CG. Clinically and functionally, the HG and CG did not differ. Therefore, it is concluded that TMJ hypermobility is a subsidiary factor in the development of TMJ OA. PMID:8118897

  9. Time-frequency analysis of VLF for seismic-ionospheric precursor detection: Evaluation of Zhao-Atlas-Marks and Hilbert-Huang Transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeberis, C.; Zaharis, Z. D.; Xenos, T. D.; Spatalas, S.; Arabelos, D. N.; Contadakis, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    This work investigates the application of two post-processing methods of extracting spectra from VLF signals in order to detect disturbances that could be attributed to seismic-ionospheric precursory phenomena. Although precursory phenomena have been investigated in detail in past studies, a different application of time-frequency analysis methods may produce distinct patterns, which reveal disturbances in the VLF spectra received from stations that are in the propagation path over preparation zones, and also pinpoint disturbances that could be attributed to seismic-ionospheric precursors. To this purpose, three different methods of post processing are compared. These are the Wavelet Transform as a benchmark method in the form of the Continuous Wavelet Transform, a noise-assisted variant of the Hilbert-Huang Transform and the Zhao-Atlas-Marks Distribution. Comparative diagrams are presented and the advantages and weaknesses of each method are presented.

  10. [Total temporomandibular joint prostheses].

    PubMed

    Zwetyenga, N; Amroun, S; Wajszczak, B-L; Moris, V

    2016-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is probably the most complex human joint. As in all joints, its prosthetic replacement may be indicated in selected cases. Significant advances have been made in the design of TMJ prostheses during the last three decades and the indications have been clarified. The aim of our work was to make an update on the current total TMJ total joint replacement. Indications, contraindications, prosthetic components, advantages, disadvantages, reasons for failure or reoperation, virtual planning and surgical protocol have been exposed. PMID:27554487

  11. Mechanics of Sheeting Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Physical breakdown of rock across a broad scale spectrum involves fracturing. In many areas large fractures develop near the topographic surface, with sheeting joints being among the most impressive. Sheeting joints share many geometric, textural, and kinematic features with other joints (opening-mode fractures) but differ in that they are (a) discernibly curved, (b) open near the topographic surface, and (c) form subparallel to the topographic surface. Where sheeting joints are geologically young, the surface-parallel compressive stresses are typically several MPa or greater. Sheeting joints are best developed beneath domes, ridges, and saddles; they also are reported, albeit rarely, beneath valleys or bowls. A mechanism that accounts for all these associations has been sought for more than a century: neither erosion of overburden nor high lateral compressive stresses alone suffices. Sheeting joints are not accounted for by Mohr-Coulomb shear failure criteria. Principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, together with the mechanical effect of a curved topographic surface, do provide a basis for understanding sheeting joint growth and the pattern sheeting joints form. Compressive stresses parallel to a singly or doubly convex topographic surface induce a tensile stress perpendicular to the surface at shallow depths; in some cases this alone could overcome the weight of overburden to open sheeting joints. If regional horizontal compressive stresses, augmented by thermal stresses, are an order of magnitude or so greater than a characteristic vertical stress that scales with topographic amplitude, then topographic stress perturbations can cause sheeting joints to open near the top of a ridge. This topographic effect can be augmented by pressure within sheeting joints arising from water, ice, or salt. Water pressure could be particularly important in helping drive sheeting joints downslope beneath valleys. Once sheeting joints have formed, the rock sheets between

  12. Protein domain architectures.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Nicola J

    2010-01-01

    Proteins are composed of functional units, or domains, that can be found alone or in combination with other domains. Analysis of protein domain architectures and the movement of protein domains within and across different genomes provide clues about the evolution of protein function. The classification of proteins into families and domains is provided through publicly available tools and databases that use known protein domains to predict other members in new proteins sequences. Currently at least 80% of the main protein sequence databases can be classified using these tools, thus providing a large data set to work from for analyzing protein domain architectures. Each of the protein domain databases provide intuitive web interfaces for viewing and analyzing their domain classifications and provide their data freely for downloading. Some of the main protein family and domain databases are described here, along with their Web-based tools for analyzing domain architectures.

  13. Compound solder joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.; Simonson, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    Joining technique prevents contamination, may be used to join dissimilar metal tubes, minimizes fluid and gas entrapment, expedites repairs, and can yield joints having leakage rates less than 0.000001 standard cubic cm He/min. Components of joint are solder sleeve, two solder rings, Teflon sleeve, and tubing to be joined.

  14. Truss Slip Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Truss slip joint has few parts, strong, and assembled and disassembled easily. Designed to carry axial loads as large as 100,000 lb and to accommodate slight initial axial-displacement and angular misalignments. Joint assembled or disassembled by astronaut in space suit or, on Earth, by technician in heavy protective clothing; simple enough to be operable by robot. Modified to accommodate welding.

  15. Wedge Joints for Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Kenneth E.

    1987-01-01

    Structure assembled rapidly with simple hand tools. Proposed locking wedge joints enable rapid assembly of lightweight beams, towers, scaffolds, and other truss-type structures. Lightweight structure assembled from tubular struts joined at nodes by wedge pins fitting into mating slots. Joint assembled rapidly by seating wedge pin in V-shaped slots and deforming end of strut until primary pawl engages it.

  16. Strategies for joint appointments.

    PubMed

    Royle, J; Crooks, D L

    1985-01-01

    The structure and policies governing joint appointments discussed above, are developed primarily through cooperation and collaboration between nursing service and education institutions. The joint appointee participates in the process of negotiation of salary, benefits and role responsibilities and exploration of the implications of the appointment for personal career development. Implementation and maintenance of the appointment requires the collaborative efforts of the joint appointee with both contracting agencies. Factors influencing the functioning of joint appointees have been identified and strategies to facilitate functioning presented. The joint appointee must be independent in thought and action yet adaptable to work within the boundaries of two social systems with differing values and expectations. Nursing management, peers and students can provide the support needed to overcome the frustrations and to achieve the rewards inherent in successful implementation of an exciting and innovative role. PMID:3852805

  17. [Approach to joint effusion].

    PubMed

    Henniger, M; Rehart, S

    2016-09-01

    The fundamental components of the differential diagnostics of joint effusions are the patient history and clinical examination. In the case of unclear findings, arthrosonography can provide information for the distinction between intra-articular and extra-articular pathologies. In atraumatic joint effusions inflammatory parameters in blood are determined in order to differentiate between systemic inflammatory and local inflammatory joint effusions. In the case of normal values further diagnostics are carried out using imaging. With elevated inflammatory parameters the main differential diagnoses are gouty arthritis, autoimmune joint processes and septic arthritis. When in doubt, a joint aspiration and synovial fluid analysis should be performed to rule out septic arthritis or if necessary confirmation of gouty arthritis. PMID:27562127

  18. An Ultrahigh Frequency Partial Discharge Signal De-Noising Method Based on a Generalized S-Transform and Module Time-Frequency Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yushun; Zhou, Wenjun; Li, Pengfei; Yang, Shuai; Tian, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Due to electromagnetic interference in power substations, the partial discharge (PD) signals detected by ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensors often contain various background noises, which may hamper high voltage apparatus fault diagnosis and localization. This paper proposes a novel de-noising method based on the generalized S-transform and module time-frequency matrix to suppress noise in UHF PD signals. The sub-matrix maximum module value method is employed to calculate the frequencies and amplitudes of periodic narrowband noise, and suppress noise through the reverse phase cancellation technique. In addition, a singular value decomposition de-noising method is employed to suppress Gaussian white noise in UHF PD signals. Effective singular values are selected by employing the fuzzy c-means clustering method to recover the PD signals. De-noising results of simulated and field detected UHF PD signals prove the feasibility of the proposed method. Compared with four conventional de-noising methods, the results show that the proposed method can suppress background noise in the UHF PD signal effectively, with higher signal-to-noise ratio and less waveform distortion. PMID:27338409

  19. Real-time observation of phonon-polariton dynamics in ferroelectric LiNbO3 in time-frequency space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikegaya, Yuki; Sakaibara, Hiroyuki; Minami, Yasuo; Katayama, Ikufumi; Takeda, Jun

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate the real-time observation of phonon-polariton propagation in ferroelectric LiNbO3 using a single-shot spectroscopic setup that employs an echelon mirror. The echelon mirror provides a spatially encoded time delay for the probe pulse; therefore, the ultrafast transient behavior of materials can be detected on a single-shot basis. Using optical Kerr gate apparatus, forward and backward propagating E-mode phonon-polaritons were simultaneously induced via an impulsive stimulated Raman scattering process, and subsequently, their dynamics were readily mapped in time-frequency space using heterodyne detection. The two phonon-polaritons appeared on opposite sides of the central probe wavelength and were symmetrically imaged against the ordinary and extraordinary probe lights. By taking into account coupling of the lowest E-mode phonon-polariton to a low-frequency relaxational mode, not only the phonon-polariton dispersion but also the wavevector dependence of the damping rate was unveiled and quantitatively evaluated.

  20. An Ultrahigh Frequency Partial Discharge Signal De-Noising Method Based on a Generalized S-Transform and Module Time-Frequency Matrix.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yushun; Zhou, Wenjun; Li, Pengfei; Yang, Shuai; Tian, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Due to electromagnetic interference in power substations, the partial discharge (PD) signals detected by ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensors often contain various background noises, which may hamper high voltage apparatus fault diagnosis and localization. This paper proposes a novel de-noising method based on the generalized S-transform and module time-frequency matrix to suppress noise in UHF PD signals. The sub-matrix maximum module value method is employed to calculate the frequencies and amplitudes of periodic narrowband noise, and suppress noise through the reverse phase cancellation technique. In addition, a singular value decomposition de-noising method is employed to suppress Gaussian white noise in UHF PD signals. Effective singular values are selected by employing the fuzzy c-means clustering method to recover the PD signals. De-noising results of simulated and field detected UHF PD signals prove the feasibility of the proposed method. Compared with four conventional de-noising methods, the results show that the proposed method can suppress background noise in the UHF PD signal effectively, with higher signal-to-noise ratio and less waveform distortion. PMID:27338409

  1. Sub-Nyquist field trial using time frequency packed DP-QPSK super-channel within fixed ITU-T grid.

    PubMed

    Potì, L; Meloni, G; Berrettini, G; Fresi, F; Foggi, T; Secondini, M; Giorgi, L; Cavaliere, F; Hackett, S; Petronio, A; Nibbs, P; Forgan, R; Leong, A; Masciulli, R; Pfander, C

    2015-06-15

    Sub-Nyquist time frequency packing technique was demonstrated for the first time in a super-channel field trial transmission over long-haul distances. The technique allows a limited spectral occupancy even with low order modulation formats. The transmission was successfully performed on a deployed Australian link between Sydney and Melbourne which included 995 km of uncompensated SMF with coexistent traffic. 40 and 100 Gb/s co-propagating channels were transmitted together with the super-channel in a 50 GHz ITU-T grid without additional penalty. The super-channel consisted of eight sub-channels with low-level modulation format, i.e. DP-QPSK, guaranteeing better OSNR robustness and reduced complexity with respect to higher order formats. At the receiver side, coherent detection was used together with iterative maximum-a-posteriori (MAP) detection and decoding. A 975 Gb/s DP-QPSK super-channel was successfully transmitted between Sydney and Melbourne within four 50GHz WSS channels (200 GHz). A maximum potential SE of 5.58 bit/s/Hz was achieved with an OSNR = 15.8 dB, comparable to the OSNR of the installed 100 Gb/s channels. The system reliability was proven through long term measurements. In addition, by closing the link in a loop back configuration, a potential SE∙d product of 9254 bit/s/Hz·km was achieved.

  2. Time-frequency and principal-component methods for the analysis of EMGs recorded during a mildly fatiguing exercise on a cycle ergometer.

    PubMed

    von Tscharner, Vinzenz

    2002-12-01

    Electromyographic signals contain the information on muscle activity and have to be frequently averaged, compared, classified or details need to be extracted. A time-frequency analysis, based on wavelets, was previously presented. The analysis transformed an EMG signal into an EMG-intensity-pattern showing the intensities at any point in time for the frequencies filtered out by the wavelets. The purpose of the present study was:to define and apply a new EMG-pattern-space for the analysis of EMG-intensity-patterns; and to determine the variation of EMG-intensity-patterns while getting mildly fatigued by cycling on a cycle-ergometer. The coordinates spanning the pattern space were principal components of the measured EMG-intensity-patterns. A point in pattern-space thus represented an EMG-intensity-pattern. Fatigue resulted in points moving along a line in pattern space. The line was characterized by an intercept at time 0 and a slope. Thus mild fatigue caused a shift from an initial intensity-pattern representing the intercept to a final intensity-pattern adding gradually larger amounts of the pattern representing the slope. The intensity-pattern of the slope revealed the physiologically important individual strategies for coping with mild fatigue. Changes were observed at different times and at different frequencies during the cycling movement.

  3. Spatially variable stage-driven groundwater-surface water interaction inferred from time-frequency analysis of distributed temperature sensing data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Elwaseif, Mehrez; Johnson, Carole D.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of groundwater-surface water exchange is essential for improving understanding of contaminant transport between aquifers and rivers. Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FODTS) provides rich spatiotemporal datasets for quantitative and qualitative analysis of groundwater-surface water exchange. We demonstrate how time-frequency analysis of FODTS and synchronous river stage time series from the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300-Area, Richland, Washington, provides spatial information on the strength of stage-driven exchange of uranium contaminated groundwater in response to subsurface heterogeneity. Although used in previous studies, the stage-temperature correlation coefficient proved an unreliable indicator of the stage-driven forcing on groundwater discharge in the presence of other factors influencing river water temperature. In contrast, S-transform analysis of the stage and FODTS data definitively identifies the spatial distribution of discharge zones and provided information on the dominant forcing periods (≥2 d) of the complex dam operations driving stage fluctuations and hence groundwater-surface water exchange at the 300-Area.

  4. When holding your horses meets the deer in the headlights: time-frequency characteristics of global and selective stopping under conditions of proactive and reactive control

    PubMed Central

    Lavallee, Christina F.; Meemken, Marie T.; Herrmann, Christoph S.; Huster, Rene J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to inhibit unwanted thoughts or actions is crucial for successful functioning in daily life; however, this ability is often impaired in a number of psychiatric disorders. Despite the relevance of inhibition in everyday situations, current models of inhibition are rather simplistic and provide little generalizability especially in the face of clinical disorders. Thus, given the importance of inhibition for proper cognitive functioning, the need for a paradigm, which incorporates factors that will subsequently improve the current model for understanding inhibition, is of high demand. A popular paradigm used to assess motor inhibition, the stop-signal paradigm, can be modified to further advance the current conceptual model of inhibitory control and thus provide a basis for better understanding different facets of inhibition. Namely, in this study, we have developed a novel version of the stop-signal task to assess how preparation (that is, whether reactive or proactive) and selectivity of the stopping behavior effect well-known time-frequency characteristics associated with successful inhibition and concomitant behavioral measures. With this innovative paradigm, we demonstrate that the selective nature of the stopping task modulates theta and motoric beta activity and we further provide the first account of delta activity as an electrophysiological feature sensitive to both manipulations of selectivity and preparatory control. PMID:25540615

  5. Comparison of Matching Pursuit Algorithm with Other Signal Processing Techniques for Computation of the Time-Frequency Power Spectrum of Brain Signals.

    PubMed

    Chandran K S, Subhash; Mishra, Ashutosh; Shirhatti, Vinay; Ray, Supratim

    2016-03-23

    Signals recorded from the brain often show rhythmic patterns at different frequencies, which are tightly coupled to the external stimuli as well as the internal state of the subject. In addition, these signals have very transient structures related to spiking or sudden onset of a stimulus, which have durations not exceeding tens of milliseconds. Further, brain signals are highly nonstationary because both behavioral state and external stimuli can change on a short time scale. It is therefore essential to study brain signals using techniques that can represent both rhythmic and transient components of the signal, something not always possible using standard signal processing techniques such as short time fourier transform, multitaper method, wavelet transform, or Hilbert transform. In this review, we describe a multiscale decomposition technique based on an over-complete dictionary called matching pursuit (MP), and show that it is able to capture both a sharp stimulus-onset transient and a sustained gamma rhythm in local field potential recorded from the primary visual cortex. We compare the performance of MP with other techniques and discuss its advantages and limitations. Data and codes for generating all time-frequency power spectra are provided. PMID:27013668

  6. Comparison of Matching Pursuit Algorithm with Other Signal Processing Techniques for Computation of the Time-Frequency Power Spectrum of Brain Signals.

    PubMed

    Chandran K S, Subhash; Mishra, Ashutosh; Shirhatti, Vinay; Ray, Supratim

    2016-03-23

    Signals recorded from the brain often show rhythmic patterns at different frequencies, which are tightly coupled to the external stimuli as well as the internal state of the subject. In addition, these signals have very transient structures related to spiking or sudden onset of a stimulus, which have durations not exceeding tens of milliseconds. Further, brain signals are highly nonstationary because both behavioral state and external stimuli can change on a short time scale. It is therefore essential to study brain signals using techniques that can represent both rhythmic and transient components of the signal, something not always possible using standard signal processing techniques such as short time fourier transform, multitaper method, wavelet transform, or Hilbert transform. In this review, we describe a multiscale decomposition technique based on an over-complete dictionary called matching pursuit (MP), and show that it is able to capture both a sharp stimulus-onset transient and a sustained gamma rhythm in local field potential recorded from the primary visual cortex. We compare the performance of MP with other techniques and discuss its advantages and limitations. Data and codes for generating all time-frequency power spectra are provided.

  7. Comparison of Matching Pursuit Algorithm with Other Signal Processing Techniques for Computation of the Time-Frequency Power Spectrum of Brain Signals

    PubMed Central

    Chandran KS, Subhash; Mishra, Ashutosh; Shirhatti, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Signals recorded from the brain often show rhythmic patterns at different frequencies, which are tightly coupled to the external stimuli as well as the internal state of the subject. In addition, these signals have very transient structures related to spiking or sudden onset of a stimulus, which have durations not exceeding tens of milliseconds. Further, brain signals are highly nonstationary because both behavioral state and external stimuli can change on a short time scale. It is therefore essential to study brain signals using techniques that can represent both rhythmic and transient components of the signal, something not always possible using standard signal processing techniques such as short time fourier transform, multitaper method, wavelet transform, or Hilbert transform. In this review, we describe a multiscale decomposition technique based on an over-complete dictionary called matching pursuit (MP), and show that it is able to capture both a sharp stimulus-onset transient and a sustained gamma rhythm in local field potential recorded from the primary visual cortex. We compare the performance of MP with other techniques and discuss its advantages and limitations. Data and codes for generating all time-frequency power spectra are provided. PMID:27013668

  8. Time-frequency dynamics during sleep spindles on the EEG in rodents with a genetic predisposition to absence epilepsy (WAG/Rij rats)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hramov, Alexander E.; Sitnikova, Evgenija Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Grubov, Vadim V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Khramova, Marina V.

    2015-03-01

    Sleep spindles are known to appear spontaneously in the thalamocortical neuronal network of the brain during slow-wave sleep; pathological processes in the thalamocortical network may be the reason of the absence epilepsy. The aim of the present work is to study developed changes in the time-frequency structure of sleep spindles during the progressive development of the absence epilepsy in WAG/Rij rats. EEG recordings were made at age 7 and 9 months. Automatic recognition and subsequent analysis of sleep spindles on the EEG were performed using the continuous wavelet transform. The duration of epileptic discharges and the total duration of epileptic activity were found to increase with age, while the duration of sleep spindles, conversely, decreased. In terms of the mean frequency, sleep spindles could be divided into three classes: `slow' (mean frequency 9.3Hz), `medium' (11.4Hz), and `fast' (13.5Hz). Slow and medium (transitional) spindles in five-month-old animals showed increased frequency from the beginning to the end of the spindle. The more intense the epilepsy is, the shorter are the durations of spindles of all types. The mean frequencies of `medium' and `fast' spindles were higher in rats with more intense signs of epilepsy. Overall, high epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats was linked with significant changes in spindles of the transitional type, with less marked changes in the two traditionally identified types of spindle, slow and fast.

  9. Understanding the Public Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Carrie

    2003-01-01

    This overview of the public domain covers: defining the public domain; figuring out if a work is protected by copyright; being sure a work is in the public domain; asserting the copyright protection and term; the Creative Commons initiative; building the Information Commons; when permission is needed for using a public domain work; and special…

  10. See What I See, Do as I Do: Promoting Joint Attention and Imitation in Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warreyn, Petra; Roeyers, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Since imitation and joint attention are both important abilities for young children and since children with autism spectrum disorder show a range of problems in these domains, imitation and joint attention are important targets for intervention. In this study, we examined the possibility of promoting imitation and joint attention by means of a…

  11. MISR JOINT_AS Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-07-21

    Joint Aerosol Product (JOINT_AS) The MISR Level 3 Products are global or regional ... field campaigns at daily and monthly time scales. The Joint Aerosol product provides a monthly global statistical summary of MISR ...

  12. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  13. Pressure vessel flex joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An airtight, flexible joint is disclosed for the interfacing of two pressure vessels such as between the Space Station docking tunnel and the Space Shuttle Orbiter bulkhead adapter. The joint provides for flexibility while still retaining a structural link between the two vessels required due to the loading created by the internal/external pressure differential. The joint design provides for limiting the axial load carried across the joint to a specific value, a function returned in the Orbiter/Station tunnel interface. The flex joint comprises a floating structural segment which is permanently attached to one of the pressure vessels through the use of an inflatable seal. The geometric configuration of the joint causes the tension between the vessels created by the internal gas pressure to compress the inflatable seal. The inflation pressure of the seal is kept at a value above the internal/external pressure differential of the vessels in order to maintain a controlled distance between the floating segment and pressure vessel. The inflatable seal consists of either a hollow torus-shaped flexible bladder or two rolling convoluted diaphragm seals which may be reinforced by a system of straps or fabric anchored to the hard structures. The joint acts as a flexible link to allow both angular motion and lateral displacement while it still contains the internal pressure and holds the axial tension between the vessels.

  14. Compliant Joints For Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Compliant joints devised to accommodate misalignments of tools and/or workpieces with respect to robotic manipulators. Has characteristics and appearance of both universal-joint and cable-spring-type flexible shaft coupling. Compliance derived from elastic properties of short pieces of cable. Compliance of joint determined by lengths, distances between, relative orientations, thickness of strands, number of strands, material, amount of pretwist, and number of short pieces of cable. Worm-drive mechanism used to adjust lengths to vary compliance as needed during operation.

  15. Total ankle joint replacement.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  16. A Noise Reduction Method for Dual-Mass Micro-Electromechanical Gyroscopes Based on Sample Entropy Empirical Mode Decomposition and Time-Frequency Peak Filtering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chong; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Shi, Yunbo; Tang, Jun; Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The different noise components in a dual-mass micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope structure is analyzed in this paper, including mechanical-thermal noise (MTN), electronic-thermal noise (ETN), flicker noise (FN) and Coriolis signal in-phase noise (IPN). The structure equivalent electronic model is established, and an improved white Gaussian noise reduction method for dual-mass MEMS gyroscopes is proposed which is based on sample entropy empirical mode decomposition (SEEMD) and time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF). There is a contradiction in TFPS, i.e., selecting a short window length may lead to good preservation of signal amplitude but bad random noise reduction, whereas selecting a long window length may lead to serious attenuation of the signal amplitude but effective random noise reduction. In order to achieve a good tradeoff between valid signal amplitude preservation and random noise reduction, SEEMD is adopted to improve TFPF. Firstly, the original signal is decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by EMD, and the SE of each IMF is calculated in order to classify the numerous IMFs into three different components; then short window TFPF is employed for low frequency component of IMFs, and long window TFPF is employed for high frequency component of IMFs, and the noise component of IMFs is wiped off directly; at last the final signal is obtained after reconstruction. Rotation experimental and temperature experimental are carried out to verify the proposed SEEMD-TFPF algorithm, the verification and comparison results show that the de-noising performance of SEEMD-TFPF is better than that achievable with the traditional wavelet, Kalman filter and fixed window length TFPF methods. PMID:27258276

  17. One hundred ways to process time, frequency, rate and scale in the central auditory system: a pattern-recognition meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hemery, Edgar; Aucouturier, Jean-Julien

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian auditory system extracts features from the acoustic environment based on the responses of spatially distributed sets of neurons in the subcortical and cortical auditory structures. The characteristic responses of these neurons (linearly approximated by their spectro-temporal receptive fields, or STRFs) suggest that auditory representations are formed, as early as in the inferior colliculi, on the basis of a time, frequency, rate (temporal modulations) and scale (spectral modulations) analysis of sound. However, how these four dimensions are integrated and processed in subsequent neural networks remains unclear. In this work, we present a new methodology to generate computational insights into the functional organization of such processes. We first propose a systematic framework to explore more than a hundred different computational strategies proposed in the literature to process the output of a generic STRF model. We then evaluate these strategies on their ability to compute perceptual distances between pairs of environmental sounds. Finally, we conduct a meta-analysis of the dataset of all these algorithms' accuracies to examine whether certain combinations of dimensions and certain ways to treat such dimensions are, on the whole, more computationally effective than others. We present an application of this methodology to a dataset of ten environmental sound categories, in which the analysis reveals that (1) models are most effective when they organize STRF data into frequency groupings—which is consistent with the known tonotopic organization of receptive fields in auditory structures -, and that (2) models that treat STRF data as time series are no more effective than models that rely only on summary statistics along time—which corroborates recent experimental evidence on texture discrimination by summary statistics. PMID:26190996

  18. One hundred ways to process time, frequency, rate and scale in the central auditory system: a pattern-recognition meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hemery, Edgar; Aucouturier, Jean-Julien

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian auditory system extracts features from the acoustic environment based on the responses of spatially distributed sets of neurons in the subcortical and cortical auditory structures. The characteristic responses of these neurons (linearly approximated by their spectro-temporal receptive fields, or STRFs) suggest that auditory representations are formed, as early as in the inferior colliculi, on the basis of a time, frequency, rate (temporal modulations) and scale (spectral modulations) analysis of sound. However, how these four dimensions are integrated and processed in subsequent neural networks remains unclear. In this work, we present a new methodology to generate computational insights into the functional organization of such processes. We first propose a systematic framework to explore more than a hundred different computational strategies proposed in the literature to process the output of a generic STRF model. We then evaluate these strategies on their ability to compute perceptual distances between pairs of environmental sounds. Finally, we conduct a meta-analysis of the dataset of all these algorithms' accuracies to examine whether certain combinations of dimensions and certain ways to treat such dimensions are, on the whole, more computationally effective than others. We present an application of this methodology to a dataset of ten environmental sound categories, in which the analysis reveals that (1) models are most effective when they organize STRF data into frequency groupings-which is consistent with the known tonotopic organization of receptive fields in auditory structures -, and that (2) models that treat STRF data as time series are no more effective than models that rely only on summary statistics along time-which corroborates recent experimental evidence on texture discrimination by summary statistics.

  19. Time-frequency analysis of neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies for selective detection of pulsatile tissues by avoiding probe-motion artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Tabata, Yuki; Izuwaki, Yusuke; Nakamori, Nobuyuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2015-03-01

    In order to detect the pulsatile tissues in neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies by avoiding probe-motion artifact, a time-frequency analysis has been performed in several movie fragments at typical three scenes: (a) a brain-lost, (b) a brain-captured and probe-stabilized, and (c) a brain-captured and probe-swayed ones. The pulsatile tissue, which is a key point of pediatric diagnosis, had successfully detected with an algorithm based on Fourier transform but it had required us to extract the probe-stabilized scene manually by visual observation of the movie. A spatial mean square of echo intensity Etot and a total AC power Ptot over a fan-shape of field of view were evaluated according to a power spectrum of a time-variation of 64 samples of echo intensity at each pixel in each movie fragment split from actual B-mode ultrasonic movies taken at coronal sections of a neonate. The results revealed that (1) significant low Etot was found at the brain-lost scene rather than that at the other scenes, and (2) lower Ptot was found at the probe-stabilized scene rather than the probe-swayed ones. This fact strongly suggests that the Etot and Ptot are promising features for automatic extraction of probe-stabilized scenes. It must lead to detect the pulsatile tissues selectively by avoiding probe-motion artifact and to realize systematic analysis of the whole of our extensive movie archives, which is useful not only for retrospective study of ischemic diseases but also for bedside diagnosis to stabilize the freehand ultrasonic probe.

  20. A Noise Reduction Method for Dual-Mass Micro-Electromechanical Gyroscopes Based on Sample Entropy Empirical Mode Decomposition and Time-Frequency Peak Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chong; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Shi, Yunbo; Tang, Jun; Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The different noise components in a dual-mass micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope structure is analyzed in this paper, including mechanical-thermal noise (MTN), electronic-thermal noise (ETN), flicker noise (FN) and Coriolis signal in-phase noise (IPN). The structure equivalent electronic model is established, and an improved white Gaussian noise reduction method for dual-mass MEMS gyroscopes is proposed which is based on sample entropy empirical mode decomposition (SEEMD) and time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF). There is a contradiction in TFPS, i.e., selecting a short window length may lead to good preservation of signal amplitude but bad random noise reduction, whereas selecting a long window length may lead to serious attenuation of the signal amplitude but effective random noise reduction. In order to achieve a good tradeoff between valid signal amplitude preservation and random noise reduction, SEEMD is adopted to improve TFPF. Firstly, the original signal is decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by EMD, and the SE of each IMF is calculated in order to classify the numerous IMFs into three different components; then short window TFPF is employed for low frequency component of IMFs, and long window TFPF is employed for high frequency component of IMFs, and the noise component of IMFs is wiped off directly; at last the final signal is obtained after reconstruction. Rotation experimental and temperature experimental are carried out to verify the proposed SEEMD-TFPF algorithm, the verification and comparison results show that the de-noising performance of SEEMD-TFPF is better than that achievable with the traditional wavelet, Kalman filter and fixed window length TFPF methods. PMID:27258276

  1. One hundred ways to process time, frequency, rate and scale in the central auditory system: a pattern-recognition meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hemery, Edgar; Aucouturier, Jean-Julien

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian auditory system extracts features from the acoustic environment based on the responses of spatially distributed sets of neurons in the subcortical and cortical auditory structures. The characteristic responses of these neurons (linearly approximated by their spectro-temporal receptive fields, or STRFs) suggest that auditory representations are formed, as early as in the inferior colliculi, on the basis of a time, frequency, rate (temporal modulations) and scale (spectral modulations) analysis of sound. However, how these four dimensions are integrated and processed in subsequent neural networks remains unclear. In this work, we present a new methodology to generate computational insights into the functional organization of such processes. We first propose a systematic framework to explore more than a hundred different computational strategies proposed in the literature to process the output of a generic STRF model. We then evaluate these strategies on their ability to compute perceptual distances between pairs of environmental sounds. Finally, we conduct a meta-analysis of the dataset of all these algorithms' accuracies to examine whether certain combinations of dimensions and certain ways to treat such dimensions are, on the whole, more computationally effective than others. We present an application of this methodology to a dataset of ten environmental sound categories, in which the analysis reveals that (1) models are most effective when they organize STRF data into frequency groupings-which is consistent with the known tonotopic organization of receptive fields in auditory structures -, and that (2) models that treat STRF data as time series are no more effective than models that rely only on summary statistics along time-which corroborates recent experimental evidence on texture discrimination by summary statistics. PMID:26190996

  2. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to attach this part. Repair your muscles and tendons around the new joint and close the surgical cut. The surgery takes about 2 hours. Most artificial knees have both metal and plastic parts. Some ...

  3. Wrist joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kersten, L.; Johnson, J. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A wrist joint assembly is provided for use with a mechanical manipulator arm for finely positioning an end-effector carried by the wrist joint on the terminal end of the manipulator arm. The wrist joint assembly is pivotable about a first axis to produce a yaw motion, a second axis is to produce a pitch motion, and a third axis to produce a roll motion. The wrist joint assembly includes a disk segment affixed to the terminal end of the manipulator arm and a first housing member, a second housing member, and a third housing member. The third housing member and the mechanical end-effector are moved in the yaw, pitch, and roll motion. Drive means are provided for rotating each of the housings about their respective axis which includes a cluster of miniature motors having spur gears carried on the output drive shaft which mesh with a center drive gear affixed on the housing to be rotated.

  4. Improved orthopedic arm joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dane, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Joint permits smooth and easy movement of disabled arm and is smaller, lighter and less expensive than previous models. Device is interchangeable and may be used on either arm at the shoulder or at the elbow.

  5. Joint fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    Gram stain of joint fluid ... result means no bacteria are present on the Gram stain. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among ... Abnormal results mean bacteria were seen on the Gram stain. This may be a sign of a ...

  6. Scaling in Columnar Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Stephen

    2007-03-01

    Columnar jointing is a fracture pattern common in igneous rocks in which cracks self-organize into a roughly hexagonal arrangement, leaving behind an ordered colonnade. We report observations of columnar jointing in a laboratory analog system, desiccated corn starch slurries. Using measurements of moisture density, evaporation rates, and fracture advance rates, we suggest an advective-diffusive system is responsible for the rough scaling behavior of columnar joints. This theory explains the order of magnitude difference in scales between jointing in lavas and in starches. We investigated the scaling of average columnar cross-sectional areas in experiments where the evaporation rate was fixed using feedback methods. Our results suggest that the column area at a particular depth is related to both the current conditions, and hysteretically to the geometry of the pattern at previous depths. We argue that there exists a range of stable column scales allowed for any particular evaporation rate.

  7. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injected so the provider can see where to place the medicine. The steroid medicine is slowly injected into the joint. After the injection, you will remain on the table for another 5 to 10 minutes or so. ...

  8. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008 Previous Next Related Articles: Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD) Are You Biting Off More Than You Can Chew? Equilibration May Lessen TMD Pain Fender-benders: Source of TMD? First Comes ...

  9. Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie Bar, & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Tie Bar, & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Medora Bridge, Spanning East Fork of White River at State Route 235, Medora, Jackson County, IN

  10. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  11. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  12. BUILDING MODEL ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS WITH THE JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY (JUPITER) API

    EPA Science Inventory

    The open-source, public domain JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) API (Application Programming Interface) provides conventions and Fortran-90 modules to develop applications (computer programs) for analyzing process models. The input ...

  13. [Biomechanics of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H

    1989-03-01

    According to Fick, the tree-dimensional patterns of foot motion are best characterized as jawlike movement. Anatomically and biomechanically, this process represents conjoined, synchronous motion within the three mobile segments of the hindfoot: the ankle joint, the posterior subtalar joint, and the anterior subtalar joint. Foot kinematics can be described more completely if the anterior subtalar joint is defined not only as the talocalcaneal navicular joint, but as including the calcaneocuboid joint, thus representing the transverse joint of the tarsus, i.e., the Chopart joint. The axes of these three joints can be defined precisely. In some parts they represent a screwlike motion, clockwise or counter-clockwise, around the central ligamentous structures (fibulotibial ligament, talocalcaneal interosseous ligament, bifurcate ligament). The individual anatomy and structure of these ligaments provide variations in the degree and direction of foot motion. A precise knowledge of foot kinematics is important in surgical ligament and joint reconstruction and in selective foot arthrodeses.

  14. Joint ventures in medical services.

    PubMed

    Rublee, D A

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an overview of joint-venture activity in healthcare, describing trends in joint ventures and raising issues for physicians. The purposes are to discuss the major current facets of joint-venture alliances in healthcare and to identify policy issues that arise from the trend to use joint ventures as an organizational tool. Speculation is made about the future role of joint ventures in the organization of healthcare.

  15. Dissimilar metals joint evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, M. E.; Apodaca, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    Dissimilar metals tubular joints between 2219-T851 aluminum alloy and 304L stainless steel were fabricated and tested to evaluate bonding processes. Joints were fabricated by four processes: (1) inertia (friction) weldings, where the metals are spun and forced together to create the weld; (2) explosive welding, where the metals are impacted together at high velocity; (3) co-extrusion, where the metals are extruded in contact at high temperature to promote diffusion; and (4) swaging, where residual stresses in the metals after a stretching operation maintain forced contact in mutual shear areas. Fifteen joints of each type were prepared and evaluated in a 6.35 cm (2.50 in.) O.D. size, with 0.32 cm (0.13 in.) wall thickness, and 7.6 cm (3.0 in) total length. The joints were tested to evaluate their ability to withstand pressure cycle, thermal cycle, galvanic corrosion and burst tests. Leakage tests and other non-destructive test techniques were used to evaluate the behavior of the joints, and the microstructure of the bond areas was analyzed.

  16. One-way quantum computing with arbitrarily large time-frequency continuous-variable cluster states from a single optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Rafael N.; Wang, Pei; Sridhar, Niranjan; Chen, Moran; Pfister, Olivier; Menicucci, Nicolas C.

    2016-09-01

    One-way quantum computing is experimentally appealing because it requires only local measurements on an entangled resource called a cluster state. Record-size, but nonuniversal, continuous-variable cluster states were recently demonstrated separately in the time and frequency domains. We propose to combine these approaches into a scalable architecture in which a single optical parametric oscillator and simple interferometer entangle up to (3 ×103 frequencies) × (unlimited number of temporal modes) into a computationally universal continuous-variable cluster state. We introduce a generalized measurement protocol to enable improved computational performance on this entanglement resource.

  17. Use of high and low frequency dielectric measurements in the NDE of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethrick, R. A.; Hayward, D.; McConnell, B. K.; Crane, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy has been developed as a non-destructive technique for assessment of moisture content and structural integrity of adhesively bonded joints. Knowledge of these parameters is particularly crucial for the aerospace industry, since environmental degradation of adhesive joints presents a major limit on their utilization. High and low frequency measurements have been carried out on joints assembled from CFRP adherend, and a commercially available adhesive (AF 163-2K). The samples have been aged in deionised water at 75oC to chart the effect water ingress has on bond durability. In addition, some joints have been exposed to cryogenic temperatures to mimic the conditions joints experience whilst an aircraft is in flight. In this way it has been possible to determine the extent of degradation caused by freezing of water within the joint structure. Dielectric behaviour of the joints was studied in both the frequency and in the time domain. Frequency domain analysis allows the amount and effects of moisture ingress in the bondline to be assessed, whereas the time domain highlights the onset of joint defects with increasing exposure time. Mechanical testing of the joints has been carried out to enable correlation between changes in strength and failure mechanism due to moisture ingress, with changes in the dielectric data. In addition, dielectric studies of the neat adhesive have been undertaken, as have gravimetric and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. These have helped reveal the effects of ageing upon the adhesive layer itself.

  18. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  19. Joint reversible data hiding and image encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bian; Busch, Christoph; Niu, Xiamu

    2010-01-01

    Image encryption process is jointed with reversible data hiding in this paper, where the data to be hided are modulated by different secret keys selected for encryption. To extract the hided data from the cipher-text, the different tentative decrypted results are tested against typical random distribution in both spatial and frequency domain and the goodnessof- fit degrees are compared to extract one hided bit. The encryption based data hiding process is inherently reversible. Experiments demonstrate the proposed scheme's effectiveness on natural and textural images, both in gray-level and binary forms.

  20. Joint Custody and Coparenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sell, Kenneth D.

    Results are presented of an intensive search of U.S. newspapers and periodicals on the joint custody of children after divorce, where both parents have continued responsibility for parenting and where the children spend part of each week, month, or year with both of the parents. Areas of concern addressed by these materials include the following:…

  1. Human temporomandibular joint morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carini, Francesco; Scardina, Giuseppe Alessandro; Caradonna, Carola; Messina, Pietro; Valenza, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint morphogenesis was studied. Ranging in age of fetuses examined was from 6 to14 weeks' gestation. Our results showed the condyle so first element that appear between 6 degrees and 8 degrees week (condylar blastema). After a week appear temporal elements. Disk appear at the same time of glenoid blastema and it reaches an advanced differentation before of the condyle and temporal element, so these don't effect machanical compression on mesenchyma where we find the disk. So we think that the disk result of genetic expression and it isn't the result of mechanical compression. The inferior joint cavity appear to 12 week. The superior joint cavity appear to 13-14 week. In conclusion, the appearance of the condyle is the first event during TMJ morphogenesis, with its initial bud, in form of a mesenchymal thickening, becoming detectable between the sixth and eight week of development, when all the large joints of the limbs are already well defined. PMID:18333411

  2. Clad metal joint closure

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, O.W.

    1985-04-09

    A plasma arc spray overlay of cladding metals is used over joints between clad metal pieces to provide a continuous cladding metal surface. The technique permits applying an overlay of a high melting point cladding metal to a cladding metal surface without excessive heating of the backing metal.

  3. Domains and Naive Theories

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Susan A.; Noles, Nicholaus S.

    2013-01-01

    Human cognition entails domain-specific cognitive processes that influence memory, attention, categorization, problem-solving, reasoning, and knowledge organization. This review examines domain-specific causal theories, which are of particular interest for permitting an examination of how knowledge structures change over time. We first describe the properties of commonsense theories, and how commonsense theories differ from scientific theories, illustrating with children’s classification of biological and non-biological kinds. We next consider the implications of domain-specificity for broader issues regarding cognitive development and conceptual change. We then examine the extent to which domain-specific theories interact, and how people reconcile competing causal frameworks. Future directions for research include examining how different content domains interact, the nature of theory change, the role of context (including culture, language, and social interaction) in inducing different frameworks, and the neural bases for domain-specific reasoning. PMID:24187603

  4. Ischemia detection by electrocardiogram in wavelet domain using entropy measure

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, Hossein; Mahjoob, Mohammad Parsa; Farahabadi, Eiman; Farahabadi, Amin; Dehnavi, Alireza Mehri

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemic heart disease is one of the common fatal diseases in advanced countries. Because signal perturbation in healthy people is less than signal perturbation in patients, entropy measure can be used as an appropriate feature for ischemia detection. METHODS: Four entropy-based methods comprising of using electrocardiogram (ECG) signal directly, wavelet sub-bands of ECG signals, extracted ST segments and reconstructed signal from time-frequency feature of ST segments in wavelet domain were investigated to distinguish between ECG signal of healthy individuals and patients. We used exercise treadmill test as a gold standard, with a sample of 40 patients who had ischemic signs based on initial diagnosis of medical practitioner. RESULTS: The suggested technique in wavelet domain resulted in the highest discrepancy between healthy individuals and patients in comparison to other methods. Specificity and sensitivity of this method were 95% and 94% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The method based on wavelet sub-bands outperformed the others. PMID:22973350

  5. New Joint Sealants. Criteria, Design and Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    Contents include--(1) sealing concrete joints, (2) sealing glass and metal joints, (3) metal and glass joint sealants from a fabricator's viewpoint, (4) a theory of adhesion for joint sealants, (5) geometry of simple joint seals under strain, (6) joint sealant specifications from a manufacturer's viewpoint, (7) joint sealant requirements from an…

  6. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly

  7. Learning and Domain Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Yishay

    Domain adaptation is a fundamental learning problem where one wishes to use labeled data from one or several source domains to learn a hypothesis performing well on a different, yet related, domain for which no labeled data is available. This generalization across domains is a very significant challenge for many machine learning applications and arises in a variety of natural settings, including NLP tasks (document classification, sentiment analysis, etc.), speech recognition (speakers and noise or environment adaptation) and face recognition (different lighting conditions, different population composition).

  8. Stress Wave Propagation Across a Rock Mass with Two Non-parallel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, S. B.; Li, J. C.; Zhang, Q. B.; Li, H. B.; Li, N. N.

    2016-10-01

    A rock mass includes a number of joints, which govern the mechanical behavior of the rock mass and greatly affect stress wave propagation. Generally, joints do not parallel with each other, resulting in multiple wave reflections between joints and complex wave propagation process in rock masses. The present study presents an approach to analyze stress wave propagation through a rock mass with two non-parallel joints when the angle between the two joints is <10°. For incident P-wave impinging on this kind of rock mass, multiple reflections take place between the two joints. Meanwhile, transmitted waves are generated and propagate successively away from the joints. The mathematical expressions for P-wave propagation across the two joints are established in time domain by analyzing the wave field in the rock mass. By comparing with the result from numerical simulation, the new approach is proved to be effective to analyze wave propagation across two non-parallel joints, where the influence of joint tips on wave propagation is neglected. Parametric studies show that the joint stiffness, joint angle and frequency of incident wave have different effects on transmission and reflection coefficients.

  9. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Iavarone, M; Moore, S A; Fedor, J; Ciocys, S T; Karapetrov, G; Pearson, J; Novosad, V; Bader, S D

    2014-08-28

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application.

  10. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Iavarone, M.; Moore, S. A.; Fedor, J.; Ciocys, S. T.; Karapetrov, G.; Pearson, J.; Novosad, V.; Bader, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application. PMID:25164004

  11. Shoulder Joint For Protective Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Smallcombe, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    Shoulder joint allows full range of natural motion: wearer senses little or no resisting force or torque. Developed for space suit, joint offers advantages in protective garments for underwater work, firefighting, or cleanup of hazardous materials.

  12. Determination of Parachute Joint Factors using Seam and Joint Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollmann, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This paper details the methodology for determining the joint factor for all parachute components. This method has been successfully implemented on the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) for the NASA Orion crew module for use in determining the margin of safety for each component under peak loads. Also discussed are concepts behind the joint factor and what drives the loss of material strength at joints. The joint factor is defined as a "loss in joint strength...relative to the basic material strength" that occurs when "textiles are connected to each other or to metals." During the CPAS engineering development phase, a conservative joint factor of 0.80 was assumed for each parachute component. In order to refine this factor and eliminate excess conservatism, a seam and joint testing program was implemented as part of the structural validation. This method split each of the parachute structural joints into discrete tensile tests designed to duplicate the loading of each joint. Breaking strength data collected from destructive pull testing was then used to calculate the joint factor in the form of an efficiency. Joint efficiency is the percentage of the base material strength that remains after degradation due to sewing or interaction with other components; it is used interchangeably with joint factor in this paper. Parachute materials vary in type-mainly cord, tape, webbing, and cloth -which require different test fixtures and joint sample construction methods. This paper defines guidelines for designing and testing samples based on materials and test goals. Using the test methodology and analysis approach detailed in this paper, the minimum joint factor for each parachute component can be formulated. The joint factors can then be used to calculate the design factor and margin of safety for that component, a critical part of the design verification process.

  13. Causal Learning Across Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Laura E.; Gopnik, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Five studies investigated (a) children's ability to use the dependent and independent probabilities of events to make causal inferences and (b) the interaction between such inferences and domain-specific knowledge. In Experiment 1, preschoolers used patterns of dependence and independence to make accurate causal inferences in the domains of…

  14. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  15. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  16. Achieving joint benefits from joint implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Moomaw, W.R.

    1995-11-01

    Joint Implementation (JI) appears to have been born with Applied Energy Services Guatemala project in 1988. That project, to plant 52 million trees, protect existing forests from cutting and fire, and enhance rural development, is being implemented by CARE Guatemala to offset 120 per cent of the emissions of a small coal burning power plant that has been built in Connecticut. Since that time, several utilities and governments have initiated additional projects. Not all of these necessarily consist of tree planting in other countries, but may consist of energy efficiency or energy conservation programs designed to reduce carbon emissions by at least as much as the additional releases from a new facility. All JI projects share the characteristic of linking the release of greenhouse gases in an industrial country with an offset that reduces or absorbs a comparable amount in another country. The emitter in the industrial country is willing to pay for the reduction elsewhere because costs are less than they would be at home.

  17. Phase 1 Program Joint Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nield, George C. (Editor); Vorobiev, Pavel Mikhailovich (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This report consists of inputs from each of the Phase I Program Joint Working Groups. The Working Groups were tasked to describe the organizational structure and work processes that they used during the program, joint accomplishments, lessons learned, and applications to the International Space Station Program. This report is a top-level joint reference document that contains information of interest to both countries.

  18. Double slotted socket spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2001-05-22

    A new class of spherical joints is disclosed. These spherical joints are capable of extremely large angular displacements (full cone angles in excess of 270.degree.), while exhibiting no singularities or dead spots in their range of motion. These joints can improve or simplify a wide range of mechanical devices.

  19. Swivel Joint For Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, James F.

    1988-01-01

    Swivel joint allows liquid-nitrogen pipe to rotate through angle of 100 degree with respect to mating pipe. Functions without cracking hard foam insulation on lines. Pipe joint rotates on disks so mechanical stress not transmitted to thick insulation on pipes. Inner disks ride on fixed outer disks. Disks help to seal pressurized liquid nitrogen flowing through joint.

  20. Real-time hybrid joint transform correlator with parallel processing architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuwen; Ge, Bao-Zhen; Zhang, Yimo; Zhao, Xiao-Dong; Huang, Zhanhua

    1996-12-01

    A real-time hybrid joint transform correlator (JTC) with parallel processing architecture that use two liquid crystal light valves spatial light modulators, two VP32 image boards and two optical wavefront-division multiplexers as the key parts was presented. Using this hybrid JTC< real-time high- efficiency joint transform correlation, high-speed joint transform correlation and four-channel joint transform correlation were realized. The hybrid JTC system has also been used in the domain of morphological complex-valued kernel scale-space image processing. In this paper, the principles of the above experiments are described, experimental results are also given and analyzed.

  1. Joint hypermobility syndrome pain.

    PubMed

    Grahame, Rodney

    2009-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) was initially defined as the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the presence of joint laxity and hypermobility in otherwise healthy individuals. It is now perceived as a commonly overlooked, underdiagnosed, multifaceted, and multisystemic heritable disorder of connective tissue (HDCT), which shares many of the phenotypic features of other HDCTs such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Whereas the additional flexibility can confer benefits in terms of mobility and agility, adverse effects of tissue laxity and fragility can give rise to clinical consequences that resonate far beyond the confines of the musculoskeletal system. There is hardly a clinical specialty to be found that is not touched in one way or another by JHS. Over the past decade, it has become evident that of all the complications that may arise in JHS, chronic pain is arguably the most menacing and difficult to treat. PMID:19889283

  2. Laundry joint venture.

    PubMed

    Giancola, D; Voyvodich, M

    1984-12-01

    Many hospitals are concerned about the loss of control which is associated with contracting for linen service. On the the hand, many laundries do not have the resources or experience to serve hospitals in a comprehensive and trouble-free manner. In many communities a joint venture, such as the one described here, can successfully combine the interests of the hospital and laundry communities without causing the hospitals to lose control of the service and without requiring the laundry operator to have detailed knowledge of hospital operations. As more hospitals opt for contract service, and if this service is to be provided at the lowest total cost, the hospitals and the laundries must come to grips with the problems surrounding the laundry-hospital interface. A joint venture, such as that described here, is one way to accomplish this.

  3. Analysis of minor fractures associated with joints and faulted joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, Kenneth M.; Zhao, Guozhu; Johnson, Arvid M.

    In this paper, we use fracture mechanics to interpret conditions responsible for secondary cracks that adorn joints and faulted joints in the Entrada Sandstone in Arches National Park, U.S.A. Because the joints in most places accommodated shearing offsets of a few mm to perhaps 1 dm, and thus became faulted joints, some of the minor cracks are due to faulting. However, in a few places where the shearing was zero, one can examine minor cracks due solely to interaction of joint segments at the time they formed. We recognize several types of minor cracks associated with subsequent faulting of the joints. One is the kink, a crack that occurs at the termination of a straight joint and whose trend is abruptly different from that of the joint. Kinks are common and should be studied because they contain a great deal of information about conditions during fracturing. The sense of kinking indicates the sense of shear during faulting: a kink that turns clockwise with respect to the direction of the main joint is a result of right-lateral shear, and a kink that turns counterclockwise is a result of left-lateral shear. Furthermore, the kink angle is related to the ratio of the shear stress responsible for the kinking to the normal stress responsible for the opening of the joint. The amount of opening of a joint at the time it faulted or even at the time the joint itself formed can be estimated by measuring the kink angle and the amount of strike-slip at some point along the faulted joint. Other fractures that form near terminations of pre-existing joints in response to shearing along the joint are horsetail fractures. Similar short fractures can occur anywhere along the length of the joints. The primary value in recognizing these fractures is that they indicate the sense of faulting accommodated by the host fracture and the direction of maximum tension. Even where there has been insignificant regional shearing in the Garden Area, the joints can have ornate terminations. Perhaps

  4. Temporomandibular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Arun; Verma, Vishal; Singh, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an uncommon but debilitating condition of the facial skeleton. The condition may be acute or chronic. Acute TMJ dislocation is common in clinical practice and can be managed easily with manual reduction. Chronic recurrent TMJ dislocation is a challenging situation to manage. In this article, we discuss the comprehensive review of the different treatment modalities in managing TMJ dislocation. PMID:26668447

  5. Prosthetic elbow joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An artificial, manually positionable elbow joint for use in an upper extremity, above-elbow, prosthetic is described. The prosthesis provides a locking feature that is easily controlled by the wearer. The instant elbow joint is very strong and durable enough to withstand the repeated heavy loadings encountered by a wearer who works in an industrial, construction, farming, or similar environment. The elbow joint of the present invention comprises a turntable, a frame, a forearm, and a locking assembly. The frame generally includes a housing for the locking assembly and two protruding ears. The forearm includes an elongated beam having a cup-shaped cylindrical member at one end and a locking wheel having a plurality of holes along a circular arc on its other end with a central bore for pivotal attachment to the protruding ears of the frame. The locking assembly includes a collar having a central opening with a plurality of internal grooves, a plurality of internal cam members each having a chamfered surface at one end and a V-shaped slot at its other end; an elongated locking pin having a crown wheel with cam surfaces and locking lugs secured thereto; two coiled compression springs; and a flexible filament attached to one end of the elongated locking pin and extending from the locking assembly for extending and retracting the locking pin into the holes in the locking wheel to permit selective adjustment of the forearm relative to the frame. In use, the turntable is affixed to the upper arm part of the prosthetic in the conventional manner, and the cup-shaped cylindrical member on one end of the forearm is affixed to the forearm piece of the prosthetic in the conventional manner. The elbow joint is easily adjusted and locked between maximum flex and extended positions.

  6. Acromioclavicular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, J R

    1998-04-01

    The acromioclavicular joint is commonly involved in athletic injuries. Most commonly, a sprain to the joint occurs with variability in the amount of ligamentous damage and displacement that occurs. In all but the most severe dislocations, treatment consists of initial sling immobilization and early functional rehabilitation. The outcome is usually excellent with full return of function following these injuries. The rarer types (IV, V, and VI) require operative reduction and fixation. Distal clavicle fractures are related injuries, which many times disrupt the stabilizing ligaments of the acromioclavicular joint. Many can be treated nonoperatively, but there are several subtypes that should be considered for early fixation to reduce complications of pain and shoulder dysfunction. An atraumatic, overuse condition, which is becoming more prevalent and seems related to weight training, is osteolysis of the distal clavicle. There is insidious onset of shoulder pain with symptoms and signs consistent with acromioclavicular pathology. Activity modification is the best method of controlling symptoms. Failure of the conservative approach necessitates operative excision of the distal clavicle.

  7. Mapping Joint Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slawski, Carl

    The flow diagrams in this document provide cognitive maps to aid in synthesizing diverse areas of knowledge in a special brand of field theory. A model is presented which highlights the domains of structural functionalism (with concepts of cultural, personal and societal systems) and symbolic interactionism (with the concepts of self, sentiments…

  8. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  9. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  10. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  11. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  12. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  13. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  14. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  15. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  16. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  17. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  18. Semi-supervised domain adaptation on manifolds.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li; Pan, Sinno Jialin

    2014-12-01

    In real-life problems, the following semi-supervised domain adaptation scenario is often encountered: we have full access to some source data, which is usually very large; the target data distribution is under certain unknown transformation of the source data distribution; meanwhile, only a small fraction of the target instances come with labels. The goal is to learn a prediction model by incorporating information from the source domain that is able to generalize well on the target test instances. We consider an explicit form of transformation functions and especially linear transformations that maps examples from the source to the target domain, and we argue that by proper preprocessing of the data from both source and target domains, the feasible transformation functions can be characterized by a set of rotation matrices. This naturally leads to an optimization formulation under the special orthogonal group constraints. We present an iterative coordinate descent solver that is able to jointly learn the transformation as well as the model parameters, while the geodesic update ensures the manifold constraints are always satisfied. Our framework is sufficiently general to work with a variety of loss functions and prediction problems. Empirical evaluations on synthetic and real-world experiments demonstrate the competitive performance of our method with respect to the state-of-the-art. PMID:25314712

  19. Joint attention studies in normal and autistic children using NIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Ujwal; Hall, Michael; Gutierrez, Anibal; Messinger, Daniel; Rey, Gustavo; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2011-03-01

    Autism is a socio-communication brain development disorder. It is marked by degeneration in the ability to respond to joint attention skill task, from as early as 12 to 18 months of age. This trait is used to distinguish autistic from nonautistic. In this study Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is being applied for the first time to study the difference in activation and connectivity in the frontal cortex of typically developing (TD) and autistic children between 4-8 years of age in response to joint attention task. The optical measurements are acquired in real time from frontal cortex using Imagent (ISS Inc.) - a frequency domain based NIRS system in response to video clips which engenders a feeling of joint attention experience in the subjects. A block design consisting of 5 blocks of following sequence 30 sec joint attention clip (J), 30 sec non-joint attention clip (NJ) and 30 sec rest condition is used. Preliminary results from TD child shows difference in brain activation (in terms of oxy-hemoglobin, HbO) during joint attention interaction compared to the nonjoint interaction and rest. Similar activation study did not reveal significant differences in HbO across the stimuli in, unlike in an autistic child. Extensive studies are carried out to validate the initial observations from both brain activation as well as connectivity analysis. The result has significant implication for research in neural pathways associated with autism that can be mapped using NIRS.

  20. Visualizing Knowledge Domains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borner, Katy; Chen, Chaomei; Boyack, Kevin W.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews visualization techniques for scientific disciplines and information retrieval and classification. Highlights include historical background of scientometrics, bibliometrics, and citation analysis; map generation; process flow of visualizing knowledge domains; measures and similarity calculations; vector space model; factor analysis;…

  1. Influence of joint topology on the formation of brazed joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekulic, Dusan P.; Zellmer, Benjamin P.; Nigro, Nicholas

    2001-09-01

    This paper discusses the influence of joint topology on the formation of brazed joints. For the purposes of this study, the joint topology is defined by dimensionless parameters that characterize: (i) the geometry of the mating surfaces (shape and configuration), (ii) the gap between bonded parts (clearance and tolerances), (iii) the joint orientation in the gravity field and (iv) the volume of the joint. The influence of these parameters is presented for several joints with a topology that is typically found in the manufacture of compact heat exchangers. The results were obtained by employing a method that is based on a variational principle and minimization of the potential energy of the molten aluminium liquid metal just prior to the onset of solidification. The method, which was verified by comparison with experimental data obtained from controlled atmosphere brazing of aluminium alloys, is discussed in an accompanying paper.

  2. FERM Domain of Moesin Desorbs the Basic-Rich Cytoplasmic Domain of l-Selectin from the Anionic Membrane Surface

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Cho, Sungyun; Li, Renhao

    2013-01-01

    Moesin and calmodulin (CaM) jointly associate with the cytoplasmic domain of l-selectin in the cell to modulate the function and ectodomain shedding of l-selectin. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, we have examined the association of moesin FERM domain with the recombinant transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of l-selectin (CLS) reconstituted in model phospholipid liposomes. The dissociation constant of moesin FERM domain to CLS in the phosphatidylcholine liposome is about 300 nM. In contrast to disrupting the CaM association with CLS, inclusion of anionic phosphatidylserine lipids in the phosphatidylcholine liposome increased the apparent binding affinity of moesin FERM domain for CLS. Using the environmentally sensitive fluorescent probe attached to the cytoplasmic domain of CLS and the nitroxide quencher attached to the lipid bilayer, we showed that the association of moesin FERM domain induced the desorption of the basic-rich cytoplasmic domain of CLS from the anionic membrane surface, which enabled subsequent association of CaM to the cytoplasmic domain of CLS. These results have elucidated the molecular basis for the moesin/l-selectin/CaM ternary complex and suggested an important role of phospholipids in modulating l-selectin function and shedding. PMID:23796515

  3. FERM domain of moesin desorbs the basic-rich cytoplasmic domain of l-selectin from the anionic membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei; Cho, Sungyun; Li, Renhao

    2013-09-23

    Moesin and calmodulin (CaM) jointly associate with the cytoplasmic domain of l-selectin in the cell to modulate the function and ectodomain shedding of l-selectin. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, we have examined the association of moesin FERM domain with the recombinant transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of l-selectin (CLS) reconstituted in model phospholipid liposomes. The dissociation constant of moesin FERM domain to CLS in the phosphatidylcholine liposome is about 300nM. In contrast to disrupting the CaM association with CLS, inclusion of anionic phosphatidylserine lipids in the phosphatidylcholine liposome increased the apparent binding affinity of moesin FERM domain for CLS. Using the environmentally sensitive fluorescent probe attached to the cytoplasmic domain of CLS and the nitroxide quencher attached to the lipid bilayer, we showed that the association of moesin FERM domain induced the desorption of the basic-rich cytoplasmic domain of CLS from the anionic membrane surface, which enabled subsequent association of CaM to the cytoplasmic domain of CLS. These results have elucidated the molecular basis for the moesin/l-selectin/CaM ternary complex and suggested an important role of phospholipids in modulating l-selectin function and shedding.

  4. Joint hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fikree, Asma; Aziz, Qasim; Grahame, Rodney

    2013-05-01

    Although perceived as a rare condition, joint hypermobility syndrome is common. Its prevalence in rheumatology clinics is extremely high. Early estimates suggest that it may be the most common of all rheumatologic conditions. The problem lies in the general lack of awareness of the syndrome, its means of recognition, and the resultant failure to diagnose it correctly when present. It is a worldwide problem. This article provides an overview of hypermobility and hypermobility syndrome, stressing its multisystemic nature and the negative impact that it may have on quality of life, with particular reference to gastrointestinal involvement. PMID:23597972

  5. Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Scillia, Anthony J; Cain, E Lyle

    2015-12-01

    Our technique for acromioclavicular joint reconstruction provides a variation on coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction to also include acromioclavicular ligament reconstruction. An oblique acromial tunnel is drilled, and the medial limb of the gracilis graft, after being crossed and passed beneath the coracoid and through the clavicle, is passed through this acromial tunnel and sutured to the trapezoid graft limb after appropriate tensioning. Tenodesis screws are not placed in the bone tunnels to avoid graft fraying, and initial forces on the graft are offloaded with braided absorbable sutures passed around the clavicle. PMID:27284528

  6. Arthroscopy and joint lavage.

    PubMed

    Ayral, Xavier

    2005-06-01

    Arthroscopy is used by rheumatologists for research purposes in cases with knee osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthritis. This chapter explains the technical characteristics of 'research arthroscopy' including the simplification of the procedure, video-recording, as well as risks and training. Lavage of the knee joint is proposed as a treatment procedure for osteoarthritis and inflammatory and septic arthritis. Tidal irrigation and the two-needle technique of lavage are described. In the absence of clear predictive factors for efficacy, the indications for these techniques are a matter of debate. PMID:15939366

  7. Joint bone radiobiology workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Joint Bone Radiobiology Workshop was held on July 12--13, 1991 in Toronto, Canada. This document contains the papers presented at the meeting. The five sections were: Dose-effects, Endogenous Cofactors, Tumorigenesis, New Methods and Medical Implications. The papers covered risk assessment, tissue distribution of radionuclides, lifetime studies, biological half-lifes, the influence of age at time of exposure, tumor induction by different radionuclides, microscopic localization of radionuclides, and nuclear medicine issues including tissue distribution in the skeleton and bone marrow transplantation. (MHB)

  8. Surgery center joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Zasa, R J

    1999-01-01

    Surgery centers have been accepted as a cost effective, patient friendly vehicle for delivery of quality ambulatory care. Hospitals and physician groups also have made them the vehicles for coming together. Surgery centers allow hospitals and physicians to align incentives and share benefits. It is one of the few types of health care businesses physicians can own without anti-fraud and abuse violation. As a result, many surgery center ventures are now jointly owned by hospitals and physician groups. This article outlines common structures that have been used successfully to allow both to own and govern surgery centers.

  9. Glenohumeral Joint Injections

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christopher; Dhawan, Aman; Harwood, Daniel; Gochanour, Eric; Romeo, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Context: Intra-articular injections into the glenohumeral joint are commonly performed by musculoskeletal providers, including orthopaedic surgeons, family medicine physicians, rheumatologists, and physician assistants. Despite their frequent use, there is little guidance for injectable treatments to the glenohumeral joint for conditions such as osteoarthritis, adhesive capsulitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence Acquisition: We performed a comprehensive review of the available literature on glenohumeral injections to help clarify the current evidence-based practice and identify deficits in our understanding. We searched MEDLINE (1948 to December 2011 [week 1]) and EMBASE (1980 to 2011 [week 49]) using various permutations of intra-articular injections AND (corticosteroid OR hyaluronic acid) and (adhesive capsulitis OR arthritis). Results: We identified 1 and 7 studies that investigated intra-articular corticosteroid injections for the treatment of osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. Two and 3 studies investigated the use of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. One study compared corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and another discussed adhesive capsulitis. Conclusion: Based on existing studies and their level of evidence, there is only expert opinion to guide corticosteroid injection for osteoarthritis as well as hyaluronic acid injection for osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis. PMID:24427384

  10. The acromioclavicular joint.

    PubMed

    Montellese, Phyllis; Dancy, Timothy

    2004-12-01

    Acute injuries of the AC joint have a limited differential diagnosis. A thorough examination and appropriate radiographs can identify nearly all problems while ruling out tumors as a causal factor. AC injury frequently occurs with other fractures, dislocations, or soft tissue injury around the shoulder. The single unifying diagnosis one searches for in medical conditions is frequently absent in musculoskeletal injury. For effective management of AC separations, the primary care physician need only distinguish type I, II, and III injuries from surgically treated type IV, V, and VI injuries. Types I, II, and III injuries should be treated with pain control and progressive rehabilitation as described previously. Patients who have types IV, V, and VI injuries should be referred to an orthopedic surgeon. Chronic injuries of the AC joint are also clearly diagnosed by appropriate physical examination and radiographs. Steroid injections can aid in the diagnosis and management of these conditions. Injury to one shoulder component predisposes to other shoulder injuries. A thorough examination will reveal these other associated abnormalities that may not be part of the presenting complaint. With practice in the examination of the shoulder and intra-articular injections, the primary care physician can effectively treat most common AC conditions. Only after conservative measures fail is it necessary to refer the patient for surgical management.

  11. Jointly Sponsored Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Everett A. Sondreal; John G. Hendrikson; Thomas A. Erickson

    2009-03-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40321 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying highly efficient, nonpolluting energy systems that meet the nation's requirements for clean fuels, chemicals, and electricity in the 21st century. The EERC in partnership with its nonfederal partners jointly performed 131 JSRP projects for which the total DOE cost share was $22,716,634 (38%) and the nonfederal share was $36,776,573 (62%). Summaries of these projects are presented in this report for six program areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, and (6) advanced materials. The work performed under this agreement addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration; near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources.

  12. Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Marty

    2010-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials have great potential in influencing the future of small scale electronics. At a basic level, this is because ferroelectric surfaces are charged, and so interact strongly with charge-carrying metals and semiconductors - the building blocks for all electronic systems. Since the electrical polarity of the ferroelectric can be reversed, surfaces can both attract and repel charges in nearby materials, and can thereby exert complete control over both charge distribution and movement. It should be no surprise, therefore, that microelectronics industries have already looked very seriously at harnessing ferroelectric materials in a variety of applications, from solid state memory chips (FeRAMs) to field effect transistors (FeFETs). In all such applications, switching the direction of the polarity of the ferroelectric is a key aspect of functional behavior. The mechanism for switching involves the field-induced nucleation and growth of domains. Domain coarsening, through domain wall propagation, eventually causes the entire ferroelectric to switch its polar direction. It is thus the existence and behavior of domains that determine the switching response, and ultimately the performance of the ferroelectric device. A major issue, associated with the integration of ferroelectrics into microelectronic devices, has been that the fundamental properties associated with ferroelectrics, when in bulk form, appear to change quite dramatically and unpredictably when at the nanoscale: new modes of behaviour, and different functional characteristics from those seen in bulk appear. For domains, in particular, the proximity of surfaces and boundaries have a dramatic effect: surface tension and depolarizing fields both serve to increase the equilibrium density of domains, such that minor changes in scale or morphology can have major ramifications for domain redistribution. Given the importance of domains in dictating the overall switching characteristics of a device

  13. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  14. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, John V.; Novak, Robert F.; McBride, James R.

    1991-01-01

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  15. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  16. Ball-joint grounding ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aperlo, P. J. A.; Buck, P. A.; Weldon, V. A.

    1981-01-01

    In ball and socket joint where electrical insulator such as polytetrafluoroethylene is used as line to minimize friction, good electrical contact across joint may be needed for lightning protection or to prevent static-charge build-up. Electrical contact is maintained by ring of spring-loaded fingers mounted in socket. It may be useful in industry for cranes, trailers, and other applications requiring ball and socket joint.

  17. OIG targets contractual joint ventures.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Patrick K

    2003-09-01

    A recent OIG Special Advisory Bulletin raises questions for providers involved in joint ventures. The Bulletin describes several characteristics that the OIG views as potentially suspect, including a referral stream controlled by the provider initiating the joint venture and the use of a wholly owned subsidiary of the provider to bill and collect for services. According to the OIG, profits paid by the subsidiary to the provider owner in such "suspect contractual joint ventures" could constitute illegal remuneration for referrals.

  18. Expression of joint moment in the joint coordinate system.

    PubMed

    Desroches, Guillaume; Chèze, Laurence; Dumas, Raphaël

    2010-11-01

    The question of using the nonorthogonal joint coordinate system (JCS) to report joint moments has risen in the literature. However, the expression of joint moments in a nonorthogonal system is still confusing. The purpose of this paper is to present a method to express any 3D vector in a nonorthogonal coordinate system. The interpretation of these expressions in the JCS is clarified and an example for the 3D joint moment vector at the shoulder and the knee is given. A nonorthogonal projection method is proposed based on the mixed product. These nonorthogonal projections represent, for a 3D joint moment vector, the net mechanical action on the JCS axes. Considering the net mechanical action on each axis seems important in order to assess joint resistance in the JCS. The orthogonal projections of the same 3D joint moment vector on the JCS axes can be characterized as "motor torque." However, this interpretation is dependent on the chosen kinematic model. The nonorthogonal and orthogonal projections of shoulder joint moment during wheelchair propulsion and knee joint moment during walking were compared using root mean squares (rmss). rmss showed differences ranging from 6 N m to 22.3 N m between both projections at the shoulder, while differences ranged from 0.8 N m to 3.0 N m at the knee. Generally, orthogonal projections were of lower amplitudes than nonorthogonal projections at both joints. The orthogonal projection on the proximal or distal coordinates systems represents the net mechanical actions on each axis, which is not the case for the orthogonal projection (i.e., motor torque) on JCS axes. In order to represent the net action at the joint in a JCS, the nonorthogonal projection should be used.

  19. Rotary Joint for Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shauback, R.

    1986-01-01

    Rotary joint exchanges heat between two heat pipes - one rotating and one stationary. Joint accommodates varying heat loads with little temperature drop across interface. According to concept, heat pipe enters center of disklike stationary section of joint. There, wicks in central artery of heat pipe separate into multiple strands that lead to concentric channels on rotaryinterface side of stationary disk. Thin layer of liquid sodium/potassium alloy carries heat from one member of rotary joint to other. Liquid conducts heat efficiently while permitting relative motion between members. Polypropylene rings contain liquid without interfering with rotation.

  20. Variable Joint Elasticities in Running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Stephan; Grimmer, Sten; Lipfert, Susanne W.; Seyfarth, Andre

    In this paper we investigate how spring-like leg behavior in human running is represented at joint level. We assume linear torsion springs in the joints and between the knee and the ankle joint. Using experimental data of the leg dynamics we compute how the spring parameters (stiffness and rest angles) change during gait cycle. We found that during contact the joints reveal elasticity with strongly changing parameters and compare the changes of different parameters for different spring arrangements. The results may help to design and improve biologically inspired spring mechanisms with adjustable parameters.

  1. Structural domains and their potential impact on recharge to intermontane-basin aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ohlmacher, G.C.

    1999-01-01

    Variations in the structures exposed in structural domains associated with faults can affect the amount of ground-water recharge to fractured rock aquifers supplying intermontane-basin aquifers. In the south-western Franklin Mountains, El Paso, Texas, an outcrop of the Ordovician Scenic Drive Formation exposes a group of structures including faults, joints, and folds associated with a left-lateral fault striking N74??E and dipping 81??NW. Slip along this fault has produced a structural domain with extensional structures (normal faults and joints) and a domain with contractional structures (folds and joints). These extensional and contractional domains occur on opposite sides of the fault. Properties of fractures within the different structural domains can influence ground-water recharge and migration. For example, the domain with extensional structures contains nearly vertical joints that extend from the soil-bedrock interface to normal faults and along which precipitation can infiltrate. Since the left-lateral fault is approximately normal to the trend of the Franklin Mountains, this fault may be a conduit for ground-water flow from the mountains to the basin. The domain with contractional structures is limited in extent, and the fractures in this domain are poorly connected. Therefore, surface infiltration in this domain is reduced, and may not contribute as much to ground-water migration. Structural domains that are analogous to this outcrop and cover larger areas can be found throughout the Franklin Mountains. Understanding the variations between structural domains can aid in siting water-supply wells and determining contaminant transport in fractured rock.

  2. Just how versatile are domains?

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Creating new protein domain arrangements is a frequent mechanism of evolutionary innovation. While some domains always form the same combinations, others form many different arrangements. This ability, which is often referred to as versatility or promiscuity of domains, its a random evolutionary model in which a domain's promiscuity is based on its relative frequency of domains. Results We show that there is a clear relationship across genomes between the promiscuity of a given domain and its frequency. However, the strength of this relationship differs for different domains. We thus redefine domain promiscuity by defining a new index, DV I ("domain versatility index"), which eliminates the effect of domain frequency. We explore links between a domain's versatility, when unlinked from abundance, and its biological properties. Conclusion Our results indicate that domains occurring as single domain proteins and domains appearing frequently at protein termini have a higher DV I. This is consistent with previous observations that the evolution of domain re-arrangements is primarily driven by fusion of pre-existing arrangements and single domains as well as loss of domains at protein termini. Furthermore, we studied the link between domain age, defined as the first appearance of a domain in the species tree, and the DV I. Contrary to previous studies based on domain promiscuity, it seems as if the DV I is age independent. Finally, we find that contrary to previously reported findings, versatility is lower in Eukaryotes. In summary, our measure of domain versatility indicates that a random attachment process is sufficient to explain the observed distribution of domain arrangements and that several views on domain promiscuity need to be revised. PMID:18854028

  3. Joint shape morphogenesis precedes cavitation of the developing hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Nowlan, Niamh C; Sharpe, James

    2014-01-01

    The biology and mechanobiology of joint cavitation have undergone extensive investigation, but we have almost no understanding of the development of joint shape. Joint morphogenesis, the development of shape, has been identified as the ‘least understood aspect of joint formation’ (2005, Birth Defects Res C Embryo Today 75, 237), despite the clinical relevance of shape morphogenesis to postnatal skeletal malformations such as developmental dysplasia of the hip. In this study, we characterise development of early hip joint shape in the embryonic chick using direct capture 3D imaging. Contrary to formerly held assumptions that cavitation precedes morphogenesis in joint development, we have found that the major anatomical features of the adult hip are present at Hamburger Hamilton (HH)32, a full day prior to cavitation of the joint at HH34. We also reveal that the pelvis undergoes significant changes in orientation with respect to the femur, despite the lack of a joint cavity between the rudiments. Furthermore, we have identified the appearance of the ischium and pubis several developmental stages earlier than was previously reported, illustrating the value and importance of direct capture 3D imaging. PMID:24266523

  4. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  5. Passive Ball Capture Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloyd, Richard A. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A passive ball capture joint has a sleeve with a plurality of bores distributed about a circumference thereof and formed therethrough at an acute angle relative to the sleeve's longitudinal axis. A spring-loaded retainer is slidingly fitted in each bore and is biased such that, if allowed, will extend at least partially into the sleeve to retain a ball therein. A ring, rotatably mounted about the bores, has an interior wall defining a plurality of shaped races that bear against the spring-loaded retainers. A mechanized rotational force producer is coupled to the ring. The ring can be rotated from a first position (that presses the retainers into the sleeve to lock the ball in place) to a second position (that allows the retainers to springback out of the sleeve to release the ball).

  6. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  7. Corynebacterium Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cazanave, Charles; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Hanssen, Arlen D.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of Corynebacterium species may be challenging. Corynebacterium species are occasional causes of prosthetic joint infection (PJI), but few data are available on the subject. Based on the literature, C. amycolatum, C. aurimucosum, C. jeikeium, and C. striatum are the most common Corynebacterium species that cause PJI. We designed a rapid PCR assay to detect the most common human Corynebacterium species, with a specific focus on PJI. A polyphosphate kinase gene identified using whole-genome sequence was targeted. The assay differentiates the antibiotic-resistant species C. jeikeium and C. urealyticum from other species in a single assay. The assay was applied to a collection of human Corynebacterium isolates from multiple clinical sources, and clinically relevant species were detected. The assay was then tested on Corynebacterium isolates specifically associated with PJI; all were detected. We also describe the first case of C. simulans PJI. PMID:22337986

  8. Surrogate Modeling of Deformable Joint Contact using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Eskinazi, Ilan; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Deformable joint contact models can be used to estimate loading conditions for cartilage-cartilage, implant-implant, human-orthotic, and foot-ground interactions. However, contact evaluations are often so expensive computationally that they can be prohibitive for simulations or optimizations requiring thousands or even millions of contact evaluations. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel surrogate contact modeling method based on artificial neural networks (ANNs). The method uses special sampling techniques to gather input-output data points from an original (slow) contact model in multiple domains of input space, where each domain represents a different physical situation likely to be encountered. For each contact force and torque output by the original contact model, a multi-layer feed-forward ANN is defined, trained, and incorporated into a surrogate contact model. As an evaluation problem, we created an ANN-based surrogate contact model of an artificial tibiofemoral joint using over 75,000 evaluations of a fine-grid elastic foundation (EF) contact model. The surrogate contact model computed contact forces and torques about 1000 times faster than a less accurate coarse grid EF contact model. Furthermore, the surrogate contact model was seven times more accurate than the coarse grid EF contact model within the input domain of a walking motion. For larger input domains, the surrogate contact model showed the expected trend of increasing error with increasing domain size. In addition, the surrogate contact model was able to identify out-of-contact situations with high accuracy. Computational contact models created using our proposed ANN approach may remove an important computational bottleneck from musculoskeletal simulations or optimizations incorporating deformable joint contact models. PMID:26220591

  9. Joint Interdisciplinary Earth Science Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, Menas

    2004-01-01

    The report spans the three year period beginning in June of 2001 and ending June of 2004. Joint Interdisciplinary Earth Science Information Center's (JIESIC) primary purpose has been to carry out research in support of the Global Change Data Center and other Earth science laboratories at Goddard involved in Earth science, remote sensing and applications data and information services. The purpose is to extend the usage of NASA Earth Observing System data, microwave data and other Earth observing data. JIESIC projects fall within the following categories: research and development; STW and WW prototyping; science data, information products and services; and science algorithm support. JIESIC facilitates extending the utility of NASA's Earth System Enterprise (ESE) data, information products and services to better meet the science data and information needs of a number of science and applications user communities, including domain users such as discipline Earth scientists, interdisciplinary Earth scientists, Earth science applications users and educators.

  10. Temporomandibular joint vibration in bruxers.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueling; Lin, Xuefeng; Wang, Yan

    2009-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint vibration is considered an important physical sign of joint dysfunction and/or joint pathology. The aim of this study was to compare the difference of joint vibration between bruxers and asymptomatic individuals, evaluate the effect of bruxism on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the association between bruxism and temporomandibular disorders. Twenty-four (24) bruxers and 16 asymptomatic subjects were included in the study. Bilateral joint vibrations with jaw tracking were recorded using a TMJ detecting instrument during rhythmic jaw opening and closing movement. The results showed that the vibratory energy and amplitude of the moderate to severe bruxers were significantly higher than that of the mild bruxers and asymptomatic subjects. The percentage of joint vibration occurrence in asymptomatic subjects, mild bruxers, and moderate to severe bruxers was 75.0%, 77.8%, and 100%, respectively. It was concluded that bruxism might induce abnormal joint vibrations, and that the energy of abnormal vibrations might increase with the degree of bruxism.

  11. Review of Rock Joint Models

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J P

    2003-06-06

    This report discusses several constitutive models for joint behavior with emphasis upon the experimental data which motivates them. Particular emphasis is placed upon data available for granite. The LDEC joint model is presented in detail and LDEC simulations using this model are compared against data from constant normal stiffness and constant normal load tests.

  12. Robotic joint experiments under ultravacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borrien, A.; Petitjean, L.

    1988-01-01

    First, various aspects of a robotic joint development program, including gearbox technology, electromechanical components, lubrication, and test results, are discussed. Secondly, a test prototype of the joint allowing simulation of robotic arm dynamic effects is presented. This prototype is tested under vacuum with different types of motors and sensors to characterize the functional parameters: angular position error, mechanical backlash, gearbox efficiency, and lifetime.

  13. Joint Attention and Early Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael; Farrar, Michael Jeffrey

    1986-01-01

    Findings from studies exploring role of joint attentional focus in children's acquisition of language indicated that language of 24 mothers and their 15- to 21-month-olds inside episodes of joint attentional focus involved more utterances, shorter sentences, more comments, and longer conversations than outside of episodes. Also, object references…

  14. Exercise and the Knee Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This report by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports examines the effects of various forms of physical exercise on the knee joint which, because of its vulnerability, is especially subject to injury. Discussion centers around the physical characteristics of the joint, commonly used measurements for determining knee stability,…

  15. Structuring managed care joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Williams, L

    1995-08-01

    Providers that undertake joint ventures to secure managed care contracts must understand the important governance, operational, legal, and political issues involved. Careful planning in all these areas can help ensure that the joint venture will meet its goals and avoid problems such as inappropriately negotiated contracts and legal violations.

  16. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  17. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  18. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  19. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  20. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  1. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  2. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  3. 20 CFR 410.645 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint hearings. 410.645 Section 410.645..., Finality of Decisions, and Representation of Parties § 410.645 Joint hearings. When two or more hearings... joint hearing, a joint hearing may not be held. Where joint hearings are held, a single record of...

  4. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.121 Section 213.121..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.121 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions...

  5. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.121 Section 213.121..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.121 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions...

  6. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.121 Section 213.121..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.121 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions...

  7. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.121 Section 213.121..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.121 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions...

  8. 37 CFR 1.45 - Joint inventors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Joint inventors. 1.45 Section... Patent § 1.45 Joint inventors. (a) Joint inventors must apply for a patent jointly and each must make the... joint application under 35 U.S.C. 116. If multiple inventors are named in a provisional...

  9. 37 CFR 1.45 - Joint inventors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Joint inventors. 1.45 Section... Patent § 1.45 Joint inventors. (a) Joint inventors must apply for a patent jointly and each must make the... joint application under 35 U.S.C. 116. If multiple inventors are named in a provisional...

  10. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  11. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  12. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  13. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  14. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  15. 20 CFR 410.645 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Joint hearings. 410.645 Section 410.645..., Finality of Decisions, and Representation of Parties § 410.645 Joint hearings. When two or more hearings... joint hearing, a joint hearing may not be held. Where joint hearings are held, a single record of...

  16. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.121 Section 213.121..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.121 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions...

  17. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  18. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  19. 37 CFR 1.45 - Joint inventors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Joint inventors. 1.45 Section... Patent § 1.45 Joint inventors. (a) Joint inventors must apply for a patent jointly and each must make the... patent for an invention invented by them jointly, except as provided in § 1.47. (b) Inventors may...

  20. Method of forming a joint

    DOEpatents

    Butt, Darryl Paul; Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Rynders, Steven Walton; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2006-08-22

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, including providing a first multicomponent metallic oxide having a perovskitic or fluorite crystal structure; providing a second sintered body including a second multicomponent metallic oxide having a crystal structure of the same type as the first; and providing at an interface a joint material containing at least one metal oxide containing at least one metal identically contained in at least one of the first and second multicomponent metallic oxides. The joint material is free of cations of Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, P and Te and has a melting point below the sintering temperatures of both sintered bodies. The joint material is heated to a temperature above the melting point of the metal oxide(s) and below the sintering temperatures of the sintered bodies to form the joint. Structures containing such joints are also disclosed.

  1. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  2. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  3. The Application of Auto-Disturbance Rejection Control Optimized by Least Squares Support Vector Machines Method and Time-Frequency Representation in Voltage Source Converter-High Voltage Direct Current System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Pei; Liang, Hai-Ping; Gao, Zhong-Ke

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of voltage source converter-high voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC) system, we propose an improved auto-disturbance rejection control (ADRC) method based on least squares support vector machines (LSSVM) in the rectifier side. Firstly, we deduce the high frequency transient mathematical model of VSC-HVDC system. Then we investigate the ADRC and LSSVM principles. We ignore the tracking differentiator in the ADRC controller aiming to improve the system dynamic response speed. On this basis, we derive the mathematical model of ADRC controller optimized by LSSVM for direct current voltage loop. Finally we carry out simulations to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed control method. In addition, we employ the time-frequency representation methods, i.e., Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) and adaptive optimal kernel (AOK) time-frequency representation, to demonstrate our proposed method performs better than the traditional method from the perspective of energy distribution in time and frequency plane.

  4. The Application of Auto-Disturbance Rejection Control Optimized by Least Squares Support Vector Machines Method and Time-Frequency Representation in Voltage Source Converter-High Voltage Direct Current System

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Ke

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of voltage source converter-high voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC) system, we propose an improved auto-disturbance rejection control (ADRC) method based on least squares support vector machines (LSSVM) in the rectifier side. Firstly, we deduce the high frequency transient mathematical model of VSC-HVDC system. Then we investigate the ADRC and LSSVM principles. We ignore the tracking differentiator in the ADRC controller aiming to improve the system dynamic response speed. On this basis, we derive the mathematical model of ADRC controller optimized by LSSVM for direct current voltage loop. Finally we carry out simulations to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed control method. In addition, we employ the time-frequency representation methods, i.e., Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) and adaptive optimal kernel (AOK) time-frequency representation, to demonstrate our proposed method performs better than the traditional method from the perspective of energy distribution in time and frequency plane. PMID:26098556

  5. General joint hypermobility and temporomandibular joint derangement in adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Westling, L; Mattiasson, A

    1992-01-01

    Joint mobility was assessed in each member of an epidemiological sample of 96 girls and 97 boys, 17 years old, and graded by means of the hypermobility score of Beighton et al. Twenty two per cent of the girls and 3% of the boys could perform five or more of the nine manoeuvres. The prevalence of symptoms and signs of internal derangement in the temporomandibular joint was higher in adolescents with hypermobility of joints (score greater than or equal to 5/9). In subjects with a high mobility score oral parafunctions (overuse) correlated more strongly with several signs and symptoms of craniomandibular disorder than in those with a low score. PMID:1540046

  6. Gigahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging for non-destructive materials research and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarevich, Dmitry S.; Shiwa, Mitsuharu; Furuya, Takashi; Tani, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    By using optical sampling with repetition frequency modulation of pump/probe laser pulses on photoconductive emitter/detector antennas, the high-speed time/frequency domain gigahertz imaging is reported due to the absence of opto-mechanical delay line in this optical scheme. The clear contrast for a 3-cm wide metal plate, which was placed behind a 5-cm thick concrete block, was observed with a 1 × 1 mm image pixilation. On average, it took only ~0.75 s per pixel/waveform acquisition/assignment with a 675 ps time-domain window. This could become a valuable non-destructive evaluation technique in gigahertz spectral range with all benefits of time-domain spectroscopy.

  7. Gigahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging for non-destructive materials research and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bulgarevich, Dmitry S; Shiwa, Mitsuharu; Furuya, Takashi; Tani, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    By using optical sampling with repetition frequency modulation of pump/probe laser pulses on photoconductive emitter/detector antennas, the high-speed time/frequency domain gigahertz imaging is reported due to the absence of opto-mechanical delay line in this optical scheme. The clear contrast for a 3-cm wide metal plate, which was placed behind a 5-cm thick concrete block, was observed with a 1 × 1 mm image pixilation. On average, it took only ~0.75 s per pixel/waveform acquisition/assignment with a 675 ps time-domain window. This could become a valuable non-destructive evaluation technique in gigahertz spectral range with all benefits of time-domain spectroscopy. PMID:27302877

  8. Gigahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging for non-destructive materials research and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bulgarevich, Dmitry S.; Shiwa, Mitsuharu; Furuya, Takashi; Tani, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    By using optical sampling with repetition frequency modulation of pump/probe laser pulses on photoconductive emitter/detector antennas, the high-speed time/frequency domain gigahertz imaging is reported due to the absence of opto-mechanical delay line in this optical scheme. The clear contrast for a 3-cm wide metal plate, which was placed behind a 5-cm thick concrete block, was observed with a 1 × 1 mm image pixilation. On average, it took only ~0.75 s per pixel/waveform acquisition/assignment with a 675 ps time-domain window. This could become a valuable non-destructive evaluation technique in gigahertz spectral range with all benefits of time-domain spectroscopy. PMID:27302877

  9. ECG Feature Extraction using Time Frequency Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Mahesh A.

    The proposed algorithm is a novel method for the feature extraction of ECG beats based on Wavelet Transforms. A combination of two well-accepted methods, Pan Tompkins algorithm and Wavelet decomposition, this system is implemented with the help of MATLAB. The focus of this work is to implement the algorithm, which can extract the features of ECG beats with high accuracy. The performance of this system is evaluated in a pilot study using the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database.

  10. Time-frequency analysis of pediatric murmurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Joseph S.; Blodgett, Lisa A.; Rosen, Ron S.; Najmi, Amir-Homayoon; Thompson, W. Reid

    1998-05-01

    Technology has provided many new tools to assist in the diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the heart. Echocardiography, Ultrafast CT, and MRI are just a few. While these tools are a valuable resource, they are typically too expensive, large and complex in operation for use in rural, homecare, and physician's office settings. Recent advances in computer performance, miniaturization, and acoustic signal processing, have yielded new technologies that when applied to heart sounds can provide low cost screening for pathologic conditions. The short duration and transient nature of these signals requires processing techniques that provide high resolution in both time and frequency. Short-time Fourier transforms, Wigner distributions, and wavelet transforms have been applied to signals form hearts with various pathologic conditions. While no single technique provides the ideal solution, the combination of tools provides a good representation of the acoustic features of the pathologies selected.

  11. Acromioclavicular joint cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Andrew D; Miller, Joshua D; Zeller, John L

    2010-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) cysts are an uncommon and unusual sequela associated with shoulder pathophysiology. The majority of literature on ACJ cysts consists of individual case reports with no definitive literature review currently available. In addition to a comprehensive literature review, four clinical cases are presented in this report. First described by Craig (1984), a total of 41 cases have been previously reported in the literature. Of these cases, five occurred with the rotator cuff musculature intact. The remaining 36 cases of ACJ cysts occurred in patients with a complete tear/avulsion of the rotator cuff. Previous attempts at compiling a complete record of all reported cases have combined several distinct conditions into a single category. This article presents two distinct etiologies for the pathogenesis of ACJ cyst formation. In the presence of an intact rotator cuff, a Type 1 cyst can form superficially and be limited to the ACJ. Following a massive or traumatic tear of the rotator cuff, mechanical instability of the humeral head can cause a deterioration of the inferior acromioclavicular capsule (cuff tear arthropathy) and an overproduction of synovial fluid. Overtime, a "geyser" of fluid can form between the glenohumeral and the ACJ, forming a Type 2 cyst. This differentiation and categorization is essential for appropriate classification and treatment.

  12. Acromioclavicular joint cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Andrew D; Miller, Joshua D; Zeller, John L

    2010-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) cysts are an uncommon and unusual sequela associated with shoulder pathophysiology. The majority of literature on ACJ cysts consists of individual case reports with no definitive literature review currently available. In addition to a comprehensive literature review, four clinical cases are presented in this report. First described by Craig (1984), a total of 41 cases have been previously reported in the literature. Of these cases, five occurred with the rotator cuff musculature intact. The remaining 36 cases of ACJ cysts occurred in patients with a complete tear/avulsion of the rotator cuff. Previous attempts at compiling a complete record of all reported cases have combined several distinct conditions into a single category. This article presents two distinct etiologies for the pathogenesis of ACJ cyst formation. In the presence of an intact rotator cuff, a Type 1 cyst can form superficially and be limited to the ACJ. Following a massive or traumatic tear of the rotator cuff, mechanical instability of the humeral head can cause a deterioration of the inferior acromioclavicular capsule (cuff tear arthropathy) and an overproduction of synovial fluid. Overtime, a "geyser" of fluid can form between the glenohumeral and the ACJ, forming a Type 2 cyst. This differentiation and categorization is essential for appropriate classification and treatment. PMID:20069645

  13. Arthritis: joints inflamed.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2015-06-01

    ARTHRITIS IS a generic term for inflammatory joint disease. There are various forms of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Arthritis can be a chronic debilitating condition or a transient effect of bacterial or viral infections. As a chronic condition, arthritis can cause loss of quality of life, disability and, with rheumatoid disease, early death. The economic burden of arthritis, in terms of management and loss of productivity due to disability, is high and set to increase with the ageing population. Recent advances in our understanding of the causes and progression of a number of forms of arthritis have raised hopes of better management and possible remission. Pharmacotherapy has moved from symptom management to addressing underlying disease processes. However, therapies that prevent or cure arthritis remain elusive. Current care for people with arthritis relies on a multidisciplinary approach and substantial pharmacological intervention. Nurses have a key role to play in guiding patients through treatment, ensuring they receive optimal therapy to reduce the impact of arthritis and its management on their lives.

  14. Qualification of improved joint heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1989-01-01

    Qualification testing of the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor improved igniter-to-case joint and field joint heaters was conducted on the fired TEM-04 static test motor and was completed on 7 Sep. 1989. The purpose of the test was to certify the installation and performance of the improved joint heaters for use on flight motors. The changes incorporated in the improved heaters improve durability and should reduce handling damage. The igniter-to-case joint and field joint primary heater circuits were subjected to five 20-hr ON cycles. The heater redundant circuits were then subjected to one 20-hr ON cycle. Voltage, current, and temperature set point values were maintained within the specified limits for both heaters during each ON cycle. When testing was complete, both heaters were removed and inspected. No discolorations or any other anomalies were found on either of the heaters. Based on the successful completion of this test, it is recommended that the improved igniter-to-case joint and field joint heaters be used on future flight motors.

  15. Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imtiaz, Kauser

    2011-01-01

    Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool (comBAT) is an Excel/VB-based bolted joint analysis/optimization program that lays out a systematic foundation for an inexperienced or seasoned analyst to determine fastener size, material, and assembly torque for a given design. Analysts are able to perform numerous what-if scenarios within minutes to arrive at an optimal solution. The program evaluates input design parameters, performs joint assembly checks, and steps through numerous calculations to arrive at several key margins of safety for each member in a joint. It also checks for joint gapping, provides fatigue calculations, and generates joint diagrams for a visual reference. Optimum fastener size and material, as well as correct torque, can then be provided. Analysis methodology, equations, and guidelines are provided throughout the solution sequence so that this program does not become a "black box:" for the analyst. There are built-in databases that reduce the legwork required by the analyst. Each step is clearly identified and results are provided in number format, as well as color-coded spelled-out words to draw user attention. The three key features of the software are robust technical content, innovative and user friendly I/O, and a large database. The program addresses every aspect of bolted joint analysis and proves to be an instructional tool at the same time. It saves analysis time, has intelligent messaging features, and catches operator errors in real time.

  16. Compliant Prosthetic Or Robotic Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J.; Eklund, Wayne D.

    1989-01-01

    Rotation partly free and partly restrained by resilience and damping. Joint includes U-shaped x- and y-axis frames joined by cables that cross in at center piece. The y-axis frame rotates about y-axis on roller bearing within predetermined angular range. The y-axis frame rotates slightly farther when arm strikes stop, because cables can twist. This mimics compliant resistance of knee joint reaching limit of its forward or backward motion. Used in prosthetic device to replace diseased or damage human joint, or in robot linkage to limit movement and cushion overloads.

  17. Joint ventures in health care.

    PubMed

    Pelfrey, S; Theisen, B A

    1989-04-01

    To remain competitive, many not-for-profit hospitals have turned to joint ventures with for-profit and other not-for-profit entities. The authors examine the organizational structures that are used most often to form joint ventures (contractual agreements, subsidiary corporations, partnerships, and not-for-profit title-holding corporations), as well as the advantages and disadvantages associated with each form. Nurse executives must be aware of the opportunities that joint ventures provide their institutions. These arrangements can help improve and expand services and profitability.

  18. Osteochondral Lesions of Major Joints

    PubMed Central

    Durur-Subasi, Irmak; Durur-Karakaya, Afak; Yildirim, Omer Selim

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides information about osteochondral lesions (OCL) and example cases of OCL occurring in major joints, some of which are rarely seen. This simple tutorial is presented in question and answer format. PMID:26180500

  19. Campus/Industry Joint Ventures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene J.

    1985-01-01

    Opportunities for joint economic ventures of colleges and industry are discussed, and a variety of ventures undertaken by Duke University are outlined, including a health club, hotel, and office building. Tax and financing considerations are noted. (MSE)

  20. Comparison of the domain and frequency domain state feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, we present explicitly the equivalence of the time domain and frequency domain state feedbacks, as well as the dynamic state feedback and a modified frequency domain state feedback, from the closed-loop transfer function point of view. The difference of the two approaches is also shown.