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Sample records for jordanian dental patients

  1. Career satisfaction of Jordanian dental hygienists.

    PubMed

    Malkawi, Z A

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the factors that affect Jordanian dental hygienists with their career satisfaction including financial issues, employment settings and policies. Randomized sample of 102 dental hygienists with a bachelor's degree were selected from the entire population of Jordanian dental hygienists. Participants received a cover letter with a questionnaire. Findings were analysed using descriptive data techniques. Chi-square test was used to determine the statistically significant differences across demographic variables and career satisfaction's factors. About 22.5% of the participants are not working as dental hygienist. Dental hygiene profession in Jordan includes predominantly (74.0%) females. Majority of them (51.9%) were employed in JUST, and minority (6.3%) in MOH. Most of them (56.4%) were aged 24-29 years old, and mostly 62.2% with ≤1 child. About 53.1% employed by general dentist. Almost 35.3% had ≥4 years' job experience. Majority (47.6%) expressed high level of satisfaction with dental materials and equipment to practice work; however, only 2.0% expressed very high level of satisfaction with employment policies. Almost 32.4% expressed low level of satisfaction with salary level. Minority (2.0%) expressed dissatisfaction with quality of dentist's work. Statistically significant association was found between workplace, and dental materials and equipment to practice work, salary level, employment policies (P = 0.003, P = 0.003, P = 0.026), and number of children with flexibility in work hours (P = 0.001). Jordanian dental hygienists' workplacesatisfaction w as significantly associated with dental materials and equipment to practice work, salary level, and employment policies. Understanding the working patterns of dental hygienists in Jordan is important to increase their career satisfaction levels. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Burnout Among the Clinical Dental Students in the Jordanian Universities

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Wala Majid; Al-Ali, Muna H.; Duaibis, Ramzi B.; Oweis, Tamara; Badran, Darwish H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The study aimed to evaluate the level of burnout among the clinical dental students in two Jordanian universities. Methods A total of 307 students from the two schools were surveyed using Maslach Burnout Inventory survey. Scores for the inventory’s subscales were calculated and the mean values for the students’ groups were computed separately. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were carried out and the results were compared at 95% confidence level. Results The results showed that the dental students in both Jordanian universities suffered high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization compared to reported levels for dental students in other countries. The dental students of the University of Jordan demonstrated a significantly higher (p < 0.05) level of emotional exhaustion than their counterparts in the Jordan University of Science and Technology. Conclusions The findings indicated that dental students in the Jordanian universities presented considerable degrees of burnout manifested by high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Studies targeting students health and psychology should be carried out to determine the causes of burnout among dental students. The curricula of the dental schools in the two universities should be accordingly improved to minimize burnout among the students. Keywords Burnout; Emotional exhaustion; Depersonalization; Personal accomplishment; Maslach Burnout Inventory PMID:22461870

  3. Burnout among the clinical dental students in the jordanian universities.

    PubMed

    Amin, Wala Majid; Al-Ali, Muna H; Duaibis, Ramzi B; Oweis, Tamara; Badran, Darwish H

    2009-10-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the level of burnout among the clinical dental students in two Jordanian universities. A total of 307 students from the two schools were surveyed using Maslach Burnout Inventory survey. Scores for the inventory's subscales were calculated and the mean values for the students' groups were computed separately. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were carried out and the results were compared at 95% confidence level. The results showed that the dental students in both Jordanian universities suffered high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization compared to reported levels for dental students in other countries. The dental students of the University of Jordan demonstrated a significantly higher (p < 0.05) level of emotional exhaustion than their counterparts in the Jordan University of Science and Technology. The findings indicated that dental students in the Jordanian universities presented considerable degrees of burnout manifested by high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Studies targeting students health and psychology should be carried out to determine the causes of burnout among dental students. The curricula of the dental schools in the two universities should be accordingly improved to minimize burnout among the students. Burnout; Emotional exhaustion; Depersonalization; Personal accomplishment; Maslach Burnout Inventory.

  4. Burnout among clinical dental students at Jordanian universities.

    PubMed

    Badran, D H; Al-Ali, M H; Duaibis, R B; Amin, W M

    2010-04-01

    Dentistry is a profession demanding physical and mental efforts as well as people contact, which can result in burnout. The level of burnout among 307 clinical dental students in 2 Jordanian universities was evaluated using the Maslach Burnout Inventory survey. Scores for the inventory's 3 subscales were calculated and the mean values for the students' groups were computed separately. Dental students in both universities suffered high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. The dental students at the University of Jordan demonstrated a significantly higher level of emotional exhaustion than their counterparts at the Jordan University of Science and Technology.

  5. Jordanian dentists' knowledge and implementation of eco-friendly dental office strategies.

    PubMed

    Al Shatrat, Sabha M; Shuman, Deanne; Darby, Michele L; Jeng, Hueiwang A

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the implementation of eco-friendly dental office strategies by Jordanian dentists. Self-designed questionnaires were provided to 150 dentists working in private dental practices in the city of Amman, the capital of Jordan. Dentists' names and addresses were obtained from the Jordanian Dental Association. Overall, the level of knowledge about eco-friendly dental offices strategies was high for amalgam, radiology, paper waste, infection control and energy and water conservation. In terms of implementation, the majority of Jordanian dentists apply few eco-friendly dental offices strategies. The most frequently identified barriers to implementation of eco-friendly dental offices strategies were cost and lack of incentives from the government. Most Jordanian dental practices are not eco-friendly. A continued focus on the impact of dental practices on the environment is needed through formal and continuing dental education. Results of this study can guide policy development to encourage implementation of eco-friendly strategies. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  6. Women's oral and dental health aspects in humanitarian missions and disasters: Jordanian experience.

    PubMed

    Smadi, Leena; Sumadi, Aiman Al

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to review oral and dental health aspects in female patients presented to Jordanian Royal Medical Services (RMS) international humanitarian missions over a 3-year period. Analysis of humanitarian missions of RMS data and records over a 3-year period (2011-2013) in regard to women's oral and dental health issues was done. The data were analyzed in regard to the number of women seen, the presenting conditions, and the prevalence of oral and dental diseases and procedures in these cases. During the 3-year period, 72 missions were deployed in four locations (Gaza, Ram Allah-West Bank, Jeneen-West Bank, and Iraq). The total number of females seen in this period was 86,436 women, accounting for 56 percent of adult patients seen by RMS humanitarian missions. Dental Clinics were deployed to only two missions (Iraq and Gaza), during which they received 13,629 visits; of these, 41 percent were females (5,588 patients), 29 percent were males, and 30 percent were in the pediatric age group. Trauma accounts for only 7 percent of the cases, while nonacute dental problems (caries and gingivitis) were responsible for the majority of cases (31.6 and 28.7 percent, respectively). RMS dental services during humanitarian mission deployment are a vital part of comprehensive healthcare. Women usually seek more dental care than men, with the majority of treatments for nonacute conditions. RMS experiences demonstrate the tremendous need for a well-defined preparedness plan for deployment of humanitarian missions that considers the contributions of all types of health professionals, the appropriate mobile technology to respond to emergent health risks, and a competent workforce ready and able to respond. Such preparation will require our dental education programs to develop disaster preparedness competencies to achieve the desired level of understanding.

  7. Assessment of Jordanian Patient's Colorectal Cancer Awareness and Preferences towards CRC Screening: Are Jordanians Ready to Embrace CRC Screening?

    PubMed

    Omran, Suha; Barakat, Husam; Muliira, Joshua Kanaabi; Bashaireh, Ibrahim; Batiha, Abdul-Moni'm

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC is increasingly becoming a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality in Jordan. However the population's level of awareness about CRC, CRC screening test preferences and willingness to embrace screening are not known. The aim of this study was to assess the level of CRC awareness and screening preferences among Jordanian patients. A survey assessing the CRC knowledge levels was distributed among patients attending outpatient gastroenterology clinics in public hospitals throughout Jordan. A total of 800 surveys were distributed and of these 713 (89.1%) were returned. Only 22% of the participants correctly judged CRC among the choices provided as the commonest cause of cancer related deaths. The majority of participants (68.3%) underestimated their risk for CRC. Only 26.8% correctly judged their life time risk while 5% overestimated their risk. Two thirds of participants (66%) were willing to pay 500 Jordanian Dinars (equivalent to 706 US$) in order to get a prompt colonoscopy if recommended by their physician, while 25.5% reported that they would rather wait for 6 months in order to get a free colonoscopy. Although the participants tended to underestimate their risk for CRC, they were mostly aware of CRC as a major cause of mortality and were willing to embrace the concept of CRC screening and bear the related financial costs. These findings about CRC awareness and propensity for screening provide a good foundation as the Jordanian health system moves forward with initiatives to promote CRC screening and prevention.

  8. Knowledge and attitude of Jordanian school health teachers with regards to emergency management of dental trauma.

    PubMed

    Al-Jundi, Suhad H; Al-Waeili, Haydar; Khairalah, Khaled

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, by means of a self administered structured questionnaire, the level of knowledge of school health teachers in northern Jordan with regards to the immediate emergency management of dental trauma. The questionnaire surveyed teacher's background, Knowledge of management of tooth fracture, avulsion, and loss of consciousness, it also investigated teacher's attitudes, and self assessed knowledge, as well as knowledge of availability of emergency services in Jordan. The sample consisted of all school health teachers in northern Jordan (220) who attended an oral health education course held by the Jordanian dental association. Only 190 were included in the survey. Sixty-three percent were females, 44% were in their twenties, and 43% in their forties. Their school health teaching experience ranged from 1 to 7 years. Only 20% were officially trained in school health. Less than half of the teachers received first aid training only once in their teaching career, not necessarily as part of school health training. Only 10 teachers were trained in dental first aid, and more than half had a previous experience with handling dental trauma in children. Overall the teachers' knowledge with regards to the emergency management of the trauma cases presented in the report was deficient. Chi-square test showed that, the difference in their responses to the knowledge part of the questionnaire was not statistically significant with regards to age, gender, years of teaching experience, first aid training, or number of seen trauma cases. Generally, the attitude was positive, most teachers wanting further education on the topic, however those who were trained in first aid, thought they were able to give proper action when needed in cases of trauma (P = 0.026). Most teachers were unsatisfied with their level of knowledge, and only 30% knew of the availability of after hour emergency services for dental trauma. The present report indicated the gross lack

  9. Novel mutations in the homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase gene identified in Jordanian patients with alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Al-sbou, Mohammed

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to identify mutations in the homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase gene (HGD) in alkaptonuria patients among Jordanian population. Blood samples were collected from four alkaptonuria patients, four carriers, and two healthy volunteers. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood. All 14 exons of the HGD gene were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The PCR products were then purified and analyzed by sequencing. Five mutations were identified in our samples. Four of them were novel C1273A, T1046G, 551-552insG, T533G and had not been previously reported, and one mutation T847C has been described before. The types of mutations identified were two missense mutations, one splice site mutation, one frameshift mutation, and one polymorphism. We present the first molecular study of the HGD gene in Jordanian alkaptonuria patients. This study provides valuable information about the molecular basis of alkaptonuria in Jordanian population.

  10. Patterns of physical growth and dental development in Jordanian children and adolescents with thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Hattab, Faiez N

    2013-03-01

    Dental development and physical growth are of particular interest in pediatric dentistry and orthodontics. This study evaluated these variables in patients with thalassemia major (TM). Physical growth was assessed in 54 patients (31 males and 23 females) aged 5.5 to 18.3 years and dental development was analyzed using panoramic radiographs from 39 of the 54 patients. The Demirjian system was used to characterize dental development of the seven left mandibular permanent teeth. Chronologic age (CA) and dental age (DA) were compared using the paired t-test, and the correlation between CA and extent of delay in dental development (DA minus CA) was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Growth retardation (< 10th percentile for height and weight) was present in 75.9% of TM patients. Height less than the third percentile was noted in 41.9% (13/31) of males and 34.8% (8/23) of females. Mean (SD) body mass index was 16.5 ± 2.2 kg/m(2). The extent of growth retardation increased with advancing age. Patient radiographs revealed a delay in dental development in 31 of 39 (79.5%) of participants (mean delay, 1.12 years in males and 0.81 years in females; range, 0.1 to 2.7 years). The mean difference between CA and DA was 0.97 years (P < 0.001). CA was significant correlated with extent of dental developmental delay (r = 0.64, P < 0.01). The results show that, among children and adolescents with TM, the proportions of those who had short stature, were underweight, and had a low growth rate increased with age. In addition, participants had significant delays in dental development.

  11. A comparison of health-related quality of life between Jordanian and British orthognathic patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Bitar, Zaid B; Al-Omari, Iyad K; Al-Ahmad, Hazem T; El Maaytah, Mohammed A; Cunningham, Susan J

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adult Jordanian patients referred for orthognathic treatment, and to compare this with previously published data from a British cohort. Thirty-eight Jordanians (21 females and 17 males; aged 16-31 years) who were about to commence a course of orthognathic treatment completed a generic HRQoL questionnaire [Short-Form 36 (SF-36)] and a condition-specific orthognathic quality-of-life questionnaire (OQoLQ). The questionnaires were completed prior to commencing any pre-surgical orthodontic treatment. The data were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test for independent groups with non-normally distributed data. There were no statistically significant differences between the Jordanian males and females for any of the OQoLQ or SF-36 items; hence, the groups were combined for analysis. When comparing the OQoL data with that of the British sample, there was no statistically significant differences for three of the four domains: dentofacial aesthetics (P = 0.726), social aspects (P = 0.096), or the awareness of dentofacial aesthetics (P = 0.066). There was, however, a significant difference for oral function (P = 0.016), with the Jordanian group reporting a poorer quality of life (QoL) (mean value 10.9) than the British cohort (mean value 8.4). However, it is questionable whether this difference would be of clinical relevance. While it was not possible to directly compare the results of the SF-36 questionnaires with the same British cohort, Jordanian patients had generally lower scores, and therefore a poorer QoL, than reported in other studies. These differences may be cultural or may be due to differences in the health care system's criteria for funding, and this needs further investigation.

  12. Healthcare needs of noninstitutionalized Jordanian cancer patients: an exploratory descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Al-Jauissy, Mohammed Said; Al-Hassan, Muosa; Akhu-Zaheya, Laila

    2009-01-01

    Despite all advances in healthcare, provision of healthcare for cancer patients remains one of major continuing challenges for healthcare professionals. One of these challenges is shorter hospital stay. In this fast-paced environment, identification of cancer patients' needs is limited yet necessary to initiate an appropriate treatment plan for this group of patients. The major purpose of this study was to identify healthcare needs of noninstitutionalized patients with cancer from Arab Jordanians' perspective. The study was conducted at a chemotherapy clinic of a major university hospital in Jordan. An exploratory descriptive design using a structured interview was used to collect the data. The questions of the interview composed of items of several scales including the Patient Need Scale. Sixty-two participants met the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate. The participants were patients with cancer, were receiving chemotherapy, and were (a) Jordanian male or female patients, (b) able to communicate in Arabic, (c) 19 years of age or older, and (d) free from psychiatric or mental illnesses. Participants reported 70 existing needs (68.6%). However, 50% of these identified needs were perceived as being not met. Jordanian patients with cancer reported more healthcare needs than patients in Western cultures. Individualized comprehensive assessment of patients' needs from their perspective is essential to initiate an effective treatment plan.

  13. The Correlates of Quality of Life Among Jordanian Patients With Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rayan, Ahmad; Obiedate, Khaldoon

    Addressing the quality of life (QOL) of patients with schizophrenia is of special importance in the Arab world, where little knowledge is available about their well-being, and most of them experience stigma and living in poverty. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of sociodemographic characteristics, severity of depressive symptoms, and various aspects of public stigma against mental illness, with QOL among Jordanian patients with schizophrenia. In this descriptive correlational study, 160 Jordanian outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia completed measures of demographic characteristics, perceived public stigma against mental illness, severity of depression, and QOL. Participants had poor QOL. Age, marital status, relapse, education level, stigma against mental illness, and severity of depression were significantly associated with QOL among Jordanian patients with schizophrenia. Data analysis revealed that the severity of depression accounted for an additional 27% of the variance above and beyond the 36.7% accounted for by age of the participants and perceived public stigma against mental illness. Health care professionals should develop culturally competent nursing practice considering the specific factors associated with QOL among Arab patients with schizophrenia.

  14. Jordanian Physicians' Attitudes toward Disclosure of Cancer Information and Patient Participation in Treatment Decision-making.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Rana; Khrais, Huthaifah I

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the attitude of Jordanian physicians toward disclosure of cancer information, comfort and use of different decision-making approaches, and treatment decision making. A descriptive, comparative research design was used. A convenience sample of 86 Jordanian medical and radiation oncologists and surgeons practicing mainly in oncology was recruited. A modified version of a structured questionnaire was used for data collection. The questionnaire is a valid measure of physicians' views of shared decision making. Almost 91% of all physicians indicated that the doctor should tell the patient and let him/her decide if the family should know of an early-stage cancer diagnosis. Physicians provide abundant information about the extent of the disease, the side effects and benefits of the treatment, and details of the treatment procedures. They also provided less information on the effects of treatment on the sexuality, mood, and family of the patient. Almost 48% of the participating physicians reported using shared decision making as their usual approach for treatment decision making, and 67% reported that they were comfortable with this approach. The main setting of clinical activity was the only factor associated with physicians' usual approach to medical decision making. Moreover, age, years of experience, and main setting of clinical activity were associated with physicians' comfort level with the shared approach. Although Jordanian physicians appreciate patient autonomy, self-determination, and right to information, paternalistic decision making and underuse of the shared decision-making approach persist. Strategies that target both healthcare providers and patients must be employed to promote shared decision making in the Jordanian healthcare system.

  15. Traumatic dental injuries among 12-year-old Jordanian schoolchildren: an investigation on obesity and other risk factors.

    PubMed

    Al-Bajjali, Tala Tariq; Rajab, Lamis Darwish

    2014-08-07

    Traumatic dental injury (TDI) is an important public dental health problem among schoolchildren. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between TDIs, obesity, and other possible associated factors like gender, overjet, lip coverage, parents' education level and family income among 12-year old Jordanian schoolchildren. A cross-sectional population-based study examined a total of 1015 schoolchildren attending 34 schools randomly selected from urban and rural areas of Amman-the capital city of Jordan. The epidemiological classification adopted by WHO and modified by Andreasen et al. was used to classify TDIs. Obesity was defined according to the international cut-off points of body mass index for boys and girls between 2 and 20 years old. The prevalence of TDIs was 16.3%. Enamel fracture was the most common type of TDIs (65%). Neither parents' education level nor family income had a significant effect on TDI occurrence (P > 0.05). Results of multiple logistic regression showed that TDIs were significantly more prevalent among males (OR = 1.42, CI; 1.01-2.01, P < 0.05), and children with inadequate lip coverage (OR = 1.95, CI; 1.35-2.81, P < 0.05). The relationship between TDIs and obesity was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Being a male with inadequate lip coverage was associated with higher probability of having a TDI. Obesity had no significant effect on the occurrence of TDIs.

  16. Traumatic dental injuries among 12-year-old Jordanian schoolchildren: an investigation on obesity and other risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Traumatic dental injury (TDI) is an important public dental health problem among schoolchildren. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between TDIs, obesity, and other possible associated factors like gender, overjet, lip coverage, parents’ education level and family income among 12-year old Jordanian schoolchildren. Methods A cross-sectional population-based study examined a total of 1015 schoolchildren attending 34 schools randomly selected from urban and rural areas of Amman-the capital city of Jordan. The epidemiological classification adopted by WHO and modified by Andreasen et al. was used to classify TDIs. Obesity was defined according to the international cut-off points of body mass index for boys and girls between 2 and 20 years old. Results The prevalence of TDIs was 16.3%. Enamel fracture was the most common type of TDIs (65%). Neither parents’ education level nor family income had a significant effect on TDI occurrence (P > 0.05). Results of multiple logistic regression showed that TDIs were significantly more prevalent among males (OR = 1.42, CI; 1.01-2.01, P < 0.05), and children with inadequate lip coverage (OR = 1.95, CI; 1.35-2.81, P < 0.05). The relationship between TDIs and obesity was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusions Being a male with inadequate lip coverage was associated with higher probability of having a TDI. Obesity had no significant effect on the occurrence of TDIs. PMID:25099379

  17. The correlates of stigma toward mental illness among Jordanian patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Rayan, Ahmad; Mahroum, Maryam Husnee; Khasawneh, Aws

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to assess the correlates of stigma toward mental illness among patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD). One hundred and sixty one Jordanian outpatients suffering from MDD completed the study. Participants completed the demographic questionnaire, the Center for Epidemiological Studies for the intensity of depression, and the Devaluation-Discrimination Scale to assess stigma. Participants reported a moderate level of perceived stigma toward mental illness. Age, perceived pain, the number of relapses, and severity of depressive symptoms were significantly correlated with stigma toward mental illness among the study sample. The severity of depressive symptoms was the strongest correlate of stigma toward mental illness. Factors associated with stigma toward mental illness should be carefully considered when implementing anti-stigma programs for patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Molecular Characterization of Multidrug Resistant Uropathogenic E. Coli Isolates from Jordanian Patients.

    PubMed

    Nairoukh, Yacoub R; Mahafzah, Azmi M; Irshaid, Amal; Shehabi, Asem A

    2018-01-01

    Emergence of multi-drug resistant uropathogenic E. coli strains is an increasing problem to empirical treatment of urinary tract infections in many countries. This study investigated the magnitude of this problem in Jordan. A total of 262 E. coli isolates were recovered from urine samples of Jordanian patients which were suspected to have urinary tract infections (UTIs). All isolates were primarily identified by routine biochemical tests and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by disc diffusion method. Fifty representative Multidrug Resistance (MDR) E. coli isolates to 3 or more antibiotic classes were tested for the presence of resistance genes of blaCTX-M- 1, 9 and 15, carbapenemase ( blaIMP, blaVIM, blaNDM-1, blaOXA-48 ), fluoroquinolones mutated genes ( parC and gyrA ) and clone of ST131 type using PCR methods. A total of 150/262 (57.3%) of E. coli isolates were MDR. Urine samples of hospitalized patients showed significantly more MDR isolates than outpatients. Fifty representative MDR E. coli isolates indicated the following molecular characteristics: All were positive for mutated parC gene and gyrA and for ST131 clone, and 78% were positive for genes of CTX-M-15 , 76% for CTX-M-I and for 8% CTX-M-9 , respectively. Additionally, all 50 MDR E. coli isolates were negative for carbapenemase genes ( blaIMP, blaVIM, blaNDM-1, blaOXA-48 ), except of one isolate was positive for blaKPC-2 . This study indicates alarming high rates recovery of MDR uropathogenic E. coli from Jordanian patients associated with high rates of positive ST131 clone, fluoroquinolone resistant and important types of blaCTX-M.

  19. Patients' Adherence to Healthy Behavior in Coronary Heart Disease: Risk Factor Management Among Jordanian Patients.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Sultan M; Darawad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    .54, P = .011) or regular physical activity (Mann-Whitney Z = -3.60, P = .001) and in those who had more comorbidity diseases (r = 0.34, P = .001). Our findings highlight poor adherence to secondary prevention behaviors among Jordanian CHD patients. Most participants did not adopt healthy behaviors in managing their CHD risk factors and they demonstrated a higher risk of hospital readmission. There is an urgent need for aggressive and targeted strategies to enhance adherence levels.

  20. Jordanian dialysis patients' perceived exercise benefits and barriers: a correlation study.

    PubMed

    Darawad, Muhammad W; Khalil, Amani A

    2013-01-01

    To investigate Jordanian end-stage renal disease (ESRD)patients' perceived exercise benefits and barriers, and their correlation with patients' demographic variables and dialysis measures. A descriptive correlational study was conducted using cross-sectional survey, using a convenience sample of 190 ESRD dialyzed patients who were recruited from eight hospitals in Jordan. Participants significantly perceived exercise benefits (M= 2.88/4, SD± .67) higher than barriers (M= 2.66, SD± .62). The most frequent perceived exercise benefits were preventing muscular atrophy and improving mood, whereas tiredness and lower-extremity fatigue were the most frequent exercise barriers. Finally, acceptable values of Cronbach's Alpha were revealed for perceived exercise subscale, barriers subscale, and total scale (α= .88, .81, and .70, respectively). Participants focused more on exercise benefits than barriers, and on direct exercise benefits and barriers than the indirect. The results of this study have important implications for the efforts that aim at improving ESRD patients' exercise behaviors. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  1. Knowledge and attitudes of Jordanian nurses towards patients with HIV/AIDS: findings from a nationwide survey.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Zeinab M; Wahsheh, Moayad A

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the knowledge and attitudes of Jordanian nurses toward patients with HIV/AIDS, particularly in regards to their sources of information and education. This survey utilized a cross-sectional design. A self-administered questionnaire developed by Eckstein was used in collecting the data. A total of 922 nurses completed the questionnaire. Overall, Jordanian nurses expressed negative attitudes toward patients with HIV/AIDS, and their level of HIV/AIDS knowledge was weak. Weak knowledge level was recorded among nurses in the following subsections: agent and immunology; course and manifestation; transmission and incidence; and precaution and prevention. Only in one subsection (risk group), did nurses show a good level of knowledge about HIV/AIDS. More than two-thirds of nurses (84%) refused to provide care to patients who tested positive for HIV/AIDS. Most of the nurse participants believed that currently provided HIV/AIDS information resources were inadequate (81.4 %). The majority of nurses were interested in support groups for staff nurses (96.5%). The major source of HIV/AIDS information obtained by Jordanian nurses was through Internet web sites (52.7%). The majority of nurses (96.2%) ranked their fear of getting AIDS from their nursing practice as overwhelming. The total attitude of participants towards patients with HIV/AIDS in all five subsections (i.e., fear of contagion, social stigma, fatal outcome of the disease, direct care, and education and counseling) was negative (84.3%). Accurate knowledge about HIV/AIDS along with an in-depth understanding of patients? needs can help alleviate much of the fear, anxiety, and stigma associated with caring for patients with HIV/AIDS.

  2. Prevalence of dental anomalies in a population of cleft lip and palate patients.

    PubMed

    Al Jamal, Ghaida A; Hazza'a, Abdalla M; Rawashdeh, Ma'amon A

    2010-07-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate radiographically the prevalence of dental anomalies in a group of Jordanian cleft lip and/or palate subjects. This is a retrospective review of panoramic radiographs of 78 subjects with cleft lip and/or palate that were evaluated from their file records and investigated for possible dental anomalies. Dental anomalies were found frequently in cleft lip and/or palate subjects. Missing teeth were found in 66.7% of the patients; the tooth most commonly missing was the maxillary lateral incisor. Supernumerary teeth were found in 16.7% of patients; 37% had microdontia; 70.5% had taurodontism; 30.8% had transposition and/or ectopic teeth; 19.2% had dilacerations; and 30.8% had hypoplastic teeth. There was no statistically significant difference in the above anomalies' prevalence between males and females. However, it was found that subjects with bilateral cleft lip and/or palate had significantly more microdontia (p = .005), dilaceration (p = .002), and hypoplastic teeth (p = .0001) than subjects with unilateral cleft lip and/or palate. The prevalence of dental anomalies in cleft lip and/or palate patients was higher than what had been reported in the normal Jordanian population. This emphasizes the relation of cleft lip and/or palate to all dental anomalies studied. Although our study represents a thorough and complete description of dental anomalies present in a sample of cleft lip and/or palate subjects, larger samples are required to effectively determine the relationship of each dental anomaly with cleft type.

  3. The perceptions of the ward atmosphere in four Jordanian psychiatric hospitals from the perspective of patients' relatives.

    PubMed

    Al-Sagarat, Ahmad; Moxham, Lorna; Curtis, Janette; Crooke, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    To describes the perceptions of the ward atmosphere of psychiatric hospitals from the perspective of the relatives of people who were inpatients in those hospitals. A nonexperimental descriptive survey was used. Data were collected using the Arabic version of Moos Ward Atmosphere Scale Ideal and Real forms. Data indicate that even though relatives of Jordanian mental health patients were generally positive about the ward atmosphere, they would like to see changes. By describing their current and ideal treatment environments, participants have provided information that can guide interventions to change the ward atmosphere and thus help foster better patient treatment outcomes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Mouth cancer awareness and beliefs among dental patients.

    PubMed

    Hassona, Yazan; Scully, Crispian; Abu Ghosh, Mais; Khoury, Zaid; Jarrar, Shadi; Sawair, Faleh

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the levels of awareness, knowledge about signs and risk factors of mouth (oral) cancer, and attitudes towards early diagnosis and treatment among dental outpatients. A total of 1,200 adult outpatients attending dental clinics at the University of Jordan Hospital for dental examination and treatment were randomly selected to participate in the study. An 18-item pretested close-ended questionnaire was used for the study. Descriptive statistics were generated and chi-square tests, t-tests, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Spearman's rho test were used to examine differences between groups. Only 45.6% of the subjects had heard about oral cancer. Some 66.9% and 33.8%, respectively, were able to correctly identify tobacco and alcohol as risk factors. Some 24.1% had no knowledge about any signs of oral cancer. Male subjects, smokers, alcohol drinkers, older participants (>40 years), and participants with less than a university education were significantly less aware, and had much less knowledge, of the signs and risk factors of oral cancer (P<0.05). Awareness about oral cancer among Jordanian dental outpatients is low. These dental patients, especially those in high-risk groups for mouth cancer and those of lower socio-economic status (SES), are less well informed about the signs and risk factors of oral cancer. Interventions to improve public knowledge about oral cancer and attitudes towards early diagnosis and treatment are urgently indicated. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  5. Synonymy in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alomoush, Omar Ibrahim Salameh

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of synonymy in Jordanian Arabic. It has been assumed that synonymy in Jordanian Arabic has partial rather than complete synonymy. This means that the abundance of Jordanian Arabic in synonyms can be attributed to a number of explanations, namely dialectical variations, the speaker's attitude, and origin…

  6. Cross-border dental care: 'dental tourism' and patient mobility.

    PubMed

    Turner, L

    2008-05-24

    Patient mobility is increasing. 'Dental tourism' is driven by numerous factors. These factors include the high cost of local care, delays in obtaining access to local dentists, competent care at many international clinics, inexpensive air travel, and the Internet's capacity to link 'customers' to 'sellers' of health-related services. Though dental tourism will benefit some patients, increased patient mobility comes with numerous risks. Lack of access to affordable and timely local care plays a significant role in prompting patients to cross borders and receive dental care outside their local communities.

  7. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    PubMed

    Ní Ríordáin, R; McCreary, C

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and 'dental tourism'. A questionnaire was designed and randomly distributed to 520 patients attending the restorative dentistry, dental surgery and oral medicine clinics of Cork University Dental School and Hospital. Of the 520 questionnaires distributed, 500 were completed leading to a response rate of 96.2%. The majority of patients were familiar with using the Internet on a daily basis, with only 163 (32.6%) patients not using the Internet in their everyday lives. One hundred and seventy-seven (34.5%) patients either researched their presenting dental/oral condition or had a family or friend research their condition on their behalf. One hundred and eighty-five (37%) patients would consult with a dental practitioner online regarding an oral problem and a similar number (n=186) of patients surveyed would consider using the Internet to plan trips abroad for dental treatment. Practitioner-led direction for patients regarding quality information sources online is important. With the increased interest in travelling abroad for dental treatment, guidance for patients and practitioners regarding the legal and ethical issues pertaining to dental tourism is critical.

  8. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  9. Outcomes of Middle Eastern Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: The Primary Analysis of the First Jordanian PCI Registry.

    PubMed

    Alhaddad, Imad A; Tabbalat, Ramzi; Khader, Yousef; Al-Mousa, Eyas; Izraiq, Mahmoud; Nammas, Assem; Jarrah, Mohammad; Saleh, Akram; Hammoudeh, Ayman

    2017-01-01

    This is a prospective multicenter registry designed to evaluate the incidence of adverse cardiovascular events in Middle Eastern patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). The registry was also designed to determine the predictors of poor outcomes in such patients. We enrolled 2426 consecutive patients who underwent PCI at 12 tertiary care centers in Jordan between January 2013 and February 2014. A case report form was used to record data prospectively at hospital admission, discharge, and 12 months of follow-up. Mean age was 56 ± 11 years, females comprised 21% of the study patients, 62% had hypertension, 53% were diabetics, and 57% were cigarette smokers. Most patients (77%) underwent PCI for acute coronary syndrome. In-hospital and 1-year mortality rates were 0.78% and 1.94%, respectively. Definite or probable stent thrombosis occurred in 9 patients (0.37%) during hospitalization and in 47 (1.94%) at 1 year. Rates of target vessel repeat PCI and coronary artery bypass graft surgery at 1 year were 3.4% and 0.6%, respectively. The multivariate analysis revealed that cardiogenic shock, congestive heart failure, ST-segment deviation, diabetes, and major bleeding were significantly associated with higher risk of 1-year mortality. In this first large Jordanian registry of Middle Eastern patients undergoing PCI, patients treated were relatively young age population with low in-hospital and 1-year adverse cardiovascular events. Certain clinical features were associated with worse outcomes and may warrant aggressive therapeutic strategies.

  10. Predictors of dietary and fluid non-adherence in Jordanian patients with end-stage renal disease receiving haemodialysis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Amani A; Darawad, Muhammad; Al Gamal, Eklas; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Abed, Mona A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide insight into the relationship between dietary and fluid non-adherence, depressive symptoms, quality of life, perceived barriers and benefits of exercise, and perceived social support among Jordanian patients with end-stage renal disease receiving haemodialysis using Pender's health promotion model. Non-adherence to dietary and fluid restrictions is a leading cause of treatment failure and poor outcomes in end-stage renal disease. Yet, factors that interfere with the patients' ability to follow their dietary restrictions are unknown. A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design was used. Jordanian patients (n = 190) with end-stage renal disease receiving haemodialysis from three main Jordanian cities were included. The dialysis diet and fluid nonadherence questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory-II, Quality Of Life Index, Dialysis Patient-Perceived Exercise Benefits and Barriers Scale, and the Multidimensional Perceived Social Support were employed to measure the key variables. Patients were more likely men with mean age of 48·2 ± 14·9. Only 27% of the patients showed full commitment to diet guidelines and 23% to fluid guidelines during the last 14 days. Depression (M = 18·8 ± 11·4) had significant negative association with quality of life (importance and satisfaction) (r = -0·60, r = -0·32, p = 0·001, respectively). Multiple hierarchal regressions revealed a predictive model of only two variables: age (B = -0·22, p = 0·05) and residual renal function (B = -0·23, p = 0·012) for dietary non-adherence. Non-adherence to diet and fluid guidelines association with individual characteristics, health perception and psychosocial variables should be investigated in a longitudinal design. Relationship of non-adherence with culture-related factors should deeply be assessed among Jordanian patients with end-stage renal disease receiving haemodialysis. Identification of the factors that may worsen dietary and fluid non

  11. Health-related quality of life and associated factors in Jordanian cancer patients: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Sultan M

    2018-06-04

    Understanding the factors associated with patients' health-related quality of life along with their social networks can help identify who may benefit from supportive programmes. This study sought to evaluate the impact of a cancer diagnosis on Jordanian cancer patients' health-related quality of life and its relationship with social support and emotional status. A descriptive design was utilized, and 226 clients were participated. Participants completed European Organization for Research and Treatment of cancer quality of life questionnaire (EORTC-version 3), the Hospice Comfort Questionnaire, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale. The results revealed that participants demonstrated unsatisfactory quality of life and many complained of fatigue. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed that social support, hospitalization readmission and being a nonsmoker were significant predictors for poor global quality of life score. In addition, a high educational level, less rehospitalization and high anxiety and depression scores were significant predictors for comfort level. In conclusion, patients with cancer are at an elevated risk of impaired physical functioning and report unsatisfactory quality of life, particularly if they are anxious, depressed and lack social support. The associated factors with decreased quality of life or low comfort level could be amenable to change with appropriate interventions. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Impact of Applying Quality Management Practices on Patient Centeredness in Jordanian Public Hospitals: Results of Predictive Modeling.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Heba H; Harvey, Heather L; Alyahya, Mohammad S; Alshraideh, Hussam A; Al Abdi, Rabah M; Parahoo, Sanjai K

    2018-01-01

    Targeting the patient's needs and preferences has become an important contributor for improving care delivery, enhancing patient satisfaction, and achieving better clinical outcomes. This study aimed to examine the impact of applying quality management practices on patient centeredness within the context of health care accreditation and to explore the differences in the views of various health care workers regarding the attributes affecting patient-centered care. Our study followed a cross-sectional survey design wherein 4 Jordanian public hospitals were investigated several months after accreditation was obtained. Total 829 clinical/nonclinical hospital staff members consented for study participation. This sample was divided into 3 main occupational categories to represent the administrators, nurses, as well as doctors and other health professionals. Using a structural equation modeling, our results indicated that the predictors of patient-centered care for both administrators and those providing clinical care were participation in the accreditation process, leadership commitment to quality improvement, and measurement of quality improvement outcomes. In particular, perceiving the importance of the hospital's engagement in the accreditation process was shown to be relevant to the administrators (gamma = 0.96), nurses (gamma = 0.80), as well as to doctors and other health professionals (gamma = 0.71). However, the administrator staff (gamma = 0.31) was less likely to perceive the influence of measuring the quality improvement outcomes on the delivery of patient-centered care than nurses (gamma = 0.59) as well as doctors and other health care providers (gamma = 0.55). From the nurses' perspectives only, patient centeredness was found to be driven by building an institutional framework that supports quality assurance in hospital settings (gamma = 0.36). In conclusion, accreditation is a leading factor for delivering patient-centered care and should be on a hospital

  13. [Management of conscious sedation in dental treatment for asthma patients].

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Wan, Kuo

    2010-06-01

    Asthma, often begins in childhood, can affect dental health. In return, dental treatment and dental anxiety can lead to an acute asthmatic attack. This article reviews the potential influence of asthma on dental treatment and dental medications and specifically describes the modes of dental conscious sedation in asthmatic patients.

  14. Understanding the autistic dental patient.

    PubMed

    Green, Danielle; Flanagan, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of many pervasive developmental disorders (PDD); others include Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder (also known as Heller's syndrome), pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), and the higher functioning Asperger's syndrome. Because ASD is the most common of the developmental disabilities, it is not unusual for dentists to have ASD patients among their patient population. As the name indicates, ASD varies widely in its clinical manifestations; however, dentists are likely to encounter difficulties with communication and socialization. Although communication may be difficult, it is not impossible. A thorough understanding of this complex neurological disorder and displaying patience are vital for the dentist. This article seeks to familiarize readers with ASD characteristics and co-morbid conditions that may affect dental treatment and provide some management strategies for this unique population.

  15. The Impact of Applying Quality Management Practices on Patient Centeredness in Jordanian Public Hospitals: Results of Predictive Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Heba H.; Harvey, Heather L.; Alyahya, Mohammad S.; Alshraideh, Hussam A.; Al abdi, Rabah M.; Parahoo, Sanjai K.

    2018-01-01

    Targeting the patient’s needs and preferences has become an important contributor for improving care delivery, enhancing patient satisfaction, and achieving better clinical outcomes. This study aimed to examine the impact of applying quality management practices on patient centeredness within the context of health care accreditation and to explore the differences in the views of various health care workers regarding the attributes affecting patient-centered care. Our study followed a cross-sectional survey design wherein 4 Jordanian public hospitals were investigated several months after accreditation was obtained. Total 829 clinical/nonclinical hospital staff members consented for study participation. This sample was divided into 3 main occupational categories to represent the administrators, nurses, as well as doctors and other health professionals. Using a structural equation modeling, our results indicated that the predictors of patient-centered care for both administrators and those providing clinical care were participation in the accreditation process, leadership commitment to quality improvement, and measurement of quality improvement outcomes. In particular, perceiving the importance of the hospital’s engagement in the accreditation process was shown to be relevant to the administrators (gamma = 0.96), nurses (gamma = 0.80), as well as to doctors and other health professionals (gamma = 0.71). However, the administrator staff (gamma = 0.31) was less likely to perceive the influence of measuring the quality improvement outcomes on the delivery of patient-centered care than nurses (gamma = 0.59) as well as doctors and other health care providers (gamma = 0.55). From the nurses’ perspectives only, patient centeredness was found to be driven by building an institutional framework that supports quality assurance in hospital settings (gamma = 0.36). In conclusion, accreditation is a leading factor for delivering patient-centered care and should be on a

  16. The Prevalence of Dental Anxiety in Patients of a University Dental Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodmansey, Karl F.

    2005-01-01

    Dental anxiety remains a pervasive barrier to dental treatment for many individuals, including college-age patients. In this article, the author reviews dental anxiety and examines the usefulness of assessment instruments for identifying dental anxiety. Using 2 unique assessment instruments, he examines the prevalence of dental anxiety in his…

  17. Communication in dental medicine: importance in motivating elderly dental patients.

    PubMed

    Scutariu, Mihaela Monica; Forna, Norina

    2013-01-01

    Dental services for elderly patients are characterized by a series of particularities related to the vulnerability of this age group, which is affected by various co morbidities, and the diminished physical, cognitive and financial capacities. Finding ways to keep elderly patients coming to a dental office is possible by improving the dentist-patient relationship and implicitly the quality of care by increasing the self-esteem of the elderly and their place in society, by increasing the role of oral health in the quality of life, and here we refer to the pleasure of eating, the pleasant physical aspect and normal diction. The present paper presents the psychological aspects that interfere in the communication process between the dentist and the elderly patient and the changes motivation undergoes when people are in pain. These data can sometimes change the reticent attitude of the dentist towards the elderly patient which is often considered to be a risk patient.

  18. Organisational aspects of dental practices: do dental students think like patients or like general dental practitioners?

    PubMed

    Sonneveld, R E; Brands, W G; Bronkhorst, E M; Welie, J V M; Truin, G J

    2013-02-01

    In view of transparency in health care, the widespread desire for more patient-centred care, and in an attempt to facilitate educational programmes that effectively respond to these changes, two research questions are formulated: (i) How do dental students rate the importance of various organisational aspects of dental practices compared with dental patients and general dental practitioners (GDPs), and what prescripts, defined as specific operational responsibilities of GDPs in these matters, do dental students propose? and (ii) In doing so, do students resemble patients or GDPs? In two survey studies, dental students (n = 198), patients (n = 3127) and GDPs (n = 303) were asked to rate by questionnaire the importance of 41 organisational aspects of a general dental practice and proposed specific operational responsibilities ('prescripts'). Seven of 41 aspects were rated as important by the majority of the students. Although in a different rank order, three aspects were predominantly selected by all three groups: continuing education, accessibility by telephone and Dutch-speaking GDP. For most aspects, significant differences were found between the prescripts proposed by students and those proposed by patients, and few differences were found between students and GDPs. The findings do not permit the general conclusion that the views of dental students resemble those of patients or GPDs. Looking at the overall rank order, the three respondent groups showed a great resemblance although significant differences were found for specific aspects. With regard to the proposed prescripts, students showed realistic views and the majority wants to participate in continuing education and work with protocols and guidelines. In this, they tend to resemble GDPs more than they resemble patients. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Patient satisfaction in Dental Healthcare Centers

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Dena A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to (1) measure the degree of patient satisfaction among the clinical and nonclinical dental services offered at specialty dental centers and (2) investigate the factors associated with the degree of overall satisfaction. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and ninety-seven participants from five dental centers were recruited for this study. Each participant completed a self-administered questionnaire to measure patient satisfaction with clinical and nonclinical dental services. Analysis of variance, t-tests, a general linear model, and stepwise regression analysis was applied. Results: The respondents were generally satisfied, but internal differences were observed. The exhibited highest satisfaction with the dentists’ performance, followed by the dental assistants’ services, and the lowest satisfaction with the center's physical appearance and accessibility. Females, participants with less than a bachelor's degree, and younger individuals were more satisfied with the clinical and nonclinical dental services. The stepwise regression analysis revealed that the coefficient of determination (R2) was 40.4%. The patient satisfaction with the performance of the dentists explained 42.6% of the overall satisfaction, whereas their satisfaction with the clinical setting explained 31.5% of the overall satisfaction. Conclusion: Additional improvements with regard to the accessibility and physical appearance of the dental centers are needed. In addition, interventions regarding accessibility, particularly when booking an appointment, are required. PMID:27403045

  20. Patient satisfaction in Dental Healthcare Centers.

    PubMed

    Ali, Dena A

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to (1) measure the degree of patient satisfaction among the clinical and nonclinical dental services offered at specialty dental centers and (2) investigate the factors associated with the degree of overall satisfaction. Four hundred and ninety-seven participants from five dental centers were recruited for this study. Each participant completed a self-administered questionnaire to measure patient satisfaction with clinical and nonclinical dental services. Analysis of variance, t-tests, a general linear model, and stepwise regression analysis was applied. The respondents were generally satisfied, but internal differences were observed. The exhibited highest satisfaction with the dentists' performance, followed by the dental assistants' services, and the lowest satisfaction with the center's physical appearance and accessibility. Females, participants with less than a bachelor's degree, and younger individuals were more satisfied with the clinical and nonclinical dental services. The stepwise regression analysis revealed that the coefficient of determination (R (2)) was 40.4%. The patient satisfaction with the performance of the dentists explained 42.6% of the overall satisfaction, whereas their satisfaction with the clinical setting explained 31.5% of the overall satisfaction. Additional improvements with regard to the accessibility and physical appearance of the dental centers are needed. In addition, interventions regarding accessibility, particularly when booking an appointment, are required.

  1. Dental anxiety in patients seeking care at the University Dental Hospital in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Ekanayake, L; Dharmawardena, D

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors affecting dental anxiety in patients seeking dental care. A cross sectional study. 503 first visit patients attending the University Dental Hospital in Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. Corah's dental anxiety scale was used to assess the dental anxiety in these patients. The prevalence of dental anxiety was 32% (DAS score > or = 12) while 12% were considered to be extremely anxious (DAS score > or = 15). Females were found to be more dentally anxious than males. Level of education was associated with dental anxiety. Problem oriented attenders had a significantly higher mean DAS score than regular attenders. Those who had an extraction at the last dental visit were significantly more dentally anxious than those who had a restoration/scaling. Negative dental experience was not associated with dental anxiety. The logistic regression model revealed that gender, level of education and 'fear' which was cited as the reason for the delay in seeking care for the presenting complaint were significant predictors of dental anxiety. However, only 4% of the variation in dental anxiety could be explained by these independent variables. Socio-demographic factors and variables related to past dental experiences had a limited influence in explaining dental anxiety in this sample of dental patients.

  2. Dental home: Patient centered dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Girish Babu, K. L.; Doddamani, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Early childhood dental caries occurs in all racial and socioeconomic groups; however, it tends to be more prevalent in children in families belonging to the low-income group, where it is seen in epidemic proportions. Dental caries results from an overgrowth of specific organisms that are a part of normally occurring human flora. Human dental flora is site specific, and an infant is not colonized until the eruption of the primary dentition at approximately 6 to 30 months of age. The most likely source of inoculation of an infant's dental flora is the mother, or another intimate care provider, shared utensils, etc. Decreasing the level of cariogenic organisms in the mother's dental flora at the time of colonization can significantly impact the child's redisposition to caries. To prevent caries in children, high-risk individuals must be identified at an early age (preferably high-risk mothers during prenatal care), and aggressive strategies should be adopted, including anticipatory guidance, behavior modifications (oral hygiene and feeding practices), and establishment of a dental home by 1 year of age for children deemed at risk. PMID:24478960

  3. Dental injuries in autistic patients.

    PubMed

    Altun, Ceyhan; Guven, Gunseli; Yorbik, Ozgur; Acikel, Cengizhan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of traumatic dental injury among Turkish children and young adults with autism and compare this to the general population of Turkish children and young adults without autism. This study was comprised of 186 children and young adults (138 males and 48 females), 93 with autism (autistic group, or AG) and 93 without autism (control group, or CG). Dental injuries were classified according to drawings and texts based on the WHO classification system, as modified by Andreasen and Andreasen. The rate of injury was higher among the AG (23%) than the CG (15%). The difference between the 2 groups, however, was not statistically significant (P<.19). The most common type of dental injury was enamel fracture. The rate of enamel fracture was higher in the CG (59%) than in the AG (33%), and the distribution of types of traumatic injury differed significantly between the AG and CG (P>.01). There were no significant differences in the rates of traumatic dental injuries among children and young adults with and without autistic disorder. The most frequently injured teeth were the permanent maxillary central incisors, and the frequency of injury to these teeth differed significantly (P>.01) between AG (56%) and CG (91%). The most common type of dental injury, enamel fracture, was more common in CG (59%) than AG (33%). The distribution of types of traumatic dental injuries differed significantly between the 2 groups (P>.01).

  4. Fundamental frequency characteristics of Jordanian Arabic speakers.

    PubMed

    Natour, Yaser S; Wingate, Judith M

    2009-09-01

    This study is the first in a series of investigations designed to test the acoustic characteristics of the normal Arabic voice. The subjects were three hundred normal Jordanian Arabic speakers (100 adult males, 100 adult females, and 100 children). The subjects produced a sustained phonation of the vowel /a:/ and stated their complete names (i.e. first, second, third and surname) using a carrier phrase. The samples were analyzed using the Multi Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP). Fundamental frequency (F0) from the /a:/ and speaking fundamental frequency (SF0) from the sentence were analyzed. Results revealed a significant difference of both F0 and SF0 values among adult Jordanian Arabic-speaking males (F0=131.34Hz +/- 18.65, SF0=137.45 +/- 18.93), females (F0=231.13Hz +/- 20.86, SF0=230.84 +/- 16.50) and children (F0=270.93Hz +/- 20.01, SF0=278.04 +/- 32.07). Comparison with other ethnicities indicated that F0 values of adult Jordanian Arabic-speaking males and females are generally consistent with adult Caucasian and African-American values. However, for Jordanian Arabic-speaking children, a higher trend in F0 values was present than their Western counterparts. SF0 values for adult Jordanian Arabic-speaking males are generally consistent with the adult Caucasian male SF0 values. However, SF0 values of adult Jordanian-speaking females and children were relatively higher than the reported Western values. It is recommended that speech-language pathologists in Arabic-speaking countries, Jordan in specific, utilize the new data provided (F0 and SF0) when evaluating and/or treating Arabic-speaking patients. Due to its cross-linguistic variability, SF0 emerged as a preferred measurement when conducting cross-cultural comparisons of voice features.

  5. Dental anesthesia for patients with special needs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Chia; Lin, I-Hua; Huang, Chi-Hsiang; Fan, Shou-Zen

    2012-09-01

    To offer individualized dental treatment to certain patients who cannot tolerate dental treatment, sedation or general anesthesia is required. The needs could be either medical, mental, or psychological. The most common indications for sedation or general anesthesia are lack of cooperation, multiple morbidities, and pediatric autism. In adults, cognitive impairment and multiple morbidities are most commonly encountered indications. Because of suboptimal home care, incomplete medical history, poor preoperative management, lack of cooperation, and developmental abnormalities, it is a challenge to prepare anesthesia for patients with special needs. The American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) has proposed guidelines for office-based anesthesia for ambulatory surgery. In patients with ASA physical status IV and V, sedation or general anesthesia for treatment in the dental office is not recommended. The distinction between sedation levels and general anesthesia is not clear. If intravenous general anesthesia without tracheal intubation is chosen for dental procedures, full cooperation between the dentist, dental assistant, and anesthesiologist is needed. Teamwork between the dentist and healthcare provider is key to achieve safe and successful dental treatment under sedation or general anesthesia in the patient with special needs. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Motivating your patients: marketing dental services.

    PubMed

    Grönroos, C; Masalin, K

    1990-02-01

    In most industrialized countries the issues of unemployment or under-employment are becoming more critical for the members of the dental associations. In some countries this is creating greater competition between the private practitioners and public health dentists as well as between private dental practitioners themselves. Modern marketing, especially service marketing theory and models, can provide dentists and dental associations with tools to improve their position in relation to patients, political decision makers and other public agencies. However, marketing has to be understood correctly as a philosophy providing a means of approaching the establishing, maintaining and enhancing patient or customer relationships and not as a narrowly defined set of tools. As long as marketing is considered to be external campaigns, such as advertising and not much else, it is bound to fail. Other dimensions of marketing, such as interactive marketing and internal marketing, are of much greater importance to dental practitioners.

  7. Patient and family/friend satisfaction in a sample of Jordanian Critical Care Units.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, S; Alja'afreh, M; Lee, A J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the validity of family members/friends as proxies by comparing perceptions of satisfaction with care and decision making between critically ill patients and their family/friends. A comparative, descriptive cross-sectional study. Seven Critical Care Units across four public and military hospitals in the centre and southern regions of Jordan. A modified version of the Family Satisfaction-ICU (FS-ICU) questionnaire was distributed to Critical Care Unit (CCU) patients before hospital discharge. In addition, up to two family members/close friends were also asked to complete the questionnaire. A total of 213 patients (response rate 72%) and 246 family members/friends (response rate 79%) completed and returned the questionnaire. Although the majority of family members/friends and patients were satisfied with overall care, patients were generally significantly less satisfied (mean (SD) care subscale 75.6 (17.8) and 70.9 (17.3), respectively, (p=0.005). When individual items were examined, significant differences in nursing care (family/friends 80.1 (20.7) versus patient 75.9 (22.2), p=0.038) and inclusion in decision making (family/friends 53.9 (33.2) versus patient 62.0 (34.2), p=0.010) were found. The study showed a degree of congruence between patients and their family members/friends in relation to their satisfaction with the CCU experience. Thus, views of family/friends may serve as a proxy in assessing care and decision making processes of critically ill patients. Appropriate training of the critical care team and provision of strategies to address the concerns of patients' families are needed to improve overall patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Predischarge education improves adherence to a healthy lifestyle among Jordanian patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eshah, Nidal F

    2013-09-01

    Risk factor reduction and modification of patient lifestyle have become the focus of secondary prevention and cardiac rehabilitation programs. Considering the scarcity of resources in developing countries, nurses can potentially provide great benefit to acute coronary syndrome patients by utilizing hospital time to teach the patients how to lower their risk for recurrence and adopt healthier lifestyles after discharge. The purpose of this study was to identify the effectiveness of a predischarge education on acute coronary syndrome patients' lifestyles. Quasi-experimental pretest-post-test design was used. The patients assigned to the experimental group were offered predischarge education that stimulates lifestyle modification and adoption of a healthier lifestyle. The experimental group scored significantly higher than the control group in three lifestyle components - health responsibilities, nutrition, and interpersonal relations. In conclusion, predischarge education helps motivate acute coronary syndrome patients to adhere to a healthy lifestyle postdischarge. Therefore, nurses must be educated and prepared to be qualified health educators, and health education should continue as one of the most important daily nursing practices, thus it is invested in the preparation of acute coronary patients' discharge plan. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Dental management of patients with epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Dağ, Canan; Bezgin, Tuğba; Özalp, Nurhan

    2014-09-01

    Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a group of rare, genetic skin disorders characterized by fragility and blistering to minimal trauma. All oral surfaces may be involved, including the tongue, buccal mucosa, palate, floor of the mouth and gingiva. Common oral findings of the disease include microstomia, intraoral ulcerations and bullae formation, ankyloglossia, tongue atrophy, elimination of buccal and vestibular sulci, lingual depapillation and atrophy of the palatal folds. In these case reports; systemic findings, oral manifestations and preventive measures are described for 3 patients with EB, all of whom required extensive oral management. Early dental management and preventive care to minimize caries development and improve oral health is very important for patients with EB. Pediatric dentists play an especially important role in early intervention. In describing the dental management of three EB cases, this article stresses the importance of an aggressive dental preventive programme with strict oral hygiene instructions for patients and parents along with frequent professional cleaning and fluoride therapy.

  10. Illness perception and adherence to healthy behaviour in Jordanian coronary heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Sultan M; Almalik, Mona Ma

    2016-06-01

    Patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease are strongly recommended to adopt healthier behaviours and adhere to prescribed medication. Previous research on patients with a wide range of health conditions has explored the role of patients' illness perceptions in explaining coping and health outcomes. However, among coronary heart disease patients, this has not been well examined. The purpose of this study was to explore coronary heart disease patients' illness perception beliefs and investigate whether these beliefs could predict adherence to healthy behaviours. A multi-centre cross-sectional study was conducted at four tertiary hospitals in Jordan. A convenience sample of 254 patients (73% response rate), who visited the cardiac clinic for routine review, participated in the study. Participants completed a self-reported questionnaire, which included the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, the Godin Leisure Time Activity questionnaire and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Patients reported high levels of disease understanding (coherence) and they were convinced that they were able to control their condition by themselves and/or with appropriate treatment. Male patients perceived lower consequences (p<0.05) and had a better understanding of their illness than female patients (p<0.001). There were significant associations between increasing age and each of timeline (r=0.326, p<0.001), (r=0.146, p<0.024) and coherence (r=-0.166, p<0.010). Adjusted regression analysis showed that exercise adherence was predicted by both a strong perception in personal control (β 2.66, 95% confidence interval 1.28-4.04), timeline (β -1.85, 95% confidence interval 0. 8-2.88) and illness coherence (β 2.12, 95% confidence interval 0.35-3.90). Medication adherence was predicted by perception of personal control and treatment control. Adherence to a low-fat diet regimen was predicted by perception of illness coherence only (odds ratio 12, 95% confidence interval 1

  11. Hospital dental practice in special patients

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Espín-Gálvez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Dental patients with special needs are people with different systemic diseases, multiple disorders or severe physical and/or mental disabilities. A Medline search was made, yielding a total of 29 articles that served as the basis for this study, which offers a brief description of the dental intervention protocols in medically compromised patients. Dental treatment in patients with special needs, whether presenting medical problems or disabilities, is sometimes complex. For this reason the hospital should be regarded as the ideal setting for the care of these individuals. Before starting any dental intervention, a correct patient evaluation is needed, based on a correct anamnesis, medical records and interconsultation reports, and with due assessment of the medical risks involved. The hospital setting offers the advantage of access to electronic medical records and to data referred to any complementary tests that may have been made, and we moreover have the possibility of performing treatments under general anesthesia. In this context, ambulatory major surgery is the best approach when considering general anesthesia in patients of this kind. Key words:Hospital dentistry, special patients, medically compromised patients. PMID:24121921

  12. Depression and caregiver burden experienced by caregivers of Jordanian patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Andaleeb Abu; Bond, A Elaine; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2012-04-01

    Many stroke survivors will be cared for at home, primarily by their relatives. Providing care to a family member with a chronic disabling disease can be both emotionally and physically distressing for the caregivers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patients' characteristics, duration of caregiving, daily caregiving time, caregiver's characteristics, caregiver depression and burden in caregivers of patients with stroke. A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 116 subjects. The Center of Epidemiologic Studies of Depression and the Caregiver Strain Index were used to identify caregiver depression and burden, respectively. Logistic regression analysis identified the influence of independent variables on caregiver depression and caregiver burden. Caregivers had high scores for depression and burden indices. Caregivers' health, receiving professional home health care and caregivers' burden were related to caregiver depression. Functional disabilities of patients with stroke and depression of caregivers were related to caregiver burden. To decrease caregiver depression and burden, nurses must provide caregivers with instructions for home management of patients with stroke. Development of specialized stroke home health services in Jordan that targets patients with stroke and their caregivers are recommended. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Dental and Dental Hygiene Intraprofessional Education: A Pilot Program and Assessment of Students' and Patients' Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Jones, Vickie E; Karydis, Anastasios; Hottel, Timothy L

    2017-10-01

    Interprofessional and intraprofessional education (when students from two or more professions or within the same profession, respectively, learn about, from, and/or with each other) is crucial for effective interdisciplinary collaboration. The aims of this study were to assess the effectiveness of a clinical intraprofessional education program for dental and dental hygiene students, based on students' expectations and satisfaction with the program and patients' satisfaction with the team-based care. The pilot program was developed at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry, where dental hygiene students were paired randomly with dental students scheduled for prophylaxis, scaling and root planing, or periodontal maintenance. Surveys with questions about the students' expectations and satisfaction were distributed to 89 senior dental students and 27 senior dental hygiene students before and after team-based procedures. Another survey was distributed to 17 patients asking about their satisfaction with the team-based care. All 27 dental hygiene students (100% response rate), 51 dental students (57.3% response rate), and all 17 patients (100% response rate) participated in the surveys. The results showed that both the dental and dental hygiene students had high expectations and were overall satisfied with the intraprofessional education. The students' expectations and perceived educational gap (difference between expectations and satisfaction) differed for the dental and dental hygiene students (p<0.001). The male dental students were also more satisfied than the female dental students (p<0.01). Overall, the program met or exceeded the students' expectations, and the patients were overwhelmingly satisfied with the team-based care. These results suggest that this intraprofessional practice model provided an effective educational experience for both dental and dental hygiene students and patients. The differences between the dental hygiene

  14. Nationality, Gender, Age, and Body Mass Index Influences on Vitamin D Concentration among Elderly Patients and Young Iraqi and Jordanian in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Al-Horani, Hanan; Abu Dayyih, Wael; Mallah, Eyad; Hamad, Mohammed; Mima, Mohammad; Awad, Riad; Arafat, Tawfiq

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is necessary for maintaining and regulating calcium levels; thus, insufficiency of vitamin D increases the risk of many chronic diseases. This study aimed to examine vitamin D levels among Jordanian and Iraqi volunteers and find the relation between vitamin D level and lipid profile patients. Vitamin D levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For young healthy group subjects, vitamin D levels were 20.60 ± 5.94 ng/mL for Jordanian and 27.59 ± 7.74 ng/mL for Iraqi. Vitamin D concentrations for young males and females were 25.82 ± 8.33 ng/mL and 21.95 ± 6.39 ng/mL, respectively. Females wearing hijab were 20.87 ± 6.45 ng/mL, while uncovered females were 23.55 ± 6.04 ng/mL. For >40 years Iraqi subjects, vitamin D level for healthy was 29.78 ± 9.49 ng/mL and 23.88 ± 7.93 ng/mL for hyperlipidemic subjects. Vitamin D levels for overweight and obese healthy groups were significantly higher (P < 0.050) than those for the hyperlipidemic patients groups. Vitamin D levels for males were significantly higher than females and were significantly higher for healthy than those hyperlipidemic Iraqi patients. These findings showed that vitamin D levels are affected by age, nationality, gender, and health statues and highlight the importance of vitamin D supplementation for groups with low levels particularly old, hijab wearing females, and hyperlipidemic groups. PMID:27110402

  15. Nationality, Gender, Age, and Body Mass Index Influences on Vitamin D Concentration among Elderly Patients and Young Iraqi and Jordanian in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Horani, Hanan; Abu Dayyih, Wael; Mallah, Eyad; Hamad, Mohammed; Mima, Mohammad; Awad, Riad; Arafat, Tawfiq

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is necessary for maintaining and regulating calcium levels; thus, insufficiency of vitamin D increases the risk of many chronic diseases. This study aimed to examine vitamin D levels among Jordanian and Iraqi volunteers and find the relation between vitamin D level and lipid profile patients. Vitamin D levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For young healthy group subjects, vitamin D levels were 20.60 ± 5.94 ng/mL for Jordanian and 27.59 ± 7.74 ng/mL for Iraqi. Vitamin D concentrations for young males and females were 25.82 ± 8.33 ng/mL and 21.95 ± 6.39 ng/mL, respectively. Females wearing hijab were 20.87 ± 6.45 ng/mL, while uncovered females were 23.55 ± 6.04 ng/mL. For >40 years Iraqi subjects, vitamin D level for healthy was 29.78 ± 9.49 ng/mL and 23.88 ± 7.93 ng/mL for hyperlipidemic subjects. Vitamin D levels for overweight and obese healthy groups were significantly higher (P < 0.050) than those for the hyperlipidemic patients groups. Vitamin D levels for males were significantly higher than females and were significantly higher for healthy than those hyperlipidemic Iraqi patients. These findings showed that vitamin D levels are affected by age, nationality, gender, and health statues and highlight the importance of vitamin D supplementation for groups with low levels particularly old, hijab wearing females, and hyperlipidemic groups.

  16. [Dental management in patients with cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Martínez, Sandra; Talaván Serna, Julio; Silvestre, Francisco-Javier

    2016-03-01

    The present article makes a brief review about dental management of the patients with cirrhosis. It focus on problems related with infections, haemorrhagic events and treatment with drugs of common use in odontology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  17. Patient Satisfaction in Military Dental Treatment Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-07

    assessing satisfaction. Dental Patient Satisfaction 58 References Abidi, H. (2003). Encyclopedia of Social Sciences Research Methods . Thousand Oaks (CA...Care System that gave me the opportunity to attend the Baylor Program and to complete the dual Masters in Business Administration program at The...Patient satisfaction is an integral component of the report cards and thus military dentistry had to develop a method of standardizing the assessment of

  18. Referring periodontal patients: clinical decision making by dental and dental hygiene students.

    PubMed

    Williams, Karen B; Burgardt, Grayson J; Rapley, John W; Bray, Kimberly K; Cobb, Charles M

    2014-03-01

    Referral of periodontal patients requires development of a complex set of decision making skills. This study was conducted to determine criteria used by dental and dental hygiene students regarding the referral of periodontal patients for specialty care. Using mixed methods, a thirteen-item survey was developed to elicit the students' perceptions of their knowledge, confidence regarding managing patients, and clinical reasoning related to periodontal patients. The instrument was administered during the summer prior to (T1) and at the end of the students' final year (T2) of training. Seventy-nine dental students (81 percent of total class) and thirty dental hygiene students (83 percent of total class) completed T1. At T2, forty-two dental (44 percent of total class) and twenty-six dental hygiene students (87 percent of total class) completed the questionnaire. While 90 percent of dental and 96 percent of dental hygiene respondents reported a willingness to refer patients with active disease to specialists, only 40 percent of dental and 36 percent of dental hygiene respondents reported confidence in diagnosing, treating, and appropriately referring such patients. The students' ability to recognize critical disease and risk factors influencing referral was good; however, clinical application of that knowledge indicated a gap between knowledge and applied reasoning. The students' attitudes about the importance of periodontal disease and their perceived competence to identify critical disease risk factors were not significantly related (p>0.05) to correct clinical decisions in the case scenarios. The study concludes that dental and dental hygiene curricula should emphasize both the acquisition and application of knowledge regarding criteria for referral of periodontal patients.

  19. Readability Levels of Dental Patient Education Brochures.

    PubMed

    Boles, Catherine D; Liu, Ying; November-Rider, Debra

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate dental patient education brochures produced since 2000 to determine if there is any change in the Flesch-Kincaid grade level readability. A convenience sample of 36 brochures was obtained for analysis of the readability of the patient education material on multiple dental topics. Readability was measured using the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level through Microsoft Word. Pearson's correlation was used to describe the relationship among the factors of interest. Backward model selection of multiple linear regression model was used to investigate the relationship between Flesch-Kincaid Grade level and a set of predictors included in this study. A convenience sample (n=36) of dental education brochures produced from 2000 to 2014 showed a mean Flesch-Kincaid reading grade level of 9.15. Weak to moderate correlations existed between word count and grade level (r=0.40) and characters count and grade level (r=0.46); strong correlations were found between grade level and average words per sentence (r=0.70), average characters per word (r=0.85) and Flesch Reading Ease (r=-0.98). Only 1 brochure out of the sample met the recommended sixth grade reading level (Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level 5.7). Overall, the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level of all brochures was significantly higher than the recommended sixth grade reading level (p<0.0001). The findings from this study demonstrated that there has generally been an improvement in the Flesch-Kincaid grade level readability of the brochures. However, the majority of the brochures analyzed are still testing above the recommended sixth grade reading level. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  20. Dental implants in medically complex patients-a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Manor, Yifat; Simon, Roy; Haim, Doron; Garfunkel, Adi; Moses, Ofer

    2017-03-01

    Dental implant insertion for oral rehabilitation is a worldwide procedure for healthy and medically compromised patients. The impact of systemic disease risks on the outcome of implant therapy is unclear, since there are few if any published randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The objective of this study is to investigate the rate of complications and failures following dental implantation in medically compromised patients in order to elucidate risk factors and prevent them. A retrospective cohort study was conducted from patient files treated with dental implantation between the years 2008-2014. The study group consisted of medically complex patients while the control group consisted of healthy patients. Preoperative, intraoperative, and post operative clinical details were retrieved from patients' files. The survival rate and the success rate of the dental implants were evaluated clinically and radiographically. A total of 204 patients (1003 dental implants) were included in the research, in the study group, 93 patients with 528 dental implants and in the control group, 111 patients with 475 dental implants. No significant differences were found between the groups regarding implant failures or complications. The failure rate of dental implants among the patients was 11.8 % in the study group and 16.2 % in the control group (P = 0.04). It was found that patients with a higher number of implants (mean 6.8) had failures compared with patients with a lower number of implants (mean 4.2) regardless of their health status (P < 0.01). We found a similar rate of failure and complications of dental implantation in medically complex patients and in healthy patients. Medically complex patients can undergo dental implantation. There are similar rates of complications and failures of dental implants in medically complex patients and in healthy patients.

  1. Factors associated with regular dental visits among hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Masami; Shirayama, Yasuhiko; Imoto, Issei; Hinode, Daisuke; Yanagisawa, Shizuko; Takeuchi, Yuko; Bando, Takashi; Yokota, Narushi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate awareness and attitudes about preventive dental visits among dialysis patients; to clarify the barriers to visiting the dentist. METHODS Subjects included 141 dentate outpatients receiving hemodialysis treatment at two facilities, one with a dental department and the other without a dental department. We used a structured questionnaire to interview participants about their awareness of oral health management issues for dialysis patients, perceived oral symptoms and attitudes about dental visits. Bivariate analysis using the χ2 test was conducted to determine associations between study variables and regular dental check-ups. Binominal logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with regular dental check-ups. RESULTS There were no significant differences in patient demographics between the two participating facilities, including attitudes about dental visits. Therefore, we included all patients in the following analyses. Few patients (4.3%) had been referred to a dentist by a medical doctor or nurse. Although 80.9% of subjects had a primary dentist, only 34.0% of subjects received regular dental check-ups. The most common reasons cited for not seeking dental care were that visits are burdensome and a lack of perceived need. Patients with gum swelling or bleeding were much more likely to be in the group of those not receiving routine dental check-ups (χ2 test, P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that receiving dental check-ups was associated with awareness that oral health management is more important for dialysis patients than for others and with having a primary dentist (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Dialysis patients should be educated about the importance of preventive dental care. Medical providers are expected to participate in promoting dental visits among dialysis patients. PMID:27648409

  2. Self-Reported Dental Fear among Dental Students and Their Patients

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Negra, Junia; Paiva, Saul M.; Oliveira, Mauricio; Ferreira, Efigenia; Freire-Maia, Fernanda; Pordeus, Isabela

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare self-reported dental fear among dental students and patients at a School of Dentistry in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Eighty students ranging in age from 20 to 29 years and 80 patients ranging in age from 18 to 65 years participated in the study. A self-administered pre-tested questionnaire consisting of 13 items was used for data acquisition. The city of Belo Horizonte Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) was employed for socioeconomic classification. The chi-square test and binary and multinomial logistic regression were employed in the statistical analysis, with the significance level set at 0.05. The majority of dental students (76.5%) sought the dentist for the first time for a routine exam, while patients (77.3%) mostly sought a dentist for the treatment of dental pain. Dental fear was more prevalent among the patients (72.5%) than the students (27.5%). A total of 47.1% of the students and 52.9% of the patients reported having had negative dental experiences in childhood. The logistic model revealed an association between dental fear and a pain-related experience (OR: 1.8; 95%CI: 1.3–2.6). Patients were more prone to dental fear (OR: 2.2; 95%CI: 1.0–5.0). Although at different percentages, both students and patients experienced dental fear. Current patient with previous experience of dental pain had more dental fear. PMID:22470277

  3. Satisfaction with Dental Appearance and Attitude toward improving Dental Esthetics among Patients attending a Dental Teaching Center.

    PubMed

    Maghaireh, Ghada A; Alzraikat, Hanan; Taha, Nessrin A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors influencing the satisfaction of dental appearance and attitude toward treatments to improve dental esthetics among patients attending a dental teaching center. A questionnaire was used to collect data of four background variables among 450 patients attended a dental teaching center in the city of Irbid in Jordan. The questionnaire enclosed self-reported questions about the appearance of anterior teeth, received esthetic treatment and desired treatment for improving esthetics. Descriptive, multiple logistic regression and Chi-square tests were used for data analysis (p ≤ 0.05). The 450 participants consisted of (66.2%) male and (33.8%) female. Of these, 69.3% were satisfied with their dental appearance and 58.0% with the color of their teeth. Esthetic restorations were the most received treatment (39.8%) and whitening of teeth was the most desired treatment (55.3%). The patients' satisfaction with dental appearance was influenced by teeth color, crowding and receiving whitening (p < 0.05. r = 0.561, r(2) = 0.315). The most desired esthetic treatments influenced by the satisfaction with dental appearance were esthetic restorations and orthodontics (p < 0.05. r = 0.223, r(2) = 0.05). Significantly more female reported having esthetic restorations and orthodontics (p = 0.008, 0.000) and desired to have orthodontic, crowns or veneers and esthetic restorations (p = 0.000, 0.015, 0.028). Satisfaction with dental appearance was affected by teeth color, feeling teeth are crowded, desire for esthetic restorations and orthodontic treatment. A high percentage of patients were not satisfied with the color of their teeth. Recognizing the factors that affect patients' satisfaction with their present dental appearance and attitude toward treatments to improve dental esthetic can guide clinicians to strategies to improve esthetics.

  4. Predicting dental attendance from dental hygienists' autonomy support and patients' autonomous motivation: A randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Halvari, Anne E Münster; Halvari, Hallgeir; Williams, Geoffrey C; Deci, Edward L

    2017-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that a Self-Determination Theory (SDT) intervention designed to promote oral health care competence in an autonomy-supportive way would predict change in caries competence relative to standard care. Further, to test the SDT process path-model hypotheses with: (1) the intervention and individual differences in relative autonomous locus of causality (RALOC) predicting increases in caries competence, which in turn would positively predict dental attendance; (2) RALOC negatively predicting dental anxiety, which would negatively predict dental attendance; (3) RALOC and caries disease referred to the dentist after an autonomy-supportive clinical exam directly positively predicting dental attendance; and (4) the intervention moderating the link between RALOC and dental attendance. A randomised two-group experiment was conducted at a dental clinic with 138 patients (M age  = 23.31 yr., SD = 3.5), with pre- and post-measures in a period of 5.5 months. The experimental model was supported. The SDT path model fit the data well and supported the hypotheses explaining 63% of the variance in dental attendance. Patients personality (RALOC) and hygienists promoting oral health care competence in an autonomy-supportive way, performance of autonomy-supportive clinical exams and reductions of anxiety for dental treatment have important practical implications for patients' dental attendance.

  5. Common dental anomalies in cleft lip and palate patients.

    PubMed

    Haque, Sanjida; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is the most common orofacial congenital malformation in live births. CLP can occur individually or in combination with other congenital deformities. Affected patients experience a number of dental, aesthetic, speech, hearing, and psychological complications and have a higher incidence of severe dental conditions. The purpose of this study is to characterise the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with CLP patients based on a literature survey. By literature survey, this study characterises the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with cleft lip and palate patients. Common dental anomalies associated with CLP are supernumerary tooth, congenitally missing tooth, delayed tooth development, morphological anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentition, delayed eruption of permanent maxillary incisors, microdontia, and abnormal tooth number. The incidence of certain dental anomalies is strongly correlated with Cleft lip and palate, a finding that is consistent with previous studies.

  6. Prevalence and distribution of dental anomalies in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Montasser, Mona A; Taha, Mahasen

    2012-01-01

    To study the prevalence and distribution of dental anomalies in a sample of orthodontic patients. The dental casts, intraoral photographs, and lateral panoramic and cephalometric radiographs of 509 Egyptian orthodontic patients were studied. Patients were examined for dental anomalies in number, size, shape, position, and structure. The prevalence of each dental anomaly was calculated and compared between sexes. Of the total study sample, 32.6% of the patients had at least one dental anomaly other than agenesis of third molars; 32.1% of females and 33.5% of males had at least one dental anomaly other than agenesis of third molars. The most commonly detected dental anomalies were impaction (12.8%) and ectopic eruption (10.8%). The total prevalence of hypodontia (excluding third molars) and hyperdontia was 2.4% and 2.8%, respectively, with similiar distributions in females and males. Gemination and accessory roots were reported in this study; each of these anomalies was detected in 0.2% of patients. In addition to genetic and racial factors, environmental factors could have more important influence on the prevalence of dental anomalies in every population. Impaction, ectopic eruption, hyperdontia, hypodontia, and microdontia were the most common dental anomalies, while fusion and dentinogenesis imperfecta were absent.

  7. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion

    PubMed Central

    AlShahrani, Mohammed Thamer; Alqarni, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition. PMID:28828189

  8. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion.

    PubMed

    AlShahrani, Mohammed Thamer; Haralur, Satheesh B; Alqarni, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  9. Prevalence of dental anomalies in Saudi orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Jabaa, Aljazi H; Aldrees, Abdullah M

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies and study the association of these anomalies with different types of malocclusion in a random sample of Saudi orthodontic patients. Six hundred and two randomly selected pretreatment records including orthopantomographs (OPG), and study models were evaluated. The molar relationship was determined using pretreatment study models, and OPG were examined to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies among the sample. The most common types of the investigated anomalies were: impaction followed by hypodontia, microdontia, macrodontia, ectopic eruption and supernumerary. No statistical significant correlations were observed between sex and dental anomalies. Dental anomalies were more commonly found in class I followed by asymmetric molar relation, then class II and finally class III molar relation. No malocclusion group had a statistically significant relation with any individual dental anomaly. The prevalence of dental anomalies among Saudi orthodontic patients was higher than the general population. Although, orthodontic patients have been reported to have high rates of dental anomalies, orthodontists often fail to consider this. If not detected, dental anomalies can complicate dental and orthodontic treatment; therefore, their presence should be carefully investigated during orthodontic diagnosis and considered during treatment planning.

  10. Patients with cardiac disease: considerations for the dental practitioner.

    PubMed

    Jowett, N I; Cabot, L B

    2000-09-23

    The provision of dental treatment under both local anaesthesia and sedation has an excellent safety record, although medical problems may occur. The high prevalence of cardiac disease in the population, particularly ischaemic heart disease, makes it the most common medical problem encountered in dental practice. Additionally, the increasing survival of children with congenital heart disease makes them a significant proportion of those attending for dental treatment. While most dental practitioners feel confident in performing cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, treating patients with co-existent cardio-vascular disease often causes concern over potential problems during treatment. This article aims to allay many of these fears by describing the commoner cardiac conditions and how they may affect dental treatment. It outlines prophylactic and remediable measures that may be taken to enable safe delivery of dental care.

  11. Promoting emancipated decision-making for surgical treatment of early stage breast cancer among Jordanian women

    PubMed Central

    Obeidat, Rana F.

    2015-01-01

    To use the critical social theory as a framework to analyze the oppression of Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer in the decision-making process for surgical treatment and suggest strategies to emancipate these women to make free choices. This is a discussion paper utilizing the critical social theory as a framework for analysis. The sexist and paternalistic ideology that characterizes Jordanian society in general and the medical establishment in particular as well as the biomedical ideology are some of the responsible ideologies for the fact that many Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer are denied the right to choose a surgical treatment according to their own preferences and values. The financial and political power of Jordanian medical organizations (e.g., Jordan Medical Council), the weakness of nursing administration in the healthcare system, and the hierarchical organization of Jordanian society, where men are first and women are second, support these oppressing ideologies. Knowledge is a strong tool of power. Jordanian nurses could empower women with early stage breast cancer by enhancing their knowledge regarding their health and the options available for surgical treatment. To successfully emancipate patients, education alone may not be enough; there is also a need for health care providers’ support and unconditional acceptance of choice. To achieve the aim of emancipating women with breast cancer from the oppression inherent in the persistence of mastectomy, Jordanian nurses need to recognize that they should first gain greater power and authority in the healthcare system. PMID:27981122

  12. Promoting emancipated decision-making for surgical treatment of early stage breast cancer among Jordanian women.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Rana F

    2015-01-01

    To use the critical social theory as a framework to analyze the oppression of Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer in the decision-making process for surgical treatment and suggest strategies to emancipate these women to make free choices. This is a discussion paper utilizing the critical social theory as a framework for analysis. The sexist and paternalistic ideology that characterizes Jordanian society in general and the medical establishment in particular as well as the biomedical ideology are some of the responsible ideologies for the fact that many Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer are denied the right to choose a surgical treatment according to their own preferences and values. The financial and political power of Jordanian medical organizations (e.g., Jordan Medical Council), the weakness of nursing administration in the healthcare system, and the hierarchical organization of Jordanian society, where men are first and women are second, support these oppressing ideologies. Knowledge is a strong tool of power. Jordanian nurses could empower women with early stage breast cancer by enhancing their knowledge regarding their health and the options available for surgical treatment. To successfully emancipate patients, education alone may not be enough; there is also a need for health care providers' support and unconditional acceptance of choice. To achieve the aim of emancipating women with breast cancer from the oppression inherent in the persistence of mastectomy, Jordanian nurses need to recognize that they should first gain greater power and authority in the healthcare system.

  13. Valuing the delivery of dental care: Heterogeneity in patients' preferences and willingness-to-pay for dental care attributes.

    PubMed

    Sever, Ivan; Verbič, Miroslav; Sever, Eva Klaric

    2018-02-01

    To examine the amount of heterogeneity in patients' preferences for dental care, what factors affect their preferences, and how much they would be willing to pay for improvement in specific dental care attributes. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was used to elicit patients' preferences. Three alternative dental care services that differed in the type of care provider, treatment explanation, dental staff behavior, waiting time and treatment cost were described to patients. Patients (n=265) were asked to choose their preferred alternative. The study was conducted at a public dental clinic of the School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb. Mixed logit and latent class models were used for analysis. On average, the patients would be willing to pay €45 for getting a detailed explanation of treatment over no explanation. This was the most valued attribute of dental care, followed by dental staff behavior with marginal willingness-to-pay (WTP) of €28. Dental care provided by the faculty members and private dental care were valued similarly, while student-provided care was valued €23 less. Patients also disliked longer waiting time in the office, but this was the least important attribute. Four classes of patients with distinct preferences for dental care were identified. Older and/or more educated patients tended to give relatively less importance to treatment explanation. Higher education was also associated with a higher propensity to substitute faculty dental care with the private care providers. Large heterogeneity in patients' preferences was detected. Understanding their preferences may improve the delivery of dental care. Dental care providers should pay particular attention to providing a detailed treatment explanation to their patients. Dental care for older and/or more educated patients should be more attentive to interpersonal characteristics. Faculty dental care provided by faculty members could be price competitive to private care, and student

  14. Temperament and character personality dimensions in patients with dental anxiety.

    PubMed

    Bergdahl, Maud; Bergdahl, Jan

    2003-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate character and temperament dimensions of personality in six men and 31 women (aged 20-57 yr) with severe dental anxiety, and to evaluate whether these dimensions were associated with the level of dental anxiety. The Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) and the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) were used. High ratings in novelty seeking and female gender predicted high DAS scores. Compared with controls, the patients scored significantly higher on the temperament dimension, novelty seeking. For character dimensions, the patients scored lower on cooperativeness and higher on self-transcendence than controls. Our results indicated that patients with dental anxiety are neurotic extravert (i.e. novelty seekers who experience brief dissociative periods and magical thinking). Furthermore, the combination of the inherited temperament dimension novelty seeking and the social learned character dimension cooperativeness and self-transcendence seem to form a vulnerable personality to develop dental anxiety.

  15. Comparison of incoming dental school patients with and without disabilities.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, D J; Truelove, E L; Martin, M D; Mandel, L S

    1997-01-01

    A survey of incoming dental school patients compared 64 adult patients (DECOD) and 73 patients without disability (ND), regarding past dental experience, current needs, and basis for selecting the school's clinics. The responses indicated that, for DECOD patients, clinic selection was based largely on Medicaid acceptance, staff experience, and inability of other dentists to manage their disability; for ND patients, selection was based on lower fee structure. Both groups expressed high treatment need, but the rate was lower for DECOD than for ND patients. More DECOD patients reported severe dental anxiety and adverse effects of dental problems on general health. Chart records revealed that clinical findings exceeded perceived need for both DECOD and ND patients. While both groups had high periodontal disease rates (91%), DECOD patients had significantly poorer oral hygiene and less restorative need than ND patients. The findings suggest differences between persons with disabilities and other patient groups in difficulty of access to dental services in the community, reasons for entering the dental school system, and in presenting treatment need and/or treatment planning.

  16. Dental care providers' and patients' perceptions of the effect of health information technology in the dental care setting.

    PubMed

    Asan, Onur; Ye, Zhan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-09-01

    The use of electronic health records (EHRs) in dental care and their effect on dental care provider-patient interaction have not been studied sufficiently. The authors conducted a study to explore dental care providers' interactions with EHRs during patient visits, how these interactions influence dental care provider-patient communication, and the providers' and patients' perception of EHR use in the dental clinic setting during patient visits. The authors collected survey and interview data from patients and providers at three dental clinics in a health care system. The authors used qualitative and quantitative methods to analyze data obtained from patients and dental care providers. The provider survey results showed significant differences in perceptions of EHR use in patient visits across dental care provider groups (dentists, dental hygienists and dental assistants). Patient survey results indicated that some patients experienced a certain level of frustration and distraction because of providers' use of EHRs during the visit. The provider survey results indicated that there are different perceptions across provider groups about EHRs and the effect of computer use on communication with patients. Dental assistants generally reported more negative effects on communication with patients owing to computer use. Interview results also indicated that dental care providers may not feel comfortable interacting with the EHR without having any verbal or eye contact with patients during the patient's dental visit. A new design for dental operatories and locations of computer screens within the operatories should be undertaken to prevent negative nonverbal communication such as loss of eye contact or forcing the provider and patient to sit back to back, as well as to enhance patient education and information sharing.

  17. Dental education and special-needs patients: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    McTigue, Dennis J

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric dentists have, by tradition and default, provided care for persons with special health care needs (PSHCN), regardless of age. Deinstitutionalization of PSHCN in the 1960s, however, overwhelmed the dental care system, and oral health care became one of the greatest unmet needs of this population. This presentation follows the history of training for dentists in this aspect of care, from the first demonstration programs in the 1970s to the current educational programs in U.S. dental schools. Today's dental students must be competent in assessing the treatment needs of PSHCN, but accreditation standards do not require competency in the treatment of this group of patients. Recommendations to rectify this include revising dental school curricula to be more patient-centered, improving technology in schools, earlier clinical experiences for dental students, and the use of community-based clinics.

  18. The medically compromised patient: Are dental implants a feasible option?

    PubMed

    Vissink, A; Spijkervet, Fkl; Raghoebar, G M

    2018-03-01

    In healthy subjects, dental implants have evolved to be a common therapy to solve problems related to stability and retention of dentures as well as to replace failing teeth. Although dental implants are applied in medically compromised patients, it is often not well known whether this therapy is also feasible in these patients, whether the risk of implant failure and developing peri-implantitis is increased, and what specific preventive measures, if any, have to be taken when applying dental implants in these patients. Generally speaking, as was the conclusion by the leading review of Diz, Scully, and Sanz on placement of dental implants in medically compromised patients (J Dent, 41, 2013, 195), in a few disorders implant survival may be lower, and the risk of a compromised peri-implant health and its related complications be greater, but the degree of systemic disease control outweighs the nature of the disorder rather than the risk accompanying dental implant treatment. So, as dental implant treatment is accompanied by significant functional benefits and improved oral health-related quality of life, dental implant therapy is a feasible treatment in almost any medically compromised patient when the required preventive measures are taken and follow-up care is at a high level. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Measuring patient safety in a UK dental hospital: development of a dental clinical effectiveness dashboard.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, M N; Ashley, M P; Shaw, A; Dickson, S; Saksena, A

    2014-10-01

    Patient safety is an important marker of quality for any healthcare organisation. In 2008, the British Government white paper entitled High quality care for all, resulting from a review led by Lord Darzi, identified patient safety as a key component of quality and discussed how it might be measured, analysed and acted upon. National and local clinically curated metrics were suggested, which could be displayed via a 'clinical dashboard'. This paper explains the development of a clinical effectiveness dashboard focused on patient safety in an English dental hospital and how it has helped us identify relevant patient safety issues in secondary dental care.

  20. An analysis of the attitudes of dental patients attending general dental practice in Galway.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Martina; Burke, Francis; McKenna, Gerald; Madden, Jamie; Cronin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    To describe the patterns of dental attendance and attitudes towards tooth loss of general dental practice patients in Galway. 1. To determine the pattern of adult dental attendance in general practices in Galway; and, 2. To examine the oral health attitudes of these patients. Questionnaires were distributed to 311 consecutive adult patients in the waiting rooms of ten general dental practices in Galway, which were randomly selected from the telephone directory. A total of 254 of the 311 questionnaires distributed were fully completed, returned and included in the results, giving a response rate of 81.7%. A total of 59% of dentate participants attended their dentist for annual or biannual examinations compared to 23% of edentate patients. Some 10.5% of medical card holders and 0.5% of non-medical card holders were edentulous. The data from the survey indicated that medical card holders in Galway were more likely to be edentulous than nonmedical card holders. Edentate patients were less likely to be regular dental attenders than dentate patients.

  1. Strategies to manage patients with dental anxiety and dental phobia: literature review

    PubMed Central

    Appukuttan, Deva Priya

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety and phobia result in avoidance of dental care. It is a frequently encountered problem in dental offices. Formulating acceptable evidence-based therapies for such patients is essential, or else they can be a considerable source of stress for the dentist. These patients need to be identified at the earliest opportunity and their concerns addressed. The initial interaction between the dentist and the patient can reveal the presence of anxiety, fear, and phobia. In such situations, subjective evaluation by interviews and self-reporting on fear and anxiety scales and objective assessment of blood pressure, pulse rate, pulse oximetry, finger temperature, and galvanic skin response can greatly enhance the diagnosis and enable categorization of these individuals as mildly, moderately, or highly anxious or dental phobics. Broadly, dental anxiety can be managed by psychotherapeutic interventions, pharmacological interventions, or a combination of both, depending on the level of dental anxiety, patient characteristics, and clinical situations. Psychotherapeutic interventions are either behaviorally or cognitively oriented. Pharmacologically, these patients can be managed using either sedation or general anesthesia. Behavior-modification therapies aim to change unacceptable behaviors through learning, and involve muscle relaxation and relaxation breathing, along with guided imagery and physiological monitoring using biofeedback, hypnosis, acupuncture, distraction, positive reinforcement, stop-signaling, and exposure-based treatments, such as systematic desensitization, “tell-show-do”, and modeling. Cognitive strategies aim to alter and restructure the content of negative cognitions and enhance control over the negative thoughts. Cognitive behavior therapy is a combination of behavior therapy and cognitive therapy, and is currently the most accepted and successful psychological treatment for anxiety and phobia. In certain situations, where the patient is not

  2. Breastfeeding practices among Jordanian women.

    PubMed

    Oweis, Arwa; Tayem, Asmahan; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore Jordanian women's breastfeeding beliefs and practices including exclusive breastfeeding. A descriptive cross-sectional design with a convenience sample of 200 Jordanian mothers was used. The majority of mothers were muliparous and were recruited from primary health-care centres within 6 weeks of a normal vaginal birth or an instrumental delivery. Eligible women, who met the inclusion criteria, were invited to participate in the study. A sociodemographic data form and a 14-item questionnaire concerning different aspects of breastfeeding beliefs and practices were developed for self administration. This study indicated high early initiation of breastfeeding. Most mothers gave supplements other than breastfeeding, including water without knowing that this supplementation could affect exclusive breastfeeding or the continuation of breastfeeding. Finding of this study shed some light on the current breastfeeding practices including exclusive breastfeeding among Jordanian women. Women need to be better educated about breastfeeding. Therefore, more efforts and resources should be put into providing opportunities for education to discuss breastfeeding during antenatal care. This Jordanian study could be relevant to Arabic women in the West, because cultural beliefs and practices are likely to be part of immigrant woman's perceptions about breastfeeding practices.

  3. Jordanian School Counselors' Leadership Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsmadi, Rana; Mahasneh, Randa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the degree to which Jordanian school counselors were seen by teachers and principals to possess and display leadership behaviors related to Bolman and Deal's (1997) transformational "four framework approach" to leadership. This was based on the view that such leadership would relate to…

  4. What about the dentist-patient relationship in dental tourism?

    PubMed

    Conti, Adelaide; Delbon, Paola; Laffranchi, Laura; Paganelli, Corrado

    2014-03-01

    Dental tourism is patients travelling across international borders with the intention of receiving dental care. It is a growing phenomenon that raises many ethical issues, particularly regarding the dentist-patient relationship. We discuss various issues related to this phenomenon, including patient autonomy over practitioner choice, patient safety, continuity of care, informed consent and doctor-patient communication, among other factors. In particular, patients partaking in medical tourism should be informed of its potential problems and the importance of proper planning and post-treatment care to guarantee high-quality treatment outcomes.

  5. Dental anomalies in pediatric patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Septer, Seth; Bohaty, Brenda; Onikul, Robin; Kumar, Vandana; Williams, Karen B; Attard, Thomas M; Friesen, Craig A; Friesen, Lynn Roosa

    2018-04-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis patients often present with non-malignant extra-intestinal manifestations which include dental anomalies that may be evident prior to the appearance of the colonic adenomas. The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence and type of dental anomalies and the relationships between gene mutations and dental anomalies in these patients. Twenty-two pediatric familial adenomatous polyposis patients and 46 controls, who were age and gender matched participated. Familial adenomatous polyposis patient's had a dental examination with panoramic radiograph and medical record review for age at diagnosis, the presence of the adenomatous polyposis coli gene mutation, and determination of other extra-intestinal manifestations on the body. The control group was identified from a retrospective chart review and selected if there was a current panoramic radiograph. The only significant difference between familial adenomatous polyposis patients and controls were the presence of jaw osteomas and sclerosis (p = .0001). Patients with a mutation in, or upstream of codon 1309 had a higher frequency of osteomas (77.8%) and jaw-bone sclerosis (44.4%), and 77% of these had at least one dental anomaly. This preliminary study showed an association between a genetic variant at, or upstream of codon 1309, and radiographic dental anomalies.

  6. Dental management of patient with Williams Syndrome - A case report.

    PubMed

    Wong, Daniel; Ramachandra, Srinivas Sulugodu; Singh, Ashish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystemic rare genetic disorder caused by deletion of 26-28 genes in the long arm of chromosome 7. It is characterized by developmental and physical abnormalities including congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, mental retardation, neurological features, growth deficiency, genitourinary manifestations, gastrointestinal problems, musculoskeletal problems, unique behavioral characteristics, and dental problems. Dental abnormalities include malocclusion, hypodontia, malformed teeth, taurodontism, pulp stones, increased space between teeth, enamel hypoplasia, and high prevalence of dental caries. Authors report a 17-year-old female patient with underlying Williams syndrome. Oral features and problems seen in the patient are listed. Malocclusion and screwdriver shaped teeth were noticed. Generalized widening of the periodontal ligament space with vital teeth was seen. This finding has not been reported in cases of Williams syndrome earlier. Precautions taken during dental treatment in patients with Williams syndrome are also discussed.

  7. Esthetics: patients' perceptions of dental attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Dunn, W J; Murchison, D F; Broome, J C

    1996-09-01

    The importance of dentofacial attractiveness to the psychosocial well-being of an individual has been well established. Very little information is available regarding dental patient perceptions of a pleasing esthetic image. The purpose of this study was to identify factors distinctive to attractive smiles versus unattractive smiles, as perceived by patients. Standardized format photographs (5 x 7 in, matte finish, at f-32 and 1:2 magnification) of eight male and eight female smiles, framing only lips and teeth, were viewed by 297 subjects. The smiles exhibited differences in symmetry, tooth shade, number of teeth displayed, and height of maxillary lip line, and included both restored and unrestored teeth. Respondents ranked the photographs in order from most to least appealing appearance. Respondents viewed each series of photographs in a similar lighting and time period. A questionnaire identified the respondent's age, sex, race, education, income, and home town. Twenty-five demographic groups were established from the information in the questionnaire. Data were analyzed using stepwise discriminant analysis to determine the combination of smile characteristics that best predicted the ranking. The same female smile was chosen as the most attractive by 24 of the 25 demographic groups. This smile is characterized by natural teeth having light shade, high lip line, a large display of teeth, and radiating symmetry. Two female smiles typified by darker shade and asymmetry were rated by all groups as being least attractive. Two male smiles were judged equal as the most pleasing esthetically. Respondents favored those smiles characterized by light shade, a moderate display of teeth, moderate lip line, and a symmetrical arrangement of teeth. One male smile characterized by darker shade was rated as least attractive. In all cases, tooth shade was the most important factor, followed in sequence by unrestored natural teeth and number of teeth displayed. No correlation was

  8. Herbal supplement use among adult dental patients in a USA dental school clinic: prevalence, patient demographics, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Worku; Herman, Wayne; Konzelman, Joseph

    2011-03-01

    This study assessed the frequency and patterns of utilization of herbal supplement products by adult dental patients at a USA dental school clinic. A self-reporting questionnaire was used to collect patient demographics and frequency of herbal supplement utilization along with other information. The questionnaire was distributed and collected at a dental visit. Herbal utilization was related to patient demographics using descriptive analysis. The clinical implications of the findings are discussed. Out of 1,240 questionnaires, 1,119 were returned as completed. Of these, 12.6% reported using ≥1 of 21 herbal products. The majority of the users were middle-aged educated caucasian women. Green tea, garlic, echinacea, ginkgo biloba, and ginseng were the top 5 products used. Mostly, supplements were consumed in combination with drugs. The type, prevalence, and frequency of herbal supplement utilization by adult dental patients in this USA dental clinic were generally similar to those reported for other population groups. This observation, coupled with the documented effects of the commonly used herbal products, should alert dental health caregivers to inquire about herbal supplement use when evaluating or treating their patients. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. UNITED STATES DENTAL PROFESSIONALS’ PERCEPTIONS OF DENTAL ANXIETY AND NEED FOR SEDATION IN PATIENTS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Lisa J.; Hyatt, Halee A.; Huggins, Kimberly Hanson; Milgrom, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Dental fear is a barrier to receiving dental care, particularly for those patients who also suffer from mental illnesses. The current study examined United States dental professionals’ perceptions of dental fear experienced by patients with mental illness, and frequency of sedation of patients with and without mental illness. Dentists and dental staff members (n = 187) completed a survey about their experiences in treating patients with mental illness. More participants agreed (79.8%) than disagreed (20.2%) that patients with mental illness have more anxiety regarding dental treatment (p < .001) than dental patients without mental illness. Further, significantly more participants reported mentally ill patients’ anxiety is “possibly” or “definitely” a barrier to both receiving (96.8%; p < .001) and providing (76.9%; p < .01) dental treatment. Despite reporting more fear in these patients, there were no significant differences in frequency of sedation procedures between those with and without mental illness, regardless of type of sedation (p’s > .05). This lack of difference in sedation for mentally ill patients suggests hesitancy on the part of dental providers to sedate patients with mental illness and highlights a lack of clinical guidelines for this population in the US. Suggestions are given for the assessment and clinical management of patients with mental illness. PMID:24876662

  10. Oral and Dental Considerations in Pediatric Leukemic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Padmini, Chiyadu; Bai, K. Yellamma

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the world, there have been drastic decline in mortality rate in pediatric leukemic population due to early diagnosis and improvements in oncology treatment. The pediatric dentist plays an important role in the prevention, stabilization, and treatment of oral and dental problems that can compromise the child's health and quality of life during, and follow up of the cancer treatment. This manuscript discusses recommendations and promotes dental care of the pediatric leukemic patients. PMID:24724033

  11. Dental Implant Patients and Their Satisfaction with Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawares, Mary; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study developed a profile of dental implant patients from 38 private practices to document characteristics of endosseous implant recipients of the past 10 years. Data were then analyzed using multivariate techniques to examine the relationship between these characteristics and patient-reported outcomes. Patients tended to have high incomes and…

  12. Angel or Devil? Dentists and Dental Students Conceptions of Pediatric Dental Patients through Metaphor Analysis.

    PubMed

    Buldur, B

    The aim of this qualitative study was to identify the conceptions of dentists and dental students (DSs) about pediatric dental patients (PDPs) using metaphor analysis. The study group (N = 259) consisted of dentists and DSs. Participants completed the sentence "A pediatric dental patient is like ... because …..." in order to reveal the metaphors they use about the concept of PDPs. The data were analyzed using the mixed-methods: qualitative (metaphor analysis) and quantitative (chi-square) data analysis techniques. The dentists and DSs produced 259 metaphors. These metaphors were gathered under six different conceptual categories that define a PDP as unpredictable, dangerous, uncontrollable, requiring care and sensitivity, valuable, and orientable. The most important factors leading to these conceptions were the uncooperativeness of some PDPs and the effectiveness of behavior management. The results of this study indicate that there was no significant difference among DSs, general dentists and specialist dentists with respect to six conceptual categories that identify the conceptions about PDPs.

  13. Patients with burning mouth sensations. A clinical investigation of causative factors in a group of "compete denture wearers" Jordanian population.

    PubMed

    Mukatash-Nimri, Gadeer Elea; Al-Nimri, Marwan A; Al-Jadeed, Omar G; Al-Zobe, Zaid R; Aburumman, Khuzama K; Masarwa, Nader A

    2017-01-01

    To find out the prevalence of "true" burning mouth syndrome and study the association between patients' spontaneous complaints of burning mouth and systemic conditions in a group of middle age and elderly "denture wearers" patients in Jordan. A group of 129 patients (112 female and 17 male) of "complete denture wearers" subjects aged 40 years and over attended prosthetic clinic at King Hussein Medical Hospital complaining from oral burning, with no oral lesion possibly responsible for the burning sensations were selected. Assessment of oral and general status was done based on questioners, detailed history taking, medical records and extra and intraoral examination. The existed complete dentures retention, stability, jaw relationship and the free way space were evaluated. The current blood test and instrumental protocol for examination of patients with burning mouth complains were performed for each patient. Then those studied patients with burning mouth sensations including "true" burning mouth syndrome have been compared to the controls with regard to the presence of local problem, undermined local, systemic or psychological disease. The diagnosis of "true" burning mouth syndrome was established in (2.3%) of the studied population two females and one male. In most patients (58%) more than one site was affected. Significant positive associations were found between local factors (i.e., wearing complete dentures with unsatisfactory retention or jaw relationship, dry mouth or candidasis) and patients suffering from burning mouth sensation. The results also show that some systemic or psychological disorders were significantly more present among patients with burning mouth symptoms when compared to the control group ( p  < 0.05). Spontaneous symptoms of burning mouth without mucosal signs should be considered as a manifestation of undermind pathology and/or distress, and the multi-factorial causes of burning mouth syndrome and sensation need to be referred to the

  14. The Unstimulated Salivary Flow Rate in a Jordanian Healthy Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Sawair, Faleh A.; Ryalat, Soukaina; Shayyab, Mohammad; Saku, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of xerostomia is very important for oral health. The purpose of this study was to determine the unstimulated whole salivary flow rates (UWSFR) in a Jordanian Arab population aged 15 years and older. The effect of age, gender, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol consumption, and dental conditions, on UWSFR was also investigated. Methods The study was conducted on 244 subjects, 110 males and 134 females, with an average age of 33 ± 15.5 years. They were healthy, unmedicated, and with no history of dry mouth. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected during five minutes, and UWSFRs (ml/min) were determined. Data were analyzed by univariate analysis and multivariate regression analysis. Results The mean UWSFR was 0.46 ± 0.25 ml/min (range: 0.10-1.6 ml/min). Eighteen patients (7.4%) had UWSFR between < 0.20 ml/min. In univariate analysis, UWSFR was significantly affected by age, BMI, number of missing and restored teeth, and DMFT score. Regression analysis revealed that only age and number of missing teeth were of significance in explaining the variability of the UWSFR. Conclusions We established basic standard values of UWSFR to be used in the evaluation of Jordanian patients with complaints of xerostomia and to be compared to data reported in other studies. UWSFR 0.1 ml/min could be considered the cut-off value that distinguishes normal from abnormal salivary function in this healthy unmedicated population. Keywords Whole saliva flow rate; Unstimulated; Jordan PMID:22461872

  15. Cardiovascular risk factors in Middle Eastern patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: Results from the first Jordanian percutaneous coronary intervention study.

    PubMed

    Hammoudeh, Ayman J; Alhaddad, Imad A; Khader, Yousef; Tabbalat, Ramzi; Al-Mousa, Eyas; Saleh, Akram; Jarrah, Mohamad; Nammas, Assem; Izraiq, Mahmoud

    2017-07-01

    Background and aims: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the Middle East. We sought to study the prevalence and coexistence of 6 cardiovascular risk factors (RFs) among patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and to evaluate the impact of age and gender on the presence of multiple RFs. In this prospective, multicenter study, 2426 consecutive patients were enrolled. Mean age was 59.0 ± 10.1 years and 500 (20.6%) were women. Acute coronary syndrome and stable coronary disease were the indications for PCI in 77.1% and 22.9%, respectively. Hypertension was present in 62.3%, diabetes in 53.8%, hypercholesterolemia in 48.8%, smoking in 43.5%, family history of premature CVD 39.4% and obesity in 28.8%. Only 3.8% did not have any of these RFs. Presence of ⩾3 and ⩾4 RFS was observed in 57.4% and 29.5% of patients, respectively. Presence of ⩾3 RFs was more common in women than men (69.0% vs. 54.5%, p  < 0.0001), and among patients 41-65 years of age than older or younger patients (60.1% vs. 52.0% vs. 48.3%, respectively, p  = 0.017). Conclusions: Cardiovascular RFs are highly prevalent in this PCI Middle Eastern population undergoing PCI. More than half and more than one-fourth of the patients had at least 3 or 4 RFs; respectively. More women than men and more middle aged patients than older or younger patients had significantly higher rates of presence of multiple RFs.

  16. Using Standardized Patients to Teach Interprofessional Competencies to Dental Students.

    PubMed

    Anders, Patrick L; Scherer, Yvonne Krall; Hatton, Michael; Antonson, Donald; Austin-Ketch, Tammy; Campbell-Heider, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop, implement, and evaluate a novel interprofessional standardized patient exercise (ISPE) with oral-systemic and interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) components. Dental students and doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students at one U.S. university participated in the simulation, which was primarily designed to test their teamwork skills. In spring 2014, DNP students worked in the dental clinics with dental students under the supervision of nursing and dental faculty members. To test the teamwork outcomes for both groups of students, a standardized patient (SP) scenario was designed to include multiple chronic medical diagnoses and an oral-systemic component. The exercise was filmed for later review. Outcomes measures included SP and student self-evaluations and faculty evaluation of student documentation. The primary outcome of interest from a dental standpoint was faculty evaluation of IPCP competencies derived from the Core Competencies of Interprofessional Collaborative Practice and were deemed to be observable by faculty when viewing the videotaped scenario. Eight teams of students participated with an SP trained in the scenario. Each team consisted of a DNP student, a fourth-year dental student, and a second-year dental student. All eligible students in the DNP class (n=20) and eight students from each dental class (approximately 110 each) participated. The results showed that the teams scored highest on the role/responsibilities subscale, indicating students were respectful of each other's roles and expertise and effectively engaged each other to develop strategies to meet the patient's needs. Scores on the three other subscales (values/ethics, interprofessional communication, and teams/teamwork) were also high. These findings appeared to support IPCP as a method to foster knowledge and respect for other roles and responsibilities, improve appreciation of teamwork, and encourage better communication among health

  17. 75 FR 16912 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health... notice. This notice solicits comments for information needed to measure patients' satisfaction with VA's.... Title: Survey of Healthcare Experiences, Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0503. OMB...

  18. 78 FR 79079 - Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration...- 0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...-0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any correspondence).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title...

  19. Lessons learnt from Dental Patient Safety Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Obadan, Enihomo M.; Ramoni, Rachel B.; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Errors are commonplace in dentistry, it is therefore our imperative as dental professionals to intercept them before they lead to an adverse event, and/or mitigate their effects when an adverse event occurs. This requires a systematic approach at both the profession-level, encapsulated in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s Patient Safety Initiative structure, as well as at the practice-level, where Crew Resource Management is a tested paradigm. Supporting patient safety at both the dental practice and profession levels relies on understanding the types and causes of errors, an area in which little is known. Methods A retrospective review of dental adverse events reported in the literature was performed. Electronic bibliographic databases were searched and data were extracted on background characteristics, incident description, case characteristics, clinic setting where adverse event originated, phase of patient care that adverse event was detected, proximal cause, type of patient harm, degree of harm and recovery actions. Results 182 publications (containing 270 cases) were identified through our search. Delayed and unnecessary treatment/disease progression after misdiagnosis was the largest type of harm reported. 24.4% of reviewed cases were reported to have experienced permanent harm. One of every ten case reports reviewed (11.1%) reported that the adverse event resulted in the death of the affected patient. Conclusions Published case reports provide a window into understanding the nature and extent of dental adverse events, but for as much as the findings revealed about adverse events, they also identified the need for more broad-based contributions to our collective body of knowledge about adverse events in the dental office and their causes. Practical Implications Siloed and incomplete contributions to our understanding of adverse events in the dental office are threats to dental patients’ safety. PMID:25925524

  20. Dental considerations in cardiovascular patients: A practical perspective.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Swantika; Jaiswal, Ritika; Sachdeva, Surender

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease trends, complications, and associated therapeutics impact the dental health and treatment. Such patients require special consideration with regard to when and which dental treatment is appropriate and what precautions are required. Alertness to potential oral adverse drug reactions enables referral of patient's to his physician or cardiologist. Cardiovascular drugs are also known to have mild to potentially fatal drug interactions. Dental professionals may be the first line of defense in the detection and referral of a patient suspected of having cardiovascular disease, an uncontrolled disease status, or oral adverse drug reactions, and they have a key role to play in oral and systemic disease prevention and treatment, in partnership with the patient and his physician. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pediatric advanced life support and sedation of pediatric dental patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongbin

    2016-03-01

    Programs provided by the Korea Association of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation include Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), and Korean Advanced Life Support (KALS). However, programs pertinent to dental care are lacking. Since 2015, related organizations have been attempting to develop a Dental Advanced Life Support (DALS) program, which can meet the needs of the dental environment. Generally, for initial management of emergency situations, basic life support is most important. However, emergencies in young children mostly involve breathing. Therefore, physicians who treat pediatric dental patients should learn PALS. It is necessary for the physician to regularly renew training every two years to be able to immediately implement professional skills in emergency situations. In order to manage emergency situations in the pediatric dental clinic, respiratory support is most important. Therefore, mastering professional PALS, which includes respiratory care and core cases, particularly upper airway obstruction and respiratory depression caused by a respiratory control problem, would be highly desirable for a physician who treats pediatric dental patients. Regular training and renewal training every two years is absolutely necessary to be able to immediately implement professional skills in emergency situations.

  2. Interactions between patients and dental care providers: does gender matter?

    PubMed

    Inglehart, Marita R

    2013-04-01

    Research findings concerning the role of gender in patient-physician interactions can inform considerations about the role of gender in patient-dental care provider interactions. Medical research showed that gender differences in verbal and nonverbal communication in medical settings exist and that they affect the outcomes of these interactions. The process of communication is shaped by gender identities, gender stereotypes, and attitudes. Future research needs to consider the cultural complexity and diversity in which gender issues are embedded and the degree to which ongoing value change will shape gender roles and in turn interactions between dental patients and their providers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Expanding prosthodontic services to the older patient in dental practices.

    PubMed

    Warpeha, Walter S

    2011-01-01

    Numerous articles report on the unmet dental needs of the older patient, yet few have suggested strategies to overcome barriers to care for this unique demographic. At a time when prosthodontic services, including dental implants, offer improved outcomes, the elderly remain the least served of all patient groups. Obstacles to treatment include ageism, medical and dental complexity, financial limitations, and patients' resistance to treatment. Expanding prosthodontic care of the elderly requires a departure from traditional patient management techniques. The attempt to reverse ageism in your practice must go beyond simple awareness. Those offĩces that can relate to, treat with respect, and fulfill the health aspirations of the older patient create the atmosphere where care is more readily accepted. A successful team approach to patient management depends upon the ability to listen and respond to the elderly denture patient with information on denture maintenance and implant enhancements. An essential piece is encouraging regular recall for all denture wearers by every staff member. A well documented problem area in dental practice is the timely replacement of worn out or inadequate dentures. By using a simple assessment tool called the Satisfaction/Condition Score along with motivational interviewing, we have found increased treatment acceptance among our existing patients. Use of these suggestions in a general dentistry practice is more likely to encourage the older patient to better accept enhanced prosthodontic services.

  4. Multiple Intelligences of Students at Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khataybeh, Abdalla; Al-Sheikh, Kholoud

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating different intelligence types among Jordanian students at different public and private universities in Jordan. To achieve such aim, it sought to identify and rank multiple intelligences that characterize students at Jordanian universities, and to identify and rank the differences in multiple intelligences…

  5. Dental experience and self-perceived dental care needs of patients with angioedema.

    PubMed

    Lodi, G; Sardella, A; Bez, C; Demarosi, F; Cicardi, M; Carrassi, A

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the self-perceived dental care needs and dental experiences of patients with angioedema. At the 1998 annual meeting of the Voluntary Association for the Fight, Study and Treatment of Hereditary Angioedema ("Associazione volontaria per la lotta, lo studio e la terapia dell'angioedema ereditario"), a self-administered questionnaire was distributed to participants affected by hereditary or acquired angioedema. Fifty-seven persons completed the questionnaire (37 females, 20 males; mean age, 39 +/- 17 yrs; range, 5-76). The vast majority (91%) had the hereditary form of the disease. One-third of the respondents had some problems in obtaining oral treatment, with one person having been refused care. About half of the group had experienced an acute attack following dental treatment. Preventive measures needed improvement in about two-thirds of respondents. More than half (58%) of the group perceived a need for dental care. We conclude that persons with angioedema may experience difficulty in obtaining dental treatment, a common cause of acute attacks.

  6. Professional burnout and work stress among Israeli dental assistants.

    PubMed

    Uziel, Nir; Meyerson, Joseph; Birenzweig, Yonatan; Eli, Ilana

    2018-05-16

    Professional burnout and work-related stress are known problems that have been the subject of in-depth examination among dentists. Nevertheless, these issues have not been widely studied among dental assistants. The aims of this study were threefold: to confirm the structure of a Work Stress Inventory (WSI) for Dental Assistants which was originally developed for Jordanian dental assistants (factor analysis); to evaluate work stress and burnout among Israeli dental assistants and to discover the factors predicting Israeli assistants' burnout (regression analyses). The Maslach Burnout Inventory and the WSI were distributed by mail and in person. Varimax factor analysis revealed that the items which contribute to different aspects of work stress are similar among both Jordanian and Israeli populations. Among the 299 Israeli dental assistants who completed the questionnaires, the most stressful work-related factors were income, workload, and work hazards. Eighteen percent of the participants exhibited a high to very high level of burnout. Participants exhibited a moderate level of emotional exhaustion (EE), low level of depersonalization (DP), and high level of personal accomplishment (PA). Most WSI factors were found to correlate positively with EE and DP. Linear stepwise regression analyses revealed that the best predictor of EE was the dentist‒assistant relationship, followed by workload, patient type, and salary. The best predictor of DP was patient suffering followed by dentist‒assistant relationship, years of professional experience, and work hazards. Professional stress and burnout among dental assistants are important factors that can possibly affect the wellbeing of both dental personnel and their patients. Further studies are necessary to better understand these factors in addition to the effects of personal relationships on burnout among dentists and their assistants.

  7. DENTAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR LEUKEMIC PEDIATRIC PATIENTS: AN UPDATED REVIEW FOR GENERAL DENTAL PRACTITIONER.

    PubMed

    Lowal, Kholoud A; Alaizari, Nader Ahmed; Tarakji, Bassel; Petro, Waleed; Hussain, Khaja Amjad; Altamimi, Mohamed Abdullah Alsakran

    2015-10-01

    The early signs of leukemia can usually manifest in the oral cavity due to infiltration of leukemic cells or due to associated decline in normal marrow elements, especially in the acute phase of leukemia, as common lesions at this stage of the disease can be screened and diagnosed by the dentist. Therefore, the dental community should be aware of the oral manifestations of leukemia and oral complications of anticancer treatment. This can eliminate the oral symptoms of the disease and to improve quality of life for these patients. An extensive search in PubMed line using a combination of terms like "leukemia, children, dental, Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric" for last ten years was made. Reviews and case reports concerned about acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children were all collected and analyzed and data were extracted. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight on the oral presentations of leukemia in children attending dental clinics and the management of its undesirable side effects.

  8. [Organization of patient intake at private dental institutions].

    PubMed

    Miniaev, V A; Vishniakov, N I; Mchedlidze, T Sh; Kuraskua, A A; Stozharov, V V

    1998-01-01

    Scientifically-based organization of consultations and treatment of patients at dental institutions is proposed, based on the balance between the time spent by patients in the queue and the equipment downtime. The proposed organization will decrease the total duration of treatment.

  9. Assignment of Dental School Patients Using Periodontal Treatment Need Indices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mubarak, Ala

    1990-01-01

    The validity of the Periodontal Treatment Need System and the Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need as screening tests for allocation of patients to dental students was assessed and compared. Sixty-one patients reporting to the Department of Periodontology at the University of Oslo were studied. (MLW)

  10. Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert H; Murray, Jayson N; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2017-07-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, in collaboration with the American Dental Association, has developed Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for the Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from indications of patients with orthopaedic implants presenting for dental procedures, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature to identify the appropriateness of the use of prophylactic antibiotics. The 64 patient scenarios and 1 treatment were developed by the writing panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Next, a separate, multidisciplinary, voting panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3).

  11. 38 CFR 17.164 - Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... making and keeping dental appointments. 17.164 Section 17.164 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.164 Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments. Any veteran eligible for dental treatment on a one-time completion basis only and...

  12. 38 CFR 17.164 - Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... making and keeping dental appointments. 17.164 Section 17.164 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.164 Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments. Any veteran eligible for dental treatment on a one-time completion basis only and...

  13. 38 CFR 17.164 - Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... making and keeping dental appointments. 17.164 Section 17.164 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.164 Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments. Any veteran eligible for dental treatment on a one-time completion basis only and...

  14. 38 CFR 17.164 - Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... making and keeping dental appointments. 17.164 Section 17.164 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.164 Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments. Any veteran eligible for dental treatment on a one-time completion basis only and...

  15. 38 CFR 17.164 - Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... making and keeping dental appointments. 17.164 Section 17.164 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.164 Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments. Any veteran eligible for dental treatment on a one-time completion basis only and...

  16. Knowledge of dental health and diseases among dental patients, a multicentre study in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Almas, K; Albaker, A; Felembam, N

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of dental patients about dental health and diseases. A questionnaire was developed with three sets of questions, 1-general knowledge of dental conditions, 2-use of alternate methods in prevention and treatment of dental diseases, 3-awareness about personal oral health. Six hundred questionnaires were distributed in 6 cities from 4 different regions (i.e. Makkah, Riyadh, Tabuk, Gizan). 367 respondents (61% response rate) constituted 233 (63.5%) male and 134 (36.5%) female with the age range 11-70 years (mean 30 +/- 11.9). The data were analyzed by SPSS version 9.0 and results presented in frequency distributions. 99% male and 96% female considered their teeth for chewing food, 97% male and 96% female knew that increased carbohydrate intake and poor oral hygiene are related to tooth decay, 89% male and 96% female used toothbrush and paste to prevent dental diseases and 75% male and 66% female were regular user of miswak (chewing sticks.) 67% male and 59% female visit dentist, only in pain. 46% used miswak after their meals, only 14% of the subjects used miswak on their lingual and palatal surfaces of teeth, while 38% of the subjects used clove as remedy for toothache, 25.6% used saline and 10% used lemon for bleaching their teeth. 15% considered honey important for their good oral health. Regarding personal oral health, 35% had pain in gums, 36.8% were with bad breath, 28% had tooth hypersensitivity, and almost 50% used toothbrush twice daily while 42% had bleeding gums. It is important to note that knowledge and awareness about dental health and disease conditions are better in male subjects, dietary habits and oral hygiene methods need to be addressed in future investigations. There is a need to provide more health education to female subjects to improve their oral health.

  17. Dentist-patient communication in the multilingual dental setting.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, C; Slack-Smith, L; Davies, G

    2005-12-01

    Communication between dentists and patients can be exceptionally challenging when the patient and the dentist do not speak the same language, as is frequently the case in multicultural Australia. The aim of this study was to describe the issues involved in dealing with limited-English speaking patients in order to formulate recommendations on how to improve dental communication. A cross sectional study was performed using a postal survey to Australian Dental Association member dental practitioners in Western Australia. Responses were collated and data analysis was performed using SPSS 11.5 for Windows. Most respondents encounter language-related communication barriers weekly or monthly, and the most satisfactory method of communication is informal interpreters. Despite reporting satisfaction working with professional chairside interpreters or dental staff interpreters, most respondents did not use them. The most common alternative communication methods were diagrams and models. Endodontics and periodontics provided the greatest challenge in communication. Informed consent was reportedly compromised due to language barriers by 29 per cent of respondents. Recommendations to improve communication included access to interpretation services, dentist technique/attitude to communication and patient preparedness for English-speaking encounters. Many respondents do not utilize the preferential communication methods, creating a potential compromise to both informed consent and the patients' best interests. The use of professional interpreters is recommended, and discussion should be supplemented with means of non-verbal communication. Dentists require access to lists of multilingual dentists and greater awareness of interpretation services to improve multilingual dentist-patient communication.

  18. A systematic review of dental disease management in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, Catherine H L; Hu, Shijia; Haverman, Thijs; Stokman, Monique; Napeñas, Joel J; Braber, Jacolien Bos-den; Gerber, Erich; Geuke, Margot; Vardas, Emmanouil; Waltimo, Tuomas; Jensen, Siri Beier; Saunders, Deborah P

    2018-01-01

    This systematic review aims to update on the prevalence of odontogenic-related infections and the efficacy of dental strategies in preventing dental-related complications in cancer patients since the 2010 systematic review. A literature search was conducted in the databases MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE for articles published between 1 January 2009 and 30 June 2016. Each study was assessed by 2 reviewers and the body of evidence for each intervention was assigned an evidence level. After examination of the abstracts and full-text articles, 59 articles satisfied the inclusion criteria. The weighted prevalence of dental infections and pericoronitis during cancer therapy was 5.4 and 5.3%, respectively. The frequency of dental-related infections during intensive chemotherapy after complete, partial, and minimal pre-cancer dental evaluation/treatment protocols ranged from 0 to 4%. Protocols involving third molars extractions had the highest complications (40%). In view of the low prevalence of infections and the potential for complications after third molar extractions, it is suggested that partial dental evaluation/treatment protocols prior to intensive chemotherapy; whereby minor caries (within dentin), asymptomatic third molars or asymptomatic teeth without excessive probing depth (<8 mm), mobility (mobility I or II) or with periapical lesions of <5 mm were observed; is a viable option when there is insufficient time for complete dental evaluation/treatment protocols. The use of chlorhexidine, fluoride mouth rinses as well as composite resin, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GIC), and amalgam restorations over conventional GIC in post head and neck radiation patients who are compliant fluoride users is recommended.

  19. Dental patient preferences and choice in clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Fukai, Kakuhiro; Yoshino, Koichi; Ohyama, Atsushi; Takaesu, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    In economics, the concept of utility refers to the strength of customer preference. In health care assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS), the standard gamble, and the time trade-off are used to measure health state utilities. These utility measurements play a key role in promoting shared decision-making in dental care. Individual preference, however, is complex and dynamic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patient preference and educational intervention in the field of dental health. The data were collected by distributing questionnaires to employees of two companies in Japan. Participants were aged 18-65 years and consisted of 111 males and 93 females (204 in total). One company (Group A) had a dental program of annual check-ups and health education in the workplace, while the other company (Group B) had no such program. Statistical analyses were performed with the t-test and Chi-square test. The questionnaire items were designed to determine: (1) oral health-related quality of life, (2) dental health state utilities (using VAS), and (3) time trade-off for regular dental check-ups. The percentage of respondents in both groups who were satisfied with chewing function, appearance of teeth, and social function ranged from 23.1 to 42.4%. There were no significant differences between groups A and B in the VAS of decayed, filled, and missing teeth. The VAS of gum bleeding was 42.8 in Group A and 51.3 in Group B (p<0.05). The percentage of persons having a regular dental check-up every three months was 34.1 and 31.3% in Groups A and B respectively. These results suggest that low preference results from lack of opportunity or utilization of dental care in the worksite. Ascertaining the factors involved in patient preference may have significant potential benefits in shared decision-making.

  20. Estimating Treatment and Treatment Times for Special and Nonspecial Patients in Hospital Ambulatory Dental Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Dara J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study compared the treatments and the amount of time needed for treatment of the dental needs of developmentally disabled, severely compromised, and moderately compromised patients with those of nondisabled patients in a hospital ambulatory dental clinic. (MSE)

  1. Rights of dental patients in the EU - a legal assessment.

    PubMed

    Van den Bossche, Anne-Marie; Ploscar, Paula

    2012-11-30

    This contribution presents the legal framework for intra-European mobility of dental patients. After presenting the EU competences in respect of healthcare and a brief look into the various routes of patient mobility, the article sets out the rules for access to dental care, treatment abroad and reimbursement through social security. In addition, we focus on the impact of European Union (EU) law upon national systems in respect of professional insurance, complaints procedures and information mechanisms. In conclusion, we reflect on the development in EU law of an independent set of rights to cross-border dental care and its consequences for financing and reimbursement of care, as well as for national practices in respect of professional liability and insurance.

  2. Dental students' self-perceived communication skills for patient motivation.

    PubMed

    Rindlisbacher, F; Davis, J M; Ramseier, C A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dental students' self-perceived communication skills for patient motivation over the course of their training. Pre-clinical and clinical dental students at the University of Bern School of Dental Medicine were surveyed annually from 2008 to 2011 utilising a written questionnaire. Self-reported data were pooled from all classes per time-point in the curriculum. A total of 157 students were surveyed from five classes with an overall response rate of 94.8%. A total of 393 questionnaires were available for analysis. The self-perceived skill-sets for general patient care and patient communication were rated at the end of the first clinical year with mean Visual Analog Scale values of 75.0 ± 1.6 and 75.1 ± 1.5, respectively. During the second clinical year, the self-perceived skills increased in both patient care (82.5 ± 1.2, P = 0.0004) and patient communication (81.4 ± 1.4, P = 0.0034). The students rated their competence higher when providing oral hygiene instructions as opposed to motivating patients to quit tobacco use, modify their diet or employ stress-reduction strategies (P < 0.005). At the end of the pre-clinical year, 74.5% of the students expressed interest in receiving more extensive communication training (P < 0.004). Though dental students in this study demonstrated a steady increase in their level of comfort motivating patients to utilise oral hygiene instructions, they also expressed the desire for more motivational training early in their curriculum. Therefore, these results may indicate the need to enhance communications training in patient motivation on all behavioural aspects early in the dental curriculum. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Dental caries experience, oral health status and treatment needs of dental patients with autism.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Mohamed Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    Autism is a lifelong neurodevelopmental disorder. The aims of this study were to investigate whether children with autism have higher caries prevalence, higher periodontal problems, or more treatment needs than children of a control group of non-autistic patients, and to provide baseline data to enable comparison and future planning of dental services to autistic children. 61 patients with autism aged 6-16 years (45 males and 16 females) attending Dubai and Sharjah Autism Centers were selected for the study. The control group consisted of 61 non-autistic patients chosen from relatives or friends of autistic patients in an attempt to have matched age, sex and socioeconomic status. Each patient received a complete oral and periodontal examination, assessment of caries prevalence, and caries severity. Other conditions assessed were dental plaque, gingivitis, restorations and treatment needs. Chi-square and Fisher's exact test of significance were used to compare groups. The autism group had a male-to-female ratio of 2.8:1. Compared to controls, children with autism had significantly higher decayed, missing or filled teeth than unaffected patients and significantly needed more restorative dental treatment. The restorative index (RI) and Met Need Index (MNI) for the autistic children were 0.02 and 0.3, respectively. The majority of the autistic children either having poor 59.0% (36/61) or fair 37.8% (23/61) oral hygiene compared with healthy control subjects. Likewise, 97.0% (59/61) of the autistic children had gingivitis. Children with autism exhibited a higher caries prevalence, poor oral hygiene and extensive unmet needs for dental treatment than non-autistic healthy control group. Thus oral health program that emphasizes prevention should be considered of particular importance for children and young people with autism.

  4. Dental caries experience, oral health status and treatment needs of dental patients with autism

    PubMed Central

    JABER, Mohamed Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Autism is a lifelong neurodevelopmental disorder. The aims of this study were to investigate whether children with autism have higher caries prevalence, higher periodontal problems, or more treatment needs than children of a control group of non-autistic patients, and to provide baseline data to enable comparison and future planning of dental services to autistic children. Material and Methods 61 patients with autism aged 6-16 years (45 males and 16 females) attending Dubai and Sharjah Autism Centers were selected for the study. The control group consisted of 61 non-autistic patients chosen from relatives or friends of autistic patients in an attempt to have matched age, sex and socioeconomic status. Each patient received a complete oral and periodontal examination, assessment of caries prevalence, and caries severity. Other conditions assessed were dental plaque, gingivitis, restorations and treatment needs. Chi-square and Fisher's exact test of significance were used to compare groups. Results The autism group had a male-tofemale ratio of 2.8:1. Compared to controls, children with autism had significantly higher decayed, missing or filled teeth than unaffected patients and significantly needed more restorative dental treatment. The restorative index (RI) and Met Need Index (MNI) for the autistic children were 0.02 and 0.3, respectively. The majority of the autistic children either having poor 59.0% (36/61) or fair 37.8% (23/61) oral hygiene compared with healthy control subjects. Likewise, 97.0% (59/61) of the autistic children had gingivitis. Conclusions Children with autism exhibited a higher caries prevalence, poor oral hygiene and extensive unmet needs for dental treatment than non-autistic healthy control group. Thus oral health program that emphasizes prevention should be considered of particular importance for children and young people with autism. PMID:21625735

  5. Patient retention at dental school clinics: a marketing perspective.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Suzanne C; Coe, Julie M

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the drivers of patient retention at dental school clinics from a services marketing perspective. An analysis of patient characteristics at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, screened between August 2010 and July 2011 (N=3604), was performed using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations, and a binary logistic regression. The main findings were that 42 percent of patients in the study were retained and that no response to communication efforts (36 percent) and financial problems (28 percent) constituted the most common reasons for non-retention. Older age, having insurance, and living within a sixty-mile radius were significant drivers of retention (p<0.05). Patients who had completed disease control treatments had a significantly higher retention rate (62 percent) than those who did not (42 percent). Finally, some groups of dental students had higher retention rates than others (p<0.05), indicating that service providers were a driver of retention. The resulting insights benefit dental schools in recruiting patients with the greatest likelihood of returning for care, providing dental students with skills to better service them, and consequently increasing retention. This will lead to providing a continuum of care and student education and to ensuring the sustainability and quality of the school's educational programs.

  6. Cooperation predictors for dental patients with autism.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jennifer; Sheller, Barbara; Williams, Bryan J; Mancl, Lloyd; Cowan, Charles

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated potential predictors of cooperation during dental appointments for children with autism. Data were collected from 108 parent/child pairs and their dentists. Questions included: (1) medical/dental history; (2)functional language; (3) personal hygiene skills; (4) academic setting; and (5) achievements. Behavior was scored using the Frankl scale. Subjects were 80 males and 28 females 2.7 to 19 years old with a mean age of 9.8 years. Frankl scores were 65% uncooperative (definitely negative or negative) and 35% cooperative (positive or definitely positive). Multiple factors predicted uncooperative behavior: (1) appointment type (P=.03); (2) concurrent medical diagnoses (P=.04); (3) nonverbal/minimal or echololic language (P=.005); (4) inability to understand language appropriate for age (P=.02); (5) inability to follow multistep instructions (P=.04); (6) parents providing most/all tooth-brushing (P=.004); (7) partially or not toilet trained at 4+ years (P=.02); (8) inability to sit for a haircut (P=.01); (9) attending special education (P<.001); and (10) inability to read at 6+ years (P<.001). Five questions readily answered by a caregiver may indicate a child's cooperative potential. Preappointment inquiry about toilet training, toothbrushing, haircuts, academic achievement and language can give the dentist insight into the child's ability to respond positively to behavior guidance techniques based on communication.

  7. Smoking increases salivary arginase activity in patients with dental implants.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, D A; Cortelli, J R; Holzhausen, M; Rodrigues, E; Aquino, D R; Saad, W A

    2009-09-01

    It is believed that an increased arginase activity may lead to less nitric oxide production, which consequently increases the susceptibility to bacterial infection. Considering the hypothesis that smoking may alter the arginase activity and that smoking is considered a risk factor to dental implant survival, the present study aimed at evaluating the effect of smoking on the salivary arginase activity of patients with dental implants. Salivary samples of 41 subjects were collected: ten non-smoking and with no dental implants (group A), ten non-smoking subjects with dental implants (group B), ten smoking subjects with implants (group C), and 11 smoking subjects with no dental implants (group D). The levels of salivary arginase activity were determined by the measurement of L-ornithine and expressed as mIU/mg of protein. A significant increase in the salivary arginase activity was verified in groups C (64.26 +/- 16.95) and D (49.55 +/- 10.01) compared to groups A (10.04 +/- 1.95, p = 0.00001 and p = 0.0110, groups C and D, respectively) and B (11.77 +/- 1.45, p = 0.00001 and p = 0.0147, groups C and D, respectively). No significant difference was found between groups C and D (p = 0.32). Within the limits of the present study, it can be concluded that salivary arginase activity is increased in smoking subjects with dental implants in contrast to non-smoking subjects with dental implants, therefore suggesting a possible mechanism by which cigarette smoking may lead to implant failure. The analysis of salivary arginase activity may represent an important tool to prevent implant failure in the near future.

  8. Dental claims in the Swedish Patient Insurance Scheme.

    PubMed

    René, N; Owall, B; Cronström, R

    1991-06-01

    The Swedish Patient Insurance Scheme covers treatment injuries and guarantees the replacement of failed removable prostheses for 1 year and fixed prostheses for 2 years after fitting. In this paper, 573 dental cases are analysed for a 3-month period in 1986, during which crowns and bridges formed the vast majority of failed treatments that were reported.

  9. Assessment of dental students’ communication skills with patients

    PubMed Central

    MEMARPOUR, MAHTAB; BAZRAFKAN, LEILA; ZAREI, ZAHRA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Establishment of effective communication between the clinician and patient is essential in order to increase the effectiveness of treatment. These skills have been less investigated among dental students. This study aimed to evaluate communication skills of dental students in Shiraz with patients through direct observation, patients' perspectives and students' self-assessments. Methods This cross-sectional study enrolled the fifth and sixth year dental students and one of each student’s patients who was chosen using simple random sampling method. We used a checklist for data collection. Students’ communication skills were assessed at three steps of the student-patient interview – at the beginning of the interview, during the interview, and at the end of the interview. The checklist was completed by three groups: 1) an observer, 2) the patient and 3) the student, as self-assessment. The validity of the checklist was confirmed by clinical professors and the reliability was determined by Cronbach's alpha test. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Student’s t test. A repeated measure MANOVA was used to compare the mean communication skills in the researcher, patients, and students at each step of the patient interviews. Results There were 110 students (mean age: 22.3±8.4 years) and 110 patients (mean age: 32±8.8 years) who completed the checklists. Overall, the communication skills of dental students were rated as good according to the patients. However, the observer and student participants rated the skills at the moderate level. We observed significant differences between communication skills in all three groups and in the three steps of the patient interviews (p<0.001). According to patients' beliefs and students' self assessments, there were no differences between male and female students in communication skills in the three steps of the patient interviews (all p>0.05). However from the observer’s viewpoint, female students

  10. An update on local anesthesia for pediatric dental patients

    PubMed Central

    Peedikayil, Faizal C.; Vijayan, Ajoy

    2013-01-01

    Pain control is an important part of dentistry, particularly in the management of children. Behavior guidance, and dose and technique of administration of the local anesthetic are important considerations in the successful treatment of a pediatric patient. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the relevant data on topics involved, and on the current methods available in the administration of local anesthesia used for pediatric dental patients. PMID:25885712

  11. Cervical vertebral maturation and dental age in coeliac patients.

    PubMed

    Costacurta, M; Condò, R; Sicuro, L; Perugia, C; Docimo, R

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the cervical vertebral maturation and dental age, in group of patients with coelic disease (CD), in comparison with a control group of healthy subjects. At the Paediatric Dentistry Unit of PTV Hospital, "Tor Vergata" University of Rome, 120 female patients, age range 12.0-12.9 years were recruited. Among them, 60 subjects (Group 1) were affected by CD, while the control group (Group 2) consisted of 60 healthy subjects, sex and age-matched. The Group 1 was subdivided, according to the period of CD diagnosis, in Group A (early diagnosis) and Group B (late diagnosis). The skeletal age was determined by assessing the cervical vertebral maturation, while the dental age has been determined using the method codified by Demirjiyan. STATISTICS.: The analyses were performed using the SPSS software (version 16; SPSS Inc., Chicago IL, USA). In all the assessments a significant level of alpha = 0.05 was considered. There are no statistically significant differences between Group 1 and Group 2 as for chronological age (p=0.122). Instead, from the assessment of skeletal-dental age, there are statistically significant differences between Group 1 - Group 2 (p<0.001) and Group A - Group B (p<0.001). The statistical analysis carried out to assess the differences between chronological and skeletal-dental age within the single groups, show a statistically significant difference in Group 1 (p<0.001) and in Group B (p<0.001), while there are no statistically significant differences in Group 2 (p=0.538) and in Group A (p=0.475). A correlation between skeletal and dental age was registered; for Groups 1-2 and for Groups A-B the Pearson coefficient was respectively equal to 0.967 and 0.969, with p<0.001. Through the analysis of data it is possible to assess that the percentage of subjects with skeletal and dental age delay corresponds to 20% in healthy subjects, 56.7% in coeliac subjects, 23% in coeliac subjects with early diagnosis and 90% in coeliac

  12. Microbial profiling of dental plaque from mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, Joshua A.; Lewis, Michael A. O.; Wise, Matt P.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Smith, Ann; Wilson, Melanie J.; Williams, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Micro-organisms isolated from the oral cavity may translocate to the lower airways during mechanical ventilation (MV) leading to ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Changes within the dental plaque microbiome during MV have been documented previously, primarily using culture-based techniques. The aim of this study was to use community profiling by high throughput sequencing to comprehensively analyse suggested microbial changes within dental plaque during MV. Bacterial 16S rDNA gene sequences were obtained from 38 samples of dental plaque sampled from 13 mechanically ventilated patients and sequenced using the Illumina platform. Sequences were processed using Mothur, applying a 97 % gene similarity cut-off for bacterial species level identifications. A significant ‘microbial shift’ occurred in the microbial community of dental plaque during MV for nine out of 13 patients. Following extubation, or removal of the endotracheal tube that facilitates ventilation, sampling revealed a decrease in the relative abundance of potential respiratory pathogens and a compositional change towards a more predominantly (in terms of abundance) oral microbiota including Prevotella spp., and streptococci. The results highlight the need to better understand microbial shifts in the oral microbiome in the development of strategies to reduce VAP, and may have implications for the development of other forms of pneumonia such as community-acquired infection. PMID:26690690

  13. Microbial profiling of dental plaque from mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Sands, Kirsty M; Twigg, Joshua A; Lewis, Michael A O; Wise, Matt P; Marchesi, Julian R; Smith, Ann; Wilson, Melanie J; Williams, David W

    2016-02-01

    Micro-organisms isolated from the oral cavity may translocate to the lower airways during mechanical ventilation (MV) leading to ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Changes within the dental plaque microbiome during MV have been documented previously, primarily using culture-based techniques. The aim of this study was to use community profiling by high throughput sequencing to comprehensively analyse suggested microbial changes within dental plaque during MV. Bacterial 16S rDNA gene sequences were obtained from 38 samples of dental plaque sampled from 13 mechanically ventilated patients and sequenced using the Illumina platform. Sequences were processed using Mothur, applying a 97% gene similarity cut-off for bacterial species level identifications. A significant 'microbial shift' occurred in the microbial community of dental plaque during MV for nine out of 13 patients. Following extubation, or removal of the endotracheal tube that facilitates ventilation, sampling revealed a decrease in the relative abundance of potential respiratory pathogens and a compositional change towards a more predominantly (in terms of abundance) oral microbiota including Prevotella spp., and streptococci. The results highlight the need to better understand microbial shifts in the oral microbiome in the development of strategies to reduce VAP, and may have implications for the development of other forms of pneumonia such as community-acquired infection.

  14. Prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of dental anxiety among a group of adult patients attending a dental institution in Vadodara city, Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Malvania, Ekta A; Ajithkrishnan, C G

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety is a subjective state of feelings. Dental anxiety is often reported as a cause of irregular dental attendance, delay in seeking dental care or even avoidance of dental care, resulting in poor oral health related quality of life. To assess the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of dental anxiety among a group of adult patients attending a dental institution in Vadodara, Gujarat. A total of 150 adult patients waiting in the out-patient Department of Oral Diagnosis of K.M. Shah Dental College and Hospital were included in the study. Subjects were selected by convenience sampling. Dental anxiety was assessed by using Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and self-designed, semi-structured questionnaire incorporating various demographic variables, type and nature of dental treatment. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 16. Descriptive analysis, unpaired t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test and multiple logistic regression were applied for statistical analysis. 46% of the participants were dentally anxious. Females were found to be significantly more anxious than males. Subjects residing in villages had significantly more score than those residing in city. Relative influence of age, education, type of dental treatment, and previous dental visit were not significantly associated with dental anxiety. However, those subjects who had past negative dental experience were found to be significantly more anxious. The study shows that dental anxiety was high among study subjects. It is recommended that this issue should be given due importance and addressed in a practical and meaningful manner.

  15. Survey of Infection Control Policies within Dental/Educational Patient Treatment Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Keith Winfield

    1986-01-01

    The article describes a survey of 36 dental education programs to identify educators' reactive policies and procedures in their patient treatment centers to minimize dental contamination and cross-contamination. (Author/CT)

  16. Factors Influencing Dental Patient Participation in Biobanking and Biomedical Research.

    PubMed

    Hassona, Yazan; Ahram, Mamoun; Odeh, Noorah; Abu Gosh, Mais; Scully, Crispian

    To study the willingness of dental patients to donate biospecimens for research purpose and to examine factors that may influence such a decision. A face-to-face interview was conducted using a pretested structured survey instrument on 408 adult dental patients attending a university hospital for dental care. Descriptive statistics were generated, and the x03C7;2 test was used to examine differences between groups. p values ≤0.5 were considered statistically significant. Of the 408 participants, only 71 (17.4%) had heard of the terms biobanking/biospecimens, but 293 (71.9%) approved of the idea of using biospecimens for biomedical research, and 228 (55.9%) were willing to donate biospecimens and give personal information for research purposes. In participants who were unwilling to participate in biobanking, fear of information leakage was the most frequently reported reason, while in participants who were willing to donate biospecimens, the potential to provide more effective and less costly treatments was the most frequently reported reason. The preferences of the 228 participants who were willing to donate biospecimens were as follows: give a sample of removed oral tissues including extracted teeth (n = 105, 46.1%), donate a blood sample (n = 52, 23%), donate a sample of saliva (n = 43, 18.6%), and give a urine sample (n = 28, 12.3%). Dental patients had a generally positive attitude towards biomedical research and biobanking. The most preferred types of biospecimens to donate in a dental setting were removed tissues, including extracted teeth and blood samples. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. A qualitative analysis of patient-centered dentistry in consultations with dental phobic patients.

    PubMed

    Kulich, Károly R; Berggren, Ulf; Hallberg, Lillemor R-M

    2003-01-01

    Dental phobia is regarded as one of the greatest obstructions to adequate dental care. It has long been established that fearful dental patients are particularly sensitive to dentists' behavior and performance of dental care. There is a need for the establishment of a systematic theory of dentist-patient communication and new methods analyzing how dentists interact with their patients. In this qualitative study, thirty semi-structured interviews were conducted in 1998 and 1999 with five dentists (three male and two female). Dentists consulted on two occasions with 15 newly enrolled, consecutive dental phobic patients (2 male and 13 female) in a Swedish clinic specializing in the treatment of odontophobia. The time interval between consultation one and two was approximately 2-3 weeks. Analysis of the transcribed interviews was based by the principles of Grounded Theory. The study identified one core category, "Holistic perception and understanding of the patient", two categories, "The dentist's positive outlook on people" and "The dentist's positive view of patient contact", and six further subcategories. Findings support previous models of patient-centered medicine and contribute to a better understanding of how patient-centered dentists interact with dental phobic patients.

  18. Differences in knowledge related to dental implants between patients with and without a treatment history of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Ken, Yukawa; Tachikawa, Noriko; Kasugai, Shohei

    2017-09-01

    This aim of this study was to investigate the differences between patients with and without a treatment history of dental implants by use of a questionnaire survey in order to determine the information that is required for patients undergoing dental implants. The questionnaires were given to 4512 patients who visited the Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital for oral implants between January 2012 and December 2014, and 2972 (66%) valid questionnaires were collected. There were 857 patients with a treatment history of dental implants and 2115 patients without. "Preservation of an adjacent tooth" was the reason that 32% of these patients chose implant therapy, and the patients without treatment history were significantly higher than the patients with one. Significantly, more patients without a treatment history of dental implants selected the after-effects of surgery and pain after surgery as their main concerns for implant therapy compared to those with a treatment history. In the question "Pain after surgery," the patients without treatment history did not know significantly lower than the patients with one. Patients without a treatment history of dental implants placed more importance on the preservation of healthy teeth. Because patients, in particular those without a treatment history of dental implants, are anxious about surgery, we should provide them with more information on treatment than we already do and explain the risks of treatment to them. To keep the credence between doctors and patients, informed consent and patient education on treatment are six important concerns. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Oral Sedation Postdischarge Adverse Events in Pediatric Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Annie; Tanbonliong, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated patient discharge parameters and postdischarge adverse events after discharge among children who received oral conscious sedation for dental treatment. This prospective study involved 51 patients needing dental treatment under oral conscious sedation. Each patient received one of various regimens involving combinations of a narcotic (ie, morphine or meperidine), a sedative-hypnotic (ie, chloral hydrate), a benzodiazepine (ie, midazolam or diazepam), and/or an antihistamine (ie, hydroxyzine HCl). Nitrous oxide and local anesthesia were used in conjunction with all regimens. After written informed consent was obtained, each guardian was contacted by phone with specific questions in regard to adverse events following the dental appointment. Out of 51 sedation visits, 46 were utilized for analysis including 23 boys and 23 girls ranging from 2 years 2 months to 10 years old (mean 5.8 years). 60.1% of patients slept in the car on the way home, while 21.4% of that group was difficult to awaken upon reaching home. At home, 76.1% of patients slept; furthermore, 85.7% of patients who napped following the dental visit slept longer than usual. After the appointment, 19.6% exhibited nausea, 10.1% vomited, and 7.0% experienced a fever. A return to normal behavior was reported as follows: 17.4% in <2 hours, 39.1% in 2–6 hours, 28.3% in 6–10 hours, and 15.2% in >10 hours. Postdischarge excessive somnolence, nausea, and emesis were frequent complications. The time to normality ranged until the following morning demonstrating the importance of careful postdischarge adult supervision. PMID:26398124

  20. Understanding Muslim patients: cross-cultural dental hygiene care.

    PubMed

    Sirois, M L; Darby, M; Tolle, S

    2013-05-01

    Healthcare providers who understand the basic pillars of Islamic beliefs and common religious practices can apply these concepts, anticipate the needs of the Muslim patient and family, and attract Muslim patients to the practice. Cross cultural knowledge can motivate dental hygienists to adopt culturally acceptable behaviors, strengthen patient-provider relationships and optimize therapeutic outcomes. Trends in Muslim population growth, Islamic history and beliefs, modesty practices, healthcare beliefs, contraception, childbearing, childrearing, pilgrimage, dietary practices, dental care considerations and communication are explained. This paper reviews traditional Muslim beliefs and practices regarding lifestyle, customs, healthcare and religion as derived from the literature and study abroad experiences. Recommendations are offered on how to blend western healthcare with Islamic practices when making introductions, appointments, eye contact, and selecting a practitioner. The significance of fasting and how dental hygiene care can invalidate the fast are also discussed. The ultimate goal is for practitioners to be culturally competent in providing care to Muslim patients, while keeping in mind that beliefs and practices can vary widely within a culture. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Dental treatment for handicapped patients; sedation vs general anesthesia and update of dental treatment in patients with different diseases

    PubMed Central

    Corcuera-Flores, José R.; Delgado-Muñoz, José M.; Ruiz-Villandiego, José C.; Maura-Solivellas, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Dental treatment on Handicapped Patients is often difficult because many people with a wide range of ages (from children to the elderly) with different pathologies that can affect the oral cavity and differ widely are included in this group. This situation creates some controversy, because according to pathology, each patient will be treated differently depending on collaboration, general health status, age or medication used to treat this pathologies. According to this situation we can opt for an outpatient treatment without any kind of previous medication, a treatment under conscious or deep sedation or a under general anesthesia treatment. With this systematic review is intended to help clarify in which cases patients should be treated under general anesthesia, sedation (conscious or deep) or outpatient clinic without any medication, as well as clarify what kind of treatments can be carried in private dental clinics and which should be carried out in a hospital. It will also discuss the most common diseases among this group of patients and the special care to be taken for their dental treatment. Key words:Hospital dentistry, handicapped patient. PMID:24121922

  2. Dental Student, Resident, and Faculty Attitudes Toward Treating Medicaid Patients.

    PubMed

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Feng, Xiaoying

    2017-11-01

    Failure to receive proper oral health care including both prevention and maintenance is influenced by myriad and complex social, economic, and dental factors, including access to care. Reducing oral health disparities requires changes in the preparation of future dentists as well as measuring and influencing the attitudes and knowledge of practicing dentists. The aim of this study was to determine the likelihood that future dentists (students and residents) and faculty members at one U.S. dental school would treat Medicaid participants. Attitudes were measured using the Deamonte Driver scenario survey, which assesses factors affecting dentists' participation in Medicaid. In October 2012, all 113 full-time faculty members were invited to participate, and 60 completed the survey, for a response rate of 53.1%. In January and February 2013, all 18 residents in the dental clinics and university hospital were invited to participate, and 16 completed the survey, for a response rate of 88.9%. From 2013 to 2015, all 267 students in three classes were invited to participate: first-year students in the Classes of 2017 and 2018 and fourth-year students in the Class of 2015. A total of 255 students completed the survey, for an overall student response rate of 95.5%. The results showed that the students were more likely to participate in caring for Medicaid patients than the faculty and residents. The white and male students had stronger negative stereotypes about Medicaid patients than the females and underrepresented minority students, while residents had stronger negative stereotypes about Medicaid patients than the students and faculty. Overall, the cultural competency skills, beliefs, and attitudes of these faculty members and residents were less developed than those of their students, signaling a need for broad educational and faculty development programs to fully prepare the future dental workforce to care for these patients.

  3. Controversial issues in treating the dental patient with autism.

    PubMed

    Rada, Robert E

    2010-08-01

    The author conducted a literature review to investigate concerns that parents of a child with an autism spectrum disorder may have when oral health care is provided to the child. The author conducted a search of PubMed using the terms "mercury," "fluoride," "nitrous oxide," "antibiotics," "gluten," "casein," "acetaminophen" and "dentistry" each with the term "autism." He identified controlled studies and literature reviews in both medical and alternative medical literature that were related to areas of importance to oral health care workers. The use of mercury, fluoride, nitrous oxide, antibiotic agents and acetaminophen all are sources of controversy between dentistry and the parents of children who have autism. The author found that patients who have autism frequently also have allergies, immune system problems, gastrointestinal disturbances and seizures. Dental health care workers must be aware of these comorbid conditions so they can provide optimal care to the children with autism spectrum disorders. The author found two distinct theories as to what causes autism: one that focuses on genetic causes, and one that focuses on the impact of the environment. He found that the interpretation of these theories might affect parents' concerns about various dental treatments. Dentists treating patients who have autism may need to provide more than standard patient care, as the use of time-tested dental treatment and prevention modalities may be questioned or refused by parents.

  4. Oral Cancer: Awareness and Knowledge Among Dental Patients in Riyadh.

    PubMed

    Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Al-Soneidar, Walid Ahmed; Dhaifullah, Esam; Halboub, Esam Saleh; Tarakji, Bassel

    2017-06-01

    More than 50 % of oral cancer cases are diagnosed at advanced stages. Public knowledge about oral cancer can help in prevention and early detection of the disease. The aim of the present study was to assess the levels of awareness and knowledge about signs and risk factors of oral cancer among dental patients in Saudi Arabia. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from 1410 randomly selected patients attending dental departments within public hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS software. The significance level was set at P < 0.05. The study revealed that only 62.4 % were aware of oral cancer. Some 68.2 and 56.5 %, respectively, were able to correctly identify tobacco and alcohol as risk factors. More than two thirds of subjects had no knowledge about any signs of oral cancer. Participants with lower than university education were significantly less aware, and had much less knowledge, of the signs and risk factors of oral cancer. The knowledge regarding oral cancer among Saudi dental patients is alarmingly low. Interventions to improve public knowledge about oral cancer and attitudes towards early diagnosis and treatment are urgently indicated.

  5. Dental treatment for handicapped patients; sedation vs general anesthesia and update of dental treatment in patients with different diseases.

    PubMed

    Corcuera-Flores, J-R; Delgado-Muñoz, J-M; Ruiz-Villandiego, J-C; Maura-Solivellas, I; Machuca-Portillo, G

    2014-03-01

    Dental treatment on Handicapped Patients is often difficult because many people with a wide range of ages (from children to the elderly) with different pathologies that can affect the oral cavity and differ widely are included in this group. This situation creates some controversy, because according to pathology, each patient will be treated differently depending on collaboration, general health status, age or medication used to treat this pathologies. According to this situation we can opt for an outpatient treatment without any kind of previous medication, a treatment under conscious or deep sedation or a under general anesthesia treatment. With this systematic review is intended to help clarify in which cases patients should be treated under general anesthesia, sedation (conscious or deep) or outpatient clinic without any medication, as well as clarify what kind of treatments can be carried in private dental clinics and which should be carried out in a hospital. It will also discuss the most common diseases among this group of patients and the special care to be taken for their dental treatment.

  6. Dental patients' perceptions and motivation in smoking cessation activities.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Pia; Johannsen, Annsofi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate smokers' perceptions of and motivation for smoking cessation activities in dentistry. MATERIALS AND METHODS PATIENTS: who smoked were consecutively recruited from general as well as specialist dental care clinics in Sweden. After a dental visit the patients completed a questionnaire about self-perceived oral health, smoking habits, motivation, reasons to quit and not to quit smoking, support to quit, smoking cessation activities and questions about smoking asked by dentists and dental hygienists. The sample consisted of 167 adult patients (≥ 20 years) who smoked daily. During the last 6 months, 81% of the patients had experienced oral health problems. The most common complaints were discolourations of the teeth, periodontal problems and dry mouth (38%, 36% and 33%, respectively). Improved general health was a major reason to quit smoking (89%). It was also stated that it was important to avoid oral health problems. 71% of the patients preferred to quit by themselves and 16% wanted support from dentistry. High motivation to quit smoking was reported by 20%. Occurrence of periodontitis during the last 6 months was significantly associated with being highly motivated to stop smoking (OR = 3.0, 95% CI = 1.03-8.55). This study revealed that, although it was important to quit smoking to avoid oral health problems, the patients were not aware that tobacco cessation activities can be performed in dentistry. Periodontal problems seem to be the most motivating factor among the patients who were highly motivated to stop smoking.

  7. Composition of enamel pellicle from dental erosion patients.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, G; Cotroneo, E; Moazzez, R; Rojas-Serrano, M; Donaldson, N; Austin, R; Zaidel, L; Bartlett, D; Proctor, G

    2014-01-01

    Oral health is dependent upon a thin mobile film of saliva on soft and hard tissues. Salivary proteins adhere to teeth to form the acquired enamel pellicle which is believed to protect teeth from acid erosion. This study investigated whether patients suffering diet-induced dental erosion had altered enamel pellicles. Thirty patients suffering erosion were compared to healthy age-matched controls. Subjects wore a maxillary splint holding hydroxyapatite and human enamel blocks for 1 h. The acquired enamel pellicle was removed from the blocks and compared to the natural incisor pellicle. Basic Erosive Wear Examination scores confirmed that dental erosion was present in erosion patients and absent from healthy age-matched controls. Erosion patients had half the amount of proteins (BCA assay) within the acquired pellicle forming on splint blocks compared to normal controls (p < 0.05). In particular, statherin, a calcium-binding protein, was 35% less abundant (p < 0.05). Calcium concentration within the acquired pellicle was also reduced by 50% in erosion patients (p < 0.001). In contrast, the natural pellicle on the incisor had similar amounts of total protein in erosion patients and healthy controls. In summary, the formation of new acquired pellicles on surfaces was reduced in erosion patients, which may explain their greater susceptibility to acid erosion of teeth. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. The future of dental amalgam: a review of the literature. Part 3: Mercury exposure from amalgam restorations in dental patients.

    PubMed

    Eley, B M

    1997-05-10

    This is the third article in a series of seven on the future of dental amalgam and covers mercury exposure from functioning dental amalgam restorations in patients. It firstly discusses the evidence for mercury release from amalgam fillings by considering the mechanisms of mercury release and its measurement in the expired air and the intra-oral air. In this connection it also discusses the various factors involved in the accurate measurement and calculation of mercury levels in these situations. It finally describes the various attempts to calculate the daily mercury dose from dental amalgam fillings and considers the likely accuracy of these calculations.

  9. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Dental Surgeons in managing Child Patients

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Talha Mufeed; Khan, Rabia; Batool, Kanza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Karachi providing treatment to pediatric patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Karachi providing treatment to pediatric patients. A cluster-sampling technique was used and 200 dental surgeons from six different dental institutions were selected. A self-constructed questionnaire was distributed to the dental surgeons that comprised 20 closed-ended questions. The data was entered and analyzed for frequency and percentages by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19. The results showed that 76 (38%) dental surgeons took the responsibility of managing pediatric patient when given; 68 (34%) dental surgeons allowed the parents in the clinic; 111 (55.5%) dental surgeons are of the view that colorful and fun environment in dental clinic make the child at ease; 59 (29.5%) always demonstrate the dental procedure to the child to eradicate imaginary fears; 94 (47.0%) dental surgeons preferred the child to be treated in general anesthesia (GA) to avoid difficult behavior of the child; 135 (67.5%) dental surgeons did not show syringe needle or any instrument to the child. All the members of dental profession must be aware of patient perceptions, preferences, and fear to meet patient’s needs. Dental studies should include guidelines and techniques to train the upcoming dentists for excellent practice in pediatric dentistry. How to cite this article Wali A, Siddiqui TM, Khan R, Batool K. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Dental Surgeons in managing Child Patients. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(4):372-378. PMID:28127171

  10. Clinical and Radiographic Assessment of Reasons for Replacement of Metal- Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses in Patients Referring to Dental School.

    PubMed

    Al Refai, Roa'a; Saker, Samah

    2018-01-01

    The expected length of service and reasons for fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) replacement are a frequent inquiry by patients while the answers were mainly based on studies reports that was conducted outside the middle east region. This clinical and radiographic survey was constructed to assess and survey clinically and radiographically the reasons of replacement of metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses, amongst patients reporting at dental school in Taibah University. Between January and May 2016, 151 patients were recruited for this study. Interview (include questions pertained to the length of service of the prosthesis, the nature of complaint as told by patient in her own words), clinical examination, intra-oral photographs, and periapical radiographs, were done by the researchers. The parameters assessed were secondary caries, open margins, loss of retention, failure of endodontic treatment of the abutment and periodontal diseases. A total number of 249 failed fixed dental prostheses were evaluated. Of which 180 (39.7%) were single crowns, 159 (35.0%) were retainers and 117 (25.8%) were pontics in 69 fixed partial denture. The most common reason for replacement of fixed restorations was periodontal diseases affecting 92.8% of all types' restorations, followed by defective margin in 90.4% of examined restoration, poor aesthetic in 88% of restorations, while periapical involvement was found in 85.5% of fixed dental prosthesis. The survival rates of fixed prostheses were not predictable, and no association was found between number of years in service and the number of restorations. The most common reasons for replacing single unit fixed dental prostheses are periodontal diseases and periapical involvement, while defective margins and poor aesthetic mainly associated with multi-unit fixed dental prostheses. Key words: Failure, Fixed dental prosthesis, Survival, Replacement.

  11. The effect of care coordination on pediatric dental patient attendance.

    PubMed

    Casaverde, Nina B; Douglass, Joanna M

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective study were to determine if care coordination improved appointment-keeping behavior, and identify factors associated with patient attendance at an urban Medicaid dental clinic. Children with sedation appointments received care coordination comprising telephone reminders, education regarding the appointment, and were mailed reminders or home visits if necessary. Collected chart audit data included age, behavior, appointment history and caries status. After several months, care coordination services were extended to routine, nonsedation appointments. Sedation and routine appointment controls were matched by appointment date and selected from the previous year. Attendance information was obtained from appointment and patient records. Sixty-one sedation appointments and 698 routine appointments were analyzed along with 61 and 931 control appointments, respectively. Sedation patients with care coordination had an attendance rate of 59% compared to 53% in the control group (P>.05). Routine patients with care coordination had an attendance rate of 70% compared to 62% in the control group (P<.001).) Data trends suggest that the children least likely to attend their appointments are those with: (1) high caries scores; (2) poor behavior; (3) long wait times between appointments; (4) multiple missed appointments; and (5) lack of a serviceable phone. Care coordination can improve attendance at an urban Medicaid dental clinic, but improvements are modest. Prospective studies are needed to better delineate which interventions and which patient predictors result in the most improvement in attendance-keeping behavior.

  12. Exploring sources of knowledge utilized in practice among Jordanian registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghabeesh, Suhair Husni; Abu-Moghli, Fathieh; Salsali, Mahvash; Saleh, Mohammad

    2013-10-01

    Understanding sources of knowledge used in everyday practice is very helpful in improving the quality of health care services. There is a consensus in the literature that nurses mostly relied in their practice on experiential knowledge gained through their interactions with other members of health care professionals and patients. The general aim of this study is to explore the sources of knowledge Jordanian registered nurses use during their practice. A descriptive correlational design was used to collect data from 539 Jordanian registered nurses from 10 hospitals using a self-administered questionnaire. The mean year of experience of the sample was 7.08 years. Of the 615 questionnaires distributed, 555 were returned. This yields a response rate of 87.6%. Results revealed that the top five ranked sources used by Jordanian registered nurses include: the information that nurses learned during nursing education, personal experience in nursing over time, what was learned through providing care to patients, information gained through discussion between physicians and nurses about patients, and information from policy and procedure manuals. Jordanian registered nurses recognize the value of research and that research utilization (RU) is an important issue and must not be ignored. The study has many implications for practice, education and research. Health care managers and decision makers need to play a more visible and instrumental role in encouraging RU to improve patients' quality of life. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Economic outcomes of a dental electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Langabeer, James R; Walji, Muhammad F; Taylor, David; Valenza, John A

    2008-10-01

    The implementation of an electronic patient record (EPR) in many sectors of health care has been suggested to have positive relationships with both quality of care and improved pedagogy, although evaluation of actual results has been somewhat disillusioning. Evidence-based dentistry clearly suggests the need for tools and systems to improve care, and an EPR is a critical tool that has been widely proposed in recent years. In dental schools, EPR systems are increasingly being adopted, despite obstacles such as high costs, time constraints necessary for process workflow change, and overall project complexity. The increasing movement towards cost-effectiveness analyses in health and medicine suggests that the EPR should generally cover expenses, or produce total benefits greater than its combined costs, to ensure that resources are being utilized efficiently. To test the underlying economics of an EPR, we utilized a pre-post research design with a probability-based economic simulation model to analyze changes in performance and costs in one dental school. Our findings suggest that the economics are positive, but only when student fees are treated as an incremental revenue source. In addition, other performance indicators appeared to have significant changes, although most were not comprehensively measured pre-implementation, making it difficult to truly understand the performance differential-such pre-measurement of expected benefits is a key lesson learned. This article also provides recommendations for dental clinics and universities that are about to embark on this endeavor.

  14. Rubber dam isolation for restorative treatment in dental patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Chunjie; Yuan, He; Wong, May Cm; Zou, Jing; Shi, Zongdao; Zhou, Xuedong

    2016-09-20

    Successful restorations in dental patients depend largely on the effective control of moisture and microbes during the procedure. The rubber dam technique has been one of the most widely used isolation methods in dental restorative treatments. The evidence on the effects of rubber dam usage on the longevity of dental restorations is conflicting. Therefore, it is important to summarise the available evidence to determine the effects of this method. To assess the effects of rubber dam isolation compared with other types of isolation used for direct and indirect restorative treatments in dental patients. We searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 17 August 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 7) in the Cochrane Library (searched 17 August 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 17 August 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 17 August 2016), LILACS BIREME Virtual Health Library (Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Information database; 1982 to 17 August 2016), SciELO BIREME Virtual Health Library (1998 to 17 August 2016), Chinese BioMedical Literature Database (CBM, in Chinese) (1978 to 30 August 2016), VIP (in Chinese) (1989 to 30 August 2016), and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, in Chinese) (1994 to 30 August 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, OpenGrey and Sciencepaper Online (in Chinese) for ongoing trials. There were no restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We included randomised controlled trials (including split-mouth trials) assessing the effects of rubber dam isolation for restorative treatments in dental patients. Two review authors independently screened the results of the electronic searches, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. We resolved disagreement by discussion. We included four studies

  15. Using patients as educators for communication skills: Exploring dental students' and patients' views.

    PubMed

    Coelho, C; Pooler, J; Lloyd, H

    2018-05-01

    A qualitative study to explore the issues for patients and students when giving feedback on the communication of dental students. The Department of Health and National Institute for Health Research are committed to involving patients in improving clinical education, research and service delivery. Yet, there is a limited body of evidence on the perceptions of patients when asked to be involved in this way, and specifically when asked to provide feedback on the communication skills of dental students. This study seeks to address this gap and heighten the understanding of the issues faced by patients when asked to be involved in clinical education. Data were collected using focus groups with dental students (n=10) and patients (n=8) being treated by these students. Both groups were asked about their thoughts, feelings and beliefs about patients being asked to provide feedback on the communication skills of dental students. Data analysis involved inductive thematic analysis of transcribed audio recordings. Four themes emerged from the data: "legitimacy," "co-educators," "maintaining the equilibrium of the patient-student relationship" and the "timing of patient feedback." Support for involving patients in giving feedback on students' communication skills was established, with patients considering they were best placed to comment on the communication skills of dental students. Patients and students do not want to provide feedback alone and want support to assist them, especially if feedback was negative. Issues of anonymity, confidentiality and ownership of the feedback process were worrisome, and the positioning of patient feedback in the programme was seen as critical. Patients and students are willing to engage in patient feedback on students' communication skills, and with support and training, the concerns around this are not insurmountable and the benefits could potentially profit both groups. These findings have resonance with other healthcare educators when

  16. Patient expectations of dental services. Image affects expectations, and expectations affect perceived service quality.

    PubMed

    Clow, K E; Fischer, A K; O'Bryan, D

    1995-01-01

    The authors construct a theoretical model of the antecedents of expectations for dental services by analyzing survey responses from 240 dental patients. The patients' image of the dentist, tangible cues, situational factors, and patient satisfaction with prior service encounters have the greatest influence on expectations of service, whereas marketing variables, such as price and advertising, appear to have no effect.

  17. Comparing Dental Stress in New Child Patients and Returning Patients Using Salivary Cortisol, Immunoglobulin-A and Alpha- Amylase.

    PubMed

    Alaki, Sumer M; Safi, Ayman; Ouda, Soliman; Nadhreen, Alaa

    this study was aimed at comparing dental stress in children having their first dental visit to those returning for dental treatment using salivary biomarkers of stress including salivary cortisol (s-cortisol), Immunoglobulin-A (s-IgA) and alpha-amylase (s-α-amylase). Additionally, the study was aimed at monitoring the change in stress in new patients as they progressed from the waiting to the clinical areas. salivary samples were collected from 40 children who had not been to a dentist before and similar samples were collected from 40 children who were returning for completion of dental treatment. Salivary cortisol, s-IgA and s-α-amylase concentrations were obtained by Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). salivary cortisol levels were higher for new patients at the waiting area compared to that at the dental chair (p=0.05). Salivary alpha-amylase significantly increased in new patients while being seated in the dental chair. Returning patients had higher s-α-amylase (p=0.001) and s-IgA (p=0.016) compared to new patients. Returning patients had the lowest level of s-cortisol when providers were faculty pediatric dentists than with students and interns (p=0.035). children coming in for their first dental visit may experience dental stress at the waiting area before being seated for dental examination. Returning children may experience higher levels of stress compared to new child patients possibly due to previous dental exposure.

  18. Teaching dental public health to undergraduates using community profiles and patient case studies.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, C; Robinson, P G

    2011-03-01

    Provide an example of how dental public health can be taught to undergraduates. Educational case study. General dental practice. Dental outreach placement and supporting project work. One project required students to study patients in the context of their environment via the social history. The student learned about the social determinants of health and differentiated between the causes of disease in the patient and the determinants of health affecting the practice population. Outreach training can help students learn about the social determinants of health. Dental schools may have missed an opportunity to use outreach to help their students learn from and about their environment and its impact on the health of their patients.

  19. 78 FR 53195 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration, Department... notice solicits comments for information needed to measure patient satisfaction with VA's dental services... Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any correspondence. During the comment period, comments may be viewed...

  20. Utilization of dental health care services in context of the HIV epidemic- a cross-sectional study of dental patients in the Sudan.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Elwalid Fadul; Astrøm, Anne Nordrehaug; David, Jamil; Ali, Raouf Wahab

    2009-11-16

    HIV infected patients should be expected in the Sudanese dental health care services with an increasing frequency. Dental care utilization in the context of the HIV epidemic is generally poorly understood. Focusing on Sudanese dental patients with reported unknown HIV status, this study assessed the extent to which Andersen's model in terms of predisposing (socio-demographics), enabling (knowledge, attitudes and perceived risk related to HIV) and need related factors (oral health status) predict dental care utilization. It was hypothesized that enabling factors would add to the explanation of dental care utilization beyond that of predisposing and need related factors. Dental patients were recruited from Khartoum Dental Teaching Hospital (KDTH) and University of Science and Technology (UST) during March-July 2008. A total of 1262 patients (mean age 30.7, 56.5% females and 61% from KDTH) were examined clinically (DMFT) and participated in an interview. A total of 53.9% confirmed having attended a dental clinic for treatment at least once in the past 2 years. Logistic regression analysis revealed that predisposing factors; travelling inside Sudan (OR = 0.5) were associated with lower odds and females were associated with higher odds (OR = 2.0) for dental service utilization. Enabling factors; higher knowledge of HIV transmission (OR = 0.6) and higher HIV related experience (OR = 0.7) were associated with lower odds, whereas positive attitudes towards infected people and high perceived risk of contagion (OR = 1.3) were associated with higher odds for dental care utilization. Among need related factors dental caries experience was strongly associated with dental care utilization (OR = 4.8). Disparity in the history of dental care utilization goes beyond socio-demographic position and need for dental care. Public awareness of HIV infection control and confidence on the competence of dentists should be improved to minimize avoidance behaviour and help establish dental

  1. Virtual patient instruction for dental students: can it improve dental care access for persons with special needs?

    PubMed

    Sanders, Carla; Kleinert, Harold L; Boyd, Sara E; Herren, Chris; Theiss, Lynn; Mink, John

    2008-01-01

    An interactive, virtual-patient module was produced on compact disc (CD-ROM) in response to the critical need to increase dental students' clinical exposure to patients with developmental disabilities. A content development team consisting of dental faculty members, parents of children with developmental disabilities, an individual with a developmental disability, and educational specialists developed the interactive, virtual-patient module. The module focused on a young man with congenital deafblindness presenting as a new patient with a painful molar. Students were required to make decisions regarding clinical interactions throughout the module. Differences in both comfort and knowledge level were measured pre- and post-module completion, as well as the dental students' overall satisfaction with the learning experience. Significant results were obtained in students' perceived comfort and knowledge base. Participants reported overall satisfaction using the modules. This study demonstrated that an interactive, multi-media (CD-ROM), virtual patient learning module for dental students could be an effective tool in providing students needed clinical exposure to patients with developmental disabilities.

  2. 75 FR 32539 - Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-New (VA Form 10-0503)] Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Health...).'' Title: Survey of Healthcare Experiences, Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0503. OMB...

  3. [Gingival fluid cytokine profile in patients after dental implantation and by periimplantitis].

    PubMed

    Tsarev, V N; Nikolaeva, E N; Ippolitov, E V; Tsareva, T V

    2013-01-01

    The study included 32 patients with complications which have developed 3 months to 14 years after dental implants placement. ELISA method was used to assess cytokines content in various sites of tooth alignment in patients with Herpesviridae and periodontopathogenics bacteria associated periimplantitis. The results prove the necessity for Herpesviridae and selected bacteria monitoring after dental implantation.

  4. “An Effect That is Deeper Than Beating” Family Violence in Jordanian Women

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Diane S; Paldi, Yael; Egbarya, Samah Salaime; Clark, Cari Jo

    2012-01-01

    This study informs healthcare approaches to gender-based family violence through focus groups with Jordanian women. The authors conducted a thematic qualitative analysis of 12 focus groups among 70 married, divorced, or widowed women about their experiences and beliefs regarding family violence. Five themes relevant to healthcare providers were identified. Three of the themes addressed participant-perceived causes of gender-based family violence: 1) unmet gender role expectations, 2) stigma and social norms, and 3) extended family roles. The fourth theme reflects effects on victims. The fifth theme reflects protective qualities and help seeking behaviors. The themes identified in the analysis reveal multiple ways that gender-based family violence can contribute to health problems and that it can be kept secret by Jordanian women as patients. Potential clues are described for the violence which may not be typically explored in a medical encounter. Additional ways that Jordanian families may seek help from other family or clergy instead of police and family violence agencies are described. Implications of these results for healthcare providers who care both for Jordanians and Arab immigrants in Western cultures are discussed. PMID:22329396

  5. Attitudes of Jordanian Society toward Wife Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Btoush, Rula; Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors conducted an exploratory study among a convenience sample of 260 Jordanian men and women, using self-administered open and closed questions to examine the participants' approach toward wife abuse. In general, there was high awareness of wife abuse and the different types of abuse (mainly physical and psychological), a general tendency…

  6. [Comprehensive dental treatment under general anaesthesia: implementation among patients with mouth opening limitation].

    PubMed

    Wolff, A; Singer, A; Shlomi, B

    2013-07-01

    Patients unable to tolerate routine dental treatment in an ordinary dental setting may undergo a wide range of dental procedures under general anaesthesia. This report describes a practical protocol for providing comprehensive dental treatment under general anaesthesia. The importance and uniqueness of planning, treating and adopting safety measures is illustrated through the presentation of clinical cases of patients with mouth opening limitation. Complete treatment can thus be achieved in a single visit, thereby eliminating repetition of coping with anxiety associated with repeated treatment sessions.

  7. Quality of life in patients with dental conditions: comparing patients' and providers' evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sampogna, F; Johansson, V; Axtelius, B; Abeni, D; Söderfeldt, B

    2009-12-01

    To measure the agreement between patients and their caregivers in evaluating patients' oral quality of life. Cross-sectional study. Data collected in four Swedish dental clinics in 2004. Consecutive patients. Data were completed for 444 patients. Fifteen dentists and 12 dental hygienists agreed to participate. For each patient, the patient him/herself and his/her caregiver completed the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14), a specific instrument used to measure quality of life in oral conditions, with higher scores indicating a worse quality of life. Information on personal and clinical characteristics of patients were also collected. Median OHIP-14 scores given by caregivers and patients were calculated and compared in different subgroups of patients. Cohen's kappa was calculated to measure the agreement between the evaluation of patients and caregivers. OHIP-14 scores median values were 3.0 among patients and 9.0 among caregivers. Caregivers always gave a higher score than patients, especially in older patients and patients with lower education. The concordance between patients' and caregivers' evaluation was very low (for different OHIP-14 cutoffs: Cohen's kappa from 0.10 to 0.15). In this study, great discrepancies were observed between patients and caregivers in the evaluation of patients' oral quality of life, with caregivers overestimating the burden of dental conditions on patients. It is important to improve patient-caregiver communication, in order to increase patient satisfaction and provide better care. A good patient-caregiver relationship is essential for the patients' well-being and their adherence to treatment.

  8. Financing of dental services in Turkey: opinions and expectations of dentists, residents, and patients.

    PubMed

    Hayran, Osman; Mumcu, Gonca; Sur, Haydar; Yildirim, Celal; Söylemez, Didem; Atli, Hakki

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the attitudes of dentists, residents, and patients on the financing of dental services in Turkey. In this descriptive study, randomly selected groups of 860 dentists, 641 patients, and 866 residents from 9 provinces of Turkey were interviewed. Their agreement on various statements on financing issues of dental services were recorded and analyzed. Eighty-two percent of the dentists, 83.8 percent of the patients, and 76.4 percent of the residents agreed that "governments should finance all dental services." The majority of the dentists (83.6%), patients (74.7%), and residents (84.4%) stated that patients should pay a copayment for their dental treatment. Survey results indicate that the current financing system of dental services in Turkey is not satisfactory either for the providers or for the users.

  9. A survey on the experience with dental tourism in a sample of Italian patients.

    PubMed

    Carmagnola, D; Filippucci, L; Celestino, S; Carrassi, A; Delia, S; Lodi, G

    2012-01-01

    Dentistry in Italy is mainly private and therefore perceived as forcedly expensive. Dental tourism is becoming popular in order to get cheap dental care. The aim of this study was to carry out a survey aimed at investigating the perception of dental tourism by Italian patients who have recently received such dental care abroad. A questionnaire was posted on the web site of an Italian consumers association (Altroconsumo) and members were invited to fill in the questionnaire in case they had experienced dental treatment abroad. Eighty-one complete forms were included in the study. The main motivation for turning to dental tourism was saving money. Another frequent reason for choosing dental tourism was that full rehabilitation was offered in a short time span, usually one week. Patients have often underlined that they appreciated different aspects of the foreign dentists, like speed, kindness, humanity, interest in the course of the treatment, the feeling of ease conveyed by the environment and the personnel. Past negative experiences with Italian dentists were in some cases advocated as reasons for searching dental care abroad. Such negative experiences resulted in a lack of trust in Italian dentists. Some patients reported that while the overall treatment abroad was carried out in a short time, single prosthetic sessions were very long, up to 6 hours. Most patients were satisfied with dental tourism.

  10. Can we measure patients' perception during dental impressions? The Burdens in Dental Impression-Making Questionnaire - BiDIM-Q.

    PubMed

    Tsirogiannis, Panagiotis; Neophytou, Sophia; Reul, Anika; Heydecke, Guido; Reissmann, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    To develop a reliable and valid instrument for the comprehensive assessment of patients' burdens during dental impression making, the Burdens in Dental Impression Making Questionnaire, BiDIM-Q. The item pool was generated in a convenience sample of 20 prosthodontic patients using semi-structured face-to-face interviews. The final instrument was tested in 145 consecutively recruited patients, and psychometric properties of the BiDIM-Q were determined. Four different impression materials were used according to the manufacturers' instructions and indications: alginate, c-silicone, polyvinylsiloxane, and polyether. The final BiDIM-Q consisting of 12 items showed sufficient reliability, indicated by Cronbach's alpha of .82 and an average inter-item correlation of .29. Validity was supported by Pearson correlation coefficients for the correlation between the instrument's total score with the patients' overall satisfaction rating (r=.63), and by the correlation matrix for the correlations of the patients' perceptions with the practitioners' satisfaction ratings. Overall, patient perceived burdens were low with highest burdens observed when using polyether in partially dentate patients for pick-up impressions, while lowest burdens were reported when using c-silicone for impressions of edentulous jaws. The BiDIM-Q is a reliable and valid tool for assessing patient-based process-related quality of care in dentistry allowing a deeper insight into patients' perspective during dental impression making. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Controlling fear: Jordanian women's perceptions of the diagnosis and surgical treatment of early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Rana F; Dickerson, Suzanne S; Homish, Gregory G; Alqaissi, Nesreen M; Lally, Robin M

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer among Jordanian women, practically nothing is known about their perceptions of early-stage breast cancer and surgical treatment. The objective of this study was to gain understanding of the diagnosis and surgical treatment experience of Jordanian women with a diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer. An interpretive phenomenological approach was used for this study. A purposive sample of 28 Jordanian women who were surgically treated for early-stage breast cancer within 6 months of the interview was recruited. Data were collected using individual interviews and analyzed using Heideggerian hermeneutical methodology. Fear had a profound effect on Jordanian women's stories of diagnosis and surgical treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Women's experience with breast cancer and its treatment was shaped by their preexisting fear of breast cancer, the disparity in the quality of care at various healthcare institutions, and sociodemographic factors (eg, education, age). Early after the diagnosis, fear was very strong, and women lost perspective of the fact that this disease was treatable and potentially curable. To control their fears, women unconditionally trusted God, the healthcare system, surgeons, family, friends, and/or neighbors and often accepted treatment offered by their surgeons without questioning. Jordanian healthcare providers have a responsibility to listen to their patients, explore meanings they ascribe to their illness, and provide women with proper education and the support necessary to help them cope with their illness.

  12. Association of Dental Anomalies with Different Types of Malocclusions in Pretreatment Orthodontic Patients.

    PubMed

    Dwijendra, K S; Parikh, Vishal; George, Soja Sara; Kukkunuru, Gururam Tej; Chowdary, Gali Nagarjuna

    2015-06-01

    The study is planned to correlate the existence of dental anomalies with different types of malocclusion as the occurrence of anomalies is common in malocclusion. The present study was conducted among 430 patients with different types of malocclusion as 161 patients having Class I, 203 with Class II, and 66 with Class III malocclusion. The age of the patients ranged from 12 to 15 years. Diagnosis was done on the basis of history, clinical, cephalometric, radiographs, and dental cast examination. The level of significance was set at P = 0.05. Most common anomaly was rotation of teeth (18.80%), followed by hypodontia (10.90%), and least occurring was gemination, fusion, talon's cusp, and dilacerations. 31.4% showed one dental anomaly, whereas 11.9% exhibited two or more dental anomalies. The highest mean value of all the dental anomalies was seen with severe cases of malocclusion and also significant differences were observed according to gender. The present study investigated various dental anomalies in relation to malocclusion. It was found that 31.4% showed one dental anomaly, whereas 11.9% exhibited two or more dental anomalies. Hence, careful prior investigation of dental anomalies is necessary for better orthodontic treatment planning to reduce the complications.

  13. [Full dental rehabilitation of a patient with implantable cardioverter defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Imre, Ildikó; Tóth, Zsuzsanna

    2012-06-01

    During dental rehabilitation of a patient with ICD, an upper telescope retained overdenture with acrylic baseplate and lower cantilever bridges were constructed. In the consultation following the anamnesis and the clinical examination, the cardiologist did not believe antibiotic profilaxis to be necessary, adding that it is advisable to avoid the use of ultrasonic depurator and electrocauter. Nowadays after saving the life the improving of patient's better quality of life is an important aspect. The risk of ICD-implantation is minimal however, not negligible, the patient can pursue a way of life free of limitation. According to the latest trends, the number of ICD-implantations will increase exponentially in the near future, due to the aging of the population, the simplification and safeness of implantation and the increase of patients who can be treated with the device. In case of arritmia or putative dysfunction, the latest ICD-s are able to send emergency alert to the arritmia centre with the help of an outer transmitter. Probably the system will completely change the follow-up of patients with ICD within the next few years, clinical researches of its efficiency are going on at present.

  14. Acoustic Noise Levels of Dental Equipments and Its Association with Fear and Annoyance Levels among Patients Attending Different Dental Clinic Setups in Jaipur, India

    PubMed Central

    Ganta, Shravani; Nagaraj, Anup; Pareek, Sonia; Atri, Mansi; Singh, Kushpal; Sidiq, Mohsin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Noise is a source of pervasive occupational hazard for practicing dentists and the patients. The sources of dental sounds by various dental equipments can pose as a potential hazard to hearing system and add to the annoyance levels of the patients. The aim of the study was to analyze the noise levels from various equipments and evaluate the effect of acoustic noise stimulus on dental fear and annoyance levels among patients attending different dental clinic setups in Jaipur, India. Methodology: The sampling frame comprised of 180 patients, which included 90 patients attending 10 different private clinics and 90 patients attending a Dental College in Jaipur. The levels of Acoustic Noise Stimulus originating from different equipments were determined using a precision sound level meter/decibulometer. Dental fear among patients was measured using Dental Fear Scale (DFS). Results: Statistical analysis was performed using chi square test and unpaired t-test. The mean background noise levels were found to be maximum in the pre-clinical setup/ laboratory areas (69.23+2.20). Females and the patients attending dental college setup encountered more fear on seeing the drill as compared to the patients attending private clinics (p<0.001). Conclusion: The sources of dental sounds can pose as a potential hazard to hearing system. It was analyzed that the environment in the clinics can directly have an effect on the fear and annoyance levels of patients. Hence it is necessary control the noise from various dental equipments to reduce the fear of patients from visiting a dental clinic. PMID:24959512

  15. Quality improvement program reduces perioperative dental injuries - A review of 64,718 anesthetic patients.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yi-Wei; Lu, I-Cheng; Yang, Hui-Ying; Chiu, Shun-Li; Hsu, Hung-Te; Cheng, Kuang-I

    2016-12-01

    Perioperative dental injury (PDI) is a common adverse event associated with anesthesia that can easily lead to medicolegal litigation. A quality improvement program was conducted with the electronic, standardized dental chart to document dentition before anesthesia and dentist consultation when necessary. This study aimed to reduce PDIs through execution of a quality improvement program. We reviewed the 42-month interval anesthetic records of 64,718 patients who underwent anesthesia. A standardized electronic dental chart was designed to identify any dental prosthetics, fixed and removable dentures, and degree of loose teeth. The incidence of dental injuries associated with anesthesia was separated into three time periods: baseline, initiative (Phase I), and execution (Phase II). Primary outcome measurement was the incidence of PDIs related to anesthesia. The overall incidence of dental injury related to anesthesia was 0.059% (38/64,718 patients). During the baseline period, the dental injury rate was 0.108% (26/24,137 patients), and it decreased from 0.051% in the initiative period (10/19,711 patients) to 0.009% in the execution period (2/20,870 patients) during implementation of the quality improvement program. Most dental injuries were associated with laryngeal mask airway (42.1%) and laryngoscopy (28.9%). The most commonly involved teeth were the upper incisors. Dental injury incidence was significantly reduced and remained at low levels after implementation of the quality improvement program. We suggest the implementation of a standardized dental examination into the preoperative evaluation system adding pathologic teeth fixed or protected devices to minimize dental injury associated with anesthesia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  16. Factors influencing patients seeking oral health care in the oncology dental support clinic at an urban university dental school setting.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Dale M; Walker, Mary P; Liu, Ying; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors and/or factors associated with medically compromised patients seeking dental care in the oncology dental support clinic (ODSC) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Dentistry. An 18-item survey was mailed to 2,541 patients who were new patients to the clinic from 2006 to 2011. The response rate was approximately 18% (n = 450). Analyses included descriptive statistics of percentages/frequencies as well as predictors based on correlations. Fifty percent of participants, 100 females and 119 males, identified their primary medical diagnosis as cancer. Total household income (p < .001) and the importance of receiving dental care (p < .001) were significant factors in relation to self-rated dental health. Perceived overall health (p < .001) also had a significant association with cancer status and the need for organ transplants. This study provided the ODSC at UMKC and other specialty clinics with vital information that can contribute to future planning efforts. © 2013 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Systemic Assessment of Patients Undergoing Dental Implant Surgeries: A Trans- and Post-operative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Byakodi, Sanjay; Kumar, Sachin; Reddy, Rajesh Kumar; Kumar, Vipin; Sepolia, Shipra; Gupta, Shivangi; Singh, Harkanwal Preet

    2017-01-01

    Procedure-related and patient-related factors influence the prognosis of dental implants to a major extent. Hence, we aimed to evaluate and analyze various systemic factors in patients receiving dental implants. Fifty-one patients were included in the study, in which a total of 110 dental implants were placed. Complete examination of the subjects was done before and after placement of dental implants. Implant surgery was planned, and osseointegrated dental implants were placed in the subjects. Postoperative evaluation of the dental implant patients was done after 3 weeks. Anxiety levels were determined using State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire on the surgery day and after 1 week of surgery. The participant describes how they feel at the moment by responding to twenty items as follows: (1) absolutely not, (2) slightly, (3) somewhat, or (4) very much. All the results were recorded and statistical analyzed by SPSS software. Out of 51, 29 patients were males while 22 were females, with ratio of 1.32:1. Female patients' mean age was 50.18 years while male patients' mean age was 52.71 years, with statistically nonsignificant difference between them. Functional rehabilitation was the main purpose of choosing dental implants in more than 90% of the subjects. Diameter of 3.75 mm was the shortest implants to be placed in the present study, whereas in terms of length, 8.5 mm was the shortest length of dental implant used in the present study. Tooth area in which maximum implants were placed in our study was 36 tooth region. Maximum implants were placed in Type II bone quality ( n = 38). Implants installed in the mandible were clamped more efficiently than implants placed in the maxilla ( P < 0.001). The difference of average STAI-State subscore before and after the surgery was statistically significant ( P < 0.05; significant). Mandibular dental implants show more clamping (torque) than maxillary dental implants.

  18. Dental implants in patients with ectodermal dysplasia: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos

    2018-05-21

    This study sought to assess the clinical outcome and survival rate of oral implants placed in individuals with ectodermal dysplasia (ED), based on previously published studies. An electronic search without time restrictions was undertaken in 5 databases (PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, J-Stage, Lilacs). Descriptive statistics, Kaplan Meier estimator and implant failure probability were calculated. 90 publications were included, reporting 228 ED patients that received 1472 implants (1392 conventional, 47 zygomatic, 33 mini-implants). Mean age of the patients was 20.2 ± 6.8 years (2-56). Patients had a mean of 3.2 ± 2.5 maxillary and 2.1 ± 2.6 mandibular permanent teeth (min-max, 0-14). Patients received a mean of 8.2 ± 3.8 implants (1-20). Most implants were placed in the third decade of life, 24.6% of the implants were placed in children (0-17 years of age). 1391 implants had information on follow-up (72 failures, 5.2%). The 20-year CSR was 84.6%. The probability of failure was 4.5% (95%CI 3.5%-5.6%, p < 0.001). Additional treatments performed were Le Fort I (99 implants, 20 patients, 3.5% failed), grafting (497 implants, 77 patients, 5.2% failed), distraction osteogenesis (79 implants, 16 patients, 10.1% failed). Mean follow-up was 42.9 ± 41.9 months (min-max, 2-240). Dental implants placed in ED patients, either infants or adults, present a high survival rate (20-year CSR 84.6%). Copyright © 2018 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine usage by patients of a dental school clinic.

    PubMed

    Spector, Michael L; Fischer, Mark; Dawson, Deborah V; Holmes, David C; Kummet, Colleen; Nisly, Nicole L; Baker, Karen A K

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the prevalence and specific reasons for usage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among patients of a dental school clinic. Four hundred and two patients completed a 30-page survey on CAM usage. A higher rate of CAM usage was found in this dental school clinic population than rates previously reported in a general population. More than three-quarters (76.1%) of the respondents reported using at least one CAM treatment in the past 12 months; 93.3% reported using at least one CAM treatment at some time in their lives. High rates of chiropractic use were found in this population. Tooth pain was the most frequently reported dental condition motivating CAM use. About 10% of dental school clinic patients use topical oral herbal and/or natural products to treat dental conditions, most frequently for preventive/oral health reasons or for tooth pain. © 2012 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Possibility of cross-contamination between dental patients by means of the saliva ejector.

    PubMed

    Watson, C M; Whitehouse, R L

    1993-04-01

    Concern about cross-contamination between dental patients prompted investigation of current suctioning practices. The possibility of the suck-back phenomenon and the presence of oral bacteria in vacuum lines were studied, and dental offices were surveyed concerning the use and disinfection of suction equipment.

  1. Managing dental fear and anxiety in pediatric patients: A qualitative study from the public's perspective.

    PubMed

    Hamzah, Hajar S; Gao, Xiaoli; Yung Yiu, Cynthia K; McGrath, Colman; King, Nigel M

    2014-01-01

    Internet social media offers a rich source for soliciting the public's views on health issues. This qualitative research, using You-Tube as a platform, aimed to explore the public's perspectives on management of dental fear and anxiety (DFA) in pediatric patients. Using three keywords ("dental fear," "dental phobia," and "dental anxiety"), YouTube videos were searched. Twenty-seven videos related to DFA in children and adolescents were reviewed by three investigators, including a nondental layperson. Inductive thematic analysis was adopted for interpreting the data. Several strategies were considered useful for controlling DFA in pediatric patients, including: verbal and nonverbal communication to establish closeness and effective guidance (explanation, permission-seeking, reassurance, and negotiation); desensitization to dental settings and procedures; tell-show-do; positive reinforcement; distraction by imagination and thoughtful designs of clinic; and parental presence and support. Some self-coping strategies adopted by patients alleviated their DFA, such as self-reasoning and trust-building through long-term connection. Dentists' clinical competence, favorable treatment outcomes, and state-of-the-art devices and technologies (dental lasers, intraoral camera, and adapted anaesthesia method) contributed to reducing DFA. Authentic testimonials in YouTube videos endorsed and interpreted a variety of strategies adoptable by patients, parents, and dental professionals for managing children's and adolescents' dental fears and anxieties.

  2. Factors affecting patient satisfaction at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital Dental Clinic.

    PubMed

    Adeniyi, A A; Adegbite, K O; Braimoh, M O; Ogunbanjo, B O

    2013-03-01

    Satisfaction is important in dental care because satisfaction with care alleviates dental anxiety, influences patients' compliance and is an important indicator of quality of care. This study was designed to determine the factors that contribute to satisfaction with dental care among patients attending the Lagos State University (LASUTH) Dental Clinic. Across-sectional, descriptive questionnaire-based survey was conducted among adult patients attending the LASUTH Dental Clinic. The questionnaire, a modification of the Dental Satisfaction Questionnaire (DSQ), contained 19 items on a Likert-pattern scale with scores ranging from 0 to 4. The scores obtained for satisfaction with the dental services ranged from 19 to 75 with a mean of 55.30 +/- 11.55. The majority of respondents (305 or 87.4%) were satisfied with the services received. The items generating the highest and lowest mean satisfaction score were cleanliness/comfort of the facility and cost of services respectively. Long waiting time was the item respondents liked least about the services. There was a statistically significant relationship between the items assessing communication and respondent's gender (p = 0.001). The relationship between the overall satisfaction score and gender (p = 0.233), age category (p = 0.842) and educational status (p = 0.565) were not statistically significant. The results indicate a high level of satisfaction with services provided at the LASUTH Dental Clinic. However, there is need for improvement in communication with patients and reduction in waiting time.

  3. Factors affecting the dental erosion severity of patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Otsu, Mitsuhiro; Hamura, Akira; Ishikawa, Yuiko; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Ichijyo, Tomoyasu; Yoshinaga, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Intraoral disease is a common occurrence in patients with eating disorders, particularly dental erosion, which frequently becomes severe and may hinder daily life. The severity varies from patient to patient. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may help prevent dental erosion in these patients. Accordingly, we investigated the relationship between the severity of erosion and the behavior of patients with eating disorders, with a focus on daily diet and vomiting behavior. A total 71 female eating disorder outpatients from the Clinical Center of Psychosomatic Dentistry of Nippon Dental University Hospital and the Psychosomatic Internal Medicine Department of Kudanzaka Hospital or who were hospitalized at Hasegawa Hospital were enrolled. Dental erosion severity and location were determined by oral examination. Patients who induced vomiting were queried on their behavior during vomiting and on routine diet habits. Patients with dental erosion were further divided into mild and severe groups based on the lesion severity and the groups compared. Dental erosion was observed in 43 of 50 subjects who induced vomiting. Dental erosion was most frequent on the palatal side of the anterior maxillary teeth, occurring in 81.3% of the subjects. There were significant differences observed between the mild and severe groups according to post-vomiting oral hygiene. Significantly more subjects in the mild group consumed large amounts of water before vomiting, and significantly more subjects in the severe group routinely consumed carbonated beverages or sweetened food. While self-induced vomiting is the main cause of dental erosion in eating disorder patients, the erosion severity may be affected by behavior when inducing vomiting or by routine consumption of certain foods and beverages. Addressing these factors may help prevent severe dental erosion in patients who chronically induce vomiting.

  4. Patients' priorities in assessing organisational aspects of a general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Sonneveld, Rutger E; Brands, Wolter G; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Welie, Jos V M; Truin, Gert-Jan

    2013-02-01

    To explore which organisational aspects are considered most important by patients when assessing a general dental practice, and which patients' characteristics influence their views on these aspects by a paper questionnaire. The questionnaire was handed out to a sample of 5,000 patients in the Netherlands. The response rate was 63%. Six organisational aspects out of a list of 41 aspects were valued as most important by at least 50%. In decreasing order of importance, these were: accessibility by telephone; continuing education for general dental practitioners; Dutch-speaking general dental practitioners; in-office waiting times; information about treatments offered; and waiting lists. For four out of these six aspects, respondents' age and education significantly influenced their preferences. Aspects concerning the infrastructure of a general dental practice were chosen more often than aspects such as working to professional standards, working according to protocols and guidelines, quality assessment and guaranteed treatment outcomes. The findings will enable organisations to increase the transparency of health-care delivery systems to focus on those organisational aspects of dental practices that patients themselves consider most important. These findings can also assist general dental practitioners in adapting their organisational services to the preferences of patients or specific patient groups. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  5. A controlled trial on the effect of hypnosis on dental anxiety in tooth removal patients.

    PubMed

    Glaesmer, Heide; Geupel, Hendrik; Haak, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    Empirical evidence concerning the efficacy of hypnosis to reduce anxiety in dental patients is limited. Hence we conducted a controlled trial in patients undergoing tooth removal. The study aims at assessing patient's attitude toward hypnosis and comparing the course of dental anxiety before, during and subsequent to tooth removal in patients with treatment as usual (TAU) and patients with treatment as usual and hypnosis (TAU+HYP). 102 patients in a dental practice were assigned to TAU or TAU+HYP. Dental anxiety was assessed before, during and after treatment. All patients were asked about their experiences and attitudes toward hypnosis. More than 90% of patients had positive attitudes toward hypnosis. Dental anxiety was highest before treatment, and was decreasing across the three assessment points in both groups. The TAU+HYP group reported significantly lower levels of anxiety during treatment, but not after treatment compared with TAU group. Our findings confirm that hypnosis is beneficial as an adjunct intervention to reduce anxiety in patients undergoing tooth removal, particularly with regard to its no-invasive nature. The findings underline that hypnosis is not only beneficial, but also highly accepted by the patients. Implementation of hypnosis in routine dental care should be forwarded. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Patients' Perceptions of Dehumanization of Patients in Dental School Settings: Implications for Clinic Management and Curriculum Planning.

    PubMed

    Raja, Sheela; Shah, Raveena; Hamad, Judy; Van Kanegan, Mona; Kupershmidt, Alexandra; Kruthoff, Mariela

    2015-10-01

    Although the importance of empathy, rapport, and anxiety/pain awareness in dentist-patient relations has been well documented, these factors continue to be an issue with patients in many dental school clinics. The aim of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding of how patients at an urban, university-affiliated medical center and its dental school's clinic experienced oral health care and to generate ideas for improving the dental school's clinical curriculum and management of the clinic. Although patient satisfaction surveys are common, in-depth patient narratives are an underutilized resource for improving dental education. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 uninsured or underinsured dental patients at these sites, and the results were analyzed using content analysis. Major phenomena that participants discussed were the importance of empathy and good rapport with their oral health providers and provider awareness of dental pain and anxiety. Many patients also discussed feeling dehumanized during dental visits. Based on their positive and negative experiences, the participants made suggestions for how oral health professionals can successfully engage patients in treatment.

  7. Maxillary dental anomalies in patients with cleft lip and palate: a cone beam computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Celikoglu, M; Buyuk, S K; Sekerci, A E; Cantekin, K; Candirli, C

    2015-01-01

    To compare the frequency of maxillary dental anomalies in patients affected by unilateral (UCLP) and bilateral (BCLP) cleft lip with palate and to determine whether statistical differences were present or not between cleft and normal sides in UCLP group by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). In addition, the frequency of those dental anomalies was compared with previous studies presenting the same population without cleft Study Design: Fifty non-syndromic patients affected by UCLP (28 patients) and BCLP (22 patients) were selected for analysis of dental anomalies by means of CBCT. The frequency of maxillary dental anomalies including tooth agenesis, microdontia of lateral incisor, ectopic eruption and impaction of canine and supernumerary tooth were examined. Pearson chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for statistical comparisons. All patients affected by UCLP and BCLP were found to have at least one maxillary dental anomaly. The most frequently observed dental anomaly was tooth agenesis (92.5% and 86.4%, respectively) in UCLP and BCLP groups. Tooth agenesis and canine impaction were observed more commonly in the cleft side (75.0% and 35.7%, respectively) than in the normal side (57.1% and 14.3%, respectively) in UCLP group (p≯0.05). All dental anomalies were found to be higher in both cleft groups than in general populations not affected by cleft. Since patients affected by UCLP and BCLP had at least one dental anomaly and higher dental anomaly frequency as compared to patients without cleft, those patients should be examined carefully prior to orthodontic treatment.

  8. Educational and therapeutic behavioral approaches to providing dental care for patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Travis M; Sheller, Barbara; Friedman, Clive S; Bernier, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a condition which most dentists will encounter in their practices. Contemporary educational and behavioral approaches may facilitate successful dental care. A literature review was conducted for relevant information on dental care for children with ASD. Educational principles used for children with ASD can be applied in the dental setting. Examples include: parent involvement in identifying strengths, sensitivities, and goal setting; using stories or video modeling in advance of the appointment; dividing dental treatment into sequential components; and modification of the environment to minimize sensory triggers. Patients with ASD are more capable of tolerating procedures that they are familiar with, and therefore should be exposed to new environments and stimuli in small incremental steps. By taking time to understand children with ASD as individuals and employing principles of learning, clinicians can provide high quality dental care for the majority of patients with ASD. © 2014 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Dental Management of a Pediatric Patient with Moyamoya Syndrome: A Rare Clinical Entity.

    PubMed

    Ko, Brittany L; Unkel, John H

    2018-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular disorder involving progressive constriction of the internal carotid artery and its branches. The disease has a particularly aggressive course in very young patients, and early surgical intervention is often necessary to prevent permanent neurological damage. MMD patients have an increased risk of stroke development, which may be provoked by pain or anxiety. Currently, no reports of pediatric patients with MMD exist in the dental literature. The purpose of this paper was to discuss the dental management of a two-year-old with moyamoya disease who presented with early childhood caries and dental fear, offering recommendations for dental providers with emphasis on stroke prevention, collaboration with the medical team, anesthesia considerations for patients with increased stroke risk, and the challenges to maintain the oral health of a patient undergoing complex medical treatment.

  10. Providing dental care for the patient with autism.

    PubMed

    Waldman, H Barry; Perlman, Steven P; Wong, Allen

    2008-09-01

    The increasing number of children and adults with autism spectrum disorders highlights the need to provide a full range of services, including dental care. A review of the autism spectrum, the magnitude of the problem, and approaches to providing services by dental practitioners are presented.

  11. Assessing Critical Thinking Outcomes of Dental Hygiene Students Utilizing Virtual Patient Simulation: A Mixed Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Allaire, Joanna L

    2015-09-01

    Dental hygiene educators must determine which educational practices best promote critical thinking, a quality necessary to translate knowledge into sound clinical decision making. The aim of this small pilot study was to determine whether virtual patient simulation had an effect on the critical thinking of dental hygiene students. A pretest-posttest design using the Health Science Reasoning Test was used to evaluate the critical thinking skills of senior dental hygiene students at The University of Texas School of Dentistry at Houston Dental Hygiene Program before and after their experience with computer-based patient simulation cases. Additional survey questions sought to identify the students' perceptions of whether the experience had helped develop their critical thinking skills and improved their ability to provide competent patient care. A convenience sample of 31 senior dental hygiene students completed both the pretest and posttest (81.5% of total students in that class); 30 senior dental hygiene students completed the survey on perceptions of the simulation (78.9% response rate). Although the results did not show a significant increase in mean scores, the students reported feeling that the use of virtual patients was an effective teaching method to promote critical thinking, problem-solving, and confidence in the clinical realm. The results of this pilot study may have implications to support the use of virtual patient simulations in dental hygiene education. Future research could include a larger controlled study to validate findings from this study.

  12. The patient with a heart murmur: evaluation, assessment and dental considerations.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Eric; Glick, Michael; Ahmed, Sultan; Saric, Muhamed

    2005-03-01

    Heart murmurs, a common finding in dental patients, are of major concern to dental professionals because certain dental procedures occasionally can induce severe cardiovascular complications. Murmurs may indicate existing heart disease that is a risk factor for infective endocarditis following a dental procedure, as well as more severe heart conditions such as congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation or congestive heart failure. This review article is based on data published in peer-reviewed journals, including practice guidelines published by major dental and medical professional organizations. Echocardiography is the primary means of evaluating heart murmurs, and all dental professionals should become familiar with major aspects of an echocardiogram. Understanding the medical evaluation and assessment of a heart murmur fosters better communication with other health care professionals and results in improved patient care. Beyond the need to administer antibiotic prophylaxis, the dentist also needs to address the underlying causes of a patient's heart murmur. By providing dental care to such patients, oral health care providers become part of the patient's overall health care team.

  13. Which Factors Affect Dental Esthetics and Smile Attractiveness in Orthodontically Treated Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Heravi, Farzin; Rashed, Roozbeh; Zarrabi, Mohammad Javad; Setayesh, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to find the factors that affect dental esthetics and smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients according to laypeople’s judgment, and to determine whether there is any relationship between dental and smile esthetics. Materials and Methods: Using the Q-sort technique, 60 laypersons (30 males, 30 females) rated dental and smile photographs of 48 orthodontically treated patients based on their degree of attractiveness. Dental and smile parameters of each rated image were measured by Smile Analyzer software. The Student’s t-test and chi-square test were used to compare dental and smile parameters between attractive and unattractive images. The logistic regression was used to assess which variables predicted dental and smile esthetics in treated individuals. Results: The philtral to commissural height ratio and gingival display were significantly different in attractive and unattractive smiles (P=0.003 and P=0.02, respectively). None of the dental variables were found to be a determinant of dental esthetics at the end of the orthodontic treatment (P>0.05). According to the judgment of all raters (female and male) and the male raters’ judgment, smile attractiveness could be predicted by philtral to commissural height ratio and buccal corridor ratio (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant relationship between dental esthetics and smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients (P>0.05). Conclusion: The philtral to commissural height ratio and buccal corridor ratio can be considered as predictors of smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients. Achieving dental esthetics at the end of orthodontic treatment does not guarantee smile attractiveness. PMID:26877739

  14. Which Factors Affect Dental Esthetics and Smile Attractiveness in Orthodontically Treated Patients?

    PubMed

    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Heravi, Farzin; Rashed, Roozbeh; Zarrabi, Mohammad Javad; Setayesh, Yasin

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to find the factors that affect dental esthetics and smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients according to laypeople's judgment, and to determine whether there is any relationship between dental and smile esthetics. Using the Q-sort technique, 60 laypersons (30 males, 30 females) rated dental and smile photographs of 48 orthodontically treated patients based on their degree of attractiveness. Dental and smile parameters of each rated image were measured by Smile Analyzer software. The Student's t-test and chi-square test were used to compare dental and smile parameters between attractive and unattractive images. The logistic regression was used to assess which variables predicted dental and smile esthetics in treated individuals. The philtral to commissural height ratio and gingival display were significantly different in attractive and unattractive smiles (P=0.003 and P=0.02, respectively). None of the dental variables were found to be a determinant of dental esthetics at the end of the orthodontic treatment (P>0.05). According to the judgment of all raters (female and male) and the male raters' judgment, smile attractiveness could be predicted by philtral to commissural height ratio and buccal corridor ratio (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant relationship between dental esthetics and smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients (P>0.05). The philtral to commissural height ratio and buccal corridor ratio can be considered as predictors of smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients. Achieving dental esthetics at the end of orthodontic treatment does not guarantee smile attractiveness.

  15. Dose requirements for propofol anaesthesia for dental treatment for autistic patients compared with intellectually impaired patients.

    PubMed

    Asahi, Y; Kubota, K; Omichi, S

    2009-01-01

    We had clinical grounds to suspect that patients with autism had greater propofol requirements during dental procedures than patients with intellectual impairment without autism. This hypothesis was tested by an audit of a standard anaesthetic technique. The audit was approved by our Hospital Ethics Committee. We compared the propofol requirements and effect using a standardised protocol during dental treatment in 56 autistic patients (age range three to 35 years) and 56 intellectually impaired patients (age range four to 42 years). Patients in each disability group were divided into three subgroups by age: six years or younger, seven to 19 years and 20 years or older. Combative patients received oral midazolam premedication, other patients received a single intravenous bolus of midazolam at induction. Otherwise, standardised propofol boluses and infusion were the only anaesthetic agents used. The propofol infusion rates of the intellectually impaired group showed significant decline with age (propofol rate of requirement mg x kg(-1) x h(-1), mean [SD]): < six years 13.6 (3.6), seven to 19 years 9.5 (3.0) (P = 0.008 cf < six years group), > 19 years group 8.5 (2.4) (P = 0.001 cf < six years group). The propofol requirement was greater in the autism group than in the intellectual disability group, and the proportion of the cases where bolus propofol administration was needed after induction was significantly higher in the autistic patient group than in the intellectually impaired patients (P < 0.002). This suggests that autistic patients have greater propofol requirements for anaesthesia during ordinary dental treatment compared with intellectually impaired patients.

  16. Relationship between dental erosion and respiratory symptoms in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Geng-Ru; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhong-Gao; Jiang, Guang-Shui; Guo, Cheng-Hao

    2010-11-01

    Both dental erosion and respiratory symptoms are extra-oesophageal manifestations of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of this study was to determine whether dental erosion was correlated with respiratory symptoms in GERD patients. 88 GERD patients were recruited and assigned to three groups mainly according to the frequency of respiratory symptoms: Group I: never; Group II: occasional (1-2 days a week or less); Group III: frequent (3-5 days a week or more). All patients underwent medical evaluations, including medical history, questionnaire answering and alimentary tract examinations. Dental examinations were carried out on these patients and 36 healthy controls. Dental erosions were measured by modified method of Smith and Knight Tooth Wear Index (TWI). Location and severity of dental erosion were recorded. The prevalence of dental erosion in Group III (64.52%) was higher (p<0.05) than that in Groups I (36.67%) and II (44.44%). GERD patients were presented with dental erosion with TWI scores ranging from 1 to 4. Though proportion of dental erosion with Score 2 (7/20) in Group III was higher than that in Group I (2/11) and Group II (3/12), there was no statistical significance in the proportions of erosion scores among three patient groups. Correlation coefficient between airway symptoms and scores of dental erosion was 0.231 (p<0.05). Palatal erosion of upper incisor was seen in 8 persons (72.7%) in Group I, 9 persons (75%) in Group II and 16 persons (80%) in Group III (p>0.05). Labial erosion of upper incisors was found in 1 person in Groups I and II respectively and 4 persons in Group III. All patients with labial erosion on upper incisors had palatal erosion, except 1 patient in Group III. In GERD patients, dental erosions are more prevalent in patients with frequent respiratory symptoms than those in patients with occasional and without respiratory symptoms. Palatal erosion of upper incisor is the main manifestation in patients. Acid reflux is

  17. Dental needs in Brazilian patients subjected to head and neck radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Ana Carolina de Mesquita Netto; Esteves, Sérgio Carlos Barros; Jorge, Jacks; Almeida, Oslei Paes de; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte

    2009-01-01

    In spite of its recognized benefits in the treatment of malignant tumors, radiation therapy have several side effects in the head and neck region. The evaluation of oral conditions by a dentist is important to prevent or minimize these problems. The aim of this retrospective review was to analyze the dental needs in 357 patients who received radiotherapy in the head and neck region and were treated at Orocentro/FOP/UNICAMP, between January 1990 and December 2004. Review of patient files showed that dental examination before radiotherapy was not performed in 148 patients (41.5%) and was done in 209 patients (58.5%). From the total of examined patients, 94 (45%) did not require dental procedures at the moment of examination, while 115 (55%) presented some sort of dental need. Following the patients after the radiotherapy, it was observed that the group of patients that was evaluated before radiation presented less need of restorations, root canal filling and dental extractions than those who were not evaluated. The results of this study confirm that the evaluation of oral conditions prior to radiotherapy is essential to minimize the dental needs, emphasizing the importance of the dentist in the multidisciplinary team that treats cancer patients.

  18. Determinants of receiving intravenous sedation in a sample of dentally-fearful patients in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Coolidge, Trilby; Irwin, Scott P.; Leyster, Kimberly A.; Milgrom, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Dental fear may be the most common reason for referral for intravenous sedation. Intravenous sedation offers many patients an opportunity to obtain needed dental care. However, intravenous sedation also has costs and may not help patients overcome their fear. Given a sample of 518 dentally-fearful patients in the USA presenting for dental care, this study examined the variables which predicted receiving intravenous sedation or not. About one-fifth of the patients received intravenous sedation, while the others received only cognitive behavioural therapy. Having more carious teeth, higher dental fear, more negative beliefs about dentists, lifetime diagnoses of panic disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder, fewer existing coping skills, and a lower desire to cope with the dental situation were each predictive of having intravenous sedation. When the variables were considered simultaneously, only lower desire to cope contributed uniquely to the prediction. In a setting where psychological treatment for dental fear is available, patients’ desire to cope with their fear was the most important factor in determining whether they received intravenous sedation or not. PMID:23264704

  19. Factors of patient satisfaction/dissatisfaction in a dental faculty outpatient clinic in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gürdal, P; Cankaya, H; Onem, E; Dinçer, S; Yílmaz, T

    2000-12-01

    Being service providers, dental professionals should satisfy their consumers/dental patients. This study investigates satisfaction with dental care among the patients of a dental faculty outpatient clinic of a major university in Izmir, Turkey. The study was performed on 1001 patients of whom 674 filled out the questionnaire containing sociodemographic items and open-ended questions to determine the factors of (dis)satisfaction. The open-ended questions were content analyzed, and each patient was scored according to his comments: "complaining: (0)", "both praising and complaining: (1)", "no comment: (2)", and "praising: (3)". Each factor that has an impact on the decision of the study sample was determined by statistical analyses of data, using student t-test, chi-square test, and multiple regression analysis. Most of the patients were highly educated (74.7%), had a high income (48.7%), and were young to middle-aged (73.1%). There was a well-balanced gender representation. The patient sample had sought care mostly for dental caries, periodontal diseases, problems with old restorations, and prosthetic rehabilitation. Of 1,001 patients, 38.6% were satisfied with the dental care they received, 23.8% were both satisfied and dissatisfied, 5% were dissatisfied, and 32.7% failed to comment. No significant differences were observed between the satisfaction/dissatisfaction scores and sociodemographic variables of the patients in the groups (P>0.05). The most important components of satisfaction were found to be "relationship between dentists and patients" (P<0.001), "organized service system" (P<0.001), and "scientific ability of dental personnel" (P<0.001). The most prominent complaints were "long treatment span" (P<0.001), "disorganized service system" (P<0.001), and "slowness of radiographical examination procedures" (P<0.001). Despite the significant variations among the cultural and ethnic structures of different societies, personal interactions have priority in

  20. Stress Reduction through Audio Distraction in Anxious Pediatric Dental Patients: An Adjunctive Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Divya; Samadi, Firoza; Jaiswal, Jn; Tripathi, Abhay Mani

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the eff-cacy of 'audio distraction' in anxious pediatric dental patients. Sixty children were randomly selected and equally divided into two groups of thirty each. The first group was control group (group A) and the second group was music group (group B). The dental procedure employed was extraction for both the groups. The children included in music group were allowed to hear audio presentation throughout the treatment procedure. Anxiety was measured by using Venham's picture test, pulse rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation. 'Audio distraction' was found efficacious in alleviating anxiety of pediatric dental patients. 'Audio distraction' did decrease the anxiety in pediatric patients to a significant extent. How to cite this article: Singh D, Samadi F, Jaiswal JN, Tripathi AM. Stress Reduction through Audio Distraction in Anxious Pediatric Dental Patients: An Adjunctive Clinical Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):149-152.

  1. Factors affecting dental biofilm in patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances.

    PubMed

    Mei, Li; Chieng, Joyce; Wong, Connie; Benic, Gareth; Farella, Mauro

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the amount and the distribution of biofilm in patients wearing fixed appliances and its relation with age, gender, frequency of tooth brushing, and patient motivation. The sample comprised 52 patients (15.5 ± 3.6 years old, 30 females and 22 males) wearing fixed orthodontic appliances. Dental biofilm was assessed using a modified plaque index (PI). A questionnaire was used to collect patient's information, including gender, age, treatment motivation, and frequency of tooth brushing. Gingival (PI score = 0.9 ± 0.7), mesial (0.8 ± 0.6), and distal (0.8 ± 0.5) areas accumulated more biofilm than occlusal areas (0.3 ± 0.3) (P < 0.038). The maxillary lateral incisors (1.1 ± 0.8) and maxillary canines (1.0 ± 0.8) had more biofilm than other teeth (P < 0.05). The maxillary arch (0.8 ± 0.7) had significantly more biofilm than mandibular arch (0.6 ± 0.6) (P = 0.042). No significant difference was found between the right side (0.7 ± 0.7) and left side (0.7 ± 0.6) (P = 0.627). Less biofilm was found in females (0.6 ± 0.5), adults (0.3 ± 0.3), and "self-motivated" patients (0.3 ± 0.3), compared with males (0.9 ± 0.5), children (0.8 ± 0.6), and "family-motivated" patients (1.1 ± 0.5) (P < 0.001). The amount of biofilm was associated with self-report of the frequency of daily tooth brushing (P < 0.001). Patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances have the highest biofilm accumulation on the maxillary lateral incisors and maxillary canines, particularly in the gingival area and areas behind arch wires. Less biofilm was observed in female and adult patients and in those who were self-motivated and brushed their teeth more often.

  2. A Linguistic Analysis on Errors Committed by Jordanian EFL Undergraduate Students: A Case of News Headlines in Jordanian Newspapers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Karazoun, Ghada Abdelmajid

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated some linguistic errors committed by Jordanian EFL undergraduate students when translating news headlines in Jordanian newspapers from Arabic to English and vice versa. The data of the study was collected through a test composed of (30) English news headlines and (30) Arabic ones covering various areas of news occurring in a…

  3. Attitudes of Jordanian Nursing Students towards Mental Illness: The Effect of Teaching and Contact on Attitudes Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamaideh, Shaher H.; Mudallal, Rola

    2009-01-01

    Purposes: Attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental illness influence the treatment they receive and decisions of policy makers. The purposes of this study were to assess Jordanian nursing students' attitudes towards mental illness, and to assess the effectiveness of teaching and contact on changing nursing students' attitudes about…

  4. Understanding Jordanian Psychiatric Nurses' Smoking Behaviors: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Aldiabat, Khaldoun M.; Clinton, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Smoking is prevalent in psychiatric facilities among staff and patients. However, there have been few studies of how contextual factors in specific cultures influence rates of smoking and the health promotion role of psychiatric nurses. This paper reports the findings of a classical grounded theory study conducted to understand how contextual factors in the workplace influences the smoking behaviors of Jordanian psychiatric nurses (JPNs). Method. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with a sample of eight male JPNs smokers at a psychiatric facility in Amman, Jordan. Findings. Constant comparative analysis identified becoming a heavy smoker as a psychosocial process characterized by four sub-categories: normalization of smoking; living in ambiguity; experiencing workplace conflict; and, facing up to workplace stressors. Conclusion. Specific contextual workplace factors require targeted smoking cessation interventions if JPNs are to receive the help they need to reduce health risks associated with heavy smoking. PMID:23844286

  5. Nutritional and dental issues in patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Jane; Spivack, Evan

    2018-04-01

    People with intellectual and developmental disabilities are among the most disadvantaged and underserved groups of dental patients. Considerable health care disparities for this population have been identified, particularly oral and dental health as well as access to dental care services. People with Down syndrome and cerebral palsy have a variety of nutritional and dental considerations. These people have a higher prevalence of untreated caries and periodontal disease than the general population and may have higher rates of obesity, edentulism, and chronic oral and systemic diseases. Diet choices may affect the oral health and may play an important role in the systemic health of these people. Suggestions to improve and affect dietary intake are provided. Health issues within this population require a holistic approach to care. Concerns about oral health and diet must be addressed to support optimal health. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular characterization of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Al-Sweedan, Suleimman A; Awwad, Nor

    2012-01-01

    In Jordan, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a significant health problem, and the incidence was reported to be about 3.6%. The aims of this study are to investigate the most common molecular mutations of the G6PD gene among Jordanians in northern Jordan and to examine the correlation between the genotype and phenotype of this enzyme deficiency. Seventy-five blood samples were collected from patients attending King Abdullah University Hospital and Princess Rahma Teaching Hospital. The G6PD gene was scanned for mutations using a DNA sequencing technique. Our results showed 11 variations (7 exonic and 4 intronic) as follows: c.202 G>A (rs1050828), c.376 A>G (rs1050829), c.404 A>C (CM962574 single-nucleotide polymorphism), c.542 A>T (rs5030872), c.563 C>T (rs5030868), c.1003 G>A (rs5030869), c.1311 C>T (rs2230037), c.486-90 C>T, c.486-60 C>G (rs2515904), c.770+175 C>T (rs2515905) and c.1311 C>T (rs2230037). Among these, G6PD Mediterranean (c.563 C>T) was the most common in our patients, with a frequency of 76.2%, followed by G6PD A- (c.202 G>A + c.376 A>G) with 19%, and an equal frequency of 1.6% was found for G6PD Chatham (c.1003 G>A), G6PD Santamaria (c.542 A>T + c.376 A>G) and G6PD Cairo (c.404 A>C). This is the first report of G6PD Santamaria and Cairo among our Jordanian population. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Leadership Effectiveness in Jordanian Educational Institutions: A Comparison of Jordanian Female and Male leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Tineh, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Senior leadership positions in Jordanian Ministry of Education are held predominantly by men. Women are teachers and/or school principals. This under-representation of women is primarily due to culturally derived stereotypes that see women as teachers or school principals, but not as superintendents. The purpose of this study was to investigate,…

  8. Expectations and final evaluation of complete dentures by patients, dentist and dental technician.

    PubMed

    Marachlioglou, C R M Z; Dos Santos, J F F; Cunha, V P P; Marchini, Leonardo

    2010-07-01

    There is a poor association between the dentist's evaluation of denture quality and patients' satisfaction with their dentures. Possible differences between dental professionals and patients' expectations might help explain differences in outcome evaluations. This study compared scores given by a dentist, a dental technician and patients for their expectations before and their final evaluation after complete dentures treatment. Twenty completely edentulous patients, a prosthodontist and a dental technician provided scores for the expected aesthetic and functional results of their dentures based on a visual analogue scale at baseline. Post-treatment completion ratings were given after adjustments, by dentist and patients. The dental technician provided post-treatment completion ratings after completing the dentures. The patients had higher expectations than the dental technician and the dentist perceived for both aesthetic and function (P < 0.001). The patients also presented higher post-treatment completion ratings than the dental professionals perceived for final aesthetics (P = 0.016, Kendall's W = 0.207) and function (P = 0.002, Kendall's W = 0.303). Only the dentist presented a statistically significant difference between expectations (lower) and final (higher) outcomes for aesthetics (P = 0.017) and function (P = 0.003). There was no correlation between expectations and post-treatment completion ratings according to the patients' age. There was also no correlation between the patients' gender and expectation scores. Patients presented higher expectations regarding their dentures than dental professionals. The dentist believed that dentures would bring fewer benefits than patients did, but his perception of denture benefits post-treatment was significantly higher than his expectations.

  9. Comparison of dental health of patients with head and neck cancer receiving IMRT vs conventional radiation.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Victor M; Liu, Yuan F; Rafizadeh, Sassan; Tajima, Tracey; Nabili, Vishad; Wang, Marilene B

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the dental health of patients with head and neck cancer who received comprehensive dental care after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared with radiation therapy (RT). Historical cohort study. Veteran Affairs (VA) hospital. In total, 158 patients at a single VA hospital who were treated with RT or IMRT between 2003 and 2011 were identified. A complete dental evaluation was performed prior to radiation treatment, including periodontal probing, tooth profile, cavity check, and mobility. The dental treatment plan was formulated to eliminate current and potential dental disease. The rates of dental extractions, infections, caries, mucositis, xerostomia, and osteoradionecrosis (ORN) were analyzed, and a comparison was made between patients treated with IMRT and those treated with RT. Of the 158 patients, 99 were treated with RT and 59 were treated with IMRT. Compared with those treated with IMRT, significantly more patients treated with RT exhibited xerostomia (46.5% vs 16.9%; P < .001; odds ratio [OR], 0.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.11-0.52), mucositis (46.5% vs 16.9%; P < .001; OR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.11-0.52), and ORN (10.1% vs 0%; P = .014; OR, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.00-1.21). However, significantly more patients treated with IMRT were edentulous by the conclusion of radiation treatment (32.2% vs 11.1%; P = .002; OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.65-8.73). Patients who were treated with IMRT had fewer instances of dental disease, more salivary flow, and fewer requisite posttreatment extractions compared with those treated with RT. The number of posttreatment extractions has been reduced with the advent of IMRT and more so with a complete dental evaluation prior to treatment.

  10. Knowledge and attitude of Indian clinical dental students towards the dental treatment of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Marya, Charu Mohan; Sharma, Nilima; Mohanty, Vikrant; Marwah, Mohita; Oberoi, Avneet

    2014-12-01

    Oral health care of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a growing area of concern. Information on HIV- and AIDS-related knowledge among dental students provides a crucial foundation for efforts aimed at developing an appropriate dental curriculum on HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitude of Indian clinical dental students towards the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS and perceived sources of information regarding HIV-related issues. Data were collected from clinical dental students (third year, fourth year and internship) from three dental institutions in Delhi National Capital Region (NCR). The questions assessed the knowledge and attitude towards treatment of patients with HIV and the perceived source of information related to HIV. The willingness to treat HIV-positive patients among dental students was 67.0%, and 74.20% were confident of treating a patient with HIV/AIDS. The potential problems in rendering treatment to these patients were effect on the attitude of other patients (49.90%) and staff fears (52.50%). The correct knowledge regarding the infection-control practice (barrier technique) was found among only 15.50% of respondents. The respondents had sufficient knowledge regarding the oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS. There was no correlation between the knowledge and attitude score, demonstrating a gap between knowledge and attitude among dental students regarding treatment of HIV-infected patients. Appropriate knowledge has to be delivered through the dental education curriculum, which can instil confidence in students about their ability to manage HIV-positive patients. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  11. The quality of health care and patient satisfaction: an exploratory investigation of the 5Qs model at some Egyptian and Jordanian medical clinics.

    PubMed

    Zineldin, Mosad

    2006-01-01

    To examine the major factors affecting patients' perception of cumulative satisfaction and to address the question whether patients in Egypt and Jordan evaluate quality of health care similarly or differently. A conceptual model including behavioural dimensions of patient-physician relationships and patient satisfaction has been developed. As the empirical research setting, this study concerns three hospitals in Egypt and Jordan. The survey instrument in a questionnaire form was designed to achieve the research objectives. A total of 48 items (attributes) of the newly developed five quality dimensions were identified to be the most relevant. A total of 224 complete and usable questionnaires were received from the in-patients. Hospital C has above-average total and dimensional qualities and patients are the most satisfied in accordance with all dimensions of services. Hospitals A and B have under-average total qualities as the majority of patients are not satisfied with services. Comparing hospitals A and B, in the majority of dimensions (with the exception of Q5), the quality in hospital B is higher than in hospital A. Patients' satisfaction with different service quality dimensions is correlated with their willingness to recommend the hospital to others. A cure to improve the quality for health-care services can be an application of total relationship management and the 5Qs model together with customer orientation strategy. The result can be used by the hospitals to reengineer and redesign creatively their quality management processes and the future direction of their more effective health-care quality strategies. In this research a study is described involving a new instrument and a new method which assure a reasonable level of relevance, validity and reliability, while being explicitly change-oriented. This study argues that a patient's satisfaction is a cumulative construct, summing satisfaction with five different qualities (5Qs) of the hospital: quality of

  12. An analysis of dental patient safety incidents in a patient complaint and healthcare supervisory database in Finland.

    PubMed

    Hiivala, Nora; Mussalo-Rauhamaa, Helena; Tefke, Hanna-Leena; Murtomaa, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Few studies of patient harm and harm-prevention methods in dentistry exist. This study aimed to identify and characterize dental patient safety incidents (PSIs) in a national sample of closed dental cases reported to the Regional State Administrative Agencies (AVIs) and the National Supervisory Authority for Welfare and Health (Valvira) in Finland. The sample included all available fully resolved dental cases (n = 948) during 2000-2012 (initiated by the end of 2011). Cases included both patient and next of kin complaints and notifications from other authorities, employers, pharmacies, etc. The cases analyzed concerned both public and private dentistry and included incident reports lodged against dentists and other dental-care professionals. Data also include the most severe cases since these are reported to Valvira. PSIs were categorized according to common incident types and preventability and severity assessments were based on expert opinions in the decisions from closed cases. Most alleged PSIs were proven valid and evaluated as potentially preventable. PSIs were most often related to different dental treatment procedures or diagnostics. More than half of all PSIs were assessed as severe, posing severe risk or as causing permanent or long-lasting harm to patients. The risk for PSI was highest among male general dental practitioners with recurring complaints and notifications. Despite some limitations, this register-based study identifies new perspectives on improving safety in dental care. Many PSIs could be prevented through the proper and more systematic use of already available error-prevention methods.

  13. STIGMA AROUND HIV IN DENTAL CARE: PATIENTS' EXPERIENCES.

    PubMed

    Brondani, Mario A; Phillips, J Craig; Kerston, R Paul; Moniri, Nardin R

    2016-02-01

    Tooth decay and other oral diseases can be highly prevalent among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Even though dental professionals are trained to provide equal and non-judgemental services to all, intentional or unintentional biases may exist with regard to PLWHA. We conducted qualitative descriptive research using individual interviews to explore the experiences of PLWHA accessing dental care services in Vancouver, Canada. We interviewed 25 PLWHA, aged 23-67 years; 21 were men and 60% reported fair or poor oral health. Thematic analysis showed evidence of both self-stigma and public stigma with the following themes: fear, self-stigma and dental care; overcoming past offences during encounters with dental care professionals; resilience and reconciliation to achieve quality care for all; and current encounters with dental care providers. Stigma attached to PLWHA is detrimental to oral care. The social awareness of dental professionals must be enhanced, so that they can provide the highest quality care to this vulnerable population.

  14. INCIDENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN DENTAL PLAQUE OF SAUDI GASTRITIS PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Al-Refai, Abdel-Nasser M.; Fathalla, Sami E.; Nagamani, Rambhala; Al-Momen, Sami

    2002-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was identified in dental plaque, raising the possibility of future gastritis and peptic ulceration. Objective: This trial was to study the association between presence of H. pylori in dental plaque and in the stomachs of patients with gastritis; the effect of oral hygiene and periodontal condition on the stomach. Patients and Methods: Seventy-five Saudi adult dyspeptic patients, together with 60 healthy persons as control. Two samples of dental plaque were taken from gingival crevice of deepest pocket. One sample was kept in Christensen's urea agar and incubated for H. pylori detection by rapid urease test. The second sample was kept in 5% sheep blood agar, chocolate agar and a selective medium to culture the H. pylori. Gastric urease test was done for the same patients. Results: (1) Plaque urease test results showed 89% positive patients. (2) Dental plaque Index:- Mild dental plaque accumulation in 24%, moderate in 41%, while severe accumulation was in 35% of the patients. (3) Gingival Index: Showed mild, moderate and severe gingivitis in 17%, 48% and 35% of patients, respectively. (4) Community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITN): Showed gingivitis, mild periodontitis and moderate periodontitis in 50%, 23% and 27% of patients, respectively. (5)Gastric urease results: 87% of patients were positive. (6)All cultured samples results were negative Conclusion: The ability to detect H. pylori in dental plaque samples offers a potential for a noninvasive test for gastric infection and would lend support for oral spread of H. pylori as the princi-pal mode of transmission. However, the presence of H. pylori in dental plaque and in the stomach (in gastritis patients) could permit not only a target for therapeutic procedures but also a monitor-ing tool for the efficacy of therapy. PMID:23008669

  15. Dental health - a challenging problem for a patient with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan-Yuan; Wei, I-Hua; Huang, Chih-Chia

    2013-01-01

    Patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are at an increased risk for many diseases. However, little has been published about the dental health of patients with ASDs. Here, we describe the clinical presentations in a 28-year-old woman with autistic disorder. The most striking finding was the severe dental problems which had been neglected for several years. Our patient exhibited a combination of several factors that may have increased the risk of development of severe dental problem. The early recognition is still challenging to managing this unusual condition in patients with ASDs. From the experience of caring for this patient, a team of parents or caregivers, psychiatrist and dentist should be involved in maintaining oral health care of such patients with early intervention and long-term follow-up. Evidence-based behavioral management approaches for patients with ASD need to be developed to improve compliance with oral care procedures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Compliance with dental treatment recommendations by rural paediatric patients after a live-video teledentistry consultation: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Sean W; Kopycka-Kedzierawski, Dorota T

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to assess the compliance rate with recommended dental treatment by rural paediatric dental patients after a live-video teledentistry consultation. A retrospective dental chart review was completed for 251 rural paediatric patients from the Finger Lakes region of New York State who had an initial teledentistry appointment with a paediatric dentist located remotely at the Eastman Institute for Oral Health in Rochester, NY. The recommended treatment modalities were tabulated and comprehensive dental treatment completion rates were obtained. The recommended treatment modality options of: treatment in the paediatric dental clinic; treatment using nitrous oxide anxiolysis; treatment with oral sedation; treatment in the operating room with general anaesthesia; or teleconsultation were identified for the 251 patients. Compliance rates for completed dental treatment based on initial teleconsultation recommendations were: 100% for treatment in the paediatric dental clinic; 56% for nitrous oxide patients; 87% for oral sedation; 93% for operating room; and 90% for teleconsultations. The differences in the compliance rates for all treatment modalities were not statistically significant (Fisher's exact test, p > 0.05). Compliance rates for completed comprehensive dental treatment for this rural population of paediatric dental patients were quite high, ranging from 56% to 100%, and tended to be higher when treatment was completed in fewer visits. Live-video teledentistry consultations conducted among rural paediatric patients and a paediatric dentist in the specialty clinic were feasible options for increasing dental treatment compliance rates when treating complex paediatric dental cases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Dental treatment under general anesthesia for special-needs patients: analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mallineni, Sreekanth K; Yiu, Cynthia K Y

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present review was to identify the studies published on dental treatment under general anesthesia for special-needs patients. A comprehensive search of the reported literature from January 1966 to May 2012 was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and Embase. Keywords used in the search were "dental treatment under general anesthesia", "special-needs patients", "medically-compromised patients", and "children", in various combinations. Studies published only on dental treatment under general anesthesia and in English were included. Only 10 studies were available for final analysis. Age range from 1 to 50 years, and restorative procedures, were most prevalent. Only two studies discussed repeated general anesthesia, with rates of 7.2% and 10.2%. Over time, the provision of general anesthesia for special-needs patients has changed from dental clinics to general hospitals. The demand for dental treatment for special-needs patients under general anesthesia continues to increase. Currently, there are no certain accepted protocols for the provision of dental treatment under general anesthesia. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Factors affecting use of word-of-mouth by dental patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yun-Sook; Yang, Hae-Young; Choi, Youn-Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyong; Jeong, Seong-Hwa; Cho, Min-Jeong; Nam, Soon-Hyeun; Song, Keun-Bae

    2018-03-23

    Word-of-mouth (WOM) refers to communication among consumers, which greatly influences the marketing strategies of dental clinics. This study aimed to explore factors that affect use of WOM by dental patients and to analyse their pathways. The participants were 520 outpatients from four private dental clinics. Data were obtained from a survey using self-reported questionnaires, which included questions regarding seven latent variables: five exogenous variables, including medical service quality (physical environment, customer service, patient relationship quality) and individual characteristic variables (opinion leader tendency, social hub tendency); and two endogenous variables (intention to recommend, WOM experience). Statistical analysis was performed using structural equation modelling. Significant associations were found in the pathways between relationship quality and intention to recommend, intention to recommend and WOM, and opinion leader tendency and WOM (P < 0.001). Higher patient relationship quality and higher intention to recommend were related to positive WOM, as was higher opinion leader tendency. Improving patient relationship quality can promote positive WOM for dental clinics. Strategies are needed to promote a positive perception of dental clinics by effectively responding to the views of patients with strong opinion leader tendencies. © 2018 FDI World Dental Federation.

  19. Dental treatment under general anesthesia in a group of patients with cerebral palsy and a group of healthy pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Escanilla-Casal, Alejandro; Aznar-Gómez, Mirella; Viaño, José M.; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    This is a comparative study between two groups, one of healthy children and the other of children with cerebral palsy, which underwent dental treatment under general anesthesia at Hospital Sant Joan de Déu Barcelona. The purpose of the study was to compare and determine oral pathology, frequency, severity and postoperative complications in pediatric patients with and without an underlying disease which undergo a dental treatment under general anesthesia. Key words:General anesthesia, cerebral palsy, pediatric patients. PMID:24608223

  20. Innovative Models of Dental Care Delivery and Coverage: Patient-Centric Dental Benefits Based on Digital Oral Health Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Martin, John; Mills, Shannon; Foley, Mary E

    2018-04-01

    Innovative models of dental care delivery and coverage are emerging across oral health care systems causing changes to treatment and benefit plans. A novel addition to these models is digital risk assessment, which offers a promising new approach that incorporates the use of a cloud-based technology platform to assess an individual patient's risk for oral disease. Risk assessment changes treatment by including risk as a modifier of treatment and as a determinant of preventive services. Benefit plans are being developed to use risk assessment to predetermine preventive benefits for patients identified at elevated risk for oral disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence and Characteristics of Developmental Dental Anomalies in Iranian Orofacial Cleft Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Shabnam; Pakshir, Hamidreza; Samady, Hedyeh

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Individuals with oral clefts exhibit considerably more dental anomalies than individuals without clefts. These problems could initially be among the symptoms of their disease and/or they may be the side effect of their treatments. Pushback palatoplasty could cause some interference during the development of teeth and result in tooth defects. Purpose: The study was performed to assess the prevalence and characteristics of developmental dental anomalies in orofacial cleft patients who attended Shiraz Orthodontics Research Center-Cleft Lip and Palate Clinic. We managed to compare dental anomaly traits based on gender and cleft side. Materials and Method: Eighty out of 121 cleft patients were included in this cross-sectional study. All the patients used pushback palatoplasty in their palate closure surgeries. Intraoral photographs, panoramic and intraoral radiographs, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and dental and medical histories were examined and recorded by two observers. Data were analyzed using SPSS PC version 20.0. The differences in the side of cleft and dental anomalies were compared using the Mann-Whitney test. Results: The mean age of patients was 14.27 years (SD=5.06). The most frequent cleft type was unilateral cleft lip and palate (50%) followed by bilateral cleft lip and palate (43.75%), cleft palate (2.5%) and cleft lip (1.25%). Male predominance (70%) was observed. 92.5 percent had at least one developmental dental anomaly. The most prevalent anomalies were hypodontia (71.25%) followed by microdontia (30%), root dilacerations (21.25%) and supernumerary teeth (15%). Conclusion: The most prevalent cleft types were unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate with male and left side predominance. Hypodontia, microdontia, dilacerations and supernumerary teeth were the most prevalent developmental dental anomalies among Iranian southwestern cleft patients. The surgical technique used to repair their cleft palate may have

  2. Prevalence and Characteristics of Developmental Dental Anomalies in Iranian Orofacial Cleft Patients.

    PubMed

    Ajami, Shabnam; Pakshir, Hamidreza; Samady, Hedyeh

    2017-09-01

    Individuals with oral clefts exhibit considerably more dental anomalies than individuals without clefts. These problems could initially be among the symptoms of their disease and/or they may be the side effect of their treatments. Pushback palatoplasty could cause some interference during the development of teeth and result in tooth defects. The study was performed to assess the prevalence and characteristics of developmental dental anomalies in orofacial cleft patients who attended Shiraz Orthodontics Research Center-Cleft Lip and Palate Clinic. We managed to compare dental anomaly traits based on gender and cleft side. Eighty out of 121 cleft patients were included in this cross-sectional study. All the patients used pushback palatoplasty in their palate closure surgeries. Intraoral photographs, panoramic and intraoral radiographs, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and dental and medical histories were examined and recorded by two observers. Data were analyzed using SPSS PC version 20.0. The differences in the side of cleft and dental anomalies were compared using the Mann-Whitney test. The mean age of patients was 14.27 years (SD=5.06). The most frequent cleft type was unilateral cleft lip and palate (50%) followed by bilateral cleft lip and palate (43.75%), cleft palate (2.5%) and cleft lip (1.25%). Male predominance (70%) was observed. 92.5 percent had at least one developmental dental anomaly. The most prevalent anomalies were hypodontia (71.25%) followed by microdontia (30%), root dilacerations (21.25%) and supernumerary teeth (15%). The most prevalent cleft types were unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate with male and left side predominance. Hypodontia, microdontia, dilacerations and supernumerary teeth were the most prevalent developmental dental anomalies among Iranian southwestern cleft patients. The surgical technique used to repair their cleft palate may have played a role in developmental dental defects.

  3. Potential risk factors for dental caries in Type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Almusawi, M A; Gosadi, I; Abidia, R; Almasawi, M; Khan, H A

    2018-05-11

    Diabetic patients are known to be at higher risk for dental caries. However, the role of potential risk factors such as blood glucose, salivary glucose and glycaemic control in the occurrence of dental caries in type 2 diabetes (T2D) is not clearly understood so far, and therefore, it was evaluated in this study. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 100 T2D patients from Saudi Arabia. The caries risk assessment was evaluated using the guidelines of Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CAMBRA). Cariogenic bacteria load in saliva was determined by a chair-side test kit. The levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG), salivary glucose and HbA1c were analysed. Majority of the patients had dental caries (84%), exposed root surfaces (92%) and heavy plaque (73%), whereas 66% of patients suffered from xerostomia. The frequency of patients with high counts of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli (LB) were 78% and 42%, respectively. There were significant associations between dental caries risk and FBG, HbA1c and salivary glucose. After categorizing the patients into 3 categories of glycaemic control, we observed a significant association between glycaemic control and dental caries risk. Type 2 diabetes patients are at high risk for dental caries, which is directly associated with FBG, HbA1c and salivary glucose. This is the first study measuring dental caries and its risk factors in T2D patients from Saudi Arabia. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Factors influencing Patients' Utilization of Dental Health Services in Jazan, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Quadri, Faeq A; Jafari, Fatimahi Am; Albeshri, Alanood Ts; Zailai, Abdulaziz M

    2018-01-01

    One way of prevention and early detection of oral diseases is by utilizing the dental health care services on a regular basis. The current study aims to know the factors that play a role in influencing the dental service utilization in Jazan, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire was designed and implemented. Study subjects comprised of patients visiting the dental clinics at Jazan University and the primary dental centers of five different suburbs in Jazan region of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Items in the questionnaire were grouped into three sections; "demographic details," "self-reported dental visits," and "potential factors" contributing to dental visits. Chi-square p-value of 0.05 or less was considered as significant and logistic regression with 95% confidence interval (CI) was performed to get more precise results. The sample size was 395 (N) of which 44.8% were males and 53.4% were females. Less than half (45.8%) of the studied sample reported that their last visit to a dentist was within a span of one year and 33% of them think that a dentist should only be visited if they experience pain. Patients following instructions given by a dentist were 7 times [odds ratio (OR) = 0.13; CI = 0.04, 0.40] less likely to miss their regular dental appointments. Following this, patients receiving knowledge on their dental problems were seen to be twice (OR = 0.50; CI = 0.25, 0.98) less likely to be irregular with their dental visits. Finally, the patients who are better educated and literate were also 2 times (OR = 2.21; CI = 1.14, 4.28) more likely to be regular with their dental appointments in comparison with the patients who completed just their primary level education. Findings of this study will facilitate future oral health prevention programs to be more focused, thereby reducing the gap between high and low educated sectors of the population residing in Jazan. How to cite this article: Quadri FA, Jafari FAM

  5. Oral findings and dental treatment in a patient with Dandy-Walker syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Yasuka; Shinozuka, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is congenital disease characterized by hypoplasia of the cerebellum, the formation of cysts that communicate with the fourth ventricle of the posterior cranial fossa, and hydrocephalus. In addition to various other complications, cleft lip/palate, facial retrognathia, a high-arched palate, and maldentition occur at an increased frequency in patients with DWS. However, few studies have reported the dental manifestations of DWS. Herein, we report the clinical manifestations, oral findings, and dental management of a DWS patient who was treated under general anesthesia. Poor oral hygiene, gingivitis, and several congenital dental abnormalities (e.g., generalized microdontia, conical tooth, transposition, and congenitally missing teeth) were observed. This report is the first to describe the oral findings and dental treatment of DWS. Our findings emphasize the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the diagnosis and treatment of DWS. © 2013 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Patients' perspective on dental aesthetics in a South-Eastern European community.

    PubMed

    Dudea, Diana; Lasserre, Jean-François; Alb, Camelia; Culic, Bogdan; Pop Ciutrila, Ioana Sofia; Colosi, Horatiu

    2012-07-01

    To assess the importance attributed to dental aesthetics by subjects from a Romanian community. In addition, the role played by dental color, the group-distributions based on the self-evaluation of dental color and the previous experience regarding whitening treatments are analysed. A multiple-choice questionnaire was administered to 540 patients in dental offices in Cluj-Napoca, Romania; the subjects were also asked to self-evaluate their dental shade, using a set of images as a comparison. Answers to the questionnaires were statistically analysed using Microsoft Excel and SPSS 13.00 (Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Kendall's tau b). From the participants, 17.96% were motivated by aesthetic reasons to ask for treatment; most of the patients evaluated their smile as "acceptable" (38.51%) or "having some defects" (29.44%) and were self-included in groups of medium and dark shades (33.7% and 33.89%, respectively). Whilst 22.40% of the subjects considered the dental color as being the most evident defect of their dentition, 39.07% indicated a self-perception of "an abnormal dental shade". A strong correlation between darker self-assessed tooth color-groups and the self-perception of an abnormal tooth color was found (Chi square p≪0.001, Kendall's tau-c=0.44, with p≪0.001). Previous whitening treatments were reported by 8.88% of the subjects. Among patients who wanted to improve one of their oral functions, the majority requested changes in aesthetics. Dental shade is one of the aspects recognized as problematic by the participants, but nonetheless the percentage of patients who had previously benefited by whitening treatments was moderate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The impact of dental appearance and anxiety on self-esteem in adult orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Romero-Maroto, M; Santos-Puerta, N; González Olmo, M J; Peñacoba-Puente, C

    2015-08-01

    To analyse the relationship between different dimensions of dental appearance impact and self-esteem in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, with special attention to the possible mediating role of anxiety. A quasi-experimental design was used with a matched control group (without orthodontic treatment). In each group (experimental and control), there were 85 patients. The impact of dental appearance was measured using the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ). State anxiety was assessed with the State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) and self-esteem with Rosenberg's self-esteem scale. In both groups (experimental and control), self-esteem correlates negatively, ranging between 0.26 and 0.43, with all dimensions of dental appearance impact (except for the positive dental self-confidence dimension, where all correlations were positive). Anxiety correlates positively, ranges between 0.35 and 0.44, with social impact, psychological impact and aesthetic concern, although it maintains no significant correlations with dental self-confidence. Nevertheless, in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, anxiety plays a mediating role between dental impact dimensions and self-esteem, whilst for the control group anxiety only plays a mediator role between psychological impact and self-esteem. Anxiety plays a fundamental role in the effect of perceived dental impact on self-esteem in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. These results have important practical implications for the design of bio-psycho-social intervention programs that contemplate cognitive-affective variables as an essential part of orthodontic treatment in adults. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Assessing Dental Hygienists' Communication Techniques for Use with Low Oral Health Literacy Patients.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Priscilla; Acharya, Amit; Schwei, Kelsey; VanWormer, Jeffrey; Skrzypcak, Kaitlyn

    2016-06-01

    This primary aim of this study was to assess communication techniques used with low oral health literacy patients by dental hygienists in rural Wisconsin dental clinics. A secondary aim was to determine the utility of the survey instrument used in this study. A mixed methods study consisting of a cross-sectional survey, immediately followed by focus groups, was conducted among dental hygienists in the Marshfield Clinic (Wisconsin) service area. The survey quantified the routine use of 18 communication techniques previously shown to be effective with low oral health literacy patients. Linear regression was used to analyze the association between routine use of each communication technique and several indicator variables, including geographic practice region, oral health literacy familiarity, communication skills training and demographic indicators. Qualitative analyses included code mapping to the 18 communication techniques identified in the survey, and generating new codes based on discussion content. On average, the 38 study participants routinely used 6.3 communication techniques. Dental hygienists who used an oral health literacy assessment tool reported using significantly more communication techniques compared to those who did not use an oral health literacy assessment tool. Focus group results differed from survey responses as few dental hygienists stated familiarity with the term "oral health literacy." Motivational interviewing techniques and using an integrated electronic medical-dental record were additional communication techniques identified as useful with low oral health literacy patients. Dental hygienists in this study routinely used approximately one-third of the communication techniques recommended for low oral health literacy patients supporting the need for training on this topic. Based on focus group results, the survey used in this study warrants modification and psychometric testing prior to further use. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental

  9. Jordanian pharmaceutical companies: are their marketing efforts paying off?

    PubMed

    Al-Shaikh, Mustafa S; Torres, Ivonne M; Zuniga, Miguel A; Ghunaim, Ayman

    2011-04-01

    The pharmaceuticals industry is one of the main industries in Jordan. Jordanian pharmaceuticals rank third in the export industry of this country. This study aims to examine the strengths that Jordanian pharmaceutical companies have, which, in turn, form their competitiveness base. In addition, this study aims to identify their weaknesses and the effects of marketing their products in the local market. What is the relationship between Jordanian pharmaceutical product quality, price and value, and the competitiveness of pharmaceutical companies in the local market? Our study aims to answer this and other questions. Our results and practical implications are discussed.

  10. Dental anomalies in 14 patients with IP: clinical and radiological analysis and review.

    PubMed

    Santa-Maria, Fernanda D; Mariath, Luiza Monteavaro; Poziomczyk, Cláudia S; Maahs, Marcia A P; Rosa, Rafael F M; Zen, Paulo R G; Schüller-Faccini, Lavínia; Kiszewski, Ana Elisa

    2017-06-01

    Current knowledge on dental anomalies in patients with incontinentia pigmenti (IP) has been obtained by examining case reports; however, an overall characterization of such alterations remains lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency, type and location of dental alterations in IP using a case series. Fourteen patients (9 children and 5 adults) with a clinical diagnosis of IP who presented dental anomalies were included in this study. All patients were administered a clinical questionnaire, dental examination and radiological investigation. In the present case series, agenesis of primary dentition was present in 60 % of patients and agenesis of permanent tooth was present in 92.8 % of patients. Most cases were missing at least 6 teeth. Second molar agenesis was present in 13 patients (92.8 %). Anomalies in dental crowns occurred in 71.4 % of cases, and the central incisor was most frequently affected. Two adult patients still had primary teeth. Malocclusion was found in 10 patients (71.4 %). High-arched palate was observed in 7 (50 %) patients. Patients with IP present alterations in both primary and permanent dentition. Because the agenesis of permanent teeth is more common, primary teeth are not always replaced. In addition, the durability of primary dentition appears to be greater in IP. This study shows that patients with IP experience significant loss of teeth, especially in permanent dentition, and have an increased risk of high-arched palate compared to the general population. Prophylactic care of primary teeth in IP is relevant for improving functional and aesthetic outcomes until dental prostheses are implanted.

  11. Management of exaggerated gag reflex in dental patients using intravenous sedation with dexmedetomidine.

    PubMed

    Reshetnikov, Aleksei P; Kasatkin, Anton A; Urakov, Aleksandr L; Baimurzin, Dmitrii Y

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacological sedation is one of the effective ways of prevention of gag reflex development in patients experiencing anxiety and fright before dental treatment. We are reporting a case where we could successfully eliminate exaggerated gag reflex (intravenous [IV] Gagging Severity Index) in a dental patient using IV sedation with dexmedetomidine. IV administration of dexmedetomidine provided elimination of gag reflex at a depth of sedation for the patient with the Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale score of -2 and -1. The patient received dexmedetomidine 1.0 μg/kg for 10 min and then a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine 0.4 μg/kg/h. The use of dexmedetomidine for sedation may be an alternative to other pharmacological agents in patients with dental anxiety accompanied by exaggerated gag reflex.

  12. Variations in tobacco control in National Dental PBRN practices: The role of patient and practice factors

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Midge N.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Coley, Heather L.; Williams, Jessica H.; Kohler, Connie; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Richman, Joshua S.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Sadasivam, Rajani S.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    We engaged dental practices enrolled in The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to quantify tobacco screening (ASK) and advising (ADVISE); and to identify patient and practice characteristics associated with tobacco control. Dental practices (N=190) distributed patient surveys that measured ASK and ADVISE. 29% of patients were ASKED about tobacco use during visit, 20% were identified as tobacco users, and 41% reported being ADVISED. Accounting for clustering of patients within practices, younger age and male gender were positively associated with ASK and ADVISE. Adjusting for patient age and gender, a higher proportion of non-whites in the practice, preventive services and proportion on public assistance were positively associated with ASK. Proportion of tobacco users in the practice and offering other preventive services were more strongly associated with ASK and ADVISE than other practice characteristics. Understanding variations in performance is an important step toward designing strategies for improving tobacco control in dentistry. PMID:24164227

  13. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed.

  14. Impact of simulation training on Jordanian nurses' performance of basic life support skills: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Toubasi, Samar; Alosta, Mohammed R; Darawad, Muhammad W; Demeh, Waddah

    2015-09-01

    Providing efficient basic life support (BLS) training is crucial for practicing nurses who provide direct patient care. Nevertheless, data addressing the impact of BLS courses on the skills and performance of Jordanian nurses are scarce. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a BLS simulation training on Jordanian nurses' skill improvement in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A prospective quasi-experimental, single group pretest-posttest design was used to study the effect of BLS simulation; using a 9-item checklist; on the spot training; American Heart Association, on a group of Jordanian nurses. A pre-test was conducted following a CPR scenario to test the skills using 9-item checklist extrapolated from the American Heart Association guidelines. After debriefing, an interactive on spot training was provided. Later, participants undertook an unscheduled post-test after four weeks that included the same nine items. Thirty registered nurses with a mean clinical experience of 6.1years participated in the study. Comparing pre-test (M=4.6, SD=2.9, range=0 to 9) with post-test results (M=7.5, SD=1.7, range=4 to 9) showed an overall improvement in skills and BLS scores after the simulation training program (t=7.4, df=29, p<0.0001). BLS simulation training sessions are associated with significant improvement in skills and performance among Jordanian nurses. A refreshment BLS training session for nurses is highly recommended to guarantee nurses' preparedness in actual CPR scenarios. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque and stomach of patients from Northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Assumpção, Mônica Baraúna; Martins, Luisa Caricio; Melo Barbosa, Hivana Patricia; Barile, Katarine Antonia dos Santos; de Almeida, Sintia Silva; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Corvelo, Tereza Cristina de Oliveira

    2010-06-28

    To establish whether virulence factor genes vacA and cagA are present in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) retrieved from gastric mucosa and dental plaque in patients with dyspepsia. Cumulative dental plaque specimens and gastric biopsies were submitted to histological examination, rapid urease test and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to detect the presence of cagA and vacA polymorphisms. Detection of H. pylori from dental plaque and gastric biopsy samples was greater by PCR compared to histological examination and the rapid urease test. DNA from H. pylori was detected in 96% of gastric mucosa samples and in 72% of dental plaque samples. Sixty-three (89%) of 71 dental plaque samples that were H. pylori-positive also exhibited identical vacA and cagA genotypes in gastric mucosa. The most common genotype was vacAs1bm1 and cagA positive, either in dental plaque or gastric mucosa. These virulent H. pylori isolates were involved in the severity of clinical outcome. These pathogenic strains were found simultaneously in dental plaque and gastric mucosa, which suggests that gastric infection is correlated with the presence of H. pylori in the mouth.

  16. Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque and stomach of patients from Northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Mônica Baraúna; Martins, Luisa Caricio; Melo Barbosa, Hivana Patricia; dos Santos Barile, Katarine Antonia; de Almeida, Sintia Silva; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; de Oliveira Corvelo, Tereza Cristina

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To establish whether virulence factor genes vacA and cagA are present in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) retrieved from gastric mucosa and dental plaque in patients with dyspepsia. METHODS: Cumulative dental plaque specimens and gastric biopsies were submitted to histological examination, rapid urease test and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to detect the presence of cagA and vacA polymorphisms. RESULTS: Detection of H. pylori from dental plaque and gastric biopsy samples was greater by PCR compared to histological examination and the rapid urease test. DNA from H. pylori was detected in 96% of gastric mucosa samples and in 72% of dental plaque samples. Sixty-three (89%) of 71 dental plaque samples that were H. pylori-positive also exhibited identical vacA and cagA genotypes in gastric mucosa. The most common genotype was vacAs1bm1 and cagA positive, either in dental plaque or gastric mucosa. These virulent H. pylori isolates were involved in the severity of clinical outcome. CONCLUSION: These pathogenic strains were found simultaneously in dental plaque and gastric mucosa, which suggests that gastric infection is correlated with the presence of H. pylori in the mouth. PMID:20572307

  17. Dental caries and risk indicators for patients with leprosy in China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yue; Tian, Li-Li; Zhang, Feng-Yi; Bu, Yan-Hong; Feng, Yun-Zhi; Zhou, Hou-De

    2017-02-01

    In leprosy, oral health is often neglected and poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and risk indicators of dental caries in patients with leprosy in China. This cross-sectional, multicentre study included 613 patients with leprosy and 602 control subjects. Based on the established standards of the World Health Organization, we investigated dental caries in cluster samplings from six so-called 'leprosy villages' in three Chinese provinces. Clinical oral examinations were performed and data were reported as decayed (D), missing (M) and filled (F) teeth (DMFT scores). The average DMFT scores were 10.39 in patients with leprosy (D = 4.43; M = 5.94; and F = 0.02) and 4.39 in control individuals (D = 2.29; M = 2.02; F = 0.08). The DMFT scores were statistically significantly different in patients with different ages, educational backgrounds and daily brushing frequency (P < 0.05). High DMFT scores were related to age, low educational levels and poor toothbrushing habits. The results indicate that patients with leprosy have a high prevalence of severe dental caries. Effective therapy and oral health education should be enhanced for this group of patients. © 2016 The Authors. International Dental Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Dental Federation.

  18. Nigerian dental therapy students' knowledge, attitude, and willingness to care for patients with HIV.

    PubMed

    Azodo, Clement Chinedu; Ehizele, Adebola Oluyemisi; Umoh, Agnes; Okechukwu, Robinson

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess Nigerian dental therapy students' knowledge, attitudes, and willingness to care for patients with HIV. A twenty-six-item questionnaire was used to conduct a cross-sectional study of the dental therapy students of Federal School of Dental Therapy and Technology, Enugu State, Nigeria. The level of knowledge of HIV transmission and prevention among the respondents was high. However, misconceptions about the transmission of HIV through blood donation, mosquito bite, and sharing cups and plates were noted. Erroneous descriptions of HIV as harmless, self-limiting, antibiotic sensitive infection, punishment virus, and contagious infection were also reported. More than half (56.2 percent) and 25.2 percent of the respondents, respectively, expressed feelings of empathy and sympathy towards individuals with HIV. About three-quarters (74.3 percent) expressed willingness to treat patients with HIV, and 87.6 percent expressed confidence in their ability to prevent occupational HIV acquisition. This expressed confidence was significantly associated with their willingness to treat patients with HIV. More than half (55.7 percent) of the respondents reported they can adequately deliver HIV-related information to patients. A total of 86.2 percent said there is a need for training dental therapists in the clinical care of patients with HIV, and 89.0 percent said that dental therapists can play a significant role in the dissemination of HIV-related information. The vast majority (90.0 percent) expressed willingness to disseminate HIV-related information, and the majority (70.5 percent) considered the dental therapist the most suitable dental professional to give HIV-related information to patients.

  19. Dental treatment injuries in the Finnish Patient Insurance Centre in 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Karhunen, Sini; Virtanen, Jorma I

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Patient Insurance Centre in Finland reimburses patients who sustained injuries associated with medical and dental care without having to demonstrate malpractice. The aim was to analyse all dental injuries claimed through the Patient Insurance Centre over a 12-year period in order to identify factors affecting reimbursement of claims. Methods This study investigated all dental patient insurance claims in Finland during 2000-2011. The injury cases were grouped as (K00-K08) according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Calendar year, claimant's age and gender, dental disease group and health service sector were the explanatory factors and the outcome was the decision of a claim. Multiple logistic regression modelling was used in the statistical analyses. Results The total number of decisions related to dental claims at the PIC in 2000-2011 was 7662, of which women claimed a clear majority (72%). Diseases of the pulp and periapical tissues (K04) and dental caries (K02) were the major disease groups (both 29%). Of the claims 40% were eligible for reimbursement, 27% were classified as insignificant or unavoidable injuries and 32% were rejected for other reasons. The proportion of reimbursed claims declined during the period. Patients from the private sector were more likely to be eligible for compensation than were those from the public sector (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.71-2.10). Conclusions The number of dental patient insurance claims in Finland clearly rose, while the proportion of reimbursed claims declined. More claims received compensation in the private sector than in the public sector.

  20. Geographic location and indirect costs as a barrier to dental treatment: a patient perspective.

    PubMed

    Curtis, B; Evans, R W; Sbaraini, A; Schwarz, E

    2007-12-01

    The recently published National Survey of Adult Oral Health 2004-06 indicated that tooth loss, mean decayed and number of DMF teeth were all higher outside capital city locations. In addition, dental attendance patterns were worse in terms of frequency, reason for visit, and continuity in rural and remote locations, but there was no difference by geographical location in terms of financial barriers to dental care. The objective of this research was to identify, quantify and analyse some of the non-treatment costs associated with dental treatment from the perspective of the patient and to determine whether the perceived impact of those costs may limit access to dental care. This cohort study was nested within a clinical trial. Patients had been allocated to treatment arms within clusters dependent on the randomization status of the dental practice they usually attended, classified as major city, regional or remote. A questionnaire was developed from a series of focus groups in which patients were asked to identify the domains of non-treatment costs associated with a dental visit that were important to them and to quantify those costs. Factor analysis was used to reduce these items to four core scales. These scales were assessed for reliability and validity. Regression and ANCOVA was used to explore differences in DMFS scores between the three groups and a predictive model developed to adjust for potential confounders. Two core scales were identified as key drivers on the perceived impact of indirect costs associated with dental visits; travel impact and family impact. Patients living in remote locations incurred significantly higher indirect costs associated with dental treatment and higher mean DMFS scores. Patient perception of the impact of travel costs and impact on family life are major drivers restricting access to dental services for people living in remote locations in New South Wales. Further research using outcomes directly related to access is required to

  1. Can virtual nature improve patient experiences and memories of dental treatment? A study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; White, Mathew P; Andrade, Jackie; May, Jon; Stone, Robert J; Bruce, Malcolm; Mills, Ian; Auvray, Melissa; Gabe, Rhys; Moles, David R

    2014-03-22

    Dental anxiety and anxiety-related avoidance of dental care create significant problems for patients and the dental profession. Distraction interventions are used in daily medical practice to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. There is evidence that exposure to natural scenery is beneficial for patients and that the use of virtual reality (VR) distraction is more effective than other distraction interventions, such as watching television. The main aim of this randomized controlled trial is to determine whether the use of VR during dental treatment can improve the overall dental experience and recollections of treatment for patients, breaking the negative cycle of memories of anxiety leading to further anxiety, and avoidance of future dental appointments. Additionally, the aim is to test whether VR benefits dental patients with all levels of dental anxiety or whether it could be especially beneficial for patients suffering from higher levels of dental anxiety. The third aim is to test whether the content of the VR distraction can make a difference for its effectiveness by comparing two types of virtual environments, a natural environment and an urban environment. The effectiveness of VR distraction will be examined in patients 18 years or older who are scheduled to undergo dental treatment for fillings and/or extractions, with a maximum length of 30 minutes. Patients will be randomly allocated into one of three groups. The first group will be exposed to a VR of a natural environment. The second group will be exposed to a VR of an urban environment. A third group consists of patients who receive standard care (control group). Primary outcomes relate to patients' memories of the dental treatment one week after treatment: (a) remembered pain, (b) intrusive thoughts and (c) vividness of memories. Other measures of interest are the dental experience, the treatment experience and the VR experience. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN41442806.

  2. Prevalence of Dental Anomalies in Patients With Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and/or Palate in a Brazilian Population.

    PubMed

    Paranaiba, Lívia Máris Ribeiro; Coletta, Ricardo D; Swerts, Mário Sérgio Oliveira; Quintino, Rafaela Pacífico; de Barros, Letízia Monteiro; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio

    2013-07-01

    Objective : Many studies have demonstrated a high frequency of dental anomalies in patients with cleft lip and/or palate. Because dental anomalies may complicate dental treatment, we investigated the prevalence of dental anomalies in a group of Brazilian patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate. Design, Participants, Setting : Retrospective analysis was performed using clinical records of 296 patients aged between 12 and 30 years with repaired nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate without history of tooth extraction and orthodontic treatment. Associations between oral clefts and presence of dental anomalies outside the cleft area were investigated. Results : Dental anomalies were identified in 39.9% of the nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate patients, and tooth agenesis (47.5%), impacted tooth (13.1%), and microdontia (12.7%) were the most common anomalies. Cleft lip patients were less affected by dental anomalies compared with cleft palate or cleft lip and palate patients (p  =  .057). Specifically, patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate were significantly more affected by dental anomalies than those with bilateral cleft lip and palate (p  =  .00002), and individuals with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (p  =  .002) and complete cleft palate (p  =  .01) were significantly more affected by tooth agenesis than other cleft types. Agenesis of the premolars (p  =  .043) and maxillary lateral incisors (p  =  .03) were significantly more frequent in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate. Conclusions : The present study revealed a high frequency of dental anomalies in nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate patients and further demonstrated that patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate were frequently more affected by dental anomalies than those with bilateral cleft lip and palate. Moreover, our results demonstrate that dental anomalies should be considered during dental treatment planning for

  3. Effect of Dental Status on Changes in Mastication in Patients with Obesity following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Godlewski, Anne Espérance; Veyrune, Jean Luc; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Ciangura, Cécile A.; Chaussain, Catherine C.; Czernichow, Sébastien; Basdevant, Arnaud; Hennequin, Martine

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients scheduled for bariatric surgery (BS) are encouraged to chew slowly in order to optimise the digestion process. The influence of dental status on patients' ability to comply with advice on chewing behaviour is poorly documented. This study aims to compare modifications of chewing function before and after BS in three groups of obese patients differing in dental status. Method and Findings A cohort of 46 obese women provided three groups: FD group: fully dentate (7–10 functional dental units [FU]); PD group: partially dentate (4–6 FU) without partial dentures; DW group: partial and complete denture wearers. Chewing time (CT), number of chewing cycles (CC), and chewing frequency (CF) were measured before and after surgery during mastication of standardised samples of raw carrot, peanuts, banana, apple and jelly. The median particle-size distribution (D50) of the pre-swallowed bolus was also evaluated for peanut and carrot. Before surgery, the PD and DW groups exhibited greater mean CCs and CTs than the FD group (SNK p<0.05) and produced a bolus with higher granulometry (SNK, p<0.05) than the FD group. After surgery, CT and CC increased for all groups and for all foods, but not statistically significant for jelly. The resulting changes in bolus granulometry observed depended on both food and dental status. The granulometry of carrot bolus remained as fine or as coarse in FD and DW groups respectively as it was before surgery while it was significantly decreased in the PD group (Student's test, p<0.001). Conclusions After bariatric surgery, all the obese patients, regardless of dental status modified their chewing kinematics. The effects of this chewing behaviour on bolus granulometry depended on dental status and type of food. Further studies are needed to understand better the impact of dental status on feeding behaviour and nutrition in patients with obesity. PMID:21799822

  4. Dental infections increase the likelihood of hospital admissions among adult patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, B.; Haywood, C; Lanzkron, S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective To determine if dental infections increase the likelihood of hospital admission among adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Basic Research Design Cross-sectional analysis of data from the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) pooled for the years 2006 through 2008. Prevalence ratios (PR) for the effects of interest were estimated using Poisson regression with robust estimates of the variance. Participants Adults, aged 18 and over, diagnosed with SCD using ICD-9-CM codes excluding participants discharged with a code for sickle cell trait. Main outcome measure Emergency department (ED) visit disposition, dichotomised to represent whether or not the ED visit ended in admission versus being treated and released. Results Among patients having a sickle cell crisis, those with dental infections were 72% more likely to be admitted compared to those not having dental infections (PR=1.72, 95%CI 1.58-1.87). No association was observed among adult SCD patients not having a sickle crisis event. Based on preliminary data from this analysis, prevention of dental infection among patients with SCD could result in an estimated cost saving of $2.5 million dollars per year. Conclusions Having a dental infection complicated by a sickle cell crisis significantly increases the likelihood of hospital admission among adult SCD patients presenting to the ED. PMID:24151791

  5. Protective effects of salivary factors in dental caries in diabetic patients of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Muhammad; Khan, Rashid N; Shahid, Syed M; Azhar, Abid

    2012-01-01

    Salivary factors have been studied for their effects on the process of dental caries in patients of diabetes mellitus type 2. In this study, protective role of salivary pH, salivary flow rate, and salivary calcium is assessed in the patients of diabetes mellitus type 2 with dental caries. The samples of saliva were collected from 400 patients of diabetes mellitus type 2 and 300 age- and sex- matched controls after getting informed consent. All the subjects were classified into four groups according to age. The severity of dental caries was counted by decayed, missed, and filled teeth (DMFT) score. The salivary pH, flow rate, and calcium levels were found to be low in patients as compared to controls. The levels of fasting blood sugar, HbA1c, and DMFT score were found to be significantly high in patients than controls. The glycemic factors were significantly correlated with salivary factors indicating their influence on progression of caries in diabetes. On the basis of findings, it is concluded that the suitable salivary pH and flow rate may be regarded as main protective factors against dental caries in diabetes. Optimum level of salivary calcium may be responsible for continuous supply of calcium to arrest the demineralization and help reduce the occurrence of dental caries.

  6. The characteristics and distribution of dental anomalies in patients with cleft.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting-Ting; Chen, Philip K T; Lo, Lun-Jou; Cheng, Min-Chi; Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Dental anomalies associated with different severities of cleft lip and palate have been rarely reported. This retrospective study investigates the characteristics of dental anomalies associated with different types of cleft, and compares the dental anomaly traits based on sex and severity of cleft. Cleft patients born in 1995 with qualified diagnostic records from 7 to 11 years were included for evaluation. Records were retrieved from database of Chang Gung Craniofacial Center, including panoramic radiographs and intraoral photographs. In total, 196 patients with complete records were included in the evaluation. This study compares the dental anomalies associated with each type of cleft. The frequency of dental anomalies in the maxillary incisor area in the cleft palate (CP) group (20%) was significantly lower than that in other groups. The frequency of missing maxillary lateral incisors (MLIs) increased as the cleft severity increased. Supernumerary teeth and missing lower incisors exhibited the opposite trend. No sexual dimorphism appeared in terms of the frequencies of peg laterals and missing MLIs. The distribution patterns of missing MLIs and peg laterals in males, but not in females, were consistent for the three types of unilateral clefts. Regarding the characteristics of dental anomalies among the three unilateral clefts, missing MLIs, supernumerary teeth, and missing lower incisors were found to be related to cleft severity. The maxillary lateral incisor was the most affected tooth in the cleft area. The frequency of missing MLIs and peg laterals was not sexual dimorphic, but the distribution pattern was different between the sexes.

  7. Dental management of a pediatric patient with Burkitt lymphoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, M Y; Pandey, R K; Kumar, Archana; Radhakrishnan, Aparna

    2012-06-01

    Recent advancements in the field of cancer diagnosis and chemotherapy have led to higher rates of survival for children with malignant tumors. More than 75% of pediatric patients diagnosed with malignancies survive more than 5 years. These advancements have resulted in additional responsibilities for dental professionals to diagnose, evaluate, prevent, stabilize, and manage the oral and dental problems that can compromise the quality of life of these children. This case report highlights the importance of professional and self-administered oral prophylactic measures and patient compliance in the successful oral rehabilitation of a pediatric patient with Burkitt lymphoma. © 2012 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Management of Patients With Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices in Dental, Oral, and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices as life-prolonging and life-saving devices has evolved from a treatment of last resort to a first-line therapy for an increasing number of patients. As these devices become more and more popular in the general population, dental providers utilizing instruments and medications should be aware of dental equipment and medications that may affect these devices and understand the management of patients with these devices. This review article will discuss the various types and indications for pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, common drugs and instruments affecting these devices, and management of patients with these devices implanted for cardiac dysrhythmias.

  9. Management of Patients With Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices in Dental, Oral, and Maxillofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices as life-prolonging and life-saving devices has evolved from a treatment of last resort to a first-line therapy for an increasing number of patients. As these devices become more and more popular in the general population, dental providers utilizing instruments and medications should be aware of dental equipment and medications that may affect these devices and understand the management of patients with these devices. This review article will discuss the various types and indications for pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, common drugs and instruments affecting these devices, and management of patients with these devices implanted for cardiac dysrhythmias. PMID:27269668

  10. Pre-Radiation dental considerations and management for head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kufta, Kenneth; Forman, Michael; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Sollecito, Thomas P; Panchal, Neeraj

    2018-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) is accompanied by a high rate of morbidity, and complications can have a lifelong, profound impact on both patients and caregivers. Radiation-related injury to the hard and soft tissue of the head and neck can significantly decrease patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study is to provide patent-specific guidelines for managing the oral health and related side effects of HNC patients treated with radiation therapy. Based on reviewed articles retrieved on the PubMed database, guidelines for management of the oral health of this patient population were organized into three separate categories: cancer, patient, and dentition. The location, type, and staging of the cancer, along with the radiation used to treat the cancer significantly impact dental treatment. Several unique patient characteristics such as motivation, presence of support system, socioeconomic status, nutrition, and race have all been found to affect outcomes. Dental disease and available supportive dental management was found to significantly impact treatment and quality of life in this patient population. By comprehensively assessing unique cancer, patient, and dental-related factors, this review provides individualized evidence-based guidelines on the proper management of this complex and vulnerable patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Oral and dental health status in patients with primary antibody deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Meighani, Ghasem; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Javanbakht, Honarmand; Abolhassani, Hassan; Nikayin, Sina; Jafari, Seyed Mehryar; Ghandehari Motlagh, Mehdi; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Rezaei, Nima

    2011-12-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies (PAD) are a group of immune system disorders, associated with decreased levels of secretory and protective immunoglobulins. Because of the important role of immunoglobulins in the protection of oral cavity, patients with PADs are more susceptible to dental caries or oral manifestations. This study was performed to investigate the oral and dental manifestations of PADs patients. In this study, 33 patients with PADs (21 common variable immunodeficiency, 8 X-linked agammaglobulinemia and 4 hyper IgM syndrome) and 66 controls were examined; the number of decayed, missed and filled teeth (DMFT) were investigated. Aphthous was the most frequent manifestation in PADs patients (38.7%), which was significantly 16.7% higher than the controls (p=0.03). The patients with PADs showed significantly higher presentation of other oral and dental manifestations, including herpes sores, candidiasis tonsillitis, gingivitis, calculus, enamel hypoplasia and other ulcerations. The mean DMFT scores were 6.15±3.6 and 1.93±0.4 in PADs patients and controls, respectively (p<0.001). Although the patients with common variable immunodeficiency had higher means of DMFT in comparison with other groups of PADs, this difference was not statistically significant. This study showed significantly higher frequency of oral and dental manifestations in the patients with PADs compared to controls. Therefore, regular examination of oral cavity could be suggested in this group of immunodeficient patients.

  12. A retrospective investigation of the clinical management of patients attending an out of hours dental clinic in Merseyside under the new NHS dental contract.

    PubMed

    Tulip, D E; Palmer, N O A

    2008-12-20

    To investigate the clinical management of patients attending for emergency dental treatment. A retrospective analysis of clinical record cards. Information was collected from patient record cards concerning the patient's reason for attendance and their management at an emergency dental clinic in South Sefton, Liverpool. Over a nine month period, 1,718 patients attended the clinic; 1,472 record cards were analysed. Over 80% of the patients attending the out of hours (OOH) clinic had pain associated with a localised dental infection or dental abscess. Where a diagnosis was recorded, only 67% of patients received appropriate treatment. Over 50% of patients received antibiotics alone with no other definitive treatment provided. The principal antibiotic prescribed for both adult and child patients was amoxicillin. The current study has highlighted that GDPs working within the OOH services are not adhering to current clinical and best practice guidelines with respect to patient examination, diagnosis, management, in particular the correct prescribing of antibiotics for dental infections, and clinical record keeping.

  13. Jordanian survivors' experiences of recovery from critical illness: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Abdalrahim, M S; Zeilani, R S

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that a lot of patients consider their discharge from hospitals as a positive sign of progress towards regained health, many of them start suffering from physical, psychological and social problems after discharge from intensive care units. This study aims to describe the experiences of Jordanian survivors of critical illnesses 3 months after discharge from a hospital intensive care unit. A descriptive qualitative approach was used to involve 18 Jordanian patients from two hospitals in a major Jordanian city using open-ended interviews. Interview transcripts were analysed using content analysis method. Three main themes have emerged from the data: (1) new meaning of life; (2) different perspectives on the meaning of life, and (3) struggle for role identity. The sample was chosen from one city in Jordan; longitudinal study might help identify the change in patients' experiences over time. Patients described the discharge from the intensive care unit as a means of rescue from death; they began to value their spiritual and religious rituals. Negative traumatic experiences hindered the patients' recovery process. During recovery, patients struggled to resume their power and role in family. This study emphasizes the importance of providing care according to the patient's individual needs, related to their cultural and spiritual milieu; there is a need to develop follow-up services for ICU survivors within a national health policy. Further educational and training programmes in the patient's issues after discharge from hospital are needed. This will definitely help nurses care after this patient group. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  14. Are dental researchers asking patient-important questions? A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Padhraig S; Koletsi, Despina; O'Brien, Kevin; Tsichlaki, Aliki; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing recognition that research outcomes should resonate with patients rather than fixating on technical aspects of interventions. We aimed to assess the nature of outcomes within a representative subset of clinical trials published in leading dental journals. Randomized controlled trials published over a 3-year period up to December 31st, 2015 were identified in eight leading general and specialty dental journals: Journal of Dental Research, Journal of Dentistry, American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Pediatric Dentistry, International Journal of Prosthodontics, Journal of Endodontics, International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Journal of Clinical Periodontology. The number and nature of outcomes considered within these trials were assessed. Overall 220 RCTs involving 409 outcomes (257 primary and 152 secondary) were identified. Measures of disease activity were most commonly assessed as both primary (n=91, 35%) and secondary outcomes (n=59, 39%). Quality of life and functional measures were rarely considered as primary outcome domains. Overall, 182 (44%) outcomes were primarily clinician-focused, 140 (34%) were patient-centered, while 22% (n=87) were both patient- and clinician- focused. There is an undue emphasis on technical, clinician-centered outcomes within dental research common to all specialty areas. Development and adoption of core outcome sets representing the minimum set of data that should be obtained within a dental clinical trial would assist in addressing this issue. There is an acceptance that research outcomes should ultimately be of relevance and benefit to patients rather than focusing on technical aspects of interventions. This study points to an undue emphasis on technical, clinician-centered outcomes within dental research common to all specialty areas. Development and adoption of agreed dental core outcome sets would help to remedy this. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  15. Dental management for head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy: comprehensive patient based planning--a case report.

    PubMed

    Higham, Paola; Quek, Samuel; Cohen, Harold V

    2009-01-01

    Medical management of the head and neck cancer patient (HNCP) most often will include radiation therapy to the head and neck region. HNCPs with malignant disease require judicious dental treatment planning prior to radiation therapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy. RT can result in a multitude of adverse effects, both reversible and irreversible. We report a case of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the throat above the larynx (supraglottic), who did not adhere to dental treatment recommendations for both pre- and post radiation dental management. The focus of this case report is to create awareness within the clinician that, in addition to evaluating the patient for the disease related issues that may affect the oral cavity and dentition, a total management plan should include factors beyond the structural oral problems related to the cancer. Final treatment plans for the HNCP should include medical assessment of past dental history, oral hygiene, potential compliance, or lack of, to dental care recommendations, the emotional state of the patient, socio-economic status of the patient (lifestyle, cost of care), future quality of life, the medical and/or life prognosis of the patient.

  16. Frequency of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Dental Patients with Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Martínez-Null, Cristina; Aguirre, Jose Javier; Guinea, Elena Rubio; Anitua, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To estimate the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in dental patients with tooth wear, and to assess the role of dentists in the identification of patients at risk of OSAS. Methods: Dental patients with tooth wear and treated with occlusal splint were prospectively recruited to perform sleep study. The severity of tooth wear was established by the treating dentist before patient referral to sleep disorders unit. Sleep questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, and validated respiratory polygraphy were performed. Results: All patients with dental wear were offered a sleepiness analysis. Of 31 recruited patients, 30 (77% males) participated in this study. Patients' mean age was 58.5 ± 10.7 years (range: 35–90 years) and the body mass index was 27.9 ± 3.4 kg/m2. Tooth wear was mild in 13 patients, moderate in 8 and severe in 9. The mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 32.4 ± 24.9. AHI < 5 was reported in 2 patients, AHI of 5–29 in 17, and AHI ≥ 30 in 11. A statistically significant association was found between AHI severity and tooth wear severity (Spearman R = 0.505; p = 0.004). Conclusions: Tooth wear could be a tool to identify those patients at risk of having OSAS. This highlights the importance of dental professionals to identify and refer patients with OSAS. Citation: Durán-Cantolla J, Alkhraisat MH, Martínez-Null C, Aguirre JJ, Guinea ER, Anitua E. Frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in dental patients with tooth wear. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(4):445–450. PMID:25665693

  17. The psychosocial impacts of implantation on the dental aesthetics of missing anterior teeth patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Yu, S; Zhu, G

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics among patients who received anterior implant-supported prostheses. The current study is a cross-sectional evaluation involving 115 individuals who had gone through treatment at the dental clinics of general hospitals. Participants completed the Chinese version of the psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics questionnaire (PIDAQ) before implantation and six months after crown restoration. Basic demographic information was recorded. Six months after implant crown restoration, participants were asked to self-assess their own oral aesthetics compared to before implantation. A total of 106 patients completed the study. PIDAQ scores correlated significantly with the self-assessment of the degree of oral aesthetics. Six months after crown restoration, the two factors (social impact and aesthetic attitude) decreased and the dental self-confidence score increased significantly compared to pre-implantation scores. Gender and education level significantly affected PIDAQ. Anterior implant-supported prostheses significantly affected the patients' psychosocial perception. Implantation of missing anterior teeth can significantly improve patients' negative psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics. Gender and education level are correlated with the degree of improvement. The PIDAQ can be used in assessing the psychosocial effects of implantation in missing anterior teeth.

  18. Establishing a good dentist-patient relationship: skills defined from the dental faculty perspective.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Cesar A; Jerez, Oscar M

    2014-10-01

    The importance of developing good dentist-patient relationships has been well documented, but previous studies have focused on social techniques, not considering the psychological and behavioral characteristics of patients, and have used definitions and instruments that were not dental-specific. Therefore, the aims of this study were to propose a definition of dentist-patient relationship skills, derived from dental faculty members' criteria and informed by Emotional Intelligence concepts, and to propose a preliminary dental-specific, face-valid, and reliable self-assessment instrument. The study was conducted in three phases. Phases I and II defined dentist-patient relationship competence through literature analysis and semi-structured interviews with expert key informants, establishing the outcome skills. In Phase III, the instrument was constructed and piloted. Communication skills and basic psychological tools resulted in core topics for use in practice. The definition both specifies and broadens social interactions in dentistry by including dental faculty members' criteria and topics such as psychological tools and pre-, intra-, and postoperative topics appropriate for use during consultation, examination, and treatment. The instrument was found suitable, reasonable, and accessible with a Cronbach's alpha level of 0.95. Future studies are needed to confirm the definition, as well as the instrument's validity, reliability, transference, and sensitivity to the dental educational environment.

  19. The oro-dental phenotype in Prader-Willi syndrome: a survey of 15 patients.

    PubMed

    Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Verhaeghe, Veroniek; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Vinckier, Frans; Declerck, Dominique; Vogels, Annick

    2008-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare disorder caused by genetic defects in certain regions of chromosome 15q11-13. It is characterized by severe neonatal hypotonia and feeding problems, childhood-onset hyperphagia and obesity, short stature, facial dysmorphy, hypogonadism, learning and behavioural difficulties, and dental abnormalities. To describe the oro-dental phenotypic spectrum of patients with PWS. Fifteen PWS patients (3-35 years of age) being followed at the Centre for Human Genetics of the University Hospital of Leuven were examined at the dental clinic of the same institution. Medical information collected included age at diagnosis, body mass index (BMI) and level of cognitive functioning. Oral, clinical and radiological evaluations were performed. Caries experience (cavitation level), dental erosion and salivary flow rates were assessed. The 15 patients had dmft/DMFT scores ranging from 0 to 28, while nine were cavity-free. Those with severe caries experience also presented advanced dental erosion. BMI ranged from 16 to 42.6. There was no association between BMI and caries experience or erosive tooth wear. The PWS patients in our survey presented with a more favourable oral health status than those in previous studies. This might be due to early diet management or better oral hygiene during childhood or both.

  20. Patient-centred care in general dental practice - a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delivering improvements in quality is a key objective within most healthcare systems, and a view which has been widely embraced within the NHS in the United Kingdom. Within the NHS, quality is evaluated across three key dimensions: clinical effectiveness, safety and patient experience, with the latter modelled on the Picker Principles of Patient-Centred Care (PCC). Quality improvement is an important feature of the current dental contract reforms in England, with “patient experience” likely to have a central role in the evaluation of quality. An understanding and appreciation of the evidence underpinning PCC within dentistry is highly relevant if we are to use this as a measure of quality in general dental practice. Methods A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to identify the features of PCC relevant to dentistry and ascertain the current research evidence base underpinning its use as a measure of quality within general dental practice. Results Three papers were identified which met the inclusion criteria and demonstrated the use of primary research to provide an understanding of the key features of PCC within dentistry. None of the papers identified were based in general dental practice and none of the three studies sought the views of patients. Some distinct differences were noted between the key features of PCC reported within the dental literature and those developed within the NHS Patient Experience Framework. Conclusions This systematic review reveals a lack of understanding of PCC within dentistry, and in particular general dental practice. There is currently a poor evidence base to support the use of the current patient reported outcome measures as indicators of patient-centredness. Further research is necessary to understand the important features of PCC in dentistry and patients’ views should be central to this research. PMID:24902842

  1. Dental Procedures in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and New Oral Anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the basic pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants that are used for prevention of thromboembolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. It presents available evidence, and provides recommendations for the management of patients requiring invasive procedures in dental practice. PMID:26835072

  2. [Genetic basis for skeletal disease. Dental management of patients with bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Shintani, Seikou; Ooshima, Takashi

    2010-08-01

    Malformation of teeth can be found in patients with bone diseases, which was induced when the disease occurred during the tooth formation. The tooth malformation shows typical manifestations of the disease, which may demonstrate the occurrence of the bone disease. In this article, dental management of the patients with bone diseases such as X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets, osteogenesis imperfecta, and hypophosphatasia was presented.

  3. A study of special care dental patient preference toward choice of mask and visor use by dental clinicians.

    PubMed

    Emanuel, Robert; Corcoran, Richard; Cass, Helen

    2017-07-01

    Do patients have a preference for the clinician's choice of face protection (visor or mask), and can this make a difference to the patient's feelings of anxiety? In a normative sample (n = 72) of patients from Special Care Dentistry, different combinations of face protection were studied to see whether the patients clearly preferred one type over another, and whether that was related to the levels of anxiety they suffered, based on the modified dental anxiety scale. The majority of patients, 68% had the visor only as their first choice of face protection. This was followed by 22% having the mask only as their first choice and 10% having the visor and mask combination as their first choice. Patients with higher anxiety levels were more likely to believe that the type of face protection worn by the dentist would affect their levels of anxiety. The patients preferred the visor only option. As the level of anxiety rose, so did the percentage of patients that felt the style of protection worn by the dentist would affect their level of anxiety. The comments from patients referred to the benefit of nonverbal communication offered by the visor. © 2017 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Incidence and Pattern of Dental Erosion in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Anupama; Raja Khan, Sulthan Ibrahim; Vaitheeswaran, Nandinee

    2017-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a very common condition whose consequences of are localized not only in the esophagus; extra-esophageal involvement has frequently been reported. The aim of the study is to examine the incidence and pattern of dental erosion in GERD patients. A total of 50 patients were recruited in this study (control -25 and GERD -25). All participants diagnosed having GERD by the endoscopic examination by their gastroenterologist are included. The patients were examined for dental erosion and will be quantified using Basic erosive wear examination index. The results showed that the incidence of dental erosion was 88% as compared to 32% in the control group which was found to be statistically significant.

  5. Are we Training Enough of Communication Skills and Patient Psychology Required in Dental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Shakila; Choudhury, Sunayana; Sethuraman, K.R.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss about lacunae in the areas of Communication skills and Patient psychology teaching in the dental set up in India. A literature search was performed using various databases and other resources. Data obtained was reviewed to obtain the work done in this field. It was found that there is currently no clear data in literature as to how much and how well students are taught about communication and behavioural skills and patient personality in dental curriculum in India. Pinpointing such lacunae can help dental colleges and universities to focus on the emphasis of their approaches to teaching about communication skills and psychology of the patient. Identification of future research area in this field is the need of the time for future discovery and progress in this overlooked field. PMID:28571298

  6. Dental anomalies in an orthodontic patient population with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

    PubMed

    Citak, Mehmet; Cakici, Elif Bahar; Benkli, Yasin Atakan; Cakici, Fatih; Bektas, Bircan; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmış

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of dental anomalies in a subpopulation of orthodontic patients with agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors (MLI). The material of the present study included the records of the 1964 orthodontic patients. Panoramic radiographs and dental casts were used to analyze other associated eight dental anomalies, including agenesis of other teeth, dens invaginatus, dens evaginatus, peg shaped MLI, taurodontism, pulp stone, root dilaceration and maxillary canine impaction. Out of the 1964 patients examined, 90 were found to have agenesis of MLI, representing a prevalence of 4.6%. The most commonly found associated-anomalies were agenesis of other teeth (23.3%), peg-shaped MLIs (15.6%), taurodontism (42.2%), and dilacerated teeth (18.9%). Permanent tooth agenesis, taurodontism, peg-shaped maxillary lateral incisor, and root dilacerations are frequently associated with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

  7. Changes induced by music therapy to physiologic parameters in patients with dental anxiety.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Rubalcava, Cynthia; Alanís-Tavira, Jorge; Mendieta-Zerón, Hugo; Sánchez-Pérez, Leonor

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of music therapy on patients suffering dental anxiety. In addition, a second objective was to determine the correlation between salivary cortisol and other physiologic parameters. 34 patients were randomly assigned to the control group and the experimental group. For each patient was measured for salivary cortisol, stimulate salivary flow, blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation and body temperature. Student t-test and Chi2 were applied to analyze significant differences between the studied variables before and after the unpleasant stimulation causes anxiety for dental treatment. Initially, both groups registered the same level of anxiety. In the second measurement, significant differences were registered in the salivary cortisol concentration, systolic and diastolic pressure, heart rate, body temperature and stimulated salivary flow for treated group with music therapy. Music therapy has a positive effect in control of dental anxiety. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. DYSTROPHIC CALCIFICATION OF MAXILLARY SINUS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH LIVER TRANSPLANTATION AND PIGMENTATION OF DENTAL ORGAN

    PubMed Central

    de Macedo, Adriana Furtado; Costa, Claudio; Mattar, Regina Helena Guedes da Motta; de Azevedo, Ramiro Anthero

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To report a case of severe dystrophic calcification in maxillary sinus of a child with liver transplantation and dental organs pigmented by hyperbilirubinemia. Case description: female patient, 12 years old, with liver transplantation performed at the age of 7 due to extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA). The patient was receiving the immunosuppressant tacrolimus (2 mg daily). Intraoral clinical exam showed tooth green pigmentation by bilirubin. Cone-beam volumetric computed tomography (CT) was performed to verify radiographic density of pigmented dental elements. Hounsfield scale measurement did not show changes in radiographic density of dental structures. However, CT scan showed intense dystrophic calcification in the maxillary sinus region. Comments: CT scan indicated relevant radiographic findings, with radiopacity of the maxillary sinus due to fungal or non-fungal sinusitis. This case report highlights the presence of radiographic image associated with acute infectious processes that could compromise the systemic state of immunosuppressed patients. PMID:29166493

  9. Comparing maximum intercuspal contacts of virtual dental patients and mounted dental casts.

    PubMed

    Delong, Ralph; Ko, Ching-Chang; Anderson, Gary C; Hodges, James S; Douglas, W H

    2002-12-01

    Quantitative measures of occlusal contacts are of paramount importance in the study of chewing dysfunction. A tool is needed to identify and quantify occlusal parameters without occlusal interference caused by the technique of analysis. This laboratory simulation study compared occlusal contacts constructed from 3-dimensional images of dental casts and interocclusal records with contacts found by use of conventional methods. Dental casts of 10 completely dentate adults were mounted in a semi-adjustable Denar articulator. Maximum intercuspal contacts were marked on the casts using red film. Intercuspal records made with an experimental vinyl polysiloxane impression material recorded maximum intercuspation. Three-dimensional virtual models of the casts and interocclusal records were made using custom software and an optical scanner. Contacts were calculated between virtual casts aligned manually (CM), aligned with interocclusal records scanned seated on the mandibular casts (C1) or scanned independently (C2), and directly from virtual interocclusal records (IR). Sensitivity and specificity calculations used the marked contacts as the standard. Contact parameters were compared between method pairs. Statistical comparisons used analysis of variance and the Tukey-Kramer post hoc test (P=<.05). Sensitivities (range 0.76-0.89) did not differ significantly among the 4 methods (P=.14); however, specificities (range 0.89-0.98) were significantly lower for IR (P=.0001). Contact parameters of methods CM, C1, and C2 differed significantly from those of method IR (P<.02). The ranking based on method pair comparisons was C2/C1 > CM/C1 = CM/C2 > C2/IR > CM/IR > C1/IR, where ">" means "closer than." Within the limits of this study, occlusal contacts calculated from aligned virtual casts accurately reproduce articulator contacts.

  10. Survival of dental implants in patients with Down syndrome: A case series.

    PubMed

    Limeres Posse, Jacobo; López Jiménez, Julian; Ruiz Villandiego, José C; Cutando Soriano, Antonio; Fernández Feijoo, Javier; Linazasoro Elorza, Maialen; Diniz Freitas, Márcio; Diz Dios, Pedro

    2016-12-01

    The need for tooth replacement in individuals with Down syndrome (DS) is explained by the high prevalence of dental agenesis and by the premature loss of teeth through severe periodontal disease. Dental implants may be the dental procedure of choice in some of these patients. The purpose of this clinical study was to analyze dental implant survival in a series of patients with DS. This was a multicenter, retrospective, observational study. Information on patients was gathered using a standardized questionnaire designed specifically for this study, including personal details, oral health status, information on the surgical and prosthetic phases, and follow-up visits. The questionnaire was sent to centers registered with the research network of the Spanish Society of Special Needs Dentistry (SEOENE). Patients with DS aged 18 years or older were included in the study if they had at least 1 dental implant and the corresponding prosthesis and had been followed up for at least a year. The study population was formed of 25 adult patients (13 men and 12 women) aged between 19 and 60 years. The interventions were performed by 5 different dental surgeons, usually under general anesthesia or deep sedation (n=17 patients). A total of 73 implants were inserted, 30 in the maxilla and 43 in the mandible, most commonly in the anterior region (n=51). The mean time to loading the implants was 4.1 ±1.3 months after surgery (range, 1 to 7 months). All patients completed prosthetic rehabilitation; the most frequent design used was the single fixed prosthesis (n=13 patients). A total of 17 (23.2%) implants failed in 8 (32%) patients; the majority (n=14 implants) failed in the postsurgical period before implant loading. The distribution by patients was 1 implant failure in 6 patients, 3 failures in 1 patient, and 8 failures in 1 patient. Dental implant survival is lower in individuals with DS than in the general population. The reasons for early implant failure in these patients have

  11. What do patients expect from treatment with Dental Implants? Perceptions, expectations and misconceptions: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jie; Li, Ming; Tang, Hua; Wang, Peng-Lai; Zhao, Yu-Xiao; McGrath, Colman; Mattheos, Nikos

    2017-03-01

    While research in terms of patient-centered care in implant therapy is growing, few studies have investigated patients' initial perceptions prior to consultation with the implant dentist. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to capture patients' initial information level, perceptions, as well as expectations from the implant therapy. A 34-item questionnaire was developed to investigate patients' preoperative information, perceptions and expectations from treatment with Dental Implants. The study was conducted in three locations (Hong Kong, SiChuan and JiangSu) during 2014-2015 with 277 patients. The main information source about implant therapy was the dentist or hygienist for less than half of the patients (n = 113, 42%). About 62.8% of participants considered that they were in general informed about implants, but only 17.7% felt confident with the information they had. More than 30% of the sample appeared to maintain dangerous misperceptions about Dental Implants: "Dental Implants require less care than natural teeth"; "Treatment with Dental Implants is appropriate for all patients with missing teeth"; "Dental Implants last longer than natural teeth"; and "Treatments with Dental Implants have no risks or complications." Patients were divided when asked whether "Dental Implants are as functional as natural teeth" (agreement frequency = 52.7%). Expectations from treatment outcome were commonly high, while there was a significant correlation between the overall mean of perception scores and outcome expectation scores (r = 0.32, P < 0.001). Overall, younger subjects (<45 years) and those with higher education level (bachelor and postgraduate) tended to present more realistic perceptions and lower outcome expectations. The majority of patients in this study presented relatively realistic perceptions. However, an alarming portion of the sample presented with inaccurate perceptions and unrealistic expectations, which the dental team would need to diagnose

  12. A dental look at the autistic patient through orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Gursoy, Ulvi K; Könönen, Eija; Gottfried, Carmem

    2011-07-01

    Abstract Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction and restricted interests, compromised communication skills, and repetitive patterns of behavior. Both social and behavioral problems, which may include hyperactivity and quick frustration, may hinder the detection of other important pathologies such as orofacial pain. This is aggravated by the invasive nature of oral exploration, which may trigger violent and self-injurious responses, such as temper tantrums and/or head banging, which make the work of professionals extremely difficult during diagnoses, follow-up examinations, and dental treatments. In addition, mercury-containing amalgams used to treat dental caries (the most common form of acute orofacial pain) have been associated with higher rates of severe autism in children. The purpose of this review is to describe the current state of the art regarding the co-occurrence of orofacial pain and autism spectrum disorder, and how these conditions may interrelate clinically and neurobiologically.

  13. Sleep disorders and the dental patient: an overview.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, G J; Goulet, J P; Zuconni, M; Morrison, F; Lobbezoo, F

    1999-09-01

    This article is intended to briefly describe common sleep disorders of interest to the dental profession and to render general management guidelines. Topics include sleep-related bruxism, xerostomia, hypersalivation, gastroesophageal reflux, apnea, and the effect of orofacial pain on sleep quality. The term sleep-related is used instead of the term nocturnal because some of the activities described can occur with daytime sleep.

  14. Dental students' beliefs about culture in patient care: self-reported knowledge and importance.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie A; Redford-Badwal, Deborah

    2008-05-01

    In order to decrease the well-documented disparities in oral health and oral health care, the next generation of dentists must be prepared to serve a diverse patient population. This article describes dental students' self-reported knowledge of culture and importance of using culturally sensitive dental practices. Three consecutive graduating classes (n=111) were surveyed anonymously in their sophomore years. Students indicated their self-rated knowledge of oral health and oral health care for their own culture and the cultures of patients they are likely to see in dental practice. Students also rated their perceived importance of culturally sensitive dental practice. Overall, students reported low knowledge of the cultures of the patients they will see in practice. Few students could identify any cultural group that they knew well. However, students as a group indicated that using culturally sensitive practices in dentistry is important. Students who could identify at least one cultural group they knew well perceived cultural sensitivity in dental practice as more important than students who could not. These results suggest that students need cross-cultural training and believe that such training is important. The results also suggest that a specific curriculum that increases knowledge of other cultures may have the potential to ultimately increase the use of culturally sensitive practices.

  15. The association of patients' oral health literacy and dental school communication tools: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tam, Amy; Yue, Olivia; Atchison, Kathryn A; Richards, Jessica K; Holtzman, Jennifer S

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess adult patients' ability to read and understand two communication tools at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry: the dental school clinic website and a patient education brochure pertaining to sedation in children that was written by dental school personnel. A convenience sample of 100 adults seeking treatment at the school's general dental clinic during 2012-13 completed a health literacy screening instrument. They were then asked to read clinic educational and informational materials and complete a survey. Analyses were conducted to determine the association between the subjects' oral health literacy and sociodemographics and their ability to locate and interpret information in written oral health information materials. SMOG and Flesch-Kincade formulas were used to assess the readability level of the electronic and written communication tools. The results demonstrated an association between these adults' oral health literacy and their dental knowledge and ability to navigate health information website resources and understand health education materials. Health literacy was not associated with age or gender, but was associated with education and race/ethnicity. The SMOG Readability Index determined that the website and the sedation form were written at a ninth grade reading level. These results suggest that dental schools and other health care organizations should incorporate a health-literate approach for their digital and written materials to enhance patients' ability to navigate and understand health information, regardless of their health literacy.

  16. Radiographic assessment of dental anomalies in patients with ectopic maxillary canines.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Helle Budtz; Artmann, Lone; Larsen, Helle Juul; Kjaer, Inger

    2009-03-01

    The aetiology of palatally and labially located ectopic maxillary canines is multifactorial. Accordingly, early prediction of this eruptional disturbance is in most cases not possible. The purpose of this study was to analyse dental deviations in cases with either palatal or labial ectopic canines. Panoramic and intra-oral radiographs from 50 patients with palatally located (38 females and 12 males) and 19 patients with labially located ectopic canines (11 females and 8 males), aged 10 years, 2 months-18 years, 1 month, were analysed. Dental deviations registered were crown and root malformations, agenesis, and eruption deviations. Registrations were performed in the maxillary incisor field and in the dentition in general. The study documented that palatally as well as labially located ectopic canines can occur in dentitions without other dental deviations. Dental deviations occurred in approximately two-thirds of all cases, more often in females and in cases with palatally located canines. More than half of the females with palatally located canines had deviations in the maxillary incisors and in the dentition in general. Dental deviations may be considered a risk factor for maxillary canine ectopia. Early identification of patients at risk and appropriate interceptive treatment may reduce ectopic eruption of maxillary canines.

  17. Comprehensive dental management in a Hallermann-Streiff syndrome patient with unusual radiographic appearance of teeth.

    PubMed

    Gungor, O Erken; Nur, B Guzel; Yalcin, H; Karayilmaz, H; Mihci, E

    2015-01-01

    Hallermann-Streiff syndrome (HSS) is a genetic disorder characterized by proportionate dwarfism, birdlike facies, hypotrichosis, skin atrophy, dyscephaly, bilateral microphthalmia, congenital cataracts, a narrow, weak, beaked nose, a hypoplastic mandible, and orodental anomalies. Occurrence is sporadic and distinct patterns of inheritance have not been found. This case report describes the dental management of a 3-year-old girl patient with HSS, who had unusual radiographic appearance of teeth. Furthermore, dental treatments and a 30-month follow-up period of the patient with this rare tooth structure malformation have been presented.

  18. A systematic review of dental disease in patients undergoing cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Napeñas, Joel J.; Hodgson, Brian D.; Stokman, Monique A.; Mathers-Stauffer, Vickie; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the literature and update our current understanding of the impact of present cancer therapies on the dental apparatus (teeth and periodontium) since the 1989 NIH Development Consensus Conference on the Oral Complications of Cancer Therapies. Review method A systematic literature search was conducted with assistance from a research librarian in the databases MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE for articles published between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2008. Each study was independently assessed by two reviewers. Taking into account predetermined quality measures, a weighted prevalence was calculated for the prevalence of dental caries, severe gingival disease, and dental infection. Data on DMFT/dmft, DMFS/dmfs, plaque, and gingival indexes were also gathered. The level of evidence, recommendation, and guideline (if possible) were given for published preventive and management strategies. Results Sixty-four published papers between 1990 and 2008 were reviewed. The weighted overall prevalence of dental caries was 28.1%. The overall DMFT for patients who were post-antineoplastic therapy was 9.19 (SD, 7.98; n = 457). The overall plaque index for patients who were post-antineoplastic therapy was 1.38 (SD, 0.25; n = 189). The GI for patients who were post-chemotherapy was 1.02 (SD, 0.15; n = 162). The weighted prevalence of dental infections/abscess during chemotherapy was reported in three studies and was 5.8%. Conclusions Patients who were post-radiotherapy had the highest DMFT. The use of fluoride products and chlorhexidine rinses are beneficial in patients who are post-radiotherapy. There continues to be lack of clinical studies on the extent and severity of dental disease that are associated with infectious complications during cancer therapy. PMID:20449756

  19. Dental Students' Interpretations of Digital Panoramic Radiographs on Completely Edentate Patients.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Richard J; Nguyen, Caroline T; Walton, Joanne N; MacDonald, David

    2018-03-01

    The ability of dental students to interpret digital panoramic radiographs (PANs) of edentulous patients has not been documented. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the ability of second-year (D2) dental students with that of third- and fourth-year (D3-D4) dental students to interpret and identify positional errors in digital PANs obtained from patients with complete edentulism. A total of 169 digital PANs from edentulous patients were assessed by D2 (n=84) and D3-D4 (n=85) dental students at one Canadian dental school. The correctness of the students' interpretations was determined by comparison to a gold standard established by assessments of the same PANs by two experts (a graduate student in prosthodontics and an oral and maxillofacial radiologist). Data collected were from September 1, 2006, when digital radiography was implemented at the university, to December 31, 2012. Nearly all (95%) of the PANs were acceptable diagnostically despite a high proportion (92%) of positional errors detected. A total of 301 positional errors were identified in the sample. The D2 students identified significantly more (p=0.002) positional errors than the D3-D4 students. There was no significant difference (p=0.059) in the distribution of radiographic interpretation errors between the two student groups when compared to the gold standard. Overall, the category of extragnathic findings had the highest number of false negatives (43) reported. In this study, dental students interpreted digital PANs of edentulous patients satisfactorily, but they were more adept at identifying radiographic findings compared to positional errors. Students should be reminded to examine the entire radiograph thoroughly to ensure extragnathic findings are not missed and to recognize and report patient positional errors.

  20. Dental treatment planning considerations for patients using cannabis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Grafton, Sarah Essek; Huang, Po Ning; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2016-05-01

    There is a deficit in clinical research on the potential risks involved in treating dental patients who use cannabis for either medicinal or recreational purposes. The aim of this case report is to illustrate the need for additional education for oral health care professionals so they can understand the wide variety of available cannabis options and their potential effects on dental treatment. A 27-year-old man sought care at the dental clinic with a nonrestorable molar requiring extraction. During the review of his medical history, the patient reported taking a "dab" of marijuana approximately 5 hours before his appointment. Because of the admission of recent illicit drug use, no treatment was rendered. The patient was offered an appointment the next day but he refused, citing bias in regard to his cannabis use. The number of Americans using marijuana is increasing rapidly. Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have laws legalizing cannabis to some degree, and Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington have legalized marijuana for recreational use. This drastic upswing in availability and usage will require dentists to address the possible effects of cannabis on dental practices. It is imperative that dental care providers make clinical decisions based on scientific evidence regarding the pharmacologic and psychological effects of marijuana, not on the societal stigma associated with illegal drug use. Dentists should be familiar with popular delivery systems and understand the differences between various marijuana options. Clinical guidelines may need to be developed to help providers assess the patient's degree of cognitive impairment. Dentists should be able to advise patients on the potential consequences of this habit on their oral health. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Anesthetic Management by Laryngeal Mask Airway in a Patient With a History of Difficult Intubation Resulting in Dental Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Asahi, Yoshinao; Fujii, Ryosuke; Usui, Naoko; Kagamiuchi, Hajime; Omichi, Shiro; Kotani, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Disabled patients may face respiratory problems during general anesthesia because of head and neck anomalies. We describe a case of dental treatment under general anesthesia using a laryngeal mask airway in a disabled patient who faced difficulty in endotracheal intubation on several occasions, 5 of which resulted in dental injuries. PMID:25849470

  2. Strategies to improve dental health in elderly patients with cognitive impairment: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rozas, Natalia S; Sadowsky, June M; Jeter, Cameron B

    2017-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is the gradual loss of one's ability to learn, remember, pay attention, and make decisions. Cognitively impaired elderly people are a challenging patient population for dental health care professionals and may be at higher risk of developing oral health diseases. The authors systematically reviewed interventions effective at improving dental health in patients with cognitive impairment and described research gaps remaining. In a comprehensive search of multiple databases, the authors identified 2,255 studies published in the English language from 1995 through March 2016. The authors included studies if the investigators evaluated oral health measures after an intervention in patients 65 years or older with cognitive impairment or dementia. Nine full-text articles met the criteria for inclusion. Only 1 study was a randomized control trial, whereas all others lacked appropriate controls. Investigators studied the effects of dental treatments, battery-powered devices for oral hygiene, and training of care staff members. Most interventions improved some aspect of the oral health of patients with dementia, and results were more pronounced when patients required assistance while performing oral hygiene tasks or had poor oral health at baseline. A basic care plan for patients with dementia should, at the minimum, match prevention strategies recommended for healthy elderly patients. Dental health care professionals should promote oral hygiene education for caregivers for elderly patients with cognitive impairment. There is a wide gap in knowledge regarding effective methods specifically to improve oral health in patients with dementia. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The use of general anesthesia to facilitate dental treatment in adult patients with special needs.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mathew Albert Wei Ting; Borromeo, Gelsomina Lucia

    2017-06-01

    General anesthesia is commonly used to facilitate dental treatment in patients with anxiety or challenging behavior, many of whom are children or patients with special needs. When performing procedures under general anesthesia, dental surgeons must perform a thorough pre-operative assessment, as well as ensure that the patients are aware of the potential risks and that informed consent has been obtained. Such precautions ensure optimal patient management and reduce the frequency of morbidities associated with this form of sedation. Most guidelines address the management of pediatric patients under general anesthesia. However, little has been published regarding this method in patients with special needs. This article constitutes a review of the current literature regarding management of patients with special needs under general anesthesia.

  4. Prevalence of dental anomalies in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Neda; Majidi, Mohammad Reza; Aliakbarian, Majid; Hasanzadeh, Nadia

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies in a group of patients with cleft lip and palate (CL/P) in the northeast of Iran. Ninety-one patients referring to the Cleft Lip and Palate Clinic of Mashhad Dental School were enrolled and classified into right CL/P, left CL/P, and bilateral CL/P groups. Photographs, dental casts, and panoramic and periapical radiographs were retrieved, and dental anomalies were recorded. χ test was used to analyze the frequency of dental anomalies according to type of cleft and sex. Missing maxillary lateral incisors was the most frequent dental anomaly, which was slightly higher in the bilateral group (61.1%). There were significantly more cases of missing lateral incisors outside the cleft area in right CL/P (P = 0.015). Peg lateral incisors were observed in 33.3% of bilateral CL/P compared with 28% of right and 23.3% of left unilateral cases. The sample presented rotations of central incisors in the cleft area in 33.3% of bilateral clefts. In unilateral clefts, it occurred more frequently in the right side (48%). Sexual dimorphism appeared only for maxillary central incisor rotation in the cleft area, which showed significantly greater frequency in females (P = 0.025). Transposition of maxillary canine and first premolars was found in 5.5% of bilateral, 8% of right, and 3.3% of left unilateral clefts. The prevalence of dental anomalies in the studied sample seems to be higher than that reported in the normal population. More anomalies were observed at the cleft side. The frequency of most anomalies was not significantly different between the 2 sexes.

  5. Prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidity among patients attending dental OPD and the role of consultation-liaison psychiatry in dental practice in a tertiary care general hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, Pradip K; Ray Bhattacharya, Sampa; Makhal, Manabendra; Majumder, Uttam; De, Shantanu; Ghosh, Subhankar

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric co-morbidities are frequent among patients attending dental OPD, some of which go unrecognized and hence untreated. The present study has been carried out to detect the psychiatric co-morbidities among dental patients and determine the scope of consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatry in a rural teaching hospital regarding comprehensive management of the patients. This cross-sectional, descriptive type study was conducted in a multi-speciality tertiary care teaching hospital in the northern part of West Bengal, India. One hundred patients attending the dental OPD were randomly included in the study and every patient was consecutively referred to psychiatry department for assessment, during the period from 1(st) November 2013 to 30(th) April 2014. All referred patients were clinically examined and psychiatric co-morbidity was assessed by the help of General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-28 and Mental Status Examination. The data were subjected to statistical package for social sciences (SPSS), version 16, and statistically analyzed using Cross tab and Chi test. P <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. The commonest dental illness was dental caries (22%). More than two-third of the patients had psychiatric co-morbidity according to GHQ-28 total score. Sixty-eight patients were diagnosed to have mental disorder on mental status examination. Somatoform disorder (25%) was the commonest type of mental disorder, followed by mixed anxiety and depression (14%). This study has pointed the need for psychological examination of patients visiting dental specialty with unexplained physical symptoms. Such patients can be identified and treated, provided a psychiatric consultation service exists.

  6. Septic arthritis of the shoulder in a dental patient: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Elana; Perlmutter, Leigh D; Segelnick, Stuart L; Weinberg, Mea A; Schoor, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the glenohumoral joint is rare following dental procedures, comprising approximately 3% of all joint infections. Septic arthritis following bacteremia from dental procedures is uncommon and generally occurs in prosthetic joints. Predisposing causes may include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. We report a rare case of unilateral glenohumoral joint septic arthritis in a 60-year-old male patient (without a prosthetic joint) secondary to a dental procedure. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. Septic arthritis infections, though rare, require a high level of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of shoulder pain may mask the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Incision and drainage via surgical intervention are often required, followed by parenteral antibiotics.

  7. Context of care for Jordanian women.

    PubMed

    Miller, June E; Petro-Nustas, Wasileh

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this research study was to document, describe, and analyze diverse and universal care patterns for Jordanian women. The authors used a qualitative design of observation-participation and interview data collected from 15 women in two cities and three villages in Jordan over a 4-month period. Methods used incorporated Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality as well as the ethnonursing research method. Themes discovered from the data include (a) culture of caring connectedness, (b) caring for family honor: the agony and the ecstasy, (c) Islam as feminist thought, (d) political care as intertwined with tribal and religious influences, and (e) reviving Rufaida: return to community care. Findings are being used for collaborative curriculum design for new community health nursing roles focusing on women's health.

  8. Role of Youth Associations in National Education and Extremist Intellectual Behavior Tendency of Jordanian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Tubasi, Adnan M.; Jarrar, Amani G.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the role of Jordanian youth associations in spreading the national education and its relation to the tendency towards extremist intellectual behavior among a sample of Jordanian university students. The study population consists of (504) undergraduate students in the Jordanian universities, namely: Jordan…

  9. Electromyographic characteristic of orbicularis oris in patients with dental crowding in permanent occlusion.

    PubMed

    Dmytrenko, Maryna I; Kuroiedowa, Vira D

    2016-01-01

    electromyographic indices were developed for complex analysis of functional condition of orbicularis oris. to study electromyographic indices of orbicularis oris in patients with dental crowding in permanent occlusion. thirty four patients with malocclusion and a severe degree of severity of dental crowding (15 males, 19 females, aged 16-29 years) who underwent orthodontic examination. The treatment group was divided into three: Group Ia comprised 11 subjects with mandibular crowding (mean age 19,27 ± 1,08 years); group Ib, 10 patients with maxillary dental crowding (mean age 20,10 ± 1,60 years) and group Ic, 13 subjects with both maxillary and mandibular crowding (mean age 20,15 ± 1,45 years). The control group consisted of 10 patients with malocclusions but without dental crowding (mean age 20,70 ± 1,32 years). The findings were compared with similar indices in subjects with normal occlusion (mean age 21,3 ± 1,25 years). The index of orbicularis oris activity (ACTIV,%) was determined for each patient. A Student's t-test was used to analyze statistical difference between different groups. patients having crowding of maxillary teeth showed greater activity of muscles of the upper lip during maximum voluntary clenching (АCTІV= -0,99±7,44%). Activity of the muscles of the lower lip in patients with crowding of mandibular teeth (АСTІV=20,52±4,22%) and crowding of maxillary and mandibular teeth (АСTІV=17,93±4,33%) is prevailing. аctivity of the orbicularis oris in patients with malocclusion, complicated by dental crowding depend on clinical localization of crowding.

  10. Electromyographic characteristic of orbicularis oris in patients with dental crowding in permanent occlusion.

    PubMed

    Dmytrenko, Maryna I; Kuroiedowa, Vira D

    electromyographic indices were developed for complex analysis of functional condition of orbicularis oris. to study electromyographic indices of orbicularis oris in patients with dental crowding in permanent occlusion. thirty four patients with malocclusion and a severe degree of severity of dental crowding (15 males, 19 females, aged 16-29 years) who underwent orthodontic examination. The treatment group was divided into three: Group Ia comprised 11 subjects with mandibular crowding (mean age 19,27 ± 1,08 years); group Ib, 10 patients with maxillary dental crowding (mean age 20,10 ± 1,60 years) and group Ic, 13 subjects with both maxillary and mandibular crowding (mean age 20,15 ± 1,45 years). The control group consisted of 10 patients with malocclusions but without dental crowding (mean age 20,70 ± 1,32 years). The findings were compared with similar indices in subjects with normal occlusion (mean age 21,3 ± 1,25 years). The index of orbicularis oris activity (ACTIV,%) was determined for each patient. A Student's t-test was used to analyze statistical difference between different groups. patients having crowding of maxillary teeth showed greater activity of muscles of the upper lip during maximum voluntary clenching (АCTІV= -0,99±7,44%). Activity of the muscles of the lower lip in patients with crowding of mandibular teeth (АСTІV=20,52±4,22%) and crowding of maxillary and mandibular teeth (АСTІV=17,93±4,33%) is prevailing. аctivity of the orbicularis oris in patients with malocclusion, complicated by dental crowding depend on clinical localization of crowding.

  11. Social and Psychological Aspects of Dental Trauma, Behavior Management of Young Patients Who have Suffered Dental Trauma.

    PubMed

    Arhakis, Aristidis; Athanasiadou, Eirini; Vlachou, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Injuries concerning the skull, the mouth and thus potentially involving the mouth and teeth are characterized as major public health problems due to their high prevalence and very serious functional and aesthetic consequences. Pain, aesthetic and functional problems arising from dental trauma significantly disrupt normal function, and impact, often dramatically, on young patients' quality of life. With regards to the behavior management approach to a child who has suffered a dental trauma, dentist's first step is to be to reassure child and parents. They should feel that the emergency is being properly treated on the part of the dentist and feel safe. The dentist should offer psychological support to child and parents and focus on alleviating any possible pain the child may feel. But, before that, a good level of communication with the child should be established. This can be achieved through the tell-show-do technique, a presentation of the special session's structure, the positive reinforcement method, the attention distraction method and exploiting the child's imagination. The detailed description of the treatment to be followed is crucial for reducing the child's level of stress, as well as that of the parents. Immediately after the completion of treatment, dentist should give listening time to the parents for any queries and include the child who probably wants to share their experience.

  12. Dental management of patients receiving anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chaveli-López, Begonya; Gavaldá-Esteve, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Adequate hemostasis is crucial for the success of invasive dental treatment, since bleeding problems can give rise to complications associated with important morbidity-mortality. The dental treatment of patients who tend to an increased risk of bleeding due to the use of anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet drugs raises a challenge in the daily practice of dental professionals. Adequate knowledge of the mechanisms underlying hemostasis, and the optimized management of such patients, are therefore very important issues. Objectives: A study is made of the anticoagulant / antiplatelet drugs currently available on the market, with evaluation of the risks and benefits of suspending such drugs prior to invasive dental treatment. In addition, a review is made of the current management protocols used in these patients. Material and Methods: A literature search was made in the PubMed, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, covering all studies published in the last 5 years in English and Spanish. Studies conducted in humans and with scientific evidence levels 1 and 2 (metaanalyses, systematic reviews, randomized phase 1 and 2 trials, cohort studies and case-control studies) were considered. The keywords used for the search were: tooth extraction, oral surgery, hemostasis, platelet aggregation inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs, anticoagulants, warfarin, acenocoumarol. Results and Conclusions: Many management protocols have been developed, though in all cases a full clinical history is required, together with complementary hemostatic tests to minimize any risks derived from dental treatment. Many authors consider that patient medication indicated for the treatment of background disease should not be altered or suspended unless so indicated by the prescribing physician. Local hemostatic measures have been shown to suffice for controlling possible bleeding problems resulting from dental treatment. Key words:Tooth extraction, oral surgery, hemostasis, platelet

  13. The importance of teaching communication in dental education. A survey amongst dentists, students and patients.

    PubMed

    Woelber, J P; Deimling, D; Langenbach, D; Ratka-Krüger, P

    2012-02-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the subjective importance of teaching communication in the dental curriculum by conducting a survey amongst dentists, students and patients. Three questionnaires about communication-related issues were developed in which different questions could be rated on a five-point Likert scale. These questions included the subjective importance of the dental team's friendliness, an elaborated consultation, modern office equipment or the dentist's technical skills. Seven hundred and twenty-nine questionnaires were completed [233 by dentists (32%), 310 by students (43%) and 185 by patients (25%)]. Eighty-seven percentage of the dentists, 84% of the students and 84% of the patients supported an integration of communicational issues in dental education; 94.7% of the dentists and 77.2% of the patients attached vital importance to the dentist-patient relationship regarding the therapeutic outcomes. Dentists with prior communicational training experience would spend significantly (P<0.001) more money for further courses. The results show the publicly perceived importance of integrating aspects of communication in dental education. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. The prevalence of dental erosion in Nigerian patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Oginni, Adeleke O; Agbakwuru, Elugwaraonu A; Ndububa, Dennis A

    2005-01-01

    Background In various people of the Western world, gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) has been reported to be a common problem. Various studies have also assessed the relationship between GOR and dental erosion. The authors are not aware of such studies in Nigerians. It is therefore the aims of the present study to estimate the prevalence of GOR; to estimate the prevalence of dental erosion in patients with GORD; to document the oral findings in patients diagnosed with GORD and to compare these findings with previous studies elsewhere. Methods A total of 225 subjects comprising of 100 volunteers and 125 patients diagnosed with GORD were involved in this study. History of gastric juice regurgitation and heartburn were recorded. Oral examination to quantify loss of tooth structure was done using the tooth wear index (TWI) designed by Smith and Knight (1984). Results Twenty patients with GORD presented with dental erosion in the maxillary anterior teeth with TWI scores ranging from 1–3. The prevalence of erosion was found to be statistically significant between GORD patients (16%) and control (5%) (p < 0.05), but not significant between endoscopic diagnostic groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion The present study supports the consideration of dental erosion as the extra-oesophageal manifestation of GORD. However the association between GORD and burning mouth sensation needs more investigation. PMID:15740613

  15. Metallic ion content and damage to the DNA in oral mucosa cells patients treated dental implants.

    PubMed

    López-Jornet, Pía; Perrez, Francisco Parra; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Ros-Llor, Irene; LLor-Ros, Irene; Ramírez-Fernández, Piedad

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential genotoxicity of dental implants, evaluating biomarkers of DNA damage (micronuclei and/or nuclear buds), cytokinetic defects (binucleated cells) and the presence of trace metals in gingival cells of patients with implants, comparing these with a control group. A total of 60 healthy adults (30 patients with dental implants and 30 control patients without) were included in the study. Medical and dental histories were made for each including life-style factors. Genotoxicity effects were assessed by micronucleus assays in the gingival epithelial cells of each patient; 1,000 epithelial cells were analyzed, evaluating the frequency of micronucleated cells and other nuclear anomalies. The concentration of metals (Al(27), Ag(107), Co (59), Cr (52), Cu(63), Fe(56), Sn(118), Mn(55), Mo(92), Ni(60), Pb(208), Ti(47)) were assayed by means of coupled plasma-mass spectrophotometry (ICP-MS). The frequency of micronuclei in the patient group with implants was higher than in the control group but without statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). Similar results were found for binucleated cells and nuclear buds (P > 0.05). For metals assayed by ICP-MS, significant differences were found for Ti(47) (P ≤ 0.045). Univariate analysis identified a significant association between the presence of micronuclei and age. Dental implants do not induce DNA damage in gingival cells, the slight effects observed cannot be indicated as biologically relevant.

  16. Oral complaints and dental care of haematopoietic stem cell transplant patients: a qualitative survey of patients and their dentists.

    PubMed

    Bos-den Braber, Jacolien; Potting, Carin M J; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D N J M; Blijlevens, Nicole M A

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the understanding of the oral and dental needs of haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients or about dentists' views and experiences regarding this patient group. This information is essential if we want to improve the standard of peri-HSCT dental care. The primary objective of this qualitative survey was to explore the following: (1) The understanding of dental care pre- and post-HSCT (2) The subjective oral complaints of HSCT patients both short- and long-term (3) The relationship of these oral complaints to the severity of oral mucositis during hospitalization The secondary objective was to explore the opinions of dentists regarding dental care before and after HSCT. All adult patients who survived HSCT at the Radboud University Medical Centre between 2010 and 2011 (n = 101) received a questionnaire. During hospitalization, mucositis scores were recorded daily in the patient's chart. The patients' dentist (n = 88) was also sent a questionnaire after permission of the patient. Ninety-six out of 101 patients (95%) responded. The average period since HSCT was 19 months (range 8-31 months). The overall mean maximum mucositis score was 6.6 (sd = 3.3). Only eight patients reported not having visited a dentist pre-HSCT. The majority of the patients (59%) reported short-term oral complaints, and 28% reported long-term oral complaints. Fifty-two dentists responded (59%). Nine had not performed pre-HSCT screening and eight dentists reported screening their patients but could not complete the necessary treatments. Only 44 dentists succeeded in completing the required treatments. The most important advice of the dentist was to reinforce the importance of regular dental care. Most patients report short-term and/or long-term oral complaints after HSCT. Most dentists stress the importance of regular dental care before and after HSCT but report not being familiar with the particular dental care needs of this patient group. The high

  17. Short dental implants: A scoping review of the literature for patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Edher, Faraj; Nguyen, Caroline T

    2017-09-16

    Dental implants can be essential in the rehabilitation of various cancer defects, but their ideal placement can be complicated by the limited dimensions of the available host bone. Surgical interventions developed to increase the amount of bone are not all predictable or successful and can sometimes be contraindicated. Short dental implants have been suggested as an alternative option in sites where longer implants are not possible. Whether they provide a successful treatment option is unclear. The purpose of this study was to review the literature on short dental implants and assess whether they are a viable definitive treatment option for rehabilitating cancer patients with deficient bone. A scoping review of the literature was performed, including a search of established periodontal textbooks for articles on short dental implants combined with a search of PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. A search for all literature published before June 2016 was based on the following keywords: ['dental implants' OR 'dental implantation, endosseous' OR 'dental prosthesis, implant supported'] AND [short]. The minimum acceptable implant length has been considered to be 6 mm. The survival rates of short implants varied between 74% and 96% at 5 years, depending on factors such as the quality of the patient's bone, primary stability of the implant, clinician's learning curve, and implant surface. Short implants can achieve results similar to those of longer implants in augmented bone and offer a treatment alternative that could reduce the need for invasive surgery and associated morbidity and be safer and more economical. Short dental implants (6 mm to 8 mm) can be used successfully to support single or multiple fixed reconstructions or overdentures in atrophic maxillae and mandibles. The use of short dental implants lessens the need for advanced and complicated surgical bone augmentation procedures, which reduces complications

  18. How could multimedia information about dental implant surgery effects patients' anxiety level?

    PubMed

    Kazancioglu, H-O; Dahhan, A-S; Acar, A-H

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of different patient education techniques on patients' anxiety levels before and after dental implant surgery. Sixty patients were randomized into three groups; each contained 20 patients; [group 1, basic information given verbally, with details of operation and recovery; group 2 (study group), basic information given verbally with details of operative procedures and recovery, and by watching a movie on single implant surgery]; and a control group [basic information given verbally "but it was devoid of the details of the operative procedures and recovery"]. Anxiety levels were assessed using the Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS). Pain was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS). The most significant changes were observed in the movie group (P < 0.05). Patients who were more anxious also used more analgesic medication. Linear regression analysis showed that female patients had higher levels of anxiety (P < 0.05). Preoperative multimedia information increases anxiety level.

  19. Gastro-oesophageal reflux is common in oligosymptomatic patients with dental erosion: A pH-impedance and endoscopic study.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Clive H; Materna, Andrea; Martig, Lukas; Lussi, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Dental erosion is a complication of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) according to the Montreal consensus statement. However, GORD has not been comprehensively characterized in patients with dental erosions and pH-impedance measures have not been reported. Characterize GORD in patients with dental erosions using 24-h multichannel intraluminal pH-impedance measurements (pH-MII) and endoscopy. This single-centre study investigated reflux in successive patients presenting to dentists with dental erosion using pH-MII and endoscopy. Of the 374 patients, 298 (80%) reported GORD symptoms <2 per week, 72 (19%) had oesophagitis and 59 (16%) had a hiatal hernia. In the 349 with pH-MII the mean percentage time with a pH <4 (95% CI) was 11.0 (9.3-12.7), and 34.4% (31.9-36.9) for a pH <5.5, a critical threshold for dental tissue. The mean numbers of total, acidic and weakly acidic reflux episodes were 71 (63-79), 43 (38-49) and 31 (26-35), respectively. Of the reflux episodes, 19% (17-21) reached the proximal oesophagus. In 241 (69%) patients reflux was abnormal using published normal values for acid exposure time and reflux episodes. No significant associations between the severity of dental erosions and any reflux variables were found. The presence of GORD symptoms and of oesophagitis or a hiatal hernia was associated with greater reflux, but not with increased dental erosion scores. Significant oligosymptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux occurs in the majority of patients with dental erosion. The degree of dental erosion did not correlate with any of the accepted quantitative reflux indicators. Definition of clinically relevant reflux parameters by pH-MII for dental erosion and of treatment guidelines are outstanding. Gastroenterologists and dentists need to be aware of the widely prevalent association between dental erosion and atypical GORD.

  20. A survey of North Carolina safety-net dental clinics' methods for communicating with patients of limited english proficiency (LEP).

    PubMed

    Hammersmith, Kimberly J; Lee, Jessica Y

    2009-01-01

    Dental providers are increasingly challenged in communicating with patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). Accordingly, the purpose of the study was to examine methods of communicating with patients with LEP in North Carolina (NC) safety-net dental clinics as perceived by dental staff. An anonymous, 36-item, cross-sectional survey was distributed to representatives of 68 NC safety-net dental clinics. Question domains included: a) a perceived need for language services; b) methods of language services provided; c) perceptions of dental staff about dental care experiences for patients with LEP; and d) perceived legal and financial roles in providing language services. Of the 68 clinics, 55 responded (81 percent). All clinics reported treating patients with LEP, and 93 percent of clinics reported a need for providing language services. Many clinics used multiple methods to provide language services. Some clinics reported differences in treatment recommendations (13 percent), treatment provided (19 percent), and visit length (61 percent) for patients with LEP. All responded that additional costs are incurred to treat patients with LEP, and only 69 percent of responding clinics recognized legal obligations of treating patients with LEP. There is a reported need for language services in NC safety-net dental clinics. These services often resulted in additional costs to the dental clinic. To maintain the quality of care and to comply with legal requirements related to dental patients with LEP, additional funding sources might be required to recruit multilingual staff, support language services in dental clinics, and provide language skills training for practicing dentists. Additionally, studies are suggested to measure the perception of the effectiveness of communication methods of patients with LEP.

  1. Physiologic and behavioral effects of papoose board on anxiety in dental patients with special needs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yung; Yang, Hsiang; Chi, Huang-Ju; Chen, Hsin-Ming

    2014-02-01

    Anxiety induced by dental treatment can become a serious problem, especially for patients with special needs. Application of deep touch pressure, which is a sensory adaptation technique, may ameliorate anxiety in disabled patients. However, few empiric studies have investigated the possible links between the clinical effects of deep touch pressure and its behavioral and physiologic aspects. Equally little progress has been made concerning theoretical development. The current study is a crossover intervention trial to investigate the behavioral and physiological effects of deep touch pressure for participants receiving dental treatment. Nineteen disabled participants, who were retrospectively subclassified for positive trend or negative trend, were recruited to receive the papoose board as an application of deep touch pressure. Quantitative analyses of behavioral assessments and physiological measurements, including electrodermal activity and heart rate variability, were conducted. We sought to understand the modulation of the autonomic nervous system and the orchestration of sympathetic and parasympathetic (PsNS) nervous systems. Behavioral assessments reported that higher levels of anxiety were induced by the dental treatment for participants with both groups of positive and negative trends. Although no significant differences were found in the SNS activity, physiologic responses indicated that significantly changes of PsNS activity were observed under the stress condition (dental treatment) when deep touch pressure intervention was applied, especially for participants in the group of positive trend. Our results suggest that the PsNS activation plays a critical role in the process of ANS modulation. This study provides not only physiologic evidence for the modulation effects of deep touch pressure on stressful conditions in dental environments but also the evidence that the application of papoose board, as a sensory adaptation technique, is not harmful for dental

  2. Parental attitudes regarding behavior guidance of dental patients with autism.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jennifer; Sheller, Barbara; Mancl, Lloyd; Williams, Bryan J

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate: (1) parents' ability to predict dental treatment cooperation by their autistic child; (2) behavior guidance techniques (BGTs) used during treatment; and (3) parental attitudes regarding basic and advanced BGTs. Data were collected from 85 parent/autistic child pairs and their dentists using surveys and treatment records. Parents most accurately predicted if their child would permit an examination in the dental chair (> or = 88%) and would cooperate for radiographs (> or = 84%). BGTs utilized most often (> 50%) were positive verbal reinforcement (PVR), tell-show-do (TSD), mouthprops, and rewards. In general, basic BGTs were more acceptable (> 81%) than advanced BGTs (>54%). The most acceptable techniques (>90%) in order were: PVR, TSD, distraction, rewards, general anesthesia, hand-holding by parent, and mouth-props. When parents evaluated only BGTs used for their child, all BGTs, including a stabilization device, were highly acceptable (> 91%), except for staff restraint (74%). Parents were accurate in predicting cooperation for some procedures. The most acceptable and efficacious BGTs in order were: PVR, TSD, distraction, rewards, and hand-holding by parent. Parental perceptions of BGTs were influenced by whether or not they had been used for their child.

  3. Awareness, knowledge, and attitude of patients toward dental implants - A questionnaire-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hosadurga, Rajesh; Shanti, Tenneti; Hegde, Shashikanth; Kashyap, Rajesh Shankar; Arunkumar, Suryanarayan Maiya

    2017-01-01

    In developing nations like India awareness and education about dental implants as a treatment modality is still scanty. The study was conducted to determine the awareness, knowledge, and attitude of patients toward dental implants as a treatment modality among the general population and to assess the influence of personality characteristics on accepting dental implants as a treatment modality in general and as well as treatment group. A structured questionnaire-based survey was conducted on 500 randomly selected participants attending the outpatient department. The study was conducted in 2 parts. In the first part of the study, level of awareness, knowledge, and attitude was assessed. In the second part of the study, interactive educational sessions using audiovisual aids were conducted following which a retest was conducted. The participants who agreed to undergo implant treatment were followed up to assess their change in attitude towards dental implants posttreatment. Thus pain, anxiety, functional, and esthetic benefits were measured using visual analog scale. They were further followed up for 1 year to reassess awareness, knowledge, and attitude towards dental implants. A total of 450 individuals completed the questionnaires. Only 106 individuals agreed to participate in the educational sessions and 83 individuals took the retest. Out of these, only 39 individuals chose implants as a treatment option. A significant improvement in the level of information, subjective and objective need for information, was noted after 1 year. In this study, a severe deficit in level of information, subjective and objective need for information towards, dental implants as a treatment modality was noted. In the treatment group, a significant improvement in perception of dental implant as a treatment modality suggests that professionally imparted knowledge can bring about a change in the attitude.

  4. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    PubMed Central

    Wotman, Stephen; Demko, Catherine A; Victoroff, Kristin; Sudano, Joseph J; Lalumandier, James A

    2010-01-01

    This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio dental practices observing 3751 patient encounters with dentists and hygienists. Direct observation of practice characteristics, procedures performed, and how procedure and nonprocedure time was utilized during patient visits was recorded using a modified Davis Observation Code that classified patient contact time into 24 behavioral categories. Dentist, hygienist, and patient characteristics were gathered by questionnaire. The most common nonprocedure behaviors observed for dentists were chatting, evaluation feedback, history taking, and answering patient questions. Hygienists added preventive counseling. We distinguish between preventive procedures and counseling in actual dental offices that are members of a practice-based research network. Almost a third of the dentist’s and half of the hygienist’s patient contact time is utilized for nonprocedure behaviors during patient encounters. These interactions may be linked to patient and practitioner satisfaction and effectiveness of self-care instruction. PMID:23662080

  5. Does Intellectual Disability Affect the Development of Dental Caries in Patients with Cerebral Palsy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Rafaela Nogueira; Alcantara, Carlos Eduardo Pinto; Mota-Veloso, Isabella; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the severity of intellectual disability is a factor that affects the development of dental cavities in patients with cerebral palsy. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 165 individuals who were selected from a physical rehabilitation center, a special public school and a regular public school. Of…

  6. Protocols for treating patients with end-stage renal disease: a survey of undergraduate dental programs.

    PubMed

    Sturgill, Jeremiah; Howell, Scott; Perry, Maureen Munnelly; Kothari, Hemali

    2016-11-01

    Approximately 14% of Americans are living with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the result of progressing CKD continues to rise by 21,000 per year. There are no updated, evidence-based antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines for patients with renal disease undergoing dental treatment. The most recent was a scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) in 2003. Presented in three parts, the goal of the first part of this study is to determine the current protocol being used to treat renal patients at U.S. dental schools. A 21 multiple-choice question survey was e-mailed to 58 clinic deans of accredited dental schools in the United States regarding renal treatment protocol details including antibiotic prophylaxis. Fifty-two percent of programs report having no established renal patient treatment protocol. For programs with a protocol, when using prophylactic antibiotics, 54% followed AHA protocol, whereas 62% used a modified protocol. There is a lack of consistent, established protocols among undergraduate dental programs. It is suggested that evidence-based guidelines for the safe treatment of patients be developed. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Transitioning of special needs paediatric patients to adult special needs dental services.

    PubMed

    Borromeo, G L; Bramante, G; Betar, D; Bhikha, C; Cai, Y Y; Cajili, C

    2014-09-01

    Special needs dentistry is in its infancy compared to other dental specialties. Continuity of care through transition from paediatric to adult dental care providers is unknown. This study seeks to determine the nature of transition practices adopted by paediatric and special needs (SN) specialists practising throughout Australia. A survey was sent to all paediatric and SN specialist dentists in Australia to determine the nature of current transition practices for paediatric SN patients in Australia. Two subsequent mail-outs were sent to non-responders. Forty-nine specialist dentists registered across Australia completed the survey, of which 35 (71%) were paediatric dentists and 14 (29%) were SN dentists. Both paediatric and SN dentists treated patients over the age of 18. Of the total paediatric dentists who had transition discussions with their paediatric patients and their families, the majority (over 80%) discussed treatment options available as part of future oral care management. Paediatric dentists identified level of independence and financial situations as the most significant barrier for transition. Key factors exist that should be discussed with SN patients and their parents and/or guardians in order to enhance the prospect of sustained dental care into adulthood. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Pediatric Dental Patients are Part of a Larger Picture: Detailing Population Realities.

    PubMed

    Waldman, H B; Perlman, S P

    2015-01-01

    The traditional setting of a dental practice may offer pediatric dentists a potentially isolated picture of the general health and use of health services by youngsters in their community. Results from the latest National Health Interview Survey are reviewed to provide broad dimensions to supplement and reinforce the general and specific information usually developed regarding individual patients.

  9. Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Dental Plaque Control Program in Autistic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias, Guilherme G.; Prado, Eliane F. G. B.; Vadasz, Estevao; Siqueira, Jose Tadeu T.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the efficacy of a programme for dental plaque control in autistics. Patients were evaluated on five occasions over a period of 180 days using the following instruments: OHI-S, DMF-T, the Fonnes brushing technique and diet questionnaire. Participants were divided into two groups according to level of co-operation…

  10. Community analysis of dental plaque and endotracheal tube biofilms from mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Marino, Poala J; Wise, Matt P; Smith, Ann; Marchesi, Julian R; Riggio, Marcello P; Lewis, Michael A O; Williams, David W

    2017-06-01

    Mechanically ventilated patients are at risk for developing ventilator-associated pneumonia, and it has been reported that dental plaque provides a reservoir of respiratory pathogens that may aspirate to the lungs and endotracheal tube (ETT) biofilms. For the first time, metataxonomics was used to simultaneously characterize the microbiome of dental plaque, ETTs, and non-directed bronchial lavages (NBLs) in mechanically ventilated patients to determine similarities in respective microbial communities and therefore likely associations. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences from 34 samples of dental plaque, NBLs, and ETTs from 12 adult mechanically ventilated patients were analyzed. No significant differences in the microbial communities of these samples were evident. Detected bacteria were primarily oral species (e.g., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus salivarius, Prevotella melaninogenica) with respiratory pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcuspneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae) also in high abundance. The high similarity between the microbiomes of dental plaque, NBLs, and ETTs suggests that the oral cavity is indeed an important site involved in microbial aspiration to the lower airway and ETT. As such, maintenance of good oral hygiene is likely to be highly important in limiting aspiration of bacteria in this vulnerable patient group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Establishment and current status of patient community at Tokyo Dental College.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Hirata, Soichiro; Sugihara, Naoki; Mochizuki, Riuji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Kawada, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    The "Dental students training to address the needs of each individual patient: enhancement of ability to make a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plans with high ethical standards and good communication skills", project launched at Tokyo Dental College was adopted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology as part of its "Program for Promoting University Education and Student Support, Theme A: Program for Promoting University Education Reform" in 2009. One of the main goals of this subject is "the establishment of Patient Community". Patient Community members allowed students to gain a more realistic experience of clinical practice than simulated patients. The Patient Community consists of patients and members of the parents' association who have agreed to cooperate for the advancement of dental education, becoming involved in dental student education through Communication Studies, which are held for first- to fourth-year students. Patient Community members were recruited at the open lectures (15 times, between July 10, 2010 and November 30, 2011). The Patient Community comprised 24 members, including 8 men and 16 women by November 30, 2011. The cumulative number of attendees in Communication Studies (I-IV, 6 times) was 35, including 13 men and 22 women. Fourteen people applied for admission on the day of the open lecture. Seven people signed up between 1 and 7 days after the open lecture. On the other hand, only 3 people applied within 8 to 9 days after the open lecture. However, interestingly, the ratio of the attendance for Communication Studies by Patient Community members who applied 8 to 9 days after the open lecture was higher than that of members who applied for admission on the day of the open lecture. Since the number of Patient Community members is insufficient for the purposes of the Patient Community, it is necessary to think about how recruitment methods can be made more effective and how such open lectures should be

  12. Head and Neck Cancer Patients – Information for the General Dental Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Noone, Jennifer; Barclay, Craig

    2017-03-01

    Salivary gland damage is the most common adverse effect associated with radiation therapy to the head and neck. A combination of hyposalivation and dietary changes, with a reduced emphasis on oral hygiene practices can contribute to a massive increase in a person’s caries risk status. This can be further complicated by limited mouth opening. To enable optimal dental care for head and neck cancer patients before, during and after radiation therapy, patients must be informed and educated about the potential risks of dental caries and the preventive strategies available. All patients should receive a pre-radiotherapy dental assessment by a Restorative Dentistry Consultant. This information will be delivered to the patient, often at an emotionally charged time, and can be lost amongst all the information related to other aspects of his/her cancer management. General Dental Practitioners (GDPs) are therefore in a pivotal position to reiterate this information post radiation therapy and ensure compliance with preventive strategies, with the overall aim to improve quality of life and avoid the need for future extractions and the resulting risk of osteoradionecrosis. Clinical relevance: This article highlights the GDP’s role in the shared management of head and neck cancer patients who have received radiotherapy as part of their cancer treatment. The critical issue of dental caries, one of the late effects of radiation-induced hyposalivation, will be focused upon. Other side-effects, such as trismus and osteoradionecrosis, will also be discussed. This article aims to supply GDPs with accurate information to provide to their patients with post radiation therapy, whilst highlighting what treatment is within their remit and when it may be appropriate to refer.

  13. An Australian government dental scheme: Doctor-dentist-patient tensions in the triangle.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon, Arosha; Fitzgerald, Lisa; Porter, Suzette

    2014-11-30

    Autonomy of participants is challenged when legislation to provide a public health service is weakly designed and implemented. Australia's Chronic Disease Dental Scheme was instigated to provide a government subsidy for private dental treatment for people suffering chronic illness impacting their oral health or vice versa. They were allocated AUD$4250 towards comprehensive treatment over 2 years with their eligibility determined by their general medical doctor. A qualitative research study was conducted to explore the experiences from the perspectives of the patient, medical and dental practitioner. One of the research outcomes identified a frequently reported level of discomfort in the patient/doctor/dentist triangle. Doctors and dentists reported feeling forced by patients into positions that compromised their autonomy in obeying the intent (if not the law) of the scheme. Additionally, dentists felt under pressure from doctors and patients to provide subsidized treatment to those eligible. In turn, the patients reported difficulties in gaining access to the scheme and in some cases, experiencing full or partially unmet oral health needs. REASON FOR CONFLICT: Poor inter-professional communication and lack of understanding about profession-unique patient-driven pressures, ultimately contributed to dissonance. Ill-defined eligibility guidelines rendered the doctor's ability to gate-keep challenging. OUTCOME OF CONFLICT: Inefficient gate-keeping led to exponential increase in referrals, resulting in unprecedented cost blow-outs. Ensuing government-led audits caused political tensions and contributed to the media-induced vilification of dentists. In December 2013, government financing of dental treatment through Chronic Disease Dental Scheme was discontinued, leaving many Australians without a viable alternative. There is a need for qualitative research methods to help identify social issues that affect public health policy process. In order to succeed, new health

  14. Efficacy of routine pre-radiation dental screening and dental follow-up in head and neck oncology patients on intermediate and late radiation effects. A retrospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Schuurhuis, Jennifer M; Stokman, Monique A; Roodenburg, Johannes L N; Reintsema, Harry; Langendijk, Johannes A; Vissink, Arjan; Spijkervet, Frederik K L

    2011-12-01

    Head-neck radiotherapy is accompanied by a life-long risk of developing severe oral problems. This study retrospectively assessed oral foci detected during pre-radiation dental screening and follow-up in order to assess risk factors for developing oral problems after radiotherapy. Charts of 185 consecutive head-neck cancer patients, subjected to a pre-radiation dental screening in the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands, between January 2004 and December 2008 were reviewed. Eighty (partially) dentulous patients scheduled for curative head-neck radiotherapy met the inclusion criteria. Oral foci were found in 76% of patients, predominantly periodontal disease. Osteoradionecrosis had developed in 9 out of 80 patients (11%). Overall, patients presenting with periodontal pockets ≥ 6mm at dental screening had an increased risk (19%) of developing osteoradionecrosis compared to the total group of patients. Patients in whom periodontal disease treatment was composed of initial periodontal in stead of removal of the affected teeth, the risk of developing osteoradionecrosis was even higher, viz. 33%. A worse periodontal condition at dental screening and initial periodontal therapy to safeguard these patients to develop severe oral sequelae after radiotherapy were shown to be major risk factors of developing osteoradionecrosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Anterior maxillary segmental distraction for correction of maxillary hypoplasia and dental crowding in cleft palate patients: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Wang, X-X; Wang, X; Li, Z-L; Yi, B; Liang, C; Jia, Y-L; Zou, B-S

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of anterior maxillary segmental distraction (AMSD) to correct maxillary hypoplasia and severe dental crowding in cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients, 7 patients (average age 16.4 years) with maxillary hypoplasia, shortened maxillary dental arch length and severe anterior dental crowding secondary to CLP were selected for this study. After anterior maxillary segmental osteotomy, 3 patients were treated using bilateral internal distraction devices, and 4 patients were treated using rigid external distraction devices. Photographs and radiographs were taken to review the improvement in facial profile and occlusion after distraction. An average 10.25 mm anterior maxillary advancement was obtained in all patients after 10-23 days of distraction and 9-16 weeks of consolidation. The sella-nasion-point A (SNA) angle increased from 69.5 degrees to 79.6 degrees. Midface convexity was greatly improved and velopharyngeal competence was preserved. The maxillary dental arch length was greatly increased by 10.1 mm (P<0.01). Dental crowding and malocclusion were corrected by orthodontic treatment. These results show that AMSD can effectively correct the hypoplastic maxilla and severe dental crowding associated with CLP by increasing the midface convexity and dental arch length while preserving velopharyngeal function, and dental crowding can be corrected without requiring tooth extraction.

  16. Forensic revolution need maintenance of dental records of patients by the dentists: A descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anamika; Mishra, Gaurav; Bhutani, Hemant; Hoshing, Chetan; Bhalla, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    With the growth of forensic odontology, dental records have become an essential source of information, especially for medicolegal cases in general practice. It is mandated by the law that every dentist must keep some kind of records for every patient they treat. After the death of an individual, remnants of teeth are usually damaged at the last among all body parts. Dental records assist in personal identification in cases of mass disasters, criminal investigations, and medicolegal issues. However, in India, rules for maintaining dental records are not very strictly followed. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge regarding the maintenance of dental records among dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh. Data collection was performed via a questionnaire. The study population responded to the questions pertaining to knowledge regarding forensic odontology methods and the mode of maintaining dental records in their regular practice through a personal interview. A descriptive analysis was carried out for the data. The data were summarized and analyzed using the statistical software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 18.0. A very low percentage (22%) of the dentists were seen to be maintaining records on a regular basis. Seventy-eight percent of the dentists were not maintaining any records. This study clearly indicates that the dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh need to be properly trained for any kind of forensic and medicolegal needs.

  17. Effect of length of dental resident clinical rotations on patient behavior.

    PubMed

    Lau, Agnes

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective chart review study was to determine if the length of residents' comprehensive dental care rotations in a general practice residency affected late cancellations, broken appointments, completion of treatment, timeliness of recall visits, emergency visits, and the need for redo of restorations and prostheses. Patients who presented for comprehensive care from 2010 to 2013, during which residents had 3- to 4-month dental clinic rotations, comprised Group 1, and patients who presented for comprehensive care from 2013 to 2016, during which residents had 11-month dental clinic rotations, comprised Group 2. Subjects were excluded if they only presented for emergency care, they had only one visit, or their care was delivered in both time periods. There were 105 patients in Group 1 and 55 patients in Group 2. The statistically significant results were that Group 1 patients had more late cancellations and broken appointments and failed to reach recall status more often than Group 2 patients, and that Group 1 patients had fewer emergency visits. Within the limitations of this retrospective study, the results suggest that short block rotations have an adverse effect on resident experience and outcomes of patient care in a hospital outpatient setting. © 2018 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Evidence of dietary calcium and vitamin D inadequacies in a population of dental patients.

    PubMed

    Pehowich, Daniel J; Pehowich, Enid D

    2016-12-01

    To determine the dietary calcium and vitamin D intake of a cohort of dental patients identified as being at risk of inadequacy based on a 24-hour food recall. A retrospective chart analysis was carried out on 5-day food record and nutrient analyses of 670 dental patients aged 18 to 82 years obtained over a 10-year period. All patients had scored poorly on a 24-hour food recall survey during their initial examination. The overall mean and median calcium and vitamin D intakes of the patients were significantly lower than the current estimated needs for the general population. Although calcium intake did not change over the 10-year period, vitamin D consumption decreased. The greatest dietary intake inadequacies for both calcium and vitamin D were seen in both male and female patients over age 50 years. A 24-Hour Food Recall Questionnaire may be an effective means for the oral health professional to screen patients for calcium and vitamin D and other nutrient inadequacies. Screening for potential dietary inadequacies of calcium and vitamin D may identify patients potentially at risk for poor bone health. Our results indicate that the dental health professional can obtain evidence necessary to change patient dietary behavior and thus contribute to successful treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Appointment-keeping behavior of Medicaid-enrolled pediatric dental patients in eastern Iowa.

    PubMed

    Iben, P; Kanellis, M J; Warren, J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the appointment-keeping behavior of Medicaid-enrolled pediatric dental patients in three Eastern Iowa practices. During the month of October 1998, a tally was kept of all patient appointments at a private pediatric dental office, a public health dental clinic, and a university-based pediatric dentistry clinic. Patients were categorized as either Medicaid or non-Medicaid. Appointment behavior categories were defined as: On time; Failure; Late-notice Cancellation (less than 24 hours notice); and Tardy (greater than 10 minutes). The data was entered in SPSS and analyzed using the chi square statistic. Statistical significance was P < 0.05. A total of 1,406 appointments were recorded for all three sites. Overall, patients on Iowa Medicaid had higher appointment failure, late-notice cancellation, and tardiness rates than non-Medicaid patients at all three clinics. However, these differences were only statistically significant for the private office and the university-based clinic. Failed appointment rates for Medicaid patients were much higher at the private office (38%) than at the other two sites. Consistent with anecdotal reports from dentists, Medicaid patients had higher rates of broken appointments than did non-Medicaid patients, particularly in a private practice setting.

  20. Frequency of rhinitis and orofacial disorders in patients with dental malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Imbaud, Tamara Christine de Souza; Mallozi, Márcia Carvalho; Domingos, Vanda Beatriz Teixeira Coelho; Solé, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the frequency and etiology of rhinitis, oral breathing, types of malocclusion and orofacial disorders in patients treated for dental malocclusion. Methods: Patients with poor dental occlusion (n=89, 8-15 years) undergoing orthodontic treatment at the Postgraduate Orthodontics Center (São Paulo, Brazil) participated in the study. Rhinitis and oral breathing were diagnosed by anamnesis, clinical assessment and allergic etiology of rhinitis through immediate hypersensitivity skin prick test with airborne allergens. The association between types of breathing (oral or nasal), rhinitis and types of dental malocclusion, bruxism and cephalometric alterations (increased Y axis of facial growth) compared to standard cephalometric tracing (Escola de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo) were assessed. Results: The frequency of rhinitis in patients with dental malocclusion was 76.4% (68), and, of these, 81.7% were allergic (49/60 positive skin prick test), whereas the frequency of oral breathing was 62.9%. There was a significant association between an increased Y axis of facial growth and oral breathing (p<0.001), as well as between oral breathing and rhinitis (p=0.009). There was no association between rhinitis and bruxism. Conclusions: The frequency of rhinitis in children with dental malocclusion is higher than that in the general population, which is approximately 30%. Patients with oral breathing have a tendency to a dolichofacial growth pattern (increased Y axis of facial growth). In patients with rhinitis, regardless of the presence of oral breathing, the dolichofacial growth tendency was not observed. PMID:26631324

  1. [Frequency of rhinitis and orofacial disorders in patients with dental malocclusion].

    PubMed

    Imbaud, Tamara Christine de Souza; Mallozi, Márcia Carvalho; Domingos, Vanda Beatriz Teixeira Coelho; Solé, Dirceu

    2016-06-01

    To describe the frequency and etiology of rhinitis, oral breathing, types of malocclusion and orofacial disorders in patients treated for dental malocclusion. Patients with poor dental occlusion (n=89, 8-15 years) undergoing orthodontic treatment at the Postgraduate Orthodontics Center (Sao Paulo, Brazil) participated in the study. Rhinitis and oral breathing were diagnosed by anamnesis, clinical assessment and allergic etiology of rhinitis through immediate hypersensitivity skin prick test (SPT) with airborne allergens. The association between types of breathing (oral or nasal), rhinitis and types of dental malocclusion, bruxism and cephalometric alterations (increased Y axis of facial growth) compared to standard cephalometric tracing (Escola de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo) were assessed. The frequency of rhinitis in patients with dental malocclusion was 76.4% (68), and, of these, 81.7% were allergic (49/60 positive skin prick test), whereas the frequency of oral breathing was 62.9%. There was a significant association between an increased Y axis of facial growth and oral breathing (p<0.001), as well as between oral breathing and rhinitis (p=0.009). There was no association between rhinitis and bruxism. The frequency of rhinitis in children with dental malocclusion is higher than that in the general population, which is approximately 30%. Patients with oral breathing have a tendency to a dolichofacial growth pattern (increased Y axis of facial growth). In patients with rhinitis, regardless of the presence of oral breathing, the dolichofacial growth tendency was not observed. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of anxiety related to dental treatments among patients attending dental clinics and hospitals in Ranga Reddy District, Andhra Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Prathima, Vedati; Anjum, M Shakeel; Reddy, P Parthasarathi; Jayakumar, A; Mounica, M

    2014-01-01

    To assess the levels of dental anxiety among patients anticipating dental treatments in dental clinics/hospitals of Ranga Reddy district. A cross-sectional study was conducted among a representative sample of 1200 subjects (at least 18 years old) in dental clinics/hospitals which were selected from a list obtained through systematic random sampling. The data were collected using a pre-tested and calibrated questionnaire consisting of the Modified Corah Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) to assess anxiety levels. The majority (52.4%) of subjects showed a low level of anxiety. Females (11.44 ± 4.41) were found to have higher mean MDAS scores than males, and the highest mean MDAS scores were found among 18- to 34-year-olds (11.28 ± 4.67) (P < 0.05). Significant differences were found among subjects anticipating different treatments, with higher MDAS scores for extraction (11.25 ± 5.4), followed by examination, root canal treatment, gum surgery, scaling, restoration and others, e.g. orthodontic treatment, restoration with crowns, bridges and dentures (7.79 ± 3.80). The highest mean MDAS scores were found among subjects who were apprehensive due to 'past difficult experience in dental treatments', followed by 'drill' and 'injection', with the lowest scores among subjects indicating 'other reasons' (7.82 ± 3.84). The present data show that anxiety levels are higher in patients who have to undergo extractions than those who must be fitted with dentures. Thus, dental health care providers should pay more attention to patients' anxiety levels associated with different types of treatment.

  3. The dentist's care-taking perspective of dental fear patients - a continuous and changing challenge.

    PubMed

    Gyllensvärd, K; Qvarnström, M; Wolf, E

    2016-08-01

    The aim was to analyse the care taking of dental fear patients from the perspective of the dentist, using a qualitative methodology. In total, 11 dentists from both the private and public dental service were selected through a purposive sampling according to their experience of treating dental fear patients, their gender, age, service affiliation and location of undergraduate education. Data were obtained using one semi-structured interview with each informant. The interviews were taped and verbatim transcribed. The text was analysed using qualitative content analysis. The theme, 'The transforming autodidactic process of care taking', covering the interpretative level of data content was identified. The first main category covering the descriptive level of data was 'The continuous and changing challenge', with the subcategories 'The emotional demand' and 'The financial stress'. The second main category identified was 'The repeated collection of experience', with the subcategories 'The development of resources' and 'The emotional change'. The dentists' experience of treating dental fear patients was considered a challenging self-taught process under continuous transformation. The competence and routine platform expanded over time, parallel to a change of connected emotions from frustration towards safety, although challenges remained. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A performance improvement prescribing guideline reduces opioid prescriptions for emergency department dental pain patients.

    PubMed

    Fox, Timothy R; Li, James; Stevens, Sandra; Tippie, Tracy

    2013-09-01

    In an effort to reduce prescription opioid abuse originating from our institution, we implement and measure the effect of a prescribing guideline on the rate of emergency department (ED) opioid prescriptions written for patients presenting with dental pain, a complaint previously associated with drug-seeking behavior. After implementing a departmental guideline on controlled substance prescriptions, we performed a structured before-and-after chart review of dental pain patients aged 16 and older. Before the guideline, the rate of opioid prescription was 59% (302/515). After implementation, the rate was 42% (65/153). The absolute decrease in rates was 17% (95% confidence interval 7% to 25%). Additionally, in comparing the 12-month period before and after implementation, the dental pain visit rate decreased from 26 to 21 per 1,000 ED visits (95% confidence interval of decrease 2 to 9 visits/1,000). A performance improvement program involving a departmental prescribing guideline was associated with a reduction in the rate of opioid prescriptions and visits for ED patients presenting with dental pain. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans colonization in patients wearing dental prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Baena-Monroy, Tania; Moreno-Maldonado, Víctor; Franco-Martínez, Fernando; Aldape-Barrios, Beatriz; Quindós, Guillermo; Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio

    2005-04-01

    Denture stomatitis is associated to Candida albicans, different bacteria and other co-factors such as an acid pH, a carbohydrate ingestion increase, different systemic illnesses and pharmacological treatments. The aim of this study was to determine Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans prevalence in the mucous membrane and prosthesis of patients with and without atrophic denture stomatitis and its relationship with other potential clinical co-factors. Saliva was collected from 105 patients (62 female and 43 male) wearing dental prosthesis in order to measure their pH. Oral samples of the mucous membrane and the internal surface of dental prosthesis were taken with sterile cotton to proceed with the microbiological study. The identification of the isolated microorganisms was performed using conventional microbiological methods. Diabetes and Hypertension were the most frequent systemic illnesses. High carbohydrate ingestion was observed in numerous patients. Atrophic denture stomatitis was reported in 50 patients and the pH average in saliva was of 5.2. The presence of C albicans, S. aureus and S. mutans in the mucous membrane and prosthesis was of 51.4%, 52.4% and 67.6%, respectively. C. albicans was isolated in 66.7% from the prosthesis, whereas S. aureus and S. mutans were isolated in 49.5% of those same prosthesis. C. albicans was isolated in 86% of the patients with atrophic denture stomatitis and S. aureus was isolated in a similar percentage (84% of patients). The isolation of S. mutans was less frequent, and it was observed in 16% of the oral samples of these patients. C. albicans, S. aureus and S. mutans frequently colonize the oral mucous of patients wearing dental prosthesis. This illness-bearing condition is more frequent in patients with denture stomatitis, even though dental prosthesis colonization is lower than in the oral mucous.

  6. Prevalence of Dental Implants and Evaluation of Peri-implant Bone Levels in Patients Presenting to a Dental School: A Radiographic Cross-Sectional 2-Year Study.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Eylem Ayhan; Mau, Lian Ping; Schoolfield, John; Guest, Gary F; Cochran, David L

    To evaluate the number of patients with dental implants who present to a dental school clinic for screening and to report the prevalence of peri-implant bone level change detected on digital panoramic radiographs of those subjects. Patient screening files for 9,422 patients over a 2-year period were examined to see how many patients presented with dental implants. Those patients with at least one implant were further evaluated by measuring the bone level on the mesial and distal sides of the implant using the screening radiograph. A total of 187 patients (2%) had at least one implant. In regard to implants, 423 were examined and 146 (33%) had no detectable bone loss defined as bone level below the top of the implant. When thresholds of bone loss were evaluated, 109 implants (25%) had ≥ 2 mm of bone loss on either the mesial or distal sides or both. The median bone loss was 1.74 mm for the 277 implants with detectable bone loss and 2.97 mm for the 109 implants that had ≥ 2 mm bone loss. Interestingly, patients who were ≥ 70 years of age had significantly (P = .03) more bone loss in the mandible compared with the maxilla, while patients who were 60 to 69 years of age had significantly greater loss in the maxilla. These data reveal that for patients presenting to the dental school for a screening over a 2-year period, 1.98% had one or more dental implants. Furthermore, those patients with implants had a minimum amount of bone loss as measured from the top of the implant.

  7. Pressure ulcer prevention and treatment knowledge of Jordanian nurses.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammad Y N; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud; Anthony, Denis

    2013-02-01

    The aims of the study were to determine: (1) Jordanian nurses' level of knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment of hospitalized patients based on guidelines for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. (2) Frequency of utilization of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment interventions in clinical practice. (3) Variables that are associated with nurses' utilization of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment interventions. Pressure ulcers are common and previous studies have shown education, knowledge and attitude affect implementation of interventions. A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from 460 nurses between June 2010 and November 2010. We used a questionnaire, which was informed by earlier work and guidelines, to collect data about nurses' knowledge and practice of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. Knowledge and education show an association with implementation of prevention, and demographic variables do not. Similarly knowledge and type of hospital showed an association with implementing treatment. Of concern the use of "donuts" and massage are reported in use. Although pressure ulcer care is well known by nurses, inappropriate pressure ulcer interventions were reported in use. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Career commitment and job performance of Jordanian nurses.

    PubMed

    Mrayyan, Majd T; Al-Faouri, Ibrahim

    2008-01-01

    Career commitment and job performance are complex phenomena that have received little attention in nursing research. A survey was used to assess nurses' career commitment and job performance, and the relationship between the two concepts. Predictors of nurses' career commitment and job performance were also studied. A convenience sample of 640 Jordanian registered nurses was recruited from 24 teaching, governmental, and private hospitals. Nurses "agreed" on the majority of statements about career commitment, and they reported performing "well" their jobs. Using total scores, nurses were equal in their career commitment but they were different in their job performance; the highest mean was scored for nurses in private hospitals. Using the individual items of subscales, nurses were willing to be involved, on their own time, in projects that would benefit patient care. The correlation of the total scores of nurses' career commitment and job performance revealed the presence of a significant and positive relationship (r = .457). Nurses' job performance, gender, and marital status were the best predictors of nurses' career commitment: they explained 21.8% of variance of nurses' career commitment. Nurses' career commitment, time commitment, marital status, and years of experience in nursing were the best predictors of nurses' job performance: they explained 25.6% of variance of nurses' job performance. The lowest reported means of nurses' job performance require managerial interventions.

  9. A new screening pathway for identifying asymptomatic patients using dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Takuya; Sawagashira, Tsuyoshi; Tagami, Motoki; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iida, Yukihiro; Matsuoka, Masato; Katagi, Kiyoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    To identify asymptomatic patients is the challenging task and the essential first step in diagnosis. Findings of dental panoramic radiographs include not only dental conditions but also radiographic signs that are suggestive of possible systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, arteriosclerosis, and maxillary sinusitis. Detection of such signs on panoramic radiographs has a potential to provide supplemental benefits for patients. However, it is not easy for general dental practitioners to pay careful attention to such signs. We addressed the development of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system that detects radiographic signs of pathology on panoramic images, and the design of the framework of new screening pathway by cooperation of dentists and our CAD system. The performance evaluation of our CAD system showed the sensitivity and specificity in the identification of osteoporotic patients were 92.6 % and 100 %, respectively, and those of the maxillary sinus abnormality were 89.6 % and 73.6 %, respectively. The detection rate of carotid artery calcifications that suggests the need for further medical evaluation was approximately 93.6 % with 4.4 false-positives per image. To validate the utility of the new screening pathway, preliminary clinical trials by using our CAD system were conducted. To date, 223 panoramic images were processed and 4 asymptomatic patients with suspected osteoporosis, 7 asymptomatic patients with suspected calcifications, and 40 asymptomatic patients with suspected maxillary sinusitis were detected in our initial trial. It was suggested that our new screening pathway could be useful to identify asymptomatic patients with systemic diseases.

  10. Ten-year study of postoperative complications following dental extractions in patients with inherited bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, J-T; Klein, K; Batstone, M

    2017-09-01

    Dental extractions challenge the body's haemostatic mechanism. Postoperative bleeding from dental extraction can be prolonged, or even life threatening in patients with inherited bleeding disorders. Pre- and postoperative clotting factor replacements or systemic desmopressin (ddAVP) have been advocated at our institution to prevent bleeding complications in these patients. This study aimed to assess the postoperative bleeding rate in patients with inherited bleeding disorders that underwent dental extractions at our institution between 2003 and 2012. Patients with inherited bleeding disorders such as haemophilia A, haemophilia B, and von Willebrand's disease were included. Retrospective chart review was conducted. The result showed 53 extraction events occurred in 45 patients over the 10-year period. Ten out of 53 extraction events (18.9%) had postoperative bleeding requiring further factor replacement or ddAVP. Postoperative bleeding in one patient with mild haemophilia A was complicated by the development of inhibitors. Type and severity of bleeding disorder, bone removal, and use of a local haemostatic agent did not have any significant effect on postoperative bleeding. Despite the use of perioperative factors and desmopressin, the postoperative bleeding rates remain high for patients with inherited bleeding disorders. More studies are required to assess the safety and effectiveness of using local haemostatic control to achieve haemostasis following extractions. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A clinician guide to patients afraid of dental injections and numbness.

    PubMed

    Armfield, Jason M; Milgrom, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Fears of dental injections remain a clinical problem often requiring cognitive behavioural psychology counselling and sedation in order to carry out needed dental treatment. This study, based on a national survey in Australia, compared patient concerns about numbness caused by local anaesthesia and fears of the injection itself. It also examined associations between dental fearfulness and avoidance associated with patient self-reported negative experiences and treatment need. Clinical advice on how to approach such patients is offered. Relatively high levels of dental anxiety and fear have been reported in several industrialised Western societies (McGrath & Bedi, 2004; Armfield, Spencer & Stewart, 2006; Lahti et al., 2007; Enkling, Marwinski Jöhren, 2006). In the U.K., almost one in three adults consider themselves to always be anxious about going to the dentist (Nuttall et al., 2001). Of concern is that this dental fear may be passed on to the children of anxious adults (Nuttall, Gilbert & Morris, 2008), leading to an inter-generational perpetuation of the problem. There is considerable evidence that dental fear is related to poorer oral health, reduced dental attendance and increased treatment stress for the attending dentist. There are many aspects of going to a dentist that might elicit feelings of apprehension, concern or anxiety in prospective patients (Liddell & Gosse, 1998; Oosterink, de Jongh & Aartman, 2008). One of the most commonly reported concerns relates to receiving injections. Indeed, fear of needles and the treatment of injection fear has been an important focus of a research in the U.K. (Boyle, Newton & Milgrom, 2010). Needle fear, in particular, is a major issue given that the delivery of local anaesthesia via injection is the central plank of pain relief techniques in dentistry (Malamed, 2009) and dentists as well as patients often avoid difficult injections as a consequence, resulting in poor pain control. A less well described anxiety of

  12. Honoring Dental Patients' Privacy Rule Right of Access in the Context of Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Ramoni, Rachel B; Asher, Sheetal R; White, Joel M; Vaderhobli, Ram; Ogunbodede, Eyitope O; Walji, Muhammad F; Riedy, Christine; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2016-06-01

    A person's right to access his or her protected health information is a core feature of the U.S. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule. If the information is stored electronically, covered entities must be able to provide patients with some type of machine-readable, electronic copy of their data. The aim of this study was to understand how academic dental institutions execute the Privacy Rule's right of access in the context of electronic health records (EHRs). A validated electronic survey was distributed to the clinical deans of 62 U.S. dental schools during a two-month period in 2014. The response rate to the survey was 53.2% (N=33). However, three surveys were partially completed, and of the 30 completed surveys, the 24 respondents who reported using axiUm as the EHR at their dental school clinic were the ones on which the results were based (38.7% of total schools at the time). Of the responses analyzed, 86% agreed that clinical modules should be considered part of a patient's dental record, and all agreed that student teaching-related modules should not. Great variability existed among these clinical deans as to whether administrative and financial modules should be considered part of a patient record. When patients request their records, close to 50% of responding schools provide the information exclusively on paper. This study found variation among dental schools in their implementation of the Privacy Rule right of access, and although all the respondents had adopted EHRs, a large number return records in paper format.

  13. Frequency of dental caries in active and inactive systemic lupus erythematous patients: salivary and bacterial factors.

    PubMed

    Loyola Rodriguez, J P; Galvan Torres, L J; Martinez Martinez, R E; Abud Mendoza, C; Medina Solis, C E; Ramos Coronel, S; Garcia Cortes, J O; Domínguez Pérez, R A

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine dental caries frequency and to analyze salivary and bacterial factors associated with active and inactive systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) patients. Also, a proposal to identify dental caries by a surface, teeth, and the patient was developed. A cross-sectional, blinded study that included 60 SLE patients divided into two groups of 30 subjects each, according to the Activity Index for Diagnosis of Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLEDAI). The decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index and Integrative Dental Caries Index (IDCI) were used for analyzing dental caries. The saliva variables recorded were: flow, pH, and buffer capacity. The DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus were estimated by real-time PCR. The caries frequency was 85% for SLE subjects (73.3% for inactive systemic lupus erythematous (ISLE) and 100% for active systemic lupus erythematous (ASLE)); DMFT for the SLE group was 12.6 ± 5.7 and the IDCI was (9.8 ± 5.9). The ASLE group showed a salivary flow of 0.65 compared with 0.97 ml/1 min from the ISLE group; all variables mentioned above showed a statistical difference (p < 0.05). The salivary pH was 4.6 (6.06 for ISLE and 3.9 for ASLE). The DNA copies of S. mutans and S. sobrinus were high; all variables mentioned above show a significant statistical difference (p < 0.05) between groups. SLE patients had high DMFT and IDCI scores that were associated with a decrease in salivary flow, pH, and buffer capacity. There were high counts of S. sobrinus and S. mutans species, and IDCI is a useful tool to provide more detail about dental caries in epidemiological studies. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Informed consumer or unlucky visitor? A profile of German patients who received dental services abroad.

    PubMed

    Panteli, Dimitra; Augustin, Uta; Röttger, Julia; Struckmann, Verena; Verheyen, Frank; Wagner, Caroline; Busse, Reinhard

    2015-10-01

    A common characteristic of sending countries in cross-border dental care is that of high costs and/or high copayments for dental services. This study aims to provide an insight into the characteristics of German patients receiving planned and emergency (unplanned) dental care abroad and their satisfaction with received services. The Europabefragung is a postal survey carried out by Techniker Krankenkasse for patients who are treated in EU/EEA countries. This study uses data from the Europabefragung 2012. The survey was sent to 45 189 individuals; descriptive statistics for the subset of respondents who received emergency (unplanned) or planned dental treatment are presented. There were 18 339 responses to the questionnaire, out of which 17 543 were deemed valid; 1416 respondents had received emergency (unplanned) (78%) or planned (22%) dental care and were included in the analysis. There were clear differences between unplanned and planned treatments regarding country and type of treatment as well as satisfaction with different aspects of treatment and the need for follow-up care. Overall, satisfaction with treatment was high for both groups; individuals who had received planned treatment were more satisfied on all aspects of care and reported a need for follow-up care less frequently. While German patients who received both emergency (unplanned) and planned services abroad are mostly satisfied with their experience, some concerns arise with regard to continuity of care. Types of information provided to patients seeking care abroad and dissemination modalities should be carefully planned. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A patient-centred approach to teaching and learning in dental student clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, H M; Bergdahl, J; Bergdahl, Maud

    2008-08-01

    A patient-centred clinical teaching profile in the undergraduate dental curriculum at The University of Tromsø is described. This teaching profile implies that treatment planning is primarily based on the patients' perceived needs and the students are trained to retrieve information from the patients in this context. The role of the clinical instructor is primarily as a facilitator rather than an expert. The 'best interest of the patient' is not always easy to disclose and consequences related to the patients' levels of understanding, students competence, educational challenges and professional ethics are topics for discussion through the clinical education programme.

  16. Dental erosion in patients seeking treatment for gastrointestinal complaints: a case series.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Vincenzo; Amato, Massimo; Catapano, Santo; Iovino, Paola

    2015-10-30

    Eating disorders which embrace anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and eating disorders not otherwise specified can be life-threatening due to general medical complications; however, the diagnosis of eating disorder is often delayed due to a low suspicion index. Gastroenterologists are health care providers who may come into contact with patients with undiagnosed eating disorders; it has been previously demonstrated that patients with eating disorders frequently have a significant association with functional dyspepsia. Signs of dental erosion have been described in patients with eating disorders; hence, they may help to identify eating disorders in patients who present with functional dyspepsia and deny having an eating disorder. In this report we describe three cases (a 25-year-old white woman, a 24-year-old white woman, and a 40-year-old white man) with undiagnosed eating disorders, in which a more comprehensive approach, such as the recognition of dental erosion joined with a careful gastrointestinal investigation, was performed to reach a final diagnosis of an eating disorder. The screening for dental erosion in patients seeking or receiving medical treatment for dyspeptic symptoms in a gastrointestinal out-patient clinic could be an aid for gastroenterologists to recognize the presence of an underlying eating disorder. A close collaboration with dentists, in addition to psychiatrists, could provide a more favorable treatment outcome.

  17. A study at Manchester Dental Hospital, of the compliance of IV sedation patients and their escorts.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Oral surgery, under intravenous sedation, is carried out on a daily basis at Manchester Dental Hospital. This essay discusses the background of conscious sedation in the dental setting and looks at the compliance of patients (and escorts) when having intravenous sedation. The patient journey, from pre-operative assessment through to treatment is considered. Hospital instructions indicate an obligation for patients to attend with a responsible adult (eighteen or over) who remains with them throughout their treatment, escorts them home,and arranges their care for the next twenty-four hours. By following these instructions the patient should receive optimal care. Two questionnaires were devised and given to patients/escorts to assess their compliance with Manchester Dental Hospital postoperative protocols. 100% compliance was the set standard, with results presented as pie charts. This work began during the undergraduate summer vacation of 2012 and continued over a five-month period. Initial results suggested that compliance was generally good but certain improvements could be made. Suggestions for future development are presented. These aim to give clarity to all patients/escorts and their specific roles in the anticipated treatment.

  18. Evaluation of dental plaque control in patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ousehal, Lahcen; Lazrak, Laila; Es-Said, Rabia; Hamdoune, Hind; Elquars, Farid; Khadija, Amine

    2011-03-01

    Multibracket orthodontic appliances increase dental plaque retention and make teethbrushing more difficult for patients. As a result, advice from the orthodontist on oral hygiene along with patient motivation regarding teethbrushing are particularly important. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of electric toothbrushes with that of manual brushing associated with mouth-rinses comprising chlorhexidine (0.12%) and 0% alcohol. To this end, 84 patients receiving current orthodontic treatment were randomly selected from patients treated at the Dento-Facial Orthopedics department in the Casablanca Dental Consultation and Treatment Center. Selected patients were divided into three groups: Group 1: manual teethbrushing; Group 2: electric teethbrushing; Group 3: manual brushing combined with mouth rinse. Oral hygiene was assessed using the Loe-Silness plaque and gingival indices. Measurements were made before and 4 weeks after the observation period. Results were subjected to statistical comparison in order to determine the group showing greatest improvement and to deduce the best means of controlling bacterial plaque. The electric toothbrush and the chlorhexidine mouth rinse appear to control dental plaque more effectively than manual teethbrushing alone. Following this study, patients receiving multibracket treatment were invited to combine manual brushing with short clinical mouth-rinsing sessions or to use an electric toothbrush. Copyright © 2011 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Managing HIV/hepatitis positive patients: present approach of dental health care workers and students.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Nagesh; Baad, Rajendra; Nagpal, Deepak Kumar J; Prabhu, Prashant R; Surekha, L Chavan; Karande, Prasad

    2012-11-01

    People with HIV/HBsAg in India frequently encounter discrimination while seeking and receiving health care services. The knowledge and attitudes of health care workers (HCWs) influences the willingness and ability of people with HIV/HBsAg to access care, and the quality of the care they receive. The objective of this study was to asses HIV/HBsAg-related knowledge, attitudes and risk perception among students and dental HCWs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 250 students and 120 dental HCWs in the form of objective questionnaire. Information was gathered regarding demographic details (age, sex, duration of employment, job category); HIV/ HBsAg-related knowledge and attitudes; risk perception; and previous experience caring for HIV-positive patients. The HCWs in this study generally had a positive attitude to care for the people with HIV/HBsAg. However, this was tempered by substantial concerns about providing care, and the fear of occupational infection with HIV/HBsAg. A continuing dental education program was conducted to resolve all the queries found interfering to provide care to HIV/HBsAg patients. But even after the queries were resolved the care providing capability was not attained. These findings show that even with advanced knowledge and facilities the attitude of dental HCWs and students require more strategic training with regards to the ethics and moral stigma associated with the dreaded infectious diseases (HIV/HBsAg).

  20. Visual Schedule System in Dental Care for Patients with Autism: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Mah, Janet Wt; Tsang, Phoebe

    A pilot study to test whether a visual schedule system using picture communication symbols can help children with autism have successful routine dental cleaning visits. 14 boys with autism between three- to eight-years-old presented to the dental clinic for four weekly consecutive dental appointments. Patients were randomly assigned to either the control group who received the tell-show-do method (i.e., standard of care), or the test group who received the tell-show-do method plus the visual schedule system. Patients in the test group completed an average of 1.38 more steps, at 35.52 seconds per step faster, and with 18.7% lower levels of behavioral distress than those in the control group. The use of a visual schedule system, along with repeated weekly visits, showed some promise in helping children with autism successfully complete more steps, progress at a quicker rate, and exhibit lower levels of behavioral distress within a dental appointment, compared to a traditional tell-show-do approach.

  1. Viability of dental implants in head and neck irradiated patients: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zen Filho, Edson Virgílio; Tolentino, Elen de Souza; Santos, Paulo Sérgio Silva

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the safety of dental implants placed in irradiated bone and to discuss their viability when placed post-radiotherapy (RT). A systematic review was performed to answer the questions: "Are dental implants in irradiated bone viable?" and "What are the main factors that influence the loss of implants in irradiated patients?" The search strategy resulted in 8 publications. A total of 331 patients received 1237 implants, with an overall failure rate of 9.53%. The osseointegration success rates ranged between 62.5% and 100%. The optimal time interval between irradiation and dental implantation varied from 6 to 15 months. The interval time between RT and implant placement and the radiation doses are not associated with significant implant failure rates. The placement of implants in irradiated bone is viable, and head and neck RT should not be considered as a contraindication for dental rehabilitation with implants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2229-E2240, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Disturbances of dental development distinguish patients with oligodontia-ectodermal dysplasia from isolated oligodontia.

    PubMed

    Dhamo, B; Kuijpers, M A R; Balk-Leurs, I; Boxum, C; Wolvius, E B; Ongkosuwito, E M

    2018-02-01

    To investigate phenotypic differences in dental development between isolated oligodontia and oligodontia-ectodermal dysplasia (ED). A total of 129 patients diagnosed with isolated oligodontia and 22 patients with oligodontia as part of ED were eligible. The phenotype of dental development was assessed for the frequency of missing a certain tooth, dental age, development of each tooth present, abnormal size and abnormal shape of teeth. The data were analysed building linear, ordinal and logistic regression models. Compared to patients with isolated oligodontia, patients with oligodontia-ED missed more frequently central incisors and second molars in both jaws, and lateral incisors in the mandible (P < .05). Oligodontia-ED was associated with delayed development of the permanent dentition (β = -0.10; 95% CI: -0.17, -0.03). Specifically, the maxillary teeth: right central incisor, right lateral incisor, right second premolar and left second premolar were delayed approximately from 2 to 4 developmental stages. In addition, the left mandibular second premolar was 3 developmental stages delayed. Abnormal shape of teeth was 7 times more evident in patients with oligodontia-ED compared to patients with isolated oligodontia (OR = 6.54; 95% CI: 2.34, 18.28). The abnormal size of teeth was not a distinctive characteristic for oligodontia-ED. Oligodontia-ED distinguishes from isolated oligodontia by more disturbances in dental development. The abnormal shape of incisors and canines in a patient with oligodontia can raise suspicions for accompanying ectodermal abnormalities. © 2017 The Authors. Orthodontics & Craniofacial Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Risk of developing palatally displaced canines in patients with early detectable dental anomalies: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Garib, Daniela Gamba; Lancia, Melissa; Kato, Renata Mayumi; Oliveira, Thais Marchini; Neves, Lucimara Teixeira das

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the risk of PDC occurrence in children with dental anomalies identified early during mixed dentition. The sample comprised 730 longitudinal orthodontic records from children (448 females and 282 males) with an initial mean age of 8.3 years (SD=1.36). The dental anomaly group (DA) included 263 records of patients with at least one dental anomaly identified in the initial or middle mixed dentition. The non-dental anomaly group (NDA) was composed of 467 records of patients with no dental anomalies. The occurrence of PDC in both groups was diagnosed using panoramic and periapical radiographs taken in the late mixed dentition or early permanent dentition. The prevalence of PDC in patients with and without early diagnosed dental anomalies was compared using the chi-square test (p<0.01), relative risk assessments (RR), and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV). PDC frequency was 16.35% and 6.2% in DA and NDA groups, respectively. A statistically significant difference was observed between groups (p<0.01), with greater risk of PDC development in the DA group (RR=2.63). The PPV and NPV was 16% and 93%, respectively. Small maxillary lateral incisors, deciduous molar infraocclusion, and mandibular second premolar distoangulation were associated with PDC. Children with dental anomalies diagnosed during early mixed dentition have an approximately two and a half fold increased risk of developing PDC during late mixed dentition compared with children without dental anomalies.

  4. The caries experience and behavior of dental patients with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Loo, Cheen Y; Graham, Richard M; Hughes, Christopher V

    2008-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a lifelong neurodevelopmental disorder. The authors conducted a study to evaluate the demographics, caries experience and behavior of patients with ASD and compare these characteristics with those of patients without ASD (unaffected patients). The authors reviewed patients' charts and identified a group of 395 patients with ASD and a group of 386 unaffected patients. They obtained the following patient data for analysis: primary diagnosis, age, sex, residence (home versus institution or group home), presence of seizure disorder, additional diagnosis (mental retardation, cerebral palsy, self-injurious behavior or pica), medications, caries prevalence, caries severity and behavior. The ASD group had a male:female ratio of 4:1, and patients had a diagnosis of autism, pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified or Asperger syndrome. Sex distribution was equal in the unaffected group, which was younger and had a higher decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) score than did the ASD group. When the authors controlled for age and sex, they noted a statistically significant association between ASD and dental caries prevalence. A significantly higher percentage of patients with ASD than unaffected patients were uncooperative and required dental treatment to take place under general anesthesia. Caries prevalence and severity in patients with ASD were not associated with institutionalization, presence of seizure disorder or additional diagnosis. People with ASD were more likely to be caries-free and had lower DMFT scores than did their unaffected peers. Significantly more patients with ASD than unaffected patients were uncooperative and required general anesthesia to undergo dental treatment.

  5. Maxillary hypoplasia in the cleft patient: contribution of orthodontic dental space closure to orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justine C; Slack, Ginger C; Walker, Ryann; Graves, Lindsay; Yen, Sandra; Woo, Jessica; Ambaram, Rishal; Martz, Martin G; Kawamoto, Henry K; Bradley, James P

    2014-02-01

    Cleft lip and palate surgery in the developing child is known to be associated with maxillary hypoplasia. However, the effects of nonsurgical manipulations on maxillary growth have not been well investigated. The authors present the contribution of orthodontic dental space closure with canine substitution to maxillary hypoplasia and the need for orthognathic surgery. Cleft lip/palate and cleft palate patients older than 15 years of age were reviewed for dental anomalies, orthodontic canine substitution, and Le Fort I advancement. Skeletal relationships of the maxilla to the skull base (SNA), mandible (ANB), and facial height were determined on lateral cephalograms. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate odds ratios. Ninety-five patients were reviewed (mean age, 18.1 years). In 65 patients with congenitally missing teeth, 55 percent with patent dental spaces required Le Fort I advancement. In contrast, 89 percent who underwent canine substitution required Le Fort I advancement (p = 0.004). Canine substitution is associated with a statistically significant increase in maxillary retrognathia when compared with dental space preservation on lateral cephalograms (mean SNA, 75.2 and 79.0, respectively; p = 0.006). Adjusting for missing dentition, logistic regression analyses demonstrated that canine substitution is an independent predictor for orthognathic surgery (OR, 6.47) and maxillary retrusion defined by SNA < 78 (OR, 8.100). The coordination of orthodontia and surgery is essential to cleft care. The authors report a strong association between orthodontic cleft closure using canine substitution with maxillary hypoplasia and subsequent Le Fort I advancement, and suggest systematic criteria for management of cleft-related dental agenesis. Therapeutic, III.

  6. The patient assessment questionnaire: a new instrument for evaluating the interpersonal skills of vocational dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Y K; Prescott-Clements, L E; Rennie, J S

    2004-10-23

    This paper describes a pilot study aimed at evaluating a new instrument, the patient assessment questionnaire (PAQ), which uses patient ratings for the assessment of communication skills and professionalism in vocational practitioners (VDPs). The PAQ was developed as part of an assessment system designed to address all round competence. Acohort of 99 VDPs took part in the study. Questionnaires were distributed to consecutive patients in the general dental service at two time points in the training year. Data from the pilot study was analysed to determine whether the PAQ fulfilled the criteria for robust assessment. Results provide evidence of high levels of reliability, validity and feasibility of the PAQ instrument. All indications to date suggest that the PAQ will prove to be a valuable assessment tool. It is currently being evaluated as part of the system used to assess the all round competence of dental graduates undertaking vocational training in Scotland.

  7. Subgingival microbiome in patients with healthy and ailing dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Xu, Lixin; Wang, Zicheng; Li, Lianshuo; Zhang, Jieni; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Ting; Lin, Jiuxiang; Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants are commonly used to replace missing teeth. However, the dysbiotic polymicrobial communities of peri-implant sites are responsible for peri-implant diseases, such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. In this study, we analyzed the microbial characteristics of oral plaque from peri-implant pockets or sulci of healthy implants (n = 10), peri-implant mucositis (n = 8) and peri-implantitis (n = 6) sites using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. An increase in microbial diversity was observed in subgingival sites of ailing implants, compared with healthy implants. Microbial co-occurrence analysis revealed that periodontal pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia, were clustered into modules in the peri-implant mucositis network. Putative pathogens associated with peri-implantitis were present at a moderate relative abundance in peri-implant mucositis, suggesting that peri-implant mucositis an important early transitional phase during the development of peri-implantitis. Furthermore, the relative abundance of Eubacterium was increased at peri-implantitis locations, and co-occurrence analysis revealed that Eubacterium minutum was correlated with Prevotella intermedia in peri-implantitis sites, which suggests the association of Eubacterium with peri-implantitis. This study indicates that periodontal pathogens may play important roles in the shifting of healthy implant status to peri-implant disease. PMID:26077225

  8. Speech evaluation and dental arch shape following pushback palatoplasty in cleft palate patients: Supraperiosteal flap technique versus mucoperiosteal flap technique.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shizuyo; Noguchi, Makoto; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Akira; Kohama, Geniku; Yamamoto, Etsuhide

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the maxillary dental arch shape and speech of cleft palate patients following pushback palatoplasty using either the supraperiosteal flap technique or the mucoperiosteal flap technique. Sixty-two patients (29, cleft palate only; 33, unilateral cleft lip, alveolus and palate) operated on by the supraperiosteal technique and 47 patients (23, cleft palate only; 24 unilateral cleft lip, alveolus and palate) by the mucoperiosteal technique were reviewed in this study. Dental arch shape and speech proficiency at preschool and school age were evaluated in all patients. Dental arch shapes were classified as U type (good dental arch shape) and V type (narrow dental arch shape). In cleft palate only patients, U type was observed in 90% of the supraperiosteal group and 83% of the mucoperiosteal group. In unilateral cleft lip, alveolus and palate patients, U type was observed in 85% of the supraperiosteal group, while only in 33% of the mucoperiosteal group. In cleft palate only patients, normal speech at school age was observed 100% of the supraperiosteal group and 83% of the mucoperiosteal group. In unilateral cleft lip, alveolus and palate patients, normal speech at school age was observed in 97% of the supraperiosteal group and 75% of the mucoperiosteal group. Misarticulation was frequently found in patients with the V type of dental arch shape. It is suggested that pushback palatoplasty using the supraperiosteal technique is more advantageous for speech development compared with the mucoperiosteal technique.

  9. The contents of dental implant patient information leaflets available within the UK.

    PubMed

    Barber, J; Puryer, J; McNally, L; O'Sullivan, D

    2015-02-01

    Patient information leaflets are designed to provide easy to follow information summaries and first point of contact information about treatment options. This survey reviewed the content of dental implant patient information leaflets, produced by implant companies and available within the UK in 2011. Dental implant companies in the UK were asked to provide samples of their patient information leaflets. The information within the leaflets was then summarised, including the quantity and the types of images used and whether the source of the information was given. Quantitative data was obtained on the amount of information provided, size of images and number of references. A response rate of 71% was obtained and 23 leaflets were studied. Great variation was found between the leaflets, with the word counts ranging from 88 to 5,434, and 44 different topics were identified. The majority of the images used were decorative, and none of the leaflets gave any reference to the sources of their information. Implant treatment was generally described in a positive way, with an emphasis on describing the treatment and the advantages. Much less information was given about the potential disadvantages and risks of complications or failure, including the relevance of periodontal disease or smoking. Implant patient information leaflets provided by dental implant companies should not be solely relied upon to provide patients with all the information they need to give informed consent to treatment.

  10. Office-Based Anesthesia: Safety and Outcomes in Pediatric Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spera, Allison L.; Saxen, Mark A.; Yepes, Juan F.; Jones, James E.; Sanders, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    The number of children with caries requiring general anesthesia to achieve comprehensive dental care and the demand for dentist anesthesiologists to provide ambulatory anesthesia for these patients is increasing. No current published studies examine the safety and outcomes of ambulatory anesthesia performed by dentist anesthesiologists for dental procedures in pediatric patients, and there is no national requirement for reporting outcomes of these procedures. In 2010, the Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry was developed. This Web-based database allows providers of ambulatory anesthesia to track patient demographics and various outcomes of procedures. Our study is a secondary analysis of data collected in the registry over a 4-year period, 2010–2014. Of the 7041 cases reviewed, no cases resulted in serious complications, including death, anaphylaxis, aspiration, cardiovascular adverse events, or neurologic adverse events. Of the 7041 cases reviewed, 196 (3.0%) resulted in a predischarge or postdischarge adverse event. The predischarge adverse event occurring with the highest frequency was laryngospasm, occurring in 35 cases (0.50%). The postdischarge adverse event occurring with the highest frequency was nausea, reported by 99 patients (5.0%). This study provides strong clinical outcomes data to support the safety of office-based anesthesia as performed by dentist anesthesiologists in the treatment of pediatric dental patients. PMID:28858554

  11. Office-Based Anesthesia: Safety and Outcomes in Pediatric Dental Patients.

    PubMed

    Spera, Allison L; Saxen, Mark A; Yepes, Juan F; Jones, James E; Sanders, Brian J

    The number of children with caries requiring general anesthesia to achieve comprehensive dental care and the demand for dentist anesthesiologists to provide ambulatory anesthesia for these patients is increasing. No current published studies examine the safety and outcomes of ambulatory anesthesia performed by dentist anesthesiologists for dental procedures in pediatric patients, and there is no national requirement for reporting outcomes of these procedures. In 2010, the Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry was developed. This Web-based database allows providers of ambulatory anesthesia to track patient demographics and various outcomes of procedures. Our study is a secondary analysis of data collected in the registry over a 4-year period, 2010-2014. Of the 7041 cases reviewed, no cases resulted in serious complications, including death, anaphylaxis, aspiration, cardiovascular adverse events, or neurologic adverse events. Of the 7041 cases reviewed, 196 (3.0%) resulted in a predischarge or postdischarge adverse event. The predischarge adverse event occurring with the highest frequency was laryngospasm, occurring in 35 cases (0.50%). The postdischarge adverse event occurring with the highest frequency was nausea, reported by 99 patients (5.0%). This study provides strong clinical outcomes data to support the safety of office-based anesthesia as performed by dentist anesthesiologists in the treatment of pediatric dental patients.

  12. Craniofacial structures and dental development in three patients with Nager syndrome.

    PubMed

    Halonen, Katri; Hukki, Jyri; Arte, Sirpa; Hurmerinta, Kirsti

    2006-11-01

    In Finland, 3 patients have been diagnosed with Nager syndrome (NS) during the last 17 years. Thus the incidence for NS in Finland is 3:1,000,000. The craniofacial structures and dental development of these patients were studied clinically and radiographically at the age of 3-4 years, and compared to age-matched controls and to the norms of the Finnish population. The striking structural finding was a severely short, retrognathic and posteriorly rotated mandible. Especially the ramus was deficient; its height was, on average, less than one-third of that of the control group. All children were tracheostomized neonatally. At the age of 3-4, the lower pharyngeal airway was still severely obstructed or completely closed. Nasopharyngeal airway was wide and the soft palate was missing in all patients. All patients had a complete deciduous dentition, but agenesis of permanent teeth (ranging from 2-10 missing teeth) was observed in each patient. Accelerated dental development was found in two subjects. Condylar ankylosis or severely limited mouth opening were observed. The present findings give new information and quantify earlier observations of craniofacial structures and dental development in NS. Analysis of facial structures suggests that if surgical intervention is needed to enable better breathing, the goal of the structural correction should be aimed at the most deficient structure, namely the ramus height. As a result of severe dentofacial deviation, a treatment process through the growth requires multidisciplinary teamwork of surgeons, pediatrists, orthodontists and prosthodontists.

  13. Systematic literature review of digital three-dimensional superimposition techniques to create virtual dental patients.

    PubMed

    Joda, Tim; Brägger, Urs; Gallucci, German

    2015-01-01

    Digital developments have led to the opportunity to compose simulated patient models based on three-dimensional (3D) skeletal, facial, and dental imaging. The aim of this systematic review is to provide an update on the current knowledge, to report on the technical progress in the field of 3D virtual patient science, and to identify further research needs to accomplish clinical translation. Searches were performed electronically (MEDLINE and OVID) and manually up to March 2014 for studies of 3D fusion imaging to create a virtual dental patient. Inclusion criteria were limited to human studies reporting on the technical protocol for superimposition of at least two different 3D data sets and medical field of interest. Of the 403 titles originally retrieved, 51 abstracts and, subsequently, 21 full texts were selected for review. Of the 21 full texts, 18 studies were included in the systematic review. Most of the investigations were designed as feasibility studies. Three different types of 3D data were identified for simulation: facial skeleton, extraoral soft tissue, and dentition. A total of 112 patients were investigated in the development of 3D virtual models. Superimposition of data on the facial skeleton, soft tissue, and/or dentition is a feasible technique to create a virtual patient under static conditions. Three-dimensional image fusion is of interest and importance in all fields of dental medicine. Future research should focus on the real-time replication of a human head, including dynamic movements, capturing data in a single step.

  14. Dental patients' self-reports of xerostomia and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Villa, Alessandro; Polimeni, Antonella; Strohmenger, Laura; Cicciù, Domenico; Gherlone, Enrico; Abati, Silvio

    2011-07-01

    Most studies regarding xerostomia focus on elderly people. Therefore, the authors conducted a study of dental patients 18 years or older to determine the prevalence of self-reported xerostomia and associated risk factors. The authors sent a total of 2,200 questionnaires to four dental clinics to assess patients' self-reported xerostomia. They also collected sociodemographic data and information regarding personal behavior. They used logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95 percent confidence intervals (CI) to explore the relationship between self-reported xerostomia and risk factors that reasonably might be expected to be associated with self-reported xerostomia. The overall prevalence of xerostomia in participants was 7 percent. Participants with burning-mouth sensations were associated with having higher odds of experiencing dry mouth (OR, 2.1; 95 percent CI, 0.9-5.2). Participants 51 years or older were significantly more likely to report having dry mouth than were younger participants (P < .04). The prevalence of self-reported xerostomia increased with increasing numbers of medications patients reported using. The authors found that medication use and age were highly significant risk factors for dental patients reporting xerostomia. Clinicians should interview their patients carefully regarding their use of medications and provide proper oral health care to improve xerostomia resulting from medication use.

  15. Consumption and direct costs of dental care for patients with head and neck cancer: A 16-year cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Pär; Adolfsson, Jan; Ekbom, Anders; Naimi-Akbar, Aron; Bahmanyar, Shahram; Montgomery, Scott; Sandborgh-Englund, Gunilla

    2017-01-01

    Patients with head and neck (H&N) cancer are commonly treated with surgery and/or radiotherapy, which can increase the risk of oral infection, dental caries, and periodontal disease. The present study investigated dental care consumption and costs in patient with H&N cancer before and after the cancer diagnosis. Data from Swedish regional and national registers were used to follow up dental care utilization and dental procedure costs. The analysis included 2,754 patients who had been diagnosed with H&N cancer (exposed cohort) in Stockholm County, Sweden, during 2000–2012 and 13,036 matched persons without cancer (unexposed cohort). The exposed cohort was sub-grouped into irradiated and non-irradiated patients for analysis. The exposed cohort underwent a moderately higher number of dental procedures per year than the unexposed cohort in both the year of the cancer diagnosis and the year after cancer diagnosis; in addition, these numbers were higher in the irradiated than in the non-irradiated subgroup of the exposed cohort. Dental care consumption and costs in the exposed cohort declined over time but remained at a slightly higher level than in the unexposed cohort over the long term (more than two years). Examinations and preventive procedures accounted for most of the higher consumption in the short term (2 years) and at the longer term follow-up. Swedish national insurance subsidized costs for dental treatment, which were highest in the irradiated subgroup and lowest in the unexposed cohort. Direct costs to the patient, however, were similar among the groups. Swedish national health insurance protects patients with H&N cancer from high dental expenditures. Further studies on the cost-effectiveness of preventive dental care for patients are needed. PMID:28832673

  16. Consumption and direct costs of dental care for patients with head and neck cancer: A 16-year cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lexomboon, Duangjai; Karlsson, Pär; Adolfsson, Jan; Ekbom, Anders; Naimi-Akbar, Aron; Bahmanyar, Shahram; Montgomery, Scott; Sandborgh-Englund, Gunilla

    2017-01-01

    Patients with head and neck (H&N) cancer are commonly treated with surgery and/or radiotherapy, which can increase the risk of oral infection, dental caries, and periodontal disease. The present study investigated dental care consumption and costs in patient with H&N cancer before and after the cancer diagnosis. Data from Swedish regional and national registers were used to follow up dental care utilization and dental procedure costs. The analysis included 2,754 patients who had been diagnosed with H&N cancer (exposed cohort) in Stockholm County, Sweden, during 2000-2012 and 13,036 matched persons without cancer (unexposed cohort). The exposed cohort was sub-grouped into irradiated and non-irradiated patients for analysis. The exposed cohort underwent a moderately higher number of dental procedures per year than the unexposed cohort in both the year of the cancer diagnosis and the year after cancer diagnosis; in addition, these numbers were higher in the irradiated than in the non-irradiated subgroup of the exposed cohort. Dental care consumption and costs in the exposed cohort declined over time but remained at a slightly higher level than in the unexposed cohort over the long term (more than two years). Examinations and preventive procedures accounted for most of the higher consumption in the short term (2 years) and at the longer term follow-up. Swedish national insurance subsidized costs for dental treatment, which were highest in the irradiated subgroup and lowest in the unexposed cohort. Direct costs to the patient, however, were similar among the groups. Swedish national health insurance protects patients with H&N cancer from high dental expenditures. Further studies on the cost-effectiveness of preventive dental care for patients are needed.

  17. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea patients in community dental care: knowledge and attitudes among general dental practitioners and specialist dentists.

    PubMed

    Vuorjoki-Ranta, T-R; Lobbezoo, F; Vehkalahti, M; Tuomilehto, H; Ahlberg, J

    2016-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is an increasing problem worldwide. Yet, a large number of patients may remain undiagnosed. Dentists could suspect OSA, but little is known about their knowledge and attitudes towards the topic. An email questionnaire was sent to dentists working in Helsinki Health Centre, Helsinki, Finland (n = 226). It consisted of demographic data, items on dentists' overall knowledge of OSA and factors associated with it, and their possibilities and willingness to take part in the recognition and treatment of OSA patients. Altogether, 70·9% (n = 134) of dentists eligible for the study completed the questionnaire. Of them, 79·1% (n = 106) were general practitioners and 20·9% (n = 28) dentists with specialty training. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (99·3%) and weight control (99·3%) were both generally acknowledged as effective methods to treat OSA. Regarding the efficacy of other treatment modalities, significant differences were found between general practitioners' and specialists' opinions. For example, mandibular advancement devices (MAD) were less often reported by general practitioners (69·8%) than specialists (89·3%) (P < 0·05). The possible risk factors, signs and symptoms, and consequences of OSA were overall well recognised regardless the years in dental profession, but specialists saw more often that nocturnal sweating (P < 0·01) and snoring (P < 0·05) may signify OSA. Dentists could play an important role in suspecting OSA, but they may need more education to cope with that. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Factors associated with patients' satisfaction in Brazilian dental primary health care.

    PubMed

    Aldosari, Muath Abdullah; Tavares, Mary Angela; Matta-Machado, Antônio Thomaz Gonzaga; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães

    2017-01-01

    To assess factors associated with patients' satisfaction with the treatment by dentists in primary health care (PHC) in Brazil. The dataset was part of a nationwide cross-sectional survey for evaluating PHC teams conducted by the Brazilian Ministry of Health. Patients from each of 16,202 oral health teams were interviewed. In addition to sociodemographic information, the questionnaire included information about patient experience domains: access and booking of dental appointments, bonding and accountability, welcoming of the patient, and their perception of dental facilities. The dependent variable was the answer to the question 'From 0 to 10, how would you grade your satisfaction with treatment received from the dentist?' Negative binomial regression models were used to estimate the unadjusted and adjusted rate ratios and corresponding 95% confidence interval. The mean patient satisfaction was 9.4 (±2.3). Higher patient satisfaction with PHC was associated with lower education and the patient's perception of the clinic conditions. Moreover, higher satisfaction was associated with positive reception and hospitality, enough time for treatment, and instructions that met patients' needs. Lower satisfaction with PHC was associated with patients who have jobs compared to those who do not work. Patient satisfaction is increased with friendly and understanding PHC staff. Moreover, meeting patient expectations by taking time to understand the needs and giving the right instructions is associated with higher satisfaction.

  19. Practice Characteristics Associated with Patient-Specific Receipt of Dental Diagnostic Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Weems, Richard A; Litaker, Mark S; Shelton, Brent J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To quantify the role of practice characteristics in patient-specific receipt of dental diagnostic radiographic services. Data Source/Study Setting Florida Dental Care Study (FDCS). Study Design The FDCS was a 48-month prospective observational cohort study of community-dwelling adults. Participants' dentists were asked to complete a questionnaire about their practice characteristics. Data Collection/Extraction Methods In-person interviews and clinical examinations were conducted at baseline, 24, and 48 months, with 6-monthly telephone interviews in between. A single multivariate (four radiographic service outcomes) multivariable (multiple explanatory covariates) logistic regression was used to model service receipts. Principal Findings These practice characteristics were significantly associated with patient-specific receipt of radiographic services: number of different practices attended during follow-up; dentist's rating of how busy the practice was; typical waiting time for a new patient examination; practice size; percentage of patients that the dentist reported as interested in details about the condition of their mouths; percentage of African American patients in the practice; percentage of patients in the practice who do not have dental insurance; and dentist's agreement with a statement regarding whether patients should be dismissed from the practice. Effects had differential magnitudes and directions of effect, depending upon radiograph type. Conclusions Practice characteristics were significantly associated with patient-specific receipt of services. These effects were independent of patient-specific disease level and patient-specific sociodemographic characteristics, suggesting that practitioners do influence receipt of these diagnostic services. These findings are consistent with the conclusion that practitioners act in response to a mix of patients' interests, economic self-interests, and their own treatment preferences. PMID:16987308

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Pediatric Patients with Mental Retardation undergoing Dental Treatment under General Anesthesia: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Ravish; Jyoti, Bhuvan; Shewale, Vinod; Shetty, Shridhar; Subudhi, Santosh Kumar; Kaur, Manpreet

    2016-08-01

    Behavioral management of patients forms one of the foremost components of pediatric dental treatment. Some children readily cooperate with dental treatment, while others require general anesthesia as a part of treatment protocol for carrying out various dental procedures. Hence, we evaluated the pediatric patients with and without mental retardation, who underwent dental treatment under general anesthesia. The present study analyzed the record of 480 pediatric patients reporting in the department of pedodontics from 2008 to 2014. Analysis of the records of the patients who underwent dental treatment under general anesthesia was done and all the patients were divided into two study groups depending upon their mental level. For the purpose of evaluation, the patients were also grouped according to their age; 4 to 7 years, 8 to 12 years, and 13 to 18 years. Measurement of decayed, missing, and filled teeth and scores for both deciduous and permanent dentition was done before and after the commencement of the dental treatment. Chi-square test and independent t-test were used for evaluating the level of significance. While comparing the patients in the two groups, maximum number of patients is present in the age group of 13 to 18 years. While comparing the indices' score between the two study groups in various age intervals, no statistically significant results were obtained. Restorative treatment and dental extractions were the most common dental treatments that were seen at a higher frequency in the intellectual disability study group. In patients with mental retardation, a higher frequency of restorative treatment and extractions occurs as compared to healthy subjects of similar age group. Therefore, they require special attention regarding maintenance of their oral health. Special attention should be given for maintaining the oral health of patients with special health care needs as compared to their physically and mentally normal counterparts.

  1. Characteristics and Associated Comorbidities of Pediatric Dental Patients Treated under General Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Delfiner, Alexandra; Myers, Aaron; Lumsden, Christie; Chussid, Steve; Yoon, Richard

    To describe characteristics and identify common comorbidities of children receiving dental treatment under general anesthesia at Children's Hospital of New York-Presbyterian. Electronic medical records of all children that received dental treatment under general anesthesia through the Division of Pediatric Dentistry from 2012-2014 were reviewed. Data describing patient characteristics (age, sex, race/ethnicity, insurance carrier, and American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification system), medical history, and justification for treatment were collected. Descriptive statistics, including frequencies, percentages and t-tests, were calculated. A total of 298 electronic medical records were reviewed, of which 50 records were excluded due to missing information. Of the 248 electronic medical records included, the average age was 5-years-old and 58% were male. The most common reason for dental treatment under general anesthesia was extent and severity of dental disease (53%), followed by significant medical history (47%) and behavior/pre-cooperative age (39%). Those who were ASA III or IV were older (6.6-years) (p<.001). Common medical comorbidities appear evenly distributed: autism (12%), cardiac anomalies (14%), developmental delay (14%), genetic syndromes/chromosomal disorders (13%), and neurological disorders (12%). Younger age groups (1 to 2 years and 3 to 5 years) had a high percentage of hospitalizations due to the extent and severity of the dental disease (83%) and behavior (77%) (p<0.001). No single comorbidity was seen more often than others in this patient population. The range of medical conditions in this population may be a reflection of the range of pediatric specialty services at Children's Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian.

  2. Patients' experiences of dental implant treatment: A literature review of key qualitative studies.

    PubMed

    Kashbour, W A; Rousseau, N S; Ellis, J S; Thomason, J M

    2015-07-01

    To identify and summarise the findings of previous qualitative studies relating to patients' experience of dental implant treatment (DIT) at various stages of their implant treatment, by means of textual narrative synthesis. Original articles reporting patients' experience with dental implant were included. A two-stage search of the literature, electronic and hand search identified relevant qualitative studies up to July 2014. An extensive electronic search was conducted of databases including PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Database and Google Scholar. Included primary studies (n=10) used qualitative research methods and qualitative analysis to investigate patients' experiences with dental implants treatment. While the growing interest in implant treatment for the replacement of missing dentition is evident, it is essential to investigate patients' perceptions of different aspects of implant treatment. This textual narrative synthesis conducted to review qualitative studies which provided insight into patients' experience of two types of implant prostheses namely ISOD (implant-supported overdenture) and FISP (fixed implant supported prostheses). Primary reviewed studies tended to include samples of older patients with more extensive tooth loss, and to focus on experiences prior to and post-treatment rather than on the treatment period itself. Findings across reviewed studies (n=10) suggested that patients with FISP thought of implant treatment as a process of 'normalisation'(1) and believed that such implant restorations could be similar to natural teeth, whereas patients with ISOD focused more on the functional and social advantages of their implant treatment. The growing interest in qualitative research is evident in several branches of clinical dentistry and dental implantology is not an exception. Qualitative studies concerning the patients account of their experience of dental implants is however limited. The aim of this review is to

  3. Satisfaction of Dental Students, Faculty, and Patients with Tooth Shade-Matching Using a Spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Erin; Metz, Michael J; Harris, Bryan T; Metz, Cynthia J; Chou, Jang-Ching; Morton, Dean; Lin, Wei-Shao

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate dental students' clinical shade-matching outcomes (from subjective use of shade guide) with an objective electronic shade-matching tool (spectrophotometer); to assess patients', students', and supervising faculty members' satisfaction with the clinical shade-matching outcomes; and to assess clinicians' support for use of the spectrophotometer to improve esthetic outcomes. A total of 103 volunteer groups, each consisting of patient, dental student, and supervising faculty member at the University of Louisville, were recruited to participate in the study in 2015. Using the spectrophotometer, clinical shade-matching outcome (ΔE clinical ) and laboratory shade-matching outcome (ΔE laboratory ) were calculated. Two five-point survey items were used to assess the groups' satisfaction with the clinical shade-matching outcome and support for an objective electronic shade-matching tool in the student clinic. The results showed that both ΔE clinical (6.5±2.4) and ΔE laboratory (4.3±2.0) were outside the clinical acceptability threshold ΔE values of 2.7, when visual shade-matching method (subjective usage of shade guide) was used to fabricate definitive restorations. Characteristics of the patients, dental students, supervising faculty members, and restorations had minimal to no effect on the ΔE clinical The patients, dental students, and supervising faculty members generally had positive opinions about the clinical shade-matching outcome, despite the increased ΔE clinical observed. Overall, clinical shade-matching outcomes in this school need further improvement, but the patients' positive opinions may indicate the need to revisit the acceptability threshold ΔE value of 2.7 in the academic setting.

  4. [Improving the physician-dental surgeon relationship to improve patient care].

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Annabelle; Folliguet, Marysette; Berdougo, Brice; Hervé, Christian; Moutel, Grégoire

    2008-04-01

    This study had two aims: to assess the nature of the relationship between general practitioners (GPs) and dental surgeons in relation to patient care and to evaluate qualitatively their interest in the changes that health networks and shared patient medical files could bring. Questionnaires were completed by 12 GPs belonging to ASDES, a private practitioner-hospital health network that seeks to promote a partnership between physicians and dental surgeons, and by 13 private dental surgeons in the network catchment area. The GPs and dentists had quite different perceptions of their relationship. Most dentists rated their relationship with GPs as "good" to "excellent" and did not wish to modify it, while GPs rated their relationship with dentists as nonexistent and expressed a desire to change the situation. Some GPs and some dentists supported data exchange by sharing personal medical files through the network. Many obstacles hinder communication between GPs and dentists. There is insufficient coordination between professionals. Health professionals must be made aware of how changes in the health care system (health networks, personal medical files, etc) can help to provide patients with optimal care. Technical innovations in medicine will not be beneficial to patients unless medical education and training begins to include interdisciplinary and holistic approaches to health care and preventive care.

  5. Dental esthetics--instrument for recreating a new facial esthetic to the elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Scutariu, Mihaela Monica; Forna, Norina

    2014-01-01

    The major objective of this paper consists in underlining the wide range of possibilities in assessing the elderly patient; it relies on clinical examination in order to exclusively improve the patient's physiognomic aspect. In this context it has been organized a study which included 64 elderly patients aged between 60 and 90 years of age (median age 75), which presented themselves at the Clinical Service of Dental Semiology and Gerontostomatology between 2011-2012; they requested the restoration of the functions affected by odontal coronary lesions, periodontal disorders or edentations more or less expanded, malocclusions, malrelations of the mandible to the skull and unsuccessful or deteriorated dental or prosthetic treatments. The restoration of dental arches has been performed relying on common sense and power of discernment, respecting both facial features and expression by redimensioning the lower part of the face, repositioning the mandible and using gnatoprosthetic devices. Solving the problems elderly patients confront themselves with and the success of the treatment has been possible only after a correct assessment of the involutive phenomena that influence the oral cavity, after understanding the local and general factors that predispose to oral disorders as well as the differences between various techniques and materials.

  6. Managing pediatric dental patients: issues raised by the law and changing views of proper child care.

    PubMed

    Bross, Donald C

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine legal issues regarding the management of pediatric dental patients and changing views of proper child care. Standards of care in pediatric dentistry are not static. They change in response to research, patterns of reimbursement, patient and parental expectations of reasonable care, and consensus among practitioners. The law pertaining to accountability for pediatric dental patient treatment largely reflects standards of care established by the pediatric dentistry profession. However, the law can also reflect changes in public expectations of reasonable care that can effectively outrun the discipline's efforts to reflect new knowledge or changing public concerns. A major impetus for considering the care of children in all settings has been the increasing recognition of suboptimal children's care, as well as concerns that children have either been abused or neglected in a number of settings. Too often, practices towards children have been untested and based only on the assumption that what is done is "for the child's own good." Pediatric dentists can respond to changing standards of reasonable care for pediatric dental patients, as expressed in legal decisions. They can also usefully consider how attention to child maltreatment has sensitized parents to be better consumers of services on their children's behalf. Rather than reacting only to public pressures for better means of behavior management, the challenge is to exceed expectations via new research and thoughtful anticipation of improvements that can be made.

  7. Prevalence of Third Molar Agenesis: Associated Dental Anomalies in Non-Syndromic 5923 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sujon, Mamun Khan; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Rahman, Shaifulizan Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of third molar agenesis and other associated dental anomalies in Bangladeshi population and to investigate the relationship of other dental anomalies with the third molar presence/agenesis. A retrospective study was performed using panoramic radiographs of 5923 patients, who ranged in age from 10 to 50 years. All radiographs were analyzed by Planmeca Romexis® 3.0 software (Planmeca Oy, Helsinki, Finland). Pearson chi-square and one way ANOVA (Post Hoc) test were conducted. The prevalence of third molar agenesis was 38.4%. The frequency of third molar agenesis was significantly higher in females than males (p <0.025). Third molar agenesis was significantly more prevalent in maxilla as compared to mandible (p <0.007). The prevalence of other dental anomalies was 6.5%, among them hypodontia was 3.1%. Prevalence of third molar agenesis varies in different geographic region. Among the other dental anomalies hypodontia was more prevalent. PMID:27580050

  8. Prevalence of Third Molar Agenesis: Associated Dental Anomalies in Non-Syndromic 5923 Patients.

    PubMed

    Sujon, Mamun Khan; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Rahman, Shaifulizan Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of third molar agenesis and other associated dental anomalies in Bangladeshi population and to investigate the relationship of other dental anomalies with the third molar presence/agenesis. A retrospective study was performed using panoramic radiographs of 5923 patients, who ranged in age from 10 to 50 years. All radiographs were analyzed by Planmeca Romexis® 3.0 software (Planmeca Oy, Helsinki, Finland). Pearson chi-square and one way ANOVA (Post Hoc) test were conducted. The prevalence of third molar agenesis was 38.4%. The frequency of third molar agenesis was significantly higher in females than males (p <0.025). Third molar agenesis was significantly more prevalent in maxilla as compared to mandible (p <0.007). The prevalence of other dental anomalies was 6.5%, among them hypodontia was 3.1%. Prevalence of third molar agenesis varies in different geographic region. Among the other dental anomalies hypodontia was more prevalent.

  9. A usability evaluation of four commercial dental computer-based patient record systems

    PubMed Central

    Thyvalikakath, Thankam P.; Monaco, Valerie; Thambuganipalle, Hima Bindu; Schleyer, Titus

    2008-01-01

    Background The usability of dental computer-based patient record (CPR) systems has not been studied, despite early evidence that poor usability is a problem for dental CPR system users at multiple levels. Methods The authors conducted formal usability tests of four dental CPR systems by using a purposive sample of four groups of five novice users. The authors measured task outcomes (correctly completed, incorrectly completed and incomplete) in each CPR system while the participants performed nine clinical documentation tasks, as well as the number of usability problems identified in each CPR system and their potential relationship to task outcomes. The authors reviewed the software application design aspects responsible for these usability problems. Results The range for correctly completed tasks was 16 to 64 percent, for incorrectly completed tasks 18 to 38 percent and for incomplete tasks 9 to 47 percent. The authors identified 286 usability problems. The main types were three unsuccessful attempts, negative affect and task incorrectly completed. They also identified six problematic interface and interaction designs that led to usability problems. Conclusion The four dental CPR systems studied have significant usability problems for novice users, resulting in a steep learning curve and potentially reduced system adoption. Clinical Implications The significant number of data entry errors raises concerns about the quality of documentation in clinical practice. PMID:19047669

  10. Brazilian Dental Students' Attitudes About Provision of Care for Patients Living in Poverty.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Beatriz Ferraz; Madathil, Sreenath; Zuanon, Angela Cristina Cilense; Bedos, Christophe; Nicolau, Belinda

    2017-11-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate dental students' attitudes toward people living in poverty and the extent to which their perceptions were associated with their willingness to treat those patients in their future practice. All 910 dental students enrolled in three Brazilian public universities in 2010 were invited to take part in a cross-sectional survey. A total of 766 students (83.7% response rate) completed the self-administered questionnaire on their perceptions of and attitudes about poverty and their intention to provide dental care to poor people. The responding students showed slightly positive attitudes about people living in poverty; however, a high percentage (35%) reported thinking they were different from the rest of the population. Nevertheless, most of these students expressed willingness to provide care to underserved populations in their future practice; this willingness was found to be associated with their beliefs about poverty (OR 1.65; 95% CI=1.41-1.94). Overall, the study found that these dental students had altruistic views toward people living in poverty. However, they seemed to lack a deep understanding of poverty that may prevent them from acting on their good intentions.

  11. Prevalence, association, and sexual dimorphism of Carabelli's molar and shovel incisor traits amongst Jordanian population.

    PubMed

    Khraisat, A; Taha, Sahar T; Jung, R E; Hattar, S; Smadi, L; Al-Omari, I K; Jarbawi, M

    2007-09-01

    The correlation between dental morphological traits can be used as an indicator to show major ethnic differences. Therefore, this study investigated the prevalence of Carabelli's molar and shovel incisor traits and tested their association and sexual dimorphism in Jordanian population. Three hundred subjects of school children at their 10th grade and of 15.5-year as an average age were involved. Alginate impressions for the maxillary arch were taken, poured, and casts were then trimmed. The selected accurate casts were of 132 male- and 155 female-students. The examined morphologic traits were Carabelli's trait on the maxillary first and second molars and shovel-shaped incisors. The relationship between different traits was investigated by Nonparametric Correlation analysis and Independent Sample t test was used to test sexual dimorphism in trait expression. The prevalence of Carabelli's trait in maxillary first molar and shovel trait in maxillary central incisor was relatively high (65.0 % and 53.0 %, respectively). The prevalence of Carabelli's trait on maxillary second molars was 3.8 %. Nonparametric Correlations revealed a strongest positive correlation between Carabelli's trait on maxillary first molar and shovel trait in males (P = 0.005). Significant sexual dimorphism was only found in the prevalence of Carabelli's trait on maxillary first molar (P = 0.013) and shovel trait (P = 0.038). The Jordanian Population had comparatively high prevalence of Carabelli's molar and shovel incisor traits. There was a positive association between Carabelli's trait on maxillary first molar and shovel trait in males. Sexual dimorphism was evident in Carabelli's trait on maxillary first molar and shovel trait.

  12. Pressure ulcer prevention knowledge among Jordanian nurses: a cross- sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcer remains a significant problem in the healthcare system. In addition to the suffering it causes patients, it bears a growing financial burden. Although pressure ulcer prevention and care have improved in recent years, pressure ulcer still exists and occurs in both hospital and community settings. In Jordan, there are a handful of studies on pressure ulcer. This study aims to explore levels of knowledge and knowledge sources about pressure ulcer prevention, as well as barriers to implementing pressure ulcer prevention guidelines among Jordanian nurses. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design and a self-administered questionnaire, data was collected from 194 baccalaureate and master’s level staff nurses working in eight Jordanian hospitals. From September to October of 2011, their knowledge levels about pressure ulcer prevention and the sources of this knowledge were assessed, along with the barriers which reduce successful pressure ulcer care and prevention. ANOVA and t-test analysis were used to test the differences in nurses’ knowledge according to participants’ characteristics. Means, standard deviation, and frequencies were used to describe nurses’ knowledge levels, knowledge sources, and barriers to pressure ulcer prevention. Results The majority (73%, n = 141) of nurses had inadequate knowledge about pressure ulcer prevention. The mean scores of the test for all participants was 10.84 out of 26 (SD = 2.3, range = 5–17), with the lowest score in themes related to PU etiology, preventive measures to reduce amount of pressure/shear, and risk assessment. In-service training was the second source of education on pressure ulcer, coming after university training. Shortage of staff and lack of time were the most frequently cited barriers to carrying out pressure ulcer risk assessment, documentation, and prevention. Conclusions This study highlights concerns about Jordanian nurses’ knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention. The

  13. Intravenous sedation as an adjunct to advanced comprehensive dental implantology: the patient's perspective and operator satisfaction.

    PubMed

    McCrea, S J J

    2015-03-13

    The aim of this three-year study was to evaluate whether elective comprehensive dental implant procedures involving guided bone and soft tissue regeneration carried out under intravenous sedation (midazolam) would be influenced by patient self-reported pre-operative anxiety levels; age and gender; effect the level of sedation with respect to the amount of sedative administered and the time taken in the procedures; effect patient intra-operative cooperation, and post-operative levels of patient satisfaction; influence further acceptance of dental implant surgical procedures; effect intra-operative surgeon satisfaction and consequently his/her post-operative sense of achievement.Design Single centre general dental practice, open study as a clinical audit. One hundred and seventy-three consecutive patients undergoing prolonged surgical procedures involving dental implantology with the adjunctive facility of intravenous sedation were monitored with respect to self-reported levels of anxiety. Vital signs of heart rate, mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure and arterial oxygen saturation were recorded and monitored pre-intra- and post-surgery. A post-operative questionnaire was completed as to the perceptions of the level of sedation. A distinct relationship between self-reported pre-operative anxiety levels, age and gender were recorded - the younger the age, the higher the anxiety, with females dominating. Females required more midazolam than males. However, the analysis of the data as a whole, incorporating both genders, revealed a non-significant correlation result. The correlation between the midazolam dosage and the Corah anxiety score produced a p value result of: r (161) = 0.008, p <0.01. Forty-four percent of the patients described themselves as having 'high anxiety and fear of the dentist', however, 99.4% of the patients answered 'yes' to having sedation again in the future. For the purpose of this study, detailed consideration was given to the gender

  14. Prevalence of Oral Mucosal Lesions among Dental Patients with Mixed Habits in Salem District - A Study

    PubMed Central

    Karthik, R.; Mohan, N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The practice of betel nut chewing with or without tobacco is still practiced in south india, salem inspite of its harmful effects. Methodology: 200 Patients visiting the outpatient department, Oral medicine and radiology from Aug 2015 to Aug 2016. Result and Conclusion: In our study, 3 women were exclusively churut smokers. Thirty-eight percent of the dental patients were beedi smoker, 32% were tobacco chewers, 12% were both betel nut and tobacco chewers, 8% were exclusively betel nut chewers, 1% of the dental population were exclusively churut smokers. Mean age group of the study population is 50.2 (14.4). There are 28 females and 172 males in the study group. Chi-square test revealed a statistically significant difference (P = 0.001) between males and females based on soft-tissue findings and no statistically significant difference (P = 0.572) between males and females based on distribution of hard-tissue findings. PMID:29284937

  15. Teeth, vomiting and diet: a study of the dental characteristics of seventeen anorexia nervosa patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, P. S.; Lacey, L. H.; Crisp, A. H.

    1977-01-01

    Seventeen anorexia nervosa patients were examined dentally and their dietary histories and eating habits studied. Analysis of the data confirmed earlier observations dental deterioration associated with anorexia nervosa. The deterioration included a pattern of enamel dissolution in cases of vomiting, regurgitation, and/or the consumption of large amounts of citrus fruits; and an altered caries response due to abnormal carbohydrate consumption. Despite the patient's probably insistent denial of 'anorectic' eating habits, the general practitioner should consider the existence of anorexia nervosa in the presence of such abnormal features, especially in young women. The relationship of these findings to larger populations with similar eating habits is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:887527

  16. Perspectives on providing good access to dental services for elderly people: patient selection, dentists' responsibility and budget management.

    PubMed

    Grytten, Jostein; Holst, Dorthe

    2013-06-01

    To suggest a model for organizing and financing dental services for elderly people so that they have good access to services. There are few studies on how dental services for elderly people should be organized and financed. This is surprising if we take into consideration the fact that the proportion of elderly people is growing faster than any other group in the population, and that elderly people have more dental diseases and poorer access to dental services than the rest of the adult population. In several countries, dental services are characterized by private providers who often operate in a market with competition and free price-setting. Private dentists have no community responsibility, and they are free to choose which patients they treat. Literature review and critical reasoning. In order to avoid patient selection, a patient list system for elderly people is recommended, with per capita remuneration for the patients that the dentist is given responsibility for. The patient list system means that the dentist assumes responsibility for a well-defined list of elderly people. Our model will lead to greater security in the dentist/patient relationship, and patients with great treatment needs will be ensured access to dental services. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Quantity and quality analysis of dental prosthodontics among retirement age residents from nursing homes in different regions of Latvia and retirement age patients from dental clinic in Riga.

    PubMed

    Vidzis, Aldis; Cema, Ingrida; Brinkmane, Anda; Krasta, Ingrida; Broka, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    The quality of life is closely related with condition of oral health, influence of subjective factors on the whole human body and patients perception of their oral health. In spite of the fact that the most part of Latvian retirement age residents use low-quality dentures and assess them satisfactory, these patients often have problems associated with quality of dentures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate oral health status, prosthodontics indicators and patients satisfaction with oral health among Latvian retirement age residents. There were examined 465 retirement age volunteers (170 men and 295 women), 116 of them in dental clinic Sandent (Riga, 24.9% - control group), 137 (29.5%) in nursing homes in Zemgale and 212 (45.6%) in nursing homes in Kurzeme (Zemgale and Kurzeme are districts of Latvia). There were assessed quantity of prosthodontics among patients with partial defects of dental arches, there were estimated quality of dentures and patients satisfaction with existing prosthodontics. Oral health indicators among Latvian retirement age population are better than the same indicators among elderly residents of nursing homes. Among nursing homes residents with partial edentulousness in most of cases in oral cavities remained only few residual teeth which needed treatment. Removable and fixed dental prostheses used by nursing homes residents do not meet denture's quality criteria. Self-evaluation of dentures quality among retirement age residents of nursing homes is better and not correspond with existing dentures quality. In Latvia the quantity of prosthodontics in respect of partial removable dentures among the retired who regularly visit a dentist does not significantly differ from European retirement age population's dental prosthodontics quantity. Dental prosthodontics indicators of residents of nursing homes in Latvia are unsatisfactory (p<0.001). In retirement age population self-evaluation with quality of dentures is higher than actually

  18. Patients' Willingness to Participate in Rapid HIV Testing: A pilot study in three New York City dental hygiene clinics.

    PubMed

    Davide, Susan H; Santella, Anthony J; Furnari, Winnie; Leuwaisee, Petal; Cortell, Marilyn; Krishnamachari, Bhuma

    2017-12-01

    Purpose: One in eight people living with an HIV infection in the United States is unaware of their status. Rapid HIV testing (RHT) is an easily used and accepted screening tool that has been introduced in a limited number of clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to investigate patient acceptability, certainty of their decision, and willingness to pay for screening if RHT was offered in university-based dental hygiene clinics. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was administered to 426 patients at three dental hygiene clinics in New York City over a period of four months. The survey questionnaire was based on the decisional conflict scale measuring personal perceptions; with zero indicating extremely high conflict to four indicating no conflict. Patients were assessed for their acceptance of RHT, provider preference for administration of the test and their willingness to pay for RHT. Results: Over half (72.2%) indicated acceptance of HIV testing in a dental hygiene clinic setting; with 85.3% choosing oral RHT, 4.9% fingerstick RHT, and 8.8% venipuncture. Respondents were amenable to testing when offered by dental hygienists (71.7%) and dentists (72.4%). Over 30% indicated their willingness to receive HIV testing in the dental setting when offered at no additional cost. The mean decisional conflict score was 3.42/4.0 indicating no decisional conflict. Conclusions: Patients are willing to undergo oral RHT when offered as a service and provided by dental hygienists in the dental setting. Patients appear to be aware of the benefits and risks associated with RHT. Further research is needed to evaluate the public health benefits and logistical challenges facing the delivery of RHT within in the dental setting. Copyright © 2017 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  19. Patient characteristics in relation to dental care payment model: capitation vs fee for service.

    PubMed

    Hakeberg, M; Wide Boman, U

    2016-12-01

    To analyse patient profiles in two payment models, the capitation (DCH) and the fee-for-service (FFS) systems, in relation to socioeconomic status, self-reported health and health behavior, as well as patient attitudes to and satisfaction with the DCH model in the Public Dental Service (PDS) in Sweden. The present survey included a random national sample of the adult population in Sweden. A telemarketing company, TNS SIFO, was responsible for the sample selection and telephone interviews conducted in May 2013. The 3,500 adults (aged =19 years) included in the sample gave a participation rate of 49.7%. Individuals choosing DCH were younger. FFS patients rated their health as less good, were less physically active, were more often smokers and had a lower household income. The DCH patients were more satisfied with their payment model than the FFS patients (98% vs 85%). A multivariate analysis showed that three of the variables significantly contributed to the model predicting DCH patients: age, with an odds ratio of 0.95, household income (OR=1.85) and importance of oral health for well-being (OR=2.05). There was a pattern of dimensions indicating the choice of payment model among adult patients in the Swedish Public Dental Service. The patients in DCH had higher socioeconomic position, were younger, rated their oral health as better and were more satisfied with the payment model (DCH) than the patients in the FFS system. Copyright© 2016 Dennis Barber Ltd

  20. Patients' knowledge and expectations regarding dental implants: assessment by questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Rustemeyer, J; Bremerich, A

    2007-09-01

    Today, modern implant dentistry appeals to a wide population, but the decision for and the success of implants depend on the knowledge and expectations of patients. The aim of this study was, with the help of a questionnaire, to evaluate the level of patient knowledge before a professional consultation was performed, and hence to be better prepared in the interests of patient awareness. Fifty-eight percent of 315 patients questioned thought that implants require the same care as natural teeth, 61% expected an additional payment of 2000 Euro or less, 80% held the function of an implant-supported overdenture as very important and 54% attached great importance to the aesthetics. The expectations that patients have for an implant-supported set are high in contrast to their willingness to make additional payments. There are still misconceptions regarding costs, and these must be resolved individually in practice.

  1. Childhood Obesity: Dental hygienists' beliefs attitudes and barriers to patient education.

    PubMed

    Cole, Doreen Dawn M; Boyd, Linda D; Vineyard, Jared; Giblin-Scanlon, Lori J

    2018-04-01

    Purpose: Increasing childhood obesity rates present a significant threat to public health. The purpose of this study was to explore dental hygienists' (DH) beliefs, attitudes, knowledge, current practices, and barriers for assessing and educating patients about childhood obesity. Methods: A random sample of DHs (n=13,357) was selected and emailed a link to the validated survey. Of the 1046 respondents who accessed the survey, 919 completed the survey for a completion rate of 89%. Results: A majority of the respondents understood the risk of chronic disease and obesity (99%), role sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) play as added sugar content in the diet (76%), and the amount of SSBs consumed by youth (91%). Participants felt current research showed an association between obesity and periodontal disease (62%), but were unsure of the association between obesity and dental caries (51%). Most respondents never measure height and weight (91%) or plot BMI (94%). Fifty-one percent always provide nutritional counseling to reduce consumption of SSBs, but only sometimes provide nutritional counseling for healthy eating (61%). Respondents had a slightly positive attitude (mean score=4.15, SD=14.58) about assessing and educating for childhood obesity. Major barriers reported were time constraints (63%), and fear of offending the patient or parent (47%). Regression showed attitudes towards patient's nutrition, exercise, and weight predicted the dental hygienist behavior. Conclusion: DHs have some understanding of the risks of obesity and general/oral health, but lack adequate training, knowledge, and confidence to provide obesity counseling in clinical practice settings. There is a need for further education to address the lack of knowledge about nutritional guidelines and practitioners' beliefs regarding addressing childhood obesity without offending the patient or parent. Copyright © 2018 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  2. Dental implants placement in paranoid squizofrenic patient with obsessive-compulsive disorder: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Corcuera-Flores, José-Ramón; Mesa-Cabrera, María; Cabrera-Domínguez, José; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Machuca-Portillo, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Background Paranoid schizophrenia is a mental illness that involves no observable anatomical alteration. Main characteristic affects the personality of the individual, as well as areas of his own psychology. Case Report A 33-year-old man with paranoid schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder in treatment with Haloperidol, Oxcarbazepine, Olanzapine and Seroquel is presented. Dental exploration showed widespread decay mostly cervical with numerous root fragments, agenesis of lateral incisors, impacted wisdom teeth, missing teeth and malocclusion. Treatment plan included restoration of teeth decay, extractions of root fragments and implant-supported prostheses in bilateral upper lateral incisors for aesthetics reason. A previous consultation with a psychiatric specialist was performed and no contraindication were observed. A preliminary radiological examination was performed previous dental treatment and implant placement. Due to patient refusal to replace dental abscenses with implants, inform consent was signed up from his parents. After local anesthesia, first implant was placed at upper right lateral positions (Straumann Bone Level Ø 3.3 mm, length 10 mm). Two weeks later a second implant was placed at upper left lateral position (Straumann Bone Level Ø 3.3 mm, length 12 mm). The patient showed no postoperative complications. After implant placement, the patient attended scheduled review appointments. The prosthesis was placed after a 3-month period of osseointegration. Conclusions Implant placement can be considered a suitable option for people with mental disorders. A previous consultation with psychiatric specialists for conducting a good patient management is necessaire. Key words:Paranoid schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, dental implants. PMID:29302292

  3. Two case reports of orofacial paraesthesia demonstrating the role of the general dental practitioner in identifying patients with intracranial tumours.

    PubMed

    Barber, Andrew J; Lawson, David D A; Field, E Anne

    2009-04-01

    The following case reports describe the clinical features, diagnosis and management of two patients who presented to their general dental practitioner with a complaint of orofacial paraesthesia. After appropriate investigations, both patients were diagnosed as having benign intracranial tumours and were managed by a neurosurgeon. These cases illustrate the important role the general dental practitioner has in the early recognition of potentially life-threatening conditions.

  4. The Unmet Supportive Care Needs of Arab Australian and Arab Jordanian Cancer Survivors: An International Comparative Survey.

    PubMed

    Alananzeh, Ibrahim M; Levesque, Janelle V; Kwok, Cannas; Salamonson, Yenna; Everett, Bronwyn

    2018-05-14

    Research exploring the unmet supportive care needs of Arab cancer survivors is limited, with most conducted with immigrant groups. No study has compared the unmet supportive care needs of immigrant Arab cancer survivors with Arab cancer survivors living in their native country. To explore the unmet supportive care needs of both Arab Australian and Arab Jordanian cancer survivors. Arab people living in Sydney, Australia, and Amman, Jordan, and diagnosed with cancer within the last 5 years were invited to complete a questionnaire that measured unmet supportive care needs, depression, and language acculturation. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of unmet supportive care needs. Seventy-seven Arab Jordanian and 66 Arab Australian cancer survivors were recruited. Australian participants were older than their Jordanian counterparts (61.5 vs 52.3 years; P < .001) and reported higher levels of overall unmet needs (44.9 vs 36.1; P = .012). Controlling for age and stage of cancer diagnosis, higher levels of depression (β = .34) and living in Australia (β = .26) were significant predictors of unmet needs and explained almost 17% of the variance. These findings have extended our understanding of the unmet supportive care needs of Arab cancer survivors and confirm disparities in unmet needs in immigrant populations. Greater attention is needed to ensure the supportive care needs are met for immigrant patients with cancer. Additional strategies to address physical and psychological needs are particularly needed in this group.

  5. Comparing the profile of child patients attending dental general anaesthesia and conscious sedation services.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, S; Hosey, M T; Bernabe, E

    2017-05-12

    Aims To compare the profile of paediatric patients receiving dental treatment under general anaesthesia (GA) or conscious sedation (CS). A second aim was to explore whether there is an overlap between the two patient groups.Design This service evaluation study was based on sociodemographic and clinical data extracted from clinical records of patients attending dental appointments for GA or CS services at King's College Hospital. Sociodemographic and clinical differences between GA and CS groups were explored using logistic regression models.Results Data from 113 children (58 GA and 55 CS) were analysed. There were differences between groups in terms of age and numbers of quadrants and teeth treated, but not in terms of sex, ethnicity or deprivation scores. In the adjusted model, older children and those having more teeth treated were more likely to be in the GA than in the CS group. An overlap between the GA and CS groups was found, with 50% of children aged four to nine years having two to four teeth treated in both groups.Conclusion Age and number of teeth treated were the main characteristics associated with receiving care under GA or CS. Some overlap between children receiving dental treatment under GA or CS existed despite demographic and clinical differences between both groups.

  6. Serotype distribution of Streptococcus mutans a pathogen of dental caries in cardiovascular specimens from Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Kazuhiko; Nemoto, Hirotoshi; Nomura, Ryota; Homma, Hiromi; Yoshioka, Hideo; Shudo, Yasuhiro; Hata, Hiroki; Toda, Koichi; Taniguchi, Kazuhiro; Amano, Atsuo; Ooshima, Takashi

    2007-04-01

    The involvement of oral bacteria in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease has been studied, with Streptococcus mutans, a pathogen of dental caries, detected in cardiovascular lesions at a high frequency. However, no information is available regarding the properties of S. mutans detected in those lesions. Heart valve specimens were collected from 52 patients and atheromatous plaque specimens from 50 patients, all of whom underwent cardiovascular operations, and dental plaque specimens were taken from 41 of those subjects prior to surgery. Furthermore, saliva samples were taken from 73 sets of healthy mothers (n=73) and their healthy children (n=78). Bacterial DNA was extracted from all specimens, then analysed by PCR with S. mutans-specific and serotype-specific primer sets. The detection rates of S. mutans in the heart valve and atheromatous plaque specimens were 63 and 64 %, respectively. Non-c serotypes were identified with a significantly higher frequency in both cardiovascular and dental plaque samples from the subjects who underwent surgery as compared to serotype c, which was detected in 70-75 % of the samples from the healthy subjects. The serotype distribution in cardiovascular patients was significantly different from that in healthy subjects, suggesting that S. mutans serotype may be related to cardiovascular disease.

  7. Dental Hygiene Students' Perceptions of Importance and Confidence in Applying Motivational Interviewing During Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Mills, Angela; Kerschbaum, Wendy E; Richards, Philip S; Czarnecki, Gail A; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne E

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based, patient-centered counseling approach for eliciting behavior change. In 2012, the University of Michigan (U-M) Dental Hygiene Program significantly enhanced their behavior change curriculum by reinforcing and building upon the Motivational Interviewing segment. The purpose of this study was to examine students' perceptions of the importance of MI and their confidence in applying it during patient care. Methods: A convenience sample of 22 U-M Class of 2015 dental hygiene students who had received an enhanced curriculum participated in this study, utilizing a retrospective, pre-test/post-test design. Results: A Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare the differences in average ranks between T1 (Retrospective Pre-Test) and T4 (Post-Test 3) for the importance and confidence questions at each time point for the Class of 2015. Students' perceptions of importance increased with statistical significance in five out of eight MI strategies. Perceptions in confidence increased in seven out of eight strategies. Effect size ranged from .00 to .55. Assessment of qualitative data provided additional insight on student experiences. Conclusion: Student perceptions of importance of using MI and their confidence in applying MI increased in a majority of the strategy categories. Successes with patient health behavior change and challenges with time to integrate this in practice were noted. Research on the longitudinal impact and faculty feedback calibration is recommended. Copyright © 2017 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  8. Health Literacy Approaches to Improving Communication between Dental Hygienists and Patients for HPV-Related Oral Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Erika L; Daley, Ellen M; Vamos, Cheryl A; Horowitz, Alice M; Catalanotto, Frank A; DeBate, Rita D; Merrell, Laura K; Griner, Stacey B; Vazquez-Otero, Coralia; Kline, Nolan S

    2017-08-01

    Purpose: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as a causal agent for oropharyngeal cancers, suggesting a new role for dental hygienists in HPV-related cancer prevention strategies. Health literacy assessment is an approach that can be used to understand providers' informational assets and needs for educating and discussing HPV prevention with patients. This study aimed to understand dental hygienists' level of health literacy regarding HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers. Methods: Four focus group sessions with dental hygienists (n=48) were conducted at a national conference. The constant comparison method, with a priori codes for health literacy competencies (i.e., access/understand/appraise/apply), was utilized for this qualitative study. Results: Participants mentioned a variety of modes (e.g., magazines, journals) for accessing HPV-information; however, descriptions of understanding HPV and its relationship to oropharyngeal cancer varied. Participants considered patients' personal characteristics, the dental practice environment, and professional factors to appraise HPV-related information. Additionally, participants self-described themselves as being "prevention specialists." These factors influenced how dental hygienists applied primary and secondary prevention of HPV-related care issues with their patients (e.g., education and oral-cancer screenings). Conclusions: Dental hygienists recognized the importance of HPV and oropharyngeal cancer prevention efforts, including oral-cancer screenings and promotion of the HPV vaccine. The study findings identified opportunities for intervention focusing on primary prevention. Copyright © 2017 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  9. Approaches To Teaching Science in the Jordanian Primary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qualter, Anne; Abu-Hola, I. R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a study of the influence of different approaches to teaching units from the Jordanian science curriculum on over 600 students from grades 6, 9, and 10. Trains a small sample of male and female teachers in the use of cooperative learning and lecture-demonstration approaches to teaching. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/YDS)

  10. The Licensing of Negative Sensitive Items in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsarayreh, Atef

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the licensing conditions on Negative Sensitive Items (NSIs) in Jordanian Arabic (JA). JA exhibits both types of NSIs that are discussed in the literature: Negative Polarity Items (NPIs) and Negative Concord Items (NCIs). Although these two sets of items seem to form a natural class in the sense that they show certain…

  11. Quality of Life of Students with Disabilites Attending Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zboon, Eman; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Theeb, Raied Sheikh

    2014-01-01

    In spite of increasing number of students with disabilities in universities, there is limited research on quality of life of these students. This study aimed to identify the quality of life level of undergraduate students with disabilities at Jordanian universities. The sample consisted of (147) students. A quality of life scale was constructed,…

  12. Obesity and Body Size Preferences of Jordanian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madanat, Hala; Hawks, Steven R.; Angeles, Heidi N.

    2011-01-01

    The nutrition transition is associated with increased obesity rates and increased desire to be thin. This study evaluates the relationship between actual body size and desired body size among a representative sample of 800 Jordanian women. Using Stunkard's body silhouettes, women were asked to identify their current and ideal body sizes, healthy…

  13. Barriers of Using Educational Games in Jordanian Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljaraideh, Yousef Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the barriers that prevent Jordanian teachers at primary schools in Jerash governorate from using computer games into the classroom. To achieve this goal, a descriptive analysis procedure was used in this study. The sample of study consisted of (240) English, Mathematics and social studies teachers. The questionnaire…

  14. Instant Messaging Language in Jordanian Female School Students' Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabab'ah, Ghaleb A.; Rabab'ah, Bayan B.; Suleiman, Nour A.

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to examine the existence of Instant Messaging language phenomenon among female teenagers in some Jordanian private schools and its influence on their learning experience, mainly literacy. It also raises questions about the characteristics of textese as well as teachers' attitude towards their students' use of SMS language in their…

  15. Jordanian Preservice Primary Teachers' Perceptions of Mentoring in Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abed, Osama H.; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    Quality mentoring is fundamental to preservice teacher education because of its potential to help student and novice teachers develop the academic and pedagogical knowledge and skills germane to successful induction into the profession. This study focused on Jordanian preservice primary teachers' perceptions of their mentoring experiences as these…

  16. The Syntax of Elliptical Constructions in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Bukhari, Juman

    2016-01-01

    The syntax of Arabic elliptical constructions is unsettled, as there are few studies that have been done in the Arabic descriptive literature, as well as in Jordanian Arabic (henceforth, JA) specifically. Therefore, this paper will investigate some elliptical constructions in JA in particular to figure out the analysis of these constructions. In…

  17. Negative Particles and Morphemes in Jordanian Arabic Dialects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mrayat, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating the negative particles and morphemes in three main Jordanian dialects (Urban, Rural and Bedouin). This quantitative and qualitative study includes 30 teachers from different disciplines who use these dialects. The sample of the study was selected randomly. The research used two research instruments, a checklist and…

  18. The New Faculty Members' Concerns: The Case of Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qudais, Mahmoud Abu; Al-Omari, Aieman; Smadi, Rana

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify and interpret concerns of the new faculty members in Jordanian universities. A total of 336 new faculty members who participated in this study were asked to rate their perceptions of issues related to teaching, research, service, balancing work and home life and the academic culture of their workplace. Means and…

  19. Overt and Null Subject Pronouns in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Momani, Islam M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims at examining the role that morphology plays in allowing and/or motivating sentences in Jordanian Arabic (hereafter JA) to be formed with or without subject pronouns. It also aims at giving a comprehensive and descriptive presentation of the distribution of overt and null subject pronouns in JA, and tries to determine to what extent…

  20. Jordanian School Counselors' Knowledge about and Attitudes toward Diabetes Mellitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannous, Adel G.; Khateeb, Jamal M.; Khamra, Hatem A.; Hadidi, Muna S.; Natour, Mayada M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and attitudes of Jordanian school counselors toward diabetes mellitus. A sample of 295 counselors completed a questionnaire consisting of two parts concerning knowledge and attitudes. The face validity of the questionnaire was assessed using an informed panel of judges, and its reliability was established…

  1. Quality of Work Life: Perceptions of Jordanian Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zboon, Eman K.; Al_Dababneh, Khuloud A. H.; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the level of quality of work life QOWL of Jordanian special education teachers. Participants of the study were 133 special education teachers. Results showed that special education teachers cited average level of QOWL. Furthermore, teachers rated administrators' and colleagues' respect as the…

  2. A survey of general dental practitioners in the North West of England concerning the dental care of patients following head and neck radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Husein, Adam B; Butterworth, Chris J; Ranka, Meena S; Kwasnicki, Andrew; Rogers, Simon N

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this survey was to investigate the views of general dental practitioners (GDPs) on their perceived roles and the barriers regarding dental care of patients following head and neck radio-therapy. From a total of 1163 GDPs on the Mersey Postgraduate Dental Deanery mailing list, 369 were selected at random. Questionnaires were sent out in February 2010 followed by reminders a month later. A study-specific questionnaire was piloted prior to the survey. One hundred and ninety-eight of the potential 336 respondents returned valid questionnaires, a response rate of 59%. They did not respond to all questions. Of those who responded, 99/188 (53%) were either 'not at all' or 'little' happy about managing these patients and 118/183 (64%) and 100/173 (58%), respectively, perceived that complex management and the new General Dental Services (nGDS) contract introduced in 2006 were 'quite a bit' or 'very much' barriers to treatment. The majority of the respondents felt that they were 'quite a bit' or 'very much' happy to carry out routine fillings (177/195; 90%), periodontal treatment (166/195; 85%), removable dentures (161/195; 83%), crown and bridge work (123/192; 64%), and root canal therapy (114/195; 58%) but only 53/191 (28%) to perform dental extractions. Over half of the respondents felt that they had 'quite a bit' or a 'main role' in managing radiotherapy caries, xerostomia, detecting recurrence and offering smoking-cessation advice. The majority of the GDPs who responded had been involved in the management of patients who had undergone radio-therapy to the head and neck. A substantial number perceived barriers to care, such as the complexity of the treatment and the nGDS contract. These findings need further investigation. Continuing professional development would be helpful to improve GDPs' confidence in dealing with this group of patients.

  3. Dental postoperative bleeding complications in patients with suspected and documented liver disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, C H; Scobey, M W; Napenas, J J; Brennan, M T; Lockhart, P B

    2012-10-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of bleeding complications following dental procedures in patients with known or suspected chronic liver disease and whether international normalized ratio (INR) determination could aid in predicting bleeding complications in these patients. We identified 90 patients (mean age: 51 ± 9 years) in this retrospective chart review. Sixty-nine patients had a known history of chronic liver disease and 21 had suspected chronic liver disease. Descriptive statistics were determined. Independent sample t-test and one-way variance test were utilized for continuous variables and chi-square test for dichotomous variables. The mean INR value for all patients was 1.2 ± 0.3. The INR value was significantly associated with the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis, the diagnoses of Hepatitis B and C together, the presence of ascites alone, and the number of clinical signs and symptoms (i.e. ascites, jaundice and encephalopathy) present. Nine patients with INR values between 1.5 and 2 underwent invasive dental procedures without postoperative bleeding complications. There were no episodes of postoperative bleeding in patients. The findings suggest that clinicians should not rely solely on an INR value to predict post-procedure bleeding in patients with liver disease. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy prior to dental treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Werner, C W; Saad, T F

    1999-01-01

    In the United States, there is a large and growing population of patients undergoing dialysis because of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). These patients present special management considerations for dentists, including antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of bacterial endocarditis (BE). ESRD patients, particularly those with an arteriovenous shunt for hemodialysis access, are predisposed to valvular endocarditis. Thus, BE prevention is the primary goal of antibiotic prophylaxis prior to dental or other invasive procedures in these patients. Bacteremia may predispose to infection of synthetic vascular access grafts, although this form of endovascular infection in ESRD patients has not been as well-characterized as BE. Antibiotic prophylaxis may be of some benefit for prevention of synthetic graft infections as well as BE. Poor dentist and physician compliance with BE prophylaxis regimens, as well as errors in dosing, timing, or duration of prophylaxis, have been reported. These problems are of particular concern in the treatment of chronically ill patients. In this article, we review the rationale for prophylactic antibiotic therapy prior to dental procedures in ESRD patients with vascular access. We also elaborate on the current American Heart Association guidelines for BE prophylaxis, and address special considerations for ESRD patients.

  5. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  6. Effectiveness and Comparison of Various Audio Distraction Aids in Management of Anxious Dental Paediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Navit, Saumya; Johri, Nikita; Khan, Suleman Abbas; Singh, Rahul Kumar; Chadha, Dheera; Navit, Pragati; Sharma, Anshul; Bahuguna, Rachana

    2015-12-01

    Dental anxiety is a widespread phenomenon and a concern for paediatric dentistry. The inability of children to deal with threatening dental stimuli often manifests as behaviour management problems. Nowadays, the use of non-aversive behaviour management techniques is more advocated, which are more acceptable to parents, patients and practitioners. Therefore, this present study was conducted to find out which audio aid was the most effective in the managing anxious children. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of audio-distraction aids in reducing the anxiety of paediatric patients while undergoing various stressful and invasive dental procedures. The objectives were to ascertain whether audio distraction is an effective means of anxiety management and which type of audio aid is the most effective. A total number of 150 children, aged between 6 to 12 years, randomly selected amongst the patients who came for their first dental check-up, were placed in five groups of 30 each. These groups were the control group, the instrumental music group, the musical nursery rhymes group, the movie songs group and the audio stories group. The control group was treated under normal set-up & audio group listened to various audio presentations during treatment. Each child had four visits. In each visit, after the procedures was completed, the anxiety levels of the children were measured by the Venham's Picture Test (VPT), Venham's Clinical Rating Scale (VCRS) and pulse rate measurement with the help of pulse oximeter. A significant difference was seen between all the groups for the mean pulse rate, with an increase in subsequent visit. However, no significant difference was seen in the VPT & VCRS scores between all the groups. Audio aids in general reduced anxiety in comparison to the control group, and the most significant reduction in anxiety level was observed in the audio stories group. The conclusion derived from the present study was that audio distraction

  7. Comparison of two oral health-related quality of life measures among adult dental patients.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Folake B; Taiwo, Juliana O; Arowojolu, Modupe O

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly used oral health related quality of life measures, Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) and Oral Impact on Daily Performances (OIDP), are affected by cultural and linguistic factors, which may be intensified in a treatment-need driven society. This study therefore aimed to compare the psychometric properties of the OHIP-14 and OIDP measures in adult patients in Nigeria where patients typically visit the dentist when dental problems arise. This was a cross-sectional study in which 264 patients attending two dental clinics were recruited. Data were collected with OHIP-14 and OIDP structured interviewer-administered questionnaires, global self-report and perceived need for dental treatment questions and by oral examination. Data collected were subjected to statistical analysis using SPSS version 19 and the level of statistical significance was set at a p-value of 0.05. The majority (61.0%) rated their oral health status poorly and 203 (76.9%) perceived a need for treatment. The average OHIP and OIDP scores were 12.0 (range 0 to 56) and 8.9 (range 0 to 40), respectively. Both instruments showed a high index of validity and reliability; both had similar face and content validity, however, OIDP had better criterion validity while OHIP-14 had better construct validity and internal consistency. Both OHIP-14 and OIDP are precise, valid and reliable for evaluation of OHRQOL where dental care is treatment-need driven. They are able to discriminate between groups according to their perception of oral health status, but with OIDP detecting fewer impacts on daily activities.

  8. Zirconia Dental Implants: Investigation of Clinical Parameters, Patient Satisfaction, and Microbial Contamination.

    PubMed

    Holländer, Jens; Lorenz, Jonas; Stübinger, Stefan; Hölscher, Werner; Heidemann, Detlef; Ghanaati, Shahram; Sader, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, dental implants made from zirconia have been further developed and are considered a reliable treatment method for replacing missing teeth. The aim of this study was to analyze dental implants made from zirconia regarding their clinical performance compared with natural teeth (control). One hundred six zirconia implants in 38 adults were analyzed in a clinical study after 1 year of loading. The plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing pocket depth (PPD), probing attachment level (PAL), and creeping or recession (CR/REC) of the gingiva were detected and compared with natural control teeth (CT). Furthermore, the papilla index (PAP), Periotest values (PTV), microbial colonization of the implant/dental sulcus fluid, and patient satisfaction were assessed. The survival rate was 100%. No statistical significance was observed between implants and teeth regarding BOP, PPD, and PAL. A statistical significance was detected regarding PI and CR/REC with significantly less plaque accumulation and recession in the study group. Mean PAP was 1.76 ± 0.55, whereas the mean PTV was -1.31 ± 2.24 (range from -5 to +6). A non-statistically significant higher colonization of periodontitis/peri-implantitis bacteria was observed in the implant group. The questionnaire showed that the majority of the patients were satisfied with the overall treatment. One-piece zirconia dental implants exhibited similar clinical results (BOP, PPD, and PAL) compared with natural teeth in regard to adhesion of plaque (PI) and creeping attachment (CR/REC); zirconia implants performed even better. The favorable results for PAL and CR/REC reflect the comparable low affinity of zirconia for plaque adhesion. Patient satisfaction indicated a high level of acceptance for zirconia implants. However, a long-term follow-up is needed to support these findings.

  9. Career satisfaction of Pennsylvanian dentists and dental hygienists and their plans to leave direct patient care.

    PubMed

    Vick, Brandon

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to explore a number of practice-related dynamics between dentists and dental hygienists, including their career dissatisfaction, plans to leave direct patient care, hiring difficulties, and full-time work. Data come from the 2013 Pennsylvania Health Workforce Surveys, a sample of 5,771 dentists and 6,023 dental hygienists, and logistic regression is used to estimate the relationships between outcome areas - dissatisfaction, plans to leave patient care, and hiring/job outcomes - and a number of explanatory variables, including demographic and practice characteristics. Dentists working in practices that employ hygienists have lower odds of reporting overall dissatisfaction and of leaving patient care in the next 6 years than those that do not employ hygienists. Dental hygienists that work full-time hours across two or more jobs have higher odds of dissatisfaction than those who work full-time in one job only. Part-time work in a single hygienist job is associated with higher odds of leaving the career, relative to having a single, full-time job. Results suggest that employment of dental hygienists is associated with lower career dissatisfaction and extended careers for dentists. However, a number of dentist characteristics are associated with difficulty hiring hygienists, including rural practice, nonwhite race, and solo ownership. Only 37.5 percent of hygienists work in a single, full-time job, an outcome related to lower dissatisfaction and extended careers for hygienists. Characteristics associated with this job outcome include having an associate degree, having a local anesthesia permit, and not working for a solo practice. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  10. Characteristics of patients with autistic disorder (AD) presenting for dental treatment: a survey and chart review.

    PubMed

    Klein, U; Nowak, A J

    1999-01-01

    A group of 43 patients with AD (mean age, 13.5; SD, 5.9 yrs) was identified from the University Hospital School Pediatric Dentistry Clinic. We reviewed the patients' charts to obtain demographic data, dental findings, and the management techniques used for treatment. The patients were divided into groups according to Frankl's categories of behavior, ranging from definitely negative to positive. Descriptive data are provided for each group. Commonly used communications and pharmacological management techniques, as well as physical restraints, enabled us to treat all the patients in the traditional dental setting, when simple procedures were planned. Treatment under general anesthesia in the operating room was necessary in 37% of all patients when comprehensive care was required or difficult procedures were carried out. A questionnaire was also sent out to the caregivers to gather data on patients' nutrition and eating/chewing habits. In the sample surveyed, two-thirds of the individuals reportedly exhibited a normal eating pattern, while 14% pouched food. Soft, sweet, or sticky foods were preferred by 41% of the patients.

  11. Aspects on dental hard tissues in primary teeth from patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klingberg, Gunilla; Hagberg, Catharina; Norén, Jörgen G; Nietzsche, Sandor

    2009-07-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare hereditary condition affecting connective tissues and dental hard tissues. Primary enamel and dentine from EDS patients were expected to differ from those of healthy subjects regarding morphology and chemical composition. Forty-seven exfoliated primary teeth from 25 patients with EDS were investigated. Morphology was studied using a polarized light microscope, scanning electron microscope, and X-ray microanalysis. Comparisons were made with 36 primary teeth from 36 healthy patients. Morphological analysis of enamel in EDS teeth showed a high frequency of postnatally hypomineralized enamel and postnatally located incremental lines, whereas dentine was normal in all patients. Chemical analysis could not reveal any differences between EDS and control patients except for lower content of C and a higher Ca/P ratio in the enamel in the EDS teeth, indicating porous enamel. Regarding dentine, EDS teeth had a lower content of C, and a higher content of Ca, P, and O. Ratios for Ca/C and Ca/O were also higher compared with controls. There are several aberrations of booth enamel and dentine in primary teeth from patients with EDS. These could explain the occurrence of both more dental caries and tooth fractures in patients with EDS.

  12. Electrothermal debracketing: patient acceptance and effects on the dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Dovgan, J S; Walton, R E; Bishara, S E

    1995-09-01

    Adhesives bond ceramic brackets so effectively that their removal by mechanical forces can fracture the brackets and may damage the tooth surface. Electrothermal debracketers have been developed to facilitate removal; whether the heat generated will damage the underlying pulp is unclear. In our experiment, a prototype device with a high heat tip was used to remove brackets from premolars in patients. The following parameters were evaluated: (1) time required for removal, (2) patient acceptance, and (3) histologic effect on the pulp. Forty-eight experimental teeth planned for orthodontic extraction were bonded by a filled Bis-GMA composite resin and a monocrystalline sapphire bracket. After the chemically cured composite set, debracketing was performed according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Seventeen premolars were not etched or bracketed and served as controls. The interval between heat application and removal of the bracket was timed. Patients were questioned as to sensations during debracketing. Teeth were extracted at 5 to 7 or 28 to 32 days and histologically prepared. Pulps were evaluated for alterations. Brackets were removed in an average of 2.1 seconds, usually at the bracket/composite interface. Patient acceptance was generally positive. Pulpal necrosis was not observed but, in a number of specimens, slight inflammation and odontoblastic disruption occurred at both observation periods.

  13. An evaluation of pediatric dental patient education materials using contemporary health literacy measures.

    PubMed

    Kang, Edith; Fields, Henry W; Cornett, Sandy; Beck, F Michael

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the appropriateness of nationally available dental information materials according to the suitability assessment of materials (SAM) method. Clinically related, professionally produced patient dental health education materials (N=22) provided by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) were evaluated using the SAM method that had previously been judged valid and reliable. A rater was trained by an experienced health literacy evaluator to establish validity. The rater then rated all materials for 5 categories of assessment (content, literacy demand, graphics, layout and typography, and learning stimulation/motivation) and an overall assessment, and repeated 5 materials to establish intrarater reliability. When compared to the experienced rater, the validity was K=0.43. The reliability was established for all ratings as K=0.52. The consistently weakest categories were content, graphics, and learning stimulation, while reading level as part of literacy demand was often not suitable. The overall suitability of the AAPD materials was generally classified as superior. Reliable and valid evaluation of available dental patient information materials can be accomplished. The materials were largely superior. There is great variability within the categories of evaluation. The categories of content, graphics, and learning stimulation require attention and could raise the overall quality of the materials.

  14. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Prevents Hypoxia in Dental Patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome under Intravenous Sedation.

    PubMed

    Kasatkin, Anton A; Reshetnikov, Aleksei P; Urakov, Aleksandr L; Baimurzin, Dmitrii Y

    2017-01-01

    Use of sedation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in dentistry is limited. Hypoxia may develop during medication sleep in dental patients with OSA because of repetitive partial or complete obstruction of the upper airway. In this regard, anesthesiologists prefer not to give any sedative to surgical patients with OSA or support the use of general anesthesia due to good airway control. We report a case where we could successfully sedate a dental patient with OSA using intraoperative continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) without hypoxia. Use of sedation and intraoperative CPAP in patients with OSA may be considered only if the effectiveness at home CPAP therapy is proven.

  15. Implementation of revolutionary legislation for informed consent for dental patients receiving amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Cross, Catherine L; Dahlstrom, Jill J; Long, William B; Newkirk, Anthony T

    2008-01-01

    Mercury is one of the most dangerous environmental toxins. Realizing the environmental dangers of mercury, the Norwegian Minister of the Environment and International Development, Erik Solheim, has therefore prohibited the use of mercury in products in Norway. This ban will include dental filling materials (amalgam) and measuring instruments, as well as other products. This ban is valid from January 1, 2008. Sweden announced a similar ban, and dentists in Denmark will no longer be able to use mercury in fillings after April 1, 2008. It is indeed unfortunate that the United States has not taken a leadership role in enacting Informed Consent Legislations for patients receiving dental amalgam restorations. Informed Consent Legislations have been enacted by Maine, California, Connecticut, and Vermont.

  16. Teaching dental students about patient communication following an adverse event: a pilot educational module.

    PubMed

    Raja, Sheela; Rajagopalan, Chelsea F; Patel, Janki; Van Kanegan, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    Adverse events are an important but understudied area in dentistry. Most dentists will face the issue of an adverse event several times in their clinical careers. The authors implemented a six-hour pilot educational module at one dental school to improve fourth-year dental students' knowledge and confidence in communicating with patients about adverse events. Based on results from the twenty-nine students who completed both the pre- and posttests, the module significantly increased the students' knowledge of the key concepts involved in adverse events. However, the module did not improve the students' confidence that they would be able to implement these communication skills in clinical situations. Based on these results, this article discusses how future educational efforts can be modified to better prepare students for the communication challenges associated with adverse events.

  17. Dental treatment considerations for a pediatric patient with incontinentia pigmenti (Bloch-Sulzberger syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Amy Yi-Ling; Chen, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Incontinentia pigmenti (IP) is a uncommon gene disorder, heritage with X-linked dominant mode. IP patients have a characteristic dentition varying from marked hypodontia to delayed eruption and conical crowns on both dentitions. A 5½-year-old girl, whose mother and younger sister were also diagnosed with IP, has the whirling-like pigmented skin lesion over her trunk and four extremities. Four primary teeth and multiple permanent tooth germs were found to be congenital missing. Dental considerations of further treatment were discussed with her parents including the preservation of primary molars, possible interim prosthesis in mixed or permanent dentition, full mouth rehabilitation with orthodontic and prosthodontic combined treatment, and implant therapy in adulthood. Early and longitudinal involvement of pediatric dentist to deal with the dental complications of IP can not only solve the esthetic problem and oral function but also maintain the oral health of children with IP to adulthood. PMID:28729805

  18. Internet use, online information seeking and knowledge among third molar patients attending public dental services.

    PubMed

    Hanna, K; Sambrook, P; Armfield, J M; Brennan, D S

    2017-09-01

    While Australians are searching the internet for third molar (TM) information, the usefulness of online sources may be questioned due to quality variation. This study explored: (i) internet use, online information-seeking behaviour among TM patients attending public dental services; and (ii) whether patients' TM knowledge scores are associated with the level of internet use and eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) scores. Baseline survey data from the 'Engaging Patients in Decision-Making' study were used. Variables included: sociodemographics, internet access status, online information-seeking behaviour, eHEALS, the Control Preferences Scale (CPS) and TM knowledge. Participants (N = 165) were mainly female (73.8%), aged 19-25 years (42.4%) and had 'secondary school or less' education (58.4%). A majority (N = 79, 52.7%) had sought online dental information which was associated with active decisional control preference (odds ratio = 3.1, P = 0.034) and higher educational attainment (odds ratio = 2.7, P = 0.040). TM knowledge scores were not associated with either the level of internet use (F (2,152) = 2.1, P = 0.094, χ 2 = 0.0310) or the eHEALS scores (r = 0.147, P = 0.335). 'The internet-prepared patient' phenomena exists among public TM patients and was explained by preference for involvement in decision-making. However, internet use was not associated with better TM knowledge. Providing TM patients with internet guidance may be an opportunity to improve TM knowledge. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  19. Effectiveness of Standardized Patient Simulations in Teaching Clinical Communication Skills to Dental Students.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Carly T; Tilashalski, Ken R; Peterson, Dawn Taylor; White, Marjorie Lee

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate dental students' long-term retention of clinical communication skills learned in a second-year standardized patient simulation at one U.S. dental school. Retention was measured by students' performance with an actual patient during their fourth year. The high-fidelity simulation exercise focused on clinical communication skills took place during the spring term of the students' second year. The effect of the simulation was measured by comparing the fourth-year clinical performance of two groups: those who had participated in the simulation (intervention group; Class of 2016) and those who had not (no intervention/control group; Class of 2015). In the no intervention group, all 47 students participated; in the intervention group, 58 of 59 students participated. Both instructor assessments and students' self-assessments were used to evaluate the effectiveness of key patient interaction principles as well as comprehensive presentation of multiple treatment options. The results showed that students in the intervention group more frequently included cost during their treatment option presentation than did students in the no intervention group. The instructor ratings showed that the intervention group included all key treatment option components except duration more frequently than did the no intervention group. However, the simulation experience did not result in significantly more effective student-patient clinical communication on any of the items measured. This study presents limited evidence of the effectiveness of a standardized patient simulation to improve dental students' long-term clinical communication skills with respect to thorough presentation of treatment options to a patient.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis for dental patients with prosthetic joints: Comparisons of antibiotic regimens for patients with total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Skaar, Daniel D; Park, Taehwan; Swiontkowski, Marc F; Kuntz, Karen M

    2015-11-01

    Clinician uncertainty concerning the need for antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent prosthetic joint infection (PJI) after undergoing dental procedures persists. Improved understanding of the potential clinical and economic risks and benefits of antibiotic prophylaxis will help inform the debate and facilitate the continuing evolution of clinical management guidelines for dental patients with prosthetic joints. The authors developed a Markov decision model to compare the lifetime cost-effectiveness of alternative antibiotic prophylaxis strategies for dental patients aged 65 years who had undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA). On the basis of the authors' interpretation of previous recommendations from the American Dental Association and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, they compared the following strategies: no prophylaxis, prophylaxis for the first 2 years after arthroplasty, and lifetime prophylaxis. A strategy of foregoing antibiotic prophylaxis before dental visits was cost-effective and resulted in lower lifetime accumulated costs ($11,909) and higher accumulated quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) (12.375) when compared with alternative prophylaxis strategies. The results of Markov decision modeling indicated that a no-antibiotic prophylaxis strategy was cost-effective for dental patients who had undergone THA. These results support the findings of case-control studies and the conclusions of an American Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs report that questioned general recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedures. The results of cost-effectiveness decision modeling support the contention that routine antibiotic prophylaxis for dental patients with total joint arthroplasty should be reconsidered. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dental care in patients with epilepsy: a survey of 82 patients and their attending dentists and neurologists in southern Germany.

    PubMed

    Schöpper, Malin; Ludolph, Albert C; Fauser, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    The current study assessed the knowledge and attitudes of dentists and neurologists, and of their patients with epilepsy, in the catchment area of an outpatient clinic for epilepsy in southern Germany. One-hundred patients with epilepsy were asked to complete questionnaires about their dental treatment. Attitudes of their attending dentists and neurologists were also assessed. Patients with epilepsy: The questionnaires were returned by 82% of patients. Of these, 84% regularly (once or twice a year) sought out a dentist, 79% reported their epilepsy to the dentist, 6% were refused treatment by a dentist because of their epilepsy, 10% had already experienced a seizure while at a dental office and 52% wished for more detailed information pretreatment. Dentists: Although 97% treated patients with epilepsy, 21% believed that their equipment was inappropriate for treating a patient experiencing seizures. The majority were not familiar with interactions between antibiotics/analgetics and anti-epileptic drugs. Short-term general anaesthesia was preferred for critical patients by 70% of dentists, 70% recommended dental ceramic for prosthetic reconstruction of anterior teeth and 64% would not recommend use of a removable denture. Neurologists: Sixty-two per cent were asked for advice by their patients, 71% knew about particular risks and interactions between antibiotics/analgetics and anti-epileptic drugs, 8% would stop valproic acid before extensive dental intervention and 92% recommended general anaesthesia in critical patients (uncooperative patients, patients with learning difficulties, and patients with frequent generalised tonic-clonic or complex partial seizures). In general, patients were satisfied with their dental treatment. Regarding the clinician's role, however, dentists need to know more with respect to treating patients with seizures. Beyond that, it would be desirable for neurologists to take more time to answer their patients' questions regarding dental care

  2. U.S. Dental School Deans' Views on the Value of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Evan B; Donoff, R Bruce; Riedy, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    There has historically been limited development and utilization of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in clinical dentistry. However, in recent years PROMs have been recognized by other health care fields as valuable in the comprehensive assessment of patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to survey deans of U.S. dental schools to better understand their vision for the role of PROMs in the field of dentistry. A 13-question online survey was emailed to the deans of the 64 accredited U.S. dental schools at the time to gather their opinions about the value of patient-reported outcomes in dentistry. The survey consisted of questions in 12 domains such as treatment planning, perceived success/complications of surgery, identification/management of dental pain, psychological and oral function, and insurance payment/reimbursement. Of the 64 deans, 33 responses were received (51.5% response rate), but three surveys were excluded due to incomplete answers, resulting in a final response rate of 46.8%. All respondents reported there was value in utilization of PROMs for understanding a patient's satisfaction of a procedure, a patient's perceived success of dental surgery, identifying dental pain, and managing dental pain. However, there was disagreement among the respondents about utilization of PROMs for the purpose of determining insurance payment and/or reimbursement. Additional steps should be taken to develop clinically appropriate PROMs for dentistry and to determine the appropriate situations in which to use dental PROMs. This study suggests that PROMs should be incorporated into dental school curricula as they will likely play a role in future comprehensive treatment assessment.

  3. Edentulous patients' knowledge of dental hygiene and care of prostheses.

    PubMed

    de Castellucci Barbosa, Luciano; Ferreira, Manoela Rejane Maia; de Carvalho Calabrich, Carolina Freire; Viana, Aline Cavalcanti; de Lemos, Maria Catarina Lavigne; Lauria, Roberta Andrade

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse denture users' oral care habits with regard to the use of their prostheses. Rehabilitative treatment is only successful when patients are motivated and aware of correct prosthesis use and hygiene. Questionnaires were distributed to 150 complete denture users at the Federal University of Bahia School of Dentistry, the Esmeralda Natividade Health Center, the Bahian Science Development Foundation and a Salvador nursing home. The questionnaire included information on gender, age, length of prosthesis use, cleaning methods and materials, etc. The data were analysed using EpiInfo version 6 software. The chi-squared test was used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. Questionnaire results showed that 78% of the subjects, with an average age of 67.3 years, had used the same complete denture for over 5 years. 64% slept with their prostheses and 44% removed them from the mouth only for cleaning. None of the patients interviewed knew anything about brushes designed specifically for complete dentures. 37.3% had a restricted diet and 44% believed that a complete denture would last for more than 10 years. Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that the edentulous patients surveyed had limited awareness of prosthetic hygiene and long-term oral care despite extended periods of denture use.

  4. Effectiveness of benzocaine in reducing deep cavity restoration and post-extraction stress in dental patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Samadani, Khalid H; Gazal, Giath

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of topical anesthetic, 20% benzocaine in relieving pain and stress in patients following deep cavity restoration and extraction of teeth under local anesthesia (LA). A prospective clinical trial was conducted from October 2014 until April 2015 at Taibah University, Al Madinah Al Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Forty-five patients were included in the 20% benzocaine group, and 46 in the normal saline group. Evaluation of the dental stress was made pre-operatively and immediately post-operative treatment using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Furthermore, discomfort of the injections were recorded by the patients after each treatment on standard 100 mm VAS, tagged at the endpoints with "no pain" (0 mm) and "unbearable pain" (100 mm). There were statistically significant differences between the mean stress scores for patients in the benzocaine and normal saline groups post-operatively (p=0.002). There were significant differences between the mean pain scores for patients in the post buccal injection (p=0.001), post palatal injection (p=0.01), and the post inferior alveolar nerve block groups (p=0.02). Buccal, palatal, and inferior alveolar nerve block injections were more painful for patients in the normal saline group than the benzocaine group. This investigation has demonstrated that post-operative stress associated with deep cavity restoration and dental extractions under LA can be reduced by the application of topical anesthetic (20% benzocaine) at the operative site for intra-oral injections.

  5. Is social media the way to empower patients to share their experiences of dental care?

    PubMed

    Barber, Sophy K; Lam, Yung; Hodge, Trevor M; Pavitt, Susan

    2018-06-01

    Social media present opportunities to understand patient experience and information needs. In this study, the authors use hypodontia as an example to explore social media use by dental patients and how this provides for understanding patient experience. The cross-sectional survey design involved systematic search of 6 social media online environments with hypodontia-related terms. The authors categorized records by using a coding system for user, type and theme of post, and target audience. The authors used a thematic framework approach to analyze qualitatively the word content of posts from people affected by hypodontia (nondentists). The authors searched and identified 571 records and included 467 of them in their study. The authors analyzed the content of records from people affected by hypodontia (n = 176). Themes emerged about the experience of untreated hypodontia, treatment experience and outcomes, and decision making. Content analysis provided evidence about peer-to-peer communication, areas of information need, and desire for peer support. Social media communities have responded to the need for information exchange and peer support by the public. Analysis of communications helped identify a need for dissemination of understandable information to patients and improved dentist awareness of patient needs. Clinicians should reassess understanding and information needs actively throughout treatment and identify support needs. Clinicians should refer patients to quality information sources and peer support groups. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adequacy of patient pools to support predoctoral students' achievement of competence in pediatric dentistry in U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Casamassimo, Paul S; Seale, N Sue

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the current status of predoctoral pediatric dentistry patient pools in U.S. dental schools and compare their status to that in 2001. A 2014 survey of school clinic-based and community-based dental patient pools was developed, piloted, and sent to pediatric predoctoral program directors in 57 U.S. dental schools via SurveyMonkey. Two follow-up contacts were made to increase the response rate. A total of 49 surveys were returned for a response rate of 86%. The responding program directors reported that their programs' patient pools had declined in number and had changed in character with more diversity and fewer procedures. They attributed the changes to competition, cost, and location of the dental school. The respondents reported that community-based dental education clinical sites continued to provide additional service experiences for dental students, with contributions varying by the nature of the site. A large number of the respondents felt that their graduates lacked some basic pediatric dentistry clinical skills and were not ready for independent practice with children. The results of this study suggest that the predoctoral pediatric dentistry patient pool has changed and general dentists may be graduating with inadequate experiences to practice dentistry for children.

  7. Progress and trends in patients' mindset on dental implants. I: level of information, sources of information and need for patient information.

    PubMed

    Pommer, Bernhard; Zechner, Werner; Watzak, Georg; Ulm, Christian; Watzek, Georg; Tepper, Gabor

    2011-02-01

    Little is known about the level of information on implant dentistry in the public. A representative opinion poll on dental implants in the Austrian population was published in 2003 (Clinical Oral Implants Research 14:621-642). Seven years later, the poll was rerun to assess the up-to-date information level and evaluate recent progress and trends in patients' mindset on dental implants. One thousand adults--representative for the Austrian population--were presented with a total of 19 questionnaire items regarding the level and the sources of information about dental implants as well as the subjective and objective need for patient information. Compared with the survey of 2003, the subjective level of patient information about implant dentistry has significantly increased in the Austrian population. The patients' implant awareness rate was 79%. The objective level of general knowledge about dental implants was still all but satisfactory revealing unrealistic patient expectations. Three-quarters trusted their dentists for information about dental implants, while one-quarter turned to the media. The patients' wish for high-quality implant restorations was significantly higher than in 2003, yet the majority felt that only specialists should perform implant dentistry. This representative survey reveals that dentists are still the main source of patient information, but throws doubt on the quality of their public relations work. Dentists must improve communication strategies to provide their patients with comprehensible, legally tenable information on dental implants and bridge information gaps in the future. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Utilization of dental care among patients with severe mental illness: a study of a National Health Insurance database.

    PubMed

    Teng, Po-Ren; Lin, Miao-Jean; Yeh, Ling-Ling

    2016-09-01

    The oral health of patients with severe mental illness is poor, in general, and this may be attributed, in part, to inadequate dental care. This study investigated dental care utilization among patients with severe mental illness using a national representative sample. This study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Dataset for 2009. Patients with the diagnosis of severe mental illness (ICD-9-CM: 290-298) were recruited as the study sample, and others comprised the control. Any visit to a dentist was defined as positive in terms of dental care utilization. Regression analyses were applied to determine the odds of dental care utilization for each diagnostic entity of severe mental illness, compared with the general population and controlling for potential covariates. Only 40 % of 19,609 patients with severe mental illness visited the dentist within 12 months. This was significantly lower than the dental visit rate of 48.3 % for the control population (odds ratio [OR] = .72, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = .69-.74; P <0.0001). The odds of dental care utilization differed among the severe mental illness diagnostic categories; e.g., the odds were lowest among those with alcohol psychoses (OR = .54, CI = .43-.68), senile dementia (OR = .55, CI = .52-.59) and other organic psychoses (OR = .58, CI = .52-.65), and highest among those with mood disorder (OR = .89, CI = .85-.94), with schizophrenic patients occupying a mid-level position (OR = .63, CI = .59-.67). Patients with severe mental illness received less dental care than the general population. Health care providers and caregivers of patients with severe mental illness should encourage them to visit the dentist regularly, in order to improve the oral health of these vulnerable patient groups.

  9. Gastro-oesophageal reflux is common in oligosymptomatic patients with dental erosion: A pH-impedance and endoscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Materna, Andrea; Martig, Lukas; Lussi, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental erosion is a complication of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) according to the Montreal consensus statement. However, GORD has not been comprehensively characterized in patients with dental erosions and pH-impedance measures have not been reported. Objectives Characterize GORD in patients with dental erosions using 24-h multichannel intraluminal pH-impedance measurements (pH-MII) and endoscopy. Methods This single-centre study investigated reflux in successive patients presenting to dentists with dental erosion using pH-MII and endoscopy. Results Of the 374 patients, 298 (80%) reported GORD symptoms <2 per week, 72 (19%) had oesophagitis and 59 (16%) had a hiatal hernia. In the 349 with pH-MII the mean percentage time with a pH <4 (95% CI) was 11.0 (9.3–12.7), and 34.4% (31.9–36.9) for a pH <5.5, a critical threshold for dental tissue. The mean numbers of total, acidic and weakly acidic reflux episodes were 71 (63–79), 43 (38–49) and 31 (26–35), respectively. Of the reflux episodes, 19% (17–21) reached the proximal oesophagus. In 241 (69%) patients reflux was abnormal using published normal values for acid exposure time and reflux episodes. No significant associations between the severity of dental erosions and any reflux variables were found. The presence of GORD symptoms and of oesophagitis or a hiatal hernia was associated with greater reflux, but not with increased dental erosion scores. Conclusions Significant oligosymptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux occurs in the majority of patients with dental erosion. The degree of dental erosion did not correlate with any of the accepted quantitative reflux indicators. Definition of clinically relevant reflux parameters by pH-MII for dental erosion and of treatment guidelines are outstanding. Gastroenterologists and dentists need to be aware of the widely prevalent association between dental erosion and atypical GORD. PMID:25922678

  10. [A clinical investigation of new patients who had already received treatment with dental implants at other clinics in seventeen years].

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Ken; Tachikawa, Noriko; Munakata, Motohiro; Shiota, Makoto; Kasugai, Shohei

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate new patients who had already received treatment with dental implants. The subjects were patients who visited the clinic for oral implants at Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital from April 1995 to March 2012. The results were as follows: 1) Of the total number of patients, there were 2,419 patients (14.0%) with dental implants. 2) Of the 2,419 patients, 252 patients (10.4%) had been referred from operating doctors or operating clinics. 3) There were 1,516 (62.7%) patients with complaints related to the implant therapy. 4) There were 1,367 (56.5%) patients who had ill feelings toward their attending doctors. 5) There were 1,112 (46.0%) patients with biological complications. 6) Regarding patients with or without a referral from the doctor who had performed their dental implant, those patients who had been referred showed significantly higher occurrence of loss of implants, neurological symptoms, doctor's recommendation, prosthetic problems, and surgical problems. Almost implant therapies were treated with other treatments for natural teeth, including surgical treatment, prosthetic treatment, periodontal treatment and maintenance. These were too complex to enable the results to be forecast before treatment, therefore unpredictable symptoms often occur in patients with implant therapy. Informed consent including patient education is important, but the results of this study suggest that it is insufficient at present.

  11. The tobacco-using periodontal patient: role of the dental practitioner in tobacco cessation and periodontal disease management.

    PubMed

    Chaffee, Benjamin W; Couch, Elizabeth T; Ryder, Mark I

    2016-06-01

    Although the prevalence of tobacco use has declined in some parts of the world, tobacco use remains a persistent and, in some cases, growing problem that will continue to be a fundamental challenge facing dental practitioners in the decades ahead. Dental practitioners have a unique opportunity and professional obligation to be a positive influence in reducing the economic and social burden inflicted by tobacco use on dental and general health. In this article, the current noninvasive, evidence-based approaches are presented for dental practitioners to help patients avoid initiating tobacco use, to encourage and assist patients in ceasing tobacco use and to address tobacco-induced damage to periodontal supporting tissues. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Outcomes of Dental Implant Therapy in Patients With Down Syndrome: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Siddiqui, Fahad; Zohaib, Sana; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2017-12-01

    Patients with Down syndrome (DS) require an earlier and more frequent tooth replacement than rest of the population. The objective of this systematic review is to critically analyze and summarize studies to ascertain the outcomes and survival of dental implants placed in jaws of DS patients. Using the key words "dental implants," "Down syndrome," and "prosthodontics," an electronic search was conducted via PubMed/MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, Google Scholar, Embase, and Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) databases by 2 authors, S.N. and Z.K., independently. Retrieved studies were screened against the predefined exclusion and inclusion criteria. To estimate the risk of bias, quality assessment of included studies was carried using the 'Case Reports (CARE) guidelines'. Primary search resulted in 156 studies. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria and reporting a total of 81 dental implants placed in 36 DS patients. The type of implant loading ranged from immediate to a delay of 1 year after placement of the implant. Implant diameter ranged from 3.3 to 4.5 mm, and height ranged from 8.5 to 18 mm. The follow-up ranged from 1 to 6 years. Of 81 implants placed, 21 implants (26%) were reported as failed. Patients with DS have a higher risk of implant failure. However, the reason for the failure is not very well understood. Although case reports and case series suggest that implant survival is diminished in DS patients, large-scale randomized controlled trials are required to determine the exact mechanism associated with risks of implant failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Presurgical cleft lip anthropometrics and dental arch relationships in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Antonarakis, Gregory S; Adibfar, Alex; Tompson, Bryan D; Paedo, D; Daskalogiannakis, John; Fisher, David M

    2015-05-01

    To investigate associations between anthropometric lip measurements and dental arch relationships in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (CUCLP). Retrospective cross-sectional study. Children with CUCLP. Anthropometric lip measurements, made immediately prior to lip repair, were available for each patient. The dental arch relationships were evaluated on dental study casts (8.6 ± 0.9 years) taken prior to any orthodontic treatment and prior to alveolar bone graft, using the modified Huddart and Bodenham (MHB) scoring system. The presence of associations between anthropometric lip measurements and dental arch relationships was determined using linear regression analysis. In the 63 patients included in the study, the cleft lateral lip element was deficient in height in 87% and in transverse width in 86% of patients. Patients with more deficient cleft-side lateral lip height were more likely to present with more negative MHB scores (r = .443; P < .001). Conversely, patients with more deficient cleft-side lateral lip transverse width more often presented with more positive MHB scores (r = .281; P = .025). In patients with CUCLP, there is a wide variability in the degree of deficiency of the cleft-side lateral lip element, both in the vertical and in the transverse dimension. The extent of this deficiency may, in part, predict the resulting dental arch relationships.

  14. Dental implants in patients with oral mucosal diseases - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Reichart, P A; Schmidt-Westhausen, A M; Khongkhunthian, P; Strietzel, F P

    2016-05-01

    To reveal dental implants survival rates in patients with oral mucosal diseases: oral lichen planus (OLP), Sjögren's syndrome (SjS), epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). A systematic literature search using PubMed/Medline and Embase databases, utilising MeSH and search term combinations identified publications on clinical use implant-prosthetic rehabilitation in patients with OLP, SjS, EB, SSc reporting on study design, number, gender and age of patients, follow-up period exceeding 12 months, implant survival rate, published in English between 1980 and May 2015. After a mean observation period (mOP) of 53·9 months (standard deviation [SD] ±18·3), 191 implants in 57 patients with OLP showed a survival rate (SR) of 95·3% (SD ±21·2). For 17 patients with SjS (121 implants, mOP 48·6 ± 28·7 months), 28 patients with EB (165 implants, mOP 38·3 ± 16·9 months) and five patients with SSc (38 implants, mOP 38·3 ± 16·9 months), the respective SR was 91·7 ± 5·97% (SjS), 98·5 ± 2·7% (EB) and 97·4 ± 4·8% (SSc). Heterogeneity of data structure and quality of reporting outcomes did not allow for further comparative data analysis. For implant-prosthetic rehabilitation of patients suffering from OLP, SjS, EB and SSc, no evidence-based treatment guidelines are presently available. However, no strict contraindication for the placement of implants seems to be justified in patients with OLP, SjS, EB nor SSc. Implant survival rates are comparable to those of patients without oral mucosal diseases. Treatment guidelines as for dental implantation in patients with healthy oral mucosa should be followed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Using the Monte Carlo method for assessing the tissue and organ doses of patients in dental radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, K. O.; Minenko, V. F.; Verenich, K. A.; Kuten, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    This work is dedicated to modeling dental radiographic examinations to assess the absorbed doses of patients and effective doses. For simulating X-ray spectra, the TASMIP empirical model is used. Doses are assessed on the basis of the Monte Carlo method by using MCNP code for voxel phantoms of ICRP. The results of the assessment of doses to individual organs and effective doses for different types of dental examinations and features of X-ray tube are presented.

  16. Comparing the Quality of Life of Patients Requesting Dental Implants Before and After Implant.

    PubMed

    Sargozaie, Naser; Moeintaghavi, Amir; Shojaie, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Tooth loss is a serious life event that impairs two important functions, namely, eating and speaking, and has significant side effects on different aspects of quality of life. These effects are internalized by the individual. The present study aimed to compare the quality of life (QOL) of patients requesting dental implants before and after implant. This analytical cross-sectional study was conducted on patients referred to the Mashhad faculty of Dentistry and private clinics with dental implants in 2015. Patient Quality Of Life (QOL) was assessed using the Oral Impact on Daily Practice (OIDP) questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. In this study, the most common problems reported by patients were eating (78%), smiling, laughing, and embarrassment (53%) before surgery. The quality of life associated with eating; speaking clearly; clean teeth or dentures; light physical activities, such as working at home, going out to work or meeting others; smiling; laughing; showing teeth without discomfort and embarrassment; emotional conditions, such as becoming upset quicker than usual, enjoying communication with others ( i.e. , friends, relatives and neighbors); and job-related activities significantly increased after surgery, but QOL associated with the amount of sleep and resting did not improve. No significant association was noted between quality of life after implantation and place of residence, education and gender. In this study, implants had a favorable impact on a patient's quality of life.

  17. Patient satisfaction 8-14 years after dental implant therapy - a questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Adler, Lottie; Liedholm, Eva; Silvegren, Malin; Modin, Carolina; Buhlin, Kåre; Jansson, Leif

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this questionnaire study was to investigate patient satisfaction 8-14 years after dental implant therapy and complications influencing the degree of satisfaction. A questionnaire was sent by post to 587 patients at a specialist clinic of periodontology. The questionnaire consisted of 19 statements or questions such as the degree of satisfaction with the implants and knowledge of complications. In nine of the questions, respondents were asked to grade the extent of their agreement with a statement by selecting from fixed answers. Three of the questions were designed to be answered using a visual analog scale. In total, 400 individuals (81%) responded to the questionnaire. The mean time elapsed since implant installation was 10 years. A great majority (81%) experienced a high chewing comfort and was satisfied or sufficiently satisfied (94%) with the aesthetic aspects of their implant restorations, while 32% of the individuals had experienced problems with their implant reconstructions. The disadvantage that patients remarked on was the cost of the treatment. Those who had experienced problems with their implant reconstructions were also less satisfied with the treatment. A great majority of the patients expressed a high degree of satisfaction with their dental implants 8-14 years after the treatment. Patients were less satisfied if they had experience of problems with their implant reconstructions and in cases when the clinicians were unable to resolve their complications.

  18. Implant overdentures: dental students' performance in fabrication, denture quality, and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Aragon, Cecilia E; Cornacchio, Angelica Lee Petrina; Ibarra, Lilia Marcela; Saad, Muhammed N; Zibrowski, Elaine

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dental students' performance when fabricating a mandibular two-implant overdenture (OD) as compared to conventional dentures (CD) and to determine if these prostheses were successful. Twenty students and twenty patients were divided into two groups: complete denture group (CDG) and maxillary denture and two-implant OD group (ODG). Students' progress was evaluated at each appointment as they were given a clinical assessment score (CAS), which varied from 1 (unacceptable, needs to repeat procedure) to 4 (acceptable, no errors). The success of the prosthesis was evaluated by the patients using a visual analog scale (VAS) and an expert (a prosthodontist) using a denture quality assessment (DQA) form. Performance for both groups was not statistically different across all eight appointments (CDG 3.16 versus ODG 3.25; p=0.46). Patients with ODs reported greater stability with their dentures (p=0.048) and greater ability to chew than patients with CDs (p=0.03). There were no differences between the groups in terms of expert appraisal (ODG 71.1 versus CDG 67.5; p=0.59). The performance of dental students when fabricating a two-implant OD is thus not different from that of a CD. Students can successfully fabricate a two-implant OD as perceived by both patients and prosthodontists.

  19. [Medically compromised patients in the dental office: demographics and progress in health care].

    PubMed

    Al-Nawas, B; Grötz, K A

    2011-09-01

    Due to changing demographics in our society, there are an increasing number of patients with risk factors presenting for dental care. Unfortunately valid screening instruments to identify these patients are lacking. Especially in elderly patients, there is often an association between the high number of prescribed medications and oral symptoms. Using supportive therapy in oncology (e.g., radio(chemo)therapy) as an example, the role of modern dentistry and its interaction with general medicine is illustrated. Modern substances, e.g., antiangiogenetics, with still unknown side effects represent challenging new developments in the field of oral medicine. Even with some examples of positive representation of patients with risk factors in the health systems, e.g., § 28 SGB V, it is clear that the pressure on the costs in the health systems leads to an undertreatment of patients with risk factors. Only by adapting dental and postgraduate training with respect to these aspects, together with better financial reimbursement of the additional efforts, will this trend be overcome.

  20. Irradiated patients and survival rate of dental implants: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith Nobrega, Adhara; Santiago, Joel Ferreira; de Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2016-12-01

    Radiotherapy has been considered a contraindication for rehabilitation with dental implants because it can change the survival rate of implants. Nevertheless, the installation of implants in irradiated patients has been used with varying success. The purpose of this systematic review was to compare the success rate of implants placed in irradiated human bone tissue with that of implants placed in nonirradiated areas. Searches were performed in the EMBASE, Cochrane, and PubMed/Medline databases up to December 2013 to identify clinical trials addressing the subject. This systematic review was conducted according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The relative risks of implant failure and survival curves were calculated considering a confidence interval of 95%. Heterogeneity was analyzed by using a funnel chart. A total of 40 studies involving 2220 participants and 9231 dental implants were selected. The survival curve of the studies indicated a survival rate of 84.3% for implants installed in irradiated bone tissue. The meta-analysis indicated statistically significant differences (P<.001) between item success rates of implants placed in irradiated areas and those of implants placed in nonirradiated areas. Dental implants installed in the irradiated area of an oral cavity have a high survival rate, but strict monitoring is needed to prevent complications, thereby reducing possible failures. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dental services for... Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.166 Dental services for... domiciliary care pursuant to the provisions of §§ 17.46 and 17.47, will be furnished such dental services as...

  2. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dental services for... Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.166 Dental services for... domiciliary care pursuant to the provisions of §§ 17.46 and 17.47, will be furnished such dental services as...

  3. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dental services for... Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.166 Dental services for... domiciliary care pursuant to the provisions of §§ 17.46 and 17.47, will be furnished such dental services as...

  4. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dental services for... Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.166 Dental services for... domiciliary care pursuant to the provisions of §§ 17.46 and 17.47, will be furnished such dental services as...

  5. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dental services for... Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.166 Dental services for... domiciliary care pursuant to the provisions of §§ 17.46 and 17.47, will be furnished such dental services as...

  6. Interprofessional Education Perceptions of Dental Assisting and Radiologic Technology Students Following a Live Patient Experience.

    PubMed

    Reddington, Amanda R; Egli, Amy J; Schmuck, Heather M

    2018-05-01

    Health professions students are often unaware of other health care providers' roles or professional expertise due to most education taking place within their single profession. This pattern may be even more prevalent for baccalaureate and associate degree programs since most interprofessional education (IPE) occurs in predoctoral programs and, when IPE is incorporated into allied health professions education, it often utilizes simulation instead of live patient experiences. The aim of this study was to determine if radiologic technology and dental assisting students' perceptions changed regarding interprofessional practice and teamwork after an IPE activity with actual patients. The participants were students in the University of Southern Indiana (USI) radiologic technology and dental assisting programs. This mixed-methods pilot study conducted in 2017 collected quantitative and qualitative data from pre and post surveys, the researchers' observations of student interactions during live patient assessment and acquisition of panoramic images, and large-group discussion. Twenty-five of the 26 students who participated in the IPE program completed both pre and post surveys, for a 96% response rate. The results showed significant differences in the participants' perceptions from the pre to post surveys on a wide variety of survey items. Most notable were the positive changes in perceptions related to trust in judgment of others within their profession (p=0.001), relationships with other professions (p=0.002), and thinking highly of other professions (p=0.002). Overall, this study found that incorporating the IPE activity with a live