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Sample records for jordanian dental patients

  1. Jordanian patients' satisfaction with pain management.

    PubMed

    Darawad, Muhammad W; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud; Saleh, Ali M; Al-Sutari, Manal

    2014-03-01

    Pain is still undertreated among hospitalized patients. Recently, patient satisfaction with pain management has received significant attention. This field has not yet been explored among Jordanian patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge regarding pain characteristics, beliefs, and satisfaction that can be included in planning pain management strategies and protocols within Jordanian hospitals. Using descriptive cross-sectional methodology, the American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire (APS-POQ) was used to survey 375 inpatients from Jordanian hospitals. Participants reported relatively severe pain and pain interferences while being hospitalized and seemed to be well informed regarding pain and pain management. Participants reported high levels of pain management satisfaction. Also, the Arabic version of the APS-POQ was found to be reliable among the Jordanian population. Findings of this study are similar to those reported by earlier studies in other countries and support the need for applying the caring attitude in managing patients' reports of having pain. This study is the first in Jordan, opening the door for future studies to be conducted in this important field.

  2. Jordanian dentists' knowledge and implementation of eco-friendly dental office strategies.

    PubMed

    Al Shatrat, Sabha M; Shuman, Deanne; Darby, Michele L; Jeng, Hueiwang A

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the implementation of eco-friendly dental office strategies by Jordanian dentists. Self-designed questionnaires were provided to 150 dentists working in private dental practices in the city of Amman, the capital of Jordan. Dentists' names and addresses were obtained from the Jordanian Dental Association. Overall, the level of knowledge about eco-friendly dental offices strategies was high for amalgam, radiology, paper waste, infection control and energy and water conservation. In terms of implementation, the majority of Jordanian dentists apply few eco-friendly dental offices strategies. The most frequently identified barriers to implementation of eco-friendly dental offices strategies were cost and lack of incentives from the government. Most Jordanian dental practices are not eco-friendly. A continued focus on the impact of dental practices on the environment is needed through formal and continuing dental education. Results of this study can guide policy development to encourage implementation of eco-friendly strategies. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  3. Women's oral and dental health aspects in humanitarian missions and disasters: Jordanian experience.

    PubMed

    Smadi, Leena; Sumadi, Aiman Al

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to review oral and dental health aspects in female patients presented to Jordanian Royal Medical Services (RMS) international humanitarian missions over a 3-year period. Analysis of humanitarian missions of RMS data and records over a 3-year period (2011-2013) in regard to women's oral and dental health issues was done. The data were analyzed in regard to the number of women seen, the presenting conditions, and the prevalence of oral and dental diseases and procedures in these cases. During the 3-year period, 72 missions were deployed in four locations (Gaza, Ram Allah-West Bank, Jeneen-West Bank, and Iraq). The total number of females seen in this period was 86,436 women, accounting for 56 percent of adult patients seen by RMS humanitarian missions. Dental Clinics were deployed to only two missions (Iraq and Gaza), during which they received 13,629 visits; of these, 41 percent were females (5,588 patients), 29 percent were males, and 30 percent were in the pediatric age group. Trauma accounts for only 7 percent of the cases, while nonacute dental problems (caries and gingivitis) were responsible for the majority of cases (31.6 and 28.7 percent, respectively). RMS dental services during humanitarian mission deployment are a vital part of comprehensive healthcare. Women usually seek more dental care than men, with the majority of treatments for nonacute conditions. RMS experiences demonstrate the tremendous need for a well-defined preparedness plan for deployment of humanitarian missions that considers the contributions of all types of health professionals, the appropriate mobile technology to respond to emergent health risks, and a competent workforce ready and able to respond. Such preparation will require our dental education programs to develop disaster preparedness competencies to achieve the desired level of understanding.

  4. Observance of proper mercury hygiene practices by Jordanian general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Sawair, Faleh A; Hassoneh, Yazan; Jamleh, Ahmed O; Al-Rabab'ah, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    To assess the knowledge and observance of proper mercury hygiene and amalgam waste management (AWM) among Jordanian general dental practitioners (GDPs). Interviews were conducted with randomly selected 250 Jordanian GDPs, using a specially designed questionnaire. Out of the total of 250 GDPs, 228 (91.2%) agreed to participate. The questionnaire covered aspects related to professional information and total amalgam contact (TAC) of these practitioners. The second part focused on the degree of awareness of the protocols related to mercury hygiene and safe AWM. Mean TAC was 3.2+/-3.6 hours per week. Of the Jordanian practitioners, 22.6% reported no undergraduate training in amalgam safety measures. Almost a quarter of GDPs did not have proper ventilation in their clinics, around 20-25% did not use protective clothing or eye protection, 5.3% were mixing amalgam manually, and 13.9% used their bare fingers for inserting the freshly mixed amalgam. Most of unused amalgam ends up through the drain or in trash; there are no recycling facilities to be used. Most Jordanian GDPs do not strictly follow the mercury hygiene and AWM guidelines. Promoting the American Dental Association (ADA) guidelines through undergraduate and postgraduate training will help GDPs acquire proper attitude towards the proper hygiene practices described in these recommendations.

  5. Nurses' perceptions of patient safety culture in Jordanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Khater, W A; Akhu-Zaheya, L M; Al-Mahasneh, S I; Khater, R

    2015-03-01

    Patients' safety culture is a key aspect in determining healthcare organizations' ability to address and reduce risks of patients. Nurses play a major role in patients' safety because they are accountable for direct and continuous patient care. There is little known information about patients' safety culture in Jordanian hospitals, particularly from the perspective of healthcare providers. The study aimed to assess patient safety culture in Jordanian hospitals from nurses' perspective. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was utilized. A total number of 658 nurses participated in the current study. Data were collected using an Arabic version of the hospital survey of patients' safety culture. Teamwork within unit dimensions had a high positive response, and was perceived by nurses to be the only strong suit in Jordanian hospitals. Areas that required improvement, as perceived by nurses, are as follows: communication openness, staffing, handoff and transition, non-punitive responses to errors, and teamwork across units. Regression analysis revealed factors, from nurses' perspectives, that influenced patients' safety culture in Jordanian hospital. Factors included age, total years of experience, working in university hospitals, utilizing evidence-based practice and working in hospitals that consider patient safety to be a priority. Participants in this study were limited to nurses. Therefore, there is a need to assess patient safety culture from other healthcare providers' perspectives. Moreover, the use of a self-reported questionnaire introduced the social desirability biases. The current study provides insight into how nurses perceive patient safety culture. Results of this study have revealed that there is a need to replace the traditional culture of shame/blame with a non-punitive culture. Study results implied that improving patient safety culture requires a fundamental transformation of nurses' work environment. New policies to improve collaboration between

  6. Perceptions of Jordanian laypersons and dental professionals to altered smile aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Abu Alhaija, Elham S J; Al-Shamsi, Nada O; Al-Khateeb, Susan

    2011-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to rate the attractiveness of different smile variables, to compare the perception of Jordanian laypeople, general practitioners, and orthodontists to altered smile aesthetics, and to identify the threshold where different variables begin to impair smile aesthetics. A smiling photograph of a female dental student was selected and digitally manipulated to create changes in buccal corridor space (BCS), the amount of gingival display, and the midline diastema. These altered images were rated by three groups of Jordanians: 200 laypeople (100 females and 100 males), 200 general practitioners (100 females and 100 males), and 160 orthodontists (40 females and 120 males). Smile aesthetics scores were calculated and comparisons between groups were performed using the univariate general linear model. The results showed that profession and gender affected BCS and midline diastema attractiveness ratings (P<0.001). Wide BCSs, a gingival display of more than 2 mm, and the presence of a midline diastema of any size were rated as unattractive by all groups.

  7. Knowledge and attitude of Jordanian school health teachers with regards to emergency management of dental trauma.

    PubMed

    Al-Jundi, Suhad H; Al-Waeili, Haydar; Khairalah, Khaled

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, by means of a self administered structured questionnaire, the level of knowledge of school health teachers in northern Jordan with regards to the immediate emergency management of dental trauma. The questionnaire surveyed teacher's background, Knowledge of management of tooth fracture, avulsion, and loss of consciousness, it also investigated teacher's attitudes, and self assessed knowledge, as well as knowledge of availability of emergency services in Jordan. The sample consisted of all school health teachers in northern Jordan (220) who attended an oral health education course held by the Jordanian dental association. Only 190 were included in the survey. Sixty-three percent were females, 44% were in their twenties, and 43% in their forties. Their school health teaching experience ranged from 1 to 7 years. Only 20% were officially trained in school health. Less than half of the teachers received first aid training only once in their teaching career, not necessarily as part of school health training. Only 10 teachers were trained in dental first aid, and more than half had a previous experience with handling dental trauma in children. Overall the teachers' knowledge with regards to the emergency management of the trauma cases presented in the report was deficient. Chi-square test showed that, the difference in their responses to the knowledge part of the questionnaire was not statistically significant with regards to age, gender, years of teaching experience, first aid training, or number of seen trauma cases. Generally, the attitude was positive, most teachers wanting further education on the topic, however those who were trained in first aid, thought they were able to give proper action when needed in cases of trauma (P = 0.026). Most teachers were unsatisfied with their level of knowledge, and only 30% knew of the availability of after hour emergency services for dental trauma. The present report indicated the gross lack

  8. Predictors of Glycated Hemoglobin among Jordanian Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    HAMMAD, Sawsan; DARAWAD, Muhammad; HOURANI, Eman; DEMEH, Waddah

    2015-01-01

    Background: We explored the level of Jordanian patients' knowledge, diabetes related distress, self-management activities and these effects on the A1C level. Methodology: This descriptive cross-sectional correlational design (conducted in 2013) was utilized to recruit 289 diabetic patients from outpatient diabetes clinics, using self-reported questionnaires (Diabetes Knowledge Test, Diabetes Distress Scale, and Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire) in addition to chart review for selected variables. Results: Participants' had mean glycated hemoglobin of 7.88%. Good glycemic control was significantly associated with higher self-management activities (r= −.147), high income (r= −.171), older age (r= −.252), shorter duration of illness (r= .153), and low levels of distress. Despite these relationships only age, duration of illness and income significantly predicted A1C (F (5, 284) = 11.57, P<.001, R2 = .17). Further, diabetes knowledge, diabetes-related distress, and self-management could not predict A1C level. Conclusion: Only diabetes-related distress and self-management correlated with patients' A1C, with no predictive power. Thus, further research is required to shed the light on the large unexplained components of the A1C variance. PMID:26744705

  9. Assessment of nutritional status among ESRD patients in Jordanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tayyem, Reema F; Mrayyan, Majd T; Heath, Dennis D; Bawadi, Hiba A

    2008-05-01

    Our objective was to assess nutritional status and compare quality of treatment among hemodialysis patients in public and private hospitals in Jordan. We utilized a cross-sectional survey. Our setting involved hospital hemodialysis units. This study was undertaken in five large Jordanian hospitals between 2004 and 2005. One hundred and eighty participants diagnosed with end-stage renal failure (ESRD) were enrolled. These participants (91 women and 89 men) who underwent hemodialysis treatment were recruited using a convenience sampling technique. Data from participants who received hemodialysis treatment in public hospital settings were compared with equivalent data from participants treated in private hospital settings. Subjective global assessment (SGA), anthropometry, and biochemical measurements were used as evaluative tools. In the anthropometric measurement of triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), we found a statistically significant difference (P < .05) between participants treated in the two hospital settings. In addition, approximately 62% of all participants, regardless of treatment site, were found to be moderately to severely malnourished. Anthropometric measurements showed some significant increase between prehemodialysis and posthemodialysis weight and body mass index in private hospitals; this was not unexpected. There were no statistically significant differences in the measured mean levels of eight different biochemical parameters, with the exception of plasma phosphorus and sodium levels. The prevalence of malnutrition and the quality of treatment in our two groups of participants were similar.

  10. Patterns of physical growth and dental development in Jordanian children and adolescents with thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Hattab, Faiez N

    2013-03-01

    Dental development and physical growth are of particular interest in pediatric dentistry and orthodontics. This study evaluated these variables in patients with thalassemia major (TM). Physical growth was assessed in 54 patients (31 males and 23 females) aged 5.5 to 18.3 years and dental development was analyzed using panoramic radiographs from 39 of the 54 patients. The Demirjian system was used to characterize dental development of the seven left mandibular permanent teeth. Chronologic age (CA) and dental age (DA) were compared using the paired t-test, and the correlation between CA and extent of delay in dental development (DA minus CA) was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Growth retardation (< 10th percentile for height and weight) was present in 75.9% of TM patients. Height less than the third percentile was noted in 41.9% (13/31) of males and 34.8% (8/23) of females. Mean (SD) body mass index was 16.5 ± 2.2 kg/m(2). The extent of growth retardation increased with advancing age. Patient radiographs revealed a delay in dental development in 31 of 39 (79.5%) of participants (mean delay, 1.12 years in males and 0.81 years in females; range, 0.1 to 2.7 years). The mean difference between CA and DA was 0.97 years (P < 0.001). CA was significant correlated with extent of dental developmental delay (r = 0.64, P < 0.01). The results show that, among children and adolescents with TM, the proportions of those who had short stature, were underweight, and had a low growth rate increased with age. In addition, participants had significant delays in dental development.

  11. Two novel mutations of FBN1 in Jordanian patients with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Saied A; Abujamous, Lama A; Al-Hawamdeh, Ali A; Alawneh, Khaldoon M; Rawashdeh, Tamara A; Jaradat, Zaher M

    2015-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant inheritance disorder with a 1/5000-live-birth prevalence. More than 3000 mutations have been characterized thus far in the FBN1 gene. The goal of this study is to facilitate Marfan syndrome diagnosis in Jordanian patients using a molecular genetic testing. All of the 65 coding exons and flanking intronic sequences of the FBN1 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction and were subjected to sequencing in five unrelated Jordanian patients suspected of having Marfan syndrome. Four different mutations were identified, including two novel mutations: the c.1553dupG frame-shift (p.Tyr519Ilefs*14) and the c.6650G>A (p.Cys2217Tyr) missense mutations. Two other missense mutations, c.2243G>A (p.Cys748Tyr) and c.2432G>A (p.Cys811Tyr), have been previously detected. Patient number five was heterozygous for the synonymous substitution variant c.1875T>C (p.Asn625Asn; rs#25458). Additionally, eight variants in the intronic sequence of the FBN1 gene were identified, of which the c.2168-46A>G mutation was a new variant. The data provide molecular-based evidence linking Marfan syndrome to pathogenic mutations in the FBN1 gene among Jordanians for the first time. Thus, our results will contribute to the better management of the disease using molecular tools and will help in genetic counseling of the patients' families.

  12. Jordanian Physicians’ Attitudes toward Disclosure of Cancer Information and Patient Participation in Treatment Decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Obeidat, Rana; Khrais, Huthaifah I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to determine the attitude of Jordanian physicians toward disclosure of cancer information, comfort and use of different decision-making approaches, and treatment decision making. Methods: A descriptive, comparative research design was used. A convenience sample of 86 Jordanian medical and radiation oncologists and surgeons practicing mainly in oncology was recruited. A modified version of a structured questionnaire was used for data collection. The questionnaire is a valid measure of physicians’ views of shared decision making. Results: Almost 91% of all physicians indicated that the doctor should tell the patient and let him/her decide if the family should know of an early-stage cancer diagnosis. Physicians provide abundant information about the extent of the disease, the side effects and benefits of the treatment, and details of the treatment procedures. They also provided less information on the effects of treatment on the sexuality, mood, and family of the patient. Almost 48% of the participating physicians reported using shared decision making as their usual approach for treatment decision making, and 67% reported that they were comfortable with this approach. The main setting of clinical activity was the only factor associated with physicians’ usual approach to medical decision making. Moreover, age, years of experience, and main setting of clinical activity were associated with physicians’ comfort level with the shared approach. Conclusions: Although Jordanian physicians appreciate patient autonomy, self-determination, and right to information, paternalistic decision making and underuse of the shared decision-making approach persist. Strategies that target both healthcare providers and patients must be employed to promote shared decision making in the Jordanian healthcare system. PMID:27981172

  13. Psychological Correlates of Burden Among Jordanian Caregivers of Patients With Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Ghannam, Bushar M; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Al Abeiat, Dana D

    2017-10-01

    To examine prediction power of personality traits, expressed emotion, and coping strategies on caregivers' burden. Cross-sectional descriptive correlational design was used to collect data from 196 caregivers using the Self-Administered Questionnaire from Jordanian caregivers of patients with serious mental illness. Jordanian caregivers had a moderate-to-severe burden level (M = 47.1, SD = 11.5). Burden had a significant negative relationship with coping (r = -.15, p = .04) and significant positive relationship with personality dysfunction (r = .16, p = .021). Emotional expression, coping, and personality were found to be significant predictors of burden (F = 5.16, p = .002). Mental health professionals need to address family caregivers in their plans of care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Jordanian cancer patients' information needs and information-seeking behaviour: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Al Qadire, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    Cancer diagnosis can leave patients with uncertainty and anxiety that can be reduced by providing timely information and effective communication. Despite information provision being highly important in improving the quality of provided care, no study had been conducted to assess the information needs of Jordanian cancer patients. To investigate the information needs of Jordanian cancer patients. A quantitative research method and a descriptive cross-sectional survey design were used. The sample consisted of 182 Jordanian cancer patients. Participants were recruited from two hospitals; one of them was a university hospital and the second was governmental hospital. The mean age was 46.5 (SD 15.8 years); 52% of the sample were males. In addition, 38% of the patients had haematological tumours and 20% had gastro-intestinal tumours. The majority (157) wanted information about cancer. The results showed that patients would like to know everything about their disease (mean = 3.1, SD 0.9) and medical tests (mean = 3.0, SD 1.0). The results also revealed that younger patients, those who were working, and those with a high income had high information needs. However, patients who had reached the stage of palliative care seemed to require a lesser amount of information than those in the early stage of treatment. Many factors may cause variations in patients' information-seeking behaviour. Therefore, a notational policy for information provision is needed to satisfy different patients' information needs. Healthcare providers should be aware that cancer patients' will continue to need information at all stages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Attitudes of Jordanian mental health nurses toward mental illness and patients with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Wardam, Lina A

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Jordanian mental health nurses' attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental illness. A descriptive correlational design was utilized to collect data from 92 mental health nurses in Jordan. Data was collected on nurses' attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental disorder and their satisfaction with nursing care delivery. The Jordanian mental health nurses who participated in this study had negative attitudes toward mental illness and toward patients with mental disorders. About 60% of the mental health nurses had perceived patients with mental illness to be dangerous, immature, dirty, cold hearted, harmful, and pessimistic. In only two descriptions-being polite and adult-did nurses have positive perception about patients with mental illness. Mental health nurse were not satisfied with nursing care delivery. More than 70% of nurses were proud to be a mental health nurse. Age and gender were significant influential factors in forming the nurses' attitudes or satisfaction. Immediate intervention is needed to improve the quality of patient care provided by mental health nurses.

  16. Jordanian nurses' job satisfaction, patients' satisfaction and quality of nursing care.

    PubMed

    Mrayyan, M T

    2006-09-01

    To study nurses' job satisfaction, patients' satisfaction, and quality of nursing care in a Jordanian educational hospital. A descriptive cross-sectional comparative design was used. The total populations at the educational hospital where the study was conducted were: 200 nurses (response rate 60%), 510 patients (response rate 49%), and 26 head nurses (NHs) (response rate 92%). Mueller/McCloskey Satisfaction Scale (MMSS) 1990; Eriksen's (1988) scale of The Satisfaction with Nursing Care; and Quality of Nursing Care Questionnaire-Head Nurse of Safford & Schlotfeldt (1960) were used to measure the phenomena of interest. Nurses were 'neither satisfied nor dissatisfied' in their jobs, nurses who work in wards reported a slightly better job satisfaction than nurses who work in critical care units. Patients reported that they were 'moderately' satisfied, and head nurses reported that nurses 'usually (practically)' provide a high of quality of nursing care. There were no significant differences between critical care units and wards in regard to patients' satisfaction and quality of nursing care. Jordanian nurses' job satisfaction is on the borderline, which arguably requires more interventions. Patients' satisfaction and quality of nursing care have to be enhanced to reach the levels of 'very satisfied' and 'always' consecutively.

  17. Traumatic dental injuries among 12-year-old Jordanian schoolchildren: an investigation on obesity and other risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Traumatic dental injury (TDI) is an important public dental health problem among schoolchildren. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between TDIs, obesity, and other possible associated factors like gender, overjet, lip coverage, parents’ education level and family income among 12-year old Jordanian schoolchildren. Methods A cross-sectional population-based study examined a total of 1015 schoolchildren attending 34 schools randomly selected from urban and rural areas of Amman-the capital city of Jordan. The epidemiological classification adopted by WHO and modified by Andreasen et al. was used to classify TDIs. Obesity was defined according to the international cut-off points of body mass index for boys and girls between 2 and 20 years old. Results The prevalence of TDIs was 16.3%. Enamel fracture was the most common type of TDIs (65%). Neither parents’ education level nor family income had a significant effect on TDI occurrence (P > 0.05). Results of multiple logistic regression showed that TDIs were significantly more prevalent among males (OR = 1.42, CI; 1.01-2.01, P < 0.05), and children with inadequate lip coverage (OR = 1.95, CI; 1.35-2.81, P < 0.05). The relationship between TDIs and obesity was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusions Being a male with inadequate lip coverage was associated with higher probability of having a TDI. Obesity had no significant effect on the occurrence of TDIs. PMID:25099379

  18. Jordanian patients' perception of stressors in critical care units: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Hweidi, Issa M

    2007-02-01

    Critical care units' CCUs environment has been regarded as a leading stressor because of the complex nature of patient's health problems that require an extensive use of very sophisticated technology. Multiple and complex care predominates in CCUs have been described by patients to be stressful and emotionally demanding. Number of CCUs in Jordan has been increasing and so does the advanced technology, which calls for adaptability in dealing with unit stressors as they affect patient recovery and rehabilitation. To identify the principal physical and psychological stressors as perceived by Jordanian patients in CCUs and to examine the effects of selected patients' characteristics on their perception of stressors. In this cross-sectional study, data was collected from 165 patients, 2-3 days after being discharged from CCUs in two Jordanian governmental hospitals. A structured interview guide including the Intensive Care Unit Environmental Stressor Scale was used. Having tubes in nose or mouth, being in pain, not able to sleep and hearing the buzzers and alarms from the machinery, being thirsty, and not being in control of your-self were considered by patients as the main stressors. Psychological stressors were the least stressful items identified by patients. Marital status, educational level, age, and income were the most significant characteristics which affected patients' perception of stressors. The findings suggest that single and older patients with low income and low education experience more difficulties than their counterparts. Nurses must utilize more effective communication techniques and interventions to relieve patients' pain, and provide an atmosphere in which rest is possible, with less light, noise, and the fewest possible interruptions. Although the results of this study indicate the need to provide the best possible physical care, it is equally important to give adequate attention to patients' and families' psychological aspects.

  19. Quality of life, social support, and severity of psychiatric symptoms in Jordanian patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hamaideh, S; Al-Magaireh, D; Abu-Farsakh, B; Al-Omari, H

    2014-06-01

    The major purposes of this study were to examine levels and correlations of quality of life (QOL), social support, and severity of psychiatric symptoms as well as to identify the variables that best predict QOL among Jordanian patients with schizophrenia. Descriptive cross-sectional design was used to collect data from 160 patients selected through systematic random sampling from two psychiatric outpatient clinics. Results showed that the highest domain of QOL was the social relationship domain, and the highest source of social support was perceived from significant others. Severity of affective symptoms was the highest, and severity of positive symptoms was the lowest. QOL correlated positively with social support, patients' educational and income level, and employment; and negatively with severity of psychiatric symptoms, duration of untreated illness, and duration of treatment. Support from friends, duration of untreated illness, income level, and severity of affective symptoms predicted QOL and accounting for 47.3% of the variance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Associations between patient factors and medication adherence: A Jordanian experience.

    PubMed

    Basheti, Iman A; Hait, Sami Saqf El; Qunaibi, Eyad A; Aburuz, Salah; Bulatova, Nailya

    2016-01-01

    To explore the effect of patient characteristics and health beliefs on their medication adherence. Patients (n=167) with chronic conditions (mean age 58.9; SD=13.54, 53% males) were recruited from March 2009- to March 2010 using a cross sectional study design. Data collected included patients' demographics, medical conditions, medications therapeutic regimen, frequency of physician visits and health beliefs. Patient self-reported adherence to medications was assessed by the researcher using a validated and published scale. Treatment related problems (TRPs) were evaluated for each patient by competent clinical pharmacists. Associations between patient characteristics/health beliefs with adherence were explored. About half of the patients (46.1%) were non-adherent. A significant association was found between lower adherence and higher number of disease states (p<0.001), higher number of medications (p=0.001), and higher number of identified TRPs (p = 0.003). Patient adherence was positively affected by older age, higher educational level, and higher number of physician visits per month, while it was negatively affected by reporting difficulties with getting prescription refills on time. This study identified different factors that may negatively affect adherence, including higher number of medications and disease states, higher number of identified TRPs and inability to getting prescription refills on time. Hence, more care needs to be provided to patients with complex therapeutic regimens in order to enhance adherence.

  1. The correlates of stigma toward mental illness among Jordanian patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Rayan, Ahmad; Mahroum, Maryam Husnee; Khasawneh, Aws

    2017-05-23

    This study aims to assess the correlates of stigma toward mental illness among patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD). One hundred and sixty one Jordanian outpatients suffering from MDD completed the study. Participants completed the demographic questionnaire, the Center for Epidemiological Studies for the intensity of depression, and the Devaluation-Discrimination Scale to assess stigma. Participants reported a moderate level of perceived stigma toward mental illness. Age, perceived pain, the number of relapses, and severity of depressive symptoms were significantly correlated with stigma toward mental illness among the study sample. The severity of depressive symptoms was the strongest correlate of stigma toward mental illness. Factors associated with stigma toward mental illness should be carefully considered when implementing anti-stigma programs for patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The use of medicinal herbs by diabetic Jordanian patients.

    PubMed

    Otoom, S A; Al-Safi, S A; Kerem, Z K; Alkofahi, A

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder worldwide. To date, there have been no reports on the frequency of use of herb medicines in the managements of diabetes mellitus in Jordan. This cross-sectional study was conducted by interviewing 310 diabetic patients visiting two medical centers in Jordan: Jordan University of Science & Technology Medical Center and Sarih Medical Center between December 2003 and August 2004. It is found that 31% of interviewed patients have used herbal products (96 patients). The results revealed that the most commonly used herbs by diabetic patients in Jordan were Trigonella foenumgraecum (22.9%), Lupinus albus (14.6%), Allium sativum (11.5%), Allium cepa (5.2%), Nigella sativa (7.3%), Zea mays L. (6.3%), Urtica dioica L. (8.3%), Eucalyptus globules LA (9.4%), Olea europea L. (3.1%), Cumminum cyminum (9.4%), Coriandrum sativum (10.4%), Salvia officinalis L. (3.1%), and Tilia cordata (1%). Furthermore, it is found that 47.9% of the patients used herbs according to advice from their friends on a daily basis. The side effects were reported by 36.5% of the patients and include headache, nausea, dizziness, itching, palpitation, and sweating. Among the patients, 72.9% used the herbs as adjunctive therapy along with their anti-diabetic drugs and 80.2% of the patients informed their physicians about their use. A 79.2% of the sample confirmed their intention to re-use these herbs as 86.5% of them were satisfied with their diabetes control. There was a significant relationship between the use of herbs, the patient's place of residence and his/her level of education. The main conclusion of this survey is that the use of medicinal herbs among diabetic patient in Jordan is common. Therefore, it is essential to increase the level of awareness among diabetic patients and health care providers regarding the efficacy and toxicity of these medicinal herbs.

  3. Patients' Adherence to Healthy Behavior in Coronary Heart Disease: Risk Factor Management Among Jordanian Patients.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Sultan M; Darawad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    .54, P = .011) or regular physical activity (Mann-Whitney Z = -3.60, P = .001) and in those who had more comorbidity diseases (r = 0.34, P = .001). Our findings highlight poor adherence to secondary prevention behaviors among Jordanian CHD patients. Most participants did not adopt healthy behaviors in managing their CHD risk factors and they demonstrated a higher risk of hospital readmission. There is an urgent need for aggressive and targeted strategies to enhance adherence levels.

  4. Symptom management strategies of Jordanian patients following coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

    PubMed

    Al-Daakak, Zaher Mohammed; Ammouri, Ali Ahmad; Isac, Chandrani; Gharaibeh, Huda; Al-Zaru, Ibtisam

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the symptom management strategies utilized by post coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients and its associations with demographic variables. A clear understanding of the use of symptom management strategies following CABG surgery may help nurses in developing educational program and interventions that help patients and their families during recovery period after discharge. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was utilized. A convenience sample of 100 Jordanian patients post CABG surgery selected from five hospitals was surveyed between November 2012 and June 2013 using the Cardiac Symptom Survey. Chi squared analyses were used to examine the associations between the symptoms management strategies and selected demographic variables. Frequency of symptom management strategies utilized by post CABG patients revealed that most frequently employed strategies were use of medications (79%), repositioning (54%) and the rest (45%). Symptom management strategies utilized for poor appetite, sleeping problem and fatigue had significant associations with demographic variables. By providing information about the symptoms expected after surgery and possible ways to manage them, will strengthen the patients psychologically and will make CABG experience within the realm of self-management and coping.

  5. Jordanian dialysis patients' perceived exercise benefits and barriers: a correlation study.

    PubMed

    Darawad, Muhammad W; Khalil, Amani A

    2013-01-01

    To investigate Jordanian end-stage renal disease (ESRD)patients' perceived exercise benefits and barriers, and their correlation with patients' demographic variables and dialysis measures. A descriptive correlational study was conducted using cross-sectional survey, using a convenience sample of 190 ESRD dialyzed patients who were recruited from eight hospitals in Jordan. Participants significantly perceived exercise benefits (M= 2.88/4, SD± .67) higher than barriers (M= 2.66, SD± .62). The most frequent perceived exercise benefits were preventing muscular atrophy and improving mood, whereas tiredness and lower-extremity fatigue were the most frequent exercise barriers. Finally, acceptable values of Cronbach's Alpha were revealed for perceived exercise subscale, barriers subscale, and total scale (α= .88, .81, and .70, respectively). Participants focused more on exercise benefits than barriers, and on direct exercise benefits and barriers than the indirect. The results of this study have important implications for the efforts that aim at improving ESRD patients' exercise behaviors. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  6. Dental problems in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Zioło, Anna; Mielnik-Błaszczak, Maria

    2004-01-01

    On the grounds of literature and own clinical experience, pathological changes in epilepitic patients have been described. Dental management procedures in these patients have also been presented. The unquestionable importance of prophylaxis, which may markedly minimize the impact of epilepsy on the incidence of mouth diseases, has been emphasised. It has also been stated that epileptic patients should receive specialised and integrated dental treatment.

  7. Assessment of anxiety and depression after lower limb amputation in Jordanian patients

    PubMed Central

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M; Othman, Yasmin S; Ibrahim, Alaa I

    2008-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depression among Jordanian lower limb amputees with different clinical characteristics and sociodemographic data (gender, marital status, social support, income, type and level of amputation, and occupation). Methods Participants were 56 patients with unilateral lower limb amputation with mean duration (8.4 ± 5.75 years). They were recruited from inpatient and outpatient clinics of Jordan University hospital, Royal Farah Rehabilitation Center, and Al-basheer hospital in Amman, Jordan. Participants responded to a questionnaire that included a battery of questions requesting brief information about sociodemographic variables and characteristics of amputation. The level of depression and anxiety in each participating patient was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms were 37% and 20%, respectively. Factors associated with high prevalence of psychological symptoms included female gender, lack of social support, unemployment, traumatic amputation, shorter time since amputation, and amputation below the knee. These findings were confirmed by a significant reduction of anxiety and depression scores in patients who received social support, patients with amputation due to disease, and patients with amputation above the knee. Presence of pain and use of prosthesis had no effect on the prevalence. Conclusions The findings of the present study highlight the high incidence of psychiatric disability and depression in amputees; it also showed the importance of sociodemographic factors in psychological adjustment to amputation. It is suggested that psychiatric evaluation and adequate rehabilitation should form a part of their overall management. PMID:18830394

  8. Analysis of Turner syndrome patients within the Jordanian population, with a focus on four patients with Y chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Daggag, H; Srour, W; El-Khateeb, M; Ajlouni, K

    2013-01-01

    This study presents findings in Turner syndrome (TS) patients from the Jordanian population, with focus on 4 patients with Y chromosomal abnormalities. From 1989 to 2011, 504 patients with TS stigmata were referred to our institute for karyotyping, resulting in 142 positive TS cases. Of these, 62 (43.7%) had the typical 45,X karyotype and the remaining individuals (56.3%) were found to be mosaics. Fifteen TS patients (10.5%) carried a structural abnormality of the Y chromosome and presented with the mosaic 45,X/46,XY karyotype. From these, 4 TS cases were investigated further. Karyotyping revealed that 1 patient carried a small supernumerary marker chromosome, whereas cytogenetic and molecular analyses showed that 3 patients carried 2 copies of the SRY gene. Further analysis by SRY sequencing revealed no mutations within the gene. The analyzed patients were found to be phenotypically either females or males, depending on the predominance of the cell line carrying the Y chromosome. This study demonstrates the importance of detailed cytogenetic analysis (such as FISH) in TS patients, and it also emphasizes the need for molecular analysis (such as PCR and sequencing) when fragments of the Y chromosome are present.

  9. Mouth cancer awareness and beliefs among dental patients.

    PubMed

    Hassona, Yazan; Scully, Crispian; Abu Ghosh, Mais; Khoury, Zaid; Jarrar, Shadi; Sawair, Faleh

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the levels of awareness, knowledge about signs and risk factors of mouth (oral) cancer, and attitudes towards early diagnosis and treatment among dental outpatients. A total of 1,200 adult outpatients attending dental clinics at the University of Jordan Hospital for dental examination and treatment were randomly selected to participate in the study. An 18-item pretested close-ended questionnaire was used for the study. Descriptive statistics were generated and chi-square tests, t-tests, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Spearman's rho test were used to examine differences between groups. Only 45.6% of the subjects had heard about oral cancer. Some 66.9% and 33.8%, respectively, were able to correctly identify tobacco and alcohol as risk factors. Some 24.1% had no knowledge about any signs of oral cancer. Male subjects, smokers, alcohol drinkers, older participants (>40 years), and participants with less than a university education were significantly less aware, and had much less knowledge, of the signs and risk factors of oral cancer (P<0.05). Awareness about oral cancer among Jordanian dental outpatients is low. These dental patients, especially those in high-risk groups for mouth cancer and those of lower socio-economic status (SES), are less well informed about the signs and risk factors of oral cancer. Interventions to improve public knowledge about oral cancer and attitudes towards early diagnosis and treatment are urgently indicated. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  10. Patients' satisfaction with dental esthetics.

    PubMed

    Samorodnitzky-Naveh, Gili R; Geiger, Selly B; Levin, Liran

    2007-06-01

    Esthetics has become an important issue in modern society, as it seems to define one's character. In the past, functional demands were the main consideration in dental treatment. Today, with the decrease in caries prevalence, the focus has shifted toward dental esthetics. The authors conducted a study to evaluate the factors influencing patients' satisfaction with their dental appearance and with the results of esthetic treatment. The authors surveyed a population of 407 adults (mean age, 21 years). They distributed a questionnaire regarding satisfaction with current dental esthetics and previous esthetic treatments. Of the 407 subjects, 152 (37.3 percent) were dissatisfied with their dental appearance. Tooth color was the primary reason for dissatisfaction (133 [89.3 percent] of 149 subjects), followed by poor tooth alignment (36 [23.7 percent] of 152 subjects), although 110 (27 percent) of the 407 subjects had received orthodontic treatment. The authors found no correlation between patients' satisfaction with their dental appearance and having undergone any procedure to whiten their teeth. Nevertheless, 134 (88.2 percent) of the dissatisfied subjects reported that they would like to undergo this procedure. Tooth color was a major factor with regard to dental esthetics. Most subjects were interested in improving their appearance and whitening their teeth. When planning treatment, dentists should take into consideration esthetic objectives in addition to function, structure and biology. This requires the clinician to rely on several disciplines in dentistry to deliver the highest level of dental care, which should lead to a higher level of patient satisfaction.

  11. Dental management of anticoagulated patients.

    PubMed

    Carr, M M; Mason, R B

    1992-10-01

    Today's trend toward ambulatory medical care will bring more pharmacological problems into the dental office. While the dental management of patients taking oral anticoagulants is controversial, current research supports the contention that they can be safely treated on an outpatient basis. The use of the International Normalized Ratio (INR) has made better estimates of prothrombin time possible, and patients can be maintained in a narrow therapeutic range. Postoperative hemorrhage can be avoided or controlled with local hemostatic agents.

  12. Synonymy in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alomoush, Omar Ibrahim Salameh

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of synonymy in Jordanian Arabic. It has been assumed that synonymy in Jordanian Arabic has partial rather than complete synonymy. This means that the abundance of Jordanian Arabic in synonyms can be attributed to a number of explanations, namely dialectical variations, the speaker's attitude, and origin…

  13. A comparison of intimate partner violence between Jordanian nurses and Jordanian women.

    PubMed

    Al-Natour, Ahlam; Gillespie, Gordon Lee; Wang, Lihshing Leigh; Felblinger, Dianne

    2014-01-01

    Intimate partner violence is a serious international problem. It is not known if the extent of intimate partner violence for Jordanian nurses is similar to that of Jordanian women. Until the rate is known, implementation of nursing interventions for Jordanian women may be thwarted. The study purpose was to determine the rate of intimate partner violence among Jordanian nurses working in governmental health settings in a northern city of Jordan and to compare the rate to published statistics for a community sample of Jordanian women. A cross-sectional survey design was used for this study. A stratified random sample of 80 Jordanian nurses working in governmental women's health centers and public hospitals in a northern city of Jordan was invited to participate. Institutional review board approval was granted. Participants completed the Woman Abuse Screening Tool in a private room at their work site. No identifiers were added to the survey forms. Chi-squared goodness-of-fit tests were computed to compare the rate of intimate partner violence between the study sample and reported statistics for Jordanian women. Approximately 59% of participants experienced psychological violence, 12.5% experienced physical violence, and 5.1% experienced sexual violence. No significant differences were found in the rates of violence for the study sample and published data for a community sample of Jordanian women. Intimate partner violence is as prevalent against Jordanian nurses as it is for Jordanian women. Intimate partner violence needs to be addressed to prevent potential sequelae such as decreased work productivity and an inability to provide safe patient care.

  14. Prevalence of Dental Anxiety among Dental Patients in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Fayad, Mostafa I.; Elbieh, Ahmed; Baig, Mohammed N.; Alruwaili, Selham Alhabib

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Anxiety towards dental procedures are common difficulties that may be experienced by dental patients all over the world. This study focused on evaluating the dental anxiety frequency and its relationship with age, gender, educational level, and past dental visits among patients attending the outpatient clinics of College of Dentistry, Al Jouf University, Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods: A total of 221 patients, aged 21–50 years were selected for the study. A questionnaire comprising the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) was used to measure the level of dental anxiety. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results: The mean anxiety score of the 221 patients was 11.39 (SD ± 2.7). Independent t-test showed a significant variation between the age groups with regards to their mean overall anxiety score (P < 0.05), which reduced with increasing age. A significant difference was found by independent t-test in the mean total score between male and female groups and regarding previous dental visit (P < 0.05). Regarding education level, there was no significant difference between the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Younger patients, female, and patients with previous unpleasant dental experience were associated with increased MDAS score. Clinical Significance: The present study was done for better patient management and proper treatment plan development for dentally anxious patients. PMID:28462178

  15. Patient Satisfaction in Military Dental Treatment Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-07

    related to technical expertise, Crall and Morris (1988) and Abrams, Ayers and Vogt-Petterson (1986) found that patient satisfaction was not well ...mission of the Army Dental Care Dental Patient Satisfaction 93 System. Dental emergencies in deployed military populations have been well documented...that choice. The ratings of the beliefs about the care received were high as well . Mean scores on the seven belief questions Dental Patient Satisfaction

  16. Cross-border dental care: 'dental tourism' and patient mobility.

    PubMed

    Turner, L

    2008-05-24

    Patient mobility is increasing. 'Dental tourism' is driven by numerous factors. These factors include the high cost of local care, delays in obtaining access to local dentists, competent care at many international clinics, inexpensive air travel, and the Internet's capacity to link 'customers' to 'sellers' of health-related services. Though dental tourism will benefit some patients, increased patient mobility comes with numerous risks. Lack of access to affordable and timely local care plays a significant role in prompting patients to cross borders and receive dental care outside their local communities.

  17. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    PubMed

    Ní Ríordáin, R; McCreary, C

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and 'dental tourism'. A questionnaire was designed and randomly distributed to 520 patients attending the restorative dentistry, dental surgery and oral medicine clinics of Cork University Dental School and Hospital. Of the 520 questionnaires distributed, 500 were completed leading to a response rate of 96.2%. The majority of patients were familiar with using the Internet on a daily basis, with only 163 (32.6%) patients not using the Internet in their everyday lives. One hundred and seventy-seven (34.5%) patients either researched their presenting dental/oral condition or had a family or friend research their condition on their behalf. One hundred and eighty-five (37%) patients would consult with a dental practitioner online regarding an oral problem and a similar number (n=186) of patients surveyed would consider using the Internet to plan trips abroad for dental treatment. Practitioner-led direction for patients regarding quality information sources online is important. With the increased interest in travelling abroad for dental treatment, guidance for patients and practitioners regarding the legal and ethical issues pertaining to dental tourism is critical.

  18. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  19. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  20. Dental anomalies in mental patients.

    PubMed

    Moraes, N; Moraes, E; Cunha Marques, H H

    1975-01-01

    Fifty-three patients were examined for dental abnormalities at an institution specializing in care of the mentally deficient in Bauru, São Paulo State. The incidence of teeth with abnormal morphology, mainly second molars with an abnormal number of cusps, was extremely high. Enamel hypoplasia was frequently found in anterior teeth, and the percentage of fractured maxillary incisors was significantly higher than that observed in normal individuals.

  1. Self-care Management Intervention to Improve Psychological Wellbeing for Jordanian Patients with Type Two Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Albikawi, Zainab Fatehi; Petro-Nustas, Wasileh; Abuadas, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of self-care management intervention on psychological wellbeing for Jordanian patients with type two diabetes mellitus. A quasi-experimental design was used. The study was conducted in a diabetes clinic of a specialized diabetes center in Amman. One hundred and forty-nine participants completed the three-month post-treatment assessments (76 in the intervention group and 73 in the control group). Both the control and intervention groups received a standard diabetic educational program. The intervention group received the following additional interventions: (1) Diabetes Self-care Management booklet, (2)DVD viewing, (3) counseling rehearsal session, and (4) a telephone follow-up. The main study instrument was an Arabic version 20 of the depression anxiety stress scales: To assess the group differences of dependent variable changes, repeated measure ANOVA was used. It was found that psychological wellbeing was not significant at 2-week post-intervention and significant change was observed at 3-month post-intervention. The findings from this study can guide the health providers to be trained to provide relevant diabetic interventions into their nursing interventions, education, and research.

  2. [Results of dental implantation in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Botabaev, B K

    2010-01-01

    In absence of contraindications, with competent planning and complex oral mouth treatment and adequate use of surgical and orthopedic protocols, the dental implantation could be successfully implemented for esthetical and functional rehabilitation of elderly patients with different forms of adentia. Dental implantation can significantly increase the quality of life of elderly patients.

  3. [Dental management of hemorrhage-prone patients].

    PubMed

    Szalma, József; Joób-Fancsaly, Árpád

    2015-06-01

    The authors present a proposal of dental treatment and management of anticoagulated patients and of patients on antiplatelet therapy, with the approval by the Hungarian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and by the Dental Implantology Association of Hungarian Dentists. This current guide was based on recent Hungarian and on several foreign national guidelines and considers significant publications from international literature.

  4. The Prevalence of Dental Anxiety in Patients of a University Dental Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodmansey, Karl F.

    2005-01-01

    Dental anxiety remains a pervasive barrier to dental treatment for many individuals, including college-age patients. In this article, the author reviews dental anxiety and examines the usefulness of assessment instruments for identifying dental anxiety. Using 2 unique assessment instruments, he examines the prevalence of dental anxiety in his…

  5. The Prevalence of Dental Anxiety in Patients of a University Dental Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodmansey, Karl F.

    2005-01-01

    Dental anxiety remains a pervasive barrier to dental treatment for many individuals, including college-age patients. In this article, the author reviews dental anxiety and examines the usefulness of assessment instruments for identifying dental anxiety. Using 2 unique assessment instruments, he examines the prevalence of dental anxiety in his…

  6. Communication in dental medicine: importance in motivating elderly dental patients.

    PubMed

    Scutariu, Mihaela Monica; Forna, Norina

    2013-01-01

    Dental services for elderly patients are characterized by a series of particularities related to the vulnerability of this age group, which is affected by various co morbidities, and the diminished physical, cognitive and financial capacities. Finding ways to keep elderly patients coming to a dental office is possible by improving the dentist-patient relationship and implicitly the quality of care by increasing the self-esteem of the elderly and their place in society, by increasing the role of oral health in the quality of life, and here we refer to the pleasure of eating, the pleasant physical aspect and normal diction. The present paper presents the psychological aspects that interfere in the communication process between the dentist and the elderly patient and the changes motivation undergoes when people are in pain. These data can sometimes change the reticent attitude of the dentist towards the elderly patient which is often considered to be a risk patient.

  7. Biochemical evidence of anxiety in dental patients.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, H D; Roscoe, B; Vickers, M D

    1972-10-07

    Urinary metabolites before dental treatment were compared in a group of patients with dental phobia and in a matched control group. Plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline, and free fatty acids were estimated before treatment, immediately after sedation with diazapam 0.2 mg/kg body weight in the phobic patients, during induction of oral anaesthesia, and during and after surgery. Patients with dental phobia had significantly higher levels of adrenaline, which were only temporarily lowered by sedation, and which during treatment remained consistently higher than those of control patients.

  8. Biochemical Evidence of Anxiety in Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, H. D.; Roscoe, B.; Vickers, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    Urinary metabolites before dental treatment were compared in a group of patients with dental phobia and in a matched control group. Plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline, and free fatty acids were estimated before treatment, immediately after sedation with diazapam 0·2 mg/kg body weight in the phobic patients, during induction of oral anaesthesia, and during and after surgery. Patients with dental phobia had significantly higher levels of adrenaline, which were only temporarily lowered by sedation, and which during treatment remained consistently higher than those of control patients. PMID:5078436

  9. Psychologic Interventions for the Anxious Dental Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pawlicki, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article asserts that pharmacologic usage can be reduced by understanding that pain is composed of somatic, affective, and cognitive elements; the dentist should be assertive in addressing and dealing with the emotional and psychological aspects of the anxious and fearful patient. The dentist can measure levels of anxiety and fear through self-report and records of dental care; an easily administered test of dental anxiety, such as the Dental Anxiety Scale; and a structured interview in a nonoperatory setting. For those patients exhibiting a moderate amount of anxiety, attention to basic aspects of good clinic care should be sufficient. For those patients manifesting a high level of anxiety, a treatment program implemented by a dental clinical assistant is outlined and recommended. The treatment program is intended to increase patient relaxation, positive cognitive coping statements, sensory information, sense of control, and confidence in handling the dental procedures. At any level of anxiety, it is recommended that patients be abundantly praised for any element of success in dealing with the stress of their dental experience. Lastly, for those patients who do not respond to treatment efforts to reduce anxiety, it is recommended that the dentist establish a regular consultation with a psychologist who is an expert in treating dental fear and anxiety. PMID:3481520

  10. DENTAL LOSS AMONG AMBULATORY PATIENTS WITH DIABETES.

    PubMed

    Izuora, Kenneth E; Ezeanolue, Echezona E; Neubauer, Michael F; Gewelber, Civon L; Allenback, Gayle L; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2016-06-01

    There is a high prevalence of dental loss among patients with diabetes. Understanding the factors that impact dental loss in this population will aid with developing new strategies for its prevention. Using a cross-sectional study design, diabetes patients presenting for routine clinic visit were evaluated with an investigator-administered questionnaire. Data was collected on demographics, dental history, duration, control and complications of diabetes. Among 202 subjects, 100 were female, mean age: 58.9 ± 13.2 years, duration of diabetes: 15.8 ± 11.0 years, and hemoglobin A1c: 7.7 ± 1.6%. Thirty-one patients (15.3%) had lost all their teeth and only 13 (6.4%) had all 32 of their natural teeth. Using multiple linear regression, older age (β= - 0.146; 95% CI: - 0.062 to - 0.230), not flossing (β= - 3.462; 95% CI: - 1.107 to - 5.817), and presence of diabetic retinopathy (β= - 4.271; 95% CI: - 1.307 to - 7.236) were significant predictors of dental loss. Dental loss is common in patients with diabetes and is associated with older age, diabetic retinopathy and not flossing. In order to reduce dental loss among patients with diabetes, regular flossing should be emphasized as an important component of dental care.

  11. Dental orthopantomography: survey of patient dose

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolotta, A.; Calenda, E.; Calicchia, A.; Indovina, P.L.

    1983-03-01

    Absorbed dose to specific regions of the head and neck during dental orthopantomography with various commercial units was assessed using a Rando ''standard man'' phantom and TLD-100 LiF dosimeters. Relevance to patient protection is discussed.

  12. Isolation and characterization of Candida spp. in Jordanian cancer patients: prevalence, pathogenic determinants, and antifungal sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Abeid, Hanan M; Abu-Elteen, Khaled H; Elkarmi, Ali Z; Hamad, Mawieh A

    2004-12-01

    The presence of Candida spp. in the oral cavity was evaluated in 95 cancer patients (57 in-patients and 38 out-patients) and in 65 healthcare workers in Amman, Jordan. Candida carriage occurred in 72.6% of cancer patients and 33.8% of healthcare workers, with Candida albicans being the species most commonly recovered, followed by C. glabrata. In-patients were found to harbor Candida spp. at significantly higher levels than out-patients (P = 0.0044). The number of adhered C. albicans cells and the secretion of extracellular proteinase was significantly higher in the in-patient group than in the out-patient group (P = 0.0016 and 0.00007, respectively); this significant difference was not observed regarding phospholipase secretion. Antifungal sensitivity testing data suggest that isolates were most sensitive to amphotericin B and nystatin, and least sensitive to miconazole and fluconazole, which are commonly used antifungal agents in Jordan.

  13. Factors believed by Jordanian acne patients to affect their acne condition.

    PubMed

    El-Akawi, Z; Abdel-Latif Nemr, N; Abdul-Razzak, K; Al-Aboosi, M

    2006-11-01

    This study in Jordan described the pattern of acne in 166 untreated acne patients aged 13-42 years attending dermatology clinics and assessed patients' perceptions of factors that have an effect on their acne condition. Family history of acne was positive in 69.3% of acne patients. Emotional stress, hot weather and sweating were believed to be aggravating factors by acne patients of both sexes, and premenstrual factors and cosmetics were factors among women. Many acne patients believed that their acne was exacerbated by certain aspects of diet including nuts, chocolate, fatty food, fried food, eggs, cakes and biscuits, spices and coffee and tea.

  14. Transfusion transmitted virus (TTV) in dental patients.

    PubMed

    Takata, Y; Kurokawa, H; Fukuda, J

    2003-04-01

    Transfusion transmitted virus (TTV) is a new DNA virus found in patients with post-transfusion hepatitis. The prevalence of this virus among dental patients has not been reported, therefore, the prevalence of TTV infection in consecutive dental inpatients was evaluated. TTV DNA was assayed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 441 dental inpatients with oral cancer (n=192) or oral cysts (n=249). The serum HBs antigen and HCV antibody as well as aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GTP) concentrations were also measured. Of 441 subjects, 137 were infected with TTV (31.1%). This prevalence of TTV was much higher than that of HBV or HCV (HBV 1.2%; HCV 6.0%) in these dental patients. There was no gender or age difference in the prevalence of TTV infection. Of the 192 patients with oral cancer, 57 subjects had TTV in their sera, while 80 of 249 with oral cystic disease had TTV. The prevalence of TTV was similar between the two different disease groups. Neither the serum ALT nor serum AST concentrations were different between the subjects positive and negative for TTV DNA. In hospitalized dental patients, 31.1% were infected with TTV. The prevalence of TTV was much higher than that of HBV or HCV. There was no difference in the prevalence of TTV between subjects with cancer and cysts. Dentists should maintain high standards of infection control when treating any dental patient.

  15. Patient satisfaction in Dental Healthcare Centers

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Dena A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to (1) measure the degree of patient satisfaction among the clinical and nonclinical dental services offered at specialty dental centers and (2) investigate the factors associated with the degree of overall satisfaction. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and ninety-seven participants from five dental centers were recruited for this study. Each participant completed a self-administered questionnaire to measure patient satisfaction with clinical and nonclinical dental services. Analysis of variance, t-tests, a general linear model, and stepwise regression analysis was applied. Results: The respondents were generally satisfied, but internal differences were observed. The exhibited highest satisfaction with the dentists’ performance, followed by the dental assistants’ services, and the lowest satisfaction with the center's physical appearance and accessibility. Females, participants with less than a bachelor's degree, and younger individuals were more satisfied with the clinical and nonclinical dental services. The stepwise regression analysis revealed that the coefficient of determination (R2) was 40.4%. The patient satisfaction with the performance of the dentists explained 42.6% of the overall satisfaction, whereas their satisfaction with the clinical setting explained 31.5% of the overall satisfaction. Conclusion: Additional improvements with regard to the accessibility and physical appearance of the dental centers are needed. In addition, interventions regarding accessibility, particularly when booking an appointment, are required. PMID:27403045

  16. Patient and family/friend satisfaction in a sample of Jordanian Critical Care Units.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, S; Alja'afreh, M; Lee, A J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the validity of family members/friends as proxies by comparing perceptions of satisfaction with care and decision making between critically ill patients and their family/friends. A comparative, descriptive cross-sectional study. Seven Critical Care Units across four public and military hospitals in the centre and southern regions of Jordan. A modified version of the Family Satisfaction-ICU (FS-ICU) questionnaire was distributed to Critical Care Unit (CCU) patients before hospital discharge. In addition, up to two family members/close friends were also asked to complete the questionnaire. A total of 213 patients (response rate 72%) and 246 family members/friends (response rate 79%) completed and returned the questionnaire. Although the majority of family members/friends and patients were satisfied with overall care, patients were generally significantly less satisfied (mean (SD) care subscale 75.6 (17.8) and 70.9 (17.3), respectively, (p=0.005). When individual items were examined, significant differences in nursing care (family/friends 80.1 (20.7) versus patient 75.9 (22.2), p=0.038) and inclusion in decision making (family/friends 53.9 (33.2) versus patient 62.0 (34.2), p=0.010) were found. The study showed a degree of congruence between patients and their family members/friends in relation to their satisfaction with the CCU experience. Thus, views of family/friends may serve as a proxy in assessing care and decision making processes of critically ill patients. Appropriate training of the critical care team and provision of strategies to address the concerns of patients' families are needed to improve overall patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dental home: Patient centered dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Girish Babu, K. L.; Doddamani, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Early childhood dental caries occurs in all racial and socioeconomic groups; however, it tends to be more prevalent in children in families belonging to the low-income group, where it is seen in epidemic proportions. Dental caries results from an overgrowth of specific organisms that are a part of normally occurring human flora. Human dental flora is site specific, and an infant is not colonized until the eruption of the primary dentition at approximately 6 to 30 months of age. The most likely source of inoculation of an infant's dental flora is the mother, or another intimate care provider, shared utensils, etc. Decreasing the level of cariogenic organisms in the mother's dental flora at the time of colonization can significantly impact the child's redisposition to caries. To prevent caries in children, high-risk individuals must be identified at an early age (preferably high-risk mothers during prenatal care), and aggressive strategies should be adopted, including anticipatory guidance, behavior modifications (oral hygiene and feeding practices), and establishment of a dental home by 1 year of age for children deemed at risk. PMID:24478960

  18. Patients awareness and attitude towards dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Shivani; Bhatia, Shekhar; Kaur, Arvinder; Rathakrishnan, Tiviya

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to assess the awareness of the patients regarding implant-retained prosthesis as an option for tooth replacement and the knowledge about tooth replacement as a whole including source of information and attitude towards it amongst Malaysian population. Materials and Methods: Information on demographic characteristics, knowledge about implant as an option for missing tooth replacement, source of information and knowledge about other options of tooth replacement were obtained from patients visiting various dental outpatient departments of hospital and private dental clinics using nationwide self-explanatory survey. Results: Amongst the 1013 response retrieved, 27% of respondents felt moderately well informed about the dental implant treatment. Only 9% of the respondents had dental implant treatment before and 17% felt well informed about different alternatives of replacing missing teeth. The dentists were the main source of information regarding dental implant treatment modality followed by friends and electronic media. 55.6% respondents felt implant to be as good as own teeth during function whereas high cost was the major limiting factor for implant treatment. Conclusion: 56% of Malaysian population was aware of dental implant as an alternative for replacing missing teeth. Necessary efforts and measures should be made to raise the awareness of dental implant treatment in the country. PMID:26752875

  19. Major bleeding events in Jordanian patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI): Incidence, associated factors, impact on prognosis, and predictability of the CRUSADE bleeding risk score. Results from the First Jordanian PCR (PCR1).

    PubMed

    Jarrah, Mohamad; Hammoudeh, Ayman; Okkeh, Osama; Khader, Yousef; Gharaibeh, Sahem; Nasser, Laith; Rasheed, Amro; Al-Hindi, Ayed; Mohealdeen, Mohammad; Kharabsheh, Haneen; Abunimeh, Hanan; Hijjih, Enas; Tashman, Lina; Omar, Delia; Kufoof, Nadeen

    2017-06-01

    Determine the incidence of major bleeding events, their risk factors, and their impact on prognosis in Jordanian patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Evaluate the ability of the CRUSADE bleeding risk score (BRS) to predict major bleeding. Major bleeding events were defined according to the CRUSADE classification and their incidence was evaluated from hospital admission to one year of follow up. The CRUSADE bleeding risk score was calculated for each patient during the index admission. Incidence of major bleeding events was evaluated in each of the bleeding score quintiles. JoPCR1 is a prospective, observational, multicenter registry of consecutive patients who underwent PCI at 12 tertiary care centers in Jordan. A case report form was used to record data prospectively at hospital admission, at discharge, and at 1 and 12 months of follow-up. The study included 2426 consecutive patients who underwent PCI. During the index hospitalization, major and minor bleeding events occurred in 0.95% and 2.6% of patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that only two variables were significantly associated with major bleeding: female gender (OR=3.7; 95% CI 1.6, 8.5; p=0.002) and past history of cardiovascular disease (OR=2.6; 95% CI 1.1, 5.9; p=0.026). Patients who had in-hospital major bleeding events had higher cardiac mortality during index hospitalization (13.0% vs. 0.7%, p<0.005) and at one year of follow up (13.0% vs. 1.8%, p<0.005) compared to those who had no such events. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the CRUSADE BRS has a high ability to predict major bleeding. Major bleeding events were uncommon in this ME registry of a contemporary cohort of patients undergoing PCI but were associated with a higher mortality rate compared with those who did not have major bleeding events. CRUSADE BRS was highly predictive of the incidence of major bleeding events.

  20. Illness perception and adherence to healthy behaviour in Jordanian coronary heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Sultan M; Almalik, Mona Ma

    2016-06-01

    Patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease are strongly recommended to adopt healthier behaviours and adhere to prescribed medication. Previous research on patients with a wide range of health conditions has explored the role of patients' illness perceptions in explaining coping and health outcomes. However, among coronary heart disease patients, this has not been well examined. The purpose of this study was to explore coronary heart disease patients' illness perception beliefs and investigate whether these beliefs could predict adherence to healthy behaviours. A multi-centre cross-sectional study was conducted at four tertiary hospitals in Jordan. A convenience sample of 254 patients (73% response rate), who visited the cardiac clinic for routine review, participated in the study. Participants completed a self-reported questionnaire, which included the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, the Godin Leisure Time Activity questionnaire and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Patients reported high levels of disease understanding (coherence) and they were convinced that they were able to control their condition by themselves and/or with appropriate treatment. Male patients perceived lower consequences (p<0.05) and had a better understanding of their illness than female patients (p<0.001). There were significant associations between increasing age and each of timeline (r=0.326, p<0.001), (r=0.146, p<0.024) and coherence (r=-0.166, p<0.010). Adjusted regression analysis showed that exercise adherence was predicted by both a strong perception in personal control (β 2.66, 95% confidence interval 1.28-4.04), timeline (β -1.85, 95% confidence interval 0. 8-2.88) and illness coherence (β 2.12, 95% confidence interval 0.35-3.90). Medication adherence was predicted by perception of personal control and treatment control. Adherence to a low-fat diet regimen was predicted by perception of illness coherence only (odds ratio 12, 95% confidence interval 1

  1. The prevalence, causes, and relativity of dental anxiety in adult patients to irregular dental visits.

    PubMed

    Gaffar, Balgis O; Alagl, Adel S; Al-Ansari, Asim A

    2014-06-01

    To assess the frequency and causes of dental anxiety and their relation to irregular dental visits among adult dental patients. The Dental Anxiety Question (DAQ) included within a self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1025 patients attending the Interns' Dental Clinics in the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from March 2012 to February 2013. A cross-sectional study design was used. The questionnaire consisted of 22 closed-ended questions divided into 4 sections; 1) demographics, 2) regularity of dental visits, and related causes, 3) DAQ, cancellation of dental appointments, history of previous trauma, dental anxiety provoking factors within dental environment and procedures, and 4) patients' status in dental clinics, preferences of dentists, and perceptions regarding dental anxiety. The prevalence of dental anxiety among the study sample was 27%. Anesthetic injection was the main factor of dental fear (88.2%), while dental surgical procedures (35.7%) and extractions (23%) were the most terrifying dental procedures. Lack of time (79.5%), cost (71.5%), far-situated dental services (62.2%), and fear (57.1%) were causes listed for irregular dental visits; while 31.3% had no specific reason. Irregular dental visits were not related to dental anxiety. Dental anxiety continues to be an obstacle despite the vast improvement in dentistry; and this raises an alert regarding personal and communication factors in the patient-dentist relationship. Factors such as equal distribution of dental services, time, and cost should also be addressed.

  2. Dental anesthesia for patients with special needs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Chia; Lin, I-Hua; Huang, Chi-Hsiang; Fan, Shou-Zen

    2012-09-01

    To offer individualized dental treatment to certain patients who cannot tolerate dental treatment, sedation or general anesthesia is required. The needs could be either medical, mental, or psychological. The most common indications for sedation or general anesthesia are lack of cooperation, multiple morbidities, and pediatric autism. In adults, cognitive impairment and multiple morbidities are most commonly encountered indications. Because of suboptimal home care, incomplete medical history, poor preoperative management, lack of cooperation, and developmental abnormalities, it is a challenge to prepare anesthesia for patients with special needs. The American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) has proposed guidelines for office-based anesthesia for ambulatory surgery. In patients with ASA physical status IV and V, sedation or general anesthesia for treatment in the dental office is not recommended. The distinction between sedation levels and general anesthesia is not clear. If intravenous general anesthesia without tracheal intubation is chosen for dental procedures, full cooperation between the dentist, dental assistant, and anesthesiologist is needed. Teamwork between the dentist and healthcare provider is key to achieve safe and successful dental treatment under sedation or general anesthesia in the patient with special needs.

  3. Depression and caregiver burden experienced by caregivers of Jordanian patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Andaleeb Abu; Bond, A Elaine; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2012-04-01

    Many stroke survivors will be cared for at home, primarily by their relatives. Providing care to a family member with a chronic disabling disease can be both emotionally and physically distressing for the caregivers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patients' characteristics, duration of caregiving, daily caregiving time, caregiver's characteristics, caregiver depression and burden in caregivers of patients with stroke. A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 116 subjects. The Center of Epidemiologic Studies of Depression and the Caregiver Strain Index were used to identify caregiver depression and burden, respectively. Logistic regression analysis identified the influence of independent variables on caregiver depression and caregiver burden. Caregivers had high scores for depression and burden indices. Caregivers' health, receiving professional home health care and caregivers' burden were related to caregiver depression. Functional disabilities of patients with stroke and depression of caregivers were related to caregiver burden. To decrease caregiver depression and burden, nurses must provide caregivers with instructions for home management of patients with stroke. Development of specialized stroke home health services in Jordan that targets patients with stroke and their caregivers are recommended. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Motivating your patients: marketing dental services.

    PubMed

    Grönroos, C; Masalin, K

    1990-02-01

    In most industrialized countries the issues of unemployment or under-employment are becoming more critical for the members of the dental associations. In some countries this is creating greater competition between the private practitioners and public health dentists as well as between private dental practitioners themselves. Modern marketing, especially service marketing theory and models, can provide dentists and dental associations with tools to improve their position in relation to patients, political decision makers and other public agencies. However, marketing has to be understood correctly as a philosophy providing a means of approaching the establishing, maintaining and enhancing patient or customer relationships and not as a narrowly defined set of tools. As long as marketing is considered to be external campaigns, such as advertising and not much else, it is bound to fail. Other dimensions of marketing, such as interactive marketing and internal marketing, are of much greater importance to dental practitioners.

  5. Health care needs of Jordanian caregivers of patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy on an outpatient basis.

    PubMed

    Al-Jauissy, M S

    2010-10-01

    This descriptive exploratory study was conducted to describe the health care needs and identify unmet needs of the caregivers of cancer patients in Jordan. A total of 82 caregivers accompanying patients to an outpatient chemotherapy clinic completed the 90-item caregiver need scale. Caregivers reported 75.6% of scale items as needs and rated these as "very important" needs on all 6 areas of the caregivers' need scale: personal care, activity management, involvement with health care, work, interpersonal interaction and finance. Unmet needs of caregivers were a higher proportion of identified needs (76.4%) than in similar studies elsewhere. The education and support needs of caregivers need to be considered when designing care plans for cancer patients.

  6. Dental coping strategies, general anxiety, and depression among adult patients with dental anxiety but with different dental-attendance patterns.

    PubMed

    Bernson, Jenny M; Elfström, Magnus L; Hakeberg, Magnus

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate dental coping strategies, general anxiety, and depression in relation to regularity of dental treatment among persons with either regular dental care or phobic avoidance, whilst controlling for sociodemographic factors. Psychometric questionnaires on dental anxiety, dental coping strategies, general anxiety, and depression were delivered to 263 adult patients with dental phobic avoidance behavior who were seeking help from a specialized dental fear clinic and to 141 adult patients with dental anxiety who were receiving regular dental care from various public dental clinics. The results showed that the levels of dental and general anxiety and of depression were significantly higher among irregular attendees compared with regular attendees. Irregular attendees admitted fewer adaptive coping strategies. Predictive of irregular dental care were gender, dental anxiety, general anxiety, and the nonuse of the coping strategy 'optimism'. This study further confirms earlier preliminary results that the use of optimistic thinking is predictive for regular dental attendance habits and that male gender is a risk factor for irregular attendance. Moreover, this study adds that a high level of general anxiety indicates a higher risk for irregular dental care.

  7. Sexual Advances by Patients in Dental Practice: Implications for the Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiodo, Gary T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey of Oregon dentists (n=248) and dental hygienists (n=235) investigated frequency of patient-initiated sexual advances and methods of dealing with them. Up to 44 percent experienced 1 or more patient verbal advances, and 23 percent experienced physical advances during a 5-year period. Inclusion of related issues in professional curricula is…

  8. Hospital dental practice in special patients

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Espín-Gálvez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Dental patients with special needs are people with different systemic diseases, multiple disorders or severe physical and/or mental disabilities. A Medline search was made, yielding a total of 29 articles that served as the basis for this study, which offers a brief description of the dental intervention protocols in medically compromised patients. Dental treatment in patients with special needs, whether presenting medical problems or disabilities, is sometimes complex. For this reason the hospital should be regarded as the ideal setting for the care of these individuals. Before starting any dental intervention, a correct patient evaluation is needed, based on a correct anamnesis, medical records and interconsultation reports, and with due assessment of the medical risks involved. The hospital setting offers the advantage of access to electronic medical records and to data referred to any complementary tests that may have been made, and we moreover have the possibility of performing treatments under general anesthesia. In this context, ambulatory major surgery is the best approach when considering general anesthesia in patients of this kind. Key words:Hospital dentistry, special patients, medically compromised patients. PMID:24121921

  9. The pregnant patient: considerations for dental management and drug use.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Servi Burcak

    2007-03-01

    The pregnant woman who presents for dental care requires special consideration. This article reviews physiologic changes associated with pregnancy and current considerations for the dental treatment of pregnant dental patients, as well as for pregnant dental professionals. The limitations and safety of commonly used drugs and anesthetics are discussed. Recommendations for prenatal oral counseling are presented.

  10. Dental implications in oral cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Escoda-Francolí, Jaume; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Araceli; Pérez-García, Silvia; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2011-07-01

    A study is made of the dental implications of oral cancer, with a view to avoiding the complications that appear once oncological treatment is started. The study comprised a total of 22 patients diagnosed with oral cancer according to clinical and histological criteria in the Service of Maxillofacial Surgery (Dental Clinic of the University of Barcelona, Spain) during the period 1996-2005, and posteriorly treated in different hospital centers in Barcelona. Of the 22 patients diagnosed with oral cancer in our Service, the present study finally analyzed the 12 subjects who reported for the dental controls. As regards the remaining 10 patients, 5 had died and 5 could not be located; these subjects were thus excluded from the analysis. All of the smokers had abandoned the habit. The most common tumor location was the lateral margin of the tongue. None of the patients visited the dentist regularly before the diagnosis of oral cancer. T1N0M0 was the most common tumor stage. Surgery was carried out in 50% of the cases, while 8.4% of the patients received radiotherapy and 41.6% underwent surgery with postoperative radiotherapy. In turn, 66.6% of the patients reported treatment sequelae such as dysgeusia, xerostomia or speech difficulties, and one patient suffered osteoradionecrosis. Forty-one percent of the patients did not undergo regular dental controls after cancer treatment. As regards oral and dental health, 16.6% presented caries, and 50% had active periodontal disease. Protocols are available for preventing the complications of oral cancer treatment, and thus for improving patient quality of life. However, important shortcomings in the application of such protocols on the part of the public health authorities make it difficult to reach these objectives.

  11. Dental Treatment in Patients with Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Meurer, Maria Inês; Grando, Liliane Janete; Gonzaga Del Moral, Joanita Ângela; da Silva Rath, Inês Beatriz; Schaefer Tavares, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Dental treatment of patients with leukemia should be planned on the basis of antineoplastic therapy which can be chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. Many are the oral manifestations presented by these patients, arising from leukemia and/or treatment. In addition, performing dental procedures at different stages of treatment (before, during, or after) must follow certain protocols in relation to the haematological indices of patients, aimed at maintaining health and contributing to the effectiveness of the results of antineoplastic therapy. Through a literature review, the purpose of this study was to report the hematological abnormalities present in patients with leukemia, trying to correlate them with the feasibility of dental treatment at different stages of the disease. It is concluded in this paper that dental treatment in relation to haematological indices presented by patients with leukemia must follow certain protocols, mainly related to neutrophil and platelet counts, and the presence of the dentist in a multidisciplinary team is required for the health care of this patient. PMID:25784937

  12. Management of the anticoagulated dental patient.

    PubMed

    Ball, J H

    1996-11-01

    An understanding of the primary mechanisms of hemostasis, including the coagulation pathways and the intrinsic, extrinsic, and common systems, is the basis for treating the anticoagulated patient. Two major anticoagulants are used for treating those who may be at risk for thromboembolic crisis. These drugs include Coumadin, which is an oral anticoagulant, and heparin, a parenteral anticoagulant, which is often used for acute thromboembolic episodes or for hospitalization protocols that include significant surgical procedures. The practitioner should be familiar with common dental drugs that can interact with anticoagulants and should consult with the patient's physician before administering any such drugs. By placing the patient into one of three dental treatment categories, appropriate anticoagulation therapy can be rendered to each patient according to his or her needs. Low-risk procedures require no change in anticoagulation medication. For moderate-risk procedures, withdrawal of anticoagulation medication 2 days before the procedure and verified with the PT the day of the procedure is indicated. For high-risk dental procedures, using a heparin protocol should be strongly considered. In all instances of dental treatment, the oral tissues should be treated atraumatically using local hemostatic measures for control of hemorrhage. Treating medically compromised patients who are on a variety of medications is becoming more common in dentistry today. Understanding the underlying disease and the appropriate protocol for treatment of anticoagulated patients reduces the risk of thromboembolism and hemorrhagic complications.

  13. Dental fluorosis in the paediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Atia, Gahder-Sara; May, Joanna

    2013-12-01

    Exposure to excessive fluoride intake during the early childhood years can disrupt the normal development of enamel, resulting in dental fluorosis. This varies in severity, ranging from white opacities in mild cases to more severe black and brown discoloration or enamel pitting. This article aims to give the reader a better understanding of the aetiology, diagnosis and subsequent treatment of dental fluorosis in the paediatric patient. Fluorosis can have a marked effect on dental aesthetics. The prevalence of fluorosis in the United Kingdom may increase following the publication of Delivering Better Oral Health, published by the Department of Health in 2007, which suggested changes to fluoride levels in children's toothpastes. This article highlights the importance of accurate diagnosis of fluorosis and also explains the treatment options available to paediatric patients.

  14. The dental management of medically compromised patients.

    PubMed

    Goss, A N

    1984-12-01

    There is an increasing population of apparently well, but in fact medically compromised people in the community. Most will require dental treatment at some stage and will usually seek it away from a hospital environment. In a recent survey of a general dental practice in Australia it was found that up to 55 per cent of some age groups had concurrent medical problems. Thus there is a real risk that adverse interactions between medical conditions and dental treatment may occur--on some occasions, even fatal ones. It is not possible for any one individual to know the details of all medical conditions, their treatment and the possible interactions with dental treatment. However, by the application of some sound general principles the risks of any potential interactions can be evaluated. The essential steps are: knowledge of the medical history of all patients; knowledge of the potential interactions; and knowledge of the management of medical emergencies. These principles will be discussed and illustrated by examples of medically compromised patients who may experience common or potentially serious sequelae as a result of dental treatment.

  15. Dental students' familiarity with the medical management of dental patients at Brazilian dental schools.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Paula Caetano; Garbín, Cléa Adas Saliba; Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba; Saliba, Nemre Adas; Arcieri, Renato Moreira

    2013-05-01

    Drug therapy in dentistry is essential for patients' treatment and requires special care by dentists, so it must be part of a well-grounded education for predoctoral dental students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of undergraduate students at dental schools in Brazil about the use of drugs in dental practice. The sample universe was comprised of all undergraduates enrolled in the last year of the dentistry course in three universities in 2010 (n=253). Inclusion criteria were students in their last year of enrollment and who agreed to participate in the research. The results were analyzed on Epi Info 3.5.1 software. Analyses were conducted with chi-square, Friedman, and Wilcoxon tests. Slightly more than half of the participants (51.9 percent) reported the ideal dose of anesthetic for a normal patient. However, their difficulties increased when asked about the relationship between the anesthetic and patients with systemic disease or those needing special care. Regarding drugs that usually cause allergic attack, only 29.2 percent and 36.6 percent, respectively, cited methyl methacrylate and latex. This study found that the knowledge of these undergraduates about the questions was deficient, so dental education should include more theoretical and clinical practice in recognizing the patient's medical needs.

  16. Dental management of patients taking antiplatelet medications.

    PubMed

    Henry, Robert G

    2009-07-01

    Antiplatelet medications are drugs which decrease platelet aggregation and inhibit thrombus (clot) formation. They are widely used in primary and secondary prevention of thrombotic cerebrovascular or cardiovascular disease. The most common antiplatelet medications are the cyclooxygenase inhibitors (aspirin) and the adenosine disphosphate (ADP) receptor inhibitors clopidogrel (Plavix) and ticlopidine (Ticlid). The dental management of patients taking these drugs is reviewed here.

  17. [Dental management in patients with cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Martínez, Sandra; Talaván Serna, Julio; Silvestre, Francisco-Javier

    2016-03-01

    The present article makes a brief review about dental management of the patients with cirrhosis. It focus on problems related with infections, haemorrhagic events and treatment with drugs of common use in odontology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  18. The Level of Dental Anxiety and Dental Status in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dobros, Katarzyna; Hajto-Bryk, Justyna; Wnek, Anna; Zarzecka, Joanna; Rzepka, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to assess potential correlation between dental anxiety and overall dental status in adult patients, in consideration of the frequency of dental appointments and individual dental hygiene practices. Materials and Methods: Individual dental anxiety levels were assessed with the aid of the Corah’s dental anxiety scale (DAS). The study embraced 112 patients of the University Dental Clinic, Kraków. Following clinical and X-ray exams, respectively, decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) index and dental treatment index (DTI) were computed for each study subject. Results: Mean DAS among the 112 subjects under study was 9.41 standard deviation (SD = 3.36). Mean DMFT value was 15.86 (SD = 7.00), whereas DTI value was 0.76 (SD = 0.27). The number of decayed teeth and an individual dental anxiety level were found to be correlated (r = 0.26). Higher dental anxiety correlated with lower DTI value (r = −0.22) and lesser frequency of dental appointments (r = 0.22). Conclusions: Individual dental anxiety level appears to impact overall dental status, frequency of dental appointments and everyday oral health practices. Every conceivable effort should therefore be undertaken with a view to effectively diminishing dental anxiety levels in the patients. How to cite the article: Dobros K, Hajto-Bryk J, Wnęk A, Zarzecka J, Rzepka D. The level of dental anxiety and dental status in adult patients. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):11-4. PMID:25083026

  19. Sleep quality in patients with dental anxiety.

    PubMed

    Almoznino, Galit; Zini, Avraham; Sharav, Yair; Shahar, Adi; Zlutzky, Hulio; Haviv, Yaron; Lvovsky, Alex; Aframian, Doron J

    2015-02-01

    Psychological distress is associated with sleep disturbances; however there is little research on sleep quality in dental anxiety (DA) patients. To measure the sleep quality in patients with DA compared to patients with an exacerbated gag reflex (GAG) and controls and to analyze its association with various demographic and behavioral parameters. 67 DA patients, 54 GAG patients and 100 controls with no history of DA or GAG participated in the study. Data regarding: demographic details, smoking habits, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for pain assessment, Corah's dental anxiety scale (DAS) and Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14), plaque index (PI) and Decay, Missing and Filled Teeth (DMFT) scores were collected. 49.3% of the DA group and 38.9% of the GAG group were poor sleepers (mean PSQI score > 5), compared to 29.0% of the controls (PSQI mean scores: 5.8 ± 3.4, DA group; 5.2 ± 3.6 GAG group vs. 4.5 ± 2.7, control group; p = 0.029). Compared to controls, DA and GAG patients exhibited poorer scores in the sleep disturbances PSQI component (p = 0.001). DA patients exhibited poorer scores in the sleep duration PSQI component compared to the control (p = 0.002) and GAG groups (p = 0.033). Female gender (p = 0.039), higher current (p = 0.046) and maximal NRS (p = 0.019), higher DAS (p < 0.001) and OHIP-14 (p < 0.001) scores and more missing teeth (p = 0.003) were positively associated with higher PSQI scores. DA patients suffered more from impaired sleep than controls and GAGs. Impaired sleep in DA patients is multidimensional phenomenon influenced by the specific diagnosis, gender, pain, dental anxiety levels, dental experience and oral health related quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Patient and dental student responses to a survey about AIDS in the dental setting.

    PubMed

    Thaker, H J; Gobetti, J P; Green, T G

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to gain information about patients' and dental students' attitudes concerning AIDS and dentistry. Opinions of patients and students at a Midwestern dental school were surveyed. The dental students' responses were not as consistent as the patient responses. Both groups felt there was a risk to patients and dentists of HIV infection. Both groups had confidence in the CDC infection control guidelines. The patient responses to the testing questions were significantly more positive than the student responses. The patients responded positively to the concept that healthcare professionals had the right to ask patients to be tested and to being required to be tested if a healthcare provider is accidentally stuck by a needle used on a patient. The dental students were more cautious with both issues. Patients would use knowledge about a healthcare provider's HIV status and the office treatment of AIDS patients to determine if they should continue treatment at that dental office.

  1. [Dental characteristics of patients with temporomandibular disorders].

    PubMed

    Quinteromarmol-Juárez, Myriam; Espinosa-de Santillana, Irene Aurora; Martínez-Torres, Jorge; Vargas-García, Hugo Alberto

    2009-01-01

    to describe the dental characteristics of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). a survey in 130 out patients from a Clinic of Maxilofacial Surgery Service, who fulfilled the selection criteria. The social and demographic data were reported in other paper. It was used a questionnaire to identify factors of risk for TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteries/Temporomandibular Disorders proposed by Dworkin. It was registered the Angle to molar bilaterally and canine, the presence of canine guides and incisal margin, the dental lost organs and previous surgical removal of third molars. Unvaried and bivariate statistical analysis was made. the clinical manifestations in patients with TMD which they appear in the upheavals temporomandibular were: pain to articulate, muscular pain, noises you will articulate with statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in the variables class to molar and canine of Angle, absence of canine guides and incisal margin, previous retirement of third molars, parafunctions, mandibulars deviations at rest, number of dental absences. the physiomechanical conditions in the oral cavity of the patients of upheavals temporomandibular are considered a risk factor condition.

  2. Anxiety control in the dental patient.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Orrett E; Hertz, Marc B

    2012-01-01

    Oral sedation with benzodiazepines and anxiolysis with nitrous oxide are 2 effective methods to help alleviate anxiety and fear of dental procedures. Many patients would prefer to have their dentistry performed with sedation if it were offered to them. This article presents a detailed discussion on minimal sedation that should give the reader a good understanding of this valuable aspect of clinical care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Referring periodontal patients: clinical decision making by dental and dental hygiene students.

    PubMed

    Williams, Karen B; Burgardt, Grayson J; Rapley, John W; Bray, Kimberly K; Cobb, Charles M

    2014-03-01

    Referral of periodontal patients requires development of a complex set of decision making skills. This study was conducted to determine criteria used by dental and dental hygiene students regarding the referral of periodontal patients for specialty care. Using mixed methods, a thirteen-item survey was developed to elicit the students' perceptions of their knowledge, confidence regarding managing patients, and clinical reasoning related to periodontal patients. The instrument was administered during the summer prior to (T1) and at the end of the students' final year (T2) of training. Seventy-nine dental students (81 percent of total class) and thirty dental hygiene students (83 percent of total class) completed T1. At T2, forty-two dental (44 percent of total class) and twenty-six dental hygiene students (87 percent of total class) completed the questionnaire. While 90 percent of dental and 96 percent of dental hygiene respondents reported a willingness to refer patients with active disease to specialists, only 40 percent of dental and 36 percent of dental hygiene respondents reported confidence in diagnosing, treating, and appropriately referring such patients. The students' ability to recognize critical disease and risk factors influencing referral was good; however, clinical application of that knowledge indicated a gap between knowledge and applied reasoning. The students' attitudes about the importance of periodontal disease and their perceived competence to identify critical disease risk factors were not significantly related (p>0.05) to correct clinical decisions in the case scenarios. The study concludes that dental and dental hygiene curricula should emphasize both the acquisition and application of knowledge regarding criteria for referral of periodontal patients.

  4. Readability Levels of Dental Patient Education Brochures.

    PubMed

    Boles, Catherine D; Liu, Ying; November-Rider, Debra

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate dental patient education brochures produced since 2000 to determine if there is any change in the Flesch-Kincaid grade level readability. A convenience sample of 36 brochures was obtained for analysis of the readability of the patient education material on multiple dental topics. Readability was measured using the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level through Microsoft Word. Pearson's correlation was used to describe the relationship among the factors of interest. Backward model selection of multiple linear regression model was used to investigate the relationship between Flesch-Kincaid Grade level and a set of predictors included in this study. A convenience sample (n=36) of dental education brochures produced from 2000 to 2014 showed a mean Flesch-Kincaid reading grade level of 9.15. Weak to moderate correlations existed between word count and grade level (r=0.40) and characters count and grade level (r=0.46); strong correlations were found between grade level and average words per sentence (r=0.70), average characters per word (r=0.85) and Flesch Reading Ease (r=-0.98). Only 1 brochure out of the sample met the recommended sixth grade reading level (Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level 5.7). Overall, the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level of all brochures was significantly higher than the recommended sixth grade reading level (p<0.0001). The findings from this study demonstrated that there has generally been an improvement in the Flesch-Kincaid grade level readability of the brochures. However, the majority of the brochures analyzed are still testing above the recommended sixth grade reading level. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  5. Dental implants in medically complex patients-a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Manor, Yifat; Simon, Roy; Haim, Doron; Garfunkel, Adi; Moses, Ofer

    2017-03-01

    Dental implant insertion for oral rehabilitation is a worldwide procedure for healthy and medically compromised patients. The impact of systemic disease risks on the outcome of implant therapy is unclear, since there are few if any published randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The objective of this study is to investigate the rate of complications and failures following dental implantation in medically compromised patients in order to elucidate risk factors and prevent them. A retrospective cohort study was conducted from patient files treated with dental implantation between the years 2008-2014. The study group consisted of medically complex patients while the control group consisted of healthy patients. Preoperative, intraoperative, and post operative clinical details were retrieved from patients' files. The survival rate and the success rate of the dental implants were evaluated clinically and radiographically. A total of 204 patients (1003 dental implants) were included in the research, in the study group, 93 patients with 528 dental implants and in the control group, 111 patients with 475 dental implants. No significant differences were found between the groups regarding implant failures or complications. The failure rate of dental implants among the patients was 11.8 % in the study group and 16.2 % in the control group (P = 0.04). It was found that patients with a higher number of implants (mean 6.8) had failures compared with patients with a lower number of implants (mean 4.2) regardless of their health status (P < 0.01). We found a similar rate of failure and complications of dental implantation in medically complex patients and in healthy patients. Medically complex patients can undergo dental implantation. There are similar rates of complications and failures of dental implants in medically complex patients and in healthy patients.

  6. Dental extraction in patients on warfarin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Walid Ahmed; Khalil, Hesham

    2014-01-01

    Background Warfarin is one of the most common oral anticoagulants used to prevent thromboembolic episodes. The benefits of discontinuation of this drug before simple surgical procedures are not clear and this approach could be associated with complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of bleeding in a series of 35 patients (in cases where the international normalized ratio [INR] is less than 4) following simple tooth extraction without modification of the warfarin dose given to patients. Methods Thirty-five patients taking warfarin who had been referred to the Oral and Maxillofacial Department, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, for dental extractions were included in the study. Exclusion criteria included patients with an INR of ≥4 or with a history of liver disease or coagulopathies. No alteration was made in warfarin dose, and the CoaguChek System was used to identify the INR on the same day of dental extraction. Bleeding from the extraction site was evaluated and recorded immediately after extraction until the second day. Results A total of 35 patients (16 women and 19 men) aged between 38 and 57 years (mean =48.7) were included in the present study. All patients underwent simple one-tooth extraction while undergoing warfarin treatment. Oozing, considered mild bleeding and which did not need intervention was seen in 88.6% of patients. Moderate bleeding occurred in 11.4% of all cases. The INR of the patients ranged from 2.00 to 3.50, with 77.2% of patients having INR between 2.0 and 2.5 on the day of extraction. No severe bleeding which needed hospital management was encountered after any of the extractions. The patients who suffered moderate bleeding were returned to the clinic where they received local treatment measures to control bleeding. Moderate bleeding occurred only in four patients, where three had INR between 3.1 and 3.5, and one with INR less than 3. Conclusion In the present study, we have shown that simple tooth

  7. Factors associated with regular dental visits among hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Masami; Shirayama, Yasuhiko; Imoto, Issei; Hinode, Daisuke; Yanagisawa, Shizuko; Takeuchi, Yuko; Bando, Takashi; Yokota, Narushi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate awareness and attitudes about preventive dental visits among dialysis patients; to clarify the barriers to visiting the dentist. METHODS Subjects included 141 dentate outpatients receiving hemodialysis treatment at two facilities, one with a dental department and the other without a dental department. We used a structured questionnaire to interview participants about their awareness of oral health management issues for dialysis patients, perceived oral symptoms and attitudes about dental visits. Bivariate analysis using the χ2 test was conducted to determine associations between study variables and regular dental check-ups. Binominal logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with regular dental check-ups. RESULTS There were no significant differences in patient demographics between the two participating facilities, including attitudes about dental visits. Therefore, we included all patients in the following analyses. Few patients (4.3%) had been referred to a dentist by a medical doctor or nurse. Although 80.9% of subjects had a primary dentist, only 34.0% of subjects received regular dental check-ups. The most common reasons cited for not seeking dental care were that visits are burdensome and a lack of perceived need. Patients with gum swelling or bleeding were much more likely to be in the group of those not receiving routine dental check-ups (χ2 test, P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that receiving dental check-ups was associated with awareness that oral health management is more important for dialysis patients than for others and with having a primary dentist (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Dialysis patients should be educated about the importance of preventive dental care. Medical providers are expected to participate in promoting dental visits among dialysis patients. PMID:27648409

  8. Management of dental patients with seizure disorders.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Robert B; Sullivan, Steven M

    2006-10-01

    Dental practitioners from time to time must treat patients with epilepsy or similar seizure disorders. This article describes the various classification for epilepsy, explains how such disorders are evaluated and diagnosed, discusses management methods, and addresses related issues for special populations, such as pregnant women and elderly. In addition, the article offers information about what special steps dentists should take in treating such epileptic patients and others vulnerable to seizures and in preparing offices and staff for the possibility that a patient will have a seizure in the office. In general, a patient with severe, poorly controlled epilepsy should be treated in a hospital. Otherwise, a well-controlled patient should easily be treated in the office.

  9. Anxiety and quality of life in phobic dental patients.

    PubMed

    Crofts-Barnes, N P; Brough, E; Wilson, K E; Beddis, A J; Girdler, N M

    2010-03-01

    Little is known about the anxiety patients experience before attending for dental treatment. The aim of this study was to determine, in dentally phobic patients, the temporal relationship of pre-operative anxiety levels, and the disruption to daily life caused by this. Twenty-four phobic and 19 comparison (non-phobic) dental patients were recruited. Four validated questionnaires were used to assess anxiety and quality of life, which each patient completed for 5 days prior to, and on the day of, treatment. Those in the experimental group were found to have significantly greater levels of dental and general anxiety, and a significantly lower quality of life compared with those in the comparison group. Significant temporal relationships were found with all of the questionnaires. Dental and general anxiety scores were significantly correlated with quality-of-life measures. This study suggests that phobic dental patients are experiencing significant increased anxiety, and significant negative quality-of-life effects, in this period.

  10. Satisfaction with Dental Appearance and Attitude toward improving Dental Esthetics among Patients attending a Dental Teaching Center.

    PubMed

    Maghaireh, Ghada A; Alzraikat, Hanan; Taha, Nessrin A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors influencing the satisfaction of dental appearance and attitude toward treatments to improve dental esthetics among patients attending a dental teaching center. A questionnaire was used to collect data of four background variables among 450 patients attended a dental teaching center in the city of Irbid in Jordan. The questionnaire enclosed self-reported questions about the appearance of anterior teeth, received esthetic treatment and desired treatment for improving esthetics. Descriptive, multiple logistic regression and Chi-square tests were used for data analysis (p ≤ 0.05). The 450 participants consisted of (66.2%) male and (33.8%) female. Of these, 69.3% were satisfied with their dental appearance and 58.0% with the color of their teeth. Esthetic restorations were the most received treatment (39.8%) and whitening of teeth was the most desired treatment (55.3%). The patients' satisfaction with dental appearance was influenced by teeth color, crowding and receiving whitening (p < 0.05. r = 0.561, r(2) = 0.315). The most desired esthetic treatments influenced by the satisfaction with dental appearance were esthetic restorations and orthodontics (p < 0.05. r = 0.223, r(2) = 0.05). Significantly more female reported having esthetic restorations and orthodontics (p = 0.008, 0.000) and desired to have orthodontic, crowns or veneers and esthetic restorations (p = 0.000, 0.015, 0.028). Satisfaction with dental appearance was affected by teeth color, feeling teeth are crowded, desire for esthetic restorations and orthodontic treatment. A high percentage of patients were not satisfied with the color of their teeth. Recognizing the factors that affect patients' satisfaction with their present dental appearance and attitude toward treatments to improve dental esthetic can guide clinicians to strategies to improve esthetics.

  11. Mental illness and the dental patient.

    PubMed

    Longley, Alison J; Doyle, Patricia E

    2003-01-01

    Virtually every oral health care practice includes patients with mental illness. This continuing education (CE) course gives a practical overview of common psychiatric disorders, their effects on oral and dental health, and conditions associated with mental illness that affect oral health treatment. Following a brief description of mental illnesses, information on conducting a mental health interview and making a psychiatric referral are provided. Oral health problems associated with mental illness and factors affecting treatment delivery are discussed, as well as ideas for avoiding potentially dangerous medication interactions and working with fearful, suspicious, or cognitively impaired patients. Ways in which dental hygienists can work with case managers to provide much needed oral health care to patients whose illness is severe or chronic are covered. Examples are given of work with clients illustrating principles described in the text. The purpose of this course is to provide oral health personnel the information they need to knowledgeably care for patients who have mental illness. Successful completion will be assessed with a post-test to be completed after reading the article in its entirety, including figures and case-reports. Two continuing education course credit hours will be awarded following successful completion of the post-test.

  12. The dental development in patients with Aperts syndrome.

    PubMed

    Woods, Eva; Parekh, Susan; Evans, Robert; Moles, David R; Gill, Daljit

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to quantify the level of dental developmental delay in a group of patients with Aperts syndrome when compared to matched controls. Twenty-six Dental Panoramic Tomographic (DPT) radiographs of patients with Apert syndrome attending Great Ormond Street Hospital were compared to controls (n = 29) from the Eastman Dental Hospital, UK. Dental development was assessed using the staging systems of Demirjian and Haavikko, and dental age (DA) was estimated using the weighted averages method. Dental age, as estimated using the 12 stages of Haavikko and eight stages of Demirjian, suggested no statistical evidence of developmental delay between the Aperts and control group. The hypothesis 'that there is no difference in the dental development of subjects with Apert syndrome, when compared to a group of matched controls', was accepted. © 2014 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Promoting emancipated decision-making for surgical treatment of early stage breast cancer among Jordanian women.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Rana F

    2015-01-01

    To use the critical social theory as a framework to analyze the oppression of Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer in the decision-making process for surgical treatment and suggest strategies to emancipate these women to make free choices. This is a discussion paper utilizing the critical social theory as a framework for analysis. The sexist and paternalistic ideology that characterizes Jordanian society in general and the medical establishment in particular as well as the biomedical ideology are some of the responsible ideologies for the fact that many Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer are denied the right to choose a surgical treatment according to their own preferences and values. The financial and political power of Jordanian medical organizations (e.g., Jordan Medical Council), the weakness of nursing administration in the healthcare system, and the hierarchical organization of Jordanian society, where men are first and women are second, support these oppressing ideologies. Knowledge is a strong tool of power. Jordanian nurses could empower women with early stage breast cancer by enhancing their knowledge regarding their health and the options available for surgical treatment. To successfully emancipate patients, education alone may not be enough; there is also a need for health care providers' support and unconditional acceptance of choice. To achieve the aim of emancipating women with breast cancer from the oppression inherent in the persistence of mastectomy, Jordanian nurses need to recognize that they should first gain greater power and authority in the healthcare system.

  14. Promoting emancipated decision-making for surgical treatment of early stage breast cancer among Jordanian women

    PubMed Central

    Obeidat, Rana F.

    2015-01-01

    To use the critical social theory as a framework to analyze the oppression of Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer in the decision-making process for surgical treatment and suggest strategies to emancipate these women to make free choices. This is a discussion paper utilizing the critical social theory as a framework for analysis. The sexist and paternalistic ideology that characterizes Jordanian society in general and the medical establishment in particular as well as the biomedical ideology are some of the responsible ideologies for the fact that many Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer are denied the right to choose a surgical treatment according to their own preferences and values. The financial and political power of Jordanian medical organizations (e.g., Jordan Medical Council), the weakness of nursing administration in the healthcare system, and the hierarchical organization of Jordanian society, where men are first and women are second, support these oppressing ideologies. Knowledge is a strong tool of power. Jordanian nurses could empower women with early stage breast cancer by enhancing their knowledge regarding their health and the options available for surgical treatment. To successfully emancipate patients, education alone may not be enough; there is also a need for health care providers’ support and unconditional acceptance of choice. To achieve the aim of emancipating women with breast cancer from the oppression inherent in the persistence of mastectomy, Jordanian nurses need to recognize that they should first gain greater power and authority in the healthcare system. PMID:27981122

  15. Reduction in dental plaque in patients with mental disorders through the dental hygiene care programme.

    PubMed

    Mun, S-J; Chung, W-G; Min, S-H; Park, J-K; Kim, C-B; Kim, N-H; Seo, H-Y; Chang, S-J

    2014-05-01

    To develop a dental hygiene care programme based on the specific needs of patients with mental disorders and to suggest practical guidelines to improve the oral health care of these patients. A total of 73 patients with mental illness participated in the study. The patients were randomly classified into three groups and followed over 12 weeks at 4-week intervals. A newly designed dental hygiene care programme using flash-based video, brochures and a toothpick method was implemented by five dental hygienists. Plaque index, stimulated saliva, subjective oral dryness and dental caries activity were analysed as outcome variables. Results showed that the dental plaque index significantly decreased after each session (P < 0.0001) in all three groups, and significant differences were found between groups (P = 0.036). Patients' oral dryness decreased significantly, but stimulated saliva and dental caries activity did not improve. The results of this study suggest that the dental hygiene care programme, which made use of a short, 10-min flash-based video and brochures every 4 weeks, was effective in reducing the dental plaque index of patients with mental disorders. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Predicting dental attendance from dental hygienists' autonomy support and patients' autonomous motivation: A randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Halvari, Anne E Münster; Halvari, Hallgeir; Williams, Geoffrey C; Deci, Edward L

    2017-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that a Self-Determination Theory (SDT) intervention designed to promote oral health care competence in an autonomy-supportive way would predict change in caries competence relative to standard care. Further, to test the SDT process path-model hypotheses with: (1) the intervention and individual differences in relative autonomous locus of causality (RALOC) predicting increases in caries competence, which in turn would positively predict dental attendance; (2) RALOC negatively predicting dental anxiety, which would negatively predict dental attendance; (3) RALOC and caries disease referred to the dentist after an autonomy-supportive clinical exam directly positively predicting dental attendance; and (4) the intervention moderating the link between RALOC and dental attendance. A randomised two-group experiment was conducted at a dental clinic with 138 patients (Mage = 23.31 yr., SD = 3.5), with pre- and post-measures in a period of 5.5 months. The experimental model was supported. The SDT path model fit the data well and supported the hypotheses explaining 63% of the variance in dental attendance. Patients personality (RALOC) and hygienists promoting oral health care competence in an autonomy-supportive way, performance of autonomy-supportive clinical exams and reductions of anxiety for dental treatment have important practical implications for patients' dental attendance.

  17. Dental management of special needs patients who have epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2009-04-01

    Patients who have developmental disabilities and epilepsy can be safely treated in a general dental practice. A thorough medical history should be taken and updated at every visit. A good oral examination to uncover any dental problems and possible side effects from antiepileptic drugs is necessary. Stability of the seizure disorder must be taken into account when planning dental treatment. Specific considerations for epileptic patients include the treatment of oral soft tissue side effects of medications and damage to the hard and soft tissue of the orofacial region secondary to seizure trauma. Most patients who have epilepsy can and should receive functionally and esthetically adequate dental care.

  18. Dental management of the anticoagulated patient.

    PubMed

    Purcell, C A

    1997-09-01

    Most anticoagulated patients can be safely managed for routine dental treatment in the outpatient setting by following appropriate guidelines. Management should be based on the present level of anticoagulation as assessed by tests, in particular the international normalised ratio (INR), which should be carried out as close to the intervention as possible. A philosophy of minimal, if any, alteration to the level of anticoagulation should be adopted. This is particularly true for procedures producing minimal bleeding such as scaling and cleaning which, in the past, have resulted in patients having their INR lowered, with its attendant risks. The patient's anticoagulation is potentially life-saving and, where at all possible, should be maintained at therapeutic levels when therapy for non-threatening conditions is planned.

  19. 78 FR 53195 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request... patient satisfaction with VA's dental services. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the... refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any...

  20. Intravenous Sedation for Dental Patients with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyawaki, T.; Kohjitani, A.; Maeda, S.; Egusa, M.; Mori, T.; Higuchi, H.; Kita, F.; Shimada, M.

    2004-01-01

    The poor quality of oral health care for people with intellectual disability (ID) has been recognized, and the strong fears about dental treatment suggested as a major reason for disturbances of visits to dentists by such patients. Intravenous sedation is a useful method for relieving the anxiety and fear of such patients about dental treatment,…

  1. Intravenous Sedation for Dental Patients with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyawaki, T.; Kohjitani, A.; Maeda, S.; Egusa, M.; Mori, T.; Higuchi, H.; Kita, F.; Shimada, M.

    2004-01-01

    The poor quality of oral health care for people with intellectual disability (ID) has been recognized, and the strong fears about dental treatment suggested as a major reason for disturbances of visits to dentists by such patients. Intravenous sedation is a useful method for relieving the anxiety and fear of such patients about dental treatment,…

  2. Current perspectives on dental patients receiving coumarin anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Herman, W W; Konzelman, J L; Sutley, S H

    1997-03-01

    Despite approximately 40 years of experience with oral anticoagulant drugs, controversy still exists about the safety of dental treatment in a patient receiving this therapy. The authors review the topic in depth and offer detailed recommendations for the dental management of patients receiving coumarin anticoagulant therapy.

  3. Evaluation of dental material series from patients with dental prostheses and suspicion of delayed hypersensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Fernanda Cortinhas; Cunha, Victor do Espirito Santo; Hahnstadt, Ruppert Ludwig; Pires, Mário Cezar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with oral sensitivity are common in our practice. Allergic contact dermatitis is one of the most frequent etiologies. OBJECTIVES Evaluate oral contact dermatitis using the Brazilian standard series and complementary dental series in patients using dental prostheses, with or without oral complaints. Determine specific dental Brazilian series. METHODS Patients using dental prostheses with or without oral complaints realized patch tests. Brazilian standard series and complementary dental series were used according to ICDRG recommendations. The results were analysed according to age, sex, race, atopic conditions and symptoms associated. RESULTS From 54 patients tested, 34 (63%) were positive at least to one substance. Nineteen had oral complaints, such as burning mouth, itch or oral erythema. There was no association between atopic condition and tests results. Without the oral series, just 23(42,6%) patients had a positive result. Using the Brazilian standard series with the complementary dental series we improved the positivity of the patch test to 47%. CONCLUSION In patients using prostheses and with oral complaints, patch tests with Brazilian standard series with complementary dental series improve the tests positivity. PMID:27192511

  4. Evaluation of dental material series from patients with dental prostheses and suspicion of delayed hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Fernanda Cortinhas; Cunha, Victor do Espirito Santo; Hahnstadt, Ruppert Ludwig; Pires, Mário Cezar

    2016-04-01

    Patients with oral sensitivity are common in our practice. Allergic contact dermatitis is one of the most frequent etiologies. Evaluate oral contact dermatitis using the Brazilian standard series and complementary dental series in patients using dental prostheses, with or without oral complaints. Determine specific dental Brazilian series. Patients using dental prostheses with or without oral complaints realized patch tests. Brazilian standard series and complementary dental series were used according to ICDRG recommendations. The results were analysed according to age, sex, race, atopic conditions and symptoms associated. From 54 patients tested, 34 (63%) were positive at least to one substance. Nineteen had oral complaints, such as burning mouth, itch or oral erythema. There was no association between atopic condition and tests results. Without the oral series, just 23(42,6%) patients had a positive result. Using the Brazilian standard series with the complementary dental series we improved the positivity of the patch test to 47%. In patients using prostheses and with oral complaints, patch tests with Brazilian standard series with complementary dental series improve the tests positivity.

  5. The impact of dental phobia on patient consent.

    PubMed

    Muschik, S; Kallow, J

    2015-08-28

    Dental anxiety is prevalent across a broad spectrum of the population. Dental phobia is extreme dental fear, which interferes with normal functioning. For any dental treatment, it is an ethical, legal and professional duty of dentists to obtain valid informed consent from their patients. The question arises as to how dental phobia impacts on patients' ability to give valid informed consent. Extreme fear may impair patient ability to understand information about the procedure, their capacity to make balanced decisions, and to make these decisions voluntarily. A trusting rapport between dentist and patient, supporting patient understanding by providing useful information material, and keeping regular appointments, may help overcome these obstacles. Other factors impacting on the informed consent process are institutional in nature. Implementing ways to overcome these is part of the dentist's duty to obtain valid consent.

  6. Stress amongst primary dental care patients.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Vázquez, Luis Miguel; Rubiños López, Emilio; Varela Centelles, Almudena; Blanco Otero, Ana Isabel; Varela Otero, Flor; Varela Centelles, Pablo

    2008-04-01

    to determine the prevalence of dental fear amongst primary dental care units (PDCU) patients and to characterize them according to socio-demographic features. non-probabilistic sampling on new and consecutive patients demanding exodontia at the Burela, Praza do Ferrol and Viveiro (Lugo) PDCUs from 9 january to 7 march and from 18 june to 21 september 2007. The variables considered were "demographic" (age, gender, address and educational level), "treatment-related" (reason for extraction, root extraction), "attitudes" (accompanied yes/no, spontaneous fear comments yes/no) and "stress" determined using a visual analogue scale (VAS). A total of 804 patients entered the study. The mean VAS value was 3.54+/-2.63 (range 0 to 10; median 2.95; mode 0). A 96.8% referred some degree of stress, and a 10.1% of the sample scored high values (>7.5 in the scale). These values resulted to be influenced by sex (p=0.000), address (p=0.025) and by the presence of an accompanying person in the room (p=0.008). Logistic regression analysis identifies female gender (OR=3.26; 95%CI: 1.93 , 5.49), urban (OR=2.02 95%CI: 1.04 , 3.91) or rural (OR=2.16; 95%CI: 1.15 , 4.08) address and the absence of an accompanying person in the room (OR=1.68; 95%CI: 1.05 , 2.70) as predictors for a high level of stress. A 10.1% of the patients experience a high level of stress before tooth extraction. This phenomenon is more common among unaccompanied women from rural or urban areas.

  7. Osteoporosis and its implications for dental patients.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Beatrice J; Migliorati, Cesar A

    2008-05-01

    Osteoporosis is a common disease in middle-aged and older Americans. The risk of sustaining fractures is a concern, and mortality rates after hip or vertebral fractures are high. Oral health maintenance for adults with osteoporosis is important. The authors conducted a MEDLINE search of the medical and dental literature with the objective of reviewing osteoporosis, its effect on public health in the population in the United States and the implications in providing dental care for these patients. They selected studies by performing a content search with National Library of Medicine medical subject headings (epidemiology, public health impact, treatment, adverse drug reactions, cost-effectiveness of osteoporosis therapy, oral health, periodontal disease, adverse drug reactions, bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaw). They then performed a study design search with a filter so that only randomized clinical trials were included. Osteoporosis and related fractures are more common than coronary disease, stroke and breast cancer. Fractures resulting from osteoporosis can affect a patient's quality of life severely, and fractures result in functional impairment and increased health care cost and mortality. Medical management of osteoporosis includes diet control, with appropriate intake of calcium and vitamin D, weight-bearing exercise, discontinuation of tobacco and alcohol intake, and use of medications, including selective estrogen receptor modulators, calcitonin, anabolic agents and bisphosphonates. Bisphosphonates have been associated with the development of osteonecrosis of the jaws. Oral health maintenance is important in patients with osteoporosis. Bisphosphonate therapy or other medical treatment for these people should be discontinued only after consultation with the patient's physician.

  8. Experiences of dental care: what do patients value?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dentistry in Australia combines business and health care service, that is, the majority of patients pay money for tangible dental procedures such as fluoride applications, dental radiographs, dental fillings, crowns, and dentures among others. There is evidence that patients question dentists’ behaviours and attitudes during a dental visit when those highly technical procedures are performed. However, little is known about how patients’ experience dental care as a whole. This paper illustrates the findings from a qualitative study recently undertaken in general dental practice in Australia. It focuses on patients’ experiences of dental care, particularly on the relationship between patients and dentists during the provision of preventive care and advice in general dental practices. Methods Seventeen patients were interviewed. Data analysis consisted of transcript coding, detailed memo writing, and data interpretation. Results Patients described their experiences when visiting dental practices with and without a structured preventive approach in place, together with the historical, biological, financial, psychosocial and habitual dimensions of their experience. Potential barriers that could hinder preventive activities as well as facilitators for prevention were also described. The offer of preventive dental care and advice was an amazing revelation for this group of patients as they realized that dentists could practice dentistry without having to “drill and fill” their teeth. All patients, regardless of the practice they came from or their level of clinical risk of developing dental caries, valued having a caring dentist who respected them and listened to their concerns without “blaming” them for their oral health status. These patients complied with and supported the preventive care options because they were being “treated as a person not as a patient” by their dentists. Patients valued dentists who made them aware of existing

  9. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion.

    PubMed

    AlShahrani, Mohammed Thamer; Haralur, Satheesh B; Alqarni, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  10. Jordanian School Counselors' Leadership Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsmadi, Rana; Mahasneh, Randa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the degree to which Jordanian school counselors were seen by teachers and principals to possess and display leadership behaviors related to Bolman and Deal's (1997) transformational "four framework approach" to leadership. This was based on the view that such leadership would relate to…

  11. [Dental treatment of HIV-infected and AIDS patients in the dental office in The Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Sjamsoedin, D A; Molendijk, G; Schulten, E A; ten Kate, R W; van der Waal, I

    1991-09-01

    Every dentist should accept the responsibility of treating HIV-infected and AIDS' patients in his own office. By taking the appropriate hygienic measures, the risk of HIV-transmission in the dental office can be almost completely eliminated.

  12. Titanium hypersensitivity. A hidden threat for dental implant patients?

    PubMed

    Bilhan, Hakan; Bural, Canan; Geckili, Onur

    2013-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been widely used for dental prosthetic devices because of their superior mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However, the incidence of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy is still unknown and the discussion about its existence is ongoing. Unexplained implant failures have also forced dental clinicians to investigate the possibility of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy. This review focuses on the potential of dental implant-related titanium hypersensitivity or allergic reactions. It includes an examination of the existing scientific literature and current knowledge. Evidence-based data and studies related to titanium hypersensitivity in dental implant patients are also discussed.

  13. Access to dental services for head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Mark; Aleid, Wesam; McKechnie, Alasdair

    2013-07-01

    Dental assessment is important for patients with cancer of the head and neck who are to have radiotherapy, as many of these patients have poor dental health before they start treatment. This, compounded by the fact that radiotherapy to the head and neck has a detrimental effect on oral health, has led the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) to issue guidance that the dental health of these patients should be assessed before treatment. Unfortunately some multidisciplinary teams, such as the one at United Lincolnshire Hospitals, do not have access to a restorative dentist or a dental hygienist. In a retrospective survey we investigated access to general dental services by patients with head and neck cancer who were to have radiotherapy at our hospital and found that 37/71 (52%) had not been reviewed by a dentist within the past 12 months. A secondary national survey that investigated the availability of restorative dental and dental hygienic services showed that of the 56 multidisciplinary teams that deal with head and neck cancer in England, 19 (34%) do not have access to a restorative dentist and 23 (41%) do not have access to a dental hygienist, suggesting that this problem may be countrywide. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dental beliefs: factor structure of the revised dental beliefs survey in a group of regular dental patients.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Kajsa H; Ohrn, Kerstin; Hakeberg, Magnus

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure of the revised dental beliefs survey (DBS-R) in a group of regular dental patients. The study group consisted of 278 patients (mean age 54 yr), 61% of whom were women. The DBS-R item mean value was 1.6. Principal component analysis (PCA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were performed. The initial PCA among the 28 DBS-R items showed four factors with eigenvalues of > 1 explaining 67% of the total variance. Five different CFA models were tested. The final model revealed a four-factor solution with one second-order factor (i.e. a hierarchical CFA). Thus, the latent second-order variable, 'dental beliefs', explains the variance from all DBS-R items through the four first-order factors labeled 'ethics', 'belittlement', 'communication and empathy', and 'control and anxiety'. The results suggest a somewhat different factor structure of DBS-R than previously reported for dental-fear patients. Hence, the underlying factor structure of the DBS-R may differ between different patient groups. The results point towards the use of the original 28-item DBS-R and interpreting the scale as measuring an overall construct of 'dental beliefs' and thus patients' attitudes and feelings related to dentists and dentistry.

  15. [Special considerations in dental surgery procedures on organ transplantation patients].

    PubMed

    Schmelzeisen, R; Eckardt, A; Knoll, M; Girod, S

    1991-01-01

    In 150 patients 366 (95%) of 385 dental surgery procedures performed prior to organ transplantations were free of complications. In 6 patients circumscribed wound infections occurred, and 5 post-operative hemorrhages as well as 2 injection hematomas were observed. In the group of patients where dental surgery was performed after organ transplantation, all 123 procedures were free of complications. Treatment of transplantation patients in the dental office requires a profound understanding of the complex clinical problems these patients might present, a good coordination of the required measures and close cooperation between the transplantation center and the attending dentist. Special considerations of the treatment of organ transplantation patients and the indications for dental surgery are discussed.

  16. Dental care providers' and patients' perceptions of the effect of health information technology in the dental care setting.

    PubMed

    Asan, Onur; Ye, Zhan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-09-01

    The use of electronic health records (EHRs) in dental care and their effect on dental care provider-patient interaction have not been studied sufficiently. The authors conducted a study to explore dental care providers' interactions with EHRs during patient visits, how these interactions influence dental care provider-patient communication, and the providers' and patients' perception of EHR use in the dental clinic setting during patient visits. The authors collected survey and interview data from patients and providers at three dental clinics in a health care system. The authors used qualitative and quantitative methods to analyze data obtained from patients and dental care providers. The provider survey results showed significant differences in perceptions of EHR use in patient visits across dental care provider groups (dentists, dental hygienists and dental assistants). Patient survey results indicated that some patients experienced a certain level of frustration and distraction because of providers' use of EHRs during the visit. The provider survey results indicated that there are different perceptions across provider groups about EHRs and the effect of computer use on communication with patients. Dental assistants generally reported more negative effects on communication with patients owing to computer use. Interview results also indicated that dental care providers may not feel comfortable interacting with the EHR without having any verbal or eye contact with patients during the patient's dental visit. A new design for dental operatories and locations of computer screens within the operatories should be undertaken to prevent negative nonverbal communication such as loss of eye contact or forcing the provider and patient to sit back to back, as well as to enhance patient education and information sharing.

  17. Use of dental care by HIV-infected medical patients.

    PubMed

    Coulter, I D; Marcus, M; Freed, J R; Der-Martirosian, C; Cunningham, W E; Andersen, R M; Maas, W R; Garcia, I; Schneider, D A; Genovese, B; Shapiro, M F; Bozzette, S A

    2000-06-01

    Although increasing attention has been paid to the use of dental care by HIV patients, the existing studies do not use probability samples, and no accurate population estimates of use can be made from this work. The intent of the present study was to establish accurate population estimates of the use of dental services by patients under medical care. The study, part of the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS), created a representative national probability sample, the first of its kind, of HIV-infected adults in medical care. Both bivariate and logistic regressions were conducted, with use of dental care in the preceding 6 months as the dependent variable and demographic, social, behavioral, and disease characteristics as independent variables. Forty-two percent of the sample had seen a dental health professional in the preceding 6 months. The bivariate logits for use of dental care show that African-Americans, those whose exposure to HIV was caused by hemophilia or blood transfusions, persons with less education, and those who were employed were less likely to use dental care (p < 0.05). Sixty-five percent of those with a usual source of care had used dental care in the preceding 6 months. Use was greatest among those obtaining dental care from an AIDS clinic (74%) and lowest among those without a usual source of dental care (12%). We conclude that, in spite of the high rate of oral disease in persons with HIV, many do not use dental care regularly, and that use varies by patient characteristics and availability of a regular source of dental care.

  18. The management of dental patients taking new generation oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alun; Gibson, John; Crighton, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Recently, new oral anticoagulants have been introduced as alternatives to warfarin. While national guidelines for treatment of dental patients taking warfarin as an anticoagulant are well-established, no such information is available for these novel therapeutic agents. At present, the local guidance available is contradictory between different health boards/health planning units, and liaison with the medical practitioner managing the individual patient's anticoagulation is imperative if any invasive procedure is proposed. This paper examines the available evidence regarding these drugs and sets out proposals for clinical guidance of dental practitioners treating these patients in primary dental care.

  19. Dental education and special-needs patients: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    McTigue, Dennis J

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric dentists have, by tradition and default, provided care for persons with special health care needs (PSHCN), regardless of age. Deinstitutionalization of PSHCN in the 1960s, however, overwhelmed the dental care system, and oral health care became one of the greatest unmet needs of this population. This presentation follows the history of training for dentists in this aspect of care, from the first demonstration programs in the 1970s to the current educational programs in U.S. dental schools. Today's dental students must be competent in assessing the treatment needs of PSHCN, but accreditation standards do not require competency in the treatment of this group of patients. Recommendations to rectify this include revising dental school curricula to be more patient-centered, improving technology in schools, earlier clinical experiences for dental students, and the use of community-based clinics.

  20. Dental care in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Karine Cestaro; Teófilo, Carolina Rodrigues; Perdigão, João Paulo Veloso; Sousa, Fabrício Bitu; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; de Negreiros, Wagner Araújo; Mota, Mário Rogério Lima

    2017-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a prothrombotic autoimmune disease that may be classified as primary or secondary. Treatment consists of oral anticoagulant, antiplatelet, and/or immunosuppressant drugs. This report describes the dental treatment of 2 women with APS and multiple dental concerns, including periodontal disease, caries, and missing teeth. The invasive dental procedures were performed in an outpatient setting with hematologic monitoring and use of local hemostatic measures. Neither interruption of anticoagulant medications nor administration of blood products was necessary. All of the procedures were performed without complications. To date, no recommendations for the dental care of patients with APS have been established, demonstrating a need to investigate the risks for bleeding and infection, among other concerns, during dental treatment of these patients.

  1. Age Estimation for Dental Patients Using Orthopantomographs

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Bekir; Karaarslan, Emine Sirin; Ozsevik, Abdul Semih; Ertas, Ertan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to conduct age estimates for dental patients using orthopantomographs (OPGs). The OPGs were selected by an independent author with respect to criteria and evaluated by two independent dentists. The results were compared to chronologic ages. The reliability of the estimates, concurrently made by the two independent dentists using OPGs, was also evaluated. Methods: In this retrospective study, the OPGs of 238 Turkish individuals of known chronological age, ranging from 1 to 60 years, were measured. Patients were then classified. Radiographs were evaluated by two independent dentists and age estimation was achieved according to the decades. Results: The truest age estimates made by the dentists were in the 1–10 years age range (89.6%), the most inaccurate age estimates were in the 41–50 years age range (41.7%). Results indicate that the accuracy of age estimation diminishes with age. Conclusions: Despite the variations related to the practitioners, in this study, there were no significant differences in age estimations between the two participant practitioners. Age estimation through evaluating OPGs was the most accurate in the first decade and the least in fourth decade. It can be concluded that OPGs are not adequate for accurate age estimation. PMID:20922158

  2. Measuring patient safety in a UK dental hospital: development of a dental clinical effectiveness dashboard.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, M N; Ashley, M P; Shaw, A; Dickson, S; Saksena, A

    2014-10-01

    Patient safety is an important marker of quality for any healthcare organisation. In 2008, the British Government white paper entitled High quality care for all, resulting from a review led by Lord Darzi, identified patient safety as a key component of quality and discussed how it might be measured, analysed and acted upon. National and local clinically curated metrics were suggested, which could be displayed via a 'clinical dashboard'. This paper explains the development of a clinical effectiveness dashboard focused on patient safety in an English dental hospital and how it has helped us identify relevant patient safety issues in secondary dental care.

  3. Concomitant contact allergy to formaldehyde and methacrylic monomers in students of dental medicine and dental patients.

    PubMed

    Lyapina, Maya; Dencheva, Maria; Krasteva, Assya; Tzekova, Mariana; Kisselova-Yaneva, Angelina

    2014-10-01

    A multitude of acrylic monomers is used in dentistry. Formaldehyde is a ubiquitous chemical agent, which is an ingredient of some dental materials and may be released from methacrylate-based composites. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the incidence and the risk of cross-sensitization to some methacrylic monomers (methylmethacrylate - MMA, triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate - TEGDMA, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate - EGDMA, 2,2-bis-[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacrylo-xypropoxy)phenyl]-propane - Bis-GMA, 2-hydroxy-ethyl methacrylate 2-HEMA, and tetrahydrofurfuryl methacrylate) and formaldehyde in students of dentistry, dental professionals and dental patients. A total of 139 participants were included in the study, i.e., occupationally exposed dental professionals, students of the 3rd, 4th and 6th year of dental medicine, and occupationally unexposed dental patients. They were patch-tested with methacrylic monomers and formaldehyde. The results were subjected to statistical analysis (p < 0.05). From the allergic to formaldehyde students of the 3rd and 4th year of dental medicine, 46.2% were also sensitized to MMA. Among the group of patients, the incidence of cross-sensitization to formaldehyde and methacrylic monomers was as follows: to TEGDMA - 20.6%, to ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate - 20.7%, to 2-HEMA - 20.7% and to tetrahydrofurfuryl methacrylate - 24.1%. Contact allergy to MMA was diagnosed among 22.7%, and to TEGDMA - among 27.1% of the students of the 3rd and 4th year of dental medicine. In the group of occupationally unexposed dental patients the prevalence of contact allergy to ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate was 20.7%, to Bis-GMA - 27.6%, to 2-HEMA - 44.9% and to tetrahydrofurfuryl methacrylate - 38.0%. The students of the 3rd and 4th year of dental medicine could be outlined as a group at risk of sensitization to MMA and TEGDMA and of cross-sensitization to MMA and formaldehyde. Probably, due to the ubiquitous occurrence of formaldehyde and the wide use of

  4. Recalling the threat: dental anxiety in patients waiting for dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Ehud; Iancu, Iulian

    2013-01-01

    The tendency of patients with high levels of anxiety to easily recall threatening stimuli has not been examined in relation to dental anxiety. The current study was aimed to examine the effect of pre-treatment anxiety levels and of information given prior to dentistry surgical procedures on free recall of threatening words. Forty-two subjects attending a private dental clinic were recruited. While awaiting root-canal treatment or tooth extraction, patients were asked to proofread a list of 32 words, which contained mental and physical threat-related words, as well as positive and neutral words. only half of the subjects received information on the forthcoming surgical procedure. Pre-treatment anxiety levels using the dental anxiety Scale (daS) and word recall were evaluated. Only subjects with high dental anxiety (above median score) recalled more mental and physical threat related words, than positive words. Moreover, the dental anxiety score as a continuous variable predicted the mean number of mental threat-related words recalled. no significant differences were noted between those who did or did not receive information prior to the surgical procedures, on the recall of the four types of words. Similar to other anxiety disorders, patients with dental anxiety display a tendency for free recall of threatening stimuli presented to them before a threatening event. Preliminary information given prior to dentistry surgical procedures does not decrease anxiety. Suggestions for intervention in the dentist's clinic are given.

  5. Strategies to manage patients with dental anxiety and dental phobia: literature review

    PubMed Central

    Appukuttan, Deva Priya

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety and phobia result in avoidance of dental care. It is a frequently encountered problem in dental offices. Formulating acceptable evidence-based therapies for such patients is essential, or else they can be a considerable source of stress for the dentist. These patients need to be identified at the earliest opportunity and their concerns addressed. The initial interaction between the dentist and the patient can reveal the presence of anxiety, fear, and phobia. In such situations, subjective evaluation by interviews and self-reporting on fear and anxiety scales and objective assessment of blood pressure, pulse rate, pulse oximetry, finger temperature, and galvanic skin response can greatly enhance the diagnosis and enable categorization of these individuals as mildly, moderately, or highly anxious or dental phobics. Broadly, dental anxiety can be managed by psychotherapeutic interventions, pharmacological interventions, or a combination of both, depending on the level of dental anxiety, patient characteristics, and clinical situations. Psychotherapeutic interventions are either behaviorally or cognitively oriented. Pharmacologically, these patients can be managed using either sedation or general anesthesia. Behavior-modification therapies aim to change unacceptable behaviors through learning, and involve muscle relaxation and relaxation breathing, along with guided imagery and physiological monitoring using biofeedback, hypnosis, acupuncture, distraction, positive reinforcement, stop-signaling, and exposure-based treatments, such as systematic desensitization, “tell-show-do”, and modeling. Cognitive strategies aim to alter and restructure the content of negative cognitions and enhance control over the negative thoughts. Cognitive behavior therapy is a combination of behavior therapy and cognitive therapy, and is currently the most accepted and successful psychological treatment for anxiety and phobia. In certain situations, where the patient is not

  6. Patients with burning mouth sensations. A clinical investigation of causative factors in a group of "compete denture wearers" Jordanian population.

    PubMed

    Mukatash-Nimri, Gadeer Elea; Al-Nimri, Marwan A; Al-Jadeed, Omar G; Al-Zobe, Zaid R; Aburumman, Khuzama K; Masarwa, Nader A

    2017-01-01

    To find out the prevalence of "true" burning mouth syndrome and study the association between patients' spontaneous complaints of burning mouth and systemic conditions in a group of middle age and elderly "denture wearers" patients in Jordan. A group of 129 patients (112 female and 17 male) of "complete denture wearers" subjects aged 40 years and over attended prosthetic clinic at King Hussein Medical Hospital complaining from oral burning, with no oral lesion possibly responsible for the burning sensations were selected. Assessment of oral and general status was done based on questioners, detailed history taking, medical records and extra and intraoral examination. The existed complete dentures retention, stability, jaw relationship and the free way space were evaluated. The current blood test and instrumental protocol for examination of patients with burning mouth complains were performed for each patient. Then those studied patients with burning mouth sensations including "true" burning mouth syndrome have been compared to the controls with regard to the presence of local problem, undermined local, systemic or psychological disease. The diagnosis of "true" burning mouth syndrome was established in (2.3%) of the studied population two females and one male. In most patients (58%) more than one site was affected. Significant positive associations were found between local factors (i.e., wearing complete dentures with unsatisfactory retention or jaw relationship, dry mouth or candidasis) and patients suffering from burning mouth sensation. The results also show that some systemic or psychological disorders were significantly more present among patients with burning mouth symptoms when compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Spontaneous symptoms of burning mouth without mucosal signs should be considered as a manifestation of undermind pathology and/or distress, and the multi-factorial causes of burning mouth syndrome and sensation need to be referred to the

  7. Nuclear analysis of Jordanian tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saleh, K. A.; Saleh, N. S.

    The concentration of trace and minor elements in six different Jordanian and two foreign brands of cigarette tobacco and wrapping paper were determined using combined X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Rutherford backscatteing (RBS) analysis techniques. The cigarette filter and the ash were also analyzed to determine the trapped elements on the filter and their transference with smoke. The toxic effects of some elements have been briefly discussed.

  8. What about the dentist-patient relationship in dental tourism?

    PubMed

    Conti, Adelaide; Delbon, Paola; Laffranchi, Laura; Paganelli, Corrado

    2014-03-01

    Dental tourism is patients travelling across international borders with the intention of receiving dental care. It is a growing phenomenon that raises many ethical issues, particularly regarding the dentist-patient relationship. We discuss various issues related to this phenomenon, including patient autonomy over practitioner choice, patient safety, continuity of care, informed consent and doctor-patient communication, among other factors. In particular, patients partaking in medical tourism should be informed of its potential problems and the importance of proper planning and post-treatment care to guarantee high-quality treatment outcomes.

  9. Multiple Intelligences of Students at Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khataybeh, Abdalla; Al-Sheikh, Kholoud

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating different intelligence types among Jordanian students at different public and private universities in Jordan. To achieve such aim, it sought to identify and rank multiple intelligences that characterize students at Jordanian universities, and to identify and rank the differences in multiple intelligences…

  10. Multiple Intelligences of Students at Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khataybeh, Abdalla; Al-Sheikh, Kholoud

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating different intelligence types among Jordanian students at different public and private universities in Jordan. To achieve such aim, it sought to identify and rank multiple intelligences that characterize students at Jordanian universities, and to identify and rank the differences in multiple intelligences…

  11. Dental anomalies in pediatric patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Septer, Seth; Bohaty, Brenda; Onikul, Robin; Kumar, Vandana; Williams, Karen B; Attard, Thomas M; Friesen, Craig A; Friesen, Lynn Roosa

    2017-09-08

    Familial adenomatous polyposis patients often present with non-malignant extra-intestinal manifestations which include dental anomalies that may be evident prior to the appearance of the colonic adenomas. The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence and type of dental anomalies and the relationships between gene mutations and dental anomalies in these patients. Twenty-two pediatric familial adenomatous polyposis patients and 46 controls, who were age and gender matched participated. Familial adenomatous polyposis patient's had a dental examination with panoramic radiograph and medical record review for age at diagnosis, the presence of the adenomatous polyposis coli gene mutation, and determination of other extra-intestinal manifestations on the body. The control group was identified from a retrospective chart review and selected if there was a current panoramic radiograph. The only significant difference between familial adenomatous polyposis patients and controls were the presence of jaw osteomas and sclerosis (p = .0001). Patients with a mutation in, or upstream of codon 1309 had a higher frequency of osteomas (77.8%) and jaw-bone sclerosis (44.4%), and 77% of these had at least one dental anomaly. This preliminary study showed an association between a genetic variant at, or upstream of codon 1309, and radiographic dental anomalies.

  12. Emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain among Tanzanian patients

    PubMed Central

    Nyerere, Joachim W; Matee, Mecky I; Simon, Elison NM

    2006-01-01

    Background In Tanzania, oral health services are mostly in the form of dental extractions aimed at alleviating acute dental pain. Conservative methods of alleviating acute dental pain are virtually non-existent. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to determine treatment success of emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain. Methods Setting: School of Dentistry, Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Study design: Longitudinal study. Participants: 180 patients who presented with dental pain due to acute irreversible pulpitis during the study period between July and August 2001. Treatment and evaluation: Patients were treated by emergency pulpotomy on permanent posterior teeth and were evaluated for pain after one, three and six week's post-treatment. Pain, if present, was categorised as either mild or acute. Results Of the patients with treated premolars, 25 (13.9%) patients did not experience pain at all while 19 (10.6%) experienced mild pain. None of the patients with treated premolars experienced acute pain. Among 136 patients with treated molars 56 (31%) did not experience any pain, 76 (42.2%) experienced mild pain and the other 4 (2.2%) suffered acute pain. Conclusion The short term treatment success of emergency pulpotomy was high being 100% for premolars and 97.1% for molars, suggesting that it can be recommended as a measure to alleviate acute dental pain while other conservative treatment options are being considered. PMID:16426455

  13. Vildagliptin efficacy in combination with metformin among Jordanian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with metformin.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, Mousa; Khader, Yousef; Dauod, Ali Shakir; Beni Yonis, Othman Ahmed; Khassawneh, Adi Harbi Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin added to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) inadequately controlled with metformin monotherapy. Methods: This was a 12-week prospective observational study where vildagliptin 50 mg twice daily was added to patients with T2DM inadequately controlled (glycosylated hemoglobin type A1c (Hba1c) 7-10%) by a daily dose of metformin ≥1700 mg between June 2012 and May 2013. Efficacy was assessed by change in Hba1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels, and safety was assessed by reported adverse events (AEs). Results: A total of 58 patients were enrolled in this study. Their age ranged between 39.0 and 71.0 years, with a mean of 52.6 years, and a standard deviation (SD) of 7.8. The average duration of diabetes mellitus (DM) was 4.0 years (SD 3.0) and half of the patients have had DM for more than three years. The mean baseline levels of Hba1c and FPG were 8% and 10.8 mmol/L, respectively. Patients treated with vildagliptin achieved clinically significant reductions in Hba1c of 1.1% (p value <.005) and reduction in FPG of 1.8 mmol/L (p value <.005) from baseline. Overall, 62.1% had achieved the target of Hba1c of <7% after vildagliptin use. Greater reductions in Hba1c were linked to higher baseline levels as well as to the daily frequency of metformin use. Mild AEs were reported by 16 patients. There was no incidence of hypoglycemia and there were no significant changes in body weight after treatment. Conclusions: Vildagliptin as add-on therapy to metformin improved glycemic control and was highly tolerable in T2DM patients who were inadequately controlled by metformin monotherapy.

  14. Vildagliptin efficacy in combination with metformin among Jordanian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with metformin

    PubMed Central

    Al Omari, Mousa; Khader, Yousef; Dauod, Ali Shakir; Beni Yonis, Othman Ahmed; Khassawneh, Adi Harbi Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective : To assess the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin added to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) inadequately controlled with metformin monotherapy. Methods: This was a 12-week prospective observational study where vildagliptin 50 mg twice daily was added to patients with T2DM inadequately controlled (glycosylated hemoglobin type A1c (Hba1c) 7–10%) by a daily dose of metformin ≥1700 mg between June 2012 and May 2013. Efficacy was assessed by change in Hba1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels, and safety was assessed by reported adverse events (AEs). Results: A total of 58 patients were enrolled in this study. Their age ranged between 39.0 and 71.0 years, with a mean of 52.6 years, and a standard deviation (SD) of 7.8. The average duration of diabetes mellitus (DM) was 4.0 years (SD 3.0) and half of the patients have had DM for more than three years. The mean baseline levels of Hba1c and FPG were 8% and 10.8 mmol/L, respectively. Patients treated with vildagliptin achieved clinically significant reductions in Hba1c of 1.1% (p value <.005) and reduction in FPG of 1.8 mmol/L (p value <.005) from baseline. Overall, 62.1% had achieved the target of Hba1c of <7% after vildagliptin use. Greater reductions in Hba1c were linked to higher baseline levels as well as to the daily frequency of metformin use. Mild AEs were reported by 16 patients. There was no incidence of hypoglycemia and there were no significant changes in body weight after treatment. Conclusions: Vildagliptin as add-on therapy to metformin improved glycemic control and was highly tolerable in T2DM patients who were inadequately controlled by metformin monotherapy. PMID:27994943

  15. Thrombophilia and dental surgery: a report of dental extraction in a patient with protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Crean, S J; Sivarajasingam, V; Muhammed, J; Sharma, V; Fardy, M

    2000-01-01

    Most patients with thrombophilia are asymptomatic. A case is presented here of a young woman with protein S deficiency, one of the thrombophilias, who required dental extraction. Protein S deficiency predisposes a very small number of those affected to life-threatening thromboses and emboli, for which they are required to take lifelong prophylactic anticoagulation. This report emphasizes the need to liaise closely with haematology departments when deciding whether heparinization is required for patients already taking warfarin. The role of low-molecular-weight heparins is highlighted, a brief review of thrombophilia is given and the management of patients who are taking warfarin and need dental surgery is discussed.

  16. Rating Dental Students: A Comparison of Faculty and Patient Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seefeldt, Michael; Blumberg, Phyllis

    1984-01-01

    This study compared supervisor and patient perceptions of dental students' clinical performance. Postvisit questionnaires were completed by 52 patients and by the respective supervisors overseeing the student dentists who treated the patients. Patients rated students significantly higher on 17 of 24 Likert type items. Reasons for these differences…

  17. Dental management of patient with Williams Syndrome - A case report.

    PubMed

    Wong, Daniel; Ramachandra, Srinivas Sulugodu; Singh, Ashish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystemic rare genetic disorder caused by deletion of 26-28 genes in the long arm of chromosome 7. It is characterized by developmental and physical abnormalities including congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, mental retardation, neurological features, growth deficiency, genitourinary manifestations, gastrointestinal problems, musculoskeletal problems, unique behavioral characteristics, and dental problems. Dental abnormalities include malocclusion, hypodontia, malformed teeth, taurodontism, pulp stones, increased space between teeth, enamel hypoplasia, and high prevalence of dental caries. Authors report a 17-year-old female patient with underlying Williams syndrome. Oral features and problems seen in the patient are listed. Malocclusion and screwdriver shaped teeth were noticed. Generalized widening of the periodontal ligament space with vital teeth was seen. This finding has not been reported in cases of Williams syndrome earlier. Precautions taken during dental treatment in patients with Williams syndrome are also discussed.

  18. Dental management of patient with Williams Syndrome - A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Daniel; Ramachandra, Srinivas Sulugodu; Singh, Ashish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystemic rare genetic disorder caused by deletion of 26–28 genes in the long arm of chromosome 7. It is characterized by developmental and physical abnormalities including congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, mental retardation, neurological features, growth deficiency, genitourinary manifestations, gastrointestinal problems, musculoskeletal problems, unique behavioral characteristics, and dental problems. Dental abnormalities include malocclusion, hypodontia, malformed teeth, taurodontism, pulp stones, increased space between teeth, enamel hypoplasia, and high prevalence of dental caries. Authors report a 17-year-old female patient with underlying Williams syndrome. Oral features and problems seen in the patient are listed. Malocclusion and screwdriver shaped teeth were noticed. Generalized widening of the periodontal ligament space with vital teeth was seen. This finding has not been reported in cases of Williams syndrome earlier. Precautions taken during dental treatment in patients with Williams syndrome are also discussed. PMID:26321847

  19. Dental implant survival in diabetic patients; review and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Rajendra Kumar; Gupta, Deepesh Kumar; Singh, Amit Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Rising population of diabetic individuals across the world has become a big concern to the society. The persistent hyperglycemia may affect each and every tissue and consequently results in morbidity and eventually mortality in diabetic patients. A direct negative response of diabetes has been observed on oral tissues with few contradictions however, little are known about effect of diabetes on dental implant treatment and the consequent results. Many studies concerned with osteointegration and prognosis of dental implant in diabetic patients have been conducted and published since 1994. These studies have been critically reviewed to understand the impact of diabetes on the success of dental implant and the factors to improve osseointegration and consequently survival of dental implant in diabetic patients. Theoretical literatures and studies in diabetic animals substantiate high failure rate of implants but most of clinical studies indicated statistically insignificant failure of dental implants even in moderately uncontrolled diabetic patients. Success of dental implant in well and fairly controlled diabetic patients with proper treatment planning, prophylactic remedies and adequate postsurgical maintenance appears as good as normal individuals. PMID:24665167

  20. Dental students' knowledge and attitudes toward patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hassona, Yazan M; Mahmoud, Ahmad Abd Al-Aziz; Ryalat, Soukaina M; Sawair, Faleh A

    2014-07-01

    Inadequate knowledge and negative attitudes toward epilepsy can affect the provision of health services for patients with epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes toward epilepsy among clinical dental students in Jordan. The study was conducted using a 21-item questionnaire to assess professional experience with epilepsy, knowledge about epilepsy, social tolerance, and willingness to care for patients with epilepsy among dental students at the University of Jordan. More than one-third of dental students believed that epilepsy is due to insanity or mental illness. Only 45% were able to identify convulsion or shaking as a sign of epilepsy, and more than one-third did not know how to act in case of an epileptic seizure in the dental clinic. Disappointingly, 43.4% of the respondents were of the opinion that people with epilepsy should not have children, and only 38.6% thought that people with epilepsy should be employed at the same jobs as other people. About 50% indicated that their families would be concerned about them treating patients with epilepsy, and 30% believed that knowing that patients with epilepsy were treated in their clinic might make other patients reluctant to continue their treatment there. The results revealed an inadequate level of knowledge and negative attitudes toward epilepsy among dental students at the University of Jordan. There is an urgent need to educate dental students about epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Management of oral anticoagulation in patients undergoing minor dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Alaali, Yathreb; Barnes, Geoffrey D; Froehlich, James B; Kaatz, Scott

    2012-08-01

    Approximately 4.2 million patients in the United States are taking warfarin, making it the 11th most prescribed drug. Warfarin is primarily used for treatment of venous thromboembolic disease and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valves. Dentists frequently encounter anticoagulated patients and are faced with management decisions in these patients who require dental procedures. Observational studies suggest the risk of thrombosis if anticoagulation is suspended during dental procedures is higher than the risk of bleeding if anticoagulation is not suspended. Several groups now offer guidelines that recommend most minor dental procedures should be performed while on therapeutic warfarin. The recent approval of several new oral anticoagulants has introduced greater complexity to the management of the anticoagulated patient, and this narrative review will discuss current guidelines, the scientific underpinnings of the guidelines, and offer some practical suggestions for patients that are receiving the new agents.

  2. Nonmedical use of pain medications in dental patients.

    PubMed

    Ashrafioun, Lisham; Edwards, Paul C; Bohnert, Amy S B; Ilgen, Mark A

    2014-07-01

    Substance use is overrepresented in dental clinics that provide affordable care and dental clinics provide potential access to opioid analgesics. Research is needed to better understand prescription opioid misuse in this population. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and correlates of the misuse of prescription opioids in adults seeking dental care from a low-cost dental training clinic. Patients were recruited from a university school's dentistry patient emergency and admission services clinic. Patients (n = 369) within the waiting area of the clinic completed a self-report questionnaire about their nonmedical use of prescription pain medications, medication diversion and use of substances. Approximately 37.9% (140/369) of those who completed the study survey reported at least some nonmedical use of pain medications within the past 30 days. Use was associated with diversion of medication, and use of tobacco, marijuana, and sedatives. Within this sample from a dental clinic, nonmedical use of prescription pain medications was more common than in the general population. This suggests that dental clinics may be an appropriate setting for provider education and patient-based intervention strategies to reduce nonmedical use of pain medications.

  3. UNITED STATES DENTAL PROFESSIONALS’ PERCEPTIONS OF DENTAL ANXIETY AND NEED FOR SEDATION IN PATIENTS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Lisa J.; Hyatt, Halee A.; Huggins, Kimberly Hanson; Milgrom, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Dental fear is a barrier to receiving dental care, particularly for those patients who also suffer from mental illnesses. The current study examined United States dental professionals’ perceptions of dental fear experienced by patients with mental illness, and frequency of sedation of patients with and without mental illness. Dentists and dental staff members (n = 187) completed a survey about their experiences in treating patients with mental illness. More participants agreed (79.8%) than disagreed (20.2%) that patients with mental illness have more anxiety regarding dental treatment (p < .001) than dental patients without mental illness. Further, significantly more participants reported mentally ill patients’ anxiety is “possibly” or “definitely” a barrier to both receiving (96.8%; p < .001) and providing (76.9%; p < .01) dental treatment. Despite reporting more fear in these patients, there were no significant differences in frequency of sedation procedures between those with and without mental illness, regardless of type of sedation (p’s > .05). This lack of difference in sedation for mentally ill patients suggests hesitancy on the part of dental providers to sedate patients with mental illness and highlights a lack of clinical guidelines for this population in the US. Suggestions are given for the assessment and clinical management of patients with mental illness. PMID:24876662

  4. Dental Implant Patients and Their Satisfaction with Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawares, Mary; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study developed a profile of dental implant patients from 38 private practices to document characteristics of endosseous implant recipients of the past 10 years. Data were then analyzed using multivariate techniques to examine the relationship between these characteristics and patient-reported outcomes. Patients tended to have high incomes and…

  5. Dental Implant Patients and Their Satisfaction with Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawares, Mary; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study developed a profile of dental implant patients from 38 private practices to document characteristics of endosseous implant recipients of the past 10 years. Data were then analyzed using multivariate techniques to examine the relationship between these characteristics and patient-reported outcomes. Patients tended to have high incomes and…

  6. Oral and Dental Considerations in Pediatric Leukemic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Padmini, Chiyadu; Bai, K. Yellamma

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the world, there have been drastic decline in mortality rate in pediatric leukemic population due to early diagnosis and improvements in oncology treatment. The pediatric dentist plays an important role in the prevention, stabilization, and treatment of oral and dental problems that can compromise the child's health and quality of life during, and follow up of the cancer treatment. This manuscript discusses recommendations and promotes dental care of the pediatric leukemic patients. PMID:24724033

  7. New antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs. Considerations for dental patient management.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Harold V; Quek, Samuel Y P; Subramanian, Gayathri; Abbas, Ali

    2013-01-01

    A recent occurrence in dental practice is the noting of new "blood thinners" when the clinician is reviewing a patient's medical history and medications. "Doc, I take Pradaxa or Effient or Xarelto" etc. After many years of the widespread use of aspirin and Coumadin there has appeared a new generation of medications focused on reducing thromboembolic events in patients at risk. This trend has been driven by a need for drugs providing better drug efficacy based on patient biologic processing of the medications and the frequency and cost factors associated with the monitoring the degree of anticoagulation. Guidelines for assessing bleeding risk and managing patients on these new medications in dental practice are not yet defined and are empirically based on medical practitioner experience. This paper will review these new medications and will discuss current considerations for dental patient care. (Note that not all new antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications will be reviewed in this paper.)

  8. A general dental practice research network: impact of oral health in general dental practice patients.

    PubMed

    Kay, E J; Ward, N; Locker, D

    2003-06-14

    To measure the subjective impact of oral health in a group of patients attending general dental practices in the North West of England and to investigate the attributes of dentists and practices in order to examine how such attributes might relate to patients' subjective perceptions of oral health. Fifteen general dental practices conducting a simultaneous survey of attending patients and 15 practitioners from these practices providing information about their attitudes to treatment, prevention and various aspects of their surgery. General dental Patient subjective impact scores. Relationships between practice and practitioner variables and patients' subjectively perceived oral health. Fifteen practitioners with diverse practice attributes provided data on 718 patients. The mean total oral health impact score was 18.4. Twenty two per cent of patients had experienced pain in the four weeks before the survey and 11% had been unable to chew some foods. Fifty five per cent of the surveyed population had, in the previous year, worried about the appearance of their mouth and 65% had worried about their oral health in general. Dentists' beliefs were related to patient impact scores but practice attributes were not significantly associated with patients' impacts. Fourteen percent of the differences in patients' subjectively perceived oral health can be attributed to dentist attitudes and attributes. Further research regarding the influence of dentists personality and professional beliefs on patients well-being needs to be undertaken.

  9. Dental aesthetics and the aging patient.

    PubMed

    Davis, Betsy K

    2006-05-01

    Those over the age of 65 years old and the "baby boomers" regard oral health, including oral/dental/facial aesthetics, as part of their overall health and wellness. Over 65% of discretionary wealth in the United States belongs to those over the age of 50. In many instances, they have had to deny their own needs for those of their families and are now at a point where their dental issues can finally be addressed. Aesthetic dentistry offers the opportunity to reverse the signs of aging and restore a youthful appearance. A smile can be the most eye-catching feature of a face and therefore should blend in or harmonize with facial appearance. Advances in aesthetic dentistry, such as porcelain veneers, bonding, periodontal surgery, and dental implants, have shown great efficacy and reliability when used properly. Aesthetic dentistry offers the opportunity for the aged population to have a more youthful, harmonious smile with improved function and optimum oral health.

  10. Dental management in patients with hypertension: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Southerland, Janet H; Gill, Danielle G; Gangula, Pandu R; Halpern, Leslie R; Cardona, Cesar Y; Mouton, Charles P

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a chronic illness affecting more than a billion people worldwide. The high prevalence of the disease among the American population is concerning and must be considered when treating dental patients. Its lack of symptoms until more serious problems occur makes the disease deadly. Dental practitioners can often be on the frontlines of prevention of hypertension by evaluating preoperative blood pressure readings, performing risk assessments, and knowing when to consider medical consultation of a hypertensive patient in a dental setting. In addition, routine follow-up appointments and patients seen on an emergent basis, who may otherwise not be seen routinely, allow the oral health provider an opportunity to diagnose and refer for any unknown disease. It is imperative to understand the risk factors that may predispose patients to hypertension and to be able to educate them about their condition. Most importantly, the oral health care provider is in a pivotal position to play an active role in the management of patients presenting with a history of hypertension because many antihypertensive agents interact with pharmacologic agents used in the dental practice. The purpose of this review is to provide strategies for managing and preventing complications when treating the patient with hypertension who presents to the dental office. PMID:27799823

  11. Using Standardized Patients to Teach Interprofessional Competencies to Dental Students.

    PubMed

    Anders, Patrick L; Scherer, Yvonne Krall; Hatton, Michael; Antonson, Donald; Austin-Ketch, Tammy; Campbell-Heider, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop, implement, and evaluate a novel interprofessional standardized patient exercise (ISPE) with oral-systemic and interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) components. Dental students and doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students at one U.S. university participated in the simulation, which was primarily designed to test their teamwork skills. In spring 2014, DNP students worked in the dental clinics with dental students under the supervision of nursing and dental faculty members. To test the teamwork outcomes for both groups of students, a standardized patient (SP) scenario was designed to include multiple chronic medical diagnoses and an oral-systemic component. The exercise was filmed for later review. Outcomes measures included SP and student self-evaluations and faculty evaluation of student documentation. The primary outcome of interest from a dental standpoint was faculty evaluation of IPCP competencies derived from the Core Competencies of Interprofessional Collaborative Practice and were deemed to be observable by faculty when viewing the videotaped scenario. Eight teams of students participated with an SP trained in the scenario. Each team consisted of a DNP student, a fourth-year dental student, and a second-year dental student. All eligible students in the DNP class (n=20) and eight students from each dental class (approximately 110 each) participated. The results showed that the teams scored highest on the role/responsibilities subscale, indicating students were respectful of each other's roles and expertise and effectively engaged each other to develop strategies to meet the patient's needs. Scores on the three other subscales (values/ethics, interprofessional communication, and teams/teamwork) were also high. These findings appeared to support IPCP as a method to foster knowledge and respect for other roles and responsibilities, improve appreciation of teamwork, and encourage better communication among health

  12. Lessons learnt from Dental Patient Safety Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Obadan, Enihomo M.; Ramoni, Rachel B.; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Errors are commonplace in dentistry, it is therefore our imperative as dental professionals to intercept them before they lead to an adverse event, and/or mitigate their effects when an adverse event occurs. This requires a systematic approach at both the profession-level, encapsulated in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s Patient Safety Initiative structure, as well as at the practice-level, where Crew Resource Management is a tested paradigm. Supporting patient safety at both the dental practice and profession levels relies on understanding the types and causes of errors, an area in which little is known. Methods A retrospective review of dental adverse events reported in the literature was performed. Electronic bibliographic databases were searched and data were extracted on background characteristics, incident description, case characteristics, clinic setting where adverse event originated, phase of patient care that adverse event was detected, proximal cause, type of patient harm, degree of harm and recovery actions. Results 182 publications (containing 270 cases) were identified through our search. Delayed and unnecessary treatment/disease progression after misdiagnosis was the largest type of harm reported. 24.4% of reviewed cases were reported to have experienced permanent harm. One of every ten case reports reviewed (11.1%) reported that the adverse event resulted in the death of the affected patient. Conclusions Published case reports provide a window into understanding the nature and extent of dental adverse events, but for as much as the findings revealed about adverse events, they also identified the need for more broad-based contributions to our collective body of knowledge about adverse events in the dental office and their causes. Practical Implications Siloed and incomplete contributions to our understanding of adverse events in the dental office are threats to dental patients’ safety. PMID:25925524

  13. Dental procedures in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Saour, J N; Ali, H A; Mammo, L A; Sieck, J O

    1994-05-01

    Over a 10-year period a uniform management plan for patients receiving long term oral anticoagulation therapy for prosthetic heart valves and needing dental procedures was instituted. Those undergoing dental extraction or gum hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology (Group A) had their oral anticoagulation discontinued two days prior to the procedure which was carried out only if the INR was 1.5 or less on the day of the procedure. Patients who needed dental fillings or gum hygiene in the absence of gross gum pathology (Group B) continued their anticoagulation therapy and had these procedures completed provided the INR was 3.0 or less. The main outcome measured were valve thrombosis, thromboembolism and excessive bleeding requiring hospitalization and/or blood transfusion. In Group A, 240 procedures were carried out; 212 dental extractions and 28 dental hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology. They had a brief period of under-anticoagulation (3-7 days) to an INR of 1.5 or less. In Group B, 156 procedures were performed. No patient developed valve thrombosis or thromboembolism. Two patients, both in Group A needed hospitalization for observation but no blood transfusion. This management plan was easy to implement. Patients needed one extra visit to the anticoagulation clinic within one week of the procedure. It was both safe and effective.

  14. Hair tourniquet syndrome in the dental patient.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jason R

    2014-01-01

    Hair tourniquet syndrome is a condition where a hair becomes entangled around an appendage. In some cases a knot will form and the resulting tightened noose will slowly strangulate the appendage. Rarely, this condition will affect the oral cavity, but even more rarely, this condition will affect a dental structure.

  15. Hair Tourniquet Syndrome in the Dental Patient

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Hair tourniquet syndrome is a condition where a hair becomes entangled around an appendage. In some cases a knot will form and the resulting tightened noose will slowly strangulate the appendage. Rarely, this condition will affect the oral cavity, but even more rarely, this condition will affect a dental structure. PMID:25191985

  16. Expanding prosthodontic services to the older patient in dental practices.

    PubMed

    Warpeha, Walter S

    2011-01-01

    Numerous articles report on the unmet dental needs of the older patient, yet few have suggested strategies to overcome barriers to care for this unique demographic. At a time when prosthodontic services, including dental implants, offer improved outcomes, the elderly remain the least served of all patient groups. Obstacles to treatment include ageism, medical and dental complexity, financial limitations, and patients' resistance to treatment. Expanding prosthodontic care of the elderly requires a departure from traditional patient management techniques. The attempt to reverse ageism in your practice must go beyond simple awareness. Those offĩces that can relate to, treat with respect, and fulfill the health aspirations of the older patient create the atmosphere where care is more readily accepted. A successful team approach to patient management depends upon the ability to listen and respond to the elderly denture patient with information on denture maintenance and implant enhancements. An essential piece is encouraging regular recall for all denture wearers by every staff member. A well documented problem area in dental practice is the timely replacement of worn out or inadequate dentures. By using a simple assessment tool called the Satisfaction/Condition Score along with motivational interviewing, we have found increased treatment acceptance among our existing patients. Use of these suggestions in a general dentistry practice is more likely to encourage the older patient to better accept enhanced prosthodontic services.

  17. Remarks on simple interpolation between Jordanian twists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meljanac, Stjepan; Meljanac, Daniel; Pachoł, Anna; Pikutić, Danijel

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a simple generalization of the locally r-symmetric Jordanian twist, resulting in the one-parameter family of Jordanian twists. All the proposed twists differ by the coboundary twists and produce the same Jordanian deformation of the corresponding Lie algebra. They all provide the κ-Minkowski spacetime commutation relations. Constructions from noncommutative coordinates to the star product and coproduct, and from the star product to the coproduct and the twist are presented. The corresponding twist in the Hopf algebroid approach is given. Our results are presented symbolically by a diagram relating all of the possible constructions.

  18. Dental extraction for patients presenting at oral surgery student clinic.

    PubMed

    Baqain, Zaid H; Khraisat, Ameen; Sawair, Faleh; Ghanam, Sana; Shaini, Firas J; Rajab, Lamis D

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the reasons for dental extraction and to determine the pattern of tooth loss in patients seeking care at the oral surgery teaching clinics in the Faculty of Dentistry of the University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan, over a 3-year period. Data pertaining to the dental extractions of 2435 patients were analyzed. The results showed that 63.8% of the teeth included in this study were extracted because of dental caries, 22.9% because of periodontal disease, and 11.0% for prosthetic reasons. Pericoronitis, orthodontic treatment, trauma, and eruption problems accounted for 2.4% of the reported extractions. The upper premolars were the teeth most commonly extracted, and the lower first and second molars were the teeth most commonly extracted because of dental caries. The logistic regression test revealed that extraction because of dental caries occurred mostly in the group aged 21 to 30 years (P < .001). Periodontal disease was not likely the cause of extraction in patients younger than 40 years. Mandibular incisors were the teeth least likely extracted because of dental caries (P < .001), but they were the teeth most commonly extracted because of periodontal disease (P < .001). Extraction for orthodontic reasons mostly involved the premolars (P < .05) and occurred in patients 20 years of age or younger (P < .001). Men were less likely to lose teeth because of caries and periodontal disease (P < .05 and P < .001, respectively) and were more likely to lose teeth for prosthetic reasons and trauma. The information gained from this study is useful to shift oral health planning toward emphasizing the importance of maintaining natural dentition and preventing dental disease.

  19. Oral anticoagulant therapy in patients undergoing dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Weibert, R T

    1992-10-01

    The literature on dental surgery in patients receiving oral anticoagulants is reviewed, and methods of managing anticoagulant therapy to minimize the risk of complications are discussed. Although blood loss during and after oral surgery in patients receiving oral anticoagulant drugs can be substantial, research indicates that most bleeding incidents are not serious and can be controlled by local measures. Studies of 241 anticoagulant-treated patients undergoing more than 500 dental extractions during the 1950s and 1960s showed that only 9 had postoperative bleeding. More recent studies indicate that continued anticoagulation can increase the frequency of prolonged bleeding and delay wound healing. An antifibrinolytic mouthwash containing tranexamic acid can effectively suppress postoperative bleeding. Gelatin sponges, oxidized cellulose, and microcrystalline collagen are other useful hemostatic agents. A reduction in the intensity of anticoagulation therapy has been recommended; the prothrombin time should be measured shortly before the procedure in such patients. In many patients the duration of subtherapeutic anticoagulation must be minimized to reduce the possibility of thromboembolism. An option for high-risk patients is to switch them to heparin. Each patient must be evaluated individually, and the level of risk of the dental procedure and the risk of thromboembolism should be taken into account. In patients taking oral anticoagulants who must undergo dental surgery, careful control of the intensity of anticoagulation and improved methods of local hemostasis can minimize the risk of hemorrhagic complications and thromboembolism.

  20. Dental surgery in anticoagulated patients--stop the interruption.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Pinto, Andres; Kilham, Jessica; Lalla, Rajesh V

    2015-02-01

    In a literature review, the incidence and morbidity of bleeding complications after dental surgery in anticoagulated patients was compared with embolic complications when anticoagulation was interrupted. Over 99% of anticoagulated patients had no postoperative bleeding that required more than local hemostatic measures. Of more than 5431 patients undergoing more than 11,381 surgical procedures, with many patients at higher than present therapeutic intenational normalized ratio (INR) levels, only 31 (∼0.6% of patients) required more than local hemostasis to control the hemorrhage; none died due to hemorrhage. Among at least 2673 patients whose warfarin dose was reduced or withdrawn for at least 2775 visits for dental procedures, there were 22 embolic complications (0.8% of cessations), including 6 fatal events (0.2% of cessations). The embolic morbidity risk in patients whose anticoagulation is interrupted for dental surgery exceeds that of significant bleeding complications in patients whose anticoagulation is continued, even when surgery is extensive. Warfarin anticoagulation, therefore, should not be interrupted for most dental surgery.

  1. Use of virtual patients in dental education: a survey of U.S. and Canadian dental schools.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, Robert A; Bentley, Dan A; Halpin, Richard; Valenza, John A

    2012-10-01

    The use of virtual patients in dental education is gaining acceptance as an adjunctive method to live patient interactions for training dental students. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which virtual patients are being utilized in dental education by conducting a survey that was sent to sixty-seven dental schools in the United States and Canada. A total of thirty dental schools responded to the web-based survey. Sixty-three percent of the responding dental schools use virtual patients for preclinical or clinical exercises. Of this group, 31.3 percent have used virtual patients in their curricula for more than ten years, and approximately one-third of those who do use virtual patients expose their students to more than ten virtual patient experiences over the entirety of their programs. Of the schools that responded, 90.5 percent rated the use of virtual patients in dental education as important or very important. An additional question addressed the utilization of interactive elements for the virtual patient. Use of virtual patients can provide an excellent method for learning and honing patient interviewing skills, medical history taking, recordkeeping, and patient treatment planning. Through the use of virtual patient interactive audio/video elements, the student can experience interaction with his or her virtual patients during a more realistic simulation encounter.

  2. Factors associated with Japanese dentists encouraging patients to use dental floss.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, F; Hirayama, Y; Morita, I; Nakagaki, H

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify to what extent Japanese dentists recommend dental floss and what factors influence dentists in encouraging their patients to use dental floss. The subjects in this study were 291 dentists who were directors of dental clinics, selected by stratified sampling by age. Dentists whose teachers at dental school had demonstrated dental flossing tended to recommend patients to use dental floss 2.2 (1.0-4.6: 95% CI) times more frequently compared with those who did not see demonstrations of flossing at dental school. Respondents who considered that using dental floss was very easy and easy, moderate, and difficult recommended patients to use dental floss 45.4 (11.2-183.9), 17.4 (6.6-45.8) and 5.9 (2.5-14.1) times more frequently, respectively, compared with those who considered it very difficult. Respondents who considered that using dental floss was effective, fairly effective or very effective in preventing dental caries recommended patients to use dental floss 3.8 (1.7-8.6), 3.8 (1.7-8.8) and 9.1 (3.6-23.0) times more frequently respectively, compared with those who considered it ineffective or only slightly effective. The demonstration of the use of dental floss by teachers at their dental schools gave dentists a good impression and a positive opinion of dental flossing. This was closely associated with recommendations by dentists to their patients to use dental floss.

  3. Dental aspects in patients with DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toka, Okan; Karl, Matthias; Dittrich, Sven; Holst, Stefan; Holst, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    DiGeorge syndrome, which is caused by a microdeletion of 1.5 to 3.0 megabases on the long arm of chromosome 22, has an incidence of approximately 1:4,000 to 1:5,000 live births. The phenotypic spectrum of this disorder includes congenital heart defects, immunodeficiency due to thymic hypoplasia or aplasia, transient or permanent hypocalcemia due to parathyroid hypoplasia or aplasia, developmental retardation, and psychiatric disorders. Dental aspects in these patients include skeletal malformations, velopharyngeal insufficiency with or without cleft palate, small mouth, and hypotonus orofacial musculature, as well as impaired salivary flow. Enamel aberrations related to hypocalcemia may result in a higher frequency of dental caries. Based on a series of five patients, the medical and dental aspects that have to be considered in the care of patients with DiGeorge syndrome are presented.

  4. Epilepsy and the dental management of the epileptic patient.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Peter L; Eden, Oleksandra

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to educate oral healthcare providers on the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy and seizure disorders. It also shows the impact of epilepsy on the oral cavity and provides suggestions on the dental management of epileptic patients. Epilepsy and seizure disorders affect 1.5 million Americans. The disease is caused by a number of genetic, physiologic, and infectious disorders as well as trauma. Treatment is primarily pharmaceutical but can also be surgical. The disease itself and the pharmaceutical management often have an impact on the oral cavity. Primary management considerations are the provision of good periodontal care and the restoration of the teeth with stable, strong restorations. With proper understanding of patients with epilepsy and seizure disorders and their medical treatment, the dental care team can safely and effectively render dental care that will benefit the patient and minimize the risk of oral health problems in the future.

  5. Dental hygienists' role in patient assessments and clinical examinations in U.S. dental practices: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gibson-Howell, Joan C; Hicks, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    Dental hygienists are licensed primary oral healthcare professionals, oral health educators and clinicians who provide preventive, educational, and therapeutic services to support total health through oral health promotion. Performance of patient assessments and oral examinations are part of dental hygienists' educational preparation and standards of care. Oral health examinations are one of if not the most important services provided by dental professionals. The vast majority of dental hygienists are employed in private practices and there is no standardization of scope of practice and role expectations of dental hygienists among states in the U.S. Therefore, it is unclear to what extent dental hygienists perform oral examinations and whether the examinations are shared by hygienists and dentists. This paper reviews the literature to identify what we know and what we don't know about this important role of dental hygienists. Issues surrounding this topic are discussed, followed by recommendations for our profession.

  6. Dental implants in patients with bruxing habits.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E I G; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2006-02-01

    Bruxism (teeth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence for this is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly because of the large variation in the literature in terms of both the technical aspects and the biological aspects of the study material. Although there is still no proof for the suggestion that bruxism causes an overload of dental implants and of their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. There are a few practical guidelines as to minimize the chance of implant failure. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these guidelines concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the protection of the final result with a hard occlusal stabilization splint (night guard).

  7. 38 CFR 17.164 - Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... making and keeping dental appointments. 17.164 Section 17.164 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.164 Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments. Any veteran eligible for dental treatment on a one-time completion basis only and...

  8. 38 CFR 17.164 - Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... making and keeping dental appointments. 17.164 Section 17.164 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.164 Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments. Any veteran eligible for dental treatment on a one-time completion basis only and...

  9. 38 CFR 17.164 - Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... making and keeping dental appointments. 17.164 Section 17.164 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.164 Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments. Any veteran eligible for dental treatment on a one-time completion basis only and...

  10. 38 CFR 17.164 - Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... making and keeping dental appointments. 17.164 Section 17.164 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.164 Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments. Any veteran eligible for dental treatment on a one-time completion basis only and...

  11. Knowledge Base Methods of Obtaining Preference of Dental Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chi-Chang; Li, Ya-Hsin; Chen, Yi-Fen; Liao, Kuo-Hsiung

    The purpose of this study was to explore the dental patients' preferred roles in Taiwan. A convenience sample of 66 patients, 26 recruited from one dental clinic, and 40 from one medical center, were interviewed and their preferences for participation in treatment decision making were established using a measurement tool designed to elicit decision-making preferences. Patients' preferences for participation in treatment decision making were established using Control Preference Scale (CPS) tool. In addition, Unfolding theory provided a means of analyzing the data so that the degree of control preferred by each patient could be established. This study found that nearly 70% clinic patients perceived passive role in treatment decision making whereas 50% patients in medical centre. Further, the collaborative role was most commonly preferred, but an active role was more commonly perceived in clinics than in medical centre. Finally, the implications of the results for patient participation are discussed.

  12. 75 FR 32539 - Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activities Under OMB Review... Form 10-0503).'' Title: Survey of Healthcare Experiences, Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA...

  13. Knowledge of dental health and diseases among dental patients, a multicentre study in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Almas, K; Albaker, A; Felembam, N

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of dental patients about dental health and diseases. A questionnaire was developed with three sets of questions, 1-general knowledge of dental conditions, 2-use of alternate methods in prevention and treatment of dental diseases, 3-awareness about personal oral health. Six hundred questionnaires were distributed in 6 cities from 4 different regions (i.e. Makkah, Riyadh, Tabuk, Gizan). 367 respondents (61% response rate) constituted 233 (63.5%) male and 134 (36.5%) female with the age range 11-70 years (mean 30 +/- 11.9). The data were analyzed by SPSS version 9.0 and results presented in frequency distributions. 99% male and 96% female considered their teeth for chewing food, 97% male and 96% female knew that increased carbohydrate intake and poor oral hygiene are related to tooth decay, 89% male and 96% female used toothbrush and paste to prevent dental diseases and 75% male and 66% female were regular user of miswak (chewing sticks.) 67% male and 59% female visit dentist, only in pain. 46% used miswak after their meals, only 14% of the subjects used miswak on their lingual and palatal surfaces of teeth, while 38% of the subjects used clove as remedy for toothache, 25.6% used saline and 10% used lemon for bleaching their teeth. 15% considered honey important for their good oral health. Regarding personal oral health, 35% had pain in gums, 36.8% were with bad breath, 28% had tooth hypersensitivity, and almost 50% used toothbrush twice daily while 42% had bleeding gums. It is important to note that knowledge and awareness about dental health and disease conditions are better in male subjects, dietary habits and oral hygiene methods need to be addressed in future investigations. There is a need to provide more health education to female subjects to improve their oral health.

  14. A systematic review of dental disease management in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, Catherine H L; Hu, Shijia; Haverman, Thijs; Stokman, Monique; Napeñas, Joel J; Braber, Jacolien Bos-den; Gerber, Erich; Geuke, Margot; Vardas, Emmanouil; Waltimo, Tuomas; Jensen, Siri Beier; Saunders, Deborah P

    2017-07-22

    This systematic review aims to update on the prevalence of odontogenic-related infections and the efficacy of dental strategies in preventing dental-related complications in cancer patients since the 2010 systematic review. A literature search was conducted in the databases MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE for articles published between 1 January 2009 and 30 June 2016. Each study was assessed by 2 reviewers and the body of evidence for each intervention was assigned an evidence level. After examination of the abstracts and full-text articles, 59 articles satisfied the inclusion criteria. The weighted prevalence of dental infections and pericoronitis during cancer therapy was 5.4 and 5.3%, respectively. The frequency of dental-related infections during intensive chemotherapy after complete, partial, and minimal pre-cancer dental evaluation/treatment protocols ranged from 0 to 4%. Protocols involving third molars extractions had the highest complications (40%). In view of the low prevalence of infections and the potential for complications after third molar extractions, it is suggested that partial dental evaluation/treatment protocols prior to intensive chemotherapy; whereby minor caries (within dentin), asymptomatic third molars or asymptomatic teeth without excessive probing depth (<8 mm), mobility (mobility I or II) or with periapical lesions of <5 mm were observed; is a viable option when there is insufficient time for complete dental evaluation/treatment protocols. The use of chlorhexidine, fluoride mouth rinses as well as composite resin, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GIC), and amalgam restorations over conventional GIC in post head and neck radiation patients who are compliant fluoride users is recommended.

  15. Rights of dental patients in the EU - a legal assessment.

    PubMed

    Van den Bossche, Anne-Marie; Ploscar, Paula

    2012-11-30

    This contribution presents the legal framework for intra-European mobility of dental patients. After presenting the EU competences in respect of healthcare and a brief look into the various routes of patient mobility, the article sets out the rules for access to dental care, treatment abroad and reimbursement through social security. In addition, we focus on the impact of European Union (EU) law upon national systems in respect of professional insurance, complaints procedures and information mechanisms. In conclusion, we reflect on the development in EU law of an independent set of rights to cross-border dental care and its consequences for financing and reimbursement of care, as well as for national practices in respect of professional liability and insurance.

  16. Dental treatment of patients with coagulation factor alterations: an update.

    PubMed

    Jover-Cerveró, Alba; Poveda Roda, Rafael; Bagán, José V; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda

    2007-09-01

    Hemostasia is a defense mechanism that protects vascular integrity, avoids blood loss, and maintains blood fluidity throughout the circulatory system. The biochemical processes leading to blood clot formation are complex, and alterations can appear at any point within the chain of events. While a range of alterations can affect the coagulation factors, some are more common than others in the general population, including congenital (hemophilia A and B, Von Willebrand's disease) and acquired disorders (anticoagulant drugs). Such diseases require special consideration in the context of dental treatment, and therefore must be known to dental professionals. Interconsultation with the hematologist will provide orientation on the characteristics of the disease and on the best approach to treatment, including the need for replacement therapy, the application of local hemostatic measures, the modification of anticoagulant therapy, etc. In any case, the most important concern is the prevention of bleeding complications by compiling a detailed clinical history, with adequate planning of treatment, and taking special care to avoid soft tissue damage during the dental treatment of such patients. The dental surgeon must enhance awareness among patients and their relatives of the importance of correct oral hygiene, which will help avoid the need for invasive dental treatments and will reduce the number of visits to the dentist.

  17. Dental caries experience, oral health status and treatment needs of dental patients with autism

    PubMed Central

    JABER, Mohamed Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Autism is a lifelong neurodevelopmental disorder. The aims of this study were to investigate whether children with autism have higher caries prevalence, higher periodontal problems, or more treatment needs than children of a control group of non-autistic patients, and to provide baseline data to enable comparison and future planning of dental services to autistic children. Material and Methods 61 patients with autism aged 6-16 years (45 males and 16 females) attending Dubai and Sharjah Autism Centers were selected for the study. The control group consisted of 61 non-autistic patients chosen from relatives or friends of autistic patients in an attempt to have matched age, sex and socioeconomic status. Each patient received a complete oral and periodontal examination, assessment of caries prevalence, and caries severity. Other conditions assessed were dental plaque, gingivitis, restorations and treatment needs. Chi-square and Fisher's exact test of significance were used to compare groups. Results The autism group had a male-tofemale ratio of 2.8:1. Compared to controls, children with autism had significantly higher decayed, missing or filled teeth than unaffected patients and significantly needed more restorative dental treatment. The restorative index (RI) and Met Need Index (MNI) for the autistic children were 0.02 and 0.3, respectively. The majority of the autistic children either having poor 59.0% (36/61) or fair 37.8% (23/61) oral hygiene compared with healthy control subjects. Likewise, 97.0% (59/61) of the autistic children had gingivitis. Conclusions Children with autism exhibited a higher caries prevalence, poor oral hygiene and extensive unmet needs for dental treatment than non-autistic healthy control group. Thus oral health program that emphasizes prevention should be considered of particular importance for children and young people with autism. PMID:21625735

  18. Dental caries experience, oral health status and treatment needs of dental patients with autism.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Mohamed Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    Autism is a lifelong neurodevelopmental disorder. The aims of this study were to investigate whether children with autism have higher caries prevalence, higher periodontal problems, or more treatment needs than children of a control group of non-autistic patients, and to provide baseline data to enable comparison and future planning of dental services to autistic children. 61 patients with autism aged 6-16 years (45 males and 16 females) attending Dubai and Sharjah Autism Centers were selected for the study. The control group consisted of 61 non-autistic patients chosen from relatives or friends of autistic patients in an attempt to have matched age, sex and socioeconomic status. Each patient received a complete oral and periodontal examination, assessment of caries prevalence, and caries severity. Other conditions assessed were dental plaque, gingivitis, restorations and treatment needs. Chi-square and Fisher's exact test of significance were used to compare groups. The autism group had a male-to-female ratio of 2.8:1. Compared to controls, children with autism had significantly higher decayed, missing or filled teeth than unaffected patients and significantly needed more restorative dental treatment. The restorative index (RI) and Met Need Index (MNI) for the autistic children were 0.02 and 0.3, respectively. The majority of the autistic children either having poor 59.0% (36/61) or fair 37.8% (23/61) oral hygiene compared with healthy control subjects. Likewise, 97.0% (59/61) of the autistic children had gingivitis. Children with autism exhibited a higher caries prevalence, poor oral hygiene and extensive unmet needs for dental treatment than non-autistic healthy control group. Thus oral health program that emphasizes prevention should be considered of particular importance for children and young people with autism.

  19. Patient retention at dental school clinics: a marketing perspective.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Suzanne C; Coe, Julie M

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the drivers of patient retention at dental school clinics from a services marketing perspective. An analysis of patient characteristics at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, screened between August 2010 and July 2011 (N=3604), was performed using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations, and a binary logistic regression. The main findings were that 42 percent of patients in the study were retained and that no response to communication efforts (36 percent) and financial problems (28 percent) constituted the most common reasons for non-retention. Older age, having insurance, and living within a sixty-mile radius were significant drivers of retention (p<0.05). Patients who had completed disease control treatments had a significantly higher retention rate (62 percent) than those who did not (42 percent). Finally, some groups of dental students had higher retention rates than others (p<0.05), indicating that service providers were a driver of retention. The resulting insights benefit dental schools in recruiting patients with the greatest likelihood of returning for care, providing dental students with skills to better service them, and consequently increasing retention. This will lead to providing a continuum of care and student education and to ensuring the sustainability and quality of the school's educational programs.

  20. Preventative measures for bulimic patients with dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, G; Bartlett, D

    2001-03-01

    The preventative techniques suggested to bulimic patients are frequently undervalued and ignored in favour of restorative treatment, possibly because the dentist may not be aware of the eating disorder. Educating bulimic patients about fluoride application, the use of brushing techniques, antacids, cheese, xylitol chewing gum and the possible use of mouth guards may minimise the effect of acids. Together with attempts at improving patient compliance they can be a valuable adjunct to treatment of bulimic patients with dental problems. Monitoring the wear on teeth by comparing study casts is a good way to maintain control but there are circumstances when restorations are indicated, perhaps when further delay may result in the prognosis of the teeth being compromised. Following a brief introduction to causes of bulimia and the consequences to the dentition, this paper, based on a literature review, considers patient-orientated techniques for prevention and provisional management of erosion of dental hard tissues for patients with bulimia nervosa.

  1. Oral-dental concerns of the pediatric oncology patient

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, K.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main concerns of all disciplines in health care today is maintaining the patient's quality of life and comfort during cancer therapy. Oral complications resulting from radiation or chemotherapy can be expected in a large percentage of patients. Conducting a dental evaluation and performing treatment before therapy can help prevent or lessen potential complications. With preventive care and fewer infections, the patient will be able to communicate with friends and family, and optimum care and comfort can be provided.

  2. 78 FR 79079 - Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900- 0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any correspondence....gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in...

  3. 75 FR 16912 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request... measure patients' satisfaction with VA's dental services. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on..., Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0503. OMB Control Number: 2900-New (VA Form 10-0503)....

  4. Antibiotics prescribing practices in oral implantology among jordanian dentists. A cross sectional, observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In oral implantology, there is no consensus on the most appropriate regimen for antibiotics prescribing, the decision to prescribe antibiotic is usually based on procedure, patient and clinician related factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the rationale of antibiotic prescribing among Jordanian clinicians who practice oral implantology. Findings The target sample for the study was the 250 Jordan Dental Implant Group members. A five page questionnaire contained 41 questions, both closed and open questions were used to collect data. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS Windows 16.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Descriptive statistics were generated. The response rate was (70.4%) 176/250. Mean age was 37.2 yrs, 49.4% always prescribe antibiotics mainly oral amoxicillin and amoxicillin with clavulinic acid. Antibiotics prescribing increased with flap raising, multiple implants and sinus or bone augmentation. Patient medical condition, periodontitis and oral hygiene were the most important clinical factors in antibiotic prescribing, non-clinical factors were; reading scientific materials, courses and lectures, knowledge gained during training, and the effectiveness and previous experience with the drug. Conclusions Wide variations in antibiotics types, routes, dose and duration of administration were found. Recommendations on antibiotic prescribing are needed to prevent antibiotic overprescribing and misuse. PMID:21798040

  5. Complex dental anomalies in a belatedly diagnosed cleidocranial dysplasia patient

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Zeng, Binghui; Yu, Dongsheng; Jing, Xiangyi; Hu, Bin; Wang, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare congenital disorder, typically characterized by persistently open skull sutures, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicles, and supernumerary teeth. Mutations in the gene encoding the runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) protein are responsible for approximately two thirds of CCD patients. We report a 20-year-old CCD patient presenting not only with typical skeletal changes, but also complex dental anomalies. A previously undiagnosed odontoma, 14 supernumerary teeth, a cystic lesion, and previously unreported fused primary teeth were discovered on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Mutation analysis identified the causal c.578G>A (p.R193Q) mutation in the RUNX2 gene. At 20 years of age, the patient had already missed the optimal period for dental intervention. This report describes the complex dental anomalies in a belatedly diagnosed CCD patient, and emphasizes the significance of CBCT assessment for the detection of dental anomalies and the importance of early treatment to achieve good outcomes. PMID:26389062

  6. Dental claims in the Swedish Patient Insurance Scheme.

    PubMed

    René, N; Owall, B; Cronström, R

    1991-06-01

    The Swedish Patient Insurance Scheme covers treatment injuries and guarantees the replacement of failed removable prostheses for 1 year and fixed prostheses for 2 years after fitting. In this paper, 573 dental cases are analysed for a 3-month period in 1986, during which crowns and bridges formed the vast majority of failed treatments that were reported.

  7. Consent for Dental Therapy in Severely Ill Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litch, C. Scott; Liggett, Martha L.

    1992-01-01

    Legal standards for informed consent are discussed in the context of dental care for the elderly and severely ill. Variations in state common law and legislation are analyzed, focusing on differences between practitioner-oriented and patient-oriented approaches to informed consent. Implications for educators and practitioners are examined.…

  8. Dental patient anxiety: Possible deal with Lavender fragrance

    PubMed Central

    Zabirunnisa, Md.; Gadagi, Jayaprakash S.; Gadde, Praveen; Myla, Nagamalleshwari; Koneru, Jyothirmai; Thatimatla, Chandrasekhar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The pure essence of plants (essential oils) provides both psychological and physiological benefits when used accurately and safely. Conventionally, Lavender oil is known for relaxing, carminative, and sedative effects. Hence, an attempt was made to know the effect of Lavender essential oil on dental patient anxiety. Methods: The present study included two comparison groups (Lavender and control group), each comprising five dental clinics. In Lavender group, the ambient odor of Lavender essential oil was maintained with the help of a candle warmer in the reception area and in the control group, candle warmer with normal water was used. A total of 597 patients, aged above 18 years were included. A questionnaire comprising demographic information, and a modified dental anxiety scale was given to the patients in waiting room, and data regarding anxiety levels was recorded. Findings: Student's t-test (unpaired) showed a significant reduction in anxiety scores of Lavender group compared with the control group. Analysis of variances test showed reduction in anxiety scores as age increased in Lavender group. Conclusion: Fragrance of Lavender oil at reception area may effectively reduce the patient's state or current anxiety. This practice on routine usage can improve the quality of dental treatments. PMID:25328900

  9. Osteonecrosis associated with dental implants in patients undergoing bisphosphonate treatment.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Geon; Lee, Chung-O; Park, Jin-Woo; Choi, So-Young; Rijal, Girdhari; Shin, Hong-In

    2014-05-01

    Bisphosphonate-related jaw necrosis (BRONJ) associated with dental implants is a rare but continuously reported complication. To verify clinical and pathological characteristics of BRONJ around dental implants, the present study analyzed clinical, radiographic and histopathological findings of these lesions. Nineteen patients were diagnosed with osteonecrosis of the jaw associated with dental implants and treated at our institute from 2008 to 2011. The patients' medical history, demographic features, radiographic, and histopathological findings along with information on bisphosphonates (BP) administration were analyzed. The majority of BRONJ patients associated with dental implants used oral BP for osteoporosis. The patients were divided into two groups: BP initiation before (n = 16) and after (n = 3) implant surgery. Only three patients (15.8%) could be regarded as "implant surgery-triggered" BRONJ. Many patients (n = 9) showed successful osteointegration after fixture installation to an average of 35 months (11-82 months) until the development of osteonecrosis. The histological features of the lesion showed that the necrotic bone with empty lacunae was infiltrated by inflammatory cells and bacterial colonies. Viable osteocytes were also observed in some areas of the bony specimens. Three types of bone destruction pattern were observed: (i) complete necrosis of the bone around the implant (frozen type), (ii) extensive osteolysis around the implant with or without sequestra (osteolytic type), and (iii) sequestration of bone with an implant maintaining direct implant-bone contact (en block sequestration type). These findings could be existed at the same lesions depending on the degree of local bone destruction and the severity of the infection. These results and those of others suggested that already osseointegrated dental implants can also cause the osteonecrosis around the implant after BP administration. En block sequestration of bone with implant might be one of

  10. Expanding the Lexicon: The Case of Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sa'aida, Zainab

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore (non)morphological processes that native speakers of Jordanian Urban Arabic and Jordanian Rural Arabic use to expand their own lexicon. Three Jordanian female respondents were interviewed to collect data. The data consist of transcriptions of recorded tokens, which were categorised into groups according to the…

  11. Cardiac risk stratification for postmyocardial infarction dental patients.

    PubMed

    Roberts, H W; Mitnitsky, E F

    2001-06-01

    Traditional dental management guidelines of myocardial infarction survivors mandate a 6-month waiting period before elective treatment can be considered. Technological advances in cardiac disease diagnosis, management, and revascularization treatment may make this older mandatory 6-month waiting period obsolete. The purposes of this literature review are to provide an overview of the historical development of cardiac risk stratification and discuss current developments and guidelines in cardiac risk assessment. We hope that this review and update will stimulate the development of updated dental guidelines for treating the cardiac patient.

  12. Assessment of pain among a group of Nigerian dental patients.

    PubMed

    Odai, Emeka Danielson; Ehizele, Adebola Oluyemisi; Enabulele, Joan Emien

    2015-06-19

    Pain is considered a key symptom associated with possible impairment of oral-health-related quality of life and its assessment is important for the planning and evaluation of preventive and treatment effort. The tools for assessing pain must therefore be valid and consistent. The objective of this study was to assess dental patients' level of pain based on the clinical diagnosis of their dental condition and the correlation between two pain assessment scales, Visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Full Cup Test (FCT), for the assessment of pain among dental patients. A total of 185 patients presenting at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital dental outpatient clinics with various forms of orofacial pain were included in this study. The mean VAS scores and mean FCT scores for the different dental conditions were compared. Agreement between VAS and FCT was evaluated using the Intra-class correlation (ICC) coefficients and Cronbach alpha coefficient was also calculated to assess consistency of the two pain scales. Majority i.e. 95.1, 96.2 and 100% who presented with acute pulpitis, acute apical periodontitis and pericoronitis respectively, presented with moderate to severe pain levels (p < 0.05). Only 25.9 and 4% who presented with chronic marginal gingivitis and chronic pulpitis respectively presented with no pain (p < 0.05). A large proportion (75%) of patients with no pain had single diagnosis while more than half (52.1%) of those who presented with severe pain had multiple diagnoses (p = 0.025). The mean VAS and FCT scores for acute pain were 6.1 ± 2.1 and 5.9 ± 2.4 respectively and for chronic pain 3.9 ± 2.7 and 3.7 ± 2.7 respectively (P = 0.001). The interclass correlation coefficient revealed that the mean VAS and FCT scores were statistically correlated and reliable with a Cronbach alpha coefficient of 0.85. It can be concluded that patients who presented with either acute or chronic dental conditions may experience moderate to severe level of pain, with

  13. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Dental Surgeons in managing Child Patients.

    PubMed

    Wali, Aisha; Siddiqui, Talha Mufeed; Khan, Rabia; Batool, Kanza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Karachi providing treatment to pediatric patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Karachi providing treatment to pediatric patients. A cluster-sampling technique was used and 200 dental surgeons from six different dental institutions were selected. A self-constructed questionnaire was distributed to the dental surgeons that comprised 20 closed-ended questions. The data was entered and analyzed for frequency and percentages by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19. The results showed that 76 (38%) dental surgeons took the responsibility of managing pediatric patient when given; 68 (34%) dental surgeons allowed the parents in the clinic; 111 (55.5%) dental surgeons are of the view that colorful and fun environment in dental clinic make the child at ease; 59 (29.5%) always demonstrate the dental procedure to the child to eradicate imaginary fears; 94 (47.0%) dental surgeons preferred the child to be treated in general anesthesia (GA) to avoid difficult behavior of the child; 135 (67.5%) dental surgeons did not show syringe needle or any instrument to the child. All the members of dental profession must be aware of patient perceptions, preferences, and fear to meet patient's needs. Dental studies should include guidelines and techniques to train the upcoming dentists for excellent practice in pediatric dentistry.

  14. Dental manifestations of patient with vitamin D-resistant rickets.

    PubMed

    Souza, Andréia Pereira; Kobayashi, Tatiana Yuriko; Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Silva, Salete Moura Bonifácio; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Vitamin D-resistant rickets have abnormal tooth morphology such as thin globular dentin and enlarged pulp horns that extend into the dentino-enamel junction. Invasion of the pulp by microorganisms and toxins is inevitable. The increased fibrotic content of the pulp, together with a reduced number of odontoblasts, decreases the response to pulp infection. The most important oral findings are characterized by spontaneous gingival and dental abscesses occuring without history of trauma or caries. Radiographic examinations revealed large pulp chambers, short roots, poorly defined lamina dura and hypoplastic alveolar ridge. These dental abscesses are common and therefore the extraction and pulpectomy are the treatment of choice. The purpose of this article is to report a case of Vitamin D-resistant rickets in a 5 year-old boy, describing the dental findings and the treatment to be performed in these cases.

  15. Dental manifestations of patient with Vitamin D-resistant rickets

    PubMed Central

    SOUZA, Andréia Pereira; KOBAYASHI, Tatiana Yuriko; LOURENÇO NETO, Natalino; SILVA, Salete Moura Bonifácio; MACHADO, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; OLIVEIRA, Thais Marchini

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Vitamin D-resistant rickets have abnormal tooth morphology such as thin globular dentin and enlarged pulp horns that extend into the dentino-enamel junction. Invasion of the pulp by microorganisms and toxins is inevitable. The increased fibrotic content of the pulp, together with a reduced number of odontoblasts, decreases the response to pulp infection. The most important oral findings are characterized by spontaneous gingival and dental abscesses occuring without history of trauma or caries. Radiographic examinations revealed large pulp chambers, short roots, poorly defined lamina dura and hypoplastic alveolar ridge. These dental abscesses are common and therefore the extraction and pulpectomy are the treatment of choice. The purpose of this article is to report a case of Vitamin D-resistant rickets in a 5 year-old boy, describing the dental findings and the treatment to be performed in these cases. PMID:24473729

  16. Dental management of patients taking novel oral anticoagulants (NOAs): Dabigatran

    PubMed Central

    Albaladejo, Alberto; Alvarado, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Background A new group of oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) with clear advantages over classic dicoumarin oral anticoagulants (warfarin and acenocoumarol) has been developed in recent years. Patients being treated with oral anticoagulants are at higher risk for bleeding when undergoing dental treatments. Material and Methods A literature search was conducted through April 2016 for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed and Cochrane Library using the keywords “dabigatran”, “rivaroxaban”, “apixaban”, “edoxaban”, “new oral anticoagulants”, “novel oral anticoagulants”, “bleeding” and “dental treatment”. Results There is no need for regular coagulation monitoring of patients on dabigatran therapy. Whether or not to temporarily discontinue dabigatran must be assessed according to the bleeding risk involved in the dental procedure to be performed. Conclusions The number of patients under treatment with new oral anticoagulants will increase in the coming years. It is essential to know about the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of new oral anticoagulants and about their interactions with other drugs. It is necessary to develop clinical guidelines for the perioperative and postoperative management of these new oral anticoagulants in oral surgical procedures, and to carefully evaluate the bleeding risk of dental treatment, as well as the thrombotic risk of suppressing the new oral anticoagulant. Key words:Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, novel oral anticoagulants, bleeding. PMID:28210451

  17. Dental extraction in patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Palomino, Paulino; Sánchez-Cobo, Paulino; Rodriguez-Archilla, Alberto; González-Jaranay, Maximino; Moreu, Gerardo; Calvo-Guirado, José-Luis; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background Dual anti platelet therapy consists of administering antiplatelet (antiaggregant) drugs (clopidogrel and aspirin) to prevent thrombotic processes, as a preventative measure in patients with acute coronary disease, or in patients subjected to percutaneous coronary intervention. Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a protocol for performing dental extraction in patients receiving dual anti platelet therapy. Material and Methods Thirty-two patients undergoing dental extractions were included in the study. The variables evaluated were: collagen-epinephrine fraction, collagen- adenosine diphosphate fraction, surgical surface, post-surgical measures, and adverse effects. Alveolar sutures and gauzes impregnated with an antifibrinolytic agent (tranexamic acid), which the patient pressed in place for 30 minutes, were applied to all patients as post-surgical measures. Descriptive statistics were calculated and analyzed with Student’s t-test to compare pairs of quantitative variables; simple regression analysis was performed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results Collagen/epinephrine fraction was 264.53±55.624 seconds with a range of 135 to 300 seconds, and collagen/ADP fraction was 119.41±44.216 seconds, both values being higher than normal. As a result of the post-surgical measures taken, no patients presented postoperative bleeding, hematoma or infection. Conclusions Dental extraction was safe for patients receiving dual anti-platelet therapy when using sutures and gauze impregnated with tranexamic acid, which the patient pressed in place for 30 minutes. Key words: Aspirin, clopidogrel, tranexamic acid, dental extraction, platelet function. PMID:26241454

  18. Assessment of dental students’ communication skills with patients

    PubMed Central

    MEMARPOUR, MAHTAB; BAZRAFKAN, LEILA; ZAREI, ZAHRA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Establishment of effective communication between the clinician and patient is essential in order to increase the effectiveness of treatment. These skills have been less investigated among dental students. This study aimed to evaluate communication skills of dental students in Shiraz with patients through direct observation, patients' perspectives and students' self-assessments. Methods This cross-sectional study enrolled the fifth and sixth year dental students and one of each student’s patients who was chosen using simple random sampling method. We used a checklist for data collection. Students’ communication skills were assessed at three steps of the student-patient interview – at the beginning of the interview, during the interview, and at the end of the interview. The checklist was completed by three groups: 1) an observer, 2) the patient and 3) the student, as self-assessment. The validity of the checklist was confirmed by clinical professors and the reliability was determined by Cronbach's alpha test. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Student’s t test. A repeated measure MANOVA was used to compare the mean communication skills in the researcher, patients, and students at each step of the patient interviews. Results There were 110 students (mean age: 22.3±8.4 years) and 110 patients (mean age: 32±8.8 years) who completed the checklists. Overall, the communication skills of dental students were rated as good according to the patients. However, the observer and student participants rated the skills at the moderate level. We observed significant differences between communication skills in all three groups and in the three steps of the patient interviews (p<0.001). According to patients' beliefs and students' self assessments, there were no differences between male and female students in communication skills in the three steps of the patient interviews (all p>0.05). However from the observer’s viewpoint, female students

  19. Oynophagia in patients after dental extraction: surface electromyography study.

    PubMed

    Vaiman, Michael; Nahlieli, Oded; Eliav, Eli

    2006-10-17

    Surface electromyographic (sEMG) studies were performed on 40 adult patients following extraction of lower third and second molars to research the approach and limitations of sEMG evaluation of their odynophagia complaints. Parameters evaluated during swallowing and drinking include the timing, number of swallows per 100 cc of water, and range (amplitude) of EMG activity of m. masseter, infrahyoid and submental-submandibular group. The above mentioned variables (mean + standard deviation) were measured for the group of dental patients (n = 40) and control group of healthy adults (n = 40). The duration of swallows and drinking in all tests showed increase in dental patients' group, in which this tendency is statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference between male and female adults' duration and amplitude of muscle activity during continuous drinking in both groups (p = 0.05). The mean of electric activity (in muV) of m. masseter was significantly lower in the dental patients' group in comparison with control group. The electric activity of submental-submandimular and infrahyoid muscle groups was the same in both groups. Surface EMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable noninvasive method for evaluation of odynophagia/dysphagia complaints following dental extraction with low level of discomfort of the examination. The surface EMG studies prove that dysphagia following dental extraction and molar surgery has oral origin, does not affect pharingeal segment and submental-submandibular muscle group. This type of dysphagia has clear EMG signs: increased duration of single swallow, longer drinking time, low range of electric activity of m. masseter, normal range of activity of submental-submandibular muscle group, and the "dry swalow" aftereffect. The data can be used for evaluation of complaints and symptoms, as well as for comparison purposes in pre- and postoperative stages and in EMG monitoring during treatment of post-surgical oral

  20. An update on local anesthesia for pediatric dental patients

    PubMed Central

    Peedikayil, Faizal C.; Vijayan, Ajoy

    2013-01-01

    Pain control is an important part of dentistry, particularly in the management of children. Behavior guidance, and dose and technique of administration of the local anesthetic are important considerations in the successful treatment of a pediatric patient. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the relevant data on topics involved, and on the current methods available in the administration of local anesthesia used for pediatric dental patients. PMID:25885712

  1. Microbial profiling of dental plaque from mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Sands, Kirsty M; Twigg, Joshua A; Lewis, Michael A O; Wise, Matt P; Marchesi, Julian R; Smith, Ann; Wilson, Melanie J; Williams, David W

    2016-02-01

    Micro-organisms isolated from the oral cavity may translocate to the lower airways during mechanical ventilation (MV) leading to ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Changes within the dental plaque microbiome during MV have been documented previously, primarily using culture-based techniques. The aim of this study was to use community profiling by high throughput sequencing to comprehensively analyse suggested microbial changes within dental plaque during MV. Bacterial 16S rDNA gene sequences were obtained from 38 samples of dental plaque sampled from 13 mechanically ventilated patients and sequenced using the Illumina platform. Sequences were processed using Mothur, applying a 97% gene similarity cut-off for bacterial species level identifications. A significant 'microbial shift' occurred in the microbial community of dental plaque during MV for nine out of 13 patients. Following extubation, or removal of the endotracheal tube that facilitates ventilation, sampling revealed a decrease in the relative abundance of potential respiratory pathogens and a compositional change towards a more predominantly (in terms of abundance) oral microbiota including Prevotella spp., and streptococci. The results highlight the need to better understand microbial shifts in the oral microbiome in the development of strategies to reduce VAP, and may have implications for the development of other forms of pneumonia such as community-acquired infection.

  2. Microbial profiling of dental plaque from mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, Joshua A.; Lewis, Michael A. O.; Wise, Matt P.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Smith, Ann; Wilson, Melanie J.; Williams, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Micro-organisms isolated from the oral cavity may translocate to the lower airways during mechanical ventilation (MV) leading to ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Changes within the dental plaque microbiome during MV have been documented previously, primarily using culture-based techniques. The aim of this study was to use community profiling by high throughput sequencing to comprehensively analyse suggested microbial changes within dental plaque during MV. Bacterial 16S rDNA gene sequences were obtained from 38 samples of dental plaque sampled from 13 mechanically ventilated patients and sequenced using the Illumina platform. Sequences were processed using Mothur, applying a 97 % gene similarity cut-off for bacterial species level identifications. A significant ‘microbial shift’ occurred in the microbial community of dental plaque during MV for nine out of 13 patients. Following extubation, or removal of the endotracheal tube that facilitates ventilation, sampling revealed a decrease in the relative abundance of potential respiratory pathogens and a compositional change towards a more predominantly (in terms of abundance) oral microbiota including Prevotella spp., and streptococci. The results highlight the need to better understand microbial shifts in the oral microbiome in the development of strategies to reduce VAP, and may have implications for the development of other forms of pneumonia such as community-acquired infection. PMID:26690690

  3. Electronic dental anesthesia in a patient with suspected allergy to local anesthetics: report of case.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F; Quinn, C L

    1988-01-01

    A 56-year-old patient with alleged allergy to local anesthetics required restorative dental treatment. Electronic dental anesthesia was used successfully, in lieu of injectable local anesthetics, to manage intraoperative pain associated with the restoration of vital mandibular teeth.

  4. Survey of Infection Control Policies within Dental/Educational Patient Treatment Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Keith Winfield

    1986-01-01

    The article describes a survey of 36 dental education programs to identify educators' reactive policies and procedures in their patient treatment centers to minimize dental contamination and cross-contamination. (Author/CT)

  5. Adenotonsillectomy in facial growing patients: spontaneous dental effects.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Silvia Regina Amorim; Bakor, Silvia Fuerte; Weckx, Luc Louis Maurice

    2011-01-01

    Children with hypertrophic tonsils and adenoids may have adverse effects on dental occlusion, which tend to worsen during the growth period. Diagnosis and early treatment is essential. Prospective clinical study to compare the cephalometric measurements before and after adenotonsillectomy in mouth breathing patients. We had 38 patients of both genders, aged between 7 and 11 years in our sample, broken down into: oral group, 18 patients with obstructive hypertrophy of pharyngeal tonsil and/or palate grade 3 or 4; control group, 20 patients with normal breathing. Angular and linear dental measurements were compared between the groups in a 14 months interval. We used the "t" Student and Wilcoxon tests for unpaired samples, at 5% significance, for statistical purposes. The sagittal position and axial angle of the lower incisors increased significantly in the group with oral breathing, the sagittal position of the upper incisors increased significantly in the oral group, which still had a significant increase in overbite. Adenotonsillectomy was very effective in improving some dental measurements, with benefits to growing patients preventing malocclusions from becoming difficult to treat or permanent.

  6. Association between dental anomalies and malocclusion in Brazilian orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Pedreira, Fernanda R de O; de Carli, Marina L; Pedreira, Renato do P G; Ramos, Patrícia de S; Pedreira, Marcelo R; Robazza, Carlos Roberto C; Hanemann, João Adolfo C

    2016-01-01

    Developmental dental anomalies have been associated with different malocclusions in various populations. This study verified this association in Brazilian non-syndromic orthodontic patients. The prevalence of dental anomalies was evaluated by examining 2,052 pretreatment records of orthodontic patients. Panoramic radiographs, study designs, intraoral photographs and medical history were collected in order to identify hypodontia, hyperdontia, microdontia, macrodontia, taurodontism, transposition, impaction, and ectopia. Epidemiological data and classification of malocclusion were also obtained. Data were analyzed using chi-square and Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05), and the prevalence ratio was obtained from cases that had a significant association between anomaly and malocclusion. The results showed that 27.4% of the patients evaluated had some dental anomaly, and most of them were white women aged 11-20 years. Ectopia, microdontia, impaction, and hypodontia were more prevalent in patients with Class I malocclusion. Macrodontia was the only anomaly associated with Class II division 1. Impaction was associated with Class III malocclusion, at a 1.84-times higher prevalence. In conclusion, impaction was correlated with Class I malocclusion; macrodontia showed association with Class II division 1; and impaction and ectopia were associated with Class III malocclusion in Brazilian orthodontic patients. (J Oral Sci 58, 75-81, 2016).

  7. Identification of medically compromised dental patients in a Portuguese population.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Helder José; Quintanilla, José Maria

    2013-01-01

    The age of the patients, the presence of one or more chronic disorders and the patients' drug regimens can influence dental treatment and oral health. This is a prospective, descriptive study to identify subjects with compromised health who received dental treatment between November 2010 and June 2011 at private dental practices run by graduates of the Portuguese Catholic University. Application software in Microsoft Excel was developed containing the questionnaire, based on the EMRRH (European medical risk related history), which allowed the collection of data from 1603 adult patients. Microsoft Excel, G*Power and SPSS V.18 were used for statistical treatment. The five most frequent medical conditions found were: 1) hypertension, 21.0%; 2) arrhythmias, 11.2%; 3) Angina pectoris, 8.3%; 4) allergies, 77%; 5) thyroid disease, 6.2%. The medications taken related to these were: a) antihypertensives, 11.0%; b) antidepressants, anxiolytics and hypnotics, 10.6%; c) acetylsalicylic acid, 4.2%; d) antiarrhythmic and sympathomimetic drugs, 4.1%; e) haemostatic treatment, 3.6%. 42.7% of the patients had no medical risks, 32.9% were classified as ASA II, 11.7% as ASA III and 12.7% as ASA IV. This study emphasises the importance of often-neglected anamnesis in oral care. The high prevalence of patients with medical conditions should be continuously studied to verify the changes over time and should be expanded to other regions and countries.

  8. Differences in knowledge related to dental implants between patients with and without a treatment history of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Ken, Yukawa; Tachikawa, Noriko; Kasugai, Shohei

    2017-09-01

    This aim of this study was to investigate the differences between patients with and without a treatment history of dental implants by use of a questionnaire survey in order to determine the information that is required for patients undergoing dental implants. The questionnaires were given to 4512 patients who visited the Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital for oral implants between January 2012 and December 2014, and 2972 (66%) valid questionnaires were collected. There were 857 patients with a treatment history of dental implants and 2115 patients without. "Preservation of an adjacent tooth" was the reason that 32% of these patients chose implant therapy, and the patients without treatment history were significantly higher than the patients with one. Significantly, more patients without a treatment history of dental implants selected the after-effects of surgery and pain after surgery as their main concerns for implant therapy compared to those with a treatment history. In the question "Pain after surgery," the patients without treatment history did not know significantly lower than the patients with one. Patients without a treatment history of dental implants placed more importance on the preservation of healthy teeth. Because patients, in particular those without a treatment history of dental implants, are anxious about surgery, we should provide them with more information on treatment than we already do and explain the risks of treatment to them. To keep the credence between doctors and patients, informed consent and patient education on treatment are six important concerns. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Dental findings in patients with West syndrome: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Amit; Kalra, Namita; Tyagi, Rishi; Baweja, Mani; Khandelwal, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    West syndrome a rare, severe form of epilepsy occurs in early infancy. It is characterized by a triad consisting of infantile spasms that occurs in clusters, arrest of psychomotor development and hypsarrhythmia on electroencephalogram. We present here two cases of west syndrome where patients required dental care due to the presence of certain dental findings. Preventive measurements such as controlled diet and proper oral hygiene along with professional dental management are recommended in patients with west syndrome to avoid dental problems.

  10. DENTAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR LEUKEMIC PEDIATRIC PATIENTS: AN UPDATED REVIEW FOR GENERAL DENTAL PRACTITIONER

    PubMed Central

    Lowal, Kholoud A.; Alaizari, Nader Ahmed; Tarakji, Bassel; Petro, Waleed; Hussain, Khaja Amjad; Altamimi, Mohamed Abdullah Alsakran

    2015-01-01

    The early signs of leukemia can usually manifest in the oral cavity due to infiltration of leukemic cells or due to associated decline in normal marrow elements, especially in the acute phase of leukemia, as common lesions at this stage of the disease can be screened and diagnosed by the dentist. Therefore, the dental community should be aware of the oral manifestations of leukemia and oral complications of anticancer treatment. This can eliminate the oral symptoms of the disease and to improve quality of life for these patients. An extensive search in PubMed line using a combination of terms like “leukemia, children, dental, Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric” for last ten years was made. Reviews and case reports concerned about acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children were all collected and analyzed and data were extracted. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight on the oral presentations of leukemia in children attending dental clinics and the management of its undesirable side effects. PMID:26622207

  11. Understanding Muslim patients: cross-cultural dental hygiene care.

    PubMed

    Sirois, M L; Darby, M; Tolle, S

    2013-05-01

    Healthcare providers who understand the basic pillars of Islamic beliefs and common religious practices can apply these concepts, anticipate the needs of the Muslim patient and family, and attract Muslim patients to the practice. Cross cultural knowledge can motivate dental hygienists to adopt culturally acceptable behaviors, strengthen patient-provider relationships and optimize therapeutic outcomes. Trends in Muslim population growth, Islamic history and beliefs, modesty practices, healthcare beliefs, contraception, childbearing, childrearing, pilgrimage, dietary practices, dental care considerations and communication are explained. This paper reviews traditional Muslim beliefs and practices regarding lifestyle, customs, healthcare and religion as derived from the literature and study abroad experiences. Recommendations are offered on how to blend western healthcare with Islamic practices when making introductions, appointments, eye contact, and selecting a practitioner. The significance of fasting and how dental hygiene care can invalidate the fast are also discussed. The ultimate goal is for practitioners to be culturally competent in providing care to Muslim patients, while keeping in mind that beliefs and practices can vary widely within a culture. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Dental treatment for handicapped patients; sedation vs general anesthesia and update of dental treatment in patients with different diseases

    PubMed Central

    Corcuera-Flores, José R.; Delgado-Muñoz, José M.; Ruiz-Villandiego, José C.; Maura-Solivellas, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Dental treatment on Handicapped Patients is often difficult because many people with a wide range of ages (from children to the elderly) with different pathologies that can affect the oral cavity and differ widely are included in this group. This situation creates some controversy, because according to pathology, each patient will be treated differently depending on collaboration, general health status, age or medication used to treat this pathologies. According to this situation we can opt for an outpatient treatment without any kind of previous medication, a treatment under conscious or deep sedation or a under general anesthesia treatment. With this systematic review is intended to help clarify in which cases patients should be treated under general anesthesia, sedation (conscious or deep) or outpatient clinic without any medication, as well as clarify what kind of treatments can be carried in private dental clinics and which should be carried out in a hospital. It will also discuss the most common diseases among this group of patients and the special care to be taken for their dental treatment. Key words:Hospital dentistry, handicapped patient. PMID:24121922

  13. Dental management in patients with antiplatelet therapy: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sola-Martín, Cristina; Molinero-Mourelle, Pedro; Paredes-Rodríguez, Victor; Zarrias-Caballero, Carmen; Hernández-Vallejo, Gonzalo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular diseases are the most frequent cause of death in the Western world. Its treatment frequently needs therapy with antiplatelet agents, which increases the haemorrhage risk after oral surgical procedures. The aim of this study is to present a review on the dental management of the patients under antiplatelet treatment. Material and Methods A systematic review was carried out following PRISMA recommendations including studies searched in Pubmed-Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases. Results The current trend is to maintain the treatment during the surgical procedure, assuring a good control of the haemorrhage with local haemostatic measures. However, new antiplatelet drugs protocols are not firmly established. Conclusions In spite of the existing recommendations, it is always advisable to consult with the internist or cardiologist of every patient before any intervention. Key words:Antiplatelet, Oral Surgery, Exodontia, Dental Management. PMID:28936297

  14. Dental anesthetic management of a patient with ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Miller, R A; Siegelman, L I

    1998-01-01

    During routine deep sedation for endodontic therapy, a dentist-anesthesiologist observed premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) on a 62-yr-old woman's electrocardiogram (EKG) tracing. The dentist was able to complete the root canal procedure under intravenous (i.v.) sedation without any problems. The dentist-anesthesiologist referred the patient for medical evaluation. She was found to be free from ischemic cardiac disease with normal ventricular function. The patient was cleared to continue her dental treatment with deep sedation. She subsequently continued to undergo dental treatment with deep intravenous sedation without incident, although her EKG exhibited frequent PVCs, up to 20 per minute, including couplets and episodes of trigeminy. This article will review indications for medical intervention, antiarrhythmic medications, and anesthetic interventions for perioperative PVCs.

  15. Dental care access for low-income and immigrant cancer patients in New York City.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jocelyn R; Ramirez, Julia; Li, Yuelin; Gany, Francesca

    2015-02-01

    This exploratory study assesses the dental care needs and access of low-income, mostly immigrant cancer patients enrolled in New York City's Integrated Cancer Care Action Network (ICCAN). A nested cohort of patients from ICCAN responded to a dental needs assessment that surveyed current dental health as well as access to, and use of, dental services. 373 patients participated. Self-report of having a dentist to visit, current dental problems, income, and insurance most significantly predicted a dentist visit in the past year. Discussing treatment-related oral side effects with the oncologist greatly increased the likelihood of seeing a dentist, but few patients reported having had this conversation. There is a lack of oral care information flowing from oncologists to low income patients. We found a high number of reported dental problems: concerning because of potential treatment interference and risk for infection. Finally, ability to pay largely determined dental care access in our study participants.

  16. [Use of hypnosis in treating a patient with dental anxiety: A case study].

    PubMed

    Meyerson, J; Ratson, T

    2015-10-01

    Dental anxiety is quite common and may lead to dental neglect due to lack of regular visits to the dental clinic. The difficulties in managing anxious patients are characterized by prolonged visits, a tendency to cancel appointments and a tense atmo- sphere during treatment. The use of hypnosis while treating an anxious patient can help create a posi- tive environment and shorten the duration of dental appointments as well. The article describes a case in which hypnosis was used while treating a patient who had suffered from dental anxiety for over 20 years.

  17. Controversial issues in treating the dental patient with autism.

    PubMed

    Rada, Robert E

    2010-08-01

    The author conducted a literature review to investigate concerns that parents of a child with an autism spectrum disorder may have when oral health care is provided to the child. The author conducted a search of PubMed using the terms "mercury," "fluoride," "nitrous oxide," "antibiotics," "gluten," "casein," "acetaminophen" and "dentistry" each with the term "autism." He identified controlled studies and literature reviews in both medical and alternative medical literature that were related to areas of importance to oral health care workers. The use of mercury, fluoride, nitrous oxide, antibiotic agents and acetaminophen all are sources of controversy between dentistry and the parents of children who have autism. The author found that patients who have autism frequently also have allergies, immune system problems, gastrointestinal disturbances and seizures. Dental health care workers must be aware of these comorbid conditions so they can provide optimal care to the children with autism spectrum disorders. The author found two distinct theories as to what causes autism: one that focuses on genetic causes, and one that focuses on the impact of the environment. He found that the interpretation of these theories might affect parents' concerns about various dental treatments. Dentists treating patients who have autism may need to provide more than standard patient care, as the use of time-tested dental treatment and prevention modalities may be questioned or refused by parents.

  18. Dental school patients with limited English proficiency: the California experience.

    PubMed

    Itaya, Lisa E; Glassman, Paul; Gregorczyk, Suzanne; Bailit, Howard L

    2009-09-01

    California is home to one-third of the U.S. population with limited English proficiency (LEP). Studies indicate that treating LEP patients without professional interpreters can result in miscommunication, decreased patient satisfaction, and serious medical errors. To address this problem, federal laws require all health care institutions receiving federal monies to provide interpretation services to their LEP patients at no cost to the patient. In this study we surveyed 122 students and fifty-six faculty members from the five California dental schools with respect to number, communication strategies, impact on education and clinic finances, and student and faculty perceptions regarding serving LEP patients in their clinics. Over 50 percent of students surveyed spoke a foreign language either fluently or moderately fluently. Students reported that about 10 percent of their patients required interpreters, that untrained interpreters (e.g., family, friends, bilingual students) worked adequately, but that LEP patients were more difficult to treat. To comply with federal laws, dental schools are confronted with the challenge of covering the cost of providing language services to LEP patients.

  19. Awareness of Mouth Cancer Among Adult Dental Patients Attending the Kuwait University Dental School Clinic.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Bobby K; Ali, Mohammad A; Sundaram, Devipriya B

    2016-09-08

    In Kuwait, the age-standardized incidence rate (per 100,000) for oral cancer is 1.5 and the mortality rate is 0.4. Early detection of oral cancer combined with appropriate treatment greatly improves the chances of cure and the quality of life. However, little is known about patient awareness of this disease and the ability to identify early signs, particularly among high-risk groups. Hence, the aim of this study is to assess dental patients' awareness and knowledge of mouth cancer and beliefs and perceptions about risk factors. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from a convenience sample of outpatients attending the dental admission clinic. The questionnaire included questions to ascertain information on socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge of risk factors, and signs of oral cancer as well as sources of information regarding the same. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences for Windows 19.0. A total of 160 questionnaires were distributed out of which 136 completed questionnaires were returned and used for the study. The mean knowledge score for oral cancer risk factors was found to be 5.2 ± 2.7 out of ten while that of signs and symptoms was 3.4 ± 2.7 out of eight. When the knowledge of risk factors of oral cancer was taken into consideration along with variables, significant difference was seen only in sex with women having better knowledge (p = 0.03). Knowledge about signs and symptoms of oral cancer revealed a highly significant difference with the level of education (p = 0.03). Family, friends, and colleagues were mentioned as the main source of information regarding oral cancer. Our findings suggest that knowledge regarding oral cancer risk factors, signs, and symptoms was found to be lacking among the dental patients which emphasizes the need for patient education at the dental centers as well as public awareness programs.

  20. An evaluation of the PALS after treatment modelling intervention to reduce dental anxiety in child dental patients.

    PubMed

    Howard, Karen E; Freeman, Ruth

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the passivity to activity through live symbolic (PALS) after treatment modelling intervention to reduce child dental anxiety. A convenience sample of consecutive 5- to 10-year-old dental patients were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. Self-reported child dental anxiety was assessed at the start of each visit. At the end of each visit, children in the intervention group were introduced to a glove puppet, which acted as the PALS model. The intervention group children re-enacted the treatment they had just received on the puppet's teeth. At the end of each visit, the control children received motivational rewards only. The change in dental anxiety scores was examined by t-tests and analysis of covariance. The final analysis included 27 intervention children and 26 control children. For the intervention group, there were no statistically significant changes in dental anxiety over a course of treatment, between first and second preventive visits, between first and second invasive treatment visits, or between first attendance and subsequent recall attendance. For the control group, a statistically significant decrease in dental anxiety was observed between the first and second invasive dental treatment visits. The PALS after treatment modelling intervention was ineffective in reducing child dental anxiety.

  1. Nigerian dental students' willingness to treat HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Azodo, Clement Chinedu; Ehigiator, Osarobo; Oboro, Helen Oziofu; Ehizele, Adebola Oluyemisi; Umoh, Agnes; Ezeja, Ejike Bartholomew; Omili, Michael; Ehigiator, Laura

    2010-04-01

    Dental care of HIV-positive individuals plays a vital role in improving their nutritional intake, medication tolerance and effectiveness, treatment success rate, and quality of life. It is therefore important to ensure optimal dental care of this group of people, especially since more of them, with or without knowledge of their serologic status, are now utilizing dental services. The objective of this study was to assess Nigerian dental students' willingness to treat HIV-positive individuals. A descriptive cross-sectional survey of all seventy-six final-year dental students of the University of Benin, Nigeria, was conducted in December 2007 using a self-administered questionnaire that elicited information on the students' demography, self-rated knowledge on HIV/AIDS, attitude towards homosexuals, infection control practices, occupational risk perception, and willingness to provide care for HIV-positive individuals. The response rate was 76.3 percent. Over 77 percent of the respondents were in the twenty-five to thirty years age group. The male-female ratio was approximately 1.6:1. HIV-related knowledge was reported as high by only 31 percent of the respondents. Eighty-one percent showed great interest in HIV-related information, while about half (53.4 percent) exhibited significant worry about occupational contagion. Forty-eight (82.7 percent) desired more knowledge about safety precautions during treatment of HIV patients. Fifty respondents (86.2 percent) reported good infection control practices. About three-fourths (74.2 percent) rated the risk of HIV contagion from patients high, while only one-fourth (25.8 percent) reported having an unsympathetic attitude towards homosexuals. Almost all respondents (98.3 percent) agreed that oral care for HIV-positive individuals improves their quality of life, but only 58.8 percent expressed a willingness to treat HIV-positive patients and only 46.5 percent said they will render volunteer dental services in HIV centers. HIV

  2. Dental treatment for handicapped patients; sedation vs general anesthesia and update of dental treatment in patients with different diseases.

    PubMed

    Corcuera-Flores, J-R; Delgado-Muñoz, J-M; Ruiz-Villandiego, J-C; Maura-Solivellas, I; Machuca-Portillo, G

    2014-03-01

    Dental treatment on Handicapped Patients is often difficult because many people with a wide range of ages (from children to the elderly) with different pathologies that can affect the oral cavity and differ widely are included in this group. This situation creates some controversy, because according to pathology, each patient will be treated differently depending on collaboration, general health status, age or medication used to treat this pathologies. According to this situation we can opt for an outpatient treatment without any kind of previous medication, a treatment under conscious or deep sedation or a under general anesthesia treatment. With this systematic review is intended to help clarify in which cases patients should be treated under general anesthesia, sedation (conscious or deep) or outpatient clinic without any medication, as well as clarify what kind of treatments can be carried in private dental clinics and which should be carried out in a hospital. It will also discuss the most common diseases among this group of patients and the special care to be taken for their dental treatment.

  3. Dental screening of medical patients for oral infections and inflammation: consideration of risk and benefit.

    PubMed

    Maret, Delphine; Peters, Ove A; Vigarios, Emmanuelle; Epstein, Joel B; van der Sluis, Lucas

    2017-02-01

    The primary purpose of preoperative dental screening of medical patients is to detect acute or chronic oral conditions that may require management prior to planned medical interventions. The aim of this communication is to discuss the background of preoperative dental screening and the link between dental pathologies and systemic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Dental patients' perceptions and motivation in smoking cessation activities.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Pia; Johannsen, Annsofi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate smokers' perceptions of and motivation for smoking cessation activities in dentistry. MATERIALS AND METHODS PATIENTS: who smoked were consecutively recruited from general as well as specialist dental care clinics in Sweden. After a dental visit the patients completed a questionnaire about self-perceived oral health, smoking habits, motivation, reasons to quit and not to quit smoking, support to quit, smoking cessation activities and questions about smoking asked by dentists and dental hygienists. The sample consisted of 167 adult patients (≥ 20 years) who smoked daily. During the last 6 months, 81% of the patients had experienced oral health problems. The most common complaints were discolourations of the teeth, periodontal problems and dry mouth (38%, 36% and 33%, respectively). Improved general health was a major reason to quit smoking (89%). It was also stated that it was important to avoid oral health problems. 71% of the patients preferred to quit by themselves and 16% wanted support from dentistry. High motivation to quit smoking was reported by 20%. Occurrence of periodontitis during the last 6 months was significantly associated with being highly motivated to stop smoking (OR = 3.0, 95% CI = 1.03-8.55). This study revealed that, although it was important to quit smoking to avoid oral health problems, the patients were not aware that tobacco cessation activities can be performed in dentistry. Periodontal problems seem to be the most motivating factor among the patients who were highly motivated to stop smoking.

  5. Strategies for communicating with older dental patients.

    PubMed

    Stein, Pamela S; Aalboe, Joanna A; Savage, Matthew W; Scott, Allison M

    2014-02-01

    Communication between dentists and patients 65 years or older is a critical aspect of providing optimum care, particularly given the increasing number of older adults and the communication barriers they often encounter. The authors conducted a targeted literature review of the broad health communication literature and published health literacy guidelines to examine the barriers to effective communication that are specific to the older adult population, as well as strategies for overcoming these barriers. Findings from health communication and health literacy research provide insight into techniques to improve communication with older patients, such as preparing an agenda for the appointment, exhibiting warm nonverbal behavior, listening attentively, asking open-ended questions, using simple language, presenting key points one at a time and providing patients with written instructions. Physical, psychological and literacy issues pertaining to both patients and providers present barriers to effective communication. Practitioners can surmount these barriers by enacting communication strategies tailored to older adults. Practical Implications. Dentists can overcome barriers to communication and improve the quality of patient care by considering the communication barriers specific to older adults and enacting strategies to overcome these barriers.

  6. Composition of enamel pellicle from dental erosion patients.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, G; Cotroneo, E; Moazzez, R; Rojas-Serrano, M; Donaldson, N; Austin, R; Zaidel, L; Bartlett, D; Proctor, G

    2014-01-01

    Oral health is dependent upon a thin mobile film of saliva on soft and hard tissues. Salivary proteins adhere to teeth to form the acquired enamel pellicle which is believed to protect teeth from acid erosion. This study investigated whether patients suffering diet-induced dental erosion had altered enamel pellicles. Thirty patients suffering erosion were compared to healthy age-matched controls. Subjects wore a maxillary splint holding hydroxyapatite and human enamel blocks for 1 h. The acquired enamel pellicle was removed from the blocks and compared to the natural incisor pellicle. Basic Erosive Wear Examination scores confirmed that dental erosion was present in erosion patients and absent from healthy age-matched controls. Erosion patients had half the amount of proteins (BCA assay) within the acquired pellicle forming on splint blocks compared to normal controls (p < 0.05). In particular, statherin, a calcium-binding protein, was 35% less abundant (p < 0.05). Calcium concentration within the acquired pellicle was also reduced by 50% in erosion patients (p < 0.001). In contrast, the natural pellicle on the incisor had similar amounts of total protein in erosion patients and healthy controls. In summary, the formation of new acquired pellicles on surfaces was reduced in erosion patients, which may explain their greater susceptibility to acid erosion of teeth.

  7. Doses to patients from dental radiology in France

    SciTech Connect

    Benedittini, M.; Maccia, C.; Lefaure, C.; Fagnani, F. )

    1989-06-01

    In France, a national study was undertaken to estimate both dental radiology practices (equipment and activity) and the associated population collective dose. This study was done in two steps: A nationwide survey was conducted on the practitioner categories involved in dental radiology, and dosimetric measurements were performed on patients and on an anthropomorphic phantom by using conventional dental x-ray machines and pantomographic units. A total of 27.5 x 10(6) films were estimated to have been performed in 1984; 6% of them were pantomographic and 94% were conventional. Most of the organ doses measured for one intra-oral film were lower than 1 mGy (100 mrad); pantomogram dose values were generally higher than intra-oral ones. The collective effective dose equivalent figure was 2,000 person-Sv (2 x 10(5) person rem) leading to a per head dose equivalent of 0.037 mSv (3.7 mrem). The study allowed authors to identify ways to reduce the patient dose in France (e.g., implementing the use of long cone devices and controlling darkroom practices).

  8. Patient exposure trends in medical and dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Goetz, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Patient exposure to medical and dental x rays has long been of interest to the radiological health community. With the cooperation of state and local agencies and professional groups, the Center for Devices and Radiological Health has conducted three major surveys of patient exposure to x rays. The latest of these surveys, the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT), collected x-ray exposure data for each year starting in 1972. Two earlier studies, the 1964 and 1970 X-ray Exposure Studies collected x-ray data during the years these surveys were conducted. Exposure trends presented are based on results of all three studies. Major improvements in beam limitation are seen for medical and dental radiography. Since 1964, when the first nationwide survey was conducted, dental exposures have decreased about 75%. Decreases of up to one-third occurred in exposures for medical examinations. The current exposure data presented continue to show a wide variation in medical exposures. Also presented are organ doses for four organs (ovaries, testes, thyroid and active bone marrow).

  9. Pattern of skeletal and dental malocclusions in Saudi orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Aldrees, Abdullah M

    2012-03-01

    To determine the distribution of skeletal and dental malocclusions in a sample of Saudi orthodontic patients. Six hundred and two randomly selected pretreatment orthodontic records were evaluated in this descriptive, retrospective study conducted between June to September 2009 at the Orthodontic Clinic of the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Cephalometric analysis using Dolphin software to measure the A point, Nasion, B point (ANB) angle and Wits appraisal was performed to determine the skeletal malocclusion. Angles classification was evaluated to determine the molar relationship using study models. The most common dental malocclusion was Angle Class I followed by the asymmetric molar relationship. The most common skeletal malocclusion using ANB angle was Class I, while the most common skeletal malocclusion using Wits appraisal was Class II. No gender difference was seen in the distribution of the molar relationship and skeletal relationship using both ANB angle and Wits appraisal. The pattern of skeletal and dental malocclusions in Saudi orthodontic patients differs, based on the variability of the methods used to assess the anteroposterior jaw-base relationship.

  10. Outcomes of moderate sedation in paediatric dental patients.

    PubMed

    Özen, B; Malamed, S F; Cetiner, S; Özalp, N; Özer, L; Altun, C

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of moderate sedation with nitrous oxide/oxygen (N(2) O/O(2)) alone or combined with different dosages and administration routes of midazolam in uncooperative paediatric dental patients using the Bispectral Index System (BIS). This one-year clinical study examined first-visit moderate sedation performed in 240 healthy children aged 4-6 years. Subjects were randomly divided into four groups according to drug, route and dosage, as follows: Group 1 - 0.20 mg/kg midazolam (40 mg/ml) delivered intranasally; Group 2 - 0.75 mg/kg midazolam (15 mg/3 ml) delivered orally; Group 3 - 0.50 mg/kg midazolam (15 mg/3 ml) delivered orally. All children in these three groups also received inhalation sedation with 50%-50% N(2) O/O(2), whereas children in Group 4 received inhalation sedation with 50%-50% N(2) O/O(2) only. The outcome of sedation was evaluated as either 'successful', 'failed' or 'not accepted'. The highest success rate was found in Group 1 (0.20 mg/kg intranasally, 87%), followed by Group 2 (0.75 mg/kg orally, 79%). The overall mean success rate for all groups was 73%. Moderate sedation can be successfully used in the clinical management of paediatric dental patients, with both intranasal and oral sedation using midazolam in conjunction with nitrous oxide found to be effective methods. © 2012 Australian Dental Association.

  11. Knowledge and Attitude of Faculty Members Working in Dental Institutions towards the Dental Treatment of Patients with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Sharma, Nilima; Mohanty, Vikrant; Marya, Charumohan; Rekhi, Amit; Oberoi, Avneet

    2014-01-01

    Background. Dentists have an ethical responsibility to provide treatment to HIV-infected patients, particularly because oral lesions are common among these patients. However, there are no official guidelines as to how to treat people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (PLWHA) or how to screen for potentially infectious people. Materials and Method. A descriptive cross-sectional questionnaire based study which assessed the knowledge and attitude of the faculty members towards the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS was carried out in the Sudha Rustagi College of Dental Sciences, Faridabad, and Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, New Delhi. Results. The willingness to treat patients with HIV was found to be 86.0% among the faculty members in the present study. The majority (79%) of the faculty members thought that treating an HIV-positive patient is ethical responsibility of the dentist. There was a positive attitude (88.0%) among faculty members that routine dental care should be a part of the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS. Conclusion. The level of knowledge regarding HIV and AIDS was acceptable in the present study. However, continuing dental education (CDE) programmes should be conducted on a regular basis for updating the knowledge level of the faculty members towards the dental treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS patients. PMID:27379262

  12. Recall of Dental Pain and Anxiety in a Cohort of Oral Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Kyle, B N; McNeil, D W; Weaver, B; Wilson, T

    2016-06-01

    Dental patients generally recall more pain than they originally report, with ratings of pain related to state anxiety and dental fear, but the role of depression in recall of dental pain remains uncertain. This study examined the relative contributions of different variables in explaining dental pain recalled after tooth extraction. Patients presenting for tooth extraction, prior to extraction, rated their current dental pain and state anxiety, prediction of pain and state anxiety during extraction, depression, and dental fear. Immediately postprocedure and then 1 mo later, patients rated their pain and state anxiety during extraction. Hierarchical linear regression equations were used to explain variance in recalled pain and state anxiety. In addition, patients were divided into high and low dental fear and depression groups and compared on ratings of pain and state anxiety across time. In a final sample of 157 patients, the most important predictors of recalled pain were pain reported during extraction (β = .53) and recalled state anxiety (β = .52). Dental fear and depression had a significant interaction: only when patients reported less depression did those patients who reported more dental fear also report more pain than patients who reported less dental fear (P < 0.05, ω(2) = .07). Patients who reported more depression entered the dental operatory reporting more pain, but all patients generally reported less pain during extraction than they predicted or recalled. Memory of state anxiety and pain reported during tooth extraction, not depression or state anxiety at the time of extraction, were critical factors in memory of the pain associated with the procedure. At higher levels of depression, patients higher and lower in dental fear did not differ in report of pain. Future studies are needed to further clarify interactions of depression and dental fear over time.

  13. The future of dental amalgam: a review of the literature. Part 3: Mercury exposure from amalgam restorations in dental patients.

    PubMed

    Eley, B M

    1997-05-10

    This is the third article in a series of seven on the future of dental amalgam and covers mercury exposure from functioning dental amalgam restorations in patients. It firstly discusses the evidence for mercury release from amalgam fillings by considering the mechanisms of mercury release and its measurement in the expired air and the intra-oral air. In this connection it also discusses the various factors involved in the accurate measurement and calculation of mercury levels in these situations. It finally describes the various attempts to calculate the daily mercury dose from dental amalgam fillings and considers the likely accuracy of these calculations.

  14. Anticoagulant therapy and its impact on dental patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Thean, D; Alberghini, M

    2016-06-01

    Several new oral anticoagulants have been studied in the past decade, and have now started to enter the market. These drugs are reported to be as effective as, or more effective than, warfarin. In Australia, the Therapeutic Goods Administration has approved dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. The use of these newer anticoagulants is likely to increase in time, and it is important for dentists to have a sound understanding of the mechanisms of action, reversal strategies, and management guidelines for patients taking oral anticoagulants. This article discusses the process of coagulation, available anticoagulants and their monitoring and reversal, and provides clinical advice on the management of patients on anticoagulants who require dental treatment.

  15. Management of the dental patient on anticoagulant medication: a review.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Manoj; Mittal, Sankalp; Vijay, Sharmistha; Yadav, Pooja; Panwar, Vasim Raja; Gupta, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Patients taking anticoagulant medication pose a challenge for the clinician. Dentists are often required to manage bleeding as part of routine oral surgery or dental procedures, and altered hemostasis can lead to complications. Nevertheless, use of these medications is generally important for the patient's health and any alteration in the anticoagulant regimen may have untoward sequelae. In addition, several medications can affect the clotting mechanism, potentially compromising hemostasis. This article will review a variety of anticoagulant medications and the medical conditions that necessitate their use.

  16. Patients are not equally susceptible to periodontitis: does this change dental practice and the dental curriculum?

    PubMed

    Kornman, K S

    2001-08-01

    In the 1960s and 1970s, data became available indicating that most of the adult population had periodontal disease and that effective bacterial removal prevented and treated periodontitis. This information led to a systematic approach to the management of periodontal disease and influenced teaching of periodontics in dental schools. We now know that most adults have only gingivitis and very mild localized periodontitis. A small percentage, albeit representing substantial numbers, of adults have generalized severe periodontitis. We also recognize that a few currently known and measurable risk factors, including diabetes, smoking, and genetics, can identify the patients who are at risk for the severe generalized cases that require extensive therapy and intensive prevention, as well as patients at risk for a less-predictable response to treatment. This review will discuss the evidence that supports the change in our knowledge and understanding of periodontal disease. The question now becomes at what point, and how, do we integrate this new knowledge into the dental curriculum?

  17. "An effect that is deeper than beating": family violence in Jordanian women.

    PubMed

    Morse, Diane S; Paldi, Yael; Egbarya, Samah Salaime; Clark, Cari Jo

    2012-03-01

    This study informs health care approaches to gender-based family violence through focus groups with Jordanian women. The authors conducted a thematic qualitative analysis of 12 focus groups among 70 married, divorced, or widowed women about their experiences and beliefs regarding family violence. Five themes relevant to health care providers were identified. Three of the themes addressed participant-perceived causes of gender-based family violence: (1) unmet gender role expectations; (2) stigma and social norms; and (3) extended family roles. The fourth theme reflected effects on victims. The fifth theme reflected protective qualities and help-seeking behaviors. The themes identified in the analysis revealed multiple ways that gender-based family violence can contribute to health problems and that it can be kept secret by Jordanian women as patients. Potential clues are described for the violence which may not be typically explored in a medical encounter. Additional ways that Jordanian families may seek help from other family or clergy instead of police and family violence agencies are described. Implications of these results for health care providers who care both for Jordanians and Arab immigrants in Western cultures are discussed.

  18. “An Effect That is Deeper Than Beating” Family Violence in Jordanian Women

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Diane S; Paldi, Yael; Egbarya, Samah Salaime; Clark, Cari Jo

    2012-01-01

    This study informs healthcare approaches to gender-based family violence through focus groups with Jordanian women. The authors conducted a thematic qualitative analysis of 12 focus groups among 70 married, divorced, or widowed women about their experiences and beliefs regarding family violence. Five themes relevant to healthcare providers were identified. Three of the themes addressed participant-perceived causes of gender-based family violence: 1) unmet gender role expectations, 2) stigma and social norms, and 3) extended family roles. The fourth theme reflects effects on victims. The fifth theme reflects protective qualities and help seeking behaviors. The themes identified in the analysis reveal multiple ways that gender-based family violence can contribute to health problems and that it can be kept secret by Jordanian women as patients. Potential clues are described for the violence which may not be typically explored in a medical encounter. Additional ways that Jordanian families may seek help from other family or clergy instead of police and family violence agencies are described. Implications of these results for healthcare providers who care both for Jordanians and Arab immigrants in Western cultures are discussed. PMID:22329396

  19. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Dental Surgeons in managing Child Patients

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Talha Mufeed; Khan, Rabia; Batool, Kanza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Karachi providing treatment to pediatric patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Karachi providing treatment to pediatric patients. A cluster-sampling technique was used and 200 dental surgeons from six different dental institutions were selected. A self-constructed questionnaire was distributed to the dental surgeons that comprised 20 closed-ended questions. The data was entered and analyzed for frequency and percentages by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19. The results showed that 76 (38%) dental surgeons took the responsibility of managing pediatric patient when given; 68 (34%) dental surgeons allowed the parents in the clinic; 111 (55.5%) dental surgeons are of the view that colorful and fun environment in dental clinic make the child at ease; 59 (29.5%) always demonstrate the dental procedure to the child to eradicate imaginary fears; 94 (47.0%) dental surgeons preferred the child to be treated in general anesthesia (GA) to avoid difficult behavior of the child; 135 (67.5%) dental surgeons did not show syringe needle or any instrument to the child. All the members of dental profession must be aware of patient perceptions, preferences, and fear to meet patient’s needs. Dental studies should include guidelines and techniques to train the upcoming dentists for excellent practice in pediatric dentistry. How to cite this article Wali A, Siddiqui TM, Khan R, Batool K. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Dental Surgeons in managing Child Patients. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(4):372-378. PMID:28127171

  20. [Dental care for the pregnant hypertensive patient].

    PubMed

    Díaz Romero, R M; Mandujano Valdez, L

    1989-10-01

    Different odontology publications have stressed how important it is for every D.D.S. to be familiar with the fundamentals of detection and treatment to be considered in all cases of patients who suffer from hypertension. This condition has of late been occurring at increasingly early ages, and it is now known that children of hypertensive parents have higher blood pressures than those of parents with normal readings, all ages considered. The state of stress in which individuals currently live, conditions young persons with labile hypertension to develop essential hypertension, which becomes fixed within briefer periods.

  1. Agrammatism in Jordanian-Arabic Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albustanji, Yusuf M.; Milman, Lisa H.; Fox, Robert A.; Bourgeois, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    The studies of agrammatism show that not all morpho-syntactic elements are impaired to the same degree and that some of this variation may be due to language-specific differences. This study investigated the production of morpho-syntactic elements in 15 Jordanian-Arabic (JA) speaking individuals with agrammatism and 15 age-matched neurologically…

  2. Integrating Service Learning in Jordanian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahasneh, Randa; Tawalbeh, Aisheh; Al-Smadi, Rana; Ghaith, Souad; Dajani, Rana

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this exploratory study is to test "Service Learning" as a teaching and learning strategy in Jordanian universities by integrating service learning into a counselling course at the Hashemite University. After providing a 12-h service at 10 service locations, a 16-item questionnaire was administered to 60 senior counselling…

  3. Attitudes of Jordanian Society toward Wife Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Btoush, Rula; Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors conducted an exploratory study among a convenience sample of 260 Jordanian men and women, using self-administered open and closed questions to examine the participants' approach toward wife abuse. In general, there was high awareness of wife abuse and the different types of abuse (mainly physical and psychological), a general tendency…

  4. Analysis of Jordanian phosphate using nuclear techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, N.S.; Al-Saleh, K.A.

    1987-09-01

    The concentrations of major, minor and trace element content of Jordanian phosphate ores were determined using different complementary nuclear techniques. These techniques were: Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (GRS), X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Special emphasis was given to the determination of Uranium and rare earth element concentrations.

  5. Agrammatism in Jordanian-Arabic Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albustanji, Yusuf M.; Milman, Lisa H.; Fox, Robert A.; Bourgeois, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    The studies of agrammatism show that not all morpho-syntactic elements are impaired to the same degree and that some of this variation may be due to language-specific differences. This study investigated the production of morpho-syntactic elements in 15 Jordanian-Arabic (JA) speaking individuals with agrammatism and 15 age-matched neurologically…

  6. Integrating Service Learning in Jordanian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahasneh, Randa; Tawalbeh, Aisheh; Al-Smadi, Rana; Ghaith, Souad; Dajani, Rana

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this exploratory study is to test "Service Learning" as a teaching and learning strategy in Jordanian universities by integrating service learning into a counselling course at the Hashemite University. After providing a 12-h service at 10 service locations, a 16-item questionnaire was administered to 60 senior counselling…

  7. Patient education and preventive care in Malaysian dental practice.

    PubMed

    Abdul Razak, I; Lind, O P

    1994-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted to examine the attitudes of Malaysian dentists toward patient education and preventive dentistry and the level of preventive care adopted in Malaysian dental practice. An adjusted response rate of 73.1% was obtained. Generally the Malaysian dentists had positive attitudes towards patient education and preventive dentistry including fluoridation. However, a sizable proportion of them considered that preventive measures were no challenge for the dentist. The common preventive measures given to patients were scaling, dental health education, prophylaxis and instruction in correct brushing and flossing in as much as 40 to 50 percent of the queried dentist claimed that these preventive items were provided to most or all of their new patients. In spite of the fact that the majority of the dentists had good knowledge about the application and effects of sealants only about 41 percent of the dentists claimed to have used sealants. More dentists in the private sector reportedly having done so. Also many Malaysian dentists (18.5%) did not use leaded protection for any of their new patients when taking radiographs.

  8. Applicability of zirconia dental prostheses for metal allergy patients.

    PubMed

    Gökçen-Röhlig, Bilge; Saruhanoglu, Alp; Cifter, Ebru Demet; Evlioglu, Gulumser

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of zirconium dioxide (zirconia) as a substitute for metal alloys in a group of metal allergy patients. Fourteen patients (eight women, six men) who had been restored with porcelain-fused-to-metal fixed partial dentures (FPDs) and had exhibited hypersensitivity lesions to dental alloys were enrolled in this study. Patients were previously patch-tested using standard testing substances authorized by the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group. Patients received FPDs with zirconia frameworks and occurrences of oral symptoms were evaluated. No hypersensitivity lesions in the mouth or on the skin were encountered during the follow-up period of 3 years. Zirconia FPDs may be an alternative to porcelain-fused-to-metal FPDs in patients with metal allergies.

  9. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  10. Radiographic study of delayed tooth development in patients with dental agenesis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Mealin, Erika V; Parekh, Susan; Jones, Steven P; Moles, David R; Gill, Daljit S

    2012-03-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the radiographic development of permanent teeth in a group of children affected by dental agenesis with an unaffected control group and to determine the effects of confounding factors including the severity of the dental agenesis, age, sex, ethnicity, and the number of stages used to estimate dental age. A single-center retrospective cross-sectional study of dental panoramic tomographs was undertaken between July 2007 and April 2008 in a postgraduate teaching school. A total of 139 patients (aged 9-18 years) were recruited from the orthodontic clinic on the basis of predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria to either a dental agenesis group or a control group. Dental panoramic tomograms were assessed, and the stages of development of the permanent teeth in the left maxillary and left mandibular regions were scored by using the 12 stages of Haavikko and the 8 stages of Demirjian and Goldstein. For each tooth scored, the mean dental age and standard error were determined by using the dental age assessment method, and an estimated dental age for each subject was derived by using the weighted average method. A statistically significant delay in dental age was found in the patients with dental agenesis compared with the control group. The dental age assessment method of Haavikko showed a delay of 1.20 years (SD, 1.74), and the method of Demirjian and Goldstein showed a delay of 1.64 years (SD, 1.75). It was also observed that older patients with dental agenesis had greater delays in tooth formation (P <0.001). With the Haavikko method, for every year of chronologic age, the delay in dental age increased by 0.53 year; with the Demirjian and Goldstein method, the delay increased by 0.48 year. A significant association was seen between the severity of dental agenesis and the delay in dental age (P <0.01). With both methods, for each additional developmentally absent tooth, the dental age was delayed by 0.13 year (lower confidence

  11. Comfort Levels Among Predoctoral Dental and Dental Hygiene Students in Treating Patients at High-Risk for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Natto, Zuhair S; Aladmawy, Majdi; Rogers, Thomas C

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the impact of the training program for predoctoral dental and hygiene students at Loma Linda University School of Dentistry (LLUSD) with regard to issues related to treating patients with a high risk of having HIV/AIDS. LLUSD offers a training program for fourth-year dental hygiene and predoctoral dental students that addresses the oral health care needs of persons with HIV disease. The training occurs in small groups 2 days per week at a community clinic serving HIV-positive individuals. Three academic quarters are required to train all fourth-year students each year. Evaluation of program effectiveness is conducted by means of pre- and post-session surveys. Dental hygiene and dental students completed the pre-survey during the spring quarter of their third year in public health dentistry courses. The same students completed the post-session survey at the end of their weekly training sessions during the fourth year. The overall change in all areas related to the students' comfort level in treating patients in the 3 defined categories is in a positive direction (p-value<0.0001). The change was much higher among dental hygiene students compared with predoctoral dental students. A comparison of pre- and post-session surveys reveals a significant improvement in students' perception of and comfort level with treating patients who are homosexual/bisexual or intravenous drug users, or who have a history of blood transfusion in both student groups upon completion of the HIV and the Dentist training program at LLUSD. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  12. Dental and Anaesthetic Challenges in a Patient with Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abadi, Ali; Al-Azri, Salah A.; Bakathir, Abdulaziz; Al-Riyami, Yusra

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of rare genetic disorders characterised by skin and mucous membrane fragility and systemic manifestations of variable severity. We report a case of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in an 18-year-old male patient who presented to the Department of Oral Health at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in 2015 with recurrent dental pain and infections. Due to the poor dental status of the patient and anticipated operative difficulties due to microstomia and limited mouth opening, the patient underwent full dental clearance under general anaesthesia. This article discusses the dental and anaesthetic challenges encountered during the management of this patient and provides a brief literature review. PMID:28003899

  13. Using patients as educators for communication skills: Exploring dental students' and patients' views.

    PubMed

    Coelho, C; Pooler, J; Lloyd, H

    2017-07-17

    A qualitative study to explore the issues for patients and students when giving feedback on the communication of dental students. The Department of Health and National Institute for Health Research are committed to involving patients in improving clinical education, research and service delivery. Yet, there is a limited body of evidence on the perceptions of patients when asked to be involved in this way, and specifically when asked to provide feedback on the communication skills of dental students. This study seeks to address this gap and heighten the understanding of the issues faced by patients when asked to be involved in clinical education. Data were collected using focus groups with dental students (n=10) and patients (n=8) being treated by these students. Both groups were asked about their thoughts, feelings and beliefs about patients being asked to provide feedback on the communication skills of dental students. Data analysis involved inductive thematic analysis of transcribed audio recordings. Four themes emerged from the data: "legitimacy," "co-educators," "maintaining the equilibrium of the patient-student relationship" and the "timing of patient feedback." Support for involving patients in giving feedback on students' communication skills was established, with patients considering they were best placed to comment on the communication skills of dental students. Patients and students do not want to provide feedback alone and want support to assist them, especially if feedback was negative. Issues of anonymity, confidentiality and ownership of the feedback process were worrisome, and the positioning of patient feedback in the programme was seen as critical. Patients and students are willing to engage in patient feedback on students' communication skills, and with support and training, the concerns around this are not insurmountable and the benefits could potentially profit both groups. These findings have resonance with other healthcare educators when

  14. Relation between copper, lipid profile, and cognition in elderly Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Al-khateeb, Eman; Al-zayadneh, Ebaa; Al-dalahmah, Osama; Alawadi, Zeinab; khatib, Faisal; Naffa, Randa; Shafagoj, Yanal

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the association of serum copper and lipid concentrations with changes in cognitive function in elderly Jordanian individuals. The study population consisted of two groups: 52 dementia patients and 50 control subjects. All individuals were screened using the Mini-Mental State Examination and Clock Drawing Test. Serum copper and lipid profile were also assessed. Results were statistically evaluated at p < 0.05 level of significance. The dementia group had 10.1% higher copper level than control subjects that was not statistically significant. No significant differences could be found between the two groups in lipid profile levels. There was no significant correlation between serum copper, lipid profile, and cognitive decline in elderly Jordanians. Demographic variables indicated that educational level less than 12 years and illiterate demonstrated a 3.29 fold (p = 0.026) and 6.29 fold (p = 0.002) increase in risk of developing dementia, respectively. Coffee intake demonstrated a protective effect against cognitive decline with 6.25 fold lower risk with increased coffee intake.

  15. Risks of general anesthesia for the special needs dental patient.

    PubMed

    Messieha, Zakaria

    2009-01-01

    The risk of dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia has multiple contributing factors. The literature has addressed the general anesthetic risk of dental general anesthesia and sedation in the operating room and the office settings, but more studies are needed to address the special needs population in particular. There is still a great need for more studies to assess the risk versus benefit for special need population as well as to stratify such risk in order to assist care providers in decision making as well as in sharing such risk concerns with patients, caretakers, and guardians. One recommended approach is to conduct a national retrospective study of patients treated under general anesthesia in the past 10 years in all the various settings and assess the associated risks and complications related to their physical status and the underlying physical and mental disabilities. The product of such a study could be a stratification of risk versus benefit as well as some guidelines for decision making as far as which kind of procedures should be conducted under general anesthesia while weighing the level of risk for the particular patient. Although access to care is not a direct risk factor, it can certainly deter timely treatment and intervention for patients with special needs.

  16. The effects of lavender scent on dental patient anxiety levels: a cluster randomised-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kritsidima, Metaxia; Newton, Tim; Asimakopoulou, Koula

    2010-02-01

    To review the effect of lavender scent on anticipatory anxiety in dental participants. In a cluster randomized-controlled trial, patients' (N = 340) anxiety was assessed while waiting for a scheduled dental appointment, either under the odor of lavender or with no odor. Current anxiety, assessed by the brief State Trait Anxiety Indicator (STAI-6), and generalized dental anxiety, assessed by the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) were examined. Analyses of variance (anovas) showed that although both groups showed similar, moderate levels of generalized dental anxiety (MDAS F((1,338)) = 2.17, P > 0.05) the lavender group reported significantly lower current anxiety (STAI: F((1,338)) = 74.69, P < 0.001) than the control group. Although anxiety about future dental visits seems to be unaffected, lavender scent reduces state anxiety in dental patients.

  17. Dental management of patients irradiated for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Regezi, J A; Courtney, R M; Kerr, D A

    1976-08-01

    Management of patients irradiated for oral cancer should include consideration of their oral health prior to, and after, radiation therapy. Data from 130 patients, followed for a period of 1 to 10 years, are presented and evaluated. The philosophy of retention and maintenance of as many teeth as possible is supported by this data. Extraction of teeth with severe periodontal disease after irradiation also proves to be a relatively safe operation. Osteoradionecrosis tends to be limited in extent and is generally well tolerated by the patient when treated conservatively. A treatment regimen is presented that significantly reduces the morbidity from therapeutic irradiation of the jaws. A comprehensive dental evaluation and follow-up plan coupled with patient cooperation are instrumental to the success of this program.

  18. Comparing Dental Stress in New Child Patients and Returning Patients Using Salivary Cortisol, Immunoglobulin-A and Alpha- Amylase.

    PubMed

    Alaki, Sumer M; Safi, Ayman; Ouda, Soliman; Nadhreen, Alaa

    2017-09-22

    this study was aimed at comparing dental stress in children having their first dental visit to those returning for dental treatment using salivary biomarkers of stress including salivary cortisol (s-cortisol), Immunoglobulin-A (s-IgA) and alpha-amylase (s-α-amylase). Additionally, the study was aimed at monitoring the change in stress in new patients as they progressed from the waiting to the clinical areas. salivary samples were collected from 40 children who had not been to a dentist before and similar samples were collected from 40 children who were returning for completion of dental treatment. Salivary cortisol, s-IgA and s-α-amylase concentrations were obtained by Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). salivary cortisol levels were higher for new patients at the waiting area compared to that at the dental chair (p=0.05). Salivary alpha-amylase significantly increased in new patients while being seated in the dental chair. Returning patients had higher s-α-amylase (p=0.001) and s-IgA (p=0.016) compared to new patients. Returning patients had the lowest level of s-cortisol when providers were faculty pediatric dentists than with students and interns (p=0.035). children coming in for their first dental visit may experience dental stress at the waiting area before being seated for dental examination. Returning children may experience higher levels of stress compared to new child patients possibly due to previous dental exposure.

  19. Oral adverse effects of gastrointestinal drugs and considerations for dental management in patients with gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Karthik, Ramya; Karthik, K. S.; David, Chaya; Ameerunnisa; Keerthi, G.

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is associated with alterations in the mouth or influence the course of the dental diseases, and the dental health care workers are expected to recognize, diagnose, and treat oral conditions associated with gastrointestinal diseases and also provide safe and appropriate dental care for afflicted individuals. Drugs used in the management of these diseases result in oral adverse effects and also are known to interact with those prescribed during dental care. Hence, this article has reviewed the drug considerations and guidelines for drug use during dental management of patients with gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:23066260

  20. Management of a patient suffering with Cherubism with dental implants.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Karun; Bishop, Karl

    2011-06-01

    Cherubism is a rare non-neoplastic, fibro-osseous hereditary disorder characterized by bilateral expansion of the maxilla and mandible producing a characteristic facial appearance. It can affect the facial and dental growth of the individual and often results in gross aesthetic and functional deficiencies. The teeth may also be displaced or submerged and these problems can often compromise successful restorative rehabilitation. This paper describes the restorative management of an adult patient with Cherubism involving a fixed implant retained mandibular restoration. The care utilized 3D planning software and implant insertion guides to facilitate an early loading protocol and the use of optimum bone quality/volume areas.

  1. Identification of the risk for osteoporosis in dental patients.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Hugh

    2012-10-01

    This article describes how dentists can recognize osteoporosis before fractures develop, and discusses whether osteoporosis affects tooth loss or inhibits implant osseointegration. Some success in diagnosing osteoporosis has been obtained using clinical questionnaires that attempt to identify those who have strong risk factors for the disease, and analysis of the sparse trabeculation and thinning of the mandibular cortex often seen in dental panoramic radiographs. The role of osteoporosis in periodontal disease is unclear as there are many conflicting reports, but the evidence suggests that tooth loss may be more prevalent in patients with osteoporosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hospital-based dental care for persons with disabilities: a study of patient selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Hulland, S; Sigal, M J

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to generate a medical and dental profile of patients attending the Mount Sinai Hospital Dental Program for Persons with Disabilities, to determine if certain selected criteria could identify patients likely to require dental care in that setting. The need for dental care under general anesthesia was used as the prime indicator that care should be provided in a hospital setting. A retrospective review of all the charts of the patients enrolled in this hospital program was undertaken. Results indicated that patients who were treated in this hospital-based dental program had the following characteristics: moderate to profound mental retardation (39.5%), moderate to severe behavioral problems (31.1%), and/or a history of seizure activity (29.1%). Behavioral criteria appear to be the predominant reason for the provision of hospital-based dental care for persons with disabilities.

  3. Dental management of a patient with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Olufunke Adewumi, Abimbola; Grace Tucker, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a type of cardiac arrhythmia that occurs in people with a structurally normal heart. Stress or anxiety-induced release of endogenous catecholamines causes a dysfunction in the myocytic calcium-ion channel, leading to ventricular arrhythmias that can cause dizziness, syncope, or sudden cardiac death. Since dental procedures can be anxiety-provoking, the main purpose of this paper is to report the dental management of a young patient with dental fear and CPVT. Several other issues are also discussed, such as the importance of continual collaboration with medical colleagues, the risk-benefit of using epinephrine-containing local anesthesia for dental treatment for patients with arrythmias, the potential risk of repeated general anesthesia in a patient with a cardiac arrhythmia, and the challenges of providing comprehensive dental treatment in a high caries-risk patient with extreme dental anxiety.

  4. Dental management of patients receiving anticoagulation or antiplatelet treatment.

    PubMed

    Pototski, Mariele; Amenábar, José M

    2007-12-01

    Antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents have been extensively researched and developed as potential therapies in the prevention and management of arterial and venous thrombosis. On the other hand, antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs have also been associated with an increase in the bleeding time and risk of postoperative hemorrhage. Because of this, some dentists still recommend the patient to stop the therapy for at least 3 days before any oral surgical procedure. However, stopping the use of these drugs exposes the patient to vascular problems, with the potential for significant morbidity. This article reviews the main antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs in use today and explains the dental management of patients on these drugs, when subjected to minor oral surgery procedures. It can be concluded that the optimal INR value for dental surgical procedures is 2.5 because it minimizes the risk of either hemorrhage or thromboembolism. Nevertheless, minor oral surgical procedures, such as biopsies, tooth extraction and periodontal surgery, can safely be done with an INR lower than 4.0.

  5. Candidate Gene Analysis of Breast Cancer in the Jordanian Population of Arab Descent: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Al-Eitan, Laith N; Jamous, Reem I; Khasawneh, Rame H

    2017-04-21

    This study aimed to investigate whether there are specific polymorphisms within six genes (BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, DAPK1, MMP9 promoter, and TOX3) that are associated with breast cancer among the Jordanian population. Sequenom MassARRAY system was used to genotype 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes in 230 Jordanian breast cancer patients and 225 healthy individuals. Three SNPs (MMP9 (rs6065912), TOX3 (rs1420546), and DAPK1 (rs11141901) were found to be significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (p < .05). This study is the first to provide evidence that genetic variation in MMP9, TOX3, and DAPK1 genes contribute to the development of breast cancer in the Jordanian population.

  6. First-time dental care and the most recent dental treatment in relation to utilisation of dental services among dentate elderly patients in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Vysniauskaité, Sonata; Vehkalahti, Miira M

    2006-09-01

    To describe the initial dental treatments of Lithuanian dentate elderly patients and the content of the most recent treatment in relation to their dentist-visiting behaviour. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was carried out at two public dental offices in Kédainiai, Lithuania, among dentate patients aged 60+ years. A self-administered questionnaire covered first-time dental care, the most recent dental treatment, check-up behaviour, interval since the most recent dental visit, and number of teeth. Age, gender and education served as background information. Statistical evaluation was by chi-squared test, anova and logistic regression for odds ratio (OR). In all, 174 dentate elderly responded, mean age being 69.2 (SD = 6.6) years. The mean age at the first visit was 16.3 years [95% confidence interval (CI) 14.9-17.6]. Regular dental check-ups were reported by 30%, and 36% had visited a dentist within the past 12 months. As to the content of the most recent treatment, 78% of the elderly reported filling therapy, 50% endodontics, 48% tooth extraction, 21% radiography, 10% cleaning or scaling and 6% polishing of fillings. Those going for check-ups were more likely to report diagnostic (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-2.8; p = 0.01) and preventive (OR 4.8; 95% CI 2.5-9.0; p = 0.002) treatment when analysed by a logistic regression model, controlling for age, gender, education and number of teeth. Check-up-orientated utilisation of dental services should be encouraged among the Lithuanian elderly. Dentists and health officials should place greater emphasis on prevention.

  7. Utilization of dental health care services in context of the HIV epidemic- a cross-sectional study of dental patients in the Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background HIV infected patients should be expected in the Sudanese dental health care services with an increasing frequency. Dental care utilization in the context of the HIV epidemic is generally poorly understood. Focusing on Sudanese dental patients with reported unknown HIV status, this study assessed the extent to which Andersen's model in terms of predisposing (socio-demographics), enabling (knowledge, attitudes and perceived risk related to HIV) and need related factors (oral health status) predict dental care utilization. It was hypothesized that enabling factors would add to the explanation of dental care utilization beyond that of predisposing and need related factors. Methods Dental patients were recruited from Khartoum Dental Teaching Hospital (KDTH) and University of Science and Technology (UST) during March-July 2008. A total of 1262 patients (mean age 30.7, 56.5% females and 61% from KDTH) were examined clinically (DMFT) and participated in an interview. Results A total of 53.9% confirmed having attended a dental clinic for treatment at least once in the past 2 years. Logistic regression analysis revealed that predisposing factors; travelling inside Sudan (OR = 0.5) were associated with lower odds and females were associated with higher odds (OR = 2.0) for dental service utilization. Enabling factors; higher knowledge of HIV transmission (OR = 0.6) and higher HIV related experience (OR = 0.7) were associated with lower odds, whereas positive attitudes towards infected people and high perceived risk of contagion (OR = 1.3) were associated with higher odds for dental care utilization. Among need related factors dental caries experience was strongly associated with dental care utilization (OR = 4.8). Conclusion Disparity in the history of dental care utilization goes beyond socio-demographic position and need for dental care. Public awareness of HIV infection control and confidence on the competence of dentists should be improved to minimize avoidance

  8. Clinical aspects and conservative dental management of a patient with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Francisco Artur Forte; Fernandes, Clarissa Pessoa; Araujo, Kenia Samara Barbosa; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Sousa, Fabrício Bitu; Mota, Mário Rogério Lima

    2014-01-01

    T o present the clinical findings of a patient with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), highlighting peculiarities of dental treatment in patients with this condition. FOP is a rare genetic disease characterized by skeletal malformations and ectopic ossifications in skeletal muscles, tendons, ligaments and aponeurosis. Exacerbation of these ossifications can be caused by dental treatment, resulting in disease progression. A 26-year-old male patient with a diagnosis of FOP was referred to our service for dental treatment. The patient presented decreased mobility in peripheral joints (knees and elbows), postural disability (ankylosis of the vertebral column), lateral deviation and shortness of the hallux, as well as heterotopic ossifications on the hands and back. The implementation of conservative dental procedures, such as oral hygiene instructions and recurrent topical fluoride applications, were performed in addition to endodontic and restorative treatments. Brief dental appointments were conducted without using regional anesthesia or dental dam clamps. The dental chair was positioned at 45° to provide more comfort and to avoid exacerbating the disease. The patient has now completed 6 months of follow-up and is free of heterotopic ossifications resulting from dental treatment. The dental treatment modifications implemented for the present case were sufficient to establish good oral health and to prevent the formation of heterotopic ossifications in the maxillofacial region. FOP is a rare disease dentists must familiarize themselves with to provide adequate, personalized treatment, which minimizes traumas that may exacerbate the disease.

  9. Safety of dental extraction among consecutive patients on oral anticoagulant treatment managed using a specific dental management protocol.

    PubMed

    Zanon, Ezio; Martinelli, Franco; Bacci, Christian; Cordioli, GianPiero; Girolami, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    We found no prospective studies on dental extraction in anticoagulated patients in the literature, even though most authors suggest that there is no need to change anticoagulant treatment and to utilize a local haemostatic measure after extraction. In the present study, we have verified the incidence of bleeding complications after dental extraction in a group of 250 consecutive anticoagulated patients. Two hundred and fifty non-anticoagulated subjects requiring dental extraction represented the control group. In all patients, anticoagulant treatment was not changed (International Normalized Ratio, 1.8-4) and local haemostatic measures (fibrin sponge, silk suture and a gauze saturated with tranexamic acid) were used. All procedures were performed in an outpatient clinic setting. We registered four bleeding complications in the group of anticoagulated patients and three in the control group. The difference of bleeding complications in the two groups was not statistically different (relative risk, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-6.04; P = 0.7). None of the post-operative late bleeding required hospitalization and/or blood transfusions, and further local measures were sufficient to stop the bleeding. The protocol proposed in the present study makes dental extractions in anticoagulated patients possible on an outpatient basis with a cost reduction for the community and minor discomfort for the patients.

  10. Guidelines for the management of patients on oral anticoagulants requiring dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Perry, D J; Noakes, T J C; Helliwell, P S

    2007-10-13

    The objective of these guidelines is to provide healthcare professionals, including primary care dental practitioners, with clear guidance on the management of patients on oral anticoagulants requiring dental surgery. The guidance may not be appropriate in all cases and individual patient circumstances may dictate an alternative approach.

  11. 38 CFR 17.164 - Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Patient responsibility in making and keeping dental appointments. 17.164 Section 17.164 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.164 Patient responsibility in making and...

  12. [Gingival fluid cytokine profile in patients after dental implantation and by periimplantitis].

    PubMed

    Tsarev, V N; Nikolaeva, E N; Ippolitov, E V; Tsareva, T V

    2013-01-01

    The study included 32 patients with complications which have developed 3 months to 14 years after dental implants placement. ELISA method was used to assess cytokines content in various sites of tooth alignment in patients with Herpesviridae and periodontopathogenics bacteria associated periimplantitis. The results prove the necessity for Herpesviridae and selected bacteria monitoring after dental implantation.

  13. Perception of Jordanian nurses regarding involvement in decision-making.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamdan, Zaid M; Bawadi, Hala A; Redman, Richard W; Al-Nawafleh, Ahmad H

    2016-05-01

    Nurses in any organizational context are members of a team and cannot work independently. Teamwork requires making decisions frequently, and these decisions affect team performance on a regular basis. Ultimately, the team shapes the quality of patient care. This study examines nurse decision-making related to patient care, self-management and the work environment. Qualitative descriptive design was used to collect data. Eighteen staff nurses participated in semi-structured interviews to explore the perception of Jordanian staff nurses regarding their participation in decision-making. Variation in decision-making involvement was found to exist across unit types and from hospital to hospital. In general, the participants were not satisfied with their level of decision-making involvement and believed that they could participate more. The results have implications for nurse managers in facilitating the engagement of staff nurses in decision-making and creating an organizational culture to facilitate this engagement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dental Assistants

    MedlinePlus

    ... the direction of a dentist . They may prepare materials for dental impressions or to create temporary crowns. All dental ... Nursing assistants, sometimes called nursing aides , help provide basic care for patients in hospitals and residents of ... more information about becoming a dental assistant and for a list of accredited dental ...

  15. [Comprehensive dental treatment under general anaesthesia: implementation among patients with mouth opening limitation].

    PubMed

    Wolff, A; Singer, A; Shlomi, B

    2013-07-01

    Patients unable to tolerate routine dental treatment in an ordinary dental setting may undergo a wide range of dental procedures under general anaesthesia. This report describes a practical protocol for providing comprehensive dental treatment under general anaesthesia. The importance and uniqueness of planning, treating and adopting safety measures is illustrated through the presentation of clinical cases of patients with mouth opening limitation. Complete treatment can thus be achieved in a single visit, thereby eliminating repetition of coping with anxiety associated with repeated treatment sessions.

  16. Dental Opioid Prescribing and Multiple Opioid Prescriptions Among Dental Patients: Administrative data from the South Carolina Prescription Drug Monitoring Program

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Jenna L.; Hyer, J. Madison; Ramakrishnan, V. Ramesh; Leite, Renata; Melvin, Cathy L.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Frick, Christie; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite increased attention to dentists’ role in curbing opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion, information regarding prescribing practices and the frequency of multiple concurrent opioid prescriptions among dental patients is limited. Methods Prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) data for South Carolina representing dispensed medication for patients prescribed at least one opioid by a dentist over the most recently available two-year frame (2012–2013) was reviewed. Descriptive analyses examined: (1) types, frequency of dental opioid prescriptions; and, (2) frequency of existing multiple concurrent opioid prescriptions among dental patients. Results Nearly all dispensed dental opioid prescriptions (99.9%; n = 653,650) were for immediate release opioids and were initial fills (96.2%). Hydrocodone (76.1%) and oxycodone (12.2%) combination products were the most frequently dispensed opioids prescribed by dentists. Individuals under 21 years of age received 11.2% of dentist prescribed opioids dispensed. Patients with multiple concurrent opioid prescriptions were identified within 30-day (n=113,818), 90-day (n=166,124), and 180-day (n=205,576) timeframes. Conclusions Dentists prescribed a high volume of immediate release opioids dispensed in South Carolina. A notable minority of dental patients had incident(s) of multiple pre-existing opioid prescriptions, a factor implicated in patient misuse, abuse, overdose, and diversion Practical Implications Use of a PDMP prior to prescribing provides a record of controlled substances dispensed to a patient, and may inform prescribing, coordination of care, and addiction screening or referral. Patients should be provided information regarding misuse behaviors and their risks, as well as the importance of secure storage and disposal of leftover opioid medications. PMID:27055600

  17. Burning mouth syndrome: a challenge for dental practitioners and patients.

    PubMed

    Klasser, Gary D; Epstein, Joel B; Villines, Dana; Utsman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted on patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS) to assess demographics, onset characteristics, temporal behavior (frequency), duration, and progression of oral burning symptoms. Additionally, treatments provided by health practitioners prior to a definitive diagnosis of BMS were analyzed with an overview of current management strategies. The records of 49 adult patients diagnosed with BMS were reviewed. Descriptive statistics and a Pearson correlation with a statistical significance at p < 0.05 were utilized to analyze the data. The majority of patients were mid-life white women who reported a sudden onset of constant oral burning symptoms that increased in intensity. On average, patients reported oral burning symptoms for 41 months (standard deviation = 73.5, range = 2-360 months, median = 20 months), and 38 of the patients received/trialed 71 various interventions (mean = 1.9) prior to receiving a definitive diagnosis for their oral burning symptoms. This study sample shared many characteristics with those reported previously in the literature. The authors found that patients frequently reported delays in receiving a definitive diagnosis with an array of various trialed interventions. For this reason, the authors provide this overview of current management strategies in order to assist dental practitioners in providing appropriate interventions for patients with BMS.

  18. Jordanian teachers' perceptions of voice handicap.

    PubMed

    Marie, Basem S; Natour, Yaser S; Haj-Tas, Maisa A

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate if Jordanian school teachers perceive their voice as handicapped using the Voice Handicap Index (VHI)-Arab. The effect of teachers' age, gender, years of teaching, class taught, and education level on VHI was examined. A total of 289 teachers and a control group of 100 participants took part in the study. The teachers' group differed significantly from the control group in the physical, emotional, and functional subscales and the total score of the VHI-Arab. There was no significant difference among teachers in any of the three VHI subscales or total regarding gender, age, years of teaching experience, education level, and classes taught. Jordanian teachers have a strong perception of voice handicap. Thus, preventive and treatment vocal programs are strongly advised.

  19. Lifestyle practices of Jordanian pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, M; Al-Ma'aitah, R; Al Jada, N

    2005-06-01

    Although many improvements have been made in the area of women's health in Jordan, women during pregnancy still face many health problems that put their lives at risk. This is evident in the relatively high Maternal Mortality Rate, anaemia, low birth weight and other problems related to their lifestyle practices during pregnancy (Jordanian Ministry of Health 1998). To describe the health-promoting lifestyle behaviours of Jordanian pregnant women. The Maternal Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile (MHPLP), based on the Health Promotion Model, was modified to measure maternal practices. A representative sample of 400 Jordanian pregnant women in their 20th week of gestation or beyond were recruited from five public Maternal and Child Health Centres in the city of Irbid, in the northern part of Jordan. The MHPLP measures six dimensions: physical activity, stress management, self-actualization, nutrition, health responsibility and interpersonal support. Data were analysed by using descriptive analysis. The women reported high scores on health responsibility and self-actualization, moderate scores on interpersonal support and nutrition, and low scores on physical activity and stress management behaviours. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY, PRACTICE AND RESEARCH: The findings have implications for the quality of care delivered through the maternal and child health services. Health promotion and healthy lifestyle need to be an integral part of health services provided for pregnant women. Further research is needed to develop an instrument that integrates the cultural beliefs relating to lifestyle practices of Jordanian pregnant women mainly in the areas of physical activities and stress management. Policy implications of the findings are discussed.

  20. A survey on the experience with dental tourism in a sample of Italian patients.

    PubMed

    Carmagnola, D; Filippucci, L; Celestino, S; Carrassi, A; Delia, S; Lodi, G

    2012-01-01

    Dentistry in Italy is mainly private and therefore perceived as forcedly expensive. Dental tourism is becoming popular in order to get cheap dental care. The aim of this study was to carry out a survey aimed at investigating the perception of dental tourism by Italian patients who have recently received such dental care abroad. A questionnaire was posted on the web site of an Italian consumers association (Altroconsumo) and members were invited to fill in the questionnaire in case they had experienced dental treatment abroad. Eighty-one complete forms were included in the study. The main motivation for turning to dental tourism was saving money. Another frequent reason for choosing dental tourism was that full rehabilitation was offered in a short time span, usually one week. Patients have often underlined that they appreciated different aspects of the foreign dentists, like speed, kindness, humanity, interest in the course of the treatment, the feeling of ease conveyed by the environment and the personnel. Past negative experiences with Italian dentists were in some cases advocated as reasons for searching dental care abroad. Such negative experiences resulted in a lack of trust in Italian dentists. Some patients reported that while the overall treatment abroad was carried out in a short time, single prosthetic sessions were very long, up to 6 hours. Most patients were satisfied with dental tourism.

  1. Patients' attitudes towards screening for diabetes and other medical conditions in the dental setting.

    PubMed

    Creanor, S; Millward, B A; Demaine, A; Price, L; Smith, W; Brown, N; Creanor, S L

    2014-01-01

    To determine the attitudes of patients attending routine appointments at primary care dental clinics and general dental practices towards the possibility of chair-side screening for medical conditions, including diabetes, in the dental setting. A brief, anonymous, self-administered questionnaire distributed to adult patients (≥18 years) attending 2 primary care dental clinics and 16 general dental practices in South-West England. One hundred and ninety-seven completed questionnaires were received from patients at primary care dental clinics and 429 from general dental practice patients. Overall, 87% of respondents thought that it was important or very important that dentists screened patients for medical conditions such as diabetes; 79% were very willing to let a dental team member carry out screening. The majority indicated willingness to be screened for various medical conditions during a visit to the dentist, with significantly higher proportions of respondents in the primary care clinics indicating willingness (hypertension: 83% vs 74%; heart disease: 77% vs 66%; diabetes 82% vs 72% [all p <0.02]). Nearly two thirds of primary care clinic respondents and over half of general practice patients indicated that they would be willing to discuss test results with the dental team. Overall, 61% had never knowingly been screened or tested for diabetes; 20% reported that they had been tested within the previous 12 months. The majority of respondents supported the concept of medical screening in a dental setting and were willing both to have screening tests and discuss their results with the dental team. Patient acceptance is paramount for successful implementation of such screening programmes.

  2. American, Jordanian, and Other Middle Eastern National Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szalay, Lorand B.; Strohl, Jean Bryson

    International perceptions of Jordanian university students are compared with those of American, Egyptian, and Israeli students. The sample consisted of 50 students from each country; results concentrate on Jordanian perceptions. Assessments were based on the Associative Group Analysis (AGA) which reconstructs perceptions and attitudes…

  3. Antimicrobial effect of Melaleuca alternifolia dental gel in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Milton; Petermann, Klodyne Dayana; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia Scudeler; Degan, Viviane; Lucato, Adriana; Franzini, Cristina Maria

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect and sensorial analysis of the gel developed with the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia. Thirty-four volunteers, divided into 2 groups, were monitored for 4 weeks. Initially, clinical biofilm (plaque index) and saliva samples (bacteria count) were collected, from which the standard values for each patient were obtained. For 7 days, group 1 used the melaleuca gel (Petite Marie/All Chemistry, São Paulo, Brazil), and group 2 used Colgate Total (S.B. Campo, São Paulo, Brazil). After 7 days, the plaque index was performed again, as well as the bacteria count and the sensorial analysis (appearance, color, odor, brightness, viscosity, and first taste sensation). The volunteers were instructed to return to their usual dental hygiene habits for 15 days. After this, group 1 started using Colgate Total, and group 2 started using the melaleuca gel, with the same evaluation procedures as the first week. The data were analyzed statistically with a significance level of 5%. In the bacteria count and clinical disclosure, the melaleuca gel was more effective in decreasing the dental biofilm and the numbers of bacteria colonies. According to the data from the sensory evaluation, Colgate Total (the control) showed better results regarding flavor and first sensation (P <0.05). We concluded that melaleuca gel is efficient in bacteria control but needs improvement in taste and first sensation.

  4. Ethics as an important determinant of success of orthopaedic dental care for debilitated and elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Schwartzseid, E E

    1989-01-01

    Ethical aspects of orthopaedic dental care for debilitated and elderly patients--the most complex and the least studied aspects of dentistry--are discussed here. Many articles on dental ethics, as a rule, do not cover the essential ethical aspects of orthopaedic care for the elderly or cover them only partially without reflecting on the problem at large. Understanding of the problem may help to provide more efficient dental care for the elderly population thus improving their quality of life.

  5. Can we measure patients' perception during dental impressions? The Burdens in Dental Impression-Making Questionnaire - BiDIM-Q.

    PubMed

    Tsirogiannis, Panagiotis; Neophytou, Sophia; Reul, Anika; Heydecke, Guido; Reissmann, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    To develop a reliable and valid instrument for the comprehensive assessment of patients' burdens during dental impression making, the Burdens in Dental Impression Making Questionnaire, BiDIM-Q. The item pool was generated in a convenience sample of 20 prosthodontic patients using semi-structured face-to-face interviews. The final instrument was tested in 145 consecutively recruited patients, and psychometric properties of the BiDIM-Q were determined. Four different impression materials were used according to the manufacturers' instructions and indications: alginate, c-silicone, polyvinylsiloxane, and polyether. The final BiDIM-Q consisting of 12 items showed sufficient reliability, indicated by Cronbach's alpha of .82 and an average inter-item correlation of .29. Validity was supported by Pearson correlation coefficients for the correlation between the instrument's total score with the patients' overall satisfaction rating (r=.63), and by the correlation matrix for the correlations of the patients' perceptions with the practitioners' satisfaction ratings. Overall, patient perceived burdens were low with highest burdens observed when using polyether in partially dentate patients for pick-up impressions, while lowest burdens were reported when using c-silicone for impressions of edentulous jaws. The BiDIM-Q is a reliable and valid tool for assessing patient-based process-related quality of care in dentistry allowing a deeper insight into patients' perspective during dental impression making. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Attitudes of Jordanian Nursing Students towards Mental Illness: The Effect of Teaching and Contact on Attitudes Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamaideh, Shaher H.; Mudallal, Rola

    2009-01-01

    Purposes: Attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental illness influence the treatment they receive and decisions of policy makers. The purposes of this study were to assess Jordanian nursing students' attitudes towards mental illness, and to assess the effectiveness of teaching and contact on changing nursing students' attitudes about…

  7. Attitudes of Jordanian Nursing Students towards Mental Illness: The Effect of Teaching and Contact on Attitudes Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamaideh, Shaher H.; Mudallal, Rola

    2009-01-01

    Purposes: Attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental illness influence the treatment they receive and decisions of policy makers. The purposes of this study were to assess Jordanian nursing students' attitudes towards mental illness, and to assess the effectiveness of teaching and contact on changing nursing students' attitudes about…

  8. A Linguistic Analysis on Errors Committed by Jordanian EFL Undergraduate Students: A Case of News Headlines in Jordanian Newspapers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Karazoun, Ghada Abdelmajid

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated some linguistic errors committed by Jordanian EFL undergraduate students when translating news headlines in Jordanian newspapers from Arabic to English and vice versa. The data of the study was collected through a test composed of (30) English news headlines and (30) Arabic ones covering various areas of news occurring in a…

  9. Contemporary views of dental practitioners' on patient safety.

    PubMed

    Bailey, E

    2015-12-01

    There is little known about general dental practitioners' (GDPs) views on patient safety in dentistry; we believe this to be the first paper describing their opinions and ideas for maintaining or improving safe practices. Focus groups were used to gather the views of 12 GDPs (who also hold university teaching contracts) on the following topics: Defining patient safety, the important issues in patient safety, safeguards and tools for maintaining safe care, never events and research priorities. Thematic analysis was performed on the verbatim transcripts. Key themes from the practitioners included: Medical history (polypharmacy and co-morbidities), competence and skill level, the use of safeguards and tools to ensure safety, the importance of effective communication (including working with a chaperone) and the role of reflective practice. Suggestions for improvement included: effective sharing of information with other healthcare professionals, easy access to guidelines and educational tools, adoption of practice protocols, team working and the use of universal charting systems to limit ambiguity. GDPs are well versed in the concept of patient safety and are keen to implement evidence based tools and/or interventions designed to improve safety for their patients.

  10. Geographic Tongue and Associated Risk Factors among Iranian Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    HONARMAND, Marieh; FARHAD MOLLASHAHI, Leila; SHIRZAIY, Masomeh; SEHHATPOUR, Marziye

    2013-01-01

    Background Geographic Tongue is a benign disorder involving the dorsal surface of the tongue characterized by depapillated areas with leading and folded edges in yellowish or grayish white color and sometimes with unclear borders. Many studies have reported a relationship between such condition and different risk factors. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence rate and the risk factors of geographic tongue in the patients referring to the Department of Oral Medicine of Zahedan Dental School, in 2012. Methods: Using Poisson regression model, 2000 patients referred to the Department were selected for this cross-sectional study. Data collection method included an investigation into the medical history as well as doing intraoral examinations. Using SPSS 17 software and Chi-square statistical test, the collected data were analyzed. Result: Among the 2000 patients selected, 7.8% (156 persons) suffered from geographic tongue. The results of our study show that there is a significant relationship between the occurrence of geographic tongue and a history of allergy and fissured tongue (P<0.001). There was no significant statistical relationship between the occurrence of geographic tongue and gender, smoking and medication. Conclusion: The geographic tongue is more frequently in the patients suffering from atopy or allergy as well as the patients with fissured tongue. PMID:23515238

  11. [Full dental rehabilitation of a patient with implantable cardioverter defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Imre, Ildikó; Tóth, Zsuzsanna

    2012-06-01

    During dental rehabilitation of a patient with ICD, an upper telescope retained overdenture with acrylic baseplate and lower cantilever bridges were constructed. In the consultation following the anamnesis and the clinical examination, the cardiologist did not believe antibiotic profilaxis to be necessary, adding that it is advisable to avoid the use of ultrasonic depurator and electrocauter. Nowadays after saving the life the improving of patient's better quality of life is an important aspect. The risk of ICD-implantation is minimal however, not negligible, the patient can pursue a way of life free of limitation. According to the latest trends, the number of ICD-implantations will increase exponentially in the near future, due to the aging of the population, the simplification and safeness of implantation and the increase of patients who can be treated with the device. In case of arritmia or putative dysfunction, the latest ICD-s are able to send emergency alert to the arritmia centre with the help of an outer transmitter. Probably the system will completely change the follow-up of patients with ICD within the next few years, clinical researches of its efficiency are going on at present.

  12. Understanding Jordanian Psychiatric Nurses' Smoking Behaviors: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Aldiabat, Khaldoun M.; Clinton, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Smoking is prevalent in psychiatric facilities among staff and patients. However, there have been few studies of how contextual factors in specific cultures influence rates of smoking and the health promotion role of psychiatric nurses. This paper reports the findings of a classical grounded theory study conducted to understand how contextual factors in the workplace influences the smoking behaviors of Jordanian psychiatric nurses (JPNs). Method. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with a sample of eight male JPNs smokers at a psychiatric facility in Amman, Jordan. Findings. Constant comparative analysis identified becoming a heavy smoker as a psychosocial process characterized by four sub-categories: normalization of smoking; living in ambiguity; experiencing workplace conflict; and, facing up to workplace stressors. Conclusion. Specific contextual workplace factors require targeted smoking cessation interventions if JPNs are to receive the help they need to reduce health risks associated with heavy smoking. PMID:23844286

  13. Acoustic Noise Levels of Dental Equipments and Its Association with Fear and Annoyance Levels among Patients Attending Different Dental Clinic Setups in Jaipur, India

    PubMed Central

    Ganta, Shravani; Nagaraj, Anup; Pareek, Sonia; Atri, Mansi; Singh, Kushpal; Sidiq, Mohsin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Noise is a source of pervasive occupational hazard for practicing dentists and the patients. The sources of dental sounds by various dental equipments can pose as a potential hazard to hearing system and add to the annoyance levels of the patients. The aim of the study was to analyze the noise levels from various equipments and evaluate the effect of acoustic noise stimulus on dental fear and annoyance levels among patients attending different dental clinic setups in Jaipur, India. Methodology: The sampling frame comprised of 180 patients, which included 90 patients attending 10 different private clinics and 90 patients attending a Dental College in Jaipur. The levels of Acoustic Noise Stimulus originating from different equipments were determined using a precision sound level meter/decibulometer. Dental fear among patients was measured using Dental Fear Scale (DFS). Results: Statistical analysis was performed using chi square test and unpaired t-test. The mean background noise levels were found to be maximum in the pre-clinical setup/ laboratory areas (69.23+2.20). Females and the patients attending dental college setup encountered more fear on seeing the drill as compared to the patients attending private clinics (p<0.001). Conclusion: The sources of dental sounds can pose as a potential hazard to hearing system. It was analyzed that the environment in the clinics can directly have an effect on the fear and annoyance levels of patients. Hence it is necessary control the noise from various dental equipments to reduce the fear of patients from visiting a dental clinic. PMID:24959512

  14. Using Standardized Patients to Teach Complete Denture Procedures in Second Year of Dental School.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Gary M; Halket, Christine A; Ferguson, Gilda P; Perry, Jeffrey

    2017-03-01

    Second-year dental students are commonly instructed on the process of complete denture fabrication with a traditional didactic lecture and preclinical dental laboratory education model. The problem with this limited mode of instruction is that dental students often fail to understand the various chairside procedures required to fabricate a complete denture. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of standardized dental patients to enhance students' understanding of the procedures involved with each appointment in the complete denture process. The Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine-Arizona created an event using standardized patients in four simulated chairside dental appointments for complete denture instruction of second-year dental students. Each appointment simulated the various sequential chairside procedures required to fabricate complete dentures. Following the didactic and dental laboratory instruction and the standardized patient event, a survey was conducted requesting the students' response to six statements regarding their understanding of the denture fabrication process. Of the 110 students who participated in the instructional events, 107 responded to the survey (97% response rate). These students responded very favorably to the simulated appointments, with the majority agreeing or strongly agreeing that their best understanding of the complete denture process was obtained through the standardized patient experiences. The use of standardized patients in simulated denture fabrication appointments enhanced the educational experience of these students when added to the traditional didactic lecture and preclinical laboratory education format. The experience has since been incorporated into the school's second-year oral health science laboratory curriculum.

  15. [The effect of dental health instruction before treatment on anxiety of patients with acute pulpitis].

    PubMed

    Tang, Yu; Du, Rong

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of dental health instruction before treatment on dental anxiety of patients with acute pulpitis. One hundred and fifty-four patients with acute pulpitis treated in our department from July 2011 to June 2013, and aged from 19 years to 64 years, were selected. They were randomly divided into experimental group and control group. Seventy-eight patients of the experimental group accepted dental health instruction before treatment, while 76 cases in the control group received regular treatment. Two questionaires of dental anxiety were proceeded to both groups respectively before treatment. The data was analyzed for Student's t test and Chi-square test using SPSS12.0 software package. Dental anxiety (DA) points of the experimental group after dental health instruction were significantly lower than that before treatment (t=4.1346, P<0.01). DA points of the experimental group after dental health instruction were significantly lower than that of the control group (t=6.2784, P<0.01). The acceptability of the experimental group towards the first treatment was significantly higher than of the control group. The completion rate of the following treatment of the experimental group was also significantly higher than that of the control group. Dental health instruction to patients with acute pulpitis before treatment are helpful to reduce the pressure and relieve the anxiety during the treatment, so that the patients will complete the first and the following treatment successfully.

  16. Factors influencing patients seeking oral health care in the oncology dental support clinic at an urban university dental school setting.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Dale M; Walker, Mary P; Liu, Ying; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors and/or factors associated with medically compromised patients seeking dental care in the oncology dental support clinic (ODSC) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Dentistry. An 18-item survey was mailed to 2,541 patients who were new patients to the clinic from 2006 to 2011. The response rate was approximately 18% (n = 450). Analyses included descriptive statistics of percentages/frequencies as well as predictors based on correlations. Fifty percent of participants, 100 females and 119 males, identified their primary medical diagnosis as cancer. Total household income (p < .001) and the importance of receiving dental care (p < .001) were significant factors in relation to self-rated dental health. Perceived overall health (p < .001) also had a significant association with cancer status and the need for organ transplants. This study provided the ODSC at UMKC and other specialty clinics with vital information that can contribute to future planning efforts. © 2013 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Complementary and alternative medicine usage by patients of a dental school clinic.

    PubMed

    Spector, Michael L; Fischer, Mark; Dawson, Deborah V; Holmes, David C; Kummet, Colleen; Nisly, Nicole L; Baker, Karen A K

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the prevalence and specific reasons for usage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among patients of a dental school clinic. Four hundred and two patients completed a 30-page survey on CAM usage. A higher rate of CAM usage was found in this dental school clinic population than rates previously reported in a general population. More than three-quarters (76.1%) of the respondents reported using at least one CAM treatment in the past 12 months; 93.3% reported using at least one CAM treatment at some time in their lives. High rates of chiropractic use were found in this population. Tooth pain was the most frequently reported dental condition motivating CAM use. About 10% of dental school clinic patients use topical oral herbal and/or natural products to treat dental conditions, most frequently for preventive/oral health reasons or for tooth pain.

  18. Leadership Effectiveness in Jordanian Educational Institutions: A Comparison of Jordanian Female and Male leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Tineh, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Senior leadership positions in Jordanian Ministry of Education are held predominantly by men. Women are teachers and/or school principals. This under-representation of women is primarily due to culturally derived stereotypes that see women as teachers or school principals, but not as superintendents. The purpose of this study was to investigate,…

  19. Leadership Effectiveness in Jordanian Educational Institutions: A Comparison of Jordanian Female and Male leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Tineh, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Senior leadership positions in Jordanian Ministry of Education are held predominantly by men. Women are teachers and/or school principals. This under-representation of women is primarily due to culturally derived stereotypes that see women as teachers or school principals, but not as superintendents. The purpose of this study was to investigate,…

  20. The Effects of Patient Contact upon First-Year Dental Students: A Study of Changing Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, Roger G.; And Others

    This study attempted to determine the effects of early patient contact through clinic experience upon the perceptions and attitudes of first year dental students. Questionnaires were administered at the beginning and end of students' first year in an innovative and new dental school where they were introduced to clinic experience within the first…

  1. [Dental survey of Down syndrome patients. Reflections and synthesis].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, A M; Cuevas, A; Jaramillo, R J

    1991-01-01

    This article presents a work made in year 1990 in the Asociación Odontológica Argentina, in a population of 192 persons with Down's Syndrome. The results were controlled with other Group (Control Group), taken as reference, same number of people, sex and age, not Down's Syndrome diagnostic. Age between 3 and 26 years-old. The examination evaluates: dental caries occurrence, filling and lost teeth, oral hygiene, diet and type of dental treatment received. The report illustrates the differences between the dental health care and dental treatment, in the population with Down's Syndrome and the control Group. The author calls the attention to dental profession to colaborate in the dental health care of Down's Syndrome population.

  2. Effect of tobacco counseling by dental students on patient quitting rate.

    PubMed

    Shibly, Othman

    2010-02-01

    Tobacco use has widespread, devastating effects on the body, including the oral cavity. Today's dental professional must be trained to counsel patients on tobacco cessation, but dental health professionals and students do not feel confident in their counseling abilities. The University at Buffalo School of Dental Medicine (SDM) established the Tobacco Counseling Cessation Protocol (TCCP), which was implemented in the dental curriculum, and dental students were trained in its use. The goal of this project was to assess the effectiveness of the TCCP by surveying both patients and dental students. Students and patients were contacted to determine the effect of the TCCP on the quitting rate. Third- and fourth-year dental students were surveyed through the school e-mail system and asked to report on their tobacco cessation counseling practices. Patients who received TCCP received follow-up telephone calls to obtain their input on the program and also to determine if they had quit. According to the follow-up survey, 14 percent of patients reduced the number of cigarettes smoked per day, and 22 percent quit entirely. Fifty-one percent of those who received the TCCP made a commitment to quit at the time of the intervention; 32 percent of those receiving the TCCP were still smoke-free at six months, but 19 percent had returned to smoking. If predoctoral students receive appropriate training, they can be effective in motivating patients to quit smoking. Dental students are generally receptive to the educational material on tobacco use and smoking cessation counseling, yet only half report routinely implementing the TCCP. More needs to be done to incorporate tobacco cessation counseling into routine dental care. The culture of dentistry must be changed to view tobacco use as a dental problem.

  3. Factors affecting the dental erosion severity of patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Otsu, Mitsuhiro; Hamura, Akira; Ishikawa, Yuiko; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Ichijyo, Tomoyasu; Yoshinaga, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Intraoral disease is a common occurrence in patients with eating disorders, particularly dental erosion, which frequently becomes severe and may hinder daily life. The severity varies from patient to patient. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may help prevent dental erosion in these patients. Accordingly, we investigated the relationship between the severity of erosion and the behavior of patients with eating disorders, with a focus on daily diet and vomiting behavior. A total 71 female eating disorder outpatients from the Clinical Center of Psychosomatic Dentistry of Nippon Dental University Hospital and the Psychosomatic Internal Medicine Department of Kudanzaka Hospital or who were hospitalized at Hasegawa Hospital were enrolled. Dental erosion severity and location were determined by oral examination. Patients who induced vomiting were queried on their behavior during vomiting and on routine diet habits. Patients with dental erosion were further divided into mild and severe groups based on the lesion severity and the groups compared. Dental erosion was observed in 43 of 50 subjects who induced vomiting. Dental erosion was most frequent on the palatal side of the anterior maxillary teeth, occurring in 81.3% of the subjects. There were significant differences observed between the mild and severe groups according to post-vomiting oral hygiene. Significantly more subjects in the mild group consumed large amounts of water before vomiting, and significantly more subjects in the severe group routinely consumed carbonated beverages or sweetened food. While self-induced vomiting is the main cause of dental erosion in eating disorder patients, the erosion severity may be affected by behavior when inducing vomiting or by routine consumption of certain foods and beverages. Addressing these factors may help prevent severe dental erosion in patients who chronically induce vomiting.

  4. Patient receptivity to tobacco cessation counseling and services in a dental teaching institute: a patient review.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pavan Uday; Vivek, S; Chandrasekhar, Thatimatla; Parimi, Nalini; Praveen, B H; Lingaraj, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    The dentists are in a unique position to render tobacco cessation counseling to their patients. The current study is set to assess the attitudes of tobacco users toward tobacco cessation counseling attending a dental teaching institute and hospital in Andhra Pradesh. A systematic random sampling method was used to select the sample. Survey was conducted among 660 patients attending a dental teaching institute. Patients who have completed oral examination in the department of oral medicine and radiology were asked to complete pretested questionnaire. The questionnaire was designed in both English and Telugu (local language). Among the study subjects 88.9% were planning to quit the habit, 72.27% had agreed that they discussed about ill-effects of tobacco, 82% of the subjects said that dentist should routinely offer quit tobacco assistance and services. The present study indicates the majority of patients are receptive towards tobacco counseling and services in the dental setting. In this study, the majority of tobacco users were planning to quit. Majority of patients were unaware of the resources available to help them to quit. Dentists have a significant opportunity to disseminate information to patients who need assistance in quitting the habit of tobacco usage.

  5. Spiritual Care Intervention and Spiritual Well-Being: Jordanian Muslim Nurses' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Musa, Ahmad S

    2016-04-22

    This study explored the frequency of providing aspects of spiritual care intervention and its association with nurses' own spiritual well-being in a convenience sample of 355 Jordanian Arab Muslim nurses. The nurses were recruited from different hospitals, representing both public and private health care sectors in northern and central Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive and correlational design was used. Results indicated that Jordanian Muslim nurses provided religious aspects of spiritual care intervention to their Muslim patients infrequently and that their own spiritual well-being was positively associated with the frequency of provision of spiritual care interventions. The study concluded that Jordanian Muslim nurses most frequently provided spiritual care interventions that were existential, not overtly religious, were commonly used, were more traditional, and did not require direct nurse involvement. Moreover, the findings revealed that spiritual well-being was important to those nurses, which has implications for improving the provision of spiritual care intervention. The study provides information that enables nurses, nursing managers, and nursing educators to evaluate the nurses' provision of various aspects of spiritual care to their Muslim patients, and to identify aspects of spiritual care intervention where nurses might receive training to become competent in providing this care.

  6. New oral anticoagulants and their implications for dental patients.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, John Edward; Stassen, Leo F A

    2014-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is used in several conditions to prevent or treat thromboembolism. Over the last 40 years, warfarin has been the oral anticoagulant of choice and has been considered the mainstay of treatment. However, its use is limited by a narrow therapeutic index and complex pharmacodynamics, necessitating regular monitoring and dose adjustments. Recently, two new oral anticoagulants--dabigatran etexilate (a direct thrombin inhibitor) and rivaroxiban (a factor Xa inhibitor)--have been approved for use in North America and Europe. Unlike warfarin, dabigatran and rivaroxiban are relatively small molecules that work as anticoagulants by targeting specific single steps of the coagulation cascade. Their advantages, relative to warfarin, include: predictable pharmacokinetics; limited food and drug interactions; rapid onset of action; and, short half-life. They require no monitoring. However, they lack a specific reversal agent. The number of patients taking dabigatran and rivaroxaban is increasing. Therefore, it is inevitable that dentists will be required to perform invasive procedures on this cohort of patients. This paper outlines the various properties of the new oral anticoagulants and the most recent guidelines regarding the management of these dental patients taking these medications.

  7. Patients' Perceptions of Dehumanization of Patients in Dental School Settings: Implications for Clinic Management and Curriculum Planning.

    PubMed

    Raja, Sheela; Shah, Raveena; Hamad, Judy; Van Kanegan, Mona; Kupershmidt, Alexandra; Kruthoff, Mariela

    2015-10-01

    Although the importance of empathy, rapport, and anxiety/pain awareness in dentist-patient relations has been well documented, these factors continue to be an issue with patients in many dental school clinics. The aim of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding of how patients at an urban, university-affiliated medical center and its dental school's clinic experienced oral health care and to generate ideas for improving the dental school's clinical curriculum and management of the clinic. Although patient satisfaction surveys are common, in-depth patient narratives are an underutilized resource for improving dental education. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 uninsured or underinsured dental patients at these sites, and the results were analyzed using content analysis. Major phenomena that participants discussed were the importance of empathy and good rapport with their oral health providers and provider awareness of dental pain and anxiety. Many patients also discussed feeling dehumanized during dental visits. Based on their positive and negative experiences, the participants made suggestions for how oral health professionals can successfully engage patients in treatment.

  8. Treating dental crowding with mandibular incisor extraction in an Angle Class I patient.

    PubMed

    Machado, Gislana Braga

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular dental crowding often encourages patients to seek orthodontic treatment. The orthodontist should decide between protrusion of incisors or decrease in dental volume so as to achieve proper alignment and leveling. The present study reports the treatment of an Angle Class I malocclusion adolescent female brachyfacial patient with severe mandibular dental crowding, increased curve of Spee and deep overbite. The patient was treated with extraction of a mandibular incisor. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO) as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO.

  9. Treating dental crowding with mandibular incisor extraction in an Angle Class I patient

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Gislana Braga

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular dental crowding often encourages patients to seek orthodontic treatment. The orthodontist should decide between protrusion of incisors or decrease in dental volume so as to achieve proper alignment and leveling. The present study reports the treatment of an Angle Class I malocclusion adolescent female brachyfacial patient with severe mandibular dental crowding, increased curve of Spee and deep overbite. The patient was treated with extraction of a mandibular incisor. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO) as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO. PMID:26154463

  10. Patients' attitudes about rapid oral HIV screening in an urban, free dental clinic.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Craig Allan; Ablah, Elizabeth; Reznik, David; Robbins, Darcy K

    2008-03-01

    The 2006 Centers for Disease Control recommendations for routine HIV screening in all health care settings could include dental clinics an important testing venue. However, little is known about patients' attitudes regarding the routine use of rapid oral HIV screening at an urban free dental clinic. This pilot study seeks to evaluate the patient perspective on rapid HIV screening in this setting. In June 2007, patients at a free dental clinic in Kansas City, Missouri, were provided an attitude assessment survey prior to their dental visit. This dental clinic serves a diverse patient population consisting of approximately 37% white, 47% black, 6% Hispanic, 4% Asian, and 1% Native American uninsured patients. Results were analyzed for acceptance of testing and potential barriers. Of the 150 respondents, 73% reported they would be willing to take a free rapid HIV screening test during their dental visit. Overall, 91% of Hispanics, 79% of Caucasians, and 73% of African American patients reported they would be willing to be screened. Patients with a history of multiple prior screening tests for HIV were more likely to agree to oral rapid HIV screening in the dental clinic. The majority (62%) reported that it did not matter who provided them with the screening result, although some (37%) preferred their dentist above any other provider. Low self-perception of risk (37%) and having already received screening elsewhere (24%) were the main reasons for not accepting a free, rapid HIV screening. Overall, dental clinic patients widely accepted the offer of rapid oral HIV screening. Rapid HIV screening in the dental clinic setting is a viable option to increase the number of individuals who know their HIV status.

  11. Dental Awareness among Parents and Oral Health of Paediatric Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Marwaha, Mohita; Bansal, Kalpana; Sachdeva, Anupam; Gupta, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental care is often overlooked by the parents of children receiving treatment for cancer including chemotherapy who are in a phase of severe immunosuppression. Aim (i) To study dental attitudes of parents of children receiving chemotherapy towards importance of dental care. (ii) To evaluate oral hygiene status and compare it with healthy controls. Materials and Methods A questionnaire assessing the awareness towards dental care was given to the parents of 47 paediatric patients suffering from cancer receiving chemotherapy and to parents of 47 paediatric patients reporting to outpatient Department of Pedodontics at SGT Dental College. Oral examination was also carried out for both the groups and DMFT/dmft, plaque and gingival index were noted. Results Parents had a varying opinion regarding dental health of their child. The caries status of children in the control group was greater than children in the study group. The mean plaque index of children in the control group (1.40) was greater than children in the study group (1.34) which was statistically significant according to Mann-Whitney U test. The gingival health of children in the study group was better than children in the control group which was also not statistically significant. Conclusion This study highlights need for a periodic referral of the child cancer patients to the paediatric dental clinic in hospitals for the timely dental care. PMID:27437369

  12. Current status of patient recall in U.S. predoctoral dental school clinics.

    PubMed

    Afshari, Fatemeh S; Schelkopf, Stuart; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Marinis, Aristotelis; Syros, George; Campbell, Stephen D; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2014-10-01

    The Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA)'s revised standard 2-23, which went into effect in July 2013, requires U.S. dental graduates to be competent in "evaluation of the outcomes of treatment, recall strategies, and prognosis." To assess the way dental schools are implementing this revised recommendation, a survey was conducted to assess the existence of recall systems in the schools' clinics and factors enhancing or hindering the formation of an effective recall system. Surveys were returned from thirty-five dental schools (54.7 percent response rate). Results showed that most institutions had active recall systems and the respondents believed that program effectiveness can be further improved. Suggested improvements included patient education and tracking patient recall appointments. The results indicate that recall systems exist in predoctoral dental education programs, have high student involvement, and vary among schools.

  13. Factors influencing patient satisfaction with dental appearance and treatments they desire to improve aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Tin-Oo, Mon Mon; Saddki, Norkhafizah; Hassan, Nurhidayati

    2011-02-23

    We assessed factors influencing patients' satisfaction with their dental appearance and the treatments they desired to improve dental aesthetics. A cross-sectional study was performed out among 235 adult patients who visited the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia dental clinic. A structured, interviewer-guided questionnaire was used to identify patient satisfaction with their general dental appearance, cosmetic elements and desired treatments. The 235 patients consisted of 70 males (29.8%) and 165 females (70.2%), of mean age 31.5 years (SD 13.0). Of these patients, 124 (52.8%) were not satisfied with their general dental appearance. In addition, 132 patients (56.2%) were not happy with the color of their teeth, 76 (32.3%), regarded their teeth were poorly aligned, 62 (26.4%), as crowded and 56 (23.4%) protruded. Dissatisfaction with tooth color was significantly higher in female than in male patients (odds ratio [OR] of 1.99 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-3.50). Tooth whitening was the treatment most desired by patients (48.1%). Results of multiple logistic regression analysis showed that patient dissatisfaction with general dental appearance was significantly associated with female gender (OR = 2.18; 95% CI: 1.18-4.03), unhappiness with tooth color (OR = 3.05; 95% CI: 1.74-5.34) and the opinion that their teeth protruded (OR = 2.91, 95% CI: 1.44-5.91). Most patients in this study were not satisfied with their dental appearance with a greater percentage of females expressing dissatisfaction than males. An age was not associated with satisfaction. Unhappiness with tooth color and feelings of having protruding teeth also had a significant negative influence on patient satisfaction with general dental appearance.

  14. Factors influencing patient satisfaction with dental appearance and treatments they desire to improve aesthetics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We assessed factors influencing patients' satisfaction with their dental appearance and the treatments they desired to improve dental aesthetics. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed out among 235 adult patients who visited the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia dental clinic. A structured, interviewer-guided questionnaire was used to identify patient satisfaction with their general dental appearance, cosmetic elements and desired treatments. Results The 235 patients consisted of 70 males (29.8%) and 165 females (70.2%), of mean age 31.5 years (SD 13.0). Of these patients, 124 (52.8%) were not satisfied with their general dental appearance. In addition, 132 patients (56.2%) were not happy with the color of their teeth, 76 (32.3%), regarded their teeth were poorly aligned, 62 (26.4%), as crowded and 56 (23.4%) protruded. Dissatisfaction with tooth color was significantly higher in female than in male patients (odds ratio [OR] of 1.99 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-3.50). Tooth whitening was the treatment most desired by patients (48.1%). Results of multiple logistic regression analysis showed that patient dissatisfaction with general dental appearance was significantly associated with female gender (OR = 2.18; 95% CI: 1.18-4.03), unhappiness with tooth color (OR = 3.05; 95% CI: 1.74-5.34) and the opinion that their teeth protruded (OR = 2.91, 95% CI: 1.44-5.91). Conclusions Most patients in this study were not satisfied with their dental appearance with a greater percentage of females expressing dissatisfaction than males. An age was not associated with satisfaction. Unhappiness with tooth color and feelings of having protruding teeth also had a significant negative influence on patient satisfaction with general dental appearance. PMID:21342536

  15. Altered expectations on dental implant therapy; views of patients referred for treatment of peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Kajsa H; Wennström, Jan L; Berglundh, Tord; Abrahamsson, Ingemar

    2017-04-01

    The aim was to explore patients' reactions on being diagnosed with peri-implantitis, their opinions on dental implant therapy and expectations on treatment of the disease. The study subjects were patients referred to a specialist clinic for treatment of peri-implantitis. The method of grounded theory was used in collecting and analyzing data. Audiotaped, thematized open-ended interviews were conducted. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and consecutively analyzed in hierarchical coding processes that continued until saturation was met (n = 15). In the analysis, a conceptual model was generated that illuminated a process among patients. From having very high initial expectations on dental implant therapy as a permanent solution of oral/dental problems, patients realized that dental implants, such as teeth, require continuous care and that there is no guarantee for that dental implants provides a treatment alternative free from future problems. The core concept of the model "altered expectations on dental implant therapy" was composed of three main categories: "initial expectations on dental implant therapy and living with dental implants", "being referred to periodontist and become diagnosed with peri-implantitis" and "investing again in an expensive therapy with no guarantee for the future". Patients may have unrealistically high expectations on dental implant therapy. The results illuminate the importance of patient-centered communication in dentistry and that treatment decisions should be based not only on professional expertise but also on expectations, abilities, wishes and life circumstances of the individual patient. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Assessing Critical Thinking Outcomes of Dental Hygiene Students Utilizing Virtual Patient Simulation: A Mixed Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Allaire, Joanna L

    2015-09-01

    Dental hygiene educators must determine which educational practices best promote critical thinking, a quality necessary to translate knowledge into sound clinical decision making. The aim of this small pilot study was to determine whether virtual patient simulation had an effect on the critical thinking of dental hygiene students. A pretest-posttest design using the Health Science Reasoning Test was used to evaluate the critical thinking skills of senior dental hygiene students at The University of Texas School of Dentistry at Houston Dental Hygiene Program before and after their experience with computer-based patient simulation cases. Additional survey questions sought to identify the students' perceptions of whether the experience had helped develop their critical thinking skills and improved their ability to provide competent patient care. A convenience sample of 31 senior dental hygiene students completed both the pretest and posttest (81.5% of total students in that class); 30 senior dental hygiene students completed the survey on perceptions of the simulation (78.9% response rate). Although the results did not show a significant increase in mean scores, the students reported feeling that the use of virtual patients was an effective teaching method to promote critical thinking, problem-solving, and confidence in the clinical realm. The results of this pilot study may have implications to support the use of virtual patient simulations in dental hygiene education. Future research could include a larger controlled study to validate findings from this study.

  17. Which Factors Affect Dental Esthetics and Smile Attractiveness in Orthodontically Treated Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Heravi, Farzin; Rashed, Roozbeh; Zarrabi, Mohammad Javad; Setayesh, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to find the factors that affect dental esthetics and smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients according to laypeople’s judgment, and to determine whether there is any relationship between dental and smile esthetics. Materials and Methods: Using the Q-sort technique, 60 laypersons (30 males, 30 females) rated dental and smile photographs of 48 orthodontically treated patients based on their degree of attractiveness. Dental and smile parameters of each rated image were measured by Smile Analyzer software. The Student’s t-test and chi-square test were used to compare dental and smile parameters between attractive and unattractive images. The logistic regression was used to assess which variables predicted dental and smile esthetics in treated individuals. Results: The philtral to commissural height ratio and gingival display were significantly different in attractive and unattractive smiles (P=0.003 and P=0.02, respectively). None of the dental variables were found to be a determinant of dental esthetics at the end of the orthodontic treatment (P>0.05). According to the judgment of all raters (female and male) and the male raters’ judgment, smile attractiveness could be predicted by philtral to commissural height ratio and buccal corridor ratio (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant relationship between dental esthetics and smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients (P>0.05). Conclusion: The philtral to commissural height ratio and buccal corridor ratio can be considered as predictors of smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients. Achieving dental esthetics at the end of orthodontic treatment does not guarantee smile attractiveness. PMID:26877739

  18. Which Factors Affect Dental Esthetics and Smile Attractiveness in Orthodontically Treated Patients?

    PubMed

    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Heravi, Farzin; Rashed, Roozbeh; Zarrabi, Mohammad Javad; Setayesh, Yasin

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to find the factors that affect dental esthetics and smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients according to laypeople's judgment, and to determine whether there is any relationship between dental and smile esthetics. Using the Q-sort technique, 60 laypersons (30 males, 30 females) rated dental and smile photographs of 48 orthodontically treated patients based on their degree of attractiveness. Dental and smile parameters of each rated image were measured by Smile Analyzer software. The Student's t-test and chi-square test were used to compare dental and smile parameters between attractive and unattractive images. The logistic regression was used to assess which variables predicted dental and smile esthetics in treated individuals. The philtral to commissural height ratio and gingival display were significantly different in attractive and unattractive smiles (P=0.003 and P=0.02, respectively). None of the dental variables were found to be a determinant of dental esthetics at the end of the orthodontic treatment (P>0.05). According to the judgment of all raters (female and male) and the male raters' judgment, smile attractiveness could be predicted by philtral to commissural height ratio and buccal corridor ratio (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant relationship between dental esthetics and smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients (P>0.05). The philtral to commissural height ratio and buccal corridor ratio can be considered as predictors of smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients. Achieving dental esthetics at the end of orthodontic treatment does not guarantee smile attractiveness.

  19. Jordanian pharmaceutical companies: are their marketing efforts paying off?

    PubMed

    Al-Shaikh, Mustafa S; Torres, Ivonne M; Zuniga, Miguel A; Ghunaim, Ayman

    2011-04-01

    The pharmaceuticals industry is one of the main industries in Jordan. Jordanian pharmaceuticals rank third in the export industry of this country. This study aims to examine the strengths that Jordanian pharmaceutical companies have, which, in turn, form their competitiveness base. In addition, this study aims to identify their weaknesses and the effects of marketing their products in the local market. What is the relationship between Jordanian pharmaceutical product quality, price and value, and the competitiveness of pharmaceutical companies in the local market? Our study aims to answer this and other questions. Our results and practical implications are discussed.

  20. Dental education and care for underserved patients: an analysis of students' intentions and alumni behavior.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carlos S; Ester, Todd V; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2006-04-01

    The U.S. surgeon general's report on oral health stressed the importance of providing dental care to underserved patients. The objectives of this study were to explore a) dental students' intentions and dentists' behavior concerning treating underserved patients, b) their perceptions of their education concerning these patients, and c) the relationship between dental education and their attitudes and behavior. Data were collected from 328 dental students (response rate: 77.5 percent) and 234 alumni (response rate: 43.7 percent). Only 67.4 percent of the students and 38 percent of the alumni indicated that their education had prepared them well to treat patients from different socioeconomic backgrounds; 71.3 percent of students and 55.2 percent of alumni responded that they had been well educated to treat patients from different ethnic/racial groups. The findings showed a positive relationship between the degree of curriculum focus on the importance of treating patients from all aspects of society and students' and alumni intentions to provide inclusive patient care to patients from diverse backgrounds. The more students agreed that their dental education had prepared them well to treat patients from different ethnic backgrounds, the more likely they were to report that they intended to treat these patients (r=.12; p=.033). In a similar manner, the more the alumni agreed that their dental education had prepared them well to treat patients in different communities, the more likely they were to treat patients from different socioeconomic backgrounds (r=.18; p=.009). In conclusion, these findings showed that access to oral health care for underserved patients could potentially be increased if dental students were more overtly educated about the importance of treating patients from all segments of society.

  1. Health-related information exchange experiences of Jordanian women at breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Rana F; Lally, Robin M

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore Jordanian women's experiences of information exchange following diagnosis of early stage breast cancer. A purposive sample of 28 women who had surgery for early stage breast cancer within 6 months prior to the interview and had treatment at three hospitals in Central and Northern Jordan was recruited for the study. Data were collected using semi-structured individual interviews focused on women's communication experiences at diagnosis and during cancer treatment. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed verbatim in Arabic, and analyzed using conventional content analysis. Three main themes associated with information exchange were revealed as follows: (1) knowledge about breast cancer and its treatment, (2) communication of cancer diagnosis and treatment, and (3) educating on treatment side effects. Misconceptions about breast cancer risk factors, consequences of breast cancer treatment, and breast cancer-related symptoms were common among participants. Women made important health-related decisions based on misconceptions. Physician's information giving, availability, and responses to women's questions varied by their level of education and the type and location of treatment facility. Informational exchange experiences vary among Jordanian women diagnosed with breast cancer and raise concern over opportunities offered these women to engage in informed decision making. Findings suggest a need for nurses to assess the information needs of Jordanian women newly diagnosed with breast cancer and provide education tailored to individual needs. There is also a need to develop Arabic educational materials and make these available for patients at treatment facilities in all regions of Jordan.

  2. Legislation and informed consent brochures for dental patients receiving amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Cochran, Amy A; Cross, Catherine L; Wack, Courtney A; Long, William B; Newkirk, Anthony T

    2008-01-01

    In 2008, Norway banned the use of mercury for amalgam restorations. Four states in the United States have developed Informed Consent Brochures for amalgam restorations that must be given to their dental patients. The authors describe a patient who had a large cavity in his left lower molar tooth no.18 that had to be removed by an oral surgeon. When the patient went to the oral surgeon, the surgeon told the patient that he would replace the carious tooth with a gold implant. He was not given an Informed Consent Brochure regarding dental restorative materials. The oral surgeon extracted the carious tooth, replacing the tooth with a supposed gold crown implant. On his yearly dental examination, his dentist took an x-ray of his dental implant and explained that the x-ray could not distinguish whether the implant contained either gold or mercury. Consequently, the dentist referred him to a dental clinic in which the dental implant could be removed without mercury contamination of the patient's neurologic system during the extraction of the implant from the root canal. During the removal of the dental restoration, the dentist found build up expanding into the root canal that had a black color. The crown and underlying tooth were sent to ALT BioScience for analysis. Elemental analysis of the crown and underlying tooth confirmed the presence of mercury in the restoration. The patient should have been given an Informed Consent Brochure by the dentist that described the dental restoration that was used in the dental implant.

  3. Determinants of receiving intravenous sedation in a sample of dentally-fearful patients in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Coolidge, Trilby; Irwin, Scott P.; Leyster, Kimberly A.; Milgrom, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Dental fear may be the most common reason for referral for intravenous sedation. Intravenous sedation offers many patients an opportunity to obtain needed dental care. However, intravenous sedation also has costs and may not help patients overcome their fear. Given a sample of 518 dentally-fearful patients in the USA presenting for dental care, this study examined the variables which predicted receiving intravenous sedation or not. About one-fifth of the patients received intravenous sedation, while the others received only cognitive behavioural therapy. Having more carious teeth, higher dental fear, more negative beliefs about dentists, lifetime diagnoses of panic disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder, fewer existing coping skills, and a lower desire to cope with the dental situation were each predictive of having intravenous sedation. When the variables were considered simultaneously, only lower desire to cope contributed uniquely to the prediction. In a setting where psychological treatment for dental fear is available, patients’ desire to cope with their fear was the most important factor in determining whether they received intravenous sedation or not. PMID:23264704

  4. Patient satisfaction analysis on service quality of dental health care based on empathy and responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Dewi, Fellani Danasra; Sudjana, Grita; Oesman, Yevis Marty

    2011-01-01

    Background: Transformation of health care is underway from sellers’ market to consumers’ market, where the satisfaction of the patients’ need is a primary concern while defining the service quality. Hence, commitment to provide a high-quality service and achieving patients’ satisfaction becomes an important issue for dental health care provider. The aim of this research is to investigate the quality of dental health care service based on empathy and responsiveness aspects. Methods: A total of 90 questionnaires were completed by the dental patients who came to dental polyclinic located in Government Hospital, West Java, Indonesia. The questionnaire was concerned on two dimensions of service quality model, i.e. empathy and responsiveness. The obtained data were analyzed using inferential statistics (t test) and also descriptive statistics with importance–performance analysis. Results: All the attributes tested by t test showed that perception and expectation differed significantly, except for responsiveness, i.e. ability of dental assistants in assisting the dentist (t test 0.505patient satisfaction is the response given by administration staff related to long waiting time (t test 5.377), followed by dental assistant's knowledge about the patient's need during treatment (t test 4.822) and explanation that was given by dentist (t test 4.700). Conclusion: It can be inferred from IPA that priority should be given to dentist's communication and dental assistant's knowledge toward patient's needs to enhance the service quality. PMID:22135687

  5. Prevalence, severity and etiology of dental wear in patients with eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena; Araújo, Juliana J.; Marsicano, Juliane A.; Santos, José E.; Bastos, José R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, distribution and associated factors of dental wear among patients with eating disorders (EDs). Materials and Methods: An epidemiological cross-sectional survey was conducted by trained, calibrated examiners, using the dental wear index. The sample was composed of 30 patients with EDs (experimental group – G1) and 30 control patients without current or previous history of EDs (G2). A questionnaire was used to assess the etiological factors of dental wear. The univariate analyses using the Chi-square (χ2) test were used to compare the tooth wear prevalence between groups according to the surface and tooth (P > 0.05). Results: The dental wear was similar for both group; however, the G1 presented more moderate wear in molars when compared with G2 (P = 0.048). The majority of EDs patients related have one or more oral habits (n = 26; 86.6%) and only 13.4% (n = 4) affirmed did not have oral habits. The etiological factors of tooth wear related with dental wear were biting objects (P = 0.04) and pain in temporomandibular disorders (P = 0.03). Conclusion: The highest prevalence of dental wear was observed in the molars teeth. Differences in the extent and pattern of dental wear were found in an individual, emphasized the relevance of clinical parameter. PMID:24966749

  6. Stress Reduction through Audio Distraction in Anxious Pediatric Dental Patients: An Adjunctive Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Divya; Samadi, Firoza; Jaiswal, Jn; Tripathi, Abhay Mani

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the eff-cacy of 'audio distraction' in anxious pediatric dental patients. Sixty children were randomly selected and equally divided into two groups of thirty each. The first group was control group (group A) and the second group was music group (group B). The dental procedure employed was extraction for both the groups. The children included in music group were allowed to hear audio presentation throughout the treatment procedure. Anxiety was measured by using Venham's picture test, pulse rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation. 'Audio distraction' was found efficacious in alleviating anxiety of pediatric dental patients. 'Audio distraction' did decrease the anxiety in pediatric patients to a significant extent. How to cite this article: Singh D, Samadi F, Jaiswal JN, Tripathi AM. Stress Reduction through Audio Distraction in Anxious Pediatric Dental Patients: An Adjunctive Clinical Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):149-152.

  7. Components of patient satisfaction with a dental restorative visit: results from The Dental Practice- Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Qvist, Vibeke; Patel, Sagar; Foy, Pat; Williams, O. Dale; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Identify components of patient satisfaction with a dental restorative visit; and test the hypothesis that certain dentist, patient, and procedural factors are associated with patient satisfaction. Methods 197 practices in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) recruited consecutive patients with defective restorations that were replaced or repaired in permanent teeth. At the end of the treatment visit, each subject was asked to complete a satisfaction survey and mail it directly to the DPBRN Regional Coordinators. Results Analysis of 5,879 satisfaction surveys revealed three satisfaction components which were interpersonal relationship-comfort attributes; material choice-value factors; and sensory-evaluative features. Satisfaction was highest among patients who received care in a private practice model; when the restoration was repaired rather than replaced; or when the restored tooth was not a molar. Conclusion These data suggest that a patient’s judgments of dentist’s skills and quality of care are based on personal interactions with the dentist, the level of comfort, and post-treatment sensitivity. These conclusions have direct implications for patient management before, during and after the procedure. Practice implications When taking a patient-centered approach, dentists should seek to understand how patients evaluate and rate the service provided, facilitating a focus on what each patient values most. PMID:22942147

  8. Knowledge and awareness about diabetes and periodontal health among Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Al Habashneh, Rola; Khader, Yousef; Hammad, Mohammed M; Almuradi, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the awareness, perception, sources of information, and knowledge of diabetes mellitus and periodontal health among Jordanians, to examine the factors related to their knowledge, and organize effective education programs. A random sample of 500 diabetic patients was recruited from three hospitals and three comprehensive health centers that represent both urban and rural populations in Jordan between September 25, 2006, and February 20, 2007. Completed questionnaires with the answers were returned by 405 participants (response rate was 81%). Only 28% indicated that they followed up gum diseases with the dentist; 48% were aware that diabetic patients are more prone to gum diseases and oral health complications. About a third (38%) recognized that their periodontal health might affect their glycaemic level. Television and Internet were the main source of knowledge for dentists with the rate of 50%. Knowledge about diabetes and periodontal health among diabetic patients is low, and majority of patients were unaware of the oral health complications of their disease and the need for proper preventive care. Issues on education need to be addressed. Therefore, appropriate educational programs should be planned according to community needs, and the target of these programs should be patients with irregular visits to the dentist and physicians. The clinical implication of our findings is that dentists, physicians, and other health providers should inspect diabetic patients for gum diseases each time they come for care and recommend that diabetic patient see a dentist regularly. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dental extractions for preradiation dental clearance and incidence of osteoradionecrosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    See Toh, Yoong L; Soong, Yoke L; Chim, Yi X; Tan, Li T; Lye, Weng K; Teoh, Khim H

    2017-09-01

    The aims of the present retrospective study were to evaluate the outcomes of dental extractions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients who had undergone dental clearance pre- and post-radiotherapy (RT) with intensity-modulated RT, and to report on the incidence and timing of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) in these patients. A total of 231 patients were seen pre-, mid-, and postradiation therapy. Information on patient demographics, smoking history, staging, treatment modalities, dental extraction indications, and number and site of dental extractions was gathered. Wilcoxon two-sample tests and Fisher's exact test were used to test the association between groups for patient variables. The mean number of teeth removed was 4.1 teeth per patient. A total of 334 (35.2%) teeth were removed for periodontal reasons, 322 (34.03%) were removed prophylactically, and the remaining teeth were removed because of deep caries, retained roots, partial impaction, endodontic lesions, and prosthodontic reasons. Patients had an average of 19.6 teeth remaining after dental clearance, and only 97 (42%) required prosthetic intervention. The statistical analysis showed that there was no correlation between dental extractions pre- or post-RT and the development of ORN. No specific parameter was directly associated with dental extractions, although smoking and increased number of teeth removed preradiation seemed to be prevalent in patients who developed ORN. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Dental cone beam CT image quality possibly reduced by patient movement.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, K; O'Connor, S; Heath, N

    2013-01-01

    Patient artefacts in dental cone beam CT scans can happen for various reasons. These range from artefacts from metal restorations to movement. An audit was carried out in the Glasgow Dental Hospital analysing how many scans showed signs of "motion artefact", and then to assess if there was any correlation between patient age and movement artefacts. Specific age demographics were then analysed to see if these cohorts were at a higher risk of "movement artefacts".

  11. Using standardized patients to assess presentation of a dental treatment plan.

    PubMed

    Logan, H L; Muller, P J; Edwards, Y; Jakobsen, J R

    1999-10-01

    In this new era of relationship-based care, involvement in treatment planning and goal setting is a high priority for patient satisfaction. This study reports on the use of standardized patients (SPs) in training third-year dental students to gather dental, medical, and psychosocial information from patients and to involve the patient in the decision-making process leading to the dental treatment plan. Among the skill areas measured, students were most successful in gathering dental information, with 94 percent of the students obtaining the complete set. Students were least successful in identifying the patient's goals for treatment (81 percent of the students identified the patients' goals). Students were most challenged by discussing sensitive topics with patients such as grief-related depression (25 percent of the students recognized and discussed such topics). It is important that dental schools familiarize students with patient issues and teach them how to talk effectively to patients about personal issues and to incorporate those issues into a discussion of the treatment plan for the patient. Standardized patients can be used effectively toward this end.

  12. Evaluation of dental anxiety in patients undergoing dentoalveolar surgery with laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Ugurlu, Faysal; Cavus, Onur; Kaya, Alper; Sener, Cem B

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dental anxiety in patients undergoing apicectomy procedures performed with conventional instruments or an erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Twenty-eight patients undergoing apicectomy were divided into two groups; roots were removed with an Er:YAG laser in group A (n=14) and with conventional instruments in group B (n=14). All patients completed preoperative State-Trait Anxiety Inventories (STAI) and postoperative questionnaires. Although state anxiety, trait anxiety, and postoperative questionnaire scores were lower in patients undergoing Er:YAG laser treatment than in those treated with conventional instruments, the differences were not statistically significant. Surgical instruments affect the anxiety levels of dental patients. Even with the STAI scores being lower for patients treated with Er:YAG, use of the Er:YAG laser alone cannot contribute to the resolution of dental anxiety. A patient's individual condition is the major factor influencing that patient's anxiety level.

  13. Quality control and patient dosimetry in dental cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, J; Stoyanov, D

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the initial experience in performing quality control and patient dose measurements in a cone beam computed tomography (CT) scanner (ILUMA Ultra, IMTEC Imaging, USA) for oral and maxillofacial radiology. The X-ray tube and the generator were tested first, including the kVp accuracy and precision, and the half-value layer (HVL). The following tests specific for panoramic dental systems were also performed: tube output, beam size and beam alignment to the detector. The tests specific for CT included measurements of noise and CT numbers in water and in air, as well as the homogeneity of CT numbers. The most appropriate dose quantity was found to be the air kerma-area product (KAP) measured with a KAP-metre installed at the tube exit. KAP values were found to vary from 110 to 185 microGy m(2) for available adult protocols and to be 54 microGy m(2) for the paediatric protocol. The effective dose calculated with the software PCXMC (STUK, Finland) was 0.05 mSv for children and 0.09-0.16 mSv for adults.

  14. Infection control practices in dental school: A patient perspective from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Baseer, Mohammad Abdul; Rahman, Ghousia; Yassin, Mona Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Routine use of gloves, masks and spectacles are important in infection control. Aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of infection control measures among the patients attending clinics of Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy (RCsDP) in Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods: It was a cross-sectional descriptive study of a convenient sample of dental patients attending dental clinics of RCsDP. A structured, close ended, self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 350 patients and a response rate of 86% was obtained. Questionnaireconsisted of series of queries related to knowledge and attitudes of patients towards infection control measures. Data analysis included frequency distribution tables, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Final study sample included 301 patients (147 males and 154 females). Almost 99%, 93.7% and 82.7% of the patients agreed that dentist should wear gloves, face mask and spectacles while providing treatment. However, 60.1%, 30% of the patients said that HIV and hepatitis-B infections can spread in dental clinics. Half of the patients felt that they were likely to contract AIDS and 77.7% refused to attend clinics if they knew that AIDS and Hepatitis-B patients treated there. Only 25.2% said that autoclave is the best method of sterilization. A significantly higher knowledge of infection control was observed among the previous dental visitors compared to the first time visitors to the dental clinics (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Patients revealed adequate knowledge towards the use of gloves, face mask and spectacles by dentist. However, their knowledge regarding the spread of Hepatitis-B, HIV infection and use of autoclave was poor. Previous visitor of dental clinics showed higher knowledge of infection control as compared to the first time visitors. Many patients expressed their negative attitudes towards dental care due to AIDS and Hepatitis-B concerns

  15. Expectations and final evaluation of complete dentures by patients, dentist and dental technician.

    PubMed

    Marachlioglou, C R M Z; Dos Santos, J F F; Cunha, V P P; Marchini, Leonardo

    2010-07-01

    There is a poor association between the dentist's evaluation of denture quality and patients' satisfaction with their dentures. Possible differences between dental professionals and patients' expectations might help explain differences in outcome evaluations. This study compared scores given by a dentist, a dental technician and patients for their expectations before and their final evaluation after complete dentures treatment. Twenty completely edentulous patients, a prosthodontist and a dental technician provided scores for the expected aesthetic and functional results of their dentures based on a visual analogue scale at baseline. Post-treatment completion ratings were given after adjustments, by dentist and patients. The dental technician provided post-treatment completion ratings after completing the dentures. The patients had higher expectations than the dental technician and the dentist perceived for both aesthetic and function (P < 0.001). The patients also presented higher post-treatment completion ratings than the dental professionals perceived for final aesthetics (P = 0.016, Kendall's W = 0.207) and function (P = 0.002, Kendall's W = 0.303). Only the dentist presented a statistically significant difference between expectations (lower) and final (higher) outcomes for aesthetics (P = 0.017) and function (P = 0.003). There was no correlation between expectations and post-treatment completion ratings according to the patients' age. There was also no correlation between the patients' gender and expectation scores. Patients presented higher expectations regarding their dentures than dental professionals. The dentist believed that dentures would bring fewer benefits than patients did, but his perception of denture benefits post-treatment was significantly higher than his expectations.

  16. Medical screening of 1500 patients in a dental surgery: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Y G; Fenlon, M R

    1989-01-01

    Communication between medical and dental practitioners about patients they have in common enhances total patient care, but such communication rarely occurs. This may be due to lack of appreciation by doctors of the medical risks to certain patients undergoing dental treatment. To ascertain a relevant medical history, prospective medical screening was performed on 1500 new patients attending a general dental practice using a standard health questionnaire followed by an interview between the patient and dentist. There were 382 (25.5%) patients with a current or past medical history of relevance to dentistry, 90 (6.0%) were taking medication of potential importance and 105 (7.0%) considered they had an intolerance to certain drugs. The screening provided a patient data base for medical and medico-legal purposes. A total of 376 (25.1%) questionnaires were filled out incorrectly and 63 of these (16.8%) had major misinformation about medical history. A small but important group deliberately misled the dentist either from fear of refusal of treatment or embarrassment about their medical history. Therefore interviews are an essential adjunct to written health questionnaires in eliciting accurate information. Formal screening of new patients is essential in general dental practice. Furthermore, general medical practitioners need to become aware of the common risks to patients undergoing dentistry. Better formal and informal communication between general medical and dental practitioners is recommended for the benefit of their mutual patients. PMID:2560022

  17. Knowledge and attitude of Indian clinical dental students towards the dental treatment of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Marya, Charu Mohan; Sharma, Nilima; Mohanty, Vikrant; Marwah, Mohita; Oberoi, Avneet

    2014-12-01

    Oral health care of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a growing area of concern. Information on HIV- and AIDS-related knowledge among dental students provides a crucial foundation for efforts aimed at developing an appropriate dental curriculum on HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitude of Indian clinical dental students towards the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS and perceived sources of information regarding HIV-related issues. Data were collected from clinical dental students (third year, fourth year and internship) from three dental institutions in Delhi National Capital Region (NCR). The questions assessed the knowledge and attitude towards treatment of patients with HIV and the perceived source of information related to HIV. The willingness to treat HIV-positive patients among dental students was 67.0%, and 74.20% were confident of treating a patient with HIV/AIDS. The potential problems in rendering treatment to these patients were effect on the attitude of other patients (49.90%) and staff fears (52.50%). The correct knowledge regarding the infection-control practice (barrier technique) was found among only 15.50% of respondents. The respondents had sufficient knowledge regarding the oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS. There was no correlation between the knowledge and attitude score, demonstrating a gap between knowledge and attitude among dental students regarding treatment of HIV-infected patients. Appropriate knowledge has to be delivered through the dental education curriculum, which can instil confidence in students about their ability to manage HIV-positive patients. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  18. Titanium allergy in dental implant patients: a clinical study on 1500 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Sicilia, Alberto; Cuesta, Susana; Coma, Gerardo; Arregui, Ignacio; Guisasola, Cristina; Ruiz, Eduardo; Maestro, Antonio

    2008-08-01

    In dentistry, allergic reactions to Ti implants have not been studied, nor considered by professionals. Placing permanent metal dental implants in allergic patients can provoke type IV or I reactions. Several symptoms have been described, from skin rashes and implant failure, to non-specific immune suppression. Our objective was to evaluate the presence of titanium allergy by the anamnesis and examination of patients, together with the selective use of cutaneous and epicutaneous testing, in patients treated with or intending to receive dental implants of such material. Thirty-five subjects out of 1500 implant patients treated and/or examined (2002-2004) were selected for Ti allergy analysis. Sixteen presented allergic symptoms after implant placement or unexplained implant failures [allergy compatible response group (ACRG)], while 19 had a history of other allergies, or were heavily Ti exposed during implant surgeries or had explained implant failures [predisposing factors group (PFG)]. Thirty-five controls were randomly selected (CG) in the Allergy Centre. Cutaneous and epicutaneous tests were carried out. Nine out of the 1500 patients displayed positive (+) reactions to Ti allergy tests (0.6%): eight in the ACRG (50%), one in the PFG (5.3%)(P=0.009) and zero in the control group. Five positives were unexplained implant failures (five out of eight). Ti allergy can be detected in dental implant patients, even though its estimated prevalence is low (0.6%). A significantly higher risk of positive allergic reaction was found in patients showing post-op allergy compatible response (ACRG), in which cases allergy tests could be recommended.

  19. Dental health - a challenging problem for a patient with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan-Yuan; Wei, I-Hua; Huang, Chih-Chia

    2013-01-01

    Patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are at an increased risk for many diseases. However, little has been published about the dental health of patients with ASDs. Here, we describe the clinical presentations in a 28-year-old woman with autistic disorder. The most striking finding was the severe dental problems which had been neglected for several years. Our patient exhibited a combination of several factors that may have increased the risk of development of severe dental problem. The early recognition is still challenging to managing this unusual condition in patients with ASDs. From the experience of caring for this patient, a team of parents or caregivers, psychiatrist and dentist should be involved in maintaining oral health care of such patients with early intervention and long-term follow-up. Evidence-based behavioral management approaches for patients with ASD need to be developed to improve compliance with oral care procedures.

  20. Compliance with dental treatment recommendations by rural paediatric patients after a live-video teledentistry consultation: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Sean W; Kopycka-Kedzierawski, Dorota T

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to assess the compliance rate with recommended dental treatment by rural paediatric dental patients after a live-video teledentistry consultation. A retrospective dental chart review was completed for 251 rural paediatric patients from the Finger Lakes region of New York State who had an initial teledentistry appointment with a paediatric dentist located remotely at the Eastman Institute for Oral Health in Rochester, NY. The recommended treatment modalities were tabulated and comprehensive dental treatment completion rates were obtained. The recommended treatment modality options of: treatment in the paediatric dental clinic; treatment using nitrous oxide anxiolysis; treatment with oral sedation; treatment in the operating room with general anaesthesia; or teleconsultation were identified for the 251 patients. Compliance rates for completed dental treatment based on initial teleconsultation recommendations were: 100% for treatment in the paediatric dental clinic; 56% for nitrous oxide patients; 87% for oral sedation; 93% for operating room; and 90% for teleconsultations. The differences in the compliance rates for all treatment modalities were not statistically significant (Fisher's exact test, p > 0.05). Compliance rates for completed comprehensive dental treatment for this rural population of paediatric dental patients were quite high, ranging from 56% to 100%, and tended to be higher when treatment was completed in fewer visits. Live-video teledentistry consultations conducted among rural paediatric patients and a paediatric dentist in the specialty clinic were feasible options for increasing dental treatment compliance rates when treating complex paediatric dental cases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Dental treatment under general anesthesia for special-needs patients: analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mallineni, Sreekanth K; Yiu, Cynthia K Y

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present review was to identify the studies published on dental treatment under general anesthesia for special-needs patients. A comprehensive search of the reported literature from January 1966 to May 2012 was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and Embase. Keywords used in the search were "dental treatment under general anesthesia", "special-needs patients", "medically-compromised patients", and "children", in various combinations. Studies published only on dental treatment under general anesthesia and in English were included. Only 10 studies were available for final analysis. Age range from 1 to 50 years, and restorative procedures, were most prevalent. Only two studies discussed repeated general anesthesia, with rates of 7.2% and 10.2%. Over time, the provision of general anesthesia for special-needs patients has changed from dental clinics to general hospitals. The demand for dental treatment for special-needs patients under general anesthesia continues to increase. Currently, there are no certain accepted protocols for the provision of dental treatment under general anesthesia. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Patient safety in domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, P; Bäckman, N; Sjöström, O; Zimmerman, M

    2015-12-01

    To analyse patient safety in domiciliary dental care, with data from a quality registry. Retrospective analysis. Domiciliary dental care, private caregiver, Sweden, 2012-2014. All reported events in the quality registry at a provider of domiciliary dental care, (2012-05-01 to 2014-06-30) were categorized into 14 domains, and for severity as 'minor', 'moderate', or 'serious' events. The reported events were also independently assessed by an experienced reviewer for national requirements of reporting patient safety related events. The quality registry covered 724 (0.03%) reported events during 218,586 consecutive treatment sessions in domiciliary dental care, including 628,070 registered dental procedures. Fifty (6.9%) of the reported events were patient safety related, of which 11 (1.5%) events were reportedly of minor severity, 20 (2.8%) as moderate, and 19 (2.6%) as serious. For all degrees of severity, the most frequently reported events were related to problems with patient identity control (3.3%). None of the events required reporting to national authorities. Domiciliary dental care has a low frequency of patient safety related events (0.03% of all treatments). Identity controls need to be emphasised in nursing homes or where individuals are dependent on the care of others.

  3. Cardiovascular effects of local anesthesia with vasoconstrictor during dental extraction in coronary patients.

    PubMed

    Conrado, Valeria C L S; de Andrade, Januário; de Angelis, Gabriella A M C; de Andrade, Ana Carolina P; Timerman, Lilia; Andrade, Mercedes M; Moreira, Dalmo R; Sousa, Amanda G M R; Sousa, J Eduardo M R; Piegas, Leopoldo S

    2007-05-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of variables detecting myocardial ischemia during or after dental treatment under anesthesia with vasoconstrictor (epinephrine). A total of 54 coronary patients undergoing dental extraction under local anesthesia with or without vasoconstrictor were included. They were divided into two groups (by drawing envelopes): group I (27 patients) using anesthetics with vasoconstrictor, and group II (27 cases) without vasoconstrictor. 24-hour Holter monitoring, Doppler-echocardiogram before and after dental intervention, and determination of biochemical markers (CK-MB mass, CK-MB activity, and troponin T) before and 24 hours after dental extraction were performed in all patients. Heart rate and blood pressure were also measured in the pre, post-anesthesia and post-dental extraction phases. Doppler echocardiography assessed left ventricular segmental contractility and the occasional occurrence of mitral regurgitation. The usual pharmaceutical treatment prescribed by the cardiologist was maintained in all cases. Three patients in group I presented ST-segment depression (1.0 mm) during administration of anesthesia; two other patients in group I had CK-MB mass elevation, and ischemia was not observed in any other case, as assessed by the other methods. No chest pain, arrhythmias, occurrence or worsening of left ventricular segmental hypocontractility or mitral regurgitation were observed in the study. Dental extraction performed under anesthesia with 1:100,000 epinephrine does not imply additional ischemic risks, as long as performed with good anesthetic technique and maintenance of the pharmacological treatment prescribed by the cardiologist.

  4. Hematologic and surgical management of the dental patient with plasminogen activator deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scheitler, L E; Hart, N; Phillips, G; Weinberg, J B

    1988-12-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is used to treat patients with a variety of hemostatic disorders in an attempt to prevent thrombus formation. A thorough understanding of the patient's medical history is essential before dental treatment that may require alteration of this anticoagulation therapy. Alteration of anticoagulation therapy should be undertaken only after consultation with the patient's physician because some patients are at greater risk than others for thrombus formation or hemorrhage. This case of a 29-year-old man with plasminogen activator deficiency illustrates how consultation can result in a coordinated treatment plan for medical and dental management formulated to help ensure safe surgical treatment for these medically compromised patients.

  5. Dental treatment under general anesthesia in a group of patients with cerebral palsy and a group of healthy pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Escanilla-Casal, Alejandro; Aznar-Gómez, Mirella; Viaño, José M.; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    This is a comparative study between two groups, one of healthy children and the other of children with cerebral palsy, which underwent dental treatment under general anesthesia at Hospital Sant Joan de Déu Barcelona. The purpose of the study was to compare and determine oral pathology, frequency, severity and postoperative complications in pediatric patients with and without an underlying disease which undergo a dental treatment under general anesthesia. Key words:General anesthesia, cerebral palsy, pediatric patients. PMID:24608223

  6. Evaluation of efficacy of restorative dental treatment provided under general anesthesia at hospitalized pediatric dental patients of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Alireza; Samani, Mahdi Jafarzadeh; Najafi, Naghme Feyzi; Hajiahmadi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Background: General anesthesia (GA) allows dental treatment to be rendered under optimal conditions, theoretically ensuring ideal outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of restorative dental procedures performed under GA. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional retrospective study, 305 pediatric patients who had been treated under GA 6 to 24 months before our survey at Isfahan's hospitalized dentistry center were examined. The examination was performed on dental chair with oral mirror and dental probe. The results were recorded in a special form for each patient for statistical analysis and evaluation of restorations to be successful or failed. Statistical analysis was performed by chi-square and fisher exact tests for comparison between success rates of restorations and Kendall's tau-b test for evaluating the effect of time on success rates of them (P < 0.05). Results: Stainless steel crown restorations had significantly better results vs class I and class II amalgam and class I and class II tooth color restorations. All types of posterior tooth color restorations had statistically same results with amalgam restorations. Anterior composite resin build-up represented significantly low success rates. The failure rates of stainless steel crown and anterior composite resin build-up restorations did not correlate with the time of follow-up (P = 0.344 and P = 0.091, respectively). Conclusion: Stainless steel crown restorations had significantly better results vs other posterior restorations. The failure rates of stainless steel crown and anterior composite resin build-up restorations did not correlate with the time of follow-up in comparison of other restorations. PMID:23162592

  7. The appropriateness of referral of medically compromised dental patients to hospital.

    PubMed

    Absi, E G; Satterthwaite, J; Shepherd, J P; Thomas, D W

    1997-04-01

    Hospital departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery make a substantial contribution to both managing and treating medically-compromised dental patients. Contracting arrangements should take account of this. Demographic data suggest that the treatment of medically-compromised elderly dentate patients will become increasingly important in the General Dental Service (GDS). To determine the medical conditions and treatment requirements prompting referral of these patients to hospital, a prospective study was undertaken of 75 consecutive adults referred for hospital treatment specifically because of a medical condition which prevented delivery of routine dental care in the GDS. Patients (mean age: 56 years) were referred mainly from general medical (33%) and dental (62%) practitioners. Cardiovascular disease was the most frequently cited medical condition requiring referral (43%; n = 32 cases). Forty-eight patients (64%) were symptomatic on presentation and on average had attended on 2.3 occasions before definitive treatment was instituted. Fifty-two patients (70%) had no special treatment requirements other than those available in the GDS, 11 patients (15%) simply required antibiotic prophylaxis and 81% were treated by undergraduates or junior staff. These data suggest that many patients referred for dental hospital treatment because of underlying medical condition are not in fact medically-compromised and may be treated in the primary care setting.

  8. Psychophysiological reactions in dental phobic patients with direct vs. indirect fear acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Jesper; Berggren, Ulf; Carlsson, Sven G

    2004-03-01

    Dental phobic patients with reported traumatic experiences at onset of dental anxiety were compared to subjects with an indirect fear acquisition in their psychophysiological responses to video scenes showing dental procedures. It has been suggested that individuals with conditioned fear would respond with higher levels of physiological arousal in response to threat compared to subjects with indirect fear acquisition. Although the overall pattern indicates support for this hypothesis, subjects grouped on the basis of their reported fear-etiology did not statistically differ in recorded muscle tension, heart rate or skin conductance reactions to fear-provoking conditions.

  9. Understanding the patient with epilepsy and seizures in the dental practice.

    PubMed

    Aragon, Cecilia E; Burneo, Jorge G

    2007-02-01

    Epilepsy, which is characterized by the risk of recurrent seizures, is a chronic disease that afflicts about 200,000 Canadians at any one time. Dentists with a thorough knowledge of seizure disorders and the medications used to treat them can provide necessary dental and oral health care to these patients. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of epilepsy, seizures and antiepileptic drugs and provide information on dental-related issues, as well as guidelines for the management of an acute seizure in the dental office.

  10. Dental care of patients with autoimmune vesiculobullous diseases: case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Radfar, Lida; Sirois, David A

    2006-01-01

    Dental management of patients with autoimmune vesiculobullous disorders is complicated because of prominent involvement of oral mucosa, increased risk of oral disease, and difficulty in rendering dental care. Although these diseases are relatively uncommon, dental practitioners should be familiar with the oral sequelae of these conditions and their management. Pemphigus vulgaris, cicatricial pemphigoid, and epidermolysis bullosa represent the most common autoimmune oral vesiculobullous diseases. This case-illustrated review summarizes the pathogenesis, diagnostic features, and natural history of oral vesiculobullous disorders, placing an emphasis on the treatment and prevention of associated oral disease aimed at maintaining a healthy, functional dentition.

  11. The patient taking antiplatelet drugs: a review with dental management considerations.

    PubMed

    Aubertin, Mary A

    2008-01-01

    Antiplatelet drugs are used in clinical practice to prevent the adverse sequelae of thromboses in atherosclerotic arteries of the heart, brain, and limbs and in the veins and heart chambers. They have diverse mechanisms of action, half-lives, and pharmacodynamic effects. A major concern among dental health care providers is the potential for excessive bleeding after invasive dental procedures. This article reviews the current antiplatelet agents used for managing cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases and suggests how patients taking these agents may be managed when invasive dental procedures are planned.

  12. Medical Risk Assessment in Patients Referred to Dental Clinics, Mashhad, Iran (2011-2012)

    PubMed Central

    Maryam, Amirchaghmaghi; Atessa, Pakfetrat; Mozafari Pegah, Mosannen; Zahra, Shafiee; Hanieh, Ghalavani; Davood, Aghasizadeh; Yeganeh, Khazaei

    2015-01-01

    Advances in medical and dental techniques have led to a growing aged population living with complex medical conditions. This study focuses on the detection of medically compromised dental patients by means of a validated patient-administered medical risk-related history questionnaire. Materials and Methods: We used the questionnaire EMRRH (European Risk Related Medical History) in order to study the prevalence as well as the risk assessment of past medical problems in a population who visited dental centers (dental university, dental offices and clinics) for treatment in Mashhad, Iran. Results: A total number of 1,188 patients were registered, 871 of whom had a medical history that was of some interest to us. From the population with medical problems which was 30.6% of the total (N=219), 26.7% of the patients were classified as risk ASA I; 37.3% as ASA II, 16.9% as ASA III; and 19.1% as ASA IV. Among the diverse pathologies, the highest percentage was hypertension (11.6%), followed by allergies to different drugs (8.37%). Conclusion: It seems absolutely essential for dental practitioners to take a detailed medical history prior to any therapeutic procedure, as certain medical conditions, if unnoticed, will lead to unfavorable consequences and/or repercussions. PMID:26966468

  13. Indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients: Update

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Mang-de la Rosa, María del Rocío; Romero-Pérez, María J.; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the current scientific literature in order to analyse the indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients. A reference research was carried out on PubMed using the key words “implant” AND (oral OR dental) AND (systemic disease OR medically compromised), in articles published between 1993 and 2013. The inclusion criteria were the following: clinical studies in which, at least, 10 patients were treated, consensus articles, reviewed articles and meta-analysis performed in humans treated with dental implants, and which included the disease diagnosis. A total of 64 articles were found, from which 16 met the inclusion criteria. Cardiac systemic diseases, diabetic endocrine pathologies or controlled metabolic disorders do not seem to be a total or partial contraindication to the placement of dental implants. Tobacco addiction, and head and neck radiotherapy are correlated to a higher loss of dental implants. Patients suffering from osteoporosis undergoing biphosphonates therapy show an increased risk of developing bone necrosis after an oral surgery, especially if the drugs are administered intravenously or they are associated to certain concomitant medication. Key words:Dental implants, medically compromised patient, systemic diseases. PMID:24608222

  14. A comparison between audio and audiovisual distraction techniques in managing anxious pediatric dental patients.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, A R; Marwah, N; Raju, O S

    2007-01-01

    Pain is not the sole reason for fear of dentistry. Anxiety or the fear of unknown during dental treatment is a major factor and it has been the major concern for dentists for a long time. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the two distraction techniques, viz, audio distraction and audiovisual distraction, in management of anxious pediatric dental patients. Sixty children aged between 4-8 years were divided into three groups. Each child had four dental visits--screening visit, prophylaxis visit, cavity preparation and restoration visit, and extraction visit. Child's anxiety level in each visit was assessed using a combination of four measures: Venham's picture test, Venham's rating of clinical anxiety, pulse rate, and oxygen saturation. The values obtained were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis. It was concluded that audiovisual distraction technique was more effective in managing anxious pediatric dental patient as compared to audio distraction technique.

  15. A novel dual material mouthguard for patients with dental implants.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Takayuki; Dahlin, Christer; Galli, Silvia; Parsafar, Shima; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Kasugai, Shohei

    2013-08-01

    Dental implant-supported reconstructions demonstrate significantly less physiological flexibility for loading and traumatic forces compared with a normal dentition because of their rigid integration with the adjacent bone. Ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) material has become widely accepted as a mouthguard material; however, many studies indicate the necessity of improving the impact absorption ability by considering the design and developing new materials. The aim of this study was to compare the shock-absorbing ability of a novel dual component material comprising EVA and porous rubber with that of EVA alone. Three groups of samples were tested: Group 1 = EVA (thickness, 4 mm), Group 2 = type 1 material (2-mm thick porous rubber sheet sandwiched between two sheets of 1-mm thick EVA sheets), and Group 3 = type 2 material (1-mm thick porous rubber sheet sandwiched between EVA sheets with 1 and 2-mm thickness, respectively). Shock absorption was determined by means of a hammer impact testing device equipped with strain gauge, accelerator, and load cell. The value of shock-absorbing ability of group 2 (40.6 ± 12.5%) was significantly higher than those of group 1 (15.6 ± 2.1%) and group 3 (21.2 ± 9.2%). The material with thicker rubber sheet showed significantly higher shock-absorbing ability compared with that of the material with thinner rubber sheet. The novel dual material was superior to conventional EVA material in shock-absorbing ability depending on the thickness of porous rubber, and it may be potentially effective as mouthguard material, in particular, for patients wearing implant-supported constructions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Surgical and prosthetic rehabilitation of edentulous adult cleft palate patients by dental implants.

    PubMed

    Güven, Orhan; Gürbüz, Ayhan; Baltali, Evre; Yilmaz, Burak; Hatipoğlu, Murat

    2010-09-01

    Adult patients who did not receive proper treatment for cleft palate are challenging for clinicians in terms of prosthetic rehabilitation. Moreover, during the late stages of adulthood when patients become edentulous, prosthetic reconstruction becomes even more challenging. This clinical report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation of 2 edentulous geriatric patients with unrepaired cleft palate by placement of dental implants after closure of the oronasal communications.

  17. Management of a pediatric patient with epidermolysis bullosa receiving comprehensive dental treatment under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Richard K; Ohkawa, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to detail clinical considerations and a general anesthetic approach for a 3-year-old pediatric dental patient with epidermolysis bullosa, a group of rare genetic disorders characterized by blister development following minor trauma or traction to the skin or mucosal surfaces. Challenges in providing comprehensive dental treatment and care under general anesthesia are discussed. Early evaluation is vital to preventing the consequences of severe early childhood caries.

  18. The level of risk of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus between patients and dental staff.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Porter, S

    1991-02-09

    Almost a decade into the epidemic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) there is adequate evidence to address the concerns of dental staff about possible transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) between patient and staff. This paper reviews that evidence and demonstrates that the risk of HIV transmission to health care workers is extremely low. Worldwide there are no reported proven cases of occupational transmission of HIV to dental staff.

  19. Assessing Dental Hygienists' Communication Techniques for Use with Low Oral Health Literacy Patients.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Priscilla; Acharya, Amit; Schwei, Kelsey; VanWormer, Jeffrey; Skrzypcak, Kaitlyn

    2016-06-01

    This primary aim of this study was to assess communication techniques used with low oral health literacy patients by dental hygienists in rural Wisconsin dental clinics. A secondary aim was to determine the utility of the survey instrument used in this study. A mixed methods study consisting of a cross-sectional survey, immediately followed by focus groups, was conducted among dental hygienists in the Marshfield Clinic (Wisconsin) service area. The survey quantified the routine use of 18 communication techniques previously shown to be effective with low oral health literacy patients. Linear regression was used to analyze the association between routine use of each communication technique and several indicator variables, including geographic practice region, oral health literacy familiarity, communication skills training and demographic indicators. Qualitative analyses included code mapping to the 18 communication techniques identified in the survey, and generating new codes based on discussion content. On average, the 38 study participants routinely used 6.3 communication techniques. Dental hygienists who used an oral health literacy assessment tool reported using significantly more communication techniques compared to those who did not use an oral health literacy assessment tool. Focus group results differed from survey responses as few dental hygienists stated familiarity with the term "oral health literacy." Motivational interviewing techniques and using an integrated electronic medical-dental record were additional communication techniques identified as useful with low oral health literacy patients. Dental hygienists in this study routinely used approximately one-third of the communication techniques recommended for low oral health literacy patients supporting the need for training on this topic. Based on focus group results, the survey used in this study warrants modification and psychometric testing prior to further use. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental

  20. The impact of dental appearance and anxiety on self-esteem in adult orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Romero-Maroto, M; Santos-Puerta, N; González Olmo, M J; Peñacoba-Puente, C

    2015-08-01

    To analyse the relationship between different dimensions of dental appearance impact and self-esteem in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, with special attention to the possible mediating role of anxiety. A quasi-experimental design was used with a matched control group (without orthodontic treatment). In each group (experimental and control), there were 85 patients. The impact of dental appearance was measured using the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ). State anxiety was assessed with the State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) and self-esteem with Rosenberg's self-esteem scale. In both groups (experimental and control), self-esteem correlates negatively, ranging between 0.26 and 0.43, with all dimensions of dental appearance impact (except for the positive dental self-confidence dimension, where all correlations were positive). Anxiety correlates positively, ranges between 0.35 and 0.44, with social impact, psychological impact and aesthetic concern, although it maintains no significant correlations with dental self-confidence. Nevertheless, in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, anxiety plays a mediating role between dental impact dimensions and self-esteem, whilst for the control group anxiety only plays a mediator role between psychological impact and self-esteem. Anxiety plays a fundamental role in the effect of perceived dental impact on self-esteem in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. These results have important practical implications for the design of bio-psycho-social intervention programs that contemplate cognitive-affective variables as an essential part of orthodontic treatment in adults. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Use of dental X rays on postirradiated patients with head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.A.; Purdy, R.B.; Stoker, H.W.; Palmer RW 4

    1988-10-01

    As cancer therapy becomes more successful and cancer survival rates increase, the dentist will be treating more patients who have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Occasionally, patients and health professionals have indicated a belief that patients who have received irradiation to the head and neck regions should not be subjected to additional radiation through dental diagnostic X-ray exposures. A literature search failed to find any references that specifically addressed this question. This study reflects the opinions of 278 radiation oncologists (400 surveyed) who responded to questions about contraindications of dental X rays for the patient with head and neck cancer.

  2. [Development and evaluation of an information leaflet for patients consulting an university hospital dental clinic].

    PubMed

    Pegon-Machat, E; Tubert-Jeannin, S

    2010-04-01

    Dental clinics in university hospitals have several roles; dental care is delivered to patients while dental students learn clinical practice. Patients are subjected thus to specific constraints in those mixed hospital-university structures. Patients should be informed of how these structures work and their consent must be carefully sought. Otherwise, patients could manifest their refusal to receive care by interrupting the treatment process. This study was aimed to develop an information leaflet about the organisation of the dental clinic of the university hospital of Clermont-Ferrand. A quasi-randomised controlled study was conducted to evaluate the impact of this leaflet on patients' knowledge and absenteeism. The types of information to be included in the leaflet were determined using focus groups with patients, students and practitioners. The design, appropriateness and clarity of the leaflet were pilot tested among 30 patients. The evaluation of the impact of the leaflet was conducted among new patients who visited the dental clinic in 2007-2008. Patients were randomly allocated to three groups; one group (G1) received the leaflet at home by mail before the first visit, one group (G2) benefited from the leaflet during the first visit and one group (G3) did not receive the leaflet. The number of patients present at their appointment was recorded during the first visit (G1, G2, G3) and the second one (G2, G3). The knowledge of the patients about the dental clinic was evaluated by using a self-administered questionnaire before (except G1) and after reading the leaflet. The study population included 269 patients; 94 answered the two successive questionnaires (G1=32, G2=30, G3=31). At baseline, patients did not have sufficient knowledge about the way the dental clinic was functioning. The leaflet partly improved the level of knowledge of the patients when it was given during the first visit. About 25 % of the patients were not present at their appointment and this

  3. Changes of the dental service delivered to patients with intellectual disability under general anaesthesia in Dental Polyclinic Split, Croatia, during the years 1985-2009.

    PubMed

    Kovacić, Ivan; Tadin, Antonija; Petricević, Nikola; Mikelić, Branimira; Vidović, Neven; Palac, Antonija; Filipović-Zore, Irina; Celebić, Asja

    2012-09-01

    People with intellectual disability (ID) usually have a poor quality of oral health, which include poor oral hygiene, untreated caries and high proportion of missing teeth. Due to their fear and repulsive attitude towards medical staff general anesthesia is often a useful method for dental treatment. One thousand and fifty four intellectual disability patients for the period of 1985-2009 who received dental treatment under general anesthesia in Dental Polyclinic Split, were included in the study. Patients were divided into five groups based upon the period when a specific dental treatment had been received. Each period was analyzed for the number of ID patients treated and the type of dental treatment. The results showed that the most services provided were 4006 fillings, followed by 3225 extracted teeth and finally 274 endodontic treatments. Significantly the lowest number of fillings and endodontic treatments were found among patients in group II (1990-1994), with significantly the highest number of extracted teeth. In Conclusion, the types of dental treatment have changed during twenty five years. Number of extracted teeth decreased while the number of fillings and endodontic treatment increased. However, dental status of people with intellectual disability should be improved with more restorative treatments and with better oral health prevention program.

  4. Dental anomalies in 14 patients with IP: clinical and radiological analysis and review.

    PubMed

    Santa-Maria, Fernanda D; Mariath, Luiza Monteavaro; Poziomczyk, Cláudia S; Maahs, Marcia A P; Rosa, Rafael F M; Zen, Paulo R G; Schüller-Faccini, Lavínia; Kiszewski, Ana Elisa

    2017-06-01

    Current knowledge on dental anomalies in patients with incontinentia pigmenti (IP) has been obtained by examining case reports; however, an overall characterization of such alterations remains lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency, type and location of dental alterations in IP using a case series. Fourteen patients (9 children and 5 adults) with a clinical diagnosis of IP who presented dental anomalies were included in this study. All patients were administered a clinical questionnaire, dental examination and radiological investigation. In the present case series, agenesis of primary dentition was present in 60 % of patients and agenesis of permanent tooth was present in 92.8 % of patients. Most cases were missing at least 6 teeth. Second molar agenesis was present in 13 patients (92.8 %). Anomalies in dental crowns occurred in 71.4 % of cases, and the central incisor was most frequently affected. Two adult patients still had primary teeth. Malocclusion was found in 10 patients (71.4 %). High-arched palate was observed in 7 (50 %) patients. Patients with IP present alterations in both primary and permanent dentition. Because the agenesis of permanent teeth is more common, primary teeth are not always replaced. In addition, the durability of primary dentition appears to be greater in IP. This study shows that patients with IP experience significant loss of teeth, especially in permanent dentition, and have an increased risk of high-arched palate compared to the general population. Prophylactic care of primary teeth in IP is relevant for improving functional and aesthetic outcomes until dental prostheses are implanted.

  5. Knowledge and Attitude of Dental Students towards HIV/AIDS Patients in Melaka, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijendra Pal; Osman, Izni Syazana; Rahmat, Nur Amanina; Bakar, Nur Ashikin Abu; Razak, Nurul Fathin Natasha Abdul; Nettem, Sowmya

    2017-05-01

    Cross contamination of HIV is a real threat today. Dental treatment often includes direct contact with a patient's blood and saliva, therefore dental professionals can be easily exposed to HIV microorganisms. Hence, it is essential to gain insight into dental students' knowledge and attitude towards HIV patients. A cross-sectional survey of 186 clinical year dental students (year 3, 4 and 5) in the 2015-2016 academic session at the Faculty of Dentistry, Melaka-Manipal Medical College (MMMC), Manipal University, Melaka volunteered to participate in the study. A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine their knowledge and attitude towards HIV/AIDS patients. Among 137 respondents (females 74.5% and males 25.6%), 40.9% were Malay, 46.7% were Chinese, 10.2% were Indian and 2.2% were others. The majority had an excellent (41.6%) to good (56.2%) knowledge and only (18%) had a professional attitude. There was a statistically significant association of knowledge with gender (P = 0.009) and ethnicity (P = 0.024), However, no association was found between attitude and gender (P = 0.756) or ethnicity (P = 0.792), or between knowledge and attitude (P = 0.473) of dental students. Dental students' knowledge was not significantly associated with attitude. However, knowledge was associated with gender and ethnicity, but no association was found between age and knowledge and between age, gender, or ethnicity and attitude.

  6. Frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in dental patients with tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Martínez-Null, Cristina; Aguirre, Jose Javier; Guinea, Elena Rubio; Anitua, Eduardo

    2015-04-15

    To estimate the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in dental patients with tooth wear, and to assess the role of dentists in the identification of patients at risk of OSAS. Dental patients with tooth wear and treated with occlusal splint were prospectively recruited to perform sleep study. The severity of tooth wear was established by the treating dentist before patient referral to sleep disorders unit. Sleep questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, and validated respiratory polygraphy were performed. All patients with dental wear were offered a sleepiness analysis. Of 31 recruited patients, 30 (77% males) participated in this study. Patients' mean age was 58.5 ± 10.7 years (range: 35-90 years) and the body mass index was 27.9 ± 3.4 kg/m(2). Tooth wear was mild in 13 patients, moderate in 8 and severe in 9. The mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 32.4 ± 24.9. AHI < 5 was reported in 2 patients, AHI of 5-29 in 17, and AHI ≥ 30 in 11. A statistically significant association was found between AHI severity and tooth wear severity (Spearman R = 0.505; p = 0.004). Tooth wear could be a tool to identify those patients at risk of having OSAS. This highlights the importance of dental professionals to identify and refer patients with OSAS. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  7. Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque and stomach of patients from Northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Mônica Baraúna; Martins, Luisa Caricio; Melo Barbosa, Hivana Patricia; dos Santos Barile, Katarine Antonia; de Almeida, Sintia Silva; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; de Oliveira Corvelo, Tereza Cristina

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To establish whether virulence factor genes vacA and cagA are present in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) retrieved from gastric mucosa and dental plaque in patients with dyspepsia. METHODS: Cumulative dental plaque specimens and gastric biopsies were submitted to histological examination, rapid urease test and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to detect the presence of cagA and vacA polymorphisms. RESULTS: Detection of H. pylori from dental plaque and gastric biopsy samples was greater by PCR compared to histological examination and the rapid urease test. DNA from H. pylori was detected in 96% of gastric mucosa samples and in 72% of dental plaque samples. Sixty-three (89%) of 71 dental plaque samples that were H. pylori-positive also exhibited identical vacA and cagA genotypes in gastric mucosa. The most common genotype was vacAs1bm1 and cagA positive, either in dental plaque or gastric mucosa. These virulent H. pylori isolates were involved in the severity of clinical outcome. CONCLUSION: These pathogenic strains were found simultaneously in dental plaque and gastric mucosa, which suggests that gastric infection is correlated with the presence of H. pylori in the mouth. PMID:20572307

  8. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed.

  9. Dental Age in Orthodontic Patients with Different Skeletal Patterns.

    PubMed

    Lauc, Tomislav; Nakaš, Enita; Latić-Dautović, Melina; Džemidžić, Vildana; Tiro, Alisa; Rupić, Ivana; Kostić, Mirjana; Galić, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the difference between chronological and dental age, calculated by Willems and Cameriere methods, in various skeletal patterns according to Steiner's ANB Classification. Methods. This retrospective cross-sectional study comprised the sample of 776 participants aged between 7 and 15 years (368 males and 408 females). For each participant, panoramic images (OPT) and laterolateral cephalograms (LC) were collected from the medical database. On LC ANB angle was measured; on OPT dental age (DA) was calculated while chronological age (CA) and sex were recorded. The sample was divided into three subgroups (Class I, Class II, and Class III) with similar distribution based on the chronological age and ANB angle. CA was calculated as the difference between the date of OPT imaging and the date of birth, while DA was evaluated using Willems and Cameriere methods. ANB angle was measured on LC by two independent investigators using the cephalometric software. Differences between sexes and the difference between dental and chronological age were tested by independent and paired samples t-test, respectively; one-way ANOVA was used to test differences among ANB classes with Tukey post hoc test to compare specific pairs of ANB classes. Results. The significant difference was found between Class III and other two skeletal classes in males using both dental age estimation methods. In Class III males dental age was ahead averagely by 0.41 years when using Willems method, while Cameriere method overestimated CA for 0.22 years. Conclusion. In males with Class III skeletal pattern, dental development is faster than in Classes I and II skeletal pattern. This faster development is not present in females.

  10. Dental Age in Orthodontic Patients with Different Skeletal Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Lauc, Tomislav; Nakaš, Enita; Latić-Dautović, Melina; Džemidžić, Vildana; Tiro, Alisa; Rupić, Ivana; Kostić, Mirjana

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the difference between chronological and dental age, calculated by Willems and Cameriere methods, in various skeletal patterns according to Steiner's ANB Classification. Methods. This retrospective cross-sectional study comprised the sample of 776 participants aged between 7 and 15 years (368 males and 408 females). For each participant, panoramic images (OPT) and laterolateral cephalograms (LC) were collected from the medical database. On LC ANB angle was measured; on OPT dental age (DA) was calculated while chronological age (CA) and sex were recorded. The sample was divided into three subgroups (Class I, Class II, and Class III) with similar distribution based on the chronological age and ANB angle. CA was calculated as the difference between the date of OPT imaging and the date of birth, while DA was evaluated using Willems and Cameriere methods. ANB angle was measured on LC by two independent investigators using the cephalometric software. Differences between sexes and the difference between dental and chronological age were tested by independent and paired samples t-test, respectively; one-way ANOVA was used to test differences among ANB classes with Tukey post hoc test to compare specific pairs of ANB classes. Results. The significant difference was found between Class III and other two skeletal classes in males using both dental age estimation methods. In Class III males dental age was ahead averagely by 0.41 years when using Willems method, while Cameriere method overestimated CA for 0.22 years. Conclusion. In males with Class III skeletal pattern, dental development is faster than in Classes I and II skeletal pattern. This faster development is not present in females. PMID:28401164

  11. Dental treatment injuries in the Finnish Patient Insurance Centre in 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Karhunen, Sini; Virtanen, Jorma I

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Patient Insurance Centre in Finland reimburses patients who sustained injuries associated with medical and dental care without having to demonstrate malpractice. The aim was to analyse all dental injuries claimed through the Patient Insurance Centre over a 12-year period in order to identify factors affecting reimbursement of claims. Methods This study investigated all dental patient insurance claims in Finland during 2000-2011. The injury cases were grouped as (K00-K08) according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Calendar year, claimant's age and gender, dental disease group and health service sector were the explanatory factors and the outcome was the decision of a claim. Multiple logistic regression modelling was used in the statistical analyses. Results The total number of decisions related to dental claims at the PIC in 2000-2011 was 7662, of which women claimed a clear majority (72%). Diseases of the pulp and periapical tissues (K04) and dental caries (K02) were the major disease groups (both 29%). Of the claims 40% were eligible for reimbursement, 27% were classified as insignificant or unavoidable injuries and 32% were rejected for other reasons. The proportion of reimbursed claims declined during the period. Patients from the private sector were more likely to be eligible for compensation than were those from the public sector (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.71-2.10). Conclusions The number of dental patient insurance claims in Finland clearly rose, while the proportion of reimbursed claims declined. More claims received compensation in the private sector than in the public sector.

  12. Assessment of Jordanian salt using nuclear techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saleh, K.A.; Arafah, D.E.; Jabr, I.J.; Saleh, N.S.

    1987-09-01

    Elemental study and concentration determinations have been conducted on Jordanian crude salt using Rutherford Back-Scattering (RBS) and X-ray Fluorescence (SRF) spectrometry techniques. Analysis have also been carried out on different purified salt samples available in the local market. The concentration of some elements, in particular bromide, content and its significance on human health and nutrition is discussed. Results reveal relatively high traces of elemental concentrations in crude salt. For example, bromide concentration ranges from 178 to 384 ppm in comparison to a tolerance limit of 30 ppm set by the Unites States Food and Drug Administration (USDA) and other International Agencies like FAO/WHO. It is suggested that refining crude salt may result in a reduction of bromide concentration and other traces considerably, thus making it feasible for human consumption.

  13. Can virtual nature improve patient experiences and memories of dental treatment? A study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; White, Mathew P; Andrade, Jackie; May, Jon; Stone, Robert J; Bruce, Malcolm; Mills, Ian; Auvray, Melissa; Gabe, Rhys; Moles, David R

    2014-03-22

    Dental anxiety and anxiety-related avoidance of dental care create significant problems for patients and the dental profession. Distraction interventions are used in daily medical practice to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. There is evidence that exposure to natural scenery is beneficial for patients and that the use of virtual reality (VR) distraction is more effective than other distraction interventions, such as watching television. The main aim of this randomized controlled trial is to determine whether the use of VR during dental treatment can improve the overall dental experience and recollections of treatment for patients, breaking the negative cycle of memories of anxiety leading to further anxiety, and avoidance of future dental appointments. Additionally, the aim is to test whether VR benefits dental patients with all levels of dental anxiety or whether it could be especially beneficial for patients suffering from higher levels of dental anxiety. The third aim is to test whether the content of the VR distraction can make a difference for its effectiveness by comparing two types of virtual environments, a natural environment and an urban environment. The effectiveness of VR distraction will be examined in patients 18 years or older who are scheduled to undergo dental treatment for fillings and/or extractions, with a maximum length of 30 minutes. Patients will be randomly allocated into one of three groups. The first group will be exposed to a VR of a natural environment. The second group will be exposed to a VR of an urban environment. A third group consists of patients who receive standard care (control group). Primary outcomes relate to patients' memories of the dental treatment one week after treatment: (a) remembered pain, (b) intrusive thoughts and (c) vividness of memories. Other measures of interest are the dental experience, the treatment experience and the VR experience. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN41442806.

  14. Dental treatment for the patient on anticoagulant therapy: prothrombin time value--what difference does it make?

    PubMed

    Benoliel, R; Leviner, E; Katz, J; Tzukert, A

    1986-08-01

    Thirty patients taking anticoagulants received routine dental treatment without altering their prothrombin time values. In a follow-up of 5 years, no serious complications were seen in patients with a prothrombin time value of up to 2.5. A protocol is suggested for dental treatment in these patients.

  15. Factors governing the choice of dentifrices by patients attending the Dental Centre, Lagos University Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Adegbulugbe, I C; Adegbulugbe, I C

    2007-01-01

    To investigate what influences the choice of dentifrice used by patients attending a dental clinic. Self-administered questionnaire on patients attending oral diagnosis clinic. Data analyzed for descriptIve statistics using EPI- info 2004 software. Two hundred and three patients comprising of 105 (51.7%) females and 98 (48.3%) males, were involved in this study. Toothpaste with toothbrush was the most common form of oral hygiene practice (90.6%). Cost of the dentifrice (32.5%), the taste of the dentifrice (51.7%), the presence of fluoride (53.7%), availability of the dentifrice (54.7%) and the recommendation of a dental health professional (32.5%) were some of the factors governing choice. The choice of dentifrices by patients is governed by factors other than the efficacy of the dentifrice and dental education is important to reverse this trend.

  16. Dental Health Status of HIV-Positive Patients and Related Variables in Southeast Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saravani, Shirin; Nosrat Zehi, Tahereh; Kadeh, Hamideh; Mir, Sarvar

    2016-01-01

    Background Different factors can be responsible for the increased prevalence of dental caries and missing teeth in HIV-positive patients. Objectives This study evaluates dental health status and its relationship with social, behavioral, and medical factors in HIV-positive patients under the coverage of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences in Southeast Iran. Patients and Methods In a cross-sectional study, the dental health status of 119 HIV-positive patients was assessed in accordance with WHO indices and included decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT). A questionnaire on different social, behavioral, and medical variables was filled out for every case and the relationship and correlation of the variables to dental health status were investigated using One-way ANOVA, the Kruskal Wallis test, the t-test, the Mann-Whitney test, Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient, and Pearson correlation. Results The mean value of DMFT index was 11.87 ± 8.08, where the mean values of decayed and missing teeth were 8.42 ± 5.44 and 3.43 ± 4.07, respectively. DMFT index, decayed, and missing teeth correlated only with age (P < 0.0001, P = 0.009, P < 0.0001) and duration of HIV involvement (P = 0.004, P = 0.031, P = 0.007). Conclusions The dental health status of HIV-positive patients in this region was almost inappropriate. Most social, behavioral, and medical factors had no influence on dental health; only a correlation between dental health, age, and duration of HIV involvement was observed. PMID:27622173

  17. Effect of Dental Status on Changes in Mastication in Patients with Obesity following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Godlewski, Anne Espérance; Veyrune, Jean Luc; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Ciangura, Cécile A.; Chaussain, Catherine C.; Czernichow, Sébastien; Basdevant, Arnaud; Hennequin, Martine

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients scheduled for bariatric surgery (BS) are encouraged to chew slowly in order to optimise the digestion process. The influence of dental status on patients' ability to comply with advice on chewing behaviour is poorly documented. This study aims to compare modifications of chewing function before and after BS in three groups of obese patients differing in dental status. Method and Findings A cohort of 46 obese women provided three groups: FD group: fully dentate (7–10 functional dental units [FU]); PD group: partially dentate (4–6 FU) without partial dentures; DW group: partial and complete denture wearers. Chewing time (CT), number of chewing cycles (CC), and chewing frequency (CF) were measured before and after surgery during mastication of standardised samples of raw carrot, peanuts, banana, apple and jelly. The median particle-size distribution (D50) of the pre-swallowed bolus was also evaluated for peanut and carrot. Before surgery, the PD and DW groups exhibited greater mean CCs and CTs than the FD group (SNK p<0.05) and produced a bolus with higher granulometry (SNK, p<0.05) than the FD group. After surgery, CT and CC increased for all groups and for all foods, but not statistically significant for jelly. The resulting changes in bolus granulometry observed depended on both food and dental status. The granulometry of carrot bolus remained as fine or as coarse in FD and DW groups respectively as it was before surgery while it was significantly decreased in the PD group (Student's test, p<0.001). Conclusions After bariatric surgery, all the obese patients, regardless of dental status modified their chewing kinematics. The effects of this chewing behaviour on bolus granulometry depended on dental status and type of food. Further studies are needed to understand better the impact of dental status on feeding behaviour and nutrition in patients with obesity. PMID:21799822

  18. Use of ADMS™ during sedation for dental treatment of an intellectually disabled patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chi, Seong In; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk; Yang, Martin; Chang, Juhea

    2016-09-01

    Dental treatment is often performed under general anesthesia or sedation when an intellectually disabled patient has a heightened fear of treatment or has difficulty cooperating. When it is impossible to control the patient due to the severity of intellectual disability, conscious sedation is not a viable option, and only deep sedation should be performed. Deep sedation is usually achieved by propofol infusion using the target controlled infusion (TCI) system, with deep sedation being achieved at a slightly lower concentration of propofol in disabled patients. In such cases, anesthesia depth monitoring using EEG, as with a Bispectral Index (BIS) monitor, can enable dental treatment under appropriate sedation depth. In the present case, we performed deep sedation for dental treatment on a 27-year-old female patient with mental retardation and severe dental phobia. During sedation, we used BIS and a newly developed Anesthetic Depth Monitor for Sedation (ADMS™), in addition to electrocardiography, pulse oximetry, blood pressure monitoring, and capnometry for patient safety. Oxygen was administered via nasal prong to prevent hypoxemia during sedation. The BIS and ADMS™ values were maintained at approximately 70, and dental treatment was successfully performed in approximately 30 min..

  19. Dental treatment under general anesthesia in a group of patients with cerebral palsy and a group of healthy pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Escanilla-Casal, Alejandro; Aznar-Gómez, Mirella; Viaño, José-María; López-Giménez, Ana; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2014-09-01

    This is a comparative study between two groups, one of healthy children and the other of children with cerebral palsy, which underwent dental treatment under general anesthesia at Hospital Sant Joan de Déu Barcelona. The purpose of the study was to compare and determine oral pathology, frequency, severity and postoperative complications in pediatric patients with and without an underlying disease which undergo a dental treatment under general anesthesia.

  20. [Management of the pediatric dental patient with seizure disorder: prevention and treatment of emergencies].

    PubMed

    Shapira, Y; Sapir, S; Amir, E

    2003-09-01

    Seizures are not infrequent in childhood and may occur during dental treatment. Generalized seizures and particularly the Tonic-clonic (grand-mal) are the most hazardous and may induce self-injury, aspiration, and medical emergency as status epilepticus. The differential diagnosis of isolated seizure attack should consider hyperventilation, hyperglycemia, local anesthetic toxicity, and anoxia. The pediatric dentist should be aware of predisposing factors that may induce seizure attack in their patients. Proper precautionary measures could prevent the attack from occurring or at least reduce its consequences. The diagnosis as to the cause of the seizure, as well as providing proper management, could prevent further complications. This article presents the medical and dental history relevant for prevention of seizure attack in the dental chair, antiepileptic drugs with possible interactions with the dental treatment and management of such attack, should they occurs.

  1. Drug abuse identification and pain management in dental patients: a case study and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Fahmida; Frare, Robert W; Py Berrios, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Properly identifying patients with a history of drug abuse is the first step in providing effective dental care. Dental professionals need to be fully aware of the challenges associated with treating this population. In the current study, the authors analyzed the physical and oral manifestations of illicit drug abuse to aid in the identification of patients who abuse drugs and the pain management strategies needed to treat them. The authors also present a clinical case of a patient with unique skin lesions and discuss the typical clinical findings of drug abuse based on a literature review.

  2. Management of Patients With Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices in Dental, Oral, and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices as life-prolonging and life-saving devices has evolved from a treatment of last resort to a first-line therapy for an increasing number of patients. As these devices become more and more popular in the general population, dental providers utilizing instruments and medications should be aware of dental equipment and medications that may affect these devices and understand the management of patients with these devices. This review article will discuss the various types and indications for pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, common drugs and instruments affecting these devices, and management of patients with these devices implanted for cardiac dysrhythmias.

  3. Unmet need for education by professionals and inconsistency in knowledge and behavior of dental patients.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Serdar; Akalin, Ferda Alev; Yamalik, Nermin; Etikan, Ilker

    2010-04-01

    In order to identify what knowledge dental patients have of oral health and to analyze the potential relationship between knowledge, behavior and oral health status, 250 randomly selected patients were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire. Responses were analyzed based on the age, gender and educational status of participants. It was determined that oral health-related behavior and knowledge were generally inadequate. Although knowledge had some influence on behavior, this was not constantly observed. The unmet need of patients with regard to getting information from professional resources emphasizes the need for dental professionals to dedicate more time to prevention and the promotion of oral health through efficient strategies.

  4. Management of Patients With Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices in Dental, Oral, and Maxillofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices as life-prolonging and life-saving devices has evolved from a treatment of last resort to a first-line therapy for an increasing number of patients. As these devices become more and more popular in the general population, dental providers utilizing instruments and medications should be aware of dental equipment and medications that may affect these devices and understand the management of patients with these devices. This review article will discuss the various types and indications for pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, common drugs and instruments affecting these devices, and management of patients with these devices implanted for cardiac dysrhythmias. PMID:27269668

  5. Knowledge and Attitude of Dental Students towards HIV/AIDS Patients in Melaka, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijendra Pal; Osman, Izni Syazana; Rahmat, Nur Amanina; Bakar, Nur Ashikin Abu; Razak, Nurul Fathin Natasha Abdul; Nettem, Sowmya

    2017-01-01

    Background Cross contamination of HIV is a real threat today. Dental treatment often includes direct contact with a patient’s blood and saliva, therefore dental professionals can be easily exposed to HIV microorganisms. Hence, it is essential to gain insight into dental students’ knowledge and attitude towards HIV patients. Method A cross-sectional survey of 186 clinical year dental students (year 3, 4 and 5) in the 2015–2016 academic session at the Faculty of Dentistry, Melaka-Manipal Medical College (MMMC), Manipal University, Melaka volunteered to participate in the study. A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine their knowledge and attitude towards HIV/AIDS patients. Results Among 137 respondents (females 74.5% and males 25.6%), 40.9% were Malay, 46.7% were Chinese, 10.2% were Indian and 2.2% were others. The majority had an excellent (41.6%) to good (56.2%) knowledge and only (18%) had a professional attitude. There was a statistically significant association of knowledge with gender (P = 0.009) and ethnicity (P = 0.024), However, no association was found between attitude and gender (P = 0.756) or ethnicity (P = 0.792), or between knowledge and attitude (P = 0.473) of dental students. Conclusion Dental students’ knowledge was not significantly associated with attitude. However, knowledge was associated with gender and ethnicity, but no association was found between age and knowledge and between age, gender, or ethnicity and attitude. PMID:28814935

  6. Clinical evaluation of dental and periodontal status in a group of oncological patients before chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    López-Galindo, Mónica Paula; Bagán, José V; Jiménez-Soriano, Yolanda; Alpiste, Francisco; Camps, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the dental status of 88 cancer patients before chemotherapy. Eighty-eight patients with cancer in different body locations were studied and compared with a control group. Dental plaque was assessed by means of the Silness and Löe index, dental status with the DMFT index, and periodontal status with the modified CPI index. In the oncological patients the mean Silness and Löe index was 1.28-/+0.11. Patients showed multiple missing teeth (mean number 7.55-/+0.80); the mean number of decayed teeth was 2.10-/+0.36; and the mean number of filled teeth was 2.27-/+0.37. As to periodontal status, the mean modified CPI index was 1.45-/+0.11. In the control group, the mean Silness and Löe index was 0.94-/+0.00. The mean number of decayed teeth was 1.21-/+0.25; the mean number of missing teeth was 4.97-/+0.67; and the mean number of filled teeth was 4.82-/+0.44. The mean modified CPI index was 1.29-/+0.10. Oncological patients in our study showed more dental plaque versus healthy patients and more decayed and missing teeth. However, patients in the control group showed more filled teeth than cancer patients. Periodontal status as determined by the modified CPI index was similar in both patient groups.

  7. Knowledge and Apprehension of Dental Patients about MERS-A Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Nipun; Rodrigues, Jean Clare; Azouni, Khalid; Darwish, Shorouk; Abuderman, Abdulwahab; Alkaabba, Abdul Aziz Fahad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a disease caused by beta corona virus. From April 11th to 9th June 2014, World Health Organization (WHO) reported a total of 402 laboratory confirmed cases of MERS from KSA, out of which 132 cases were reported from Riyadh alone. Aim The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and apprehension of patients about MERS visiting Al Farabi College of Dentistry, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire based survey was conducted which consisted of 10 self-prepared questions. A total of 404 patients participated in this study. Results Three hundred and forty patients had heard about MERS. Nearly a quarter of the patients (25.74%) were apprehensive about undergoing dental treatment because of MERS. A little more than half of the patients (50.99%) knew that camel was a source of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Corona virus. Most of the patients (80.72%) were aware of the infection control measures to be followed by dentist and 138 patients claimed they took some precaution when present inside the dental college. Conclusion Majority of the patients had heard about MERS and was aware of the infection control measures. However, some patients were apprehensive about undergoing dental treatment because of MERS. Further steps need to be taken to educate the patient’s about transmission of MERS and infection control measures in a dental hospital. PMID:27437361

  8. Dental students' reflections on their experiences with a diverse patient population.

    PubMed

    Victoroff, Kristin Zakariasen; Williams, Kristin A; Lalumandier, James

    2013-08-01

    Recent developments, including national reports and new accreditation standards, have emphasized the need for dental students to be prepared to address the needs of a diverse patient population. The purpose of this study was to explore students' descriptions of and reflections on their day-to-day interactions with a diverse patient population in the clinical setting, using a qualitative approach. All dental students (sixty-six) enrolled in the third year of the D.M.D. program at a Midwestern dental school were required to write a paper reflecting on their experiences working with a diverse patient population in the general dental clinic of the school as part of a behavioral sciences course. All third-year dental students were invited to participate in the study. The students' papers were deidentified prior to data analysis. Forty-two students' papers describing a total of 126 patient-student interactions were reviewed. Data analysis resulted in identification of three key themes: 1) development of cultural awareness and recognition of the need to understand each patient as a unique individual, 2) desire to build rapport with all patients, and 3) realization that the development of cultural competence is a lifelong learning process requiring ongoing experiences working with a diverse patient population. Review of student reflection papers is valuable in providing faculty with an understanding of students' degree of development of cultural competence. A greater understanding of students' day-to-day experiences with a diverse patient population can provide insights for dental educators who develop cultural competence curricula.

  9. Sedation with orally administered midazolam in elderly dental patients with major neurocognitive disorder.

    PubMed

    Rignell, Lena; Mikati, Mona; Wertsén, Madeleine; Hägglin, Catharina

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate acceptance of treatment after oral sedation with midazolam in dental patients with major neurocognitive disorder. Midazolam is commonly used as premedication in paediatric dentistry, oral surgery and people suffering from dental fear. Little is known about its use in other patient groups. Dental and sedation records of 61 patients (64% women) sedated with midazolam were examined retrospectively. All records came from patients with major neurocognitive disorder who had been referred to a special dental care unit in Sweden due to uncooperative behaviour and sedated with orally administered midazolam between 2006 and 2011. Data concerning dose, degree of acceptance of dental treatment (four-point scale) and number of possible interacting drugs were collected from dental records. On average, the participants were 80 years old (range: 62-93) and used 3.4 possible interacting drugs. The average midazolam dose was 0.11 mg/kg body weight, which is in line with the regional medical guidelines for sedation. Twenty-seven participants (44%) had no cooperation problems when sedated, twenty-six (43%) were treated with minor adaptations, five had poor cooperation, and three were not possible to treat. No statistically significant differences were found for degree of acceptance of treatment and dose or number of possible interacting drugs. Antiepileptics were used by 13% (n=7) with good or quite good acceptance compared to 37% (n=3) among those with poor or no acceptance. Unfavourable side effects were rare; one participant became hyperactive and one drowsier than expected. Sedation with orally administered midazolam seems to be effective and safe in dental treatment of uncooperative persons with major neurocognitive disorder. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Frequency of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Dental Patients with Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Martínez-Null, Cristina; Aguirre, Jose Javier; Guinea, Elena Rubio; Anitua, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To estimate the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in dental patients with tooth wear, and to assess the role of dentists in the identification of patients at risk of OSAS. Methods: Dental patients with tooth wear and treated with occlusal splint were prospectively recruited to perform sleep study. The severity of tooth wear was established by the treating dentist before patient referral to sleep disorders unit. Sleep questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, and validated respiratory polygraphy were performed. Results: All patients with dental wear were offered a sleepiness analysis. Of 31 recruited patients, 30 (77% males) participated in this study. Patients' mean age was 58.5 ± 10.7 years (range: 35–90 years) and the body mass index was 27.9 ± 3.4 kg/m2. Tooth wear was mild in 13 patients, moderate in 8 and severe in 9. The mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 32.4 ± 24.9. AHI < 5 was reported in 2 patients, AHI of 5–29 in 17, and AHI ≥ 30 in 11. A statistically significant association was found between AHI severity and tooth wear severity (Spearman R = 0.505; p = 0.004). Conclusions: Tooth wear could be a tool to identify those patients at risk of having OSAS. This highlights the importance of dental professionals to identify and refer patients with OSAS. Citation: Durán-Cantolla J, Alkhraisat MH, Martínez-Null C, Aguirre JJ, Guinea ER, Anitua E. Frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in dental patients with tooth wear. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(4):445–450. PMID:25665693

  11. Management of dental patients receiving antiplatelet therapy or chronic oral anticoagulation: A review of the latest evidence.

    PubMed

    Dézsi, Csaba András; Dézsi, Balázs Bence; Dézsi, András Döme

    2017-12-01

    The perioperative management of patients treated with antithrombotic medications who undergo surgical procedures represents a common clinical problem. Dental interventions are usually associated with a low risk of bleeding; however, the dental implications of new antithrombotic agents are not yet fully understood. The present review is based on the latest evidence and recommendations published on the periprocedural management of dental patients treated with single or dual antiplatelet therapy, vitamin K antagonists, or direct oral anticoagulants for a variety of indications.

  12. Establishing a good dentist-patient relationship: skills defined from the dental faculty perspective.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Cesar A; Jerez, Oscar M

    2014-10-01

    The importance of developing good dentist-patient relationships has been well documented, but previous studies have focused on social techniques, not considering the psychological and behavioral characteristics of patients, and have used definitions and instruments that were not dental-specific. Therefore, the aims of this study were to propose a definition of dentist-patient relationship skills, derived from dental faculty members' criteria and informed by Emotional Intelligence concepts, and to propose a preliminary dental-specific, face-valid, and reliable self-assessment instrument. The study was conducted in three phases. Phases I and II defined dentist-patient relationship competence through literature analysis and semi-structured interviews with expert key informants, establishing the outcome skills. In Phase III, the instrument was constructed and piloted. Communication skills and basic psychological tools resulted in core topics for use in practice. The definition both specifies and broadens social interactions in dentistry by including dental faculty members' criteria and topics such as psychological tools and pre-, intra-, and postoperative topics appropriate for use during consultation, examination, and treatment. The instrument was found suitable, reasonable, and accessible with a Cronbach's alpha level of 0.95. Future studies are needed to confirm the definition, as well as the instrument's validity, reliability, transference, and sensitivity to the dental educational environment.

  13. Prevalence of undiagnosed HIV infection among dental patients in a Nigerian secondary healthcare facility.

    PubMed

    Ogbebor, O G; Obisesan, B; Madukwe, I U; Azodo, Clement C

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of undiagnosed HIV infection among patients attending the Dental Clinic of General Hospital Minna, Niger State, Nigeria. The study was a prospective study of 1080 dental patients of General Hospital Minna. Out of the 1080 patients counseled, only 200 gave consent to participate in the study. Of the 200 participants, 8 tested positive for HIV, giving a prevalence of 4.0%. Females and participants in the sixth and fifth decades of life were found to have higher prevalence of undiagnosed HIV. Corpers and traders had higher prevalence of undiagnosed HIV. Participants with periodontal complaints (bleeding gums and shaking teeth) also had higher prevalence of undiagnosed HIV. The proportion of participants that reported having knowledge about the actual existence, risk factors, and prevention of HIV/AIDS was high. The proportion of participants who expressed willingness to receive more information on HIV-related issues was high. One out of 25 patients attending this secondary healthcare setting for dental services had undiagnosed HIV infection. This highlights the need for the establishment of voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) unit in the dental clinics and also re-emphasizes the strict compliance of standard precaution in dental practices.

  14. Access to dental care for HIV patients: does it matter and does discrimination exist?

    PubMed

    Levett, T; Slide, C; Mallick, F; Lau, R

    2009-11-01

    A number of surveys highlight a shortage of dentists in the UK. There is also evidence of discrimination against those with HIV reported within the dental profession and service users. We decided to assess the extent of this problem in our HIV outpatients by conducting a cross-sectional survey, asking them to complete a questionnaire exploring issues related to dental care access, and using clients attending the routine genitourinary (GU) medicine outpatient clinic as controls. A total of 241 outpatients completed the survey, of whom 51 (21%) were HIV patients. Significantly, more HIV patients reported difficulty registering with a dentist than GU patients (58.8% versus 18.2%, chi(2) with Yates correction = 8.76, P = 0.0031). They also report significantly more dental health problems compared with controls (54.9% versus 32.1%, chi(2) with Yates correction = 8.02, P = 0.0046). In total, 34.6% of HIV patients who had declared their status to a dentist thought that it had negatively impacted on their care, with 6.2% being refused treatment. Our small survey confirms that discrimination in relation to access and level of dental care exists, with black African women being at most risk. Efforts are needed to raise professional standards and HIV awareness to prevent continuing inequalities in dental care provision.

  15. Patient-centred care in general dental practice - a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delivering improvements in quality is a key objective within most healthcare systems, and a view which has been widely embraced within the NHS in the United Kingdom. Within the NHS, quality is evaluated across three key dimensions: clinical effectiveness, safety and patient experience, with the latter modelled on the Picker Principles of Patient-Centred Care (PCC). Quality improvement is an important feature of the current dental contract reforms in England, with “patient experience” likely to have a central role in the evaluation of quality. An understanding and appreciation of the evidence underpinning PCC within dentistry is highly relevant if we are to use this as a measure of quality in general dental practice. Methods A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to identify the features of PCC relevant to dentistry and ascertain the current research evidence base underpinning its use as a measure of quality within general dental practice. Results Three papers were identified which met the inclusion criteria and demonstrated the use of primary research to provide an understanding of the key features of PCC within dentistry. None of the papers identified were based in general dental practice and none of the three studies sought the views of patients. Some distinct differences were noted between the key features of PCC reported within the dental literature and those developed within the NHS Patient Experience Framework. Conclusions This systematic review reveals a lack of understanding of PCC within dentistry, and in particular general dental practice. There is currently a poor evidence base to support the use of the current patient reported outcome measures as indicators of patient-centredness. Further research is necessary to understand the important features of PCC in dentistry and patients’ views should be central to this research. PMID:24902842

  16. Dental Hygiene Students' Preparation for Treatment of Patients with Mental Illnesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Sherry; Reveal, Marge

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 138 dental hygiene programs gathered information on didactic and clinical experiences for preparing students to treat patients with mental illnesses. Although most curricula addressed the issue, inadequate time was allotted. Over half did not provide oral care to these patients; few felt the community's need was met. (MSE)

  17. Dental Procedures in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and New Oral Anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the basic pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants that are used for prevention of thromboembolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. It presents available evidence, and provides recommendations for the management of patients requiring invasive procedures in dental practice. PMID:26835072

  18. Psychological Satisfactions Derived from Smoking Cigarettes in Fifty-Seven Dental Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christen, Arden G.; Glover, Elbert D.

    1983-01-01

    Studied factors to help dentists understand smoking in patients. Dental patients (N=57) attended "quit smoking" clinics and were given the Horn Smoker's Self-Test which elicits information on factors relating to smoking. The most important functions cigarettes serve, according to smokers, were to satisfy craving, act as a crutch, and provide…

  19. Dental anomalies in an orthodontic patient population with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Citak, Mehmet; Cakici, Elif Bahar; Benkli, Yasin Atakan; Cakici, Fatih; Bektas, Bircan; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmış

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of dental anomalies in a subpopulation of orthodontic patients with agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors (MLI). Methods: The material of the present study included the records of the 1964 orthodontic patients. Panoramic radiographs and dental casts were used to analyze other associated eight dental anomalies, including agenesis of other teeth, dens invaginatus, dens evaginatus, peg shaped MLI, taurodontism, pulp stone, root dilaceration and maxillary canine impaction. Results: Out of the 1964 patients examined, 90 were found to have agenesis of MLI, representing a prevalence of 4.6%. The most commonly found associated-anomalies were agenesis of other teeth (23.3%), peg-shaped MLIs (15.6%), taurodontism (42.2%), and dilacerated teeth (18.9%). Conclusion: Permanent tooth agenesis, taurodontism, peg-shaped maxillary lateral incisor, and root dilacerations are frequently associated with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis. PMID:28125145

  20. Are we Training Enough of Communication Skills and Patient Psychology Required in Dental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Shakila; Choudhury, Sunayana; Sethuraman, K.R.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss about lacunae in the areas of Communication skills and Patient psychology teaching in the dental set up in India. A literature search was performed using various databases and other resources. Data obtained was reviewed to obtain the work done in this field. It was found that there is currently no clear data in literature as to how much and how well students are taught about communication and behavioural skills and patient personality in dental curriculum in India. Pinpointing such lacunae can help dental colleges and universities to focus on the emphasis of their approaches to teaching about communication skills and psychology of the patient. Identification of future research area in this field is the need of the time for future discovery and progress in this overlooked field. PMID:28571298

  1. Changes induced by music therapy to physiologic parameters in patients with dental anxiety.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Rubalcava, Cynthia; Alanís-Tavira, Jorge; Mendieta-Zerón, Hugo; Sánchez-Pérez, Leonor

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of music therapy on patients suffering dental anxiety. In addition, a second objective was to determine the correlation between salivary cortisol and other physiologic parameters. 34 patients were randomly assigned to the control group and the experimental group. For each patient was measured for salivary cortisol, stimulate salivary flow, blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation and body temperature. Student t-test and Chi2 were applied to analyze significant differences between the studied variables before and after the unpleasant stimulation causes anxiety for dental treatment. Initially, both groups registered the same level of anxiety. In the second measurement, significant differences were registered in the salivary cortisol concentration, systolic and diastolic pressure, heart rate, body temperature and stimulated salivary flow for treated group with music therapy. Music therapy has a positive effect in control of dental anxiety. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Dental anesthesia for patients with allergic reactions to lidocaine: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiseon; Lee, Ju-Young; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk

    2016-09-01

    Lidocaine, a local anesthetic commonly used in dental treatments, is capable of causing allergies or adverse effects similar to allergic reactions. However, the frequency of such occurrences in actual clinical settings is very rare, and even clinical tests on patients with known allergies to local anesthetics may often show negative results. When adverse effects, such as allergy to lidocaine, are involved, patients can be treated by testing other local anesthetics and choosing a local anesthetic without any adverse effects, or by performing dental treatment under general anesthesia in cases in which no local anesthetic without adverse effects is available. Along with a literature review, the authors of the present study report on two cases of patients who tested positive on allergy skin tests for lidocaine and bupivacaine and subsequently underwent successful dental treatments with either general anesthesia or a different local anesthetic.

  3. To what extent should dental implant placement be adopted as a standard for diabetic patients?

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Ahmed S.; Abed, Hassan H.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is considered one of the major chronic diseases in the world. Long-term hyperglycemia considerably affects the body tissues, and consequently, can lead to morbidity and mortality. Moreover, many oral complications have been observed with DM but little consideration in relation to the placement of dental implants has been investigated. Dental research has analyzed the relation of dental implants and bone osseointegration in diabetic patients. Theoretically, an impaired immune system and delayed wound healing of these patients might decrease the success rate of implant placement; however, with noticeable advances in evidence-based dentistry and statistically significant results, successful implant treatment could be achieved significantly in well-controlled diabetic patients. PMID:27761554

  4. Myths and facts about Minnesota's new safe patient handling statute and your dental practice.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Stephen; Simonson, Peggy; Tschida, Breca; Owen, Mary; Ofstehage, John; Glasrud, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    With the passage of a safe patient handling statute in 2009, Minnesota became one of a growing number of states requiring health care providers to become more aware and accountable about providing appropriate assistance during the movement of patients in clinical care settings. The Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry and the Minnesota Dental Association have been working together to ensure that Minnesota's SPH regulations are as practical as possible for dental providers while still achieving the objectives of the statute. A template Safe Patient Handling Program for Clinics has been developed with substantial input from MDA's ESNA Committee and is now available on the DLI website: www.dli.mn.gov/WSC/SPHlegislation.asp. All Minnesota dental practices should use this template to develop their own safe patient handling program as soon as possible. Additional background information and resources related to Minnesota's SPH regulations are also available on the DLI website. MDA and DLI are currently also developing a hazard assessment tool for dental practices to assess their specific risks associated with patient movement. This hazard assessment will, in turn, guide decisions about what type of safe patient handling equipment and staff training will be necessary for total compliance with the new statute. MDA, in cooperation with DLI, will continue to keep dental professionals informed about when these materials will be available. Additionally, MDA is working to ensure appropriate training options will be available for compliance with SPH regulations. The University of Minnesota's School of Dentistry's Oral Health Services for Older Adults Program and Department of Continuing Dental Education have been regularly providing such training in conjunction with the school's "Miniresidency in Nursing Home and Long-term Care for the Dental Team," and efforts are now underway at the dental school to create stand-alone training options for Minnesota's dental professionals

  5. Evaluating quality of dental care among patients with diabetes: Adaptation and testing of a dental quality measure in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Ana; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Ramoni, Rachel; Yansane, Alfa; Tokede, Bunmi; Etolue, Jini; Vaderhobli, Ram; Simmons, Kristen; Even, Joshua; Mullins, Joanna; Kumar, Shwetha; Bangar, Suhasini; Kookal, Krishna; White, Joel; Walji, Muhammad

    2017-09-01

    Patients with diabetes are at increased risk of developing oral complications, and annual dental examinations are an endorsed preventive strategy. The authors evaluated the feasibility and validity of implementing an automated electronic health record (EHR)-based dental quality measure to determine whether patients with diabetes received such evaluations. The authors selected a Dental Quality Alliance measure developed for claims data and adapted the specifications for EHRs. Automated queries identified patients with diabetes across 4 dental institutions, and the authors manually reviewed a subsample of charts to evaluate query performance. After assessing the initial EHR measure, the authors defined and tested a revised EHR measure to capture better the oral care received by patients with diabetes. In the initial and revised measures, the authors used EHR automated queries to identify 12,960 and 13,221 patients with diabetes, respectively, in the reporting year. Variations in the measure scores across sites were greater with the initial measure (range, 36.4-71.3%) than with the revised measure (range, 78.8-88.1%). The automated query performed well (93% or higher) for sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for both measures. The results suggest that an automated EHR-based query can be used successfully to measure the quality of oral health care delivered to patients with diabetes. The authors also found that using the rich data available in EHRs may help estimate the quality of care better than can relying on claims data. Detailed clinical patient-level data in dental EHRs may be useful to dentists in evaluating the quality of dental care provided to patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dentistry for Jordanians with special needs.

    PubMed

    Waldman, H Barry; Perlman, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    There are thousands of residents with disabilities in Jordan. Despite national legislation to assure individuals with disabilities needed services, including education and employment, social inclusion of these individuals is difficult since societal views exclude them from functioning as members of a community. While there are no national studies of the dental needs of individuals with disabilities in Jordan, local reports indicates limited use of dental services and the need for increased oral hygiene and restorative services. Examples of dental education accreditation standards in other countries are used as models for the improvement in the preparation of dental students to provide services for individuals with special needs.

  7. What do patients expect from treatment with Dental Implants? Perceptions, expectations and misconceptions: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jie; Li, Ming; Tang, Hua; Wang, Peng-Lai; Zhao, Yu-Xiao; McGrath, Colman; Mattheos, Nikos

    2017-03-01

    While research in terms of patient-centered care in implant therapy is growing, few studies have investigated patients' initial perceptions prior to consultation with the implant dentist. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to capture patients' initial information level, perceptions, as well as expectations from the implant therapy. A 34-item questionnaire was developed to investigate patients' preoperative information, perceptions and expectations from treatment with Dental Implants. The study was conducted in three locations (Hong Kong, SiChuan and JiangSu) during 2014-2015 with 277 patients. The main information source about implant therapy was the dentist or hygienist for less than half of the patients (n = 113, 42%). About 62.8% of participants considered that they were in general informed about implants, but only 17.7% felt confident with the information they had. More than 30% of the sample appeared to maintain dangerous misperceptions about Dental Implants: "Dental Implants require less care than natural teeth"; "Treatment with Dental Implants is appropriate for all patients with missing teeth"; "Dental Implants last longer than natural teeth"; and "Treatments with Dental Implants have no risks or complications." Patients were divided when asked whether "Dental Implants are as functional as natural teeth" (agreement frequency = 52.7%). Expectations from treatment outcome were commonly high, while there was a significant correlation between the overall mean of perception scores and outcome expectation scores (r = 0.32, P < 0.001). Overall, younger subjects (<45 years) and those with higher education level (bachelor and postgraduate) tended to present more realistic perceptions and lower outcome expectations. The majority of patients in this study presented relatively realistic perceptions. However, an alarming portion of the sample presented with inaccurate perceptions and unrealistic expectations, which the dental team would need to diagnose

  8. The ethics of live patient use in dental hygiene clinical licensure examinations: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Lantzy, Marlaina J; Muzzin, Kathleen B; DeWald, Janice P; Solomon, Eric S; Campbell, Patricia R; Mallonee, Lisa

    2012-06-01

    A national survey of dental hygienists was conducted to explore ethical issues arising from the use of live patients for dental hygiene clinical licensure examinations. Data were collected regarding respondents' demographics, additional costs they incurred associated with their examination beyond the examination fees, delays in patients' treatment resulting from the examination, unethical candidate and/or patient behaviors they experienced, and provisions they made for patients' follow-up care related to the examination. Five hundred surveys were mailed to dental hygienists from two states in each of the five licensure examination regions. The response rate was 40.6 percent (n=203). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. The results showed that the majority of the respondents spent additional money on examination-related expenses (69.2 percent). Sixty-one percent of the respondents reported paying their patients; however, only 50.5 percent felt such a practice was acceptable. More than half (53.1 percent) reported believing it was appropriate to delay treatment in order to have a patient participate in the examination, although only 16.4 percent reported actually delaying treatment. Informed consent was said to be obtained by 94.9 percent of the respondents. The majority (86.6 percent) said they referred patients for follow-up dental hygiene care. When asked if they felt the examination was an accurate assessment of their clinical skills, 78.7 percent of the respondents agreed that it was.

  9. The effect of radiotherapy on survival of dental implants in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shugaa-Addin, Bassam; Al-Shamiri, Hashem-Motahir; Al-Maweri, Sadeq; Tarakji, Bassel

    2016-04-01

    To explore the current literature of the survival of dental implants in irradiated head and neck cancer patients considering the role of implant location, bone augmentation, dose of radiation and timing of implant placement. Pubmed search was conducted to identify articles published between January 2000 and December 2014 and presenting data of dental implant survival with radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Studies on animal subjects and craniofacial implants were excluded. 18 articles out of 27 were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review. 12 out of 18 studies reported favorable outcome of dental implants and radiotherapy with survival rates between 74.4% and 97%. Seven out of ten studies comparing the survival rates according to site of implant placement reported that implants were found to osseointegrate with greater success in the irradiated mandible than irradiated maxilla. 5 studies which compared implant survival in irradiated native bone versus irradiated grafted bone reported that irradiated grafted bone showed a significantly reduced dental implant survival rate in comparison to irradiated native bone. 6 out of 18studies in which radiation doses exceeded 70 Gy reported lower survival rates of dental implants in comparison to the studies in which radiation doses were ≤70Gy. Higher survival rates were reported in 2 studies in which implants placement was before radiotherapy in comparison to the remaining 16 studies in which implants placement was after radiotherapy. Dental implants may be affected by radiotherapy especially when they are placed in maxilla, in grafted bone, or after radiation, however, they remain a functional option for rehabilitation of head and cancer patients. More Prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trails are still needed to draw more evidence based conclusions. Dental implants, implant survival, radiotherapy, head and neck cancer.

  10. Career commitment and job performance of Jordanian nurses.

    PubMed

    Mrayyan, Majd T; Al-Faouri, Ibrahim

    2008-01-01

    Career commitment and job performance are complex phenomena that have received little attention in nursing research. A survey was used to assess nurses' career commitment and job performance, and the relationship between the two concepts. Predictors of nurses' career commitment and job performance were also studied. A convenience sample of 640 Jordanian registered nurses was recruited from 24 teaching, governmental, and private hospitals. Nurses "agreed" on the majority of statements about career commitment, and they reported performing "well" their jobs. Using total scores, nurses were equal in their career commitment but they were different in their job performance; the highest mean was scored for nurses in private hospitals. Using the individual items of subscales, nurses were willing to be involved, on their own time, in projects that would benefit patient care. The correlation of the total scores of nurses' career commitment and job performance revealed the presence of a significant and positive relationship (r = .457). Nurses' job performance, gender, and marital status were the best predictors of nurses' career commitment: they explained 21.8% of variance of nurses' career commitment. Nurses' career commitment, time commitment, marital status, and years of experience in nursing were the best predictors of nurses' job performance: they explained 25.6% of variance of nurses' job performance. The lowest reported means of nurses' job performance require managerial interventions.

  11. Dental school deans' and dentists' perceptions of infection control and HIV/AIDS patient care: a challenge for dental education in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Mayoral, E E; Sánchez-Pérez, L; Olguín-Barreto, Y; Acosta-Gío, A E

    2009-07-01

    HIV/AIDS patients face unique oral diagnostic and treatment challenges. The aim of this investigation among dental school deans (DSD) and graduate school applicants (GSA) who had qualified from 30 different dental schools was to assess their perceptions on dental education relevant to infection control (IC) and HIV/AIDS patient care. The questionnaire included Likert-type scale evaluations of agreement with statements. Of 158 questionnaires, 23 DSD (68% response rate), and 123 GSA (100% response rate) returned valid questionnaires. Fifteen (65%) DSD and 89 (72%) GSA ranked as "very strong" their perception that infection control prevents the transmission of blood borne viruses. However, the perception prevailed, among DSD and GSA, that HIV infection was a "very strong" to "strong" occupational hazard. Special reprocessing of instruments used on HIV patients was frequently reported. Many considered "very strong" to "strong" that HIV/AIDS patients must be treated in specialized clinics, and nearly half (48%) of the DSD and one third (35%) of the GSA stated that their school does refer HIV/AIDS patients to dental treatment in specialized clinics. These results indicate that many dental schools in Mexico must provide better education on IC and HIV/AIDS patient care to enhance attitudes toward HIV/AIDS patients.

  12. Patients' choice of payment system in the Swedish Public Dental Service--views on dental care and oral health.

    PubMed

    Ostberg, Anna-Lena; Ahlström, Birgitta; Hakeberg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate new knowledge of considerations and factors having impacted the patients' choice of payment system and their views on oral health. Moreover, their later attitudes to the prepaid risk-related payment system, having been enrolled or not, were explored. A qualitative design was chosen and data was collected through semi-structured interviews.Twenty patients in the Public Dental Service (PDS) in western Sweden were strategically sampled with reference to gender, age (older/younger adults), residence (rural/urban), and choice of payment system:fee-for-service or capitation plan.The interview guide covered areas concerning the payment systems, patient considerations before choosing system, views of their own oral health and experiences of received dental care within the chosen system.The analysis was performed according to basic principles of qualitative content analysis. The results revealed two themes expressing the latent content. In the theme "The individual's relation to the PDS", expectations of the care, feelings of safety and aspects of responsibility emerged.The theme"Health-related attitudes and perceptions" revealed that views on health and self-assessment of oral health influenced the patients' considerations. Moreover, the perceived influence on oral health and risk thinking emerged as important factors in this theme. The conclusion was that the individual's relation to the PDS together with his/her health-related attitudes and perceptions were the main factors impacting the choice of payment system in the PDS. A health promotion perspective should be applied, empowering the patients to develop their risk awareness and their own resources.

  13. Indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients: update.

    PubMed

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Mang-de la Rosa, María del Rocío; Romero-Pérez, María-Jesús; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio; López-Valverde-Centeno, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to review the current scientific literature in order to analyse the indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients. A reference research was carried out on PubMed using the key words "implant" AND (oral OR dental) AND (systemic disease OR medically compromised), in articles published between 1993 and 2013. The inclusion criteria were the following: clinical studies in which, at least, 10 patients were treated, consensus articles, reviewed articles and meta-analysis performed in humans treated with dental implants, and which included the disease diagnosis. A total of 64 articles were found, from which 16 met the inclusion criteria. Cardiac systemic diseases, diabetic endocrine pathologies or controlled metabolic disorders do not seem to be a total or partial contraindication to the placement of dental implants. Tobacco addiction, and head and neck radiotherapy are correlated to a higher loss of dental implants. Patients suffering from osteoporosis undergoing biphosphonates therapy show an increased risk of developing bone necrosis after an oral surgery, especially if the drugs are administered intravenously or they are associated to certain concomitant medication.

  14. Evaluation of patients with Alzheimer's disease before and after dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Rolim, Thaís de Souza; Fabri, Gisele Maria Campos; Nitrini, Ricardo; Anghinah, Renato; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Siqueira, José Tadeu T de; Cesari, José Augusto Ferrari; Siqueira, Silvia Regina Dowgan Tesseroli de

    2014-12-01

    Oral infections may play a role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Objective To describe the orofacial pain, dental characteristics and associated factors in patients with Alzheimer's Disease that underwent dental treatment. Method 29 patients with mild AD diagnosed by a neurologist were included. They fulfilled the Mini Mental State Exam and Pfeffer's questionnaire. A dentist performed a complete evaluation: clinical questionnaire; research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders; McGill pain questionnaire; oral health impact profile; decayed, missing and filled teeth index; and complete periodontal investigation. The protocol was applied before and after the dental treatment. Periodontal treatments (scaling), extractions and topic nystatin were the most frequent. Results There was a reduction in pain frequency (p=0.014), mandibular functional limitations (p=0.011) and periodontal indexes (p<0.05), and an improvement in quality of life (p=0.009) and functional impairment due to cognitive compromise (p<0.001) after the dental treatment. Orofacial complaints and intensity of pain also diminished. Conclusion The dental treatment contributed to reduce co-morbidities associated with AD and should be routinely included in the assessment of these patients.

  15. Using dental implants in the prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with cleft defect type II.

    PubMed

    Sedlackova, Kristina; Duskova, Marketa; Strnadel, Tomas; Kotova, Magdalena; Haas, Michal

    2011-01-01

    A dental implant may be used in prosthetic tooth reconstruction in cleft patients. There are three main indications for this approach: substitution of a missing single tooth, an abutment for the framework, and an abutment for a fixed dental prosthesis (we designate these as defect types I, II, and III). A clinical report about prosthetic rehabilitation using dental implants instead of a fixed or removable partial prosthesis is presented. A patient with a unilateral cleft defect was treated at the University Hospital in Prague, Czech Republic. Together with a missing lateral incisor, the defect was associated with agenesis of the two upper canines and three second premolars. The treatment was completed by prosthetic dental reconstruction using the framework with a dental implant as an abutment. This approach allowed minimizing the preparation of adjacent teeth to a single tooth functioning as the second abutment. If classical fixed prosthodontics had been performed, the preparation would have involved a larger group of intact teeth with the risk of their viability loss. The procedure had no complications. The outcome was of high quality and brought satisfaction to the patient.

  16. The association of patients' oral health literacy and dental school communication tools: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tam, Amy; Yue, Olivia; Atchison, Kathryn A; Richards, Jessica K; Holtzman, Jennifer S

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess adult patients' ability to read and understand two communication tools at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry: the dental school clinic website and a patient education brochure pertaining to sedation in children that was written by dental school personnel. A convenience sample of 100 adults seeking treatment at the school's general dental clinic during 2012-13 completed a health literacy screening instrument. They were then asked to read clinic educational and informational materials and complete a survey. Analyses were conducted to determine the association between the subjects' oral health literacy and sociodemographics and their ability to locate and interpret information in written oral health information materials. SMOG and Flesch-Kincade formulas were used to assess the readability level of the electronic and written communication tools. The results demonstrated an association between these adults' oral health literacy and their dental knowledge and ability to navigate health information website resources and understand health education materials. Health literacy was not associated with age or gender, but was associated with education and race/ethnicity. The SMOG Readability Index determined that the website and the sedation form were written at a ninth grade reading level. These results suggest that dental schools and other health care organizations should incorporate a health-literate approach for their digital and written materials to enhance patients' ability to navigate and understand health information, regardless of their health literacy.

  17. [Advance notice of contents of treatment influences patients' stress during dental treatment].

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of advance notice of contents of treatment on the patients' physiological stress during dental treatment The subjects of our study comprised 34 non-dental professionals (22 female and 12 male). In simulated dental treatment, the subjects were exposed to predetermined stimulations comprised of blowing air on the molars, percussion on the premolar and usage of an air turbine next to the molar in randomized order, with/without advance notice. The skin potential level (SPL) of the subjects was measured as a physiological stress index during such simulated dental treatment As a psychological profile, the stress-coping style of each subject was examined using Lazarus Type Stress Coping Inventory (SCI). The number of decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMF). and the experience of teeth extraction in the past of each subject was also recorded. The correlation among advance notice, order and kind of stimulation, factors of SCI, DMF, gender of the subject, the experience of teeth extraction, and the subjects' stress (SPL change) was statistically analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. As a result, the effect of advance notice on the subjects' stress was opposite when the stress-coping style differed; therefore, dentists must pay attention to the patients' psychological characteristics when using advance notice for the purpose of relieving the patients' stress during dental treatment.

  18. Association between dental floss use and gingival conditions in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Fabricio Batistin; Moreira, Carlos Heitor Cunha; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecher

    2011-12-01

    Evidence comparing periodontal conditions in orthodontic patients who regularly use or do not use dental floss is scarce. The subjects were 330 patients who had been under fixed orthodontic treatment for at least 6 months. They were examined by 1 calibrated examiner for plaque and gingival indexes, probing pocket depths, clinical attachment losses, and excessive resin around brackets. Socioeconomic background, time with orthodontic appliances, and use of dental floss were assessed in interviews. Unadjusted and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess the associations. The results demonstrated statistically significant higher means of plaque index, gingival index, pocket probing depth, and clinical attachment loss for nonusers of dental floss. Intragroup analyses showed higher means of these parameters in proximal sites and posterior teeth, compared with their counterparts' buccal and lingual sites and anterior teeth, respectively. After multivariate analysis, male subjects (P = 0.044) with a household income less than 5 national minimum wages (P = 0.044), and nonusers of dental floss (P = 0.000) showed higher probabilities of gingival bleeding (>30%) than did their counterparts. Orthodontic patients who use dental floss regularly have somewhat better gingival conditions than those who do not use floss. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Apical root end resection (Apicoectomy) as treatment option in cases of dental trauma in young patient].

    PubMed

    Lin, S; Guttmacher, Z; Steif, M; Braun, R

    2011-04-01

    Apical root end resection is becoming popular procedure as a treatment option in cases of ortho-grade endodontic failure. In this case report it has been shown that root end resection (Apicoectomy) had succeed to preserve a tooth after dental trauma with root fractured in the apical third. Any other conservative endodontic treatment failed. One-year follow-up revealed complete healing of the area. Apical root end resection might serve as a viable treatment option in cases of dental trauma in young patient in carefully selected patients.

  20. Dental implants in patients treated with oral bisphosphonates: a bibliographic review.

    PubMed

    Montoya-Carralero, José-Maria; Parra-Mino, Pablo; Ramírez-Fernández, Piedad; Morata-Murcia, Isabel Maria; Mompeán-Gambín, Maria del Carmen; Calvo-Guirado, José-Luis

    2010-01-01

    Bisphosphonates inhibit bone resorption and are used to treat a range of pathologies, including Paget disease, osteoporosis, multiple myeloma and metastases associated with breast or prostate cancer. At present, there is no effective treatment for bisphosphonate induced osteonecrosis, so prevention is extremely important. Since quality of life deteriorates for those suffering osteonecrosis, maximum precautions should be taken with patients at risk, and especially whenever oral surgery, including dental implant placement, is contemplated. Dentists and oral or maxillofacial surgeons must keep up to date with the latest approaches to prevention, particularly when treating patients who are presently taking, or who will be taking bisphosphonates and are also candidates for dental implants.

  1. Treatment with dental implants in patients with severe osteoporosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Friberg, B

    1994-08-01

    The case report of a woman with severe osteoporosis who was treated with dental implants is presented. Polyarthritis was diagnosed in 1955, and a corticosteroid medication treatment was started in 1960. During the years, the patient has undergone multiple joint surgeries. Dental implants were inserted in the maxilla in 1987 and in the mandible in 1988. Due to a compression of the spine, the patient lost 12 cm in body height between 1991 and 1993; a spontaneous femur fracture was diagnosed in December 1992. However, the arch bone has been stable; the 6- and 5-year follow-up results of the maxillary and mandibular implants, respectively, are presented.

  2. A short-term follow-up of treatment outcome in groups of uncooperative child dental patients.

    PubMed

    Arnrup, K; Berggren, U; Broberg, A G; Bodin, L

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate the short-term follow-up outcome in four subgroups of uncooperative child dental patients referred to a specialist paediatric dental clinic in Sweden. Seventy children, classified into four groups (based on fear, temperament, behaviour and verbal intelligence), were followed-up at their public dental clinics after termination of specialist dental treatment. Questionnaire assessments of children's dental and general fear, parental dental fear, emotional stress, locus of control and parenting efficacy were made by parents pre and post treatment and at follow-up and were analysed within and between groups. At follow-up, parents rated their children's coping and procedure stress, while treatment acceptance was rated by the dentists. Decreases in child dental fear were maintained at follow-up, although a third of children still had moderate or high dental fear. For those children who had been classified into the externalising, impulsive group, an increased risk of non-acceptance (RR=3.7) was indicated. The risk of dental fear at follow-up was increased for the group of fearful, inhibited children (RR=3.8). For the study group as a whole a poorer follow-up outcome could be predicted by avoidance behaviour (OR 12.9-16.6) and moderate or high post treatment dental fear (OR 6.5- 21.3). Fearful, inhibited child dental patients may need, due to dental fear, extra attention even after successful dental treatment at a specialist clinic. Externalising, impulsive children constitute a special challenge for dentistry. The continued need for adjusted management after termination of specialist treatment can be predicted from avoidance behaviour and post treatment dental fear scores.

  3. Anesthetic management by laryngeal mask airway in a patient with a history of difficult intubation resulting in dental injuries.

    PubMed

    Asahi, Yoshinao; Fujii, Ryosuke; Usui, Naoko; Kagamiuchi, Hajime; Omichi, Shiro; Kotani, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Disabled patients may face respiratory problems during general anesthesia because of head and neck anomalies. We describe a case of dental treatment under general anesthesia using a laryngeal mask airway in a disabled patient who faced difficulty in endotracheal intubation on several occasions, 5 of which resulted in dental injuries.

  4. Anesthetic Management by Laryngeal Mask Airway in a Patient With a History of Difficult Intubation Resulting in Dental Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Asahi, Yoshinao; Fujii, Ryosuke; Usui, Naoko; Kagamiuchi, Hajime; Omichi, Shiro; Kotani, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Disabled patients may face respiratory problems during general anesthesia because of head and neck anomalies. We describe a case of dental treatment under general anesthesia using a laryngeal mask airway in a disabled patient who faced difficulty in endotracheal intubation on several occasions, 5 of which resulted in dental injuries. PMID:25849470

  5. The use of general anesthesia to facilitate dental treatment in adult patients with special needs.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mathew Albert Wei Ting; Borromeo, Gelsomina Lucia

    2017-06-01

    General anesthesia is commonly used to facilitate dental treatment in patients with anxiety or challenging behavior, many of whom are children or patients with special needs. When performing procedures under general anesthesia, dental surgeons must perform a thorough pre-operative assessment, as well as ensure that the patients are aware of the potential risks and that informed consent has been obtained. Such precautions ensure optimal patient management and reduce the frequency of morbidities associated with this form of sedation. Most guidelines address the management of pediatric patients under general anesthesia. However, little has been published regarding this method in patients with special needs. This article constitutes a review of the current literature regarding management of patients with special needs under general anesthesia.

  6. Perception of smile esthetics varies between patients and dental professionals when recession defects are present.

    PubMed

    Musskopf, Marta Liliana; Rocha, José Mariano da; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the smile esthetic perception of patients, dental students and dentists faced to different situations concerning gingival margin position. A total of 123 individuals (41 patients, 41 dental students and 41 dentists) completed a structured questionnaire and evaluated 6 pictures of the same smile modified in Adobe Photoshop® image-editing software representing: no gingival recession, 2 mm recession in one maxillary lateral incisor, 2 mm recession in both maxillary lateral incisors, 2 mm recession in one maxillary canine, 2 mm recession in both maxillary canines and generalized 2 mm recession. The visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to rate the esthetic perception. Mean VAS values were calculated and compared among gingival situations as well as group of respondents by one-way ANOVA, with an alpha level of 0.05. VAS analysis revealed that mean values ranged from 4.2 (±1.8) to 6.8 (±1.7). Images with no gingival recession received the highest score by all groups, with statistically significant differences among dentists and dental students. However, patients scored images with no recession with significantly lower ranks as compared with dentists and dental students. No significant differences were observed among patients for any of the situations. When dentists and dental students were compared, the worst situation was observed for generalized gingival recession, with scores 4.2 (±1.8) and 4.9 (±1.8), respectively. Patients and dental professionals had different perceptions about esthetics related to gingival margin position.

  7. A systematic review of dental disease in patients undergoing cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Napeñas, Joel J.; Hodgson, Brian D.; Stokman, Monique A.; Mathers-Stauffer, Vickie; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the literature and update our current understanding of the impact of present cancer therapies on the dental apparatus (teeth and periodontium) since the 1989 NIH Development Consensus Conference on the Oral Complications of Cancer Therapies. Review method A systematic literature search was conducted with assistance from a research librarian in the databases MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE for articles published between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2008. Each study was independently assessed by two reviewers. Taking into account predetermined quality measures, a weighted prevalence was calculated for the prevalence of dental caries, severe gingival disease, and dental infection. Data on DMFT/dmft, DMFS/dmfs, plaque, and gingival indexes were also gathered. The level of evidence, recommendation, and guideline (if possible) were given for published preventive and management strategies. Results Sixty-four published papers between 1990 and 2008 were reviewed. The weighted overall prevalence of dental caries was 28.1%. The overall DMFT for patients who were post-antineoplastic therapy was 9.19 (SD, 7.98; n = 457). The overall plaque index for patients who were post-antineoplastic therapy was 1.38 (SD, 0.25; n = 189). The GI for patients who were post-chemotherapy was 1.02 (SD, 0.15; n = 162). The weighted prevalence of dental infections/abscess during chemotherapy was reported in three studies and was 5.8%. Conclusions Patients who were post-radiotherapy had the highest DMFT. The use of fluoride products and chlorhexidine rinses are beneficial in patients who are post-radiotherapy. There continues to be lack of clinical studies on the extent and severity of dental disease that are associated with infectious complications during cancer therapy. PMID:20449756

  8. A systematic review of dental disease in patients undergoing cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Catherine H L; Napeñas, Joel J; Hodgson, Brian D; Stokman, Monique A; Mathers-Stauffer, Vickie; Elting, Linda S; Spijkervet, Fred K L; Brennan, Michael T

    2010-08-01

    This purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the literature and update our current understanding of the impact of present cancer therapies on the dental apparatus (teeth and periodontium) since the 1989 NIH Development Consensus Conference on the Oral Complications of Cancer Therapies. A systematic literature search was conducted with assistance from a research librarian in the databases MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE for articles published between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2008. Each study was independently assessed by two reviewers. Taking into account predetermined quality measures, a weighted prevalence was calculated for the prevalence of dental caries, severe gingival disease, and dental infection. Data on DMFT/dmft, DMFS/dmfs, plaque, and gingival indexes were also gathered. The level of evidence, recommendation, and guideline (if possible) were given for published preventive and management strategies. Sixty-four published papers between 1990 and 2008 were reviewed. The weighted overall prevalence of dental caries was 28.1%. The overall DMFT for patients who were post-antineoplastic therapy was 9.19 (SD, 7.98; n = 457). The overall plaque index for patients who were post-antineoplastic therapy was 1.38 (SD, 0.25; n = 189). The GI for patients who were post-chemotherapy was 1.02 (SD, 0.15; n = 162). The weighted prevalence of dental infections/abscess during chemotherapy was reported in three studies and was 5.8%. Patients who were post-radiotherapy had the highest DMFT. The use of fluoride products and chlorhexidine rinses are beneficial in patients who are post-radiotherapy. There continues to be lack of clinical studies on the extent and severity of dental disease that are associated with infectious complications during cancer therapy.

  9. Dental treatment planning considerations for patients using cannabis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Grafton, Sarah Essek; Huang, Po Ning; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2016-05-01

    There is a deficit in clinical research on the potential risks involved in treating dental patients who use cannabis for either medicinal or recreational purposes. The aim of this case report is to illustrate the need for additional education for oral health care professionals so they can understand the wide variety of available cannabis options and their potential effects on dental treatment. A 27-year-old man sought care at the dental clinic with a nonrestorable molar requiring extraction. During the review of his medical history, the patient reported taking a "dab" of marijuana approximately 5 hours before his appointment. Because of the admission of recent illicit drug use, no treatment was rendered. The patient was offered an appointment the next day but he refused, citing bias in regard to his cannabis use. The number of Americans using marijuana is increasing rapidly. Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have laws legalizing cannabis to some degree, and Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington have legalized marijuana for recreational use. This drastic upswing in availability and usage will require dentists to address the possible effects of cannabis on dental practices. It is imperative that dental care providers make clinical decisions based on scientific evidence regarding the pharmacologic and psychological effects of marijuana, not on the societal stigma associated with illegal drug use. Dentists should be familiar with popular delivery systems and understand the differences between various marijuana options. Clinical guidelines may need to be developed to help providers assess the patient's degree of cognitive impairment. Dentists should be able to advise patients on the potential consequences of this habit on their oral health. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiple lingual cusps trait on mandibular premolars and hypoconulid reduction trait on mandibular first molar in living Jordanian population. Intra- and inter-trait interactions.

    PubMed

    Khraisat, Ameen; Alsoleihat, Firas; Subramani, Karthikeyan; Al-Rabab'ah, Mohammad A; Al-Omiri, Mahmoud K; Abu-Tahun, Ibrahim

    2013-09-01

    The objective was to determine the expression and fluctuating asymmetry of two dental morphological traits in the living Jordanians: The lingual cusp number on the lower premolars (LP1 and LP2) and the hypoconulid (distal cusp) reduction on the lower first molar (LM1). In addition, both intra- trait and inter- trait interactions were analyzed. Three hundred school children (15.5 +/- 0.4 years) were involved. Impressions for the mandibular dental arches were taken, and dental casts were reproduced. The above-mentioned traits were observed. Paired sample t test and nonparametric correlation analysis were used for data analysis. Three-cusped LP1 was found in 11.40 % of the examined students, while the two-cusped LP1 was found in 88.60%. In comparison, the Three-cusped LP2 was found in 61.40% while the two-cusped LP2 was found in 38.60% of the observed subjects. The frequencies of the 4-cusped and 5-cusped LM1 were found to be 8.65% and 91.35%, respectively. Nonparametric correlation analysis revealed positive and statistically significant association between the expression of two lingual cusps on LP1 and on LP2 in both genders (p < 0.01), while there was no significant correlation between expression of two lingual cusps on either LP1 or LP2 and the hypoconulid loss on LM1 in both genders (p > 0.05). Bilateralism was highly significant in the tested traits in both genders (p < 0.001). This finding might be a sign of relatively low environmental stresses experienced by the living Jordanians and/or great ability of its individuals to buffer the adverse effects of such stresses on dental development. This study is a useful addition to the existing literature in that it examines a previously poorly characterized population and assists in placing the contemporary Jordanian population within the current framework of human population groups globally.

  11. Availability of dental services for patients with blood-borne viruses.

    PubMed

    Kellock, D J; Carlin, E M

    2002-08-01

    Dental practitioners were surveyed, using a self-completed postal questionnaire, to assess their attitudes to managing patients with blood-borne viruses (BBV) and to identify dental services available for such patients in North Nottinghamshire. Questionnaires were completed by 79 (65.3%) of the 121 practitioners from 43 (82.7%) of the 52 study practices. Previous BBV experience was reported by 44 (55.7%), 31 (39.2%), 20 (25.3%) respondents for hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), HIV, respectively. Over two-thirds would maintain existing patients with subsequently diagnosed BBV on their lists, approximately one-third would accept new BBV patients. Risk factors for BBV of homo/bisexuality and injecting drug use were not asked by 71 (89.9%) and 49 (62.0%) practitioners, respectively. Universal precautions were employed by 67 (84.8%) practitioners regardless of the patient's status and by seven practitioners for known BBV patients. The advice of the General Dental Council, British Dental Association, and the use of universal precautions are discussed.

  12. Allergy and corrosion of dental materials in patients with oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Lundström, I M

    1984-02-01

    Patients with histologically verified oral lichen planus (OLP) were studied regarding allergic reactions to substances in dental materials, presence of clinical corrosion orally and factors influencing corrosion, such as mixed gold and amalgam therapy, non-precious pin-constructions or complete dentures. The material consisted of 48 OLP patients (33 female, 15 male) and the results were compared with those of a control group (40 patients) and/or general population samples. When patch tested, 39% of the OLP patients reacted to one or more components in dental materials. Reaction to mercury was most common, being noted in 26%. Clinical signs of corrosion were significantly more frequent in the OLP group (72%) than in the control cases (28%). Patients with atrophic-erosive OLP exhibited a significantly higher frequency of corrosion (83%) than those with reticular type (46%). Mixed gold and amalgam therapy and screwposts were equally present in both the OLP and control group and the frequency of complete dentures corresponded to that reported for general populations. A change of dental materials in 8 patients with positive patch tests led to marked oral improvement in 6 cases, 2 of which became completely cured. The frequencies recorded for allergic reactions and corrosion as well as the result of treatment indicate that substances in dental materials may be of significance in cases of OLP.

  13. Jordanian nurses' barriers to screening for intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Al-Natour, Ahlam; Gillespie, Gordon L; Felblinger, Dianne; Wang, Leigh L

    2014-12-01

    Screening rates for intimate partner violence (IPV) among nurses are still very low. The study purpose is to evaluate IPV screening and barriers by Jordanian nurses. A cross-sectional design was used with a stratified random sample (N = 125) of Jordanian nurses. Findings included a significantly lower IPV screening rate among Jordanian nurses compared with those in the United States, no difference in screening between IPV victims compared with non-victimized nurses, and that the IPV screening barriers related to a lack of system support were the most clinically important barriers. Nurses can work in partnership with health care providers and managers to increase screening and overcome barriers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Patients' Perceptions of Dental Students' Empathic, Person-Centered Care in a Dental School Clinic in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Babar, Muneer Gohar; Hasan, Syed Shahzad; Yong, Wong Mei; Mitha, Shahid; Al-Waeli, Haider Abdulameer

    2017-04-01

    Empathy has been identified as a crucial foundation in building an effective dentist-patient relationship. The aim of this study was to assess patients' perceptions of dental students' empathic care in the primary oral health care clinic at International Medical University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in May-October 2014. The study also assessed the validity and reliability of the Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure in this setting; the association between number of encounters and students' CARE Measure scores; and the association between students' empathy (measured by the Toronto Empathy Questionnaire) and CARE Measure scores. Participants were 283 patients (aged ≥18 years) who were asked to self-complete the ten-item CARE Measure immediately after their clinical encounter with students who provided care under supervision of the teaching staff. The results showed that the CARE Measure demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.95). A single factor solution emerged, accounting for 69% of the variance. The mean CARE Measure score in the consultations was 43.55±6.14, and 26% of the students achieved the maximum possible score of 50. The mean number of encounters with each student was 2.33±2.78. An increase of one episode was associated with an insignificant average CARE score decrease of 0.05 (-0.28, 0.38), whereas students' empathy was associated with a small increase in average CARE Measure score of 0.63 (0.08, 1.18). These results provide evidence of the measure's ability to support feedback to dental students on their empathy when interacting with patients.

  15. Prevalence of dental anomalies in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Neda; Majidi, Mohammad Reza; Aliakbarian, Majid; Hasanzadeh, Nadia

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies in a group of patients with cleft lip and palate (CL/P) in the northeast of Iran. Ninety-one patients referring to the Cleft Lip and Palate Clinic of Mashhad Dental School were enrolled and classified into right CL/P, left CL/P, and bilateral CL/P groups. Photographs, dental casts, and panoramic and periapical radiographs were retrieved, and dental anomalies were recorded. χ test was used to analyze the frequency of dental anomalies according to type of cleft and sex. Missing maxillary lateral incisors was the most frequent dental anomaly, which was slightly higher in the bilateral group (61.1%). There were significantly more cases of missing lateral incisors outside the cleft area in right CL/P (P = 0.015). Peg lateral incisors were observed in 33.3% of bilateral CL/P compared with 28% of right and 23.3% of left unilateral cases. The sample presented rotations of central incisors in the cleft area in 33.3% of bilateral clefts. In unilateral clefts, it occurred more frequently in the right side (48%). Sexual dimorphism appeared only for maxillary central incisor rotation in the cleft area, which showed significantly greater frequency in females (P = 0.025). Transposition of maxillary canine and first premolars was found in 5.5% of bilateral, 8% of right, and 3.3% of left unilateral clefts. The prevalence of dental anomalies in the studied sample seems to be higher than that reported in the normal population. More anomalies were observed at the cleft side. The frequency of most anomalies was not significantly different between the 2 sexes.

  16. Dental management of patients receiving anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chaveli-López, Begonya; Gavaldá-Esteve, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Adequate hemostasis is crucial for the success of invasive dental treatment, since bleeding problems can give rise to complications associated with important morbidity-mortality. The dental treatment of patients who tend to an increased risk of bleeding due to the use of anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet drugs raises a challenge in the daily practice of dental professionals. Adequate knowledge of the mechanisms underlying hemostasis, and the optimized management of such patients, are therefore very important issues. Objectives: A study is made of the anticoagulant / antiplatelet drugs currently available on the market, with evaluation of the risks and benefits of suspending such drugs prior to invasive dental treatment. In addition, a review is made of the current management protocols used in these patients. Material and Methods: A literature search was made in the PubMed, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, covering all studies published in the last 5 years in English and Spanish. Studies conducted in humans and with scientific evidence levels 1 and 2 (metaanalyses, systematic reviews, randomized phase 1 and 2 trials, cohort studies and case-control studies) were considered. The keywords used for the search were: tooth extraction, oral surgery, hemostasis, platelet aggregation inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs, anticoagulants, warfarin, acenocoumarol. Results and Conclusions: Many management protocols have been developed, though in all cases a full clinical history is required, together with complementary hemostatic tests to minimize any risks derived from dental treatment. Many authors consider that patient medication indicated for the treatment of background disease should not be altered or suspended unless so indicated by the prescribing physician. Local hemostatic measures have been shown to suffice for controlling possible bleeding problems resulting from dental treatment. Key words:Tooth extraction, oral surgery, hemostasis, platelet

  17. Medical diagnoses of pediatric dental patients treated under general anesthesia: a 19 year review.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Michael W; Milano, Michael; Lee, Jessica Y

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the records of pediatric dental patients treated under general anesthesia to determine if there had been any significant change in preoperative diagnoses between 1990-99 and 2000-08. The records of 3298 pediatric dental patients treated in the operating room under general anesthesia at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Children's Hospital were examined and medical diagnoses recorded. The number of cases treated by calendar year was obtained. The results of this study did not find any significant differences in percentage frequency of medical diagnoses between the years of 1990-99 and 2000-08. There has been a steady increase in the number of cases treated under general anesthesia over the period of the study. 1. Dental care under general anesthesia remains an important treatment option. 2. The medical diagnoses of children provided dental treatment under general anesthesia has not changed significantly over the past nineteen years at the UNC Children's Hospital. 3. The demand to provide dental care for children under general anesthesia has continued to increase.

  18. The importance of teaching communication in dental education. A survey amongst dentists, students and patients.

    PubMed

    Woelber, J P; Deimling, D; Langenbach, D; Ratka-Krüger, P

    2012-02-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the subjective importance of teaching communication in the dental curriculum by conducting a survey amongst dentists, students and patients. Three questionnaires about communication-related issues were developed in which different questions could be rated on a five-point Likert scale. These questions included the subjective importance of the dental team's friendliness, an elaborated consultation, modern office equipment or the dentist's technical skills. Seven hundred and twenty-nine questionnaires were completed [233 by dentists (32%), 310 by students (43%) and 185 by patients (25%)]. Eighty-seven percentage of the dentists, 84% of the students and 84% of the patients supported an integration of communicational issues in dental education; 94.7% of the dentists and 77.2% of the patients attached vital importance to the dentist-patient relationship regarding the therapeutic outcomes. Dentists with prior communicational training experience would spend significantly (P<0.001) more money for further courses. The results show the publicly perceived importance of integrating aspects of communication in dental education. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Patients' knowledge and awareness of dental implants in a Turkish subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Özçakır Tomruk, Ceyda; Şençift, Kemal

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patients' knowledge on dental implants in a Turkish subpopulation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Five hundred twenty seven Turkish adults referred to Yeditepe University Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul, Turkey, were presented with a questionnaire including 20 questions regarding the level of information and awareness about the dental implants. The data were collected and statistical analyses were performed with Chi square test to compare the descriptive data. RESULTS Among 527 subjects, 54% were female and 46% were male with a mean age of 42.2 years. The rate of patients' implant awareness was 27.7%. When the patients were questioned about the treatment options for rehabilitation of tooth missing, 60.9% of patients were informed about fixed partial denture, followed by conventional complete denture (32.5%) and removable partial denture (24.9%). Six percent reported that they were very well informed about the dental implants whereas 48.2% were poorly informed. The information sources of the implants were from the dentist (44.5%), printed media (31.6%) and friends and acquaintances (17.3%), respectively. Sixteen percent of the population believed that their implants would last forever. CONCLUSION The dentists should give more detailed information to the patients about dental implants and tooth-supported fixed partial dentures in the future. PMID:24843399

  20. Metallic ion content and damage to the DNA in oral mucosa cells patients treated dental implants.

    PubMed

    López-Jornet, Pía; Perrez, Francisco Parra; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Ros-Llor, Irene; LLor-Ros, Irene; Ramírez-Fernández, Piedad

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential genotoxicity of dental implants, evaluating biomarkers of DNA damage (micronuclei and/or nuclear buds), cytokinetic defects (binucleated cells) and the presence of trace metals in gingival cells of patients with implants, comparing these with a control group. A total of 60 healthy adults (30 patients with dental implants and 30 control patients without) were included in the study. Medical and dental histories were made for each including life-style factors. Genotoxicity effects were assessed by micronucleus assays in the gingival epithelial cells of each patient; 1,000 epithelial cells were analyzed, evaluating the frequency of micronucleated cells and other nuclear anomalies. The concentration of metals (Al(27), Ag(107), Co (59), Cr (52), Cu(63), Fe(56), Sn(118), Mn(55), Mo(92), Ni(60), Pb(208), Ti(47)) were assayed by means of coupled plasma-mass spectrophotometry (ICP-MS). The frequency of micronuclei in the patient group with implants was higher than in the control group but without statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). Similar results were found for binucleated cells and nuclear buds (P > 0.05). For metals assayed by ICP-MS, significant differences were found for Ti(47) (P ≤ 0.045). Univariate analysis identified a significant association between the presence of micronuclei and age. Dental implants do not induce DNA damage in gingival cells, the slight effects observed cannot be indicated as biologically relevant.

  1. [Coping mechanisms of mentally disabled patients in need of dental treatment].

    PubMed

    Simion, Carmen-Nicoleta; Dafinoiu, I; Forna, Norina-Consuela

    2010-01-01

    The concept of the study appeared as a necessity of a better understanding the patients with mental disabilities, exposed to the need of professional dental treatment. The study's purpose consists in the investigation of mechanisms by which the patients with mental disabilities react while exposed to the action of a stress agent, represented in the study by the necessity of following a dental treatment. The lot consisted in 52 patients with mental disabilities from the University Hospital of Psychiatry "Socola"-Iasi, who needed prosthetic restaurative treatment which implies the use of syringe with needle, extraction and endodonthic tools, dental turbine. The evaluation was made on the basis of: the coping COPE questionnaire. The procedure consists in registering 14 scales for the measurement of so many forms of coping which can have a preponderantly active state or a passive one. From the statistical point of view, the only significant differences were found depending on the sex of patients in the case of coping C14 study method (using alcohol or medicines). The highest score was obtained for coping C7 (positive reinterpretation). Due to the analysis of parameters' values of coping in the studied lot, we can conclude that the patients with mental disabilities, in the need of dental treatment, preponderantly react by active mechanisms of coping, focused on the issue, in disfavour of passive ones.

  2. Rapid onset of Parkinsonian-like symptoms in a geriatric dental patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Cleverick D; Shynett, Betty; Johnson, Claudette D; Maldonado, Barbara J

    2006-11-01

    This article reviews the clinical issues regarding adverse drug reactions in geriatric dental patients. Accurate clinical observations and diagnosis are complicated in geriatric patients because they are predisposed to chronic illnesses, various prescribing physicians, and a decreased ability to metabolize and detoxify multiple medications. The authors have further reviewed neurological motor reactions with a detailed review of the physical presentations of Parkinson's disease. As such, the dental professional has a unique opportunity to provide observational feedback to other healthcare providers concerning the health status of their geriatric patients. In this case report, the changes in the patient's physical status and mental well-being were not a result or associated with a catastrophic event (eg, stroke, cardiovascular event, or head injury). The patient's rapid degeneration was anecdotally associated with a recently prescribed group of medications, which shows the need for healthcare professionals to be aware of changes in medications when assessing patients' health.

  3. Molecular analysis of the CTNS gene in Jordanian families with nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Saied; Al-Rababah, Bothina; Hazza, Issa; Akl, Kamal; Saca, Edward; Al-Younis, Doaa

    2015-01-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that is characterised by the accumulation of the amino acid cystine in several body tissues due to a mutation in the CTNS gene, which encodes the cystinosin protein. The aim of this study was to sequence the coding exons of the CTNS gene in five different Jordanian families and one family from Sudan with nephropathic cystinosis. Probands initially presented with Fanconi syndrome symptoms. An eye examination showed the accumulation of cystine crystals in the cornea by the age of 2 years, suggesting cystinosis. All of the coding exons and flanking intronic sequences and the promoter region of the CTNS gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction and subjected to sequencing. None of the probands in this study carried the European 57-kb deletion in the CTNS gene. Seven variants in the coding and promoter sequence of the CTNS gene were identified in the probands of this study. Two of these variants were a CTNS mutation that was previously identified in a heterozygous genotype in two different patients of European descendant. The two mutations were c.829dupA in exon 10 and c.890G>A in exon 11. The proband of family 2 was compound-heterozygous for the two mutations. This study is the first molecular study of infantile nephropathic cystinosis in Jordan. We successfully identified the causative CTNS mutations in Jordanian families. The results provide a basis for the early detection of the disease using molecular tools in a highly consanguineous Jordanian population. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Short dental implants: A scoping review of the literature for patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Edher, Faraj; Nguyen, Caroline T

    2017-09-16

    Dental implants can be essential in the rehabilitation of various cancer defects, but their ideal placement can be complicated by the limited dimensions of the available host bone. Surgical interventions developed to increase the amount of bone are not all predictable or successful and can sometimes be contraindicated. Short dental implants have been suggested as an alternative option in sites where longer implants are not possible. Whether they provide a successful treatment option is unclear. The purpose of this study was to review the literature on short dental implants and assess whether they are a viable definitive treatment option for rehabilitating cancer patients with deficient bone. A scoping review of the literature was performed, including a search of established periodontal textbooks for articles on short dental implants combined with a search of PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. A search for all literature published before June 2016 was based on the following keywords: ['dental implants' OR 'dental implantation, endosseous' OR 'dental prosthesis, implant supported'] AND [short]. The minimum acceptable implant length has been considered to be 6 mm. The survival rates of short implants varied between 74% and 96% at 5 years, depending on factors such as the quality of the patient's bone, primary stability of the implant, clinician's learning curve, and implant surface. Short implants can achieve results similar to those of longer implants in augmented bone and offer a treatment alternative that could reduce the need for invasive surgery and associated morbidity and be safer and more economical. Short dental implants (6 mm to 8 mm) can be used successfully to support single or multiple fixed reconstructions or overdentures in atrophic maxillae and mandibles. The use of short dental implants lessens the need for advanced and complicated surgical bone augmentation procedures, which reduces complications

  5. Rehabilitation of a fearful dental patient with oral sedation: utilizing the incremental oral administration technique.

    PubMed

    Feck, Anthony S; Goodchild, Jason H

    2005-01-01

    The treatment of fearful or anxious patients presents a myriad of problems for the dentist. In-office sedation using oral (enteral) medications is an effective means of increasing patient tolerance of invasive dental procedures. The incremental oral administration technique is a protocol that can be utilized to treat fearful or anxious patients. A case is presented in which this technique was used as an adjunct to the rehabilitation of a debilitated mouth.

  6. [The choice of local anesthesia for patients with hypertension in dental practice].

    PubMed

    Anisimova, E N; Orekhova, I V; Sokhov, S T; Davydova, S S

    2016-01-01

    The study involved 153 patients (92 females, 61 males aged 30-75 years) with arterial pressure from 120/80 to 180/100 mm Hg. The role of dentist in primary diagnosis of hypertension was identified. The study highlights the need for functional status assessment before dental treatment and the importance of safe and effective local anesthesia for the patients with arterial hypertension. The paper presents rationale for the choice of local anesthetic agent for these patients.

  7. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    PubMed Central

    Wotman, Stephen; Demko, Catherine A; Victoroff, Kristin; Sudano, Joseph J; Lalumandier, James A

    2010-01-01

    This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio dental practices observing 3751 patient encounters with dentists and hygienists. Direct observation of practice characteristics, procedures performed, and how procedure and nonprocedure time was utilized during patient visits was recorded using a modified Davis Observation Code that classified patient contact time into 24 behavioral categories. Dentist, hygienist, and patient characteristics were gathered by questionnaire. The most common nonprocedure behaviors observed for dentists were chatting, evaluation feedback, history taking, and answering patient questions. Hygienists added preventive counseling. We distinguish between preventive procedures and counseling in actual dental offices that are members of a practice-based research network. Almost a third of the dentist’s and half of the hygienist’s patient contact time is utilized for nonprocedure behaviors during patient encounters. These interactions may be linked to patient and practitioner satisfaction and effectiveness of self-care instruction. PMID:23662080

  8. Physiologic and behavioral effects of papoose board on anxiety in dental patients with special needs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yung; Yang, Hsiang; Chi, Huang-Ju; Chen, Hsin-Ming

    2014-02-01

    Anxiety induced by dental treatment can become a serious problem, especially for patients with special needs. Application of deep touch pressure, which is a sensory adaptation technique, may ameliorate anxiety in disabled patients. However, few empiric studies have investigated the possible links between the clinical effects of deep touch pressure and its behavioral and physiologic aspects. Equally little progress has been made concerning theoretical development. The current study is a crossover intervention trial to investigate the behavioral and physiological effects of deep touch pressure for participants receiving dental treatment. Nineteen disabled participants, who were retrospectively subclassified for positive trend or negative trend, were recruited to receive the papoose board as an application of deep touch pressure. Quantitative analyses of behavioral assessments and physiological measurements, including electrodermal activity and heart rate variability, were conducted. We sought to understand the modulation of the autonomic nervous system and the orchestration of sympathetic and parasympathetic (PsNS) nervous systems. Behavioral assessments reported that higher levels of anxiety were induced by the dental treatment for participants with both groups of positive and negative trends. Although no significant differences were found in the SNS activity, physiologic responses indicated that significantly changes of PsNS activity were observed under the stress condition (dental treatment) when deep touch pressure intervention was applied, especially for participants in the group of positive trend. Our results suggest that the PsNS activation plays a critical role in the process of ANS modulation. This study provides not only physiologic evidence for the modulation effects of deep touch pressure on stressful conditions in dental environments but also the evidence that the application of papoose board, as a sensory adaptation technique, is not harmful for dental

  9. Establishment and current status of patient community at Tokyo Dental College.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Hirata, Soichiro; Sugihara, Naoki; Mochizuki, Riuji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Kawada, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    The "Dental students training to address the needs of each individual patient: enhancement of ability to make a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plans with high ethical standards and good communication skills", project launched at Tokyo Dental College was adopted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology as part of its "Program for Promoting University Education and Student Support, Theme A: Program for Promoting University Education Reform" in 2009. One of the main goals of this subject is "the establishment of Patient Community". Patient Community members allowed students to gain a more realistic experience of clinical practice than simulated patients. The Patient Community consists of patients and members of the parents' association who have agreed to cooperate for the advancement of dental education, becoming involved in dental student education through Communication Studies, which are held for first- to fourth-year students. Patient Community members were recruited at the open lectures (15 times, between July 10, 2010 and November 30, 2011). The Patient Community comprised 24 members, including 8 men and 16 women by November 30, 2011. The cumulative number of attendees in Communication Studies (I-IV, 6 times) was 35, including 13 men and 22 women. Fourteen people applied for admission on the day of the open lecture. Seven people signed up between 1 and 7 days after the open lecture. On the other hand, only 3 people applied within 8 to 9 days after the open lecture. However, interestingly, the ratio of the attendance for Communication Studies by Patient Community members who applied 8 to 9 days after the open lecture was higher than that of members who applied for admission on the day of the open lecture. Since the number of Patient Community members is insufficient for the purposes of the Patient Community, it is necessary to think about how recruitment methods can be made more effective and how such open lectures should be

  10. Pediatric Dental Patients are Part of a Larger Picture: Detailing Population Realities.

    PubMed

    Waldman, H B; Perlman, S P

    2015-01-01

    The traditional setting of a dental practice may offer pediatric dentists a potentially isolated picture of the general health and use of health services by youngsters in their community. Results from the latest National Health Interview Survey are reviewed to provide broad dimensions to supplement and reinforce the general and specific information usually developed regarding individual patients.

  11. Community analysis of dental plaque and endotracheal tube biofilms from mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Marino, Poala J; Wise, Matt P; Smith, Ann; Marchesi, Julian R; Riggio, Marcello P; Lewis, Michael A O; Williams, David W

    2017-06-01

    Mechanically ventilated patients are at risk for developing ventilator-associated pneumonia, and it has been reported that dental plaque provides a reservoir of respiratory pathogens that may aspirate to the lungs and endotracheal tube (ETT) biofilms. For the first time, metataxonomics was used to simultaneously characterize the microbiome of dental plaque, ETTs, and non-directed bronchial lavages (NBLs) in mechanically ventilated patients to determine similarities in respective microbial communities and therefore likely associations. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences from 34 samples of dental plaque, NBLs, and ETTs from 12 adult mechanically ventilated patients were analyzed. No significant differences in the microbial communities of these samples were evident. Detected bacteria were primarily oral species (e.g., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus salivarius, Prevotella melaninogenica) with respiratory pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcuspneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae) also in high abundance. The high similarity between the microbiomes of dental plaque, NBLs, and ETTs suggests that the oral cavity is indeed an important site involved in microbial aspiration to the lower airway and ETT. As such, maintenance of good oral hygiene is likely to be highly important in limiting aspiration of bacteria in this vulnerable patient group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Dental Plaque Control Program in Autistic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias, Guilherme G.; Prado, Eliane F. G. B.; Vadasz, Estevao; Siqueira, Jose Tadeu T.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the efficacy of a programme for dental plaque control in autistics. Patients were evaluated on five occasions over a period of 180 days using the following instruments: OHI-S, DMF-T, the Fonnes brushing technique and diet questionnaire. Participants were divided into two groups according to level of co-operation…

  13. Patient Anxiety Reduction Through Mediated Role Modeling in a Dental Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Henrietta; And Others

    This investigation was conducted to determine the effect of video-taped role modeling on patient-reported level of anxiety at the beginning of dental treatment and the long term effects of the modeling tape as evidenced by appointment cancellations and failure rate. Subjects completed the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)…

  14. Conservative approach to dental extractions in patients on anticoagulant therapy: A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Somma, Francesco; Grande, Nicola Maria; Plotino, GianLuca; Cameli, Giorgio; Pameijer, Cornelis H

    2010-01-01

    This clinical study reviewed dental surgical extractions that were performed on 532 patients diagnosed at risk of thromboembolism without interrupting their anticoagulant therapy. The results confirmed that anticoagulant therapy can be modified successfully and does not need to be interrupted, which can carry significant risks.

  15. Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Dental Plaque Control Program in Autistic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias, Guilherme G.; Prado, Eliane F. G. B.; Vadasz, Estevao; Siqueira, Jose Tadeu T.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the efficacy of a programme for dental plaque control in autistics. Patients were evaluated on five occasions over a period of 180 days using the following instruments: OHI-S, DMF-T, the Fonnes brushing technique and diet questionnaire. Participants were divided into two groups according to level of co-operation…

  16. Does Intellectual Disability Affect the Development of Dental Caries in Patients with Cerebral Palsy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Rafaela Nogueira; Alcantara, Carlos Eduardo Pinto; Mota-Veloso, Isabella; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the severity of intellectual disability is a factor that affects the development of dental cavities in patients with cerebral palsy. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 165 individuals who were selected from a physical rehabilitation center, a special public school and a regular public school. Of…

  17. Does Intellectual Disability Affect the Development of Dental Caries in Patients with Cerebral Palsy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Rafaela Nogueira; Alcantara, Carlos Eduardo Pinto; Mota-Veloso, Isabella; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the severity of intellectual disability is a factor that affects the development of dental cavities in patients with cerebral palsy. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 165 individuals who were selected from a physical rehabilitation center, a special public school and a regular public school. Of…

  18. Patient management: measuring patients' expectations and perceptions of service quality in a dental training hospital.

    PubMed

    White, J G; Slabber, J; Schreuder, A

    2001-04-01

    The difference between service quality expectations and perceptions (experiences) of patients (customers) attending a dental training hospital was investigated by using a modified version of the Parasuraman SERVQUAL model. A questionnaire comprising 28 service quality-related statements and four open-ended questions was used at the interviews. The study showed that 11.6% of respondents experienced problems with the service. A principal component factor analysis indicated that two of the five dimensions of service quality, namely reliability and assurance, contributed to 59% of service level variance. Female patients showed larger mean differences than male patients. The greater the number of visits to the hospital, the smaller the difference between expectations and perceptions. Patients in the category 36-45 years of age, showed larger mean differences than younger or older patients. Respondents with no academic qualifications had lower expectations of the service, while professional people seemed to have more realistic expectations prior to a visit to the hospital than respondents in the technical/clerical category.

  19. Management of the patient who smokes and the diabetic patient in the dental office.

    PubMed

    Kunzel, Carol; Lalla, Evanthia; Lamster, Ira B

    2006-03-01

    Approaches to patient care consistent with a greater emphasis on the importance of risk factors associated with periodontal disease should include measures to reduce risk. In this article, we investigate the extent to which periodontists' and general practice dentists' (GPs) behaviors and attitudes reflect current understanding of the most important environmental risk factor for periodontitis (smoking) and the most important systemic disease risk factor for periodontitis (diabetes mellitus). A mail survey of active periodontists and GPs in the Northeastern United States was conducted during the fall of 2002. Random samples of periodontists and GPs listed in the designated Northeastern states were drawn from the 2002 American Academy of Periodontology Directory and the 2001 American Dental Directory, respectively. Responses were received from 103 periodontists (for a response rate of 73%) and from 105 GPs (for a response rate of 80%). Although periodontists generally perform risk identification and management behaviors for patients who smoke or who have diabetes more frequently than GPs, both groups tend to engage in activities that inquire, discuss, and inform more than they tend to undertake measures to control or manage these risk factors. Rates of proactive patient management activities are quite low in both clinician groups. There is a need to increase periodontists' and GPs' involvement in the active management of the patient who smokes and in the diabetic patient. Such actions can be expected to result in improved periodontal and general health outcomes.

  20. Influence of dental status on nutritional status of geriatric patients in a convalescent and rehabilitation hospital.

    PubMed

    Chai, John; Chu, Frederick C S; Chow, Tak W; Shum, Nam C; Hui, Wendy W H

    2006-01-01

    To investigate 6 dental statuses as risk factors for malnutrition in geriatric patients admitted to a convalescent and rehabilitation hospital. One hundred twenty (59 men and 61 women) geriatric patients admitted to a convalescent and rehabilitation hospital were recruited. Three biochemical and hematologic parameters (albumin, hemoglobin, and lymphocyte count) were used for analysis. Malnutrition was defined as Body Mass Index (BMI) below 18.5 and albumin level under 35 g/L. The number of natural or prosthetic teeth in the dentate patients, and the presence of one or both dentures in the edentate patients, were recorded. Risk factors associated with malnutrition were investigated, namely: (1) edentulism among all patients, (2) edentulism without a set of complete dentures among all patients, (3) edentulism without a set of complete dentures among the edentate patients, (4) decreased number (< 6) of occluding pairs of natural or prosthetic teeth among the dentate patients, (5) decreased number (< 5) of posterior occluding pairs of natural or prosthetic teeth among the dentate patients, and (6) absence of posterior occluding pairs of natural or prosthetic teeth among the dentate patients. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons were used to determine if significant differences in the anthropometric, biochemical, and hematologic parameters existed between the patients with different dental statuses. The odds ratio and significance of 6 dental statuses as risk factors of malnutrition were calculated (P = .05). BMI, albumin, and hemoglobin levels of the malnourished patients were significantly lower than those of nourished patients (P < .05). Lymphocyte count was not significantly different between the 2 patient groups (P > .05). The status of edentate patients without a set of complete dentures compared with other edentate and dentate patients was the only independent risk factor (P < .05) in the 6 statuses studied. Primary healthcare workers caring for

  1. Patients appearing to dental professionals with orofacial pain arising from intracranial tumors: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Moazzam, Alan A; Habibian, Mina

    2012-12-01

    A small proportion of patients with orofacial pain appearing to dentists and dental specialists will have intracranial tumors as the underlying cause. These patients may undergo unnecessary dental interventions before the correct diagnosis is made. A search of the literature using the PubMed database was performed to identify case reports of this occurrence. Cases were analyzed for common characteristics or presenting features that may aid dentists in identifying patients with intracranial tumors. Twenty-eight cases were identified. Features consistent with the diagnoses of trigeminal neuralgia, persistent idiopathic facial pain, and temporomandibular disorders were the most common presentations. Fifty-nine percent of patients presented with sensory or motor function loss at their initial diagnosis. Patients who present with symptoms that extend beyond the typical presentation of these entities are at highest risk for intracranial tumors and should be further evaluated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Behavioural aspects of patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) that affect their dental management.

    PubMed

    Limeres-Posse, Jacobo; Castaño-Novoa, Patricia; Abeleira-Pazos, Maite; Ramos-Barbosa, Isabel

    2014-09-01

    Dental treatment in patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) can be complicated due to the presence of behavioral alterations. In this group, there are no specific behavioral profiles that allow dentist to anticipate the attitude that a patient will show during a visit. Thus, behavioral attitudes have been described that vary from total permissiveness and collaboration during even bloody procedures, to the absolute impossibility in conducting a simple oral examination. There is no effective behavioral management technique for all ASD patients. Prior information, such as the type of ASD or the presence of certain concurrent pathologies can help predict the patient's likely behavior. Therefore, gathering all the information in a preliminary interview with the parents/guardians of the patient is recommended. Knowing these factors will allow individualized behavioral management strategies to be designed and facilitates the planning of dental treatment.

  3. Pressure ulcer prevention knowledge among Jordanian nurses: a cross- sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcer remains a significant problem in the healthcare system. In addition to the suffering it causes patients, it bears a growing financial burden. Although pressure ulcer prevention and care have improved in recent years, pressure ulcer still exists and occurs in both hospital and community settings. In Jordan, there are a handful of studies on pressure ulcer. This study aims to explore levels of knowledge and knowledge sources about pressure ulcer prevention, as well as barriers to implementing pressure ulcer prevention guidelines among Jordanian nurses. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design and a self-administered questionnaire, data was collected from 194 baccalaureate and master’s level staff nurses working in eight Jordanian hospitals. From September to October of 2011, their knowledge levels about pressure ulcer prevention and the sources of this knowledge were assessed, along with the barriers which reduce successful pressure ulcer care and prevention. ANOVA and t-test analysis were used to test the differences in nurses’ knowledge according to participants’ characteristics. Means, standard deviation, and frequencies were used to describe nurses’ knowledge levels, knowledge sources, and barriers to pressure ulcer prevention. Results The majority (73%, n = 141) of nurses had inadequate knowledge about pressure ulcer prevention. The mean scores of the test for all participants was 10.84 out of 26 (SD = 2.3, range = 5–17), with the lowest score in themes related to PU etiology, preventive measures to reduce amount of pressure/shear, and risk assessment. In-service training was the second source of education on pressure ulcer, coming after university training. Shortage of staff and lack of time were the most frequently cited barriers to carrying out pressure ulcer risk assessment, documentation, and prevention. Conclusions This study highlights concerns about Jordanian nurses’ knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention. The

  4. A cost analysis of treating pediatric dental patients using general anesthesia versus conscious sedation.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. Y.; Vann, W. F.; Roberts, M. W.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study is to report a cost comparison of general anesthesia (GA) versus oral conscious sedation (CS) for pediatric dental patients. The study sample included 22 children whose parents or guardians selected GA care for their child. Selection criteria limited inclusion to healthy children (American Society of Anesthesiologists' classification I) aged 24-60 months. The subjects acted as their own comparison group to an estimation CS model. Models were developed to assess societal costs for treatment under GA and CS. Treatment rendered was equalized using the dental relative based value unit scale. PMID:11724224

  5. Multiple Developmental Dental Anomalies in a Non-Syndromic Patient: Report of a Rare Simultaneous Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Ghasempour, Maryam; Hemmati, Samane; Mooudi, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    A case of multiple pulp stones, a supernumerary tooth and a congenitally missing tooth accompanied by several developmental dental anomalies concurrently affecting the upper and lower anterior teeth in an Iranian healthy girl is reported. Developmental tooth abnormalities are usually found in conjunction with certain diseases or conditions. In the present case, although the patient had consanguineous parents and the role of genetics should be considered particularly for autosomal recessive traits, based on the child’s family and medical history, no correlation could be established between dental findings and systemic or metabolic diseases. PMID:26877734

  6. Improving patient safety in a UK dental hospital: long-term use of clinical audit.

    PubMed

    Ashley, M P; Pemberton, M N; Saksena, A; Shaw, A; Dickson, S

    2014-10-01

    The improvement of patient safety has been a long-term aim of healthcare organisations and following recent negative events within the UK, the focus on safety has rightly increased. For over twenty years, clinical audit has been the tool most frequently used to measure safety-related aspects of healthcare and when done so correctly, can lead to sustained improvements. This paper explains how clinical audit is used as a safety improvement tool in an English dental hospital and gives several examples of projects that have resulted in long-term improvements in secondary dental care.

  7. Discrepancies between dental and medical records of cardiac patients in AlHada Armed Forces Hospital, Taif, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al Hibshi, Sana M.; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M.; Assery, Mansour K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: This study aims to estimate the prevalence of medical information discrepancies between dental and medical records of cardiac patients at AlHada Armed Forces Hospital in Taif and to identify the factors contributing to these information discrepancies. Materials and Methods: The study applied a descriptive retrospective medical and dental records review of a stratified proportional sample of 289 cardiac patients, which was extracted from 1154 cardiac patients who visited both the cardiology and dental clinics at the AlHada Armed Forces Hospital between 2007 and June 2012. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 19. Results: The main results of this study are the following: The mean and standard deviation of patient's age was 56 ± 16.9, female patients represented 47.8% of the study population. A total of 78.5% of dental records were documented by dental residents whereas 48.4% of the dentists had more than 6 years of experience. Two hundred and seventy-nine (96.5%) of the 289 dental records had medical information discrepancies compared to the corresponding medical records. One hundred percent of systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatic fever cases were not documented in the dental records followed by 93% of medications, 92% of stroke, and 88.5% of hyperlipidemia, whereas the least prevalent were cardiac disease (26%) and diabetes mellitus (22.2%). Conclusion: Approximately 75% of the patients who directly or indirectly accessed the dental services showed discrepancies. The researcher concludes that critical information gaps exist between dental and medical records that mostly attributed to system level problems. A well-established model for efficient communication among medical and dental care providers caring for cardiac patients does not appear to exist. The absence of such a model can threaten the overall health of patients. PMID:28032050

  8. Anterior maxillary segmental distraction for correction of maxillary hypoplasia and dental crowding in cleft palate patients: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Wang, X-X; Wang, X; Li, Z-L; Yi, B; Liang, C; Jia, Y-L; Zou, B-S

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of anterior maxillary segmental distraction (AMSD) to correct maxillary hypoplasia and severe dental crowding in cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients, 7 patients (average age 16.4 years) with maxillary hypoplasia, shortened maxillary dental arch length and severe anterior dental crowding secondary to CLP were selected for this study. After anterior maxillary segmental osteotomy, 3 patients were treated using bilateral internal distraction devices, and 4 patients were treated using rigid external distraction devices. Photographs and radiographs were taken to review the improvement in facial profile and occlusion after distraction. An average 10.25 mm anterior maxillary advancement was obtained in all patients after 10-23 days of distraction and 9-16 weeks of consolidation. The sella-nasion-point A (SNA) angle increased from 69.5 degrees to 79.6 degrees. Midface convexity was greatly improved and velopharyngeal competence was preserved. The maxillary dental arch length was greatly increased by 10.1 mm (P<0.01). Dental crowding and malocclusion were corrected by orthodontic treatment. These results show that AMSD can effectively correct the hypoplastic maxilla and severe dental crowding associated with CLP by increasing the midface convexity and dental arch length while preserving velopharyngeal function, and dental crowding can be corrected without requiring tooth extraction.

  9. Training to Care for Limited English Proficient Patients and Provision of Interpreter Services at U.S. Dental School Clinics.

    PubMed

    Simon, Lisa; Hum, Lauren; Nalliah, Romesh

    2017-02-01

    Legal protections in the United States mandate that individuals with limited English proficiency (LEP) have equal access to health care. However, LEP populations are at higher risk of poor health. Dental school clinics offer lower cost care by supervised dental students and often provide care for LEP patients. The aims of this study were to survey dental students about their clinical experience with LEP patients, the interpreter resources available at their dental school clinics, and the extent of instruction on these topics. Academic deans at 19 dental schools (30.6% of 62 invited schools) distributed the survey to their students, and the survey was completed by 325 students (4.2% of students at the 19 participating schools). Among the responding students, 44% reported their dental school clinic lacked formal interpreter services, and most of the respondents reported receiving minimal instruction on caring for LEP patients. Only 54% of the responding students reported feeling adequately prepared to manage LEP patients following graduation. These results suggest there is limited access to interpreter services for students while in dental school. A large proportion of these dental students thus reported feeling unprepared to treat LEP patients after graduation.

  10. A survey of denture hygiene in patients attending Cardiff Dental Hospital.

    PubMed

    Collis, J J; Stafford, G D

    1994-12-01

    Patients attending the Cardiff Dental Hospital were interviewed by staff and students in the Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and a multidisciplinary teaching clinic. Information on denture hygiene was collected using a questionnaire. This questionnaire consisted of nineteen questions on the methods and materials used for denture hygiene, along with details pertinent to the patients and their dentures. One thousand patients were interviewed. The results showed that patients were less critical of standards of denture hygiene than clinicians. Only 46% of patients believed their dentures stained. This suggests high patient apathy regarding denture hygiene, that should be addressed in health education programs.

  11. Appointment-keeping behavior of Medicaid-enrolled pediatric dental patients in eastern Iowa.

    PubMed

    Iben, P; Kanellis, M J; Warren, J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the appointment-keeping behavior of Medicaid-enrolled pediatric dental patients in three Eastern Iowa practices. During the month of October 1998, a tally was kept of all patient appointments at a private pediatric dental office, a public health dental clinic, and a university-based pediatric dentistry clinic. Patients were categorized as either Medicaid or non-Medicaid. Appointment behavior categories were defined as: On time; Failure; Late-notice Cancellation (less than 24 hours notice); and Tardy (greater than 10 minutes). The data was entered in SPSS and analyzed using the chi square statistic. Statistical significance was P < 0.05. A total of 1,406 appointments were recorded for all three sites. Overall, patients on Iowa Medicaid had higher appointment failure, late-notice cancellation, and tardiness rates than non-Medicaid patients at all three clinics. However, these differences were only statistically significant for the private office and the university-based clinic. Failed appointment rates for Medicaid patients were much higher at the private office (38%) than at the other two sites. Consistent with anecdotal reports from dentists, Medicaid patients had higher rates of broken appointments than did non-Medicaid patients, particularly in a private practice setting.

  12. Forensic revolution need maintenance of dental records of patients by the dentists: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anamika; Mishra, Gaurav; Bhutani, Hemant; Hoshing, Chetan; Bhalla, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: With the growth of forensic odontology, dental records have become an essential source of information, especially for medicolegal cases in general practice. It is mandated by the law that every dentist must keep some kind of records for every patient they treat. After the death of an individual, remnants of teeth are usually damaged at the last among all body parts. Dental records assist in personal identification in cases of mass disasters, criminal investigations, and medicolegal issues. However, in India, rules for maintaining dental records are not very strictly followed. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge regarding the maintenance of dental records among dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh. Materials and Methods: Data collection was performed via a questionnaire. The study population responded to the questions pertaining to knowledge regarding forensic odontology methods and the mode of maintaining dental records in their regular practice through a personal interview. A descriptive analysis was carried out for the data. The data were summarized and analyzed using the statistical software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 18.0. Results: A very low percentage (22%) of the dentists were seen to be maintaining records on a regular basis. Seventy-eight percent of the dentists were not maintaining any records. Conclusion: This study clearly indicates that the dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh need to be properly trained for any kind of forensic and medicolegal needs. PMID:27583219

  13. Treatment options to optimize display of anterior dental esthetics in the patient with the aged lip.

    PubMed

    Perenack, Jon

    2005-11-01

    With aging a number of predictable changes occur in the upper and lower lips that act to mask otherwise esthetic dental procedures including dental implants, gingival esthetic surgery, and optimal dental restorations. The purpose of this article is to show how lip modification can be used to enhance the esthetic appearance of the patient, with specific attention to esthetic dental smile line characteristics. Proper evaluation and diagnosis of senile lip changes, such as lip atrophy, loss of lip architecture, and lip lengthening lead to a reliable treatment plan that provides a more esthetic frame to view the oral aperture. Treatment options will be discussed that act to reverse these problems. Directed lip augmentation procedures are used to correct loss of lip volume and architecture. The subnasal lip lift technique is presented as a method to correct lip lengthening. Risks and limitations of these procedures are addressed. Safe and reliable methods are presented that can improve and rejuvenate the lip complex, thus allowing for optimal display of dental esthetics.

  14. [Oral health and perceptions regarding dental care in patients with mental disorders living in therapeutic residences].

    PubMed

    Jamelli, Silvia Regina; Mendonça, Maria Cristina; Diniz, Maria das Graças; Andrade, Felipe Bravo Machado de; Melo, Júlia Figueirêdo de; Ferreira, Sergilene Rodrigues; Silva, Polliana Vilaça

    2010-06-01

    Patients with mental disorders have considerable difficulty in access to dental care, including the refusal of oral health professionals to offer care to this clientele and the inadequate professional training of oral health professionals regarding this issue. The present study was carried out in therapeutic residences in order to assess the oral health conditions of the residents as well as their perceptions regarding the dental care they have received. Thirty-eight individuals participated in the study. Data were collected through clinical examinations and a semi-structured interview. Data analysis revealed a high number of caries and the need for dentures, with 42.5% of the individuals needing complete dentures and 30.3% needing partial dentures. Regarding periodontal conditions, 28.5% of the dental elements exhibited losses of over 4 mm of periodontal insertion. Data from the interviews were submitted to content analysis, which enabled the establishment of two categories: the association of pain with the presence of teeth and mutilating dental care. Oral health was associated to dental extraction, which was considered the only solution to oral health disturbances, indicating that, for this population, oral health signifies not having teeth.

  15. Regenerative potential of dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells harvested from high caries patient's teeth.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Ramesh; Gopal, Sushruth; Masood, Huda; Vivek, Purushottam; Deb, Kaushik

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp are known to contains stem cells or dentinogenic progenitors that are responsible for dentin repair. Dental pulp Stem cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous teeth (SHED) represent a population of postnatal stem cells capable of extensive proliferation and multipotential or multilineage differentiations. This potential for tissue regeneration has become the current basis for dental pulp stem cell banking. Here, we have attempted to develop a protocol for harvesting stem cells from patients with High Caries tooth, which are most often electively discarded. We have characterized the stem cells with mesenchymal stem cell markers and have compared their potential to grow in culture, doubling times, and differentiate into different lineages, with normal bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We observed that the MSCs from dental pulp grew faster, with lower doubling time, and had equal efficiency in differentiating to various lineages, when subjected to standard directed differentiation protocols. This paper establishes that discarded High Carries Tooth can be a good source for regenerative medicine and also could be a potential source for MSCs and dental pulp MSC banking.

  16. Eight year follow-up dental treatment in a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ranadheer, E; Nagaraju, K; Suresh, P; Updesh, M

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development characterized by variable involvement of the craniofacial structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of this syndrome is relatively rare with wide variations in the clinical expression. Aspects of speech, appearance, and social well-being along with psychological issues are hampered in these patients. Treating such disabled children poses a great challenge not only in the medical field but also in the dental meadow. We report a case of a 5-year-old boy who presented with this syndrome and the dental treatment was carried out with a noteworthy outcome for a period of 8 years. A brief review of etiology, dental anomalies along with prognosis is documented.

  17. [Frequency of rhinitis and orofacial disorders in patients with dental malocclusion].

    PubMed

    Imbaud, Tamara Christine de Souza; Mallozi, Márcia Carvalho; Domingos, Vanda Beatriz Teixeira Coelho; Solé, Dirceu

    2016-06-01

    To describe the frequency and etiology of rhinitis, oral breathing, types of malocclusion and orofacial disorders in patients treated for dental malocclusion. Patients with poor dental occlusion (n=89, 8-15 years) undergoing orthodontic treatment at the Postgraduate Orthodontics Center (Sao Paulo, Brazil) participated in the study. Rhinitis and oral breathing were diagnosed by anamnesis, clinical assessment and allergic etiology of rhinitis through immediate hypersensitivity skin prick test (SPT) with airborne allergens. The association between types of breathing (oral or nasal), rhinitis and types of dental malocclusion, bruxism and cephalometric alterations (increased Y axis of facial growth) compared to standard cephalometric tracing (Escola de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo) were assessed. The frequency of rhinitis in patients with dental malocclusion was 76.4% (68), and, of these, 81.7% were allergic (49/60 positive skin prick test), whereas the frequency of oral breathing was 62.9%. There was a significant association between an increased Y axis of facial growth and oral breathing (p<0.001), as well as between oral breathing and rhinitis (p=0.009). There was no association between rhinitis and bruxism. The frequency of rhinitis in children with dental malocclusion is higher than that in the general population, which is approximately 30%. Patients with oral breathing have a tendency to a dolichofacial growth pattern (increased Y axis of facial growth). In patients with rhinitis, regardless of the presence of oral breathing, the dolichofacial growth tendency was not observed. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Frequency of rhinitis and orofacial disorders in patients with dental malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Imbaud, Tamara Christine de Souza; Mallozi, Márcia Carvalho; Domingos, Vanda Beatriz Teixeira Coelho; Solé, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the frequency and etiology of rhinitis, oral breathing, types of malocclusion and orofacial disorders in patients treated for dental malocclusion. Methods: Patients with poor dental occlusion (n=89, 8-15 years) undergoing orthodontic treatment at the Postgraduate Orthodontics Center (São Paulo, Brazil) participated in the study. Rhinitis and oral breathing were diagnosed by anamnesis, clinical assessment and allergic etiology of rhinitis through immediate hypersensitivity skin prick test with airborne allergens. The association between types of breathing (oral or nasal), rhinitis and types of dental malocclusion, bruxism and cephalometric alterations (increased Y axis of facial growth) compared to standard cephalometric tracing (Escola de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo) were assessed. Results: The frequency of rhinitis in patients with dental malocclusion was 76.4% (68), and, of these, 81.7% were allergic (49/60 positive skin prick test), whereas the frequency of oral breathing was 62.9%. There was a significant association between an increased Y axis of facial growth and oral breathing (p<0.001), as well as between oral breathing and rhinitis (p=0.009). There was no association between rhinitis and bruxism. Conclusions: The frequency of rhinitis in children with dental malocclusion is higher than that in the general population, which is approximately 30%. Patients with oral breathing have a tendency to a dolichofacial growth pattern (increased Y axis of facial growth). In patients with rhinitis, regardless of the presence of oral breathing, the dolichofacial growth tendency was not observed. PMID:26631324

  19. The burden of disease of dental anxiety: generic and disease-specific quality of life in patients with and without extreme levels of dental anxiety.

    PubMed

    Vermaire, J H; van Houtem, C M H H; Ross, J N; Schuller, A A

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare disease-specific (oral health-related) quality of life (OHRQoL), assessed using the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14), and generic (health-related) quality of life (HRQoL), assessed using the EuroQol5D (EQ-5D-5L), in patients with severe dental anxiety (who were visiting a centre for special care dentistry) with a control group from the general population. Seventy-six patients with severe dental anxiety [Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) score ≥ 13] were matched, according to age, gender, and socio-economic status, to a control group of 76 participants in a larger epidemiological study on oral health in the Netherlands (n = 1,125). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare levels of HRQoL and OHRQoL in both groups. The total OHIP score (indicating lower OHRQoL) was higher for the patient group (10th percentile = 30.5; 90th percentile = 46.0) than for the control group (10th percentile = 1.0; 90th percentile = 14.5). The patient group showed higher scores on all seven OHIP domains. Lower utility scores were found in patients with severe dental anxiety (HRQOL: 10th percentile = 0.7; 90th percentile = 0.9) relative to the control group (HRQOL: 10th percentile = 0.9; 90th percentile = 1.0). A disease burden of 74,000 disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) was calculated for the Netherlands. The findings of this study show differences between patients visiting a dental fear clinic and matched controls from the general population for both OHRQoL and HRQoL, indicating that having severe dental anxiety generates a significant burden of disease. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  20. Stigma of addiction and mental illness in healthcare: The case of patients' experiences in dental settings.

    PubMed

    Brondani, Mario A; Alan, Rana; Donnelly, Leeann

    2017-01-01

    To explore the ways in which stigma is experienced in healthcare and dental settings by patients with a history of addiction and mental illness. Audio-recorded, semi-structured interviews with a purposefully selected convenience sample of residents from two community treatment centres in Vancouver, Canada were conducted. The interview guide contained questions about experiences while seeking health and dental care and was based on an existing framework of labeling, stereotyping, exclusion, discrimination, and power imbalance. Interviews were transcribed verbatim for coding and thematic analysis. Twenty-five participants between 23 and 67 years of age were interviewed; 17 were males. Most had a self-reported history of depression combined with use of alcohol and crack-cocaine; most of them only sought dental care for emergency purposes. Textual analysis of more than 300 pages of transcribed interviews revealed that participants perceived stigma when they were negatively stereotyped as 'unworthy', labeled as 'different', excluded from the decision-making process, discriminated against, 'treated unfairly', and felt powerless when interacting in the heath and dental care systems. Conversely, positive experiences were characterized by empathy, reassurance and good communication, which were empowering for patients. When associated with stigma, mental illness and addictions have negative implications for accessing health and dental care. From our participants' perspectives, it seems that the lack of understanding about their life conditions by the healthcare professionals was the origin of stigma. We suggest that an increased social awareness of these health issues be enhanced among current and future health and dental care professionals to help improve care experiences for this marginalized population.

  1. An evidence summary of the management of patients taking direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) undergoing dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S

    2016-05-01

    Direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) drugs (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban) have emerged in the last decade to overcome some of the drawbacks of existing medications. To date, little is known about the dental management of patients taking these drugs. This study was undertaken to establish the evidence for the management of patients undergoing dental procedures while taking these medications. A rapid review approach was used to identify clinical and scientific research related to dental surgery performed in patients taking DOACs in order to produce an evidence summary. The rapid review did not identify any systematic reviews or original clinical trials and the overall quality of evidence found was poor. Most of the literature consisted of non-structured review articles and guidance documents based on assumptions from non-dental data and expert opinion, and recommendations on best practice varied throughout. The findings from the review of the literature varied considerably. Currently, recommendations are based on poor quality scientific data and clinical trials are required to establish best evidence-based practice guidance.

  2. Dental problems delaying the initiation of interferon therapy for HCV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There has been little discussion about the importance of oral management and interferon (IFN) therapy, although management of the side effects of therapy for chronic hepatitis C has been documented. This study determined whether dental problems delayed the initiation of IFN therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients. Results We analyzed 570 HCV-infected patients who were admitted to our hospital from December 2003 to June 2010 for treatment consisting of pegylated IFN (Peg-IFN) monotherapy or Peg-IFN/ribavirin combination therapy. The group comprised 274 men and 296 women with a mean age 57.2 years. Of the 570 patients, six could not commence Peg-IFN therapy, despite their admission, because of dental problems such as periodontitis, pupitis, and pericoronitis. The ages of six whose dental problems delayed the initiation of Peg-IFN ranged from 25 to 67 years, with a mean age of 47.3 ± 15.2 years. IFN therapy was deferred for 61.3 ± 47.7 days. Among the six subjects for whom IFN treatment was delayed, only one had a salivary flow that was lower than the normal value. Conclusions Treatment of dental infections is required before IFN therapy for HCV infection can be started. To increase the depth of understanding of oral health care, it is hoped that dentists and medical specialists in all areas will hold discussions to generate cooperation. PMID:20712912

  3. A performance improvement prescribing guideline reduces opioid prescriptions for emergency department dental pain patients.

    PubMed

    Fox, Timothy R; Li, James; Stevens, Sandra; Tippie, Tracy

    2013-09-01

    In an effort to reduce prescription opioid abuse originating from our institution, we implement and measure the effect of a prescribing guideline on the rate of emergency department (ED) opioid prescriptions written for patients presenting with dental pain, a complaint previously associated with drug-seeking behavior. After implementing a departmental guideline on controlled substance prescriptions, we performed a structured before-and-after chart review of dental pain patients aged 16 and older. Before the guideline, the rate of opioid prescription was 59% (302/515). After implementation, the rate was 42% (65/153). The absolute decrease in rates was 17% (95% confidence interval 7% to 25%). Additionally, in comparing the 12-month period before and after implementation, the dental pain visit rate dec