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Sample records for jordanian organizations

  1. Basics of the "Learning Organization" at Jordanian Schools: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawamdeh, Basem; Jaradat, Mohammed H.

    2012-01-01

    The study aims at identifying the extent to which the basics of the "learning organization" (LO) principles are available at Jordanian schools (Pilot TQA schools in Jersah); to this effect, a specially customized questionnaire was developed--it was made of 19 items across three areas: a leadership that supports learning, an environment that is…

  2. Assessment of Development of the Learning Organization Concept in Jordanian Industrial Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khadra, Marah F. Abu; Rawabdeh, Ibrahim A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to examine the impact on organizational performance of the application of management and human resource practices, and to attempt to outline key elements and assess development of the learning organization (LO) concept in Jordan. Design/methodology/approach: The tool described in this article assesses…

  3. Organizational Learning Culture, Learning Transfer Climate and Perceived Innovation in Jordanian Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Reid; Khasawneh, Samer

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between organizational learning culture, learning transfer climate, and organizational innovation. The objective was to test the ability of learning organization culture to account for variance in learning transfer climate and subsequent organizational innovation, and to examine the role of learning transfer…

  4. Multiple Intelligences of Students at Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khataybeh, Abdalla; Al-Sheikh, Kholoud

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating different intelligence types among Jordanian students at different public and private universities in Jordan. To achieve such aim, it sought to identify and rank multiple intelligences that characterize students at Jordanian universities, and to identify and rank the differences in multiple intelligences…

  5. Job satisfaction and turnover intention among Jordanian nurses in psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Alsaraireh, Faris; Quinn Griffin, Mary T; Ziehm, Scott R; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2014-10-01

    Psychiatric nursing has been identified as a stressful occupation, and this stress could affect individuals' health, well-being, and job satisfaction. The stress of nurses might also affect the organization in terms of absenteeism and quality of care. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intention among Jordanian nurses in the psychiatric units of the Jordanian National Mental Health Center. A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design was used. Nurses were asked to complete a demographic data sheet and questionnaires regarding job satisfaction and turnover intention. Of the 179 questionnaires distributed, 154 were completed, with an 86% response rate. The results revealed a statistically-significant negative relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intention. The findings of the study are consistent with previous research regarding the negative relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intention. The findings provide new information about Jordanian nurses who work in government hospital psychiatric services.

  6. Investigating and profiling the leadership behaviours of Jordanian nursing leaders.

    PubMed

    Mrayyan, Majd; Khasawneh, Israa

    Leadership' is a social process in which a member or members of a group influence the interpretation of events, choice of goals/outcomes, organization of work activities, motivation, abilities, power relations, and shared orientations. This study identifies leadership behaviours of Jordanian nursing leaders. A descriptive comparative design was used to collect data from four governmental and three private hospitals. Data were collected during April 2005. The total number of recruited nursing leaders was 140 with a 70% response rate. T-tests and chi-squares were performed to compare the phenomenon of interest. The mean reported leadership behaviours were slightly higher in private hospitals than those in governmental hospitals. However, more than half of the time, leaders in both types of hospitals used supportive leadership behaviours. There were significant differences between governmental and private hospitals in most demographics of the sample. Based on types of hospitals and gender, differences in leadership behaviours were advantageous for nursing leaders in private hospitals, while differences based on units and wards were advantageous for nursing leaders in governmental hospitals. In general, Jordanian nursing leaders used supportive leadership behaviours. Differences in leadership behaviours have implications for nursing practice, research, and education.

  7. Policies Governing Admission to Jordanian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massadeh, Nassar

    2012-01-01

    This paper intends to discuss the policy of admission to Jordanian public universities. This admission rules are variable and open to almost 100% of the graduates from secondary schools. This might refer to the historical events and economic conditions that the country has gone through since its establishment. Furthermore, the admission policy is…

  8. Attitudes of Jordanian Society toward Wife Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Btoush, Rula; Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors conducted an exploratory study among a convenience sample of 260 Jordanian men and women, using self-administered open and closed questions to examine the participants' approach toward wife abuse. In general, there was high awareness of wife abuse and the different types of abuse (mainly physical and psychological), a general tendency…

  9. Integrating Service Learning in Jordanian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahasneh, Randa; Tawalbeh, Aisheh; Al-Smadi, Rana; Ghaith, Souad; Dajani, Rana

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this exploratory study is to test "Service Learning" as a teaching and learning strategy in Jordanian universities by integrating service learning into a counselling course at the Hashemite University. After providing a 12-h service at 10 service locations, a 16-item questionnaire was administered to 60 senior counselling students…

  10. Jordanian teachers' perceptions of voice handicap.

    PubMed

    Marie, Basem S; Natour, Yaser S; Haj-Tas, Maisa A

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate if Jordanian school teachers perceive their voice as handicapped using the Voice Handicap Index (VHI)-Arab. The effect of teachers' age, gender, years of teaching, class taught, and education level on VHI was examined. A total of 289 teachers and a control group of 100 participants took part in the study. The teachers' group differed significantly from the control group in the physical, emotional, and functional subscales and the total score of the VHI-Arab. There was no significant difference among teachers in any of the three VHI subscales or total regarding gender, age, years of teaching experience, education level, and classes taught. Jordanian teachers have a strong perception of voice handicap. Thus, preventive and treatment vocal programs are strongly advised.

  11. A Linguistic Analysis on Errors Committed by Jordanian EFL Undergraduate Students: A Case of News Headlines in Jordanian Newspapers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Karazoun, Ghada Abdelmajid

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated some linguistic errors committed by Jordanian EFL undergraduate students when translating news headlines in Jordanian newspapers from Arabic to English and vice versa. The data of the study was collected through a test composed of (30) English news headlines and (30) Arabic ones covering various areas of news occurring in a…

  12. Leadership Effectiveness in Jordanian Educational Institutions: A Comparison of Jordanian Female and Male leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Tineh, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Senior leadership positions in Jordanian Ministry of Education are held predominantly by men. Women are teachers and/or school principals. This under-representation of women is primarily due to culturally derived stereotypes that see women as teachers or school principals, but not as superintendents. The purpose of this study was to investigate,…

  13. Jordanian pharmaceutical companies: are their marketing efforts paying off?

    PubMed

    Al-Shaikh, Mustafa S; Torres, Ivonne M; Zuniga, Miguel A; Ghunaim, Ayman

    2011-04-01

    The pharmaceuticals industry is one of the main industries in Jordan. Jordanian pharmaceuticals rank third in the export industry of this country. This study aims to examine the strengths that Jordanian pharmaceutical companies have, which, in turn, form their competitiveness base. In addition, this study aims to identify their weaknesses and the effects of marketing their products in the local market. What is the relationship between Jordanian pharmaceutical product quality, price and value, and the competitiveness of pharmaceutical companies in the local market? Our study aims to answer this and other questions. Our results and practical implications are discussed. PMID:21590563

  14. Jordanian pharmaceutical companies: are their marketing efforts paying off?

    PubMed

    Al-Shaikh, Mustafa S; Torres, Ivonne M; Zuniga, Miguel A; Ghunaim, Ayman

    2011-04-01

    The pharmaceuticals industry is one of the main industries in Jordan. Jordanian pharmaceuticals rank third in the export industry of this country. This study aims to examine the strengths that Jordanian pharmaceutical companies have, which, in turn, form their competitiveness base. In addition, this study aims to identify their weaknesses and the effects of marketing their products in the local market. What is the relationship between Jordanian pharmaceutical product quality, price and value, and the competitiveness of pharmaceutical companies in the local market? Our study aims to answer this and other questions. Our results and practical implications are discussed.

  15. Burnout, social support, and job satisfaction among Jordanian mental health nurses.

    PubMed

    Hamaideh, Shaher H

    2011-01-01

    Burnout occurs in occupations, such as nursing, where a significant proportion of time is spent in close involvement with other people. Mental health nursing has been considered an area that is subjected to high levels of burnout. Burnout in mental health nursing affects both individuals and organizations. The purposes of this study were to measure the levels of burnout and identify the correlates of burnout among Jordanian mental health nurses. A descriptive correlational design was used to collect data from mental health nurses using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Social Support Scale, Job Satisfaction Scale, and demographic and work-related variables through a self-reported questionnaire. The sample consisted of 181 mental health nurses recruited from all mental health settings in Jordan. Jordanian mental health nurses showed high levels of emotional exhaustion and moderate levels of depersonalization and personal accomplishment. Scores of job satisfaction and social support were slightly higher than the midrange. Significant correlations were found among burnout categories, job satisfaction, social support, and demographic and work-related variables. Predictor variables accounted for 32.7% of emotional exhaustion, 27.7% of depersonalization, and 16.8% of personal accomplishment. Results revealed that a comprehensive interventional approach aimed at minimizing the risk of burnout among mental health nurses is needed. Such an approach should involve interventions at both individual and organizational levels.

  16. Barriers of Using Educational Games in Jordanian Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljaraideh, Yousef Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the barriers that prevent Jordanian teachers at primary schools in Jerash governorate from using computer games into the classroom. To achieve this goal, a descriptive analysis procedure was used in this study. The sample of study consisted of (240) English, Mathematics and social studies teachers. The questionnaire…

  17. The Type of Curriculum Activities Implemented in Jordanian Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Jamal; Fayez, Merfat; Al-Zboon, Eman Khleif

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to ascertain the nature of curriculum activities in Jordanian preschools. Fifteen preschools participated in the study. Data were collected by observing the children in their daily routines, as well as analysing their writings and drawings. Data were translated from Arabic to English before analysing it. Four main categories were…

  18. Preparing Teachers for Inclusion: Jordanian Preservice Early Childhood Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayez, Merfat; Dababneh, Kholoud; Jumiaan, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted during a period of national educational reforms in Jordan to investigate Jordanian preservice early childhood teachers' attitudes toward inclusion and the adequacy of their current preparation for implementing inclusion. The study also sought to identify the perceived concerns of preservice early childhood teachers about…

  19. Student Faculty Evaluation (SFE) at Jordanian Universities: A Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asassfeh, Sahail; Al-Ebous, Hana'; Khwaileh, Faisal; Al-Zoubi, Zohair

    2014-01-01

    This study is the first to address student evaluation of faculty members (SFE) from a student perspective at a major Jordanian public university using a comprehensive (71-item) questionnaire administered to 620 undergraduates. Addressed are students' perceptions of the SFE process in terms of: (a) their paper-based vs. online-format…

  20. Obesity and Body Size Preferences of Jordanian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madanat, Hala; Hawks, Steven R.; Angeles, Heidi N.

    2011-01-01

    The nutrition transition is associated with increased obesity rates and increased desire to be thin. This study evaluates the relationship between actual body size and desired body size among a representative sample of 800 Jordanian women. Using Stunkard's body silhouettes, women were asked to identify their current and ideal body sizes, healthy…

  1. Jordanian School Counselors' Knowledge about and Attitudes toward Diabetes Mellitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannous, Adel G.; Khateeb, Jamal M.; Khamra, Hatem A.; Hadidi, Muna S.; Natour, Mayada M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and attitudes of Jordanian school counselors toward diabetes mellitus. A sample of 295 counselors completed a questionnaire consisting of two parts concerning knowledge and attitudes. The face validity of the questionnaire was assessed using an informed panel of judges, and its reliability was established…

  2. The Licensing of Negative Sensitive Items in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsarayreh, Atef

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the licensing conditions on Negative Sensitive Items (NSIs) in Jordanian Arabic (JA). JA exhibits both types of NSIs that are discussed in the literature: Negative Polarity Items (NPIs) and Negative Concord Items (NCIs). Although these two sets of items seem to form a natural class in the sense that they show certain…

  3. Dual/Duel Identities: Jordanian Perceptions of Academic Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marar, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to address how the sociopolitical climate in Jordan facilitates, perpetuates, and/or alleviates negative or positive views of Palestinians from the perspective of Jordanian university graduates. The qualitative study looked specifically at how education and the "hidden curriculum" addresses coexistence. (Contains 1 table.)

  4. Factors Affecting the Acquisition of Plural Morphology in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albirini, Abdulkafi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the development of plural morphology in Jordanian Arab children, and explores the role of the predictability, transparency, productivity, and frequency of different plural forms in determining the trajectory that children follow in acquiring this complex inflectional system. The study also re-examines the development of the…

  5. Jordanian Preservice Primary Teachers' Perceptions of Mentoring in Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abed, Osama H.; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    Quality mentoring is fundamental to preservice teacher education because of its potential to help student and novice teachers develop the academic and pedagogical knowledge and skills germane to successful induction into the profession. This study focused on Jordanian preservice primary teachers' perceptions of their mentoring experiences as these…

  6. Quality of Work Life: Perceptions of Jordanian Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zboon, Eman K.; Al_Dababneh, Khuloud A. H.; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the level of quality of work life QOWL of Jordanian special education teachers. Participants of the study were 133 special education teachers. Results showed that special education teachers cited average level of QOWL. Furthermore, teachers rated administrators' and colleagues' respect as the…

  7. Negative Particles and Morphemes in Jordanian Arabic Dialects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mrayat, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating the negative particles and morphemes in three main Jordanian dialects (Urban, Rural and Bedouin). This quantitative and qualitative study includes 30 teachers from different disciplines who use these dialects. The sample of the study was selected randomly. The research used two research instruments, a checklist and…

  8. Quality of Life of Students with Disabilites Attending Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zboon, Eman; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Theeb, Raied Sheikh

    2014-01-01

    In spite of increasing number of students with disabilities in universities, there is limited research on quality of life of these students. This study aimed to identify the quality of life level of undergraduate students with disabilities at Jordanian universities. The sample consisted of (147) students. A quality of life scale was constructed,…

  9. Approaches To Teaching Science in the Jordanian Primary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qualter, Anne; Abu-Hola, I. R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a study of the influence of different approaches to teaching units from the Jordanian science curriculum on over 600 students from grades 6, 9, and 10. Trains a small sample of male and female teachers in the use of cooperative learning and lecture-demonstration approaches to teaching. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/YDS)

  10. Information Technology in a Developing Country: An Exploration of the Factors Associated with Attitudes of Decision Makers in Jordanian Government Institutions toward the Utilization of Computer-Based Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khasawneh, Saleh

    2010-01-01

    In this era of rapidly advancing technologies, many governments around the globe are spending a great amount of money on these technologies, in order to increase their work performance. Therefore, the Jordanian government decided to implement IT in its public organizations. However, the picture is unclear about users' attitudes toward this…

  11. Understanding Electricity Use Changes in the Jordanian Industrial Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghandoor, A.; Al-Hinti, I.

    2009-08-01

    Industrial electricity demand is responsible for about 31% of total electricity demand in Jordan. This paper analyzes the changes in industrial electricity demand during 1998-2005 years and identifies the factors affecting this demand. In order to gain greater insight into past electricity use changes, a Laspeyers decomposition approach was used to disaggregate changes in the electricity demand of the Jordanian industrial sector into production, structural, and efficiency effects. To accomplish the objectives of this paper, the Jordanian industrial sector was disaggregated into seven sub-sectors: mining of chemical and fertilizer minerals, paper, plastics, petroleum, cement, iron and steel, and others industries. A major finding of this paper is that although increased industrial production caused electricity demand to increase between 1998 and 2005, significant improvements in energy efficiency and structural shift have contributed to reducing the rate of this increase.

  12. Energy end-use model of the Jordanian SMES industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bashir, Adnan; Al-Ghandoor, Ahmed; Abdallat, Yousef; Al-Hadethi, Rami

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, an energy end-use model of the Jordanian SMEs industries is presented. The industrial sector in Jordan consumes about 23% of the country's total energy. To establish the end-use model, a survey covering 150 facilities of different types of industries was conducted. The results show that the main electricity end-use consumers are electrical motors with a share of 55% of the total electricity consumption. On the other hand, fossil fuel is mainly used for hot water and steam generation with diesel fuel as a dominant fuel. The results of the study can be considered as an insight into the energy usage pattern of the Jordanian industrial sector for the policy maker. Furthermore, the results could provide important guidelines and insights for future research and development allocations and energy projects.

  13. A Study of Pragmatic Functions of Silence in Colloquial Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Harahsheh, Ahmad Mohammad Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The pragmatic study of silence has not got much concern in the Arab world in general and in Jordanian Arabic in particular. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the perception and practice of silence in casual conversation in Jordanian society from a pragmatic point of view. This study adapts Volosinov's notion of…

  14. Self-Esteem Profile among the Female Futsal-Football Players at Jordanian Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khasawneh, Aman

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the level of physical and body self-esteem among the female futsal - football players at Jordanian clubs. The sample of the study was composed of (38) female players among the Jordanian clubs' players of futsal-football who were chosen randomly out of the study community, and the self-esteem scale was used,…

  15. Jordanian deformation of the open sℓ(2) Gaudin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    António, N. Cirilo; Manojlović, N.; Nagy, Z.

    2014-04-01

    We derive a deformed sℓ( 2) Gaudin model with integrable boundaries. Starting from the Jordanian deformation of the SL( 2)-invariant Yang R-matrix and generic solutions of the associated reflection equation and the dual reflection equation, we obtain the corresponding inhomogeneous spin- 1/2 XXX chain. The semiclassical expansion of the transfer matrix yields the deformed sℓ( 2) Gaudin Hamiltonians with boundary terms.

  16. Hepatitis A virus age-specific sero-prevalence and risk factors among Jordanian children.

    PubMed

    Hayajneh, Wail A; Balbeesi, Adel; Faouri, Samir

    2015-04-01

    Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) has been a significant cause of infections among the children and adolescents of Jordan. Availability of safe vaccines made it necessary to identify the ill-defined temporal immunity trends for HAV and possible age-specific prevalence transitions. This community-based cross sectional study was conducted during the period July-August 2008 on 3,066 recruited subjects from the 12 governorates of Jordan, with pre-defined criteria. Several households were chosen at random within each selected block to enroll the subjects. They were interviewed and data were collected. Their sera were tested for total antibodies against HAV. A multivariate model was then performed to identify the possible risk factors. The HAV sero-prevalence rates among the age categories-second year, 2-4 years, 5-9 years, 10-14 years, 15-19 years, and those above 20 years were 26%, 32%, 44%, 63%, 78%, and 94%, respectively. The model revealed the association of several risk factors for higher HAV sero-prevalence rates: (i) older age groups; (ii) lower maternal education levels; (iii) residing in certain governorates; (iv) using public net drinking water; and (v) avoiding use of public net sewage system. This study provided strong evidence for continuous transition of HAV epidemiology towards intermediate endemicity in Jordan, with more susceptible adolescents and adults. Following the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations for countries with intermediate endemicity, large-scale hepatitis A vaccination is recommended for children in Jordan. This is strengthened by the availability of effective and safe HAV vaccines, improving the socio-economic status of the Jordanians, and increasing life expectancy among Jordanians.

  17. Safety practices in Jordanian manufacturing enterprises within industrial estates.

    PubMed

    Khrais, Samir; Al-Araidah, Omar; Aweisi, Assaf Mohammad; Elias, Fadia; Al-Ayyoub, Enas

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates occupational health and safety practices in manufacturing enterprises within Jordanian industrial estates. Response rates were 21.9%, 58.6% and 70.8% for small, medium and large sized enterprises, respectively. Survey results show that most companies comply with state regulations, provide necessary facilities to enhance safety and provide several measures to limit and control hazards. On the negative side, little attention is given to safety training that might be due to the lack of related regulations and follow-up, financial limitations or lack of awareness on the importance of safety training. In addition, results show that ergonomic hazards, noise and hazardous chemicals are largely present. Accident statistics show that medium enterprises have the highest accident cases per enterprise, and chemical industries reported highest total number of accidents per enterprise. The outcomes of this study establish a base for appropriate safety recommendations to enhance the awareness and commitment of companies to appropriate safety rules.

  18. Understanding Jordanian Psychiatric Nurses' Smoking Behaviors: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Aldiabat, Khaldoun M.; Clinton, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Smoking is prevalent in psychiatric facilities among staff and patients. However, there have been few studies of how contextual factors in specific cultures influence rates of smoking and the health promotion role of psychiatric nurses. This paper reports the findings of a classical grounded theory study conducted to understand how contextual factors in the workplace influences the smoking behaviors of Jordanian psychiatric nurses (JPNs). Method. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with a sample of eight male JPNs smokers at a psychiatric facility in Amman, Jordan. Findings. Constant comparative analysis identified becoming a heavy smoker as a psychosocial process characterized by four sub-categories: normalization of smoking; living in ambiguity; experiencing workplace conflict; and, facing up to workplace stressors. Conclusion. Specific contextual workplace factors require targeted smoking cessation interventions if JPNs are to receive the help they need to reduce health risks associated with heavy smoking. PMID:23844286

  19. The Status of Corporal Punishment in Jordanian Primary Schools from the Perspectives Of: Teachers, Students, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khateeb, Linda Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the status of corporal punishment in Jordanian Primary schools from the perspectives of: Teachers, students, and parents. The corpus of the study comprises (95) Male and female teachers, (135) male and female students form Jordanian primary schools. Two questionnaire forms were used in this study: one for teachers and…

  20. Human diversity in Jordan: polymorphic Alu insertions in general Jordanian and Bedouin groups.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Daniela; Sadiq, May; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Khabour, Omar; Alkaraki, Almuthanna; Esteban, Esther; Via, Marc; Moral, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Jordan, located in the Levant region, is an area crucial for the investigation of human migration between Africa and Eurasia. However, the genetic history of Jordanians has yet to be clarified, including the origin of the Bedouins today resident in Jordan. Here, we provide new genetic data on autosomal independent markers in two Jordanian population samples (Bedouins and the general population) to begin to examine the genetic diversity inside this country and to provide new information about the genetic position of these populations in the context of the Mediterranean and Middle East area. The markers analyzed were 18 Alu polymorphic insertions characterized by their identity by descent, known ancestral state (lack of insertion), and apparent selective neutrality. The results indicate significant genetic diffferences between Bedouins and general Jordanians (p = 0.038). Whereas Bedouins show a close genetic proximity to North Africans, general Jordanians appear genetically more similar to other Middle East populations. In general, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that Bedouins had an important role in the peopling of Jordan and constitute the original substrate of the current population. However, migration into Jordan in recent years likely has contributed to the diversity among current Jordanian population groups.

  1. Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis in Arabs in Jordan: a comparative study between Jordanians and Palestinians.

    PubMed

    Najim Al-Din, A S; Kurdi, A; Mubaidin, A; El-Khateeb, M; Khalil, R W; Wriekat, A L

    1996-02-01

    In a 2-year hospital-based study in Jordan 131 Arab multiple sclerosis patients were identified including 84 Palestinians and 36 Jordanians. Based on MS/ALS case ratio, multiple sclerosis was found to be twice as common among Palestinians than Jordanians. Other than the less marked female preponderance among Jordanian patients, the disease had the same clinical and paraclinical characteristics in both groups. It was more likely for Palestinian and Jordanian patients to originate from the northern parts of their countries, to be Rh negative and to be HLA-DR2 positive than their controls. Palestinians (patients and controls) did not show significant differences from Jordanians (patients and controls) in relation to their eye color, ABO and Rh blood groups distribution nor the HLA-DR or HLA-DQ (apart from HLA-DQ3) epitopes frequency, thus not offering any significant difference in the genetic-racial markers studies to explain the difference in the observed disease susceptibility. Previous studies demonstrated that 2 racially different populations sharing the same environment can have different risk of developing multiple sclerosis, but this study has shown that this can also be true for 2 racially similar populations sharing the same environment.

  2. An ethnographic-feminist study of Jordanian women's experiences of domestic violence and process of resolution.

    PubMed

    Safadi, Reema; Swigart, Valerie; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Banimustafa, Radwan; Constantino, Rose E

    2013-01-01

    We interviewed 12 Jordanian women who had experienced domestic violence (DV) and were receiving assistance at the Jordanian Women's Union (JWU). Our aim was to explore the history and factors supporting attainment of freedom from DV. Narratives revealed themes of DV toward girls; forced marriage; physical, psychological, or sexual abuse before and during marriage; and escalation and enduring DV. Escaping from DV required family and JWU support. In the context of a strongly patriarchal, religious society, we observed a process of resolution by shifting cultural values and themes of empowerment, with an undercurrent of suffering blamed on inequalities in the legal process.

  3. Determinants of Cigarette Smoking Initiation in Jordanian Schoolchildren: Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Attonito, Jennifer; Madhivanan, Purnima; Yi, Qilong; Mzayek, Fawaz; Maziak, Wasim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify determinants of cigarette smoking initiation, by gender, among schoolchildren in Irbid, Jordan. Methods: Between 2008 and 2011, data were collected annually using self-reported questionnaires over 4-years in a prospective cohort of 1,781 students recruited from all 7th grade classes in 19 secondary schools, selected out of a total 60, using probability-proportionate-to-size method. Independent predictors of smoking initiation were identified among the cigarette naïve participants (N = 1,454) with mixed-effect multivariable logistic regression. Results: Participants were 12.6 years of age on average at baseline. 29.8% of the 1,454 students (37.2% of boys and 23.7% of girls) initiated cigarette smoking by 10th grade. Of those who initiated (n = 498), 47.2% of boys and 37.2% of girls initiated smoking in the 8th grade. Determinants of cigarette smoking initiation included ever smoking a waterpipe, low cigarette refusal self-efficacy, intention to start smoking cigarettes, and having friends who smoked. For girls, familial smoking was also predictive of cigarette initiation. Conclusion: This study shows that many Jordanian youth have an intention to initiate cigarette smoking and are susceptible to cigarette smoking modeled by peers and that girls are influenced as well by familial cigarette smoking. Prevention efforts should be tailored to address culturally relevant gender norms, help strengthen adolescents’ self-efficacy to refuse cigarettes, and foster strong non-smoking social norms. PMID:25143297

  4. Determinants of depressive symptoms in Jordanian working women.

    PubMed

    Al-Modallal, H; Abuidhail, J; Sowan, A; Al-Rawashdeh, A

    2010-09-01

    Depressive symptoms are an epidemic problem affecting different subgroups of women in clinical and non-clinical settings. However, depressive symptoms experienced by working women have rarely been studied. This study aimed at identifying depressive symptoms and their determinants in a sample of 101 Jordanian working women recruited from a higher educational institution. Data about women's depressive symptoms, their educational level, presence of children, sharing a job with an intimate partner, health status, diagnosis with chronic illnesses, and complaints of spousal abuse were collected. Logistic regression analysis was used to test for the significance of the selected factors on women's experiences of depressive symptoms. Findings indicated that 51.2% (n = 42) women complained of moderate and severe levels of depressive symptoms. Factors identified as significant in predicting depressive symptoms were women's experiences of spousal abuse (odds ratio adjusted = 3.5, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-11.7) and being diagnosed with chronic illnesses (odds ratio adjusted = 7.09, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-42.2). It was concluded that causes of women's depressive symptoms were imbedded in their familial and social environment, rather than their job per se. Mental health nurses can change the practice of nursing to better standards. Being familiarized with causes of depressive symptoms can empower nurses to be active advocates for depressed women. PMID:20712679

  5. Jordanian women: perceptions and practices of first-time pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Safadi, Reema

    2005-12-01

    A woman's child-bearing encounter is an experience that reflects the cultural beliefs and practices of the society. The purpose of this study was to describe the perceptions and practices of urban, low socioeconomic, Jordanian women (aged 18-30 years) in relation to their pregnancy career. An opportunistic sample consisting of 67 Muslim first-time pregnant women who followed up antenatal care at two maternity-care centres in East Amman was selected. A qualitative approach, including ethnographic semistructured interview, participant observation data from the households and clinics and oblique interviewing in random conversations initiated by the primigravidae, was conducted over 18 months. Women gave elaborative accounts of their pregnancy and childbirth expectations in narrative, phenomenological forms. Qualitative data analysis was performed concurrently with data collection, revealing the essential themes of immediacy of pregnancy; familial support and changing networks, especially for the after-birth period; fear of pain and medical interventions, all emphasizing the traditional and religious perceptions and practices in a familial context.

  6. Jordanian Preservice Primary Teachers' Perceptions of Mentoring in Science Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abed, Osama H.; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2015-03-01

    Quality mentoring is fundamental to preservice teacher education because of its potential to help student and novice teachers develop the academic and pedagogical knowledge and skills germane to successful induction into the profession. This study focused on Jordanian preservice primary teachers' perceptions of their mentoring experiences as these pertain to science teaching. The Mentoring for Effective Primary Science Teaching instrument was administered to 147 senior preservice primary teachers in a university in Jordan. The results indicated that the greater majority of participants did not experience effective mentoring toward creating a supportive and reflexive environment that would bolster their confidence in teaching science; further their understanding of primary science curriculum, and associated aims and school policies; help with developing their pedagogical knowledge; and/or furnish them with specific and targeted feedback and guidance to help improve their science teaching. Substantially more participants indicated that their mentors modeled what they perceived to be effective science teaching. The study argues for the need for science-specific mentoring for preservice primary teachers, and suggests a possible pathway for achieving such a model starting with those in-service primary teachers-much like those identified by participants in the present study-who are already effective in their science teaching.

  7. Bringing Benefits and Warding off Blights in Due Commandment (Analytic Study Compared with the Jordanian Law)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Etoum, Niebal Mohd Ibrahim; Mowafi, Hanan Sami Mohammad; Al Zubaidi, Faraj Hamad Salem

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to highlight the benefits and blights of the due commandment (intestate law) under Jordanian law for the year (2010) in the article (279). The study came in two sections, the first one dealt with the concept of due commandment, its legitimacy, verdict and terms; in the second section, I've dealt with the persons entitled to due…

  8. Jordanian Vocational, Secondary Education Teachers and Acquisition of the National Professional Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Dajeh, Hesham I.

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to estimate the level of acquisition of the Jordanian national professional standards by vocational, secondary education teachers. Two hundred teachers participated in the study. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 15.0. Questionnaire validity was assessed by content validity,…

  9. Jordanian Social Studies Teachers' Perceptions of Competency Needed for Implementing Technology in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Bataineh, Mohammad; Anderson, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This study used a cross-sectional, ten-point Likert-type scale survey design, to examine the perception of Jordanian seventh to twelfth-grade social studies teachers of the competency needed for technology implementation in their classrooms. The instrument for this study was a modified version of a survey developed by Kelly (2003) called the…

  10. Sustainable Development and Values Education in the Jordanian Social Studies Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alelaimat, Abeer Rashed; Taha, Kelle

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at identifying the values function, its relationship with sustainable development, and the extent of taking in to consideration the national education book for Jordanian tenth graders in the years 2004-2010. This study will attempt to answer the following questions: what is the values function that should be followed in the social…

  11. Strategies Used by Jordanian EFL University Graduate Students in Translating Idioms into Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smadi, Oqlah; Alrishan, Amal

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the strategies utilized by Jordanian EFL University graduate students in translating idioms into Arabic. The participants of the study were all M.A translation students at the University of Jordan and Yarmouk University who were selected purposefully. The total number of the students was 90 who participated in a…

  12. “An Effect That is Deeper Than Beating” Family Violence in Jordanian Women

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Diane S; Paldi, Yael; Egbarya, Samah Salaime; Clark, Cari Jo

    2012-01-01

    This study informs healthcare approaches to gender-based family violence through focus groups with Jordanian women. The authors conducted a thematic qualitative analysis of 12 focus groups among 70 married, divorced, or widowed women about their experiences and beliefs regarding family violence. Five themes relevant to healthcare providers were identified. Three of the themes addressed participant-perceived causes of gender-based family violence: 1) unmet gender role expectations, 2) stigma and social norms, and 3) extended family roles. The fourth theme reflects effects on victims. The fifth theme reflects protective qualities and help seeking behaviors. The themes identified in the analysis reveal multiple ways that gender-based family violence can contribute to health problems and that it can be kept secret by Jordanian women as patients. Potential clues are described for the violence which may not be typically explored in a medical encounter. Additional ways that Jordanian families may seek help from other family or clergy instead of police and family violence agencies are described. Implications of these results for healthcare providers who care both for Jordanians and Arab immigrants in Western cultures are discussed. PMID:22329396

  13. The Acoustic and Perceptual Correlates of Emphasis in Urban Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Masri, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic and perceptual correlates of emphasis, a secondary articulation in the posterior vocal tract, in Urban Jordanian Arabic were studied. CVC monosyllables and CV.CVC bisyllables with emphatic and plain target consonants in word-initial, word-medial and word-final positions were examined. Spectral measurements on the target vowels at vowel…

  14. The Impact of Using Music on Teaching English Poetry in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hijazi, Dima; Al-natour, Amal

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of using music on teaching English Poetry in Jordanian universities on students' performance. The researchers followed the equivalent pre/post T test two group designs. To achieve the aim of the study, a pre/post-test was constructed to measure students' performance in English poetry. The…

  15. Using Computers in Jordanian Pre-School Settings: The Views of Pre-School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jumiaan, Ibrahim F.; Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Hassan, Omayya M.

    2012-01-01

    Computer technology holds promise for facilitating learning and teaching in the current educational systems at all levels. This study examined computer use in Jordanian pre-school settings. The study surveyed 113 pre-school teachers from 43 pre-school settings, gathering information about their perception of using computer in their classrooms.…

  16. Necessary School Readiness Skills for Kindergarten Success According to Jordanian Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Taleb, Tagreed Fathi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the necessity levels of children's school readiness skills held by Jordanian kindergarten teachers. The sample consisted of 347 teachers drawn from the public and private kindergarten education sectors. The school readiness data collection instrument included seven readiness domains with a total of 39…

  17. Requirements of High-Quality Kindergarten Programs According to Jordanian Parents: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Taleb, Tagreed Fathi

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore what Jordanian parents of children attending "traditional" kindergartens recognize as high-quality education programs. The sample consisted of 509 families ("N"?=?509) of kindergarten-age children. Data were collected using a three-part questionnaire: curriculum domains, teacher…

  18. The Notion of Adminstrative Transparency among Academic Leaderships at Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaradat, Mohammed Hasan

    2013-01-01

    The study aims at identifying the notion of transparency among academic leaderships at Jordanian universities. To this effect, the interview-based approach was used in order to delineate the concept of transparency. Eighty individual academic leaderships were interviewed across various schools in Jordan. Upon collection of data and information,…

  19. Empowerment of Female Students for Participation in the Representative Councils in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleh, Al-Jufout; Ziad, Abu-Hamatteh; Lama, Al-Qaisy

    2008-01-01

    The current article presents an analytical study of female students' participation in the representative councils in various Jordanian Universities. The data-base applied in the present investigation has indicated a clear weak representation of female students in general. The possible reasons, behind this weakness, have been tracked using a…

  20. Scientific Research in Jordanian Higher Education Institutions: An Evaluation of the Status and Obstacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    bin Tareef, Atif

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the status and obstacles of scientific research in Jordanian higher education institutions. And defined by being an attempt to increase faculty member's, researcher's and educational leader's attention to the necessity of improving research planning or strategies, professional development, working conditions,…

  1. E-Learning versus Traditional Learning as Perceived by Undergraduate Students in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Omari, Aieman A.; Salameh, Kayed M.

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to define the perception of e-learning and traditional learning among undergraduate students in Jordanian universities. The results of the study indicated that e-learning had significantly higher scores for perceived value among students than traditional learning. The perception of e-learning among male students…

  2. Teacher Self-Efficacy and Classroom Management Styles in Jordanian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Tineh, Abdullah M.; Khasawneh, Samar A.; Khalaileh, Huda A.

    2011-01-01

    Two main purposes guided this study. The first was to identify the degree to which Jordanian teachers practise classroom management styles in their classrooms and their level of teacher self-efficacy. The second purpose was to explore the relationships between classroom management styles and teacher self-efficacy. This study is quantitative in…

  3. Students' Learning Assessment Practices Used by Jordanian Teachers of Mathematics for Grades (1-6)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abed, Eman Rasmi; Abu Awwad, Ferial Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the students' learning assessment practices used by Jordanian teachers of mathematics for grades (1-6) in Amman. The sample of the study consists of (402) teachers. A questionnaire of (72) items are developed on four domains, namely: questions, homework, exams, and alternative strategies. Validity and reliability are…

  4. The Dimensions of the Citizenship Concept among the Jordanian University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Sabeelah, Amal M. S.; Alraggad, Fatima E. A.; Abou-Ameerh, Oraib A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined Jordanian university students' knowledge of the citizenship concept while also aiming to reveal whether there were any statistically significant differences in students' knowledge of the citizenship concept due to gender, residence, family income, college, academic level and accumulative grade point average. The study sample…

  5. Counseling Gifted and Talented Students in Jordanian Inclusive Schools: Conclusion and Implication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Zraigat, Ibrahim A.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to review counseling services for students who are gifted and talented at Jordanian inclusive schools in relation to theoretical counseling literature. The present study is considered a theoretical study. Gifted and talented students exhibit a wide range of characteristics, among of which are intellectual…

  6. The Effect of Home Computer Use on Jordanian Children: A Parental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khasawneh, Omar M.; Al-Awidi, Hamed M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of computer technology on Jordanian children from the perspectives of their parents. The sample of the study consisted of 127 participants. Each participant is a parent of a child or children who owned a personal computer. Our findings revealed some of the positive as well as negative changes…

  7. Fostering Jordanian University Students' Communicative Performance through Literature-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bataineh, Ruba Fahmi; Rabadi, Raghd Yaqoub Al; Smadi, Oqlah Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a literature-based program on eight Jordanian university students' communicative performance. The research design was essentially qualitative (observation was the primary instrument); however, triangulation was achieved through the use of other instruments, including pre- and posttests, interviews,…

  8. Attitudes toward Communication Skills among Students'-Teachers' in Jordanian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Omari, Aieman Ahmad; Al-Dababneh, Kholoud A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the positive and negative attitudes among 289 students of class teachers and childhood teachers' disciplines using the communication skills attitude scale (CSAS) in Jordanian public universities. GPA, year level of students were recorded. Overall results of study revealed that the mean of positive…

  9. Difficulties EFL Jordanian University Students Encounter in Translating English Idioms into Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alrishan, Amal; Smadi, Oqlah

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the difficulties that Jordanian EFL University students encounter in translating English idioms into Arabic. The participants of the study were all M.A translation students at Yarmouk University and the University of Jordan who were selected purposefully. The total number of the students who participated in the…

  10. The Philosophy and Practice of Training and Development: The Case of the Jordanian Electricity Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensour, Waed Abdel Razzaq; Kharabsheh, Radwan Alyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to gain an understanding of training and development (T&D) as a philosophy and practice in Jordanian electricity companies and to explore factors that shape T&D. Data were gathered through in-depth interviews, observation and document analysis. Results indicate that T&D was interpreted in terms of learning, was…

  11. Occupational stress, social support, and quality of life among Jordanian mental health nurses.

    PubMed

    Hamaideh, Shaher H

    2012-01-01

    Occupational stress affects physical and mental health of mental health nurses. This study measured levels of occupational stress and identified the variables that are associated with occupational stress among Jordanian mental health nurses. A descriptive design was conducted, using self-report questionnaires and demographic characteristics. Data were collected from 181 mental health nurses who were recruited from all mental health settings in Jordan. Jordanian mental health nurses showed high levels of occupational stress regarding "client-related difficulties," "lack of resources," and "workload." The highest level of social support as indicated by these Jordanian mental health nurses was from a spouse/partner followed by colleagues. Regarding quality of life (QOL), physical health scores were higher than mental health scores. Occupational stress correlated significantly and negatively with QOL-physical scores, QOL-mental scores, and social support scores, and correlated positively with being physically assaulted, verbally assaulted, and the respondent having the intention to leave his or her current job. Social support, QOL-mental scores, verbal assault, ward type, and intention to leave the current job were the best predictors of occupational stress among Jordanian mental health nurses. Mental health nurses are under significant occupational stress levels; therefore, comprehensive interventions aimed at minimizing the risk of occupational stress and improving social support and quality of life among mental health nurses are needed.

  12. Improving English Pronunciation through Computer-Assisted Programs in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Qudah, Fatima Zaki Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of using computer- assisted programs for teaching English pronunciation on students' performance in English Language pronunciation in Jordanian universities. To achieve the purpose of the study, a pre/post-test was constructed to measure students' level in English pronunciation. The sample…

  13. {kappa}-Minkowski spacetime as the result of Jordanian twist deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Borowiec, A.; Pachol, A.

    2009-02-15

    Two one-parameter families of twists providing {kappa}-Minkowski * product deformed spacetime are considered: Abelian and Jordanian. We compare the derivation of quantum Minkowski space from two perspectives. The first one is the Hopf module algebra point of view, which is strictly related with Drinfeld's twisting tensor technique. The other one relies on an appropriate extension of ''deformed realizations'' of nondeformed Lorentz algebra by the quantum Minkowski algebra. This extension turns out to be de Sitter Lie algebra. We show the way both approaches are related. The second path allows us to calculate deformed dispersion relations for toy models ensuing from different twist parameters. In the Abelian case, one recovers {kappa}-Poincare dispersion relations having numerous applications in doubly special relativity. Jordanian twists provide a new type of dispersion relations which in the minimal case (related to Weyl-Poincare algebra) takes an energy-dependent linear mass deformation form.

  14. Contraceptive decision making in a sample of Jordanian Muslim women: delineating salient beliefs.

    PubMed

    Libbus, K; Kridli, S

    1997-01-01

    In this article, the authors identify attitudes, normative beliefs, and behavioral control beliefs of Muslim Jordanian women with regard to avoiding unplanned pregnancy and using specific contraceptive methods. Based on Ajzen and Fishbein's theory of planned behavior, open-ended questions were used in audio-taped face-to-face interviews with 25 married 19-44-year-old Jordanian Muslim women. A majority of respondents interviewed were currently using an intrauterine device (IUD) for contraception. Few women were using oral contraceptives, condoms, or the rhythm method and none of them reported using foam or a diaphragm. Content analyses of narrative transcriptions suggest the individual's concerns for family and individual well-being, as well as husbands' and families' opinions, may influence women's contraceptive behavior in this population. PMID:9119785

  15. SMS as Out-of-Class, Student-Instructor Interaction Tool: A Case Study of Jordanian Graduate Students' Perceptions and Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana M.; Qablan, Bassam Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the Jordanian university students' perceptions toward and use of Short Message Service (SMS) as out-of-class student-instructor interaction tool. The participants in this study were 33 graduate students who were enrolled in on-campus information technology course at a public Jordanian university. SMS was used in the…

  16. Phonological Processes in the Speech of Jordanian Arabic Children with Cleft Lip and/or Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Tamimi, Feda Y.; Owais, Arwa I.; Khabour, Omar F.; Khamaiseh, Zaidan A.

    2011-01-01

    The controlled and free speech of 15 Jordanian male and female children with cleft lip and/or palate was analyzed to account for the different phonological processes exhibited. Study participants were divided into three main age groups, 4 years 2 months to 4 years 7 months, 5 years 3 months to 5 years 6 months, and 6 years 4 months to 6 years 6…

  17. A retrospective study on imported malaria in Jordan. 2. Malaria among non-military Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Kanani, K A; Amr, Z S; Alkhatib, R; Shadfan, B; Al-Rashadan, M; Hani, R B

    2015-03-01

    Cases of imported malaria among civilian Jordanians returning from Asian and African countries from 1991-2011 are documented. A total of 511 cases of imported malaria were diagnosed among civilian Jordanians travelling abroad. Majority of cases were reported among adults over 21 year old accounting for or 87,67% of the total number of cases. Eighteen different categories of occupation were identified, where as students studying abroad showed the highest infection rate (33.2%), especially those returning from India (n=70). Infection among males was as high as 91.78%, compared to 8.22% in females. Females were mostly housewives accompanying their spouses. Cases were reported from 34 Asian and African countries.Most cases were reported among Jordanians returning from Pakistan (23.68%), Yemen (18.6%), India (18.4%) and Sudan (5.1%). The majority of infections were due to Plasmodium vivax (n=370, 72.4%), followed by Plasmodium falciparum (n=138, 27%). Only one case of Plasmodium malariae was observed. Few cases (n=3, 0.65%) of mixed infection with P. vivax and P. falciparum were reported. Sudan was the main source of P. falciparum (25.4%) followed by Yemen (20.3%), while Pakistan was the main source of P. vivax (28.9%) followed by India (22.7%). Most mixed infection cases were acquired in Sudan (66.7%).

  18. A retrospective study on imported malaria in Jordan. 2. Malaria among non-military Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Kanani, K A; Amr, Z S; Alkhatib, R; Shadfan, B; Al-Rashadan, M; Hani, R B

    2015-03-01

    Cases of imported malaria among civilian Jordanians returning from Asian and African countries from 1991-2011 are documented. A total of 511 cases of imported malaria were diagnosed among civilian Jordanians travelling abroad. Majority of cases were reported among adults over 21 year old accounting for or 87,67% of the total number of cases. Eighteen different categories of occupation were identified, where as students studying abroad showed the highest infection rate (33.2%), especially those returning from India (n=70). Infection among males was as high as 91.78%, compared to 8.22% in females. Females were mostly housewives accompanying their spouses. Cases were reported from 34 Asian and African countries.Most cases were reported among Jordanians returning from Pakistan (23.68%), Yemen (18.6%), India (18.4%) and Sudan (5.1%). The majority of infections were due to Plasmodium vivax (n=370, 72.4%), followed by Plasmodium falciparum (n=138, 27%). Only one case of Plasmodium malariae was observed. Few cases (n=3, 0.65%) of mixed infection with P. vivax and P. falciparum were reported. Sudan was the main source of P. falciparum (25.4%) followed by Yemen (20.3%), while Pakistan was the main source of P. vivax (28.9%) followed by India (22.7%). Most mixed infection cases were acquired in Sudan (66.7%). PMID:25925812

  19. Effects of gender on the production of emphasis in Jordanian Arabic: A sociophonetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudalbuh, Mujdey D.

    Emphasis, or pharyngealization, is a distinctive phonetic phenomenon and a phonemic feature of Semitic languages such as Arabic and Hebrew. The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of gender on the production of emphasis in Jordanian Arabic as manifested on the consonants themselves as well as on the adjacent vowels. To this end, 22 speakers of Jordanian Arabic, 12 males and 10 females, participated in a production experiment where they produced monosyllabic minimal CVC pairs contrasted on the basis of the presence of a word-initial plain or emphatic consonant. Several acoustic parameters were measured including Voice Onset Time (VOT), friction duration, the spectral mean of the friction noise, vowel duration and the formant frequencies (F1-F3) of the target vowels. The results of this study indicated that VOT is a reliable acoustic correlate of emphasis in Jordanian Arabic only for voiceless stops whose emphatic VOT was significantly shorter than their plain VOT. Also, emphatic fricatives were shorter than plain fricatives. Emphatic vowels were found to be longer than plain vowels. Overall, the results showed that emphatic vowels were characterized by a raised F1 at the onset and midpoint of the vowel, lowered F2 throughout the vowel, and raised F3 at the onset and offset of the vowel relative to the corresponding values of the plain vowels. Finally, results using Nearey's (1978) normalization algorithm indicated that emphasis was more acoustically evident in the speech of males than in the speech of females in terms of the F-pattern. The results are discussed from a sociolinguistic perspective in light of the previous literature and the notion of linguistic feminism.

  20. A retrospective study on imported malaria in Jordan. 1. Malaria among Jordanian UN peacekeeping forces.

    PubMed

    Kanani, K; Amr, Z-S; Shadfan, B; Al-Rashadan, M; Bani Hani, R

    2014-05-01

    Malaria is considered as one of the most threatening diseases affecting peacekeeping forces serving in malaria endemic countries. The Jordanian Armed Forces participated in many of the United Nations peacekeeping missions in over 20 countries across the world. Thin and thick blood smears were collected from military personnel returning to Jordan, and relevant data including occupation, age, sex, residence address and the country they served in were recorded. Mefloquine 250 mg/week was prescribed for prophylaxis during the period of stay for three contingents of Jordanian military forces deployed to East Timor. Members of two contingents were given post exposure prophylactic treatment of Doxycycline 100 mg coupled with Primaquine 15 mg daily for 14 days soon after returning to Jordan. Blood smears were taken from all soldiers suspected to be affected by malaria, and were monitored over a period of 15 weeks. A total of 811 malaria cases were reported during 1992-2011 among Jordanian military personnel whom served in over 20 countries. Most cases were reported among troops returning from Eretria (54.74%), East Timor (18.86%), Ivory Coast (9.12%) and Sierra Leone (5.1%). Troops aged between 20-40 years constituted 96.3% of the total reported cases. The majority of infections were due to Plasmodium vivax (83.5%), followed by Plasmodium falciparum (13.6%). The attack rates (AR) of malaria/100 soldiers among the three contingents were 10.8% for Timor 1, with no post-exposure prophylaxis, and 2.8% for Timor 2 and 3 with post-exposure prophylaxis. There was an evident reduction of malaria attack rate and relapse rate between the two groups Timor 1 (without post-exposure prophylaxis) and Timor 2 and 3 (given post exposure prophylaxis). PMID:24639137

  1. Benign oral masses in a Northern Jordanian population-a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Al-Khateeb, Taiseer Hussain

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative frequencies, types and distribution of benign oral masses in North Jordanians. The records of the Department of Pathology at Jordan University of Science & Technology were reviewed and analyzed for patients with benign oral soft tissue masses, received during an 11-year period (1991-2001). The main outcome measures were patients' age and sex, and the mass type and location. A sum of 818 benign oral soft tissue masses (4% neoplastic and 96% non-neoplastic) was analyzed. Common benign neoplasms were salivary pleomorphic adenoma and lipoma. Non-neoplastic lesions consisted of traumatic (43%) inflammatory/ infective (33%), cystic (14%) and developmental (9%) lesions. Common non-neoplastic lesions were fibroepithelial polyp, pyogenic granuloma, mucoceles, hemangioma and squamous papilloma, in a descending order. There were 330 (40%) males and 488 (60%) females with a male to female ratio of 1: 1.5. The mean age was 33 years, with the majority in the 2(nd), 3(rd) and 4(th) decades. The sites commonly affected by benign neoplasms were the palate, tongue, upper lip and buccal mucosa, in a descending order and the sites commonly affected by non-neoplastic lesions were the gingiva, buccal mucosa, lower lip and tongue in a descending order. It is concluded that some of the features of benign oral masses in north Jordanians published in this paper are similar to those from other countries, and some are different. Further nationwide population-based surveys are needed to further define the epidemiology of benign oral masses among Jordanians.

  2. Crossing cultures: the lived experience of Jordanian graduate students in nursing: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Deluca, Ellen K

    2005-08-01

    This qualitative phenomenologic study explores the meaning of crossing cultures as experienced by Jordanian graduate students in nursing. Seven male and female students participated in conversations and journals regarding their experiences in the academic, social and professional realms of an American culture at a private, mid-Atlantic university. An analysis of the text revealed an overarching theme, "metamorphosis of self." Events leading to the metamorphosis included being chosen, experiencing a time full of memories, feeling bombarded with stimuli and "looking to do something" as professional nurses in Jordan. PMID:15967451

  3. Crossing cultures: the lived experience of Jordanian graduate students in nursing: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Deluca, Ellen K

    2005-08-01

    This qualitative phenomenologic study explores the meaning of crossing cultures as experienced by Jordanian graduate students in nursing. Seven male and female students participated in conversations and journals regarding their experiences in the academic, social and professional realms of an American culture at a private, mid-Atlantic university. An analysis of the text revealed an overarching theme, "metamorphosis of self." Events leading to the metamorphosis included being chosen, experiencing a time full of memories, feeling bombarded with stimuli and "looking to do something" as professional nurses in Jordan.

  4. The Use of Metaphorical Connotation of Inanimate Objects to Describe People by Speakers of Jordanian Arabic: A Pragmatic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Soudi, Layth

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the use of connotations of inanimate objects to describe people by speakers of Jordanian Arabic. Its main goal is to analyze the positive and negative connotative meanings of inanimate object used to describe people in Jordan. Besides, the contribution of gender in making connotative meanings. The study provides a…

  5. The Effect of Explicit Instruction of Meta Cognitive Learning Strategies on Promoting Jordanian Language Learners' Reading Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Ghazo, Abeer

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of met cognitive strategies on reading comprehension among Jordanian university students. The participants of this research consists of two classes of English Course , Level one with 60 students, 30 in the control group and 30 in the experimental group. Then, Metacognitive reading…

  6. Predictors of Images towards the "Other": A Comparative Study between Jordanian and Greek Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostoulas-Makrakis, Nelly; Al-Said, Khaleel; Makrakis, Vassilios; Kalogiannakis, Pella; de Baz, Theodora

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the perceptions of Jordanian and Greek pre-service teachers (N = 489) towards the "Other" as well as towards tolerance and intolerance. Frequencies, "t"-tests and one-way analysis of variance, as well as multiple regression analyses, were performed for the data analysis. The results show that although the two…

  7. Social Understanding in Young Israeli-Jewish, Israeli-Palestinian, Palestinian, and Jordanian Children: Moral Judgments and Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenick, Alaina; Killen, Melanie; Lee-Kim, Jennie; Fox, Nathan; Leavitt, Lewis; Raviv, Amiram; Masalha, Shafiq; Murra, Farid; Al-Smadi, Yahia

    2010-01-01

    Research Findings: An empirical investigation was conducted to test young Palestinian, Jordanian, Israeli-Palestinian, and Israeli-Jewish children's (N = 433; M = 5.7 years of age) cultural stereotypes and their evaluations of peer intergroup exclusion based upon a number of different factors, including being from a different country and speaking…

  8. Jordanian Social Studies Teachers' Attitudes and Their Perceptions of Competency Needed for Implemeting Technology in Their Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Bataineh, Mohammad T.

    2013-01-01

    This study used a cross-sectional survey design to examine the attitudes of Jordanian seventh to twelfth-grade social studies teachers toward technology, and their perceptions of the competency needed for implementing technology in their classrooms. It also explored the relationship between teachers' attitudes and their percptions of competency…

  9. Combating Violence against Children: Jordanian Pre-Service Early Childhood Teachers' Perceptions towards Child Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayez, Merfat; Takash, Hanan Mahmoud; Al-Zboon, Eman Khleif

    2014-01-01

    Early childhood teachers play major roles in defying child abuse and neglect and alleviating its detrimental effects on young children. Therefore, this study aimed at exploring how Jordanian pre-service early childhood teachers define and perceive violence against children and their role in child abuse detection and prevention. Furthermore, the…

  10. A Study of Faculty Attitudes toward Internet-Based Distance Education: A Survey of Two Jordanian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes toward internet-based distance education by the faculty members of two Jordanian public universities, Al-Hussein Bin Talal University and Yarmouk University, as well as to explore the relationship between their attitudes toward internet-based distance education and their perceptions of their…

  11. Problems Accompanied Individuals with Learning Disability and Its Relationship to Gender and Family Economic Status Variables in a Jordanian Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Oweidi, Alia M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between problems that accompany individuals with learning disability and the variables of gender and family economic status for a selected sample of Jordanians. The sample of the study, which consisted of (239) male and female students, was chosen randomly. To achieve this aim, the…

  12. Assessing the Level of Performance of Sign Language Interpreters from Impaired Hearing Students' Perspectives at Public and Private Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanikat, Feryal Abdel-Hadi

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the level of performance of sign language interpreters in both public and private Jordanian universities, as well as to recognize the effect of the study variables specifically gender and qualifications for acoustically disabled and interpreter, and the experience of the interpreter on the level of the performance…

  13. Jordanian Kindergarten and 1st-Grade Teachers' Beliefs about Child-Based Dimensions of School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayez, Merfat; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Oliemat, Enass

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the beliefs of Jordanian kindergarten and 1st-grade teachers regarding six child-based dimensions of school readiness: academic knowledge, basic thinking skills, socioemotional maturity, physical well-being and motor development, self-discipline, and communication skills. Questionnaires were used to collect…

  14. The Effect of Cognitive Learning Style-Based Reading Program on the Achievement of Jordanian Freshmen English Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hajaya, Nail; Al-Khresheh, Taisir

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cognitive learning style-based reading program on the achievement of Jordanian freshmen English majors. The subjects of the study consisted of 104 freshmen English majors enrolled for Reading Skills 1 in Tafila Technical University in Jordan in the fall semester 2007/2008. Students' learning styles,…

  15. Genre-Pragmatic Strategies in English Letter-of-Application Writing of Jordanian Arabic--English Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Ali, Mohammed N.

    2006-01-01

    This study reports an investigation of the genre components and pragmatic strategies of letters of applications written by Jordanian Arabic--English bilinguals. Specifically it is set up to trace how far novice non-native speakers of English are able to utilise the generic components and politeness strategies of the target language that strongly…

  16. Parenting Styles and Children's Social Skills as Perceived by Jordanian Mothers of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Taleb, Tagreed Fathi

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the perceived parenting styles in a sample of Jordanian mothers and their perceptions of the social skills exhibited by their preschool children. The sample consisted of 802 ("N"=802) mothers who responded to a three-part questionnaire: demographic information, parenting styles, and social skills. The results of this…

  17. Attitudes of Jordanian Nursing Students towards Mental Illness: The Effect of Teaching and Contact on Attitudes Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamaideh, Shaher H.; Mudallal, Rola

    2009-01-01

    Purposes: Attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental illness influence the treatment they receive and decisions of policy makers. The purposes of this study were to assess Jordanian nursing students' attitudes towards mental illness, and to assess the effectiveness of teaching and contact on changing nursing students' attitudes about…

  18. A Study of Jordanian University Students' Perceptions of Using Email Exchanges with Native English Keypals for Improving Their Writing Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahfouz, Safi Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    English foreign language learners generally tend to consider email exchanges with native speakers (NSs) as an effective tool for improving their foreign language proficiency. This study investigated Jordanian university students' perceptions of using email exchanges with native English keypals (NEKs) for improving their writing competency. A…

  19. Jordanian Prospective and Experienced Chemistry Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching and Learning and Their Potential Role for Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Amoush, Siham A.; Markic, Silvija; Abu-Hola, Imfadi; Eilks, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study of Jordanian chemistry student teachers' and experienced teachers' beliefs about teaching and learning. Different instruments were used, focusing on different aspects of teaching and learning. The first instrument is based on teachers' and students' drawings of teaching situations. It includes open…

  20. Identification of a novel WFS1 homozygous nonsense mutation in Jordanian children with Wolfram syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bodoor, Khaldon; Batiha, Osama; Abu-Awad, Ayman; Al-Sarihin, Khaldon; Ziad, Haya; Jarun, Yousef; Abu-Sheikha, Aya; Abu Jalboush, Sara; Alibrahim, Khoulod S

    2016-09-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presentation of early onset type I diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy with later onset diabetes insipidus and deafness. WFS1 gene was identified on chromosome 4p16.1 as the gene responsible for WS disease given that most of the WS patients were found to carry mutations in this gene. This study was carried out to investigate the molecular spectrum of WFS1 gene in Jordanian families. Molecular and clinical characterization was performed on five WS patients from two unrelated Jordanian families. Our data indicated that WS patients of the first family harbored two deletion mutations (V415del and F247fs) located in exon 8 and exon 7 respectively, with a compound heterozygous pattern of inheritance; while in the second family, we identified a novel nonsense mutation (W185X) located in exon 5 in the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain with a homozygous pattern of inheritance. This mutation can be considered as loss of function mutation since the resulting truncated protein lost both the transmembrane domain and the C-terminal domain. Additionally, the W185X mutation lies within the CaM binding domain in wolframin protein which is thought to have a role in the regulation of wolframin function in response to calcium levels. PMID:27617222

  1. The Effect of the Graphic Organizer Strategy on University Students' English Vocabulary Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hinnawi, Arwa N.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of the graphic organizer strategy on vocabulary building and vocabulary incremental growth of Jordanian university EFL students. One hundred and two students participated in the study which lasted for one academic semester of four months. Each student enrolled in one of two intact and equally-sized…

  2. ACC interleukin-10 gene promoter haplotype as a breast cancer risk factor predictor among Jordanian females

    PubMed Central

    Atoum, Manar Fayiz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a multifactorial cytokine with a complex biological role in breast cancer. The aims of this study were to investigate any association between IL-10 gene promoter polymorphisms, 1082A>/G, −819T>C, and −592A>C, or haplotypes and breast cancer risk among Jordanian women and to evaluate any association between the most common haplotype with clinicopathological features of breast cancer. Patients and methods A total of 202 breast cancer patients and 210 age-matched healthy control subjects were genotyped for −1082A/G, −819T/C, and −592A/C single nucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter region of the IL-10 gene by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Study patients and control subjects were recruited from Prince Hamzah Hospital, Amman, Jordan (2012–2013). Ethical approval and signed consent forms were signed by all participants. DNA was extracted, and polymerase chain reaction fragments were amplified and restriction digested by MnII, MaeIII, and RsaI. Results This study showed no statistically significant difference between −1082A/G, −819T/C, and −592A/C IL-10 genotypes or alleles among breast cancer patients or controls. Four different haplotypes ATA, ACC, GTA, and ACA within the IL-10 promoter gene were determined among both breast cancer and control groups. The most frequent haplotype was ACC among breast cancer patients and controls (41.6% and 40.7%, respectively). No statistical differences in these haplotypes among breast cancer patients or controls were determined. Analysis of the most common ACC haplotype showed statistical difference in positive estrogen receptor (P=0.022), positive progesterone receptor (P=0.004), cancer grade (P=0.0001), and cancer stage (P=0.009) among the ACC haplotype compared to non-ACC haplotype. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report studying the association of IL-10 haplotype with breast cancer risk events among Jordanian females. The

  3. Risk of perinatal transmission of rubella and parvovirus B19 in Jordanian pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Bdour, Salwa

    2006-04-12

    The seroprevalence and the risk of perinatal transmission of rubella virus (RV) and human parvovirus B19 were assessed in 439 Jordanian pregnant women. Seroprevalence data indicate that 43.7%, 48.7% and 19% of women are susceptible to RV, parvovirus B19 infections and both, respectively. A total of 12.2% and 20.2% of RV susceptible women are at the first and second trimester of gestation, respectively. They are at risk of bearing infants with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). However, 15% and 23% of parvovirus B19 susceptible women are at the first and second trimester of gestation, respectively. They are at risk of fetal loss or hydrops fetalis. Prenatal screening for these viruses, postpartum MMR vaccination and parvovirus B19 passive immunization are recommended. PMID:16460842

  4. Removal of copper(II) from aqueous solution by Jordanian pottery materials.

    PubMed

    Khazali, Omar; Abu-El-Halawa, Rajab; Al-Sou'od, Khaldoun

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the possibility of removing some heavy metals from water by a low-cost adsorbent, like Jordanian raw pottery. Five types of raw and modified pottery materials have been investigated. The effects of initial metal concentration, agitation time, pH and temperature on the removal of Cu(II) were studied. A pseudo-first order was used to test the adsorption kinetics. In order to investigate the sorption isotherm, two equilibrium models, the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms, were analyzed. The effect of solution pH on the adsorption onto pottery was studied in the pH range 1-5. The adsorption was exothermic at ambient temperature and the computation of the parameters, DeltaH, DeltaS and DeltaG, indicated the interactions to be thermodynamically favorable.

  5. Cross Cultural Indicators of Independent Learning in Young Children: A Jordanian Case.

    PubMed

    Almeqdad, Qais; Al-Hamouri, Firas; Zghoul, Rafe'a A; Al-Rousan, Ayoub; Whitebread, David

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to explore the level of Independent Learning (IL) amongst a sample of Jordanian preschoolers. Behaviors of sixty preschool children aged 5-6 years old were observed and rated by their teachers against an Arabic version of the Children's Independent Learning Development (CHILD 3-5) observational instrument to explore the independent learning among young children according to their gender, engagement level, parental education and the size of their families. The results illustrated that preschoolers may show some aspects of behaviors particularly those related to pro-social and cognitive areas. It also indicated that children from high educated environments demonstrated IL behaviors more than those coming from low educated environments. Finally, children coming from larger family size showed less IL behaviors than those coming from smaller ones. Results and implications are discussed. PMID:27283750

  6. Jordanian nurses' job satisfaction and intent to stay: comparing teaching and non-teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mrayyan, Majd T

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify variables of Jordanian nurses' job satisfaction and intent to stay, compare the phenomena of interest in teaching and non-teaching hospitals, and correlate the two concepts of nurses' job satisfaction and intent to stay. A convenience sample of 433 nurses was obtained from three teaching hospitals and two non-teaching hospitals. Nurses were "neither satisfied nor dissatisfied" and were "neutral" in reporting their intent to stay at their current jobs. Nurses who were working in non-teaching hospitals reported higher job satisfaction and intent to stay rates than those working in teaching hospitals. Nurses' job satisfaction and intent to stay were at the borderlines, which require the immediate attention of nursing and hospital administrators. Nurses' job satisfaction and intent to stay, particularly in teaching hospitals, have to be promoted; thus, interventions have to be effectively initiated and maintained at the unit and organizational levels. PMID:17540315

  7. Quality of life, social support, and severity of psychiatric symptoms in Jordanian patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hamaideh, S; Al-Magaireh, D; Abu-Farsakh, B; Al-Omari, H

    2014-06-01

    The major purposes of this study were to examine levels and correlations of quality of life (QOL), social support, and severity of psychiatric symptoms as well as to identify the variables that best predict QOL among Jordanian patients with schizophrenia. Descriptive cross-sectional design was used to collect data from 160 patients selected through systematic random sampling from two psychiatric outpatient clinics. Results showed that the highest domain of QOL was the social relationship domain, and the highest source of social support was perceived from significant others. Severity of affective symptoms was the highest, and severity of positive symptoms was the lowest. QOL correlated positively with social support, patients' educational and income level, and employment; and negatively with severity of psychiatric symptoms, duration of untreated illness, and duration of treatment. Support from friends, duration of untreated illness, income level, and severity of affective symptoms predicted QOL and accounting for 47.3% of the variance.

  8. Leptin and uric acid as predictors of metabolic syndrome in jordanian adults

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mousa N.; Haddad, Fares H.; Azzeh, Firas S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a set of interrelated metabolic risk factors that increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Studies regarding the specificity and sensitivity of serum levels of leptin and uric acid as predictors of MetS are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum levels of leptin and uric acid in terms of their specificity and sensitivity as predictors of MetS in the studied Jordanian group. SUBJECTS/METHODS In this cross sectional study, 630 adult subjects (308 men and 322 women) were recruited from the King Hussein Medical Center (Amman, Jordan). The diagnosis of MetS was made according to the 2005 International Diabetes Federation criteria. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the efficacy of serum levels of leptin and uric acid as predictors of MetS in the studied Jordanian group. RESULTS Study results showed that for identification of subjects with MetS risk, area under the curve (AUC) for leptin was 0.721 and 0.683 in men and women, respectively. Serum uric acid levels in men showed no significant association with any MetS risk factors and no significant AUC, while uric acid AUC was 0.706 in women. CONCLUSION Serum leptin levels can be useful biomarkers for evaluation of the risk of MetS independent of baseline obesity in both men and women. On the other hand, serum uric acid levels predicted the risk of MetS only in women. PMID:27478548

  9. Concentration effect of trace metals in Jordanian patients of urinary calculi.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Iyad Ahmed

    2008-02-01

    Due to the increase in the number of urinary calculi disease cases in Jordan, stone samples were collected from patients from various Jordanian hospitals (Princes Basma (PBH), King Abdullah University (KAUH), Al-Basheer (ABH) and Al-Mafraq (AMH)). This study concentrates on the effect of trace metals in patients of urinary calculi. Trace metals were detected in 110 urinary calculi samples using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) techniques. Of the calculi examined, 21 were pure calcium oxalate (CaOax), 29 were mixed calcium oxalate/uric acid, 23 were mixed calcium oxalate/phosphate (apatite), 25 were phosphate calculi (apatite/struvite), five were mixed calcium oxalate monohydrate/struvite, four were urate calculi (mixed ammonium acid urate/sodium acid urate) and three were pure cystine calculi. The concentration measurement of Ca and other trace metals levels has been found useful in understanding the mechanism of stone formation and in evaluating pathological factors. It has been found that Ca is the main constituent of the urinary calculi, especially those stones composed of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. The concentration of most of the trace metals that were analyzed was (Ca = 48.18, Na = 1.56, K = 0.9, Mg = 3.08, Fe = 1.17, Al = 0.49, Zn = 0.7, Cu = 0.19, Mn = 0.029, P = 10.35, S = 1.88, Sr = 0.306, Mo = 0.2, Cr = 0.146, Co = 0.05, Ni = 0.014)%. In conclusion, metals concentration in Jordanian patient's urinary calculi samples was higher than its equivalents of other patients'. It has been noted that there is no concentration of toxic trace elements (like Li, V, Pb, Cd, and As). Some heavy metals, however, were detected Mo, Cr, Co and Ni as traces. P and S ions are present in few calculi stones as traces.

  10. Abdominal Pain-Predominant Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Jordanian School Children

    PubMed Central

    Altamimi, Eyad M.; Al-Safadi, Mohammad H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) is a common complaint in children. Significant portion of them are of functional origin. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of abdominal pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) and its types in Jordanian school children. Methods This is a school-based survey at south Jordan. Information using the self-reporting form of the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III Version (QPGS-RIII) - the official Arabic translation - was collected. Classes from academic years (grades) 6 - 8 were selected. SPSS Statistical Package Version 17 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA) was used. Categorical data were analyzed using Fisher’s exact test, and continuous data were analyzed using t-test. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results Five hundred questionnaires were distributed, and 454 returned answered (91%). Two hundred twenty-nine (50.8%) were males. The average age of participants was 12.7 years (11 - 15 years). One hundred sixteen (25.7%) had abdominal pain-predominant FGID. Seventy-nine (68%) of them were females. Forty-seven (10.6%) had irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Thirty-six (8%), 17 (3.8%), 11 (2.4%) and five (1.1%) had abdominal migraine, functional abdominal pain, functional abdominal pain syndrome and functional dyspepsia, respectively. Conclusion Abdominal pain-predominant FGID has become a major health issue in Jordanian children. One of four children between the ages of 11 and 15 years exhibits at least one abdominal pain-predominant FGID. The most common form of abdominal pain-predominant FGID in our children was IBS. Females are affected more often than males. Intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms are seen regularly with abdominal pain-predominant FGIDs.

  11. Jordanian men's attitudes and views of birth-spacing and contraceptive use (a qualitative approach).

    PubMed

    Petro-Nustas, Wasileh; Al-Qutob, Rae'da

    2002-01-01

    This qualitative study was carried out to understand the meaning that Jordanian men attach to birth-spacing/family planning and to identify their attitudes and practices regarding contraceptives. Six focus group discussions were conducted over a 3-month period starting April 1996, with each group containing 6-10 men. The sample consisted of Jordanian men residing in Amman. Education, social class, and marital status stratified men's selection. The discussions were moderated by a social psychologist of the same sex. With respondents' consent, data gathered in the discussion groups were tape-recorded, transcribed, and critically analyzed using the content analysis method. The researchers found that there was a consensus among all men about the link between the concept of birth-spacing/family planning and the concept of better health for the mother and the child. Yet, the practice of contraception was influenced by some religious and cultural beliefs including that of "RIZK" (or fortune) which comes when the child is born. Moreover, some knowledge deficits concerning modern methods of contraception, and their side effects in particular, were noted. Some unfavorable attitudes of men for themselves using male contraceptives were also noted. Most men in the study indicated that spousal communication takes place on issues related to family planning, but the final decision is, in most cases, left to the husband alone (the head of the house). The demand for an increasing number of male children and the resistance of males to use condoms were among the most prevalent unexpected phenomena noticed in this study. The study concludes by recommending that special attention be directed to males when delivering family planning services. PMID:12418974

  12. Determining responsibility for smoking in society: accountability continuum for Jordanian college students and its implication on FCTC implementation.

    PubMed

    Madanat, Hala N; Barnes, Michael D; Cole, Eugene C; Njord, Rebecca

    As one of the first countries to ratify the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, Jordan has signaled an interest in stronger anti-tobacco restrictions. This study examines whether Jordanian students believe smoking is an individual right or a social issue, and if they would support more stringent policies and enforcement. Undergraduate Jordanian students (n = 1211) from public and private universities completed the survey. Never smokers scored significantly higher on smoking being a social issue that required public policy response (p-value < .001); whereas smokers scored significantly higher with all individual right items. Ample opportunity exists for developing and enforcing stronger tobacco policies both on college campus and generally in the country. However, increasing tobacco taxes may need to be preceded by health communication campaigns that increase knowledge of the effectiveness of the tobacco tax in reducing use and resultant premature deaths. PMID:20860982

  13. The influence of using Jordanian natural zeolite on the adsorption, physical, and mechanical properties of geopolymers products.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Rushdi Ibrahim; El-Eswed, Bassam; Alshaaer, Mazen; Khalili, Fawwaz; Khoury, Hani

    2009-06-15

    Geopolymers consist of an amorphous, three-dimensional structure resulting from the polymerization of aluminosilicate monomers that result from dissolution of kaolin in an alkaline solution at temperatures around 80 degrees C. One potential use of geopolymers is as Portland cement replacement. It will be of great importance to provide a geopolymer with suitable mechanical properties for the purpose of water storage and high adsorption capacity towards pollutants. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of using Jordanian zeolitic tuff as filler on the mechanical performance and on the adsorption capacity of the geopolymers products. Jordanian zeolitic tuff is inexpensive and is known to have high adsorption capacity. The results confirmed that this natural zeolitic tuff can be used as a filler of stable geopolymers with high mechanical properties and high adsorption capacity towards methylene blue and Cu(II) ions. The XRD measurements showed that the phillipsite peaks (major mineral constituent of Jordanian zeolite) were disappeared upon geopolymerization. The zeolite-based geopolymers revealed high compressive strength compared to reference geopolymers that employ sand as filler. Adsorption experiments showed that among different geopolymers prepared, the zeolite-based geopolymers have the highest adsorption capacity towards methylene blue and copper(II) ions.

  14. Factor Structure of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale: Cross-Cultural Comparisons Between Jordanian Arab and Malaysian Muslim University Students in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Musa, Ahmad S

    2016-03-01

    This study reported the differences in factor structure of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS) among Jordanian Arab and Malaysian Muslim participants and further examined its validity and reliability. A convenience sample of 553 Jordanian Arab and 183 Malaysian Malay Muslim university students was recruited from governmental universities in northern Jordan. The findings of this study revealed that this scale consists of two factors for the Jordanian Arab group, representing the "Religious Well-Being" and the "Existential Well-Being" subscales, and consists of three factors for the Malaysian group, representing the "Affiliation/Meaning and Purpose," "Positive Existential Well-Being/God Caring and Love," and "Alienation/Despair" subscales. In conclusion, the factor structure of the SWBS for both groups in this study was psychometrically sound with evidence of acceptable to good validity and reliability. Furthermore, this study supported the multidimensional nature of the SWBS and the earlier notion that ethnicity shapes responses to this scale.

  15. Families’ Stressors and Needs at Time of Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation: A Jordanian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Masa’Deh, Rami; Saifan, Ahmad; Timmons, Stephen; Nairn, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Background: During cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, family members, in some hospitals, are usually pushed to stay out of the resuscitation room. However, growing literature implies that family presence during resuscitation could be beneficial. Previous literature shows controversial belief whether or not a family member should be present during resuscitation of their relative. Some worldwide association such as the American Heart Association supports family-witnessed resuscitation and urge hospitals to develop policies to ease this process. The opinions on family-witnessed resuscitation vary widely among various cultures, and some hospitals are not applying such polices yet. This study explores family members’ needs during resuscitation in adult critical care settings. Methods: This is a part of larger study. The study was conducted in six hospitals in two major Jordanian cities. A purposive sample of seven family members, who had experience of having a resuscitated relative, was recruited over a period of six months. Semi-structured interview was utilised as the main data collection method in the study. Findings: The study findings revealed three main categories: families’ need for reassurance; families’ need for proximity; and families’ need for support. The need for information about patient’s condition was the most important need. Updating family members about patient’s condition would reduce their tension and improve their acceptance for the end result of resuscitation. All interviewed family members wanted the option to stay beside their loved one at end stage of their life. Distinctively, most of family members want this option for some religious and cultural reasons such as praying and supplicating to support their loved one. Conclusions: This study emphasizes the importance of considering the cultural and religious dimensions in any family-witnessed resuscitation programs. The study recommends that family members of resuscitated patients should

  16. Detection of novel LAMA3 mutation in Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa in a Jordanian family.

    PubMed

    Badran, Eman F; Battah, Hamdi A; Akl, Kamal F; Khalil, Raida W; Al Amori, Iyad

    2013-08-01

    The Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (H-JEB) subtype usually presents as a severe lethal inherited variant of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) caused by a homozygous mutation in the genes LAMA3, LMAB3, or LAMAC3. Each gene encodes one of the three chains of heterotrimer laminin-332 proteins (including the alpha-3 chain, beta-3 chain and gamma-2-chain) responsible for the adherence of the epidermis to the underlying dermis. The aim of this report is to add to the existing knowledge about EB by describing a novel mutation in a gene responsible for genodermatosis. A case of a Jordanian male neonate, born to healthy, first cousin consanguineous parents, who developed nonhealing blistering skin and mucous membrane lesions, crusted erosions with significant granulation tissue and dystrophic nails immediately after birth is described. The patient was diagnosed as having a novel LAMA3 mutation causing (H-JEB) by immunofluorescence mapping and molecular analysis. Both parents and this baby's sibling were shown to be heterozygous carriers of the same mutation. Pre-implantation diagnosis using molecular analysis for subsequent pregnancies in this family is crucial for managing any new pregnancy. PMID:22963541

  17. Genetic association of NALP1 with generalized vitiligo in Jordanian Arabs.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Asem; Qarqaz, Firas

    2010-10-01

    Generalized vitiligo is an autoimmune disorder characterized by patchy loss of pigmentation due to autoimmune destruction of melanocytes in the involved areas. Vitiligo is a polygenic, multifactorial disorder involving multiple genes and unknown environmental triggers. Recently, genetic variation in NALP1 (also called NLRP1), encoding a key regulator of the innate immune response, has been associated with generalized vitiligo in Caucasians of northern European origin. Here, we have investigated whether NALP1 is also associated with generalized vitiligo in Jordanian Arab patients. We genotyped 8 NALP1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 generalized vitiligo patients and 61 matched controls unaffected by vitiligo or any other autoimmune disorder. We found that two SNPs in the NALP1 extended promoter region, rs1008588 and rs2670660 were significantly associated with generalized vitiligo in our cohort of Arab vitiligo patients, and several other SNPs in the NALP1 region were at the margin of significant association. These results indicate that NALP1 is associated with susceptibility to generalized vitiligo in Arabs, as in Caucasians. Whether the casual variants are the same of not is yet to be identified by functional analysis.

  18. The removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution using natural Jordanian zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taamneh, Yazan; Sharadqah, Suhail

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the adsorption process of cadmium and copper using natural Jordanian (NJ) zeolite as adsorbent has been experimentally estimated. The samples of NJ zeolite were obtained from Al Mafraq discrete, north east of Jordan. The influence of the bulk concentration (C o), contact time (t) and different adsorbent masses (m) of NJ zeolite on the removal of heavy metal were evaluated. These variables had a considerable function in promoting the sorption process of heavy metal using the NJ zeolite. The initial concentration of heavy metals in the stock solution was extended between 80 and 600 mg/L. The batch adsorption method was employed to investigate the adsorption process. The experimental data were correlated using Freundlich and Langmuir empirical formula. The ability of NJ zeolite to eliminate cadmium and copper was estimated according to Langmuir isotherm empirical formula and found 25.9 and 14.3 mg/g for cadmium and copper, respectively. The kinetics of adsorption of cadmium and copper have been analyzed and correlated by first-order and second-order reaction model. It was noticed that adsorption of cadmium and copper was better correlated with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The results presented that NJ zeolite is practical adsorbent for removing cadmium and copper ion metal.

  19. Understanding of School Related Factors Associated with Emotional Health and Bullying Behavior among Jordanian Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    SHAHEEN, Abeer; NASSAR, Omayyah; SALEH, Mohammad; ARABIA T, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Students emotional health and bullying behavior are receiving greater attention worldwide due to their long-term effects on students’ health. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between perceived school climate, peer support, teacher support, school pressure and emotional health and bullying among adolescent school students in Jordan. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to recruit a sample of 1166 in-school adolescents in Amman between November 2013 and January 2014. A multi-stage cluster sampling technique was used to select respondents and Health Behavior in School Aged Children questionnaire was used to collect the data. Data were analyzed using Pearson Correlation to detect relationships among study variables. Results Significant correlations (P value was ≤.05) were found between school climate including teacher and peer support and emotional health and bullying behavior of school students. School pressure was not correlated significantly with emotional health and bullying. Conclusion Study findings emphasize the importance of school related factors in influencing students’ emotional health and bullying behavior. This indicates that the issue of bullying and emotional health of students in Jordanian schools requires further attention, both for future research and preventive intervention. PMID:26060720

  20. The relationship between spiritual intelligence and personality traits among Jordanian university students

    PubMed Central

    Mahasneh, Ahmad M; Shammout, Nizar A; Alkhazaleh, Ziad M; Al-Alwan, Ahmed F; Abu-Eita, Jawhara D

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying the level of spiritual intelligence and its correlation with personality traits among a group of Jordanian undergraduate students. A purposive sample of 716 male and female students was chosen from different faculties at the Hashemite University. Two questionnaires on spiritual intelligence and personality traits were distributed to members of the sample during the academic year 2013–2014. Results illustrated a medium level of spiritual intelligence in students, and indicated a positive and statistically significant relationship between spiritual intelligence dimensions (critical existential thinking, personal meaning production, transcendental awareness, and conscious state expansion) and personality traits (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness), but no significant correlation between personal meaning production and transcendental awareness dimensions and neuroticism personality traits. Finally, regression analysis results indicate that critical existential thinking is the first predictor dimension of spiritual intelligence in terms of neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. In the light of the results of this study, many recommendations were written by the researchers. PMID:25834470

  1. Litter pollution on the Jordanian shores of the Gulf of Aqaba (Red Sea).

    PubMed

    Abu-Hilal, Ahmad H; Al-Najjar, Tariq

    2004-07-01

    Litter was assessed on three beaches along the Jordanian coast of the Gulf of Aqaba, south of the town Aqaba, monthly during 1994 and 1995, in order to determine its nature, extent and possible sources. The overall mean was about 5 and 3 items/m(2) in 1994 and 1995, respectively. Approximately a total of 14,000 m(2) were examined and a total of 101,000 items were noted, 67,000 during 1994 and 34,000 in 1995. More than 50% of the litter was plastic and the remainder wood, glass, cardboard, Styrofoam, metal and other materials. Most litter appears to be from local land-based or near shore sources, although there are some regional influences as well. The main local sources are the passenger port, the cargo port and the beach goers. The findings are compared with other regions of the world. The amount of litter is related to distance of the beach from the main sources, and shape, physiography and orientation of the beach. Spatial and seasonal variations are examined and discussed, and actions and measures to combat the problem on local and regional levels are suggested.

  2. Phenol content, antioxidant capacity and antibacterial activity of methanolic extracts derived from four Jordanian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Irshaid, Fawzi I; Tarawneh, Khalid A; Jacob, Jacob H; Alshdefat, Aisha M

    2014-02-01

    This study was performed to assess the antioxidant and antibacterial properties of methanolic extracts derived from aerial parts of four Jordanian medicinal plants (Artemisia sieberi, Peganum harmala, Rosmarinus officinalis (Green-Flowered) and Sarcopterium spinosium). The possible relationship between these biological properties and the total phenolic concentrations of these extracts were also be determined. The antioxidant capacity and total phenolic concentrations were assessed by the ABTS method and Folin-Ciocalteu method, respectively. The amount of the extract required to scavenge 50% of ABTS (IC50) was also measured. Broth dilution and disc diffusion assays were performed to measure the antibacterial activity of these extracts against available bacterial strains. Variations were observed among the examined plants in antioxidant and antibacterial activities as well as in their phenol contents. According to ABTS assay and IC50 value, the highest free radical scavenging potential was found in Sarcopterium spinosium, followed by Rosmarinus officinalis, Peganum harmala and Artemisia sieberi, respectively. Similarly, the results of antibacterial assays showed that Sarcopterium spinosium exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against all tested bacterial strains as compared to Rosmarinus officinalis, Peganum harmala and Artemisia sieberi. Moreover, Sarcopterium spinosium contained the highest amount of phenolic compounds followed by, Rosmarinus officinalis, Artemisia sieberi and Peganum harmala, respectively. In conclusion, these plants are not only interesting sources for antimicrobial agents but also have a considerable amount of antioxidants. In addition, these findings revealed that the antioxidant capacity and antibacterial activity of these plant extracts do not necessary be attributed to their total phenolic concentrations.

  3. Treatment, Conservation and Restoration of the Bedouin Dyed Textiles in the Museum of Jordanian Heritage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Alfaisal, R.

    This study aims to establish and design effective methods to conserve two Bedouin dyed textile objects selected from the museum of Jordanian heritage and to improve the physical and environmental conditions in which items are kept to optimize their longterm chances of survival. The conservation processes that were used in conservation of the selected objects can be used a guide for conservators to conserve other similar textile objects. Investigations and analysis were used to identify the fibers and the extent of deterioration by using noninvasive methods. Transmitted Light Microscopy (TLM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy associated with EDAX (SEM-EDAX) were used for identifying the fibers and the deterioration. The results showed that the textile artifacts studied were very dirty, had white spots occupying cavities and holes, wrinkles and creases, fiber damages. Previous damage may due to the improper display methods in the museum or due to the incompatible environmental conditions surrounded the artifacts during exhibition such as: light, temperature, relative humidity, pollutants and microorganisms. For these reasons, the textile objects were cleaned using wet cleaning methods that improved the physical and mechanical properties of textile objects and returned them to their original shape as much as possible. Then the textile objects were mounted and supported by stitching on to backing fabric stretched on wooden frames. Finally, and according to the requirements of the museum, the objects were displayed temporarily inside showcases in an aesthetically pleasing manner.

  4. Late-presenting developmental dysplasia of the hip in Jordanian males

    PubMed Central

    Samarah, Omar Q.; Hadidi, Fadi A. Al; Hamdan, Mohammad Q.; Hantouly, Ashraf T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the pattern of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in late presenting Jordanian male patients and identify the risk factors and associated findings. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 1145 male patients who attended the Pediatric Orthopedic Clinic for a DDH check up. This study was carried out in the Orthopedic Section, Special Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan between March 2011 and October 2014. Data was collected from medical records, and x-ray measurements were evaluated. Results: Of the 1145 male patients, 43 (3.75%) with 70 involved hips were diagnosed with late- presenting DDH. Being a first-born baby resulted in 41.9% increased risk for DDH. Cesarian delivery was significantly associated with an increased risk of hip dislocation (p=0.004) while normal delivery was significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia (p=0.004). No predictable risk factors were found in 44.2% patients with DDH. Bilateral cases were more common than unilateral cases: (26 [60.5%] versus 17 [39.5%]). Limited abduction was a constant finding in all dislocated hips (p<0.001). Associated conditions, such as club foot and congenital muscular torticollis were not observed. Conclusion: Cesarian section is a significant risk for dislocated hips while normal delivery is significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia. Bilateral DDH is more common than the unilateral. Club foot and torticollis were not observed in this series. PMID:26837397

  5. Attributing regional effects of the 2014 Jordanian extreme drought to external climate drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergaoui, Karim; Mitchell, Dann; Zaaboul, Rashyd; Otto, Friederike; McDonnell, Rachael; Dadson, Simon; Allen, Myles

    2015-04-01

    Throughout 2014, the regions of Jordan, Israel, Lebanon and Syria have experienced a persistent draught with clear impacts on the local populations. In this study we perform an extreme event attribution analysis of how such a draught has changed under climate change, with a specific focus on the flow rate of the Upper Jordan river and the water level of Lake Tiberious (AKA the Sea of Galilee). Both of which hold major societal, political and religious importance. To perform the analysis we make use of distributed computing power to run thousands of modelled years of 2014 with slightly different initial conditions. We use an atmosphere only model (HadAM3p) with a nested 50 km regional model covering Africa and the Middle East. The 50 km model atmospheric variables will be used directly to force offline our 1 km LIS surface model. Two separate experiments and simulations are performed, 1. for all known climate forcings that are present in 2014, and 2. for a naturalised 2014 scenario where we assume humans never impacted the climate. We perform sensitivity analyses on the observed precipitation over the regions of interest, and determine that the TRMM data is in good agreement with station data obtained from the Jordanian Ministry of Water. Using a combination of the TRMM and model data we are able to make clear statements on the attribution of a 2014-like extreme draught event to human causal factors.

  6. Dispositional optimism among American and Jordanian college students: are Westerners really more upbeat than Easterners?

    PubMed

    Khallad, Yacoub

    2010-02-01

    The present study aimed at assessing some previous research conclusions, based primarily on comparisons of North Americans and East Asians, that Westerners tend to be optimistic while Easterners tend to be pessimistic. Two samples of European American and Jordanian college students were administered a questionnaire consisting of items measuring dispositional optimism along with items pertaining to risk and self-protective behaviors (e.g., seatbelt use, vehicular speeding, smoking) and social and demographic factors (e.g., sex, socioeconomic status, religiosity). The findings uncovered dispositional optimism to be stronger for American compared to Jordanian participants. Separate analyses of optimism versus pessimism revealed that Jordanian participants were more pessimistic, but not less optimistic than their American counterparts. No significant correlations were found between dispositional optimism and sex, socioeconomic status, or religiosity. The levels of optimism displayed by Jordanians in this study are inconsistent with previous claims of an optimistic West and a pessimistic East, and suggest that self-enhancing processes may not be confined to Western or highly individualistic groups. The findings did not uncover an association between dispositional optimism and risk or self-protective behaviors. Multiple regression analyses showed cultural background and sex to be the best predictors of these behaviors. The implications of these findings are discussed. La présente étude avait pour but d'évaluer quelques conclusions de recherches passées, fondées principalement sur des comparaisons de nord-américains et d'asiatiques de l'est, indiquant que les occidentaux tendent à être optimistes alors que les orientaux tendent à être pessimistes. Deux échantillons d'étudiants américains-européens et jordaniens du collège ont rempli un questionnaire ayant des items mesurant l'optimisme dispositionnel avec d'autres items qui portent sur les comportements de

  7. Waterpipe smoking among middle and high school Jordanian students: patterns and predictors.

    PubMed

    Alzyoud, Sukaina; Weglicki, Linda S; Kheirallah, Khalid A; Haddad, Linda; Alhawamdeh, Khalid A

    2013-12-12

    Despite the increase in attention to waterpipe tobacco smoking, the patterns and predictors of this method of tobacco use among Jordanian youth are not well known. The current study was conducted to assess the patterns and the predictors of waterpipe tobacco smoking among school aged students in one of Jordan's Central Governorates. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to investigate the patterns and predictors of waterpipe tobacco smoking among youth (grades 6, 8, 10 and 12). Using a multistage random sampling more than 1,000 students was selected. Data were collected using the Arabic Youth Tobacco Use Composite Measure (YTUCM). Waterpipe smoking was assessed for "past 12 months", "past month" and "past week". Students' ages ranged from 11 to 18 years, (mean age ± 14.7; SD ± 1.9 years). The percentage of girls who smoked waterpipe was greater for all frequencies of use than it was for boys. Age, gender, and belief that smoking makes more friends were predictors of smoking among study participants. This is the first known study to examine waterpipe smoking among youth aged 11 and 12. Our findings illustrate the need for public health campaigns to reach and educate youth, their families, teachers and school systems regarding the growing recognized health risks of waterpipe smoking.

  8. The Role of Age and Gender in the Relationship between (Attitude, Subjective Norm and Perceived Behavioural Control) and Adoption of E-Learning at Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    altawallbeh, Manal; Thiam, Wun; alshourah, Sultan; Fong, Soon Fook

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the moderating factors that effect on adaption e-learning among students in Jordanian universities. Two models of e-learning that are observed among adopting institutions are: E-learning as a supplement to traditional classroom model have been introduced by the respondents in this research. The paper takes a…

  9. Conversational Repair Strategies in Response to Requests for Clarification in Typically Developing Jordanian Children Ages 4;0-6;0 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamal, Sana M.; Haj-Tas, Maisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Conversational repairs are an important pragmatic language skill. We identified types of responses to requests for clarification and their frequencies in typically developing 4;0-6;0-year-old Jordanian children. This study was motivated by the fact that there are no Arabic data regarding this issue and by the limited range of forms of requests for…

  10. Negotiating the Dimensions of the Digital Divide: A Phenomenological Study of Jordanian Pre-Service Teachers' Experiences with Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arouri, Yousef Mhmoud Said

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study was designed to explore and learn how six pre-service teachers, studying at one of the Jordanian universities in the capital of Amman, identify, experience, and negotiate the barriers to Information and Communication Technology (ICT) access in their schooling experiences. The process of collecting…

  11. Monitoring, Controlling And Prevention Of The Fungal Deterioration Of Textile Artifacts In The Museum Of Jordanian Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.

    This study aims at monitoring, controlling and prevention the fungal deterioration of the museum textiles in the museum of Jordanian heritage as a case study. In this study valuable fungal deteriorated textile samples collected from different areas in the storage rooms and the display halls in the selected museum, were used for isolating fungi. Both of the plate method with the manual key and the direct observation method by SEM were used for identification of the fungi. The results show that the most dominant fungi isolated from tested samples belong to Aspergillus, Penicillium, Chaetomium and Alternaria species. The results show that all kinds of textile fibers in both storage room and display halls in the selected museum suffer from fungal attack. This study confirms that the textile collections are displayed and storied in very poor environmental conditions. This study established a strategy for controlling and prevention of the fungal deterioration problem on textile objects in the Museum of Jordanian Heritage and includes disinfection of the biodeteriorated textile objects, and then controlling the environmental conditions surrounding the objects in display showcases and storage cabinets. For disinfection of fungal deteriorated textiles with active fungal infestation the study suggested some fungicides that are safe for both textile objects and conservators.

  12. Consumption of Whole Grains, Refined Cereals, and Legumes and Its Association With Colorectal Cancer Among Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Tayyem, Reema F; Bawadi, Hiba A; Shehadah, Ihab; Agraib, Lana M; Al-Awwad, Narmeen J; Heath, Dennis D; Bani-Hani, Kamal E

    2016-09-01

    Background The role of whole grains, refined cereals, and legumes in preventing or initiating colorectal cancer (CRC) is still uncertain. The aim of this study is to examine the possible association between the consumption of whole grains, refined cereals, and legumes and the risk of developing CRC among Jordanian population. Methods A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to collect dietary data with regard to intake of whole grains, refined cereals, and legumes. A total of 220 diagnosed CRC participants and 281 CRC-free control participants matched by age, gender, occupation, and marital status were recruited. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of developing CRC in relation to the consumption of different types of whole grains, refined cereals, and legumes. Results The odds ratio (OR) for developing CRC among cases consumed refined wheat bread at all meals was 3.1 compared with controls (95% CI: 1.2-7.9, P-Trend = 0.001); whereas the OR associated with whole wheat bread was 0.44 (95% CI: 0.22-0.92, P-Trend = 0.001). The statistical evaluation for daily consumption of rice suggested a direct association with the risk of developing CRC, OR = 3.0 (95% CI: 0.27-33.4, P-Trend = 0.020). Weekly consumption of macaroni was associated with CRC with OR of 2.4 (95% CI: 1.1-5.3, P-Trend = 0.001). The consumption of corn, bulgur, lentils, and peas suggested a protective trend, although the trend was not statistically significant. Conclusion This study provides additional indicators of the protective role of whole grains and suggests a direct association between consumption of refined grains and higher possibility for developing CRC.

  13. Consumption of Whole Grains, Refined Cereals, and Legumes and Its Association With Colorectal Cancer Among Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Tayyem, Reema F; Bawadi, Hiba A; Shehadah, Ihab; Agraib, Lana M; Al-Awwad, Narmeen J; Heath, Dennis D; Bani-Hani, Kamal E

    2016-09-01

    Background The role of whole grains, refined cereals, and legumes in preventing or initiating colorectal cancer (CRC) is still uncertain. The aim of this study is to examine the possible association between the consumption of whole grains, refined cereals, and legumes and the risk of developing CRC among Jordanian population. Methods A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to collect dietary data with regard to intake of whole grains, refined cereals, and legumes. A total of 220 diagnosed CRC participants and 281 CRC-free control participants matched by age, gender, occupation, and marital status were recruited. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of developing CRC in relation to the consumption of different types of whole grains, refined cereals, and legumes. Results The odds ratio (OR) for developing CRC among cases consumed refined wheat bread at all meals was 3.1 compared with controls (95% CI: 1.2-7.9, P-Trend = 0.001); whereas the OR associated with whole wheat bread was 0.44 (95% CI: 0.22-0.92, P-Trend = 0.001). The statistical evaluation for daily consumption of rice suggested a direct association with the risk of developing CRC, OR = 3.0 (95% CI: 0.27-33.4, P-Trend = 0.020). Weekly consumption of macaroni was associated with CRC with OR of 2.4 (95% CI: 1.1-5.3, P-Trend = 0.001). The consumption of corn, bulgur, lentils, and peas suggested a protective trend, although the trend was not statistically significant. Conclusion This study provides additional indicators of the protective role of whole grains and suggests a direct association between consumption of refined grains and higher possibility for developing CRC. PMID:26631260

  14. Knowledge and attitude of Jordanian school health teachers with regards to emergency management of dental trauma.

    PubMed

    Al-Jundi, Suhad H; Al-Waeili, Haydar; Khairalah, Khaled

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, by means of a self administered structured questionnaire, the level of knowledge of school health teachers in northern Jordan with regards to the immediate emergency management of dental trauma. The questionnaire surveyed teacher's background, Knowledge of management of tooth fracture, avulsion, and loss of consciousness, it also investigated teacher's attitudes, and self assessed knowledge, as well as knowledge of availability of emergency services in Jordan. The sample consisted of all school health teachers in northern Jordan (220) who attended an oral health education course held by the Jordanian dental association. Only 190 were included in the survey. Sixty-three percent were females, 44% were in their twenties, and 43% in their forties. Their school health teaching experience ranged from 1 to 7 years. Only 20% were officially trained in school health. Less than half of the teachers received first aid training only once in their teaching career, not necessarily as part of school health training. Only 10 teachers were trained in dental first aid, and more than half had a previous experience with handling dental trauma in children. Overall the teachers' knowledge with regards to the emergency management of the trauma cases presented in the report was deficient. Chi-square test showed that, the difference in their responses to the knowledge part of the questionnaire was not statistically significant with regards to age, gender, years of teaching experience, first aid training, or number of seen trauma cases. Generally, the attitude was positive, most teachers wanting further education on the topic, however those who were trained in first aid, thought they were able to give proper action when needed in cases of trauma (P = 0.026). Most teachers were unsatisfied with their level of knowledge, and only 30% knew of the availability of after hour emergency services for dental trauma. The present report indicated the gross lack

  15. Macro- and Micronutrients Consumption and the Risk for Colorectal Cancer among Jordanians

    PubMed Central

    Tayyem, Reema F.; Bawadi, Hiba A.; Shehadah, Ihab N.; Abu-Mweis, Suhad S.; Agraib, Lana M.; Bani-Hani, Kamal E.; Al-Jaberi, Tareq; Al-Nusairr, Majed; Heath, Dennis D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Diet and lifestyle have been reported to be important risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the association between total energy and nutrient intake and the risk of developing CRC has not been clearly explained. The aim of our study is to examine the relationship between total energy intake and other nutrients and the development of CRC in the Jordanian population. Research Methods and Procedures: Dietary data was collected from 169 subjects who were previously diagnosed with CRC, and 248 control subjects (matched by age, gender, occupation and marital status). These control subjects were healthy and disease free. Data was collected between January 2010 and December 2012, using interview-based questionnaires. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between quartiles of total energy, macro- and micronutrient intakes with the risk of developing CRC in our study population. Results: Total energy intake was associated with a higher risk of developing CRC (OR = 2.60 for the highest versus lowest quartile of intake; 95% CI: 1.21–5.56, p-trend = 0.03). Intakes of protein (OR = 3.62, 95% CI: 1.63–8.05, p-trend = 0.002), carbohydrates (OR = 1.41, 95% CI: 0.67–2.99, p-trend = 0.043), and percentage of energy from fat (OR = 2.10, 95% CI: 0.38–11.70, p-trend = 0.009) significantly increased the risk for the development of CRC. Saturated fat, dietary cholesterol and sodium intake showed a significant association with the risk of developing CRC (OR = 5.23, 95% CI: 2.33–11.76; OR = 2.48, 95% CI: 1.18–5.21; and OR = 3.42, 95% CI: 1.59–7.38, respectively), while vitamin E and caffeine intake were indicative of a protective effect against the development of CRC, OR = 0.002 (95% CI: 0.0003–0.011) and 0.023 (95%CI: 0.008–0.067), respectively. Conclusion: Our results suggest an increased risk for the development of CRC in subjects with high dietary intake of energy, protein, saturated fat, cholesterol, and

  16. A novel SOX18 mutation uncovered in Jordanian patient with hypotrichosis-lymphedema-telangiectasia syndrome by Whole Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bastaki, Fatma; Mohamed, Madiha; Nair, Pratibha; Saif, Fatima; Tawfiq, Nafisa; Al-Ali, Mahmoud Taleb; Brandau, Oliver; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2016-02-01

    The SOX18 gene encodes a transcription factor that plays a notable role in certain developmental contexts such as lymphangiogenesis, hair follicle development and vasculogenesis. SOX18 mutations are linked to recessive and dominant hypotrichosis-lymphedema-telangiectasia syndrome (HLTS). In this study we report on a novel heterozygous mutation in SOX18 in a Jordanian patient suffering from HLTS that was revealed by Whole Exome Sequencing. In this case, a frameshift caused by 14-nucleotide duplication in SOX18 appeared de novo resulting in a premature translational stop at the N-terminal region of the central trans-activation domain. Here we present the clinical manifestations of the above mentioned molecular lesion in the light of what is known from published SOX18 mutations.

  17. Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This is a list of aerospace organizations and other groups that provides educators with assistance and information in specific areas. Both government and nongovernment organizations are included. (Author/SA)

  18. Cr(VI)/Cr(III) and As(V)/As(III) ratio assessments in Jordanian spent oil shale produced by aerobic combustion and Anaerobic Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    El-Hasan, Tayel; Szczerba, Wojciech; Buzanich, Günter; Radtke, Martin; Riesemeier, Heinrich; Kersten, Michael

    2011-11-15

    With the increase in the awareness of the public in the environmental impact of oil shale utilization, it is of interest to reveal the mobility of potentially toxic trace elements in spent oil shale. Therefore, the Cr and As oxidation state in a representative Jordanian oil shale sample from the El-Lajjoun area were investigated upon different lab-scale furnace treatments. The anaerobic pyrolysis was performed in a retort flushed by nitrogen gas at temperatures in between 600 and 800 °C (pyrolytic oil shale, POS). The aerobic combustion was simply performed in porcelain cups heated in a muffle furnace for 4 h at temperatures in between 700 and 1000 °C (burned oil shale, BOS). The high loss-on-ignition in the BOS samples of up to 370 g kg(-1) results from both calcium carbonate and organic carbon degradation. The LOI leads to enrichment in the Cr concentrations from 480 mg kg(-1) in the original oil shale up to 675 mg kg(-1) in the ≥ 850 °C BOS samples. Arsenic concentrations were not much elevated beyond that in the average shale standard (13 mg kg(-1)). Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis revealed that within the original oil shale the oxidation states of Cr and As were lower than after its aerobic combustion. Cr(VI) increased from 0% in the untreated or pyrolyzed oil shale up to 60% in the BOS ash combusted at 850 °C, while As(V) increased from 64% in the original oil shale up to 100% in the BOS ash at 700 °C. No Cr was released from original oil shale and POS products by the European compliance leaching test CEN/TC 292 EN 12457-1 (1:2 solid/water ratio, 24 h shaking), whereas leachates from BOS samples showed Cr release in the order of one mmol L(-1). The leachable Cr content is dominated by chromate as revealed by catalytic adsorptive stripping voltammetry (CAdSV) which could cause harmful contamination of surface and groundwater in the semiarid environment of Jordan.

  19. Cr(VI)/Cr(III) and As(V)/As(III) ratio assessments in Jordanian spent oil shale produced by aerobic combustion and Anaerobic Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    El-Hasan, Tayel; Szczerba, Wojciech; Buzanich, Günter; Radtke, Martin; Riesemeier, Heinrich; Kersten, Michael

    2011-11-15

    With the increase in the awareness of the public in the environmental impact of oil shale utilization, it is of interest to reveal the mobility of potentially toxic trace elements in spent oil shale. Therefore, the Cr and As oxidation state in a representative Jordanian oil shale sample from the El-Lajjoun area were investigated upon different lab-scale furnace treatments. The anaerobic pyrolysis was performed in a retort flushed by nitrogen gas at temperatures in between 600 and 800 °C (pyrolytic oil shale, POS). The aerobic combustion was simply performed in porcelain cups heated in a muffle furnace for 4 h at temperatures in between 700 and 1000 °C (burned oil shale, BOS). The high loss-on-ignition in the BOS samples of up to 370 g kg(-1) results from both calcium carbonate and organic carbon degradation. The LOI leads to enrichment in the Cr concentrations from 480 mg kg(-1) in the original oil shale up to 675 mg kg(-1) in the ≥ 850 °C BOS samples. Arsenic concentrations were not much elevated beyond that in the average shale standard (13 mg kg(-1)). Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis revealed that within the original oil shale the oxidation states of Cr and As were lower than after its aerobic combustion. Cr(VI) increased from 0% in the untreated or pyrolyzed oil shale up to 60% in the BOS ash combusted at 850 °C, while As(V) increased from 64% in the original oil shale up to 100% in the BOS ash at 700 °C. No Cr was released from original oil shale and POS products by the European compliance leaching test CEN/TC 292 EN 12457-1 (1:2 solid/water ratio, 24 h shaking), whereas leachates from BOS samples showed Cr release in the order of one mmol L(-1). The leachable Cr content is dominated by chromate as revealed by catalytic adsorptive stripping voltammetry (CAdSV) which could cause harmful contamination of surface and groundwater in the semiarid environment of Jordan. PMID:21970732

  20. Organics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  1. Organizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a specific…

  2. Perceived stress and coping strategies among Jordanian nursing students during clinical practice in psychiatric/mental health courses.

    PubMed

    Al-Zayyat, Abdulkarim Subhi; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas

    2014-08-01

    Clinical practice in the psychiatric/mental health nursing (PMHN) field is considered a highly-stressful experience for nursing students. The purpose of the present study was to identify the degrees of stress, the types of stressors, and coping strategies perceived by undergraduate nursing students during their clinical practice in PMHN courses. A descriptive, longitudinal design was used. Sixty-five students registered in PMHN clinical courses were recruited from five Jordanian universities using a systematic random-sampling method. Data collection was conducted in the second semester of the 2012-2013 academic year at two points of time: pre-PMHN clinical training and post-PMHN training. The Basic Information Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, and Coping Behavior Inventory were administered. Students' ages ranged from 20 to 25 years. The findings illustrate that the highest reported types of stressors at both data-collection times were taking care of patients, stress related to teachers and nursing staff, and from assignments and workloads. The most utilized coping strategy at both data-collection times was problem solving. The findings of the present study are useful for clinical educators in identifying nursing students' stressors, easing their learning in the clinical setting, and establishing an efficient PMHN course programme.

  3. Low intestinal colonization of Escherichia coli clone ST131 producing CTX-M-15 in Jordanian infants.

    PubMed

    Badran, E F; Qamer Din, R A; Shehabi, A A

    2016-02-01

    Over a period of 3 years' study (2012-2014), a total of 518 faecal samples were collected and cultured to isolate Escherichia coli. Of these, 338 (65.3%) E. coli isolates were recovered from infants, and 142/338 (42%) were multidrug-resistant (MDR) to ≥ 3 drug classes using the antimicrobial susceptibility disc diffusion method. A total of 125/142 (88%) of E. coli isolates were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers. blaCTX-M-15 types were observed in 80/125 (64%) of the isolates, and 60/80 (75%) were positive for blaCTX-M-15. Out of 338 E. coli isolates, 9 (2.6%) were positive for ST131/O25b clone and each isolate was associated with several plasmids of different sizes (1-21.2 kb). The identities of these nine isolates were confirmed by sequencing for presence of pabB (347 bp) and trpA (427 bp) genes. This study demonstrates low prevalence rate of the highly virulent E. coli ST131 clone producing blaCTX-M-15 in the intestines of Jordanian infants.

  4. Analysis of Turner syndrome patients within the Jordanian population, with a focus on four patients with Y chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Daggag, H; Srour, W; El-Khateeb, M; Ajlouni, K

    2013-01-01

    This study presents findings in Turner syndrome (TS) patients from the Jordanian population, with focus on 4 patients with Y chromosomal abnormalities. From 1989 to 2011, 504 patients with TS stigmata were referred to our institute for karyotyping, resulting in 142 positive TS cases. Of these, 62 (43.7%) had the typical 45,X karyotype and the remaining individuals (56.3%) were found to be mosaics. Fifteen TS patients (10.5%) carried a structural abnormality of the Y chromosome and presented with the mosaic 45,X/46,XY karyotype. From these, 4 TS cases were investigated further. Karyotyping revealed that 1 patient carried a small supernumerary marker chromosome, whereas cytogenetic and molecular analyses showed that 3 patients carried 2 copies of the SRY gene. Further analysis by SRY sequencing revealed no mutations within the gene. The analyzed patients were found to be phenotypically either females or males, depending on the predominance of the cell line carrying the Y chromosome. This study demonstrates the importance of detailed cytogenetic analysis (such as FISH) in TS patients, and it also emphasizes the need for molecular analysis (such as PCR and sequencing) when fragments of the Y chromosome are present.

  5. The Arabic culture of Jordan and its impacts on a wider Jordanian adoption of business continuity management.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Ihab H; Meaton, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Culture is important to individuals and societies, as well as organisations. Failing to address cultural aspects will hinder the wider adoption and development of business continuity management (BCM) and will subsequently increase the vulnerabilities of organisations to crises, disasters and business interruptions. Three main issues are discussed in this paper. The first is the background to culture and the characteristics of the Jordanian culture. Secondly, the influence of the Arab culture on the wider adoption and development of BCM in Jordan is considered. Thirdly, the paper looks at potential factors that underpin the role of culture in the BCM process in Jordan. These issues are significant, as they represent the characteristics and influence of the Arab culture. This paper contributes to the understanding of the significance of culture in the adoption and development of BCM for organisations operating in Jordan and in the Arab world more generally. It also highlights current cultural changes and trends taking place in the Arab world in a time of huge political instability in the Middle East and Arab countries. PMID:22948108

  6. The Arabic culture of Jordan and its impacts on a wider Jordanian adoption of business continuity management.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Ihab H; Meaton, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Culture is important to individuals and societies, as well as organisations. Failing to address cultural aspects will hinder the wider adoption and development of business continuity management (BCM) and will subsequently increase the vulnerabilities of organisations to crises, disasters and business interruptions. Three main issues are discussed in this paper. The first is the background to culture and the characteristics of the Jordanian culture. Secondly, the influence of the Arab culture on the wider adoption and development of BCM in Jordan is considered. Thirdly, the paper looks at potential factors that underpin the role of culture in the BCM process in Jordan. These issues are significant, as they represent the characteristics and influence of the Arab culture. This paper contributes to the understanding of the significance of culture in the adoption and development of BCM for organisations operating in Jordan and in the Arab world more generally. It also highlights current cultural changes and trends taking place in the Arab world in a time of huge political instability in the Middle East and Arab countries.

  7. Comparison of Coconut Water and Jordanian Propolis on Survival of Bench-dried Periodontal Ligament Cells: An in vitro Cell Culture Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jundi, Suhad; Mhaidat, Nizar

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The aim of this study is to assess and compare the efficacy of Jordanian propolis and full concentration mature coconut water in their ability to preserve periodontal ligament (PDL) cell viability after exposure of PDL cells to up to 120 minutes dry storage. Materials and methods: PDL cells were obtained from sound permanent first molars which were cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM). Cultures were subjected to 0, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes dry storage times then incubated with 100% mature coconut water, Jordanian propolis and DMEM for 45 minutes at room temperature (18-26°C). Untreated cells served as controls at each dry storage time tested. PDL cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Statistical analysis of data was accomplished by using one-way analysis of variance complemented by Tukey test and the level of significance was 5% ( p < 0.05). Results: Up to 60 minutes dry storage, no significant improvement on the percentage of viable cells was found from soaking in all tested media. On the other hand, soaking in mature coconut water only resulted in higher percentages of viable cells at >60 minutes dry storage. However, this improvement was not significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Avulsed teeth which have been left dry for <45 minutes should be replanted immediately, whereas avulsed teeth which have been left dry for >45 minutes may benefit from soaking for 45 minutes in mature coconut water. How to cite this article: Al-Haj Ali SN, Al-Jundi S, Mhaidat N. Comparison of Coconut Water and Jordanian Propolis on Survival of Bench-dried Periodontal Ligament Cells: An in vitro Cell Culture Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):161-165. PMID:25206215

  8. Quantifying selected morphometric characteristics for Jordanian side of the Jordan river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Rukah, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The Jordanian part of the Jordan river basin is almost 3679.692 km2. The river flows within the Jordan Rift Valley, a structurally complicated region which is cover almost by Upper Cretaceous chalky marls, bituminous limestone and nodular limestone, while the Quaternary sediments are mainly fluvitile deposits and Lisan marls. Other deposits are Tertiary and Jurassic. The present study includes the selected drainage basin characteristics, part of these characteristics refer as primary characteristics measurements and the others are found and concluded from the primary drainage basin characteristics and name as calculated basin characteristics. The drainage pattern is mainly dendritic but in some part is shows parallel pattern but not very mature. To simplify the study more and based on the detailed analysis of the drainage selected characteristics of the study area using various techniques and both topographic and geologic maps, the Jordan river basin is furtherly divided into 10 sub basin. Keywords: Jordan side of Jordan River Basin, Drainage Basin Morphology (Primary Basin Characteristics measurements, Calculated Basin Characteristics), Jordan. Table (1): Combined (Primary + Calculated) Basin Characteristics, Based on Toposheets 1:50,000 and Equations. Code Name of Catchment Area TDA (km2) 1 NCDA (km2) 2 BL (km2) 3 BP (km2) Total 4 BS (m) area 5 BR (m) 6 CDA (km2) 7 BW (km2) 8 SF 9 A Wadi Arab 413.905 302.02 239.3 27.8 34.4 636 ♢111. 0.467 512.42 B Wadi Zeglab 130.039 95.23 95 15.7 25 966 32.81 0.37 256.26 C Wadi Jurum 84.62 50.28 61.6 22.4 36.36 400 34.34 ♢1.7 34.4 D Wadi Yabis 208.02 150.930 122.1 25.2 46.29 400 57.09 0.47 259.78 E Wadi Kufanga 214.564 189.953 120.9 19.3 41.66 123 26.61 0.22 549.55 F Wadi Rajib 405.6 374.23 118.5 29.5 37.33 1285 31.37 0.27 438.88 G Wadi Siel Ezzarqa 476.293 394.83 258.1 29 28.56 1277 81.46 0.32 806.56 H Wadi el Mallaha 554.251 485.1 ♢385 ♢35 ♢48.25 ♢1435 69.25 0.18 ♢2142.7 I Wadi Nimrin ♢601.9 ♢520.3 282.5 30

  9. Mediating Role of Attitude, Subjective Norm and Perceived Behavioural Control in the Relationships between Their Respective Salient Beliefs and Behavioural Intention to Adopt E-Learning among Instructors in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altawallbeh, Manal; Soon, Fong; Thiam, Wun; Alshourah, Sultan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the factors that determine intention to adopt e-learning in Jordanian universities. Two models of e-learning that are observed among adopting institutions: E-learning as a supplement to traditional classroom mode, and total electronic learning. The respondents in this research have just been introduced to…

  10. The Effectiveness of Training Program Based on the Six Hats Model in Developing Creative Thinking Skills and Academic Achievements in the Arabic Language Course for Gifted and Talented Jordanian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziadat, Ayed H.; Al Ziyadat, Mohammad T.

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a training program based on the six hats model in developing creative thinking skills and academic achievements in the Arabic language for gifted and talented Jordanian students. The study sample consisted of 59 gifted male and female students of the 7th grade from King Abdullah…

  11. Quantifying selected morphometric characteristics for Jordanian side of the Jordan river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Rukah, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The Jordanian part of the Jordan river basin is almost 3679.692 km2. The river flows within the Jordan Rift Valley, a structurally complicated region which is cover almost by Upper Cretaceous chalky marls, bituminous limestone and nodular limestone, while the Quaternary sediments are mainly fluvitile deposits and Lisan marls. Other deposits are Tertiary and Jurassic. The present study includes the selected drainage basin characteristics, part of these characteristics refer as primary characteristics measurements and the others are found and concluded from the primary drainage basin characteristics and name as calculated basin characteristics. The drainage pattern is mainly dendritic but in some part is shows parallel pattern but not very mature. To simplify the study more and based on the detailed analysis of the drainage selected characteristics of the study area using various techniques and both topographic and geologic maps, the Jordan river basin is furtherly divided into 10 sub basin. Keywords: Jordan side of Jordan River Basin, Drainage Basin Morphology (Primary Basin Characteristics measurements, Calculated Basin Characteristics), Jordan. Table (1): Combined (Primary + Calculated) Basin Characteristics, Based on Toposheets 1:50,000 and Equations. Code Name of Catchment Area TDA (km2) 1 NCDA (km2) 2 BL (km2) 3 BP (km2) Total 4 BS (m) area 5 BR (m) 6 CDA (km2) 7 BW (km2) 8 SF 9 A Wadi Arab 413.905 302.02 239.3 27.8 34.4 636 ♢111. 0.467 512.42 B Wadi Zeglab 130.039 95.23 95 15.7 25 966 32.81 0.37 256.26 C Wadi Jurum 84.62 50.28 61.6 22.4 36.36 400 34.34 ♢1.7 34.4 D Wadi Yabis 208.02 150.930 122.1 25.2 46.29 400 57.09 0.47 259.78 E Wadi Kufanga 214.564 189.953 120.9 19.3 41.66 123 26.61 0.22 549.55 F Wadi Rajib 405.6 374.23 118.5 29.5 37.33 1285 31.37 0.27 438.88 G Wadi Siel Ezzarqa 476.293 394.83 258.1 29 28.56 1277 81.46 0.32 806.56 H Wadi el Mallaha 554.251 485.1 ♢385 ♢35 ♢48.25 ♢1435 69.25 0.18 ♢2142.7 I Wadi Nimrin ♢601.9 ♢520.3 282.5 30

  12. Assessing the spatial and temporal variability of fine particulate matter components in Israeli, Jordanian, and Palestinian cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnat, Jeremy A.; Moise, Tamar; Shpund, Jacob; Liu, Yang; Pachon, Jorge E.; Qasrawi, Radwan; Abdeen, Ziad; Brenner, Shmuel; Nassar, Khaled; Saleh, Rami; Schauer, James J.

    2010-07-01

    This manuscript presents results from an extensive, multi-country comparative monitoring study of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) and its primary chemical components in Israeli, Jordanian and Palestinian cities. This study represented the first time that researchers from these countries have worked together to examine spatial and temporal relationships for PM 2.5 and its major components among the study sites. The findings indicated that total PM 2.5 mass was relatively homogenous among many of the 11 sites as shown from strong between-site correlations. Mean annual concentrations ranged from 19.9 to 34.9 μg m -3 in Haifa and Amman, respectively, and exceeded accepted international air quality standards for annual PM 2.5 mass. Similarity of total mass was largely driven by SO 42- and crustal PM 2.5 components. Despite the close proximity of the seven, well correlated sites with respect to PM 2.5, there were pronounced differences among the cities for EC and, to a lesser degree, OC. EC, in particular, exhibited spatiotemporal trends that were indicative of strong local source contributions. Interestingly, there were moderate to strong EC correlations ( r > 0.65) among the large metropolitan cities, West Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and Amman. For these relatively large cities, (i.e., West Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and Amman), EC sources from the fleet of buses and cars typical for many urban areas predominate and likely drive spatiotemporal EC distributions. As new airshed management strategies and public health interventions are implemented throughout the Middle East, our findings support regulatory strategies that target integrated regional and local control strategies to reduce PM 2.5 mass and specific components suspected to drive adverse health effects of particulate matter exposure.

  13. Profiling Amino Acids of Jordanian Scalp Hair as a Tool for Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Rashaid, Ayat H B; Harrington, Peter de B; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-07-21

    Hair analysis is an area of increasing interest in the fields of medical and forensic sciences. Human scalp hair has attractive features in clinical studies because hair can be sampled easily and noninvasively from human subjects, and unlike blood and urine samples, it contains a chronological record of medication use. Keratin protein is the major component of scalp hair shaft material and it is composed of 21 amino acids. The method used herein for the amino acid determination in hair included keratin protein acid hydrolysis using 6 M hydrochloric acid (HCl), followed by amino acids derivatization using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA), and the determination of derivatized amino acids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Amino acid profiles of scalp hair of 27 Jordanian subjects (15 diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 patients and 12 control subjects) were analyzed. A fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES) classified the amino acid profiles into diabetic and control groups based on multivariate analyses of the abundance of 14 amino acids. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% for diabetes detection using leave-one-individual-out cross-validation. The areas under the receiver operative characteristics (ROC) curves were 1.0, which represents a highly sensitive and specific diabetes test. The nonessential amino acids Gly and Glu, and the essential amino acid Ile were more abundant in the scalp hair of diabetic patients compared to the hair of control subjects. The associations between the abundance of amino acids of human hair and health status may have clinical applications in providing diagnostic indicator or predicting other chronic or acute diseases.

  14. Monitoring and modeling of sinkholes affecting the Jordanian coast of the Dead Sea through satellite interferometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessari, Giulia; Pasquali, Paolo; Floris, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) techniques have been applied to investigate sinkholes affecting the Jordanian coast of the Dead Sea. The Dead Sea is a hyper saline terminal lake located in a pull-apart basin. Most of the area is characterized by highly karstic and fractured rock formations that are connected with faults. Karstic conduits extend from the land into the sea. Since the 1960s, the Dead Sea level is dropping at an increasing rate: from about 60 cm/yr in the 1970s up to 1 m/yr in the 2000s. From about the mid-1980s, sinkholes appeared more and more frequently over and around the emerged mudflats and salt flats. Strong subsidence and landslides also affect some segments of the coast. Nowadays, several thousands of sinkholes attest that the degradation of the Dead Sea coast is worsening. Deformation analysis has been focused on the Ghor Al Haditha area, located in the South-Eastern part of the lake coast. SAR data acquired by three different sensors, ERS, ENVISAT and COSMO- SkyMed have been analysed. 70 ERS images from 1992 to 2009 and 30 ENVISAT images from 2003 to 2010 have been processed. SBAS technique has been applied to define surface velocity and displacement maps. Results obtained from the SBAS technique, applied to ERS and Envisat data, highlight a diffuse subsiding of the entire Eastern coast of the Dead Sea. It was not possible to detect single sinkholes because of the resolution of these sensors (25m2) and the small size of each punctual event that is generally varying from a few meters to a hundred meters diameter. Furthermore, SBAS has been applied to 23 COSMO-SkyMed SAR satellite images from December 2011 to May 2013. The high resolution of these data (3m x 3m) and the short revisiting time allowed precise information of the displacement of punctual sinkholes beyond the overall subsidence of the coast. A specific sinkhole has been identified in order to understand its temporal evolution. The considered

  15. Chemical and structural properties of Jordanian zeolitic tuffs and their admixtures with urea and thiourea: Potential scavengers for phenolics in aqueous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Yousef, R.I.; Tutunji, M.F.; Derwish, G.A.W.; Musleh, S.M.

    1999-08-15

    Native Jordanian zeolitic tuffs, rich in phillipsite, were treated with urea and thiourea. The chemical and structural properties of the tuffs and their urea and thiourea admixtures were studied using SEM, XRF, XRD, and FTIR techniques, and their adsorption capacities were estimated by the methylene blue method. The urea and thiourea treatment has not affected the mineral constitution of the tuffs. The results revealed that urea and thiourea were linked by hydrogen bonding through the NH{sub 2} moiety to the zeolite substrate, with urea showing the strongest effect. Experiments were carried out to investigate the possible use of the prepared materials for the removal of phenol and chlorinated phenols from aqueous solutions. Although thiourea caused a reduction in the relative surface area, both urea and thiourea admixtures were more effective than the free zeolitic tuff in the removal of phenol and chlorinated phenols from water, with urea admixture displaying the largest removal capacity.

  16. “Would a man smell a rose then throw it away?” Jordanian men’s perspectives on women's breast cancer and breast health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most common malignancy afflicting women, and the most common cancer overall in Jordan. A woman’s decision to go for screening is influenced by her social support network. This study aims to explore Jordanian men’s individual and contextual perspectives on women’s breast cancer and their own role in the breast health of the females within their families. Methods An explorative qualitative design was used to purposively recruit 24 married men aged 27 to 65 years (median 43 years) from four governorates in Jordan. Data in the form of interviews transcriptions was subjected to qualitative content analysis. Results Three themes were identified: a) Supporting one’s wife; b) Marital needs and obligations; c) Constrained by a culture of destiny and shame. The first theme was built on men’s feelings of responsibility for the family’s health and well-being, their experiences of encouraging their wives to seek health care and their providing counselling and instrumental support. The second theme emerged from men’s views about other men’s rejection of a wife inflicted by breast cancer, their own perceptions of diminished femininity due to mastectomy and their own concerns about protecting the family from the hereditary risk of breast cancer. The third theme was seen in men’s perception of breast cancer as an inevitable act of God that is far away from one’s own family, in associating breast cancer with improper behaviour and in their readiness to face the culture of Eib (shame). Conclusions Jordanian men perceive themselves as having a vital role in supporting, guiding and encouraging their wives to follow breast cancer early detection recommendations. Breast health awareness campaigns could involve husbands to capitalize on family support. PMID:24160268

  17. Nationality, Gender, Age, and Body Mass Index Influences on Vitamin D Concentration among Elderly Patients and Young Iraqi and Jordanian in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Al-Horani, Hanan; Abu Dayyih, Wael; Mallah, Eyad; Hamad, Mohammed; Mima, Mohammad; Awad, Riad; Arafat, Tawfiq

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is necessary for maintaining and regulating calcium levels; thus, insufficiency of vitamin D increases the risk of many chronic diseases. This study aimed to examine vitamin D levels among Jordanian and Iraqi volunteers and find the relation between vitamin D level and lipid profile patients. Vitamin D levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For young healthy group subjects, vitamin D levels were 20.60 ± 5.94 ng/mL for Jordanian and 27.59 ± 7.74 ng/mL for Iraqi. Vitamin D concentrations for young males and females were 25.82 ± 8.33 ng/mL and 21.95 ± 6.39 ng/mL, respectively. Females wearing hijab were 20.87 ± 6.45 ng/mL, while uncovered females were 23.55 ± 6.04 ng/mL. For >40 years Iraqi subjects, vitamin D level for healthy was 29.78 ± 9.49 ng/mL and 23.88 ± 7.93 ng/mL for hyperlipidemic subjects. Vitamin D levels for overweight and obese healthy groups were significantly higher (P < 0.050) than those for the hyperlipidemic patients groups. Vitamin D levels for males were significantly higher than females and were significantly higher for healthy than those hyperlipidemic Iraqi patients. These findings showed that vitamin D levels are affected by age, nationality, gender, and health statues and highlight the importance of vitamin D supplementation for groups with low levels particularly old, hijab wearing females, and hyperlipidemic groups. PMID:27110402

  18. The Effect of Micro/Nano-metrics Size on the Interaction of Jordanian Aluminosilicate Raw Materials with High pH Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldabsheh, Islam; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Martinez, Salvador

    2014-05-01

    Environmental preservation has become a driving force behind the search for new sustainable and environmentally friendly composites to replace conventional concrete produced from ordinary Portland cement (OPC). Current researches concentrate on developing building products (geopolymers) through geopolymerization. The goal is to produce low cost construction materials for green housing. Geopolymerization is the process of polymerizing minerals with high silica and alumina at low temperature by the use of alkali solutions. Dissolution is the most important process for supplying the high initial Al and Si concentrations to produce the gel phase that is responsible for geopolymerization. This study has been focused on the influence of different micrometric particle sizes of three Jordanian raw materials on their dissolution behavior in sodium hydroxide solution. The samples are kaolinite, volcanic tuff and silica sand. The dissolution properties of each material, alone and mixed with the other two materials were studied in different concentrations (5 and 10 M) using (NaOH) at 25ºC, and shaking time for 24 and 168 h. To better understand the dissolution process, the alkaline solution was renewed after the desired time in order to know if the Al-Si raw material is completely dissolved or not. Different analytical techniques were used to characterize raw materials physically, mineralogically, chemically and thermally. All processed samples either centrifuged solutions or solid residues were fully characterized. The leached concentrations of Al and Si were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP). X-ray Diffraction Technique (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used to evaluate the solid residue characterization compared with the original ones. The three aluminosilicate raw materials have indicated variable degrees of solubility under highly alkaline conditions. The method for the size reduction of the used raw

  19. A homozygous contiguous gene deletion in chromosome 16p13.3 leads to autosomal recessive osteopetrosis in a Jordanian patient.

    PubMed

    Pangrazio, Alessandra; Frattini, Annalisa; Valli, Roberto; Maserati, Emanuela; Susani, Lucia; Vezzoni, Paolo; Villa, Anna; Al-Herz, Waleed; Sobacchi, Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Human malignant autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder caused by reduced bone resorption by osteoclasts. Mutations in the CLCN7 gene are responsible not only for a substantial portion of ARO patients but also for other forms of osteopetrosis characterized by different severity and inheritance. The lack of a clear genotype/phenotype correlation makes genetic counseling a tricky issue for CLCN7-dependent osteopetrosis. Here, we characterize the first homozygous interstitial deletion in 16p13.3, detected by array comparative genomic hybridization in an ARO patient of Jordanian origin. The deletion involved other genes besides CLCN7, while the proband displayed a classic ARO phenotype; however, her early death did not allow more extensive clinical investigations. The identification of this novel genomic deletion involving a large part of the CLCN7 gene is of clinical relevance, especially in prenatal diagnosis, and suggests the possibility that this kind of mutation has been underestimated so far. These data highlight the need for alternative approaches to genetic analysis also in other ARO-causative genes.

  20. The Jordanian Mid Jordan Valley is a classic focus of Leishmania major as revealed by RFLP of 56 isolates and 173 ITS-1-PCR-positive clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Ibrahim M; Shönian, Gabriele; Geith, Eid; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Natsheh, Lina

    2015-01-01

    The identity of the causative species of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in the endemic Jordanian Mid Jordan Valley (JMidJV) was investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifying the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) followed by the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The geographical distribution of CL and the usefulness of ITS1 PCR in diagnosis of suspected CL in the study area were also addressed. Over the period from 2004 to 2009, 56 clinical isolates of Leishmania promastigotes and 185 lesion scrapings spotted on filter papers were obtained from suspected CL patients living in the JMidJV, which is divided into northern and southern districts. The majority (67.1%) of patients occurred in the populated eastern part of the southern district. Of the 185 suspected CL patients, 173 (93.5%) were confirmed positive using PCR. Leishmanial DNA was detected in 27 (90%) of 30 patients having clinically atypical lesions of CL and in 60 (92%) of 65 smear- and culture-negative cases having typical lesions of CL. The parasites in all of the 56 isolates and the 173 PCR-positive scrapings were classified as Leishmania major. In conclusion, PCR is useful in diagnosis of CL especially when smear and culture are negative. It is also recommended as a differential diagnostic tool of atypical lesions when CL is endemic. The identification of L. major as the causative species in such a considerable number of CL cases, representative of all mini foci of CL in the study area, shows that the JMidJV is a classic focus of L. major.

  1. Measurement of natural radioactivity in Jordanian building materials and their contribution to the public indoor gamma dose rate.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, J M; Hamideen, M S

    2013-10-01

    This study is undertaken to determine the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in samples of commonly used building materials in Jordan. Samples of seven different materials were collected from construction sites and local agencies supplying raw construction materials and analyzed using a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer, taking into account self-attenuation in bulk samples. The average specific activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K ranged from 2.84 to 41.52, 0.78 to 58.42. and 3.74 to 897 Bq/kg, respectively. All the samples had radium equivalent activities well below the limit of 370 Bq/kg set by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, 1979). External and internal hazard indices, absorbed dose and annual effective dose rate associated with the radionuclides of interest were calculated and compared with the international legislation and guidance. In general, most of the activities did not exceed the recommended international limits, except for granite and ceramic samples which are usually used as secondary building materials in Jordan. PMID:23831927

  2. Measurement of natural radioactivity in Jordanian building materials and their contribution to the public indoor gamma dose rate.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, J M; Hamideen, M S

    2013-10-01

    This study is undertaken to determine the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in samples of commonly used building materials in Jordan. Samples of seven different materials were collected from construction sites and local agencies supplying raw construction materials and analyzed using a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer, taking into account self-attenuation in bulk samples. The average specific activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K ranged from 2.84 to 41.52, 0.78 to 58.42. and 3.74 to 897 Bq/kg, respectively. All the samples had radium equivalent activities well below the limit of 370 Bq/kg set by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, 1979). External and internal hazard indices, absorbed dose and annual effective dose rate associated with the radionuclides of interest were calculated and compared with the international legislation and guidance. In general, most of the activities did not exceed the recommended international limits, except for granite and ceramic samples which are usually used as secondary building materials in Jordan.

  3. Deep COI sequencing of standardized benthic samples unveils overlooked diversity of Jordanian coral reefs in the northern Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Al-Rshaidat, Mamoon M D; Snider, Allison; Rosebraugh, Sydney; Devine, Amanda M; Devine, Thomas D; Plaisance, Laetitia; Knowlton, Nancy; Leray, Matthieu

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of DNA barcodes (metabarcoding), particularly when combined with standardized sampling protocols, is one of the most promising approaches for censusing overlooked cryptic invertebrate communities. We present biodiversity estimates based on sequencing of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene for coral reefs of the Gulf of Aqaba, a semi-enclosed system in the northern Red Sea. Samples were obtained from standardized sampling devices (Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS)) deployed for 18 months. DNA barcoding of non-sessile specimens >2 mm revealed 83 OTUs in six phyla, of which only 25% matched a reference sequence in public databases. Metabarcoding of the 2 mm - 500 μm and sessile bulk fractions revealed 1197 OTUs in 15 animal phyla, of which only 4.9% matched reference barcodes. These results highlight the scarcity of COI data for cryptobenthic organisms of the Red Sea. Compared with data obtained using similar methods, our results suggest that Gulf of Aqaba reefs are less diverse than two Pacific coral reefs but much more diverse than an Atlantic oyster reef at a similar latitude. The standardized approaches used here show promise for establishing baseline data on biodiversity, monitoring the impacts of environmental change, and quantifying patterns of diversity at regional and global scales. PMID:27584940

  4. Deep COI sequencing of standardized benthic samples unveils overlooked diversity of Jordanian coral reefs in the northern Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Al-Rshaidat, Mamoon M D; Snider, Allison; Rosebraugh, Sydney; Devine, Amanda M; Devine, Thomas D; Plaisance, Laetitia; Knowlton, Nancy; Leray, Matthieu

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of DNA barcodes (metabarcoding), particularly when combined with standardized sampling protocols, is one of the most promising approaches for censusing overlooked cryptic invertebrate communities. We present biodiversity estimates based on sequencing of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene for coral reefs of the Gulf of Aqaba, a semi-enclosed system in the northern Red Sea. Samples were obtained from standardized sampling devices (Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS)) deployed for 18 months. DNA barcoding of non-sessile specimens >2 mm revealed 83 OTUs in six phyla, of which only 25% matched a reference sequence in public databases. Metabarcoding of the 2 mm - 500 μm and sessile bulk fractions revealed 1197 OTUs in 15 animal phyla, of which only 4.9% matched reference barcodes. These results highlight the scarcity of COI data for cryptobenthic organisms of the Red Sea. Compared with data obtained using similar methods, our results suggest that Gulf of Aqaba reefs are less diverse than two Pacific coral reefs but much more diverse than an Atlantic oyster reef at a similar latitude. The standardized approaches used here show promise for establishing baseline data on biodiversity, monitoring the impacts of environmental change, and quantifying patterns of diversity at regional and global scales.

  5. Remnants of Miocene fluvial sediments in the Negev Desert, Israel, and the Jordanian Plateau: Evidence for an extensive subsiding basin in the northwestern margins of the Arabian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberman, Ezra; Calvo, Ran

    2013-06-01

    Relics of a thick, widely spread, fluvial sequence of Early Miocene age are scattered throughout southern Israel, eastern Sinai, the Dead Sea Rift Valley and the western margins of the Jordanian Plateau. These relics are mainly preserved in structural lows, karstic systems, and abandoned stream valleys. The paleogeography of this fluvial system was reconstructed based on the relations between the sequence remnants and the main structural and morphological features of the southeastern Levant region. Three sedimentary associations were identified in the Miocene sequence: a lower part dominated by locally derived clastic sediments; a thicker middle part, composed mostly of far-field allochthonous clastic sediments; and an upper part composed of local as well as allochthonous sediments. The two lower parts are regionally distributed whereas the upper part is syn-tectonic and confined to the Dead Sea basin and the Karkom graben in the central Negev. The composition of the far-field allochthonous sediments points to a provenance of Precambrian crystalline rocks of the Arabo-Nubian massif that were exposed along the uplifted shoulders of the Red Sea Rift as the upper drainage basin of the fluvial system. The diverse mammal remains found in this fluvial sequence suggest a complex of savanna, forests and fluvial habitats similar to those of present East Africa, with monsoon-type rains, which were the dominant water source of the rivers. The thickness of the Miocene sequence in the central Negev is at least 1700 m, similar to that of the subsurface sequence encountered in the Dead Sea basin. This similarity suggests that both were parts of an extensive subsiding sedimentary basin that developed between the Neo-Tethys and the uplifted margins of the Red Sea. The relations between the reconstructed pre-depositional landscape of southern Israel during the Early Miocene and the overlying fluvial sequence indicate that the entire area was buried under several hundred meters of

  6. The Jordanian Library Scene, 1973

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Library Review, 1974

    1974-01-01

    This discussion is made up of several individual papers by different authors: Introduction; Libraries in Jordan; The Royal Scientific Society and its Library; The Royal Scientific Society Course in Librarianship; Jordan Library Association Course in Librarianship; Secondary School Libraries in Jordan; and Notes on West Bank Libraries, 1972. (JB)

  7. The Effect of Contextual Material on Evolution in the Jordanian Secondary-School Curriculum on Students' Acceptance of the Theory of Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Baz, Theodora; El-Weher, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect the extent to which contextual material of a unit on "The origin and evolution of living organisms" included in the high-school biology curriculum in Jordan affected students' acceptance of the theory of evolution. The participants of this study consisted of 107 tenth-grade students randomly drawn from three…

  8. Potential of organic filter materials for treating greywater to achieve irrigation quality: a review.

    PubMed

    Dalahmeh, Sahar S; Hylander, Lars D; Vinnerås, Björn; Pell, Mikael; Oborn, Ingrid; Jönsson, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this literature review were to: (i) evaluate the impact of greywater generated in rural communities, with the emphasis on Jordanian conditions, on soil, plant and public health and assess the need for treatment of this greywater before it is used for irrigation, and (ii) assess the potential of different types of organic by-products as carrier material in different filter units for removal of pollutants from greywater. Greywater with high BOD5, COD, high concentrations of SS, fat, oil and grease and high levels of surfactants is commonly found in rural areas in Jordan. Oxygen depletion, odour emission, hydrophobic soil phenomena, plant toxicity, blockage of piping systems and microbiological health risks are common problems associated with greywater without previous treatment. Organic by-products such as wood chips, bark, peat, wheat straw and corncob may be used as carrier material in so-called mulch filters for treating wastewater and greywater from different sources. A down-flow-mode vertical filter is a common setup used in mulch filters. Wastewaters with a wide range of SS, cBOD5 and COD fed into different mulch filters have been studied. The different mulch materials achieved SS removal ranging between 51 and 91%, a BOD5 reduction range of 55-99.9%, and COD removal of 51-98%. Most types of mulches achieved a higher organic matter removal than that achieved by an ordinary septic tank. Bark, peat and wood chips filters removed organic matter better than sand and trickling filters, under similar conditions. Release of filter material and increase in COD in the effluent was reported using some mulch materials. In conclusion, some mulch materials such as bark, peat and woodchips seem to have a great potential for treatment of greywater in robust, low-tech systems. They can be expected to be resilient in dealing with variable low and high organic loads and shock loads.

  9. Organ Donation

    MedlinePlus

    Organ donation takes healthy organs and tissues from one person for transplantation into another. Experts say that the ... lungs Skin Bone and bone marrow Cornea Most organ and tissue donations occur after the donor has died. But some ...

  10. Organ Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donation Home / Before The Transplant / Organ Facts Organ Facts Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver ... Receiving "the call" About the Operation Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Organ Facts Here you can find valuable information about organs ...

  11. Matching Organs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donor Organs With Transplant Candidates When a deceased organ donor is identified, a transplant coordinator from an organ ... transplant candidate, you are registered on the national organ transplant waiting list. A living donor may also be identified and evaluated for living ...

  12. PIXE analysis of ancient Jordanian pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Naser; Carlsson, Lars-Eric; Hallak, Awni B.; Bennet, Crystal

    1981-03-01

    Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been applied for the determination of 18 elements (Si, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba and Pb) in two groups of pottery from two different sites in Jordan, Biblical Bozrah (BB) and Amman Citadel (AC). The analysis showed that the elements Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr and Ba were the most useful elements to study to be able to differentiate between the two groups of pottery.

  13. Heuristic Evaluation of Three Jordanian University Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasan, Layla

    2013-01-01

    Generally, universities have complex and large websites, which include a collection of many sub-sites related to the different parts of universities (e.g. registration unit, faculties, departments). Managers of academic institutions and educational websites need to know types of usability problems that could be found on their websites. This would…

  14. Dentistry for Jordanians with special needs.

    PubMed

    Waldman, H Barry; Perlman, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    There are thousands of residents with disabilities in Jordan. Despite national legislation to assure individuals with disabilities needed services, including education and employment, social inclusion of these individuals is difficult since societal views exclude them from functioning as members of a community. While there are no national studies of the dental needs of individuals with disabilities in Jordan, local reports indicates limited use of dental services and the need for increased oral hygiene and restorative services. Examples of dental education accreditation standards in other countries are used as models for the improvement in the preparation of dental students to provide services for individuals with special needs. PMID:24354987

  15. Agrammatism in Jordanian-Arabic Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albustanji, Yusuf Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Agrammatism is a frequent sequela of Broca's aphasia that manifests itself in omission and/or substitution of the grammatical morphemes in spontaneous and constrained speech. The hierarchical structure of syntactic trees has been proposed as an account for difficulty across grammatical morphemes (e.g., tense, agreement, and negation). Supporting…

  16. Prevalence of colour blindness in young Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Al-Aqtum, M T; Al-Qawasmeh, M H

    2001-01-01

    Colour blindness is one of the common genetic disorders observed in all human populations. It is a sex-linked recessive trait. The genes are located on the X chromosome within the Xq28 band. 1,418 university students (1,200 female and 218 male) from Zarka Private University and the Hashemite University were randomly selected and tested for congenital red/green colour blindness, by using Ishihara pseudo-isochromatic colour plates. A total of 23 individuals were found to be colour blind. In females, 4 students (0.33%) were colour blind: 1 of them showed protanomalia, 1 protanopia and 2 deuteranomalia. In males, 19 students (8.72%) were colour blind: 4 showed protanomalia, 3 protanopia, 8 deuteranomalia and 4 deuteranopia. The allelic frequencies of the colour vision gene were found to be 0.087 in males, 0.003 in females and 0.016 in the total population. Studies on colour blindness in Jordan are very few; this population-based investigation is meant to fill a gap in this field.

  17. Organ Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... recipients to reduce the risk of transplant rejection. Rejection happens when your immune system attacks the new organ. If you have a transplant, you must take drugs the rest of your life to help keep your body from rejecting the new organ.

  18. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  19. Organic spintronics.

    PubMed

    Bergenti, I; Dediu, V; Prezioso, M; Riminucci, A

    2011-08-13

    Organic semiconductors are emerging materials in the field of spintronics. Successful achievements include their use as a tunnel barrier in magnetoresistive tunnelling devices and as a medium for spin-polarized current in transport devices. In this paper, we give an overview of the basic concepts of spin transport in organic semiconductors and present the results obtained in the field, highlighting the open questions that have to be addressed in order to improve devices performance and reproducibility. The most challenging perspectives will be discussed and a possible evolution of organic spin devices featuring multi-functional operation is presented.

  20. Organic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mielke

    2009-02-27

    Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

  1. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Karl

    2016-08-01

    Organic photovoltaics are on the verge of revolutionizing building-integrated photovoltaics. For other applications, however, several basic open scientific questions need answering to, in particular, further improve energy-conversion efficiency and lifetime.

  2. Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankland, Kenneth

    For many years, powder X-ray diffraction was used primarily as a fingerprinting method for phase identification in the context of molecular organic materials. In the early 1990s, with only a few notable exceptions, structures of even moderate complexity were not solvable from PXRD data alone. Global optimisation methods and highly-modified direct methods have transformed this situation by specifically exploiting some well-known properties of molecular compounds. This chapter will consider some of these properties.

  3. IVS Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  4. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Krebs, Frederik C.; Chen, Hongzheng

    2013-12-01

    Energy inflation, the constant encouragement to economize on energy consumption and the huge investments in developing alternative energy resources might seem to suggest that there is a global shortage of energy. Far from it, the energy the Sun beams on the Earth each hour is equivalent to a year's supply, even at our increasingly ravenous rate of global energy consumption [1]. But it's not what you have got it's what you do with it. Hence the intense focus on photovoltaic research to find more efficient ways to harness energy from the Sun. Recently much of this research has centred on organic solar cells since they offer simple, low-cost, light-weight and large-area flexible photovoltaic structures. This issue with guest editors Frederik C Krebs and Hongzheng Chen focuses on some of the developments at the frontier of organic photovoltaic technology. Improving the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic systems, while maintaining the inherent material, economic and fabrication benefits, has absorbed a great deal of research attention in recent years. Here significant progress has been made with reports now of organic photovoltaic devices with efficiencies of around 10%. Yet operating effectively across the electromagnetic spectrum remains a challenge. 'The trend is towards engineering low bandgap polymers with a wide optical absorption range and efficient hole/electron transport materials, so that light harvesting in the red and infrared region is enhanced and as much light of the solar spectrum as possible can be converted into an electrical current', explains Mukundan Thelakkat and colleagues in Germany, the US and UK. In this special issue they report on how charge carrier mobility and morphology of the active blend layer in thin film organic solar cells correlate with device parameters [2]. The work contributes to a better understanding of the solar-cell characteristics of polymer:fullerene blends, which form the material basis for some of the most

  5. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Krebs, Frederik C.; Chen, Hongzheng

    2013-12-01

    Energy inflation, the constant encouragement to economize on energy consumption and the huge investments in developing alternative energy resources might seem to suggest that there is a global shortage of energy. Far from it, the energy the Sun beams on the Earth each hour is equivalent to a year's supply, even at our increasingly ravenous rate of global energy consumption [1]. But it's not what you have got it's what you do with it. Hence the intense focus on photovoltaic research to find more efficient ways to harness energy from the Sun. Recently much of this research has centred on organic solar cells since they offer simple, low-cost, light-weight and large-area flexible photovoltaic structures. This issue with guest editors Frederik C Krebs and Hongzheng Chen focuses on some of the developments at the frontier of organic photovoltaic technology. Improving the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic systems, while maintaining the inherent material, economic and fabrication benefits, has absorbed a great deal of research attention in recent years. Here significant progress has been made with reports now of organic photovoltaic devices with efficiencies of around 10%. Yet operating effectively across the electromagnetic spectrum remains a challenge. 'The trend is towards engineering low bandgap polymers with a wide optical absorption range and efficient hole/electron transport materials, so that light harvesting in the red and infrared region is enhanced and as much light of the solar spectrum as possible can be converted into an electrical current', explains Mukundan Thelakkat and colleagues in Germany, the US and UK. In this special issue they report on how charge carrier mobility and morphology of the active blend layer in thin film organic solar cells correlate with device parameters [2]. The work contributes to a better understanding of the solar-cell characteristics of polymer:fullerene blends, which form the material basis for some of the most

  6. The Organic Solid State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Dwaine O.; Wlygul, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews interesting and useful electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of the organic solid state. Offers speculation as to areas of fruitful research. Discusses organic superconductors, conducting organic polymers, organic metals, and traces recent history of creation of organic metals. (JM)

  7. Learning Organization. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium on the learning organization is comprised of three papers. "Leading the Learning Organization" (James R. Johnson) examines actions that four leaders of widely diverse organizations took to transform an organization into a learning organization. (Leaders who were successful in implementing the learning organization concept used it as…

  8. Ordered organic-organic multilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lunt, Richard R.

    2016-04-05

    An ordered multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure is formed by depositing at least two layers of thin film crystalline organic materials successively wherein the at least two thin film layers are selected to have their surface energies within .+-.50% of each other, and preferably within .+-.15% of each other, whereby every thin film layer within the multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure exhibit a quasi-epitaxial relationship with the adjacent crystalline organic thin film.

  9. Ordered organic-organic multilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Lunt, Richard R

    2015-01-13

    An ordered multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure is formed by depositing at least two layers of thin film crystalline organic materials successively wherein the at least two thin film layers are selected to have their surface energies within .+-.50% of each other, and preferably within .+-.15% of each other, whereby every thin film layer within the multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure exhibit a quasi-epitaxial relationship with the adjacent crystalline organic thin film.

  10. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prosthetics Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... What is Pelvic Organ Prolapse? Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) occurs when the tissue and muscles of the ...

  11. A Scarcity of Organs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Areen, Judith

    1988-01-01

    Resistance to organ donation and the continuing shortage of donated organs is discussed and four legal approaches to organ acquisition are examined. A fifth, based on the principle of supported individual autonomy, is proposed. (MSE)

  12. Yersinia enterocolitica organism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture shows the organism Yersinia enterocolitica . Yersinia organisms cause a wide range of disease but are most often associated with diarrhea or gastrointestinal symptoms. Yersinia infection ...

  13. Photographing Aquatic Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Sigurd

    1977-01-01

    Techniques for effective photography of aquatic organisms in the field and laboratory are described. Photography of microscopic organisms and construction techniques of photoaquaria are described. (CS)

  14. Learning Organization Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on learning organization issues. "How Action Learning Builds the Learning Organization: A Conceptual Analysis" (Michael Marquardt, Ty Alexander) is a systematic examination of four subsystems of learning organizations (learning dynamics, organization renewal, people empowerment, knowledge management)…

  15. Deceased Organ Donation.

    PubMed

    Israni, A K; Zaun, D; Bolch, C; Rosendale, J D; Snyder, J J; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    SRTR uses data collected by OPTN to calculate metrics such as donation/conversion rate, organ yield, and rate of organs recovered for transplant but not transplanted. In 2014, 9252 eligible deaths were reported by organ procurement organizations, a slight increase from 8944 in 2012, and the donation/conversation rate was 73.4 eligible donors per 100 eligible deaths, a slight increase from 71.3 in 2013. Some metrics show variation across organ procurement organizations, suggesting that sharing best practices could lead to gains in efficiency and organ retrieval.

  16. From Learning Organization to Practically Wise Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Jennifer; Gibbs, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although the notion of wisdom confronts the economic rationale of business organizations, this paper aims to argue that organizations are coming under increasing pressure not only to learn, change and adapt, but also to take actions that are ethically acceptable and respond to the expectations of multiple stakeholders, or in other words…

  17. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  18. Jordanian and British Primary Schoolchildren's Attitudes Towards the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ivan; Sa'di, Imad

    1997-01-01

    Explores the important but neglected field of primary schoolchildren's attitudes toward the environment, particularly toward issues of pollution, waste, and plants and animals, using a scale in Arabic and English. Shows that environmental-education programs produce only slightly positive results. Gives consideration to further research required to…

  19. Bioclimatic regions influence genetic structure of four Jordanian Stipa species.

    PubMed

    Hamasha, H R; Schmidt-Lebuhn, A N; Durka, W; Schleuning, M; Hensen, I

    2013-09-01

    Strong environmental gradients can affect the genetic structure of plant populations, but little is known as to whether closely related species respond similarly or idiosyncratically to ecogeographic variation. We analysed the extent to which gradients in temperature and rainfall shape the genetic structure of four Stipa species in four bioclimatic regions in Jordan. Genetic diversity, differentiation and structure of Stipa species were investigated using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) molecular markers. For each of the four study species, we sampled 120 individuals from ten populations situated in distinct bioclimatic regions and assessed the degree of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation within and among populations. The widespread ruderals Stipa capensis and S. parviflora had higher genetic diversity than the geographically restricted semi-desert species S. arabica and S. lagascae. In three of the four species, genetic diversity strongly decreased with precipitation, while genetic diversity increased with temperature in S. capensis. Most genetic diversity resided among populations in the semi-desert species (Φ(ST) = 0.572/0.595 in S. arabica/lagascae) but within populations in the ruderal species (Φ(ST) = 0.355/0.387 S. capensis/parviflora). Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE analysis showed that Stipa populations of all species clustered ecogeographically. A genome scan revealed that divergent selection at particular AFLP loci contributed to genetic differentiation. Irrespective of their different life histories, Stipa species responded similarly to the bioclimatic gradient in Jordan. We conclude that, in addition to predominant random processes, steep climatic gradients might shape the genetic structure of plant populations.

  20. Psychosocial correlates of Internet addiction among Jordanian university students.

    PubMed

    Alzayyat, Abdulkarim; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas; Ahmad, Muayyad M

    2015-04-01

    Internet addiction is a significant international mental health problem among university students. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the correlation of Internet addiction with university students' characteristics in Jordan using a descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design. The Internet Addiction Test, Beck Depression Inventory, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support were administered to a random sample of 587 undergraduate university students. The findings demonstrated that university year level, student age, depression, and family support were significant correlates of Internet addiction. The current study should raise awareness in nurses and other health care providers that Internet addiction is a potential mental health problem for this student population. The findings from the current study will help develop appropriate interventions for these students and inform future research.

  1. Jordanian School Counselor Involvement in School-Family-Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaith, Souad Mansour; Banat, Suhaila Mahmood; Hamad, Ghada Esmail; Albadareen, Ghaleb Salman

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the level of partnership between the school counselor, families and the local community in Jordan, as well as highlighting the factors that affect this partnership. A "School Counselor Involvement in School-Family-Community Partnerships Scale" was developed and administered to a sample of 152 school…

  2. Depressive symptoms among Jordanian youth: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Ismayilova, Leyla; Hmoud, Olimat; Alkhasawneh, Esra; Shaw, Stacey; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2013-02-01

    This study examines level of depression and factors associated with depression among female and male youth in Jordan. The study uses data from a cross-sectional survey conducted among a national sample of 14-25 year old youth attending educational institutions in Jordan (N = 8,129). On average, respondents reported frequently experiencing feelings of sadness (66 %), loss of joy (49 %) and loss of hope in living (43 %). Regression models demonstrated that higher levels of depressive symptoms were observed among females and among youth exposed to violence. Better parent-child relationships were associated with lower depression score. Among males depressive symptoms were associated with poor economic status, low assertiveness and a higher likelihood of alcohol use and smoking. There is a need for mental health prevention programs for youth in Jordan that enhance youth's social and emotional skills, strengthen parent-child relationships, and reduce violence in school, home and in the community.

  3. Jordanian Chemistry Teachers' Views on Teaching Practices and Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Amoush, Siham A.; Markic, Silvija; Eilks, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates experienced teachers' views of chemistry teaching and learning and educational reform in Jordan. The main focus is an investigation of applied teaching practices in chemistry education, including educators' perception of the intentions and effects of ongoing educational reforms. The study is based on semi-structured interviews…

  4. Learning Styles and Preferences of Jordanian EFL Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ababneh, Sana'

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comparative investigation into the learning styles of successful and unsuccessful language learners. Subjects of the study were seventeen graduate university students at Yarmouk University, Jordan. They were categorized as "successful" or "unsuccessful" learners, on the basis of their final…

  5. Multidimensional Perfectionism in a Sample of Jordanian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaradat, Abdul-Kareem M.

    2013-01-01

    Counsellors need to be able to understand perfectionism in students, and the different forms that this perfectionism may take, in order to provide their students with the appropriate counselling services. This study investigated gender differences in perfectionism, and examined the relationship of perfectionism to general self-efficacy,…

  6. Fear of failure among a sample of Jordanian undergraduate students

    PubMed Central

    Alkhazaleh, Ziad M; Mahasneh, Ahmad M

    2016-01-01

    Background Fear of failure (FoF) is the motivation to avoid failure in achievement tests, and involves cognitive, behavioral, and emotional experiences. Aims The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of FoF among students at The Hashemite University, Jordan. We were also interested in identifying the difference in the level of FoF between the sexes, the academic level, and grade-point average (GPA). Method A total of 548 students participated in the study by completing the Performance Failure Appraisal Inventory. Descriptive statistics (mean and SD), independent sample t-test, and one-way analysis of variance were used to analyze the data collected. Results The results indicated the overall mean FoF to be −0.34. There were also significant differences between male and female students’ level of fear in experiencing shame and embarrassment. Significant differences were found between the four academic level groups in the following fear categories: experiencing shame and embarrassment, important others losing interest, and fear of upsetting important others. The results also showed significant differences between the GPA level groups in the following fear categories: experiencing shame and embarrassment, diminishing of one’s self-esteem, having an uncertain future, fear of important others losing interest, and fear of upsetting important others. Conclusion FoF may be an important consideration when trying to understand student behavior in the university. Moreover, the level of FoF differs between sexes, academic levels, and GPA levels. PMID:27099537

  7. Jordanian Children in the Eye of the Storm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Amman (Jordan). Regional Office for the Middle East and North Africa.

    The Gulf Crisis that erupted in August, 1990 brought Jordan widespread economic devastation, increased poverty, the threat of hunger, health setbacks, and other hardships. Just as the country's economy was beginning to pull out of a lingering recession, Jordan was struck by the economic embargo against Iraq, the influx of over a million evacuees…

  8. Finiteness in Jordanian Arabic: A Semantic and Morphosyntactic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Aqarbeh, Rania

    2011-01-01

    Previous research on finiteness has been dominated by the studies in tensed languages, e.g. English. Consequently, finiteness has been identified with tense. The traditional definition influences the morphological, semantic, and syntactic characterization of finiteness which has also been equated with tense and its realization. The present study…

  9. Bioclimatic regions influence genetic structure of four Jordanian Stipa species.

    PubMed

    Hamasha, H R; Schmidt-Lebuhn, A N; Durka, W; Schleuning, M; Hensen, I

    2013-09-01

    Strong environmental gradients can affect the genetic structure of plant populations, but little is known as to whether closely related species respond similarly or idiosyncratically to ecogeographic variation. We analysed the extent to which gradients in temperature and rainfall shape the genetic structure of four Stipa species in four bioclimatic regions in Jordan. Genetic diversity, differentiation and structure of Stipa species were investigated using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) molecular markers. For each of the four study species, we sampled 120 individuals from ten populations situated in distinct bioclimatic regions and assessed the degree of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation within and among populations. The widespread ruderals Stipa capensis and S. parviflora had higher genetic diversity than the geographically restricted semi-desert species S. arabica and S. lagascae. In three of the four species, genetic diversity strongly decreased with precipitation, while genetic diversity increased with temperature in S. capensis. Most genetic diversity resided among populations in the semi-desert species (Φ(ST) = 0.572/0.595 in S. arabica/lagascae) but within populations in the ruderal species (Φ(ST) = 0.355/0.387 S. capensis/parviflora). Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE analysis showed that Stipa populations of all species clustered ecogeographically. A genome scan revealed that divergent selection at particular AFLP loci contributed to genetic differentiation. Irrespective of their different life histories, Stipa species responded similarly to the bioclimatic gradient in Jordan. We conclude that, in addition to predominant random processes, steep climatic gradients might shape the genetic structure of plant populations. PMID:23369254

  10. Decreasing the Inattentive Behavior of Jordanian Children: A Group Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaghlawan, Hasan Y.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Al-Khateeb, Jamal M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated the efficacy of using response cost paired with Differential Reinforcement of Incompatible Behavior (DRI) to manage the inattentive behavior of 30 students attending third and fourth grade in Jordan. A pretest-posttest control group design was employed to evaluate the efficacy of response cost and DRI. Results showed…

  11. Organic Pesticide Ingredients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control a pest Integrated Pest Management What are pesticides? Herbicides Disinfectants Fungicides Insecticides Natural and Biological Pesticides ... Other types of pesticides Disponible en español Organic Pesticide Ingredients Organic foods are not necessarily pesticide-free. ...

  12. Organ Donation: The Process

    MedlinePlus

    ... team arrives, the donor is taken to the operating room where organs and tissues are recovered in ... at the hospital and may be in the operating room awaiting the arrival of the lifesaving organ. ...

  13. Thoracic organs (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called the chest and contains the main organs of respiration and circulation. The heart through its ... the body and eliminate carbon dioxide. Together these organs sustain some of the most critical life functions ...

  14. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  15. Organ Donation and Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... my body to medical science? Can non-resident aliens donate and receive organs? Why should minorities be ... improving lives. Return to top Can non-resident aliens donate and receive organs? Non-resident aliens can ...

  16. Temporal Organization in Prose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhavy, Raymond W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    High school students read textual passages organized around a semantic, temporal, or random theme. Free recall, semantically, and temporally-cued tests measured recall. During free recall, the organized passages yielded greater recall. For the cued tests, more words were remembered when the passage organization matched the type of test cue.…

  17. Organic chemistry in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Organic cosmochemistry, organic materials in space exploration, and biochemistry of man in space are briefly surveyed. A model of Jupiter's atmosphere is considered, and the search for organic molecules in the solar system and in interstellar space is discussed. Materials and analytical techniques relevant to space exploration are indicated, and the blood and urine analyses performed on Skylab are described.

  18. Organ Harvesting and Transplants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskette, Kimberly G.; Ritz, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and animals need healthy organs to live. Due to medical conditions and accidents, some organs fail to function properly. For these reasons, the medical community has experimented and can now perform successful organ transplants, allowing patients to continue to live their lives. Many countries have medical programs where individuals can…

  19. Teaching Organic Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reemer, Rita, Ed.

    This teaching guide is designed as a text composed of factual outlines to help teachers interpret the organic method of gardening. Organized as a practical course for elementary through adult education levels, it presents examples and activities on how to plan, start, and maintain an organic garden. The first five chapters cover history and…

  20. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  1. Organic watermelon production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing perception by consumers that organic food tastes better and is healthier continues to expand the demand for organically produced crops. Research investigating certified organic production requires a systems approach to determine the optimum combination of individual components to max...

  2. Organizations as Social Inventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, T. Barr

    In discussing what is meant by the concept "organization," the author raises the questions, "What is an organization that it can have such a thing as a goal?" and, assuming it appropriate to speak of organizational goals, "how do the goals of individuals bear on those of the organization?" The author submits that answers to these questions raise…

  3. The Semantic Learning Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sicilia, Miguel-Angel; Lytras, Miltiadis D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is introducing the concept of a "semantic learning organization" (SLO) as an extension of the concept of "learning organization" in the technological domain. Design/methodology/approach: The paper takes existing definitions and conceptualizations of both learning organizations and Semantic Web technology to develop…

  4. Organic herbicide update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed research is the top research priority among organic producers. Very few chemical weed control options are approved for organic use (corn gluten meal, vinegar, clove oil, and most recently ammonium pelargonate ), but additional compounds are under investigation and pursuing organic approval. C...

  5. Challenges in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Beyar, Rafael

    2011-04-01

    Organ transplantation has progressed tremendously with improvements in surgical methods, organ preservation, and pharmaco-immunologic therapies and has become a critical pathway in the management of severe organ failure worldwide. The major sources of organs are deceased donors after brain death; however, a substantial number of organs come from live donations, and a significant number can also be obtained from non-heart-beating donors. Yet, despite progress in medical, pharmacologic, and surgical techniques, the shortage of organs is a worldwide problem that needs to be addressed internationally at the highest possible levels. This particular field involves medical ethics, religion, and society behavior and beliefs. Some of the critical ethical issues that require aggressive interference are organ trafficking, payments for organs, and the delicate balance in live donations between the benefit to the recipient and the possible harm to the donor and others. A major issue in organ transplantation is the definition of death and particularly brain death. Another major critical factor is the internal tendency of a specific society to donate organs. In the review below, we will discuss the various challenges that face organ donation worldwide, and particularly in Israel, and some proposed mechanisms to overcome this difficulty. PMID:23908807

  6. Organs as inheritable property?

    PubMed

    Voo, Teck Chuan; Holm, Soren

    2014-01-01

    It has been argued that organs should be treated as individual tradable property like other material possessions and assets, on the basis that this would promote individual freedom and increase efficiency in addressing the shortage of organs for transplantation. If organs are to be treated as property, should they be inheritable? This paper seeks to contribute to the idea of organs as inheritable property by providing a defence of a default of the family of a dead person as inheritors of transplantable organs. In the course of discussion, various succession rules for organs and their justifications will be suggested. We then consider two objections to organs as inheritable property. Our intention here is to provoke further thought on whether ownership of one's body parts should be assimilated to property ownership.

  7. Organic contaminant separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, Peter; Hemberger, Barbara J.

    1991-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a polyolefin tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.01 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the tube, (b) passing a solvent through the tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the tube. Further, a chromatographic apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a polyolefin tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.01 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the tube is disclosed.

  8. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Peumans, Peter; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2013-01-22

    A photoactive device is provided. The device includes a first electrode, a second electrode, and a photoactive region disposed between and electrically connected to the first and second electrodes. The photoactive region further includes an organic donor layer and an organic acceptor layer that form a donor-acceptor heterojunction. The mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region are different by a factor of at least 100, and more preferably a factor of at least 1000. At least one of the mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region is greater than 0.001 cm.sup.2/V-sec, and more preferably greater than 1 cm.sup.2/V-sec. The heterojunction may be of various types, including a planar heterojunction, a bulk heterojunction, a mixed heterojunction, and a hybrid planar-mixed heterojunction.

  9. The Knowing Organization as Learning Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choo, Chun Wei

    2001-01-01

    In organizational knowledge cycles there is continuous flow of information between sensemaking, knowledge creation, and decision making. The outcome of information use in one provides the context and resources for use in another. The example of the World Health Organization's smallpox eradication program illustrates a continuous cycle of…

  10. Organics on Mars?

    PubMed

    ten Kate, Inge L

    2010-01-01

    Organics are expected to exist on Mars based on meteorite infall, in situ production, and any possible biological sources. Yet they have not been detected on the martian surface; are they there, or are we not capable enough to detect them? The Viking gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer did not detect organics in the headspace of heated soil samples with a detection limit of parts per billion. This null result strongly influenced the interpretation of the reactivity seen in the Viking biology experiments and led to the conclusion that life was not present and, instead, that there was some chemical reactivity in the soil. The detection of perchlorates in the martian soil by instruments on the Phoenix lander and the reports of methane in the martian atmosphere suggest that it may be time to reconsider the question of organics. The high-temperature oxidizing properties of perchlorate will promote combustion of organics in pyrolytic experiments and may have affected the ability of both Phoenix's organic analysis experiment and the Viking mass spectrometer experiments to detect organics. So the question of organics on Mars remains open. A primary focus of the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory will be the detection and identification of organic molecules by means of thermal volatilization, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry--as was done on Viking. However, to enhance organic detectability, some of the samples will be processed with liquid derivatization agents that will dissolve organics from the soil before pyrolysis, which may separate them from the soil perchlorates. Nonetheless, the problem of organics on Mars is not solved, and for future missions other organic detection techniques should therefore be considered as well.

  11. Organics on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Kate, Inge L.

    2010-08-01

    Organics are expected to exist on Mars based on meteorite infall, in situ production, and any possible biological sources. Yet they have not been detected on the martian surface; are they there, or are we not capable enough to detect them? The Viking gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer did not detect organics in the headspace of heated soil samples with a detection limit of parts per billion. This null result strongly influenced the interpretation of the reactivity seen in the Viking biology experiments and led to the conclusion that life was not present and, instead, that there was some chemical reactivity in the soil. The detection of perchlorates in the martian soil by instruments on the Phoenix lander and the reports of methane in the martian atmosphere suggest that it may be time to reconsider the question of organics. The high-temperature oxidizing properties of perchlorate will promote combustion of organics in pyrolytic experiments and may have affected the ability of both Phoenix's organic analysis experiment and the Viking mass spectrometer experiments to detect organics. So the question of organics on Mars remains open. A primary focus of the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory will be the detection and identification of organic molecules by means of thermal volatilization, followed by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry - as was done on Viking. However, to enhance organic detectability, some of the samples will be processed with liquid derivatization agents that will dissolve organics from the soil before pyrolysis, which may separate them from the soil perchlorates. Nonetheless, the problem of organics on Mars is not solved, and for future missions other organic detection techniques should therefore be considered as well.

  12. Reconstituted Thymus Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zimu; Liu, Haifeng; Rui, Jinxiu; Liu, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Reconstituted thymus organ culture is based on fetal thymus organ culture (FTOC). Purified thymocyte populations, from genetically modified mice or even from other species, are cultured in vitro with thymic lobes depleted of their endogenous thymocytes (by 2'-deoxyguanosine treatment) to form a new thymus. This potent and timesaving method is distinct from FTOC, which assesses development of unmodified thymic lobes, and reaggregate thymic organ culture, in which epithelial cells are separately purified before being aggregated with thymocytes.

  13. Organic substances in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeson, Phillip E.

    1981-01-01

    This is the third of several compilations of briefing papers on water quality by the U.S. Geological Survey. Each briefing paper is prepared in a simple, nontechnical, easy-to-understand manner. This U.S. Geological Survey Circular contains papers on selected organic substances in water. Briefing papers are included on ' Why study organic substances in water. ', ' Taste and odor in water ', and ' Classification and fractionation of organic solutes in natural waters'. (USGS)

  14. Organics on Mars?

    PubMed

    ten Kate, Inge L

    2010-01-01

    Organics are expected to exist on Mars based on meteorite infall, in situ production, and any possible biological sources. Yet they have not been detected on the martian surface; are they there, or are we not capable enough to detect them? The Viking gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer did not detect organics in the headspace of heated soil samples with a detection limit of parts per billion. This null result strongly influenced the interpretation of the reactivity seen in the Viking biology experiments and led to the conclusion that life was not present and, instead, that there was some chemical reactivity in the soil. The detection of perchlorates in the martian soil by instruments on the Phoenix lander and the reports of methane in the martian atmosphere suggest that it may be time to reconsider the question of organics. The high-temperature oxidizing properties of perchlorate will promote combustion of organics in pyrolytic experiments and may have affected the ability of both Phoenix's organic analysis experiment and the Viking mass spectrometer experiments to detect organics. So the question of organics on Mars remains open. A primary focus of the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory will be the detection and identification of organic molecules by means of thermal volatilization, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry--as was done on Viking. However, to enhance organic detectability, some of the samples will be processed with liquid derivatization agents that will dissolve organics from the soil before pyrolysis, which may separate them from the soil perchlorates. Nonetheless, the problem of organics on Mars is not solved, and for future missions other organic detection techniques should therefore be considered as well. PMID:20735250

  15. Titan's organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager discovered nine simple organic molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. Complex organic solids, called tholins, produced by irradiation of the simulated Titanian atmosphere, are consistent with measured properties of Titan from ultraviolet to microwave frequencies and are the likely main constituents of the observed red aerosols. The tholins contain many of the organic building blocks central to life on earth. At least 100-m, and possibly kms thicknesses of complex organics have been produced on Titan during the age of the solar system, and may exist today as submarine deposits beneath an extensive ocean of simple hydrocarbons.

  16. The organization of thanatology.

    PubMed

    Doka, Kenneth J; Heflin-Wells, E Neil; Martin, Terry L; Redmond, Lula M; Schachter, Sherry R

    2011-01-01

    This article explores, using Wilensky's Model of Professionalization, the emergence of professional organizations within the thanatology. The authors review the history of four organizations--The Foundation of Thanatology, Ars Moriendi, The Forum for Death Education and Counseling (now the Association for Death Education and Counseling: A Thanatology Organization [ADEC]), and The International Work Group on Death, Dying, and Bereavement (IWG). The authors speculate on some of the reasons that the first two failed while IWG and ADEC remain viable-while noting challenges that these remaining thanatological organizations will experience as they seek to continue to stay relevant.

  17. ORGANIC CATATONIA: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Niraj

    2000-01-01

    Catatonia is a clinical syndrome associated with a wide variety of psychiatric, medical and neurological disorders. Despite several reports in the literature of a wide range of medical and neurological diseases causing catatonia, there has been a tendency to consider catatonia as purely psychiatric disorder. The review attempts to look at the concept of organic catatonia from a historical viewpoint, including its place in the psychiatric classification, discusses the various etiological causes of organic catatonia, and them goes through some important management issues in organic catatonia. The review suggests that organic catatonic disorder must be first considered in every patient with catatonic signs, particularly in a patient with new onset catatonia. PMID:21407969

  18. Get Organized around Assets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferlazzo, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Educators, Ferlazzo claims, often perceive English language learners through a lens of deficits. We would serve these learners better, especially as readers, if we viewed them through a lens focused on assets. The author, who was a community organizer for 19 years before becoming an ESL teacher, relates the process of community organizing--helping…

  19. Are Learning Organizations Pragmatic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleri, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the future prospects of the popular concept known as the learning organization; to trace the influence of philosophical pragmatism on the learning organization and to consider its potential impact on the future; and to emphasize how pragmatic theories have shaped the development of Deming's total…

  20. Sustainable Learning Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velazquez, Luis E.; Esquer, Javier; Munguia, Nora E.; Moure-Eraso, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to debate how companies may better become a sustainable learning organization by offering the most used and insightful concepts of sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: Through literature review, learning organization and sustainability perspectives are explored and compared. Findings: Learning…

  1. Organization Development. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains four papers on organization development and human resources. "Identification of Key Predictors of Rapid Change Adaptation in a Service Organization" (Constantine Kontoghiorghes, Carol Hansen) reports on the results of an exploratory study, which suggests that rapid change adaptation will be more likely to occur in an…

  2. Computer-Assisted Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, David James

    2009-01-01

    Organizing refers to methods of distributing physical and symbolic tasks among multiple agents in order to achieve goals. My dissertation investigates the dynamics of organizing in hybrid information processing systems that incorporate both humans and computers. To explain the behavior of these hybrid systems, I develop and partially test a theory…

  3. Organization Theory as Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Thomas B.

    The theory that organizations are ideological inventions of the human mind is discussed. Organizational science is described as an ideology which is based upon social concepts and experiences. The main justification for organizational theory is that it attempts to answer why we behave as we do in social organizations. Ways in which ideas and…

  4. MICROWAVES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of microwaves, a non-ionizing radiation, on organic reactions is described both in polar solvents and under solvent-free conditions. The special applications are highlighted in the context of solventless organic synthesis which involve microwave (MW) exposure of neat r...

  5. Person-Organization Pairing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scirotino, P. T.; Madden, Denis

    1973-01-01

    Malfunctioning organizations do not facilitate the accomplishment of the purposes of their members in a number of ways and for a number of reasons. This paper used Maslow's hierarchy of needs model in an attempt to describe one view of that malfunction. Leadership is examined briefly as a functioning organization's facilitating arrangement.…

  6. The Effective Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesselbein, Frances

    1992-01-01

    The former Girl Scouts CEO discusses her hierarchy-flattening circular management concept. Traditionally, organizations have been bureaucracies dominated by a command-and-control orientation. As Drucker advises, nonprofit organizations, like corporations, must reexamine their mission's workability, consider who is the customer, and underscore what…

  7. Organ Facts: Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / Before The Transplant / Organ Facts / Pancreas Organ Facts Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver ... Receiving "the call" About the Operation Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Pancreas Facts The pancreas is a five to six inch ...

  8. Organizing a Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Harold S.

    The organization and development of instructional materials centers (IMC's) as a part of a program of educational improvement is discussed. Analysis is made of the advantages, disadvantages, and organization of centralized IMC's, decentralized IMC's, and coordinated IMC's, with recommendations being made for their development. The operation of…

  9. THE QUASI NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PIFER, ALAN

    ORGANIZED TO MEET URGENT NATIONAL NEEDS, PROVIDE INDEPENDENT JUDGMENT, AND OFFER FRESH SOLUTIONS TO COMPLEX PROBLEMS, THE QUASI NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION IS DEFINED AS A NONPROFIT ASSOCIATION OR INSTITUTION LODGED IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR OF SOCIETY BUT FINANCED LARGELY OR ENTIRELY BY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, RESPONSIBLE TO ITS OWN BOARD OF…

  10. World Studies: Selected Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Studies Development Center, Bloomington, IN.

    Descriptive information is given for 80 organizations. The organizations are concerned with world studies ranging from global population concerns to specific cultural societies. They represent global issues concerning education and teaching, international education, population and food, war and peace, religion, economics, and ocean education.…

  11. Innovation Adoption by Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Paul F.

    1974-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of understanding adaptation or learning by organizations, describes the state of our knowledge as of the late 1960's, and reports both the failure of current models of adaptative change by organizations and some promising findings about a new model. (Author)

  12. Developing Culturally Competent Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focal Point, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This special issue examines multicultural aspects of services provided by agencies concerned with children's mental health. The lead article is titled "Developing Culturally Competent Organizations" by James L. Mason. This article uses the cultural competence model to discuss an organization's self-evaluation and its planning in the areas of…

  13. Organic chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    The course of organic chemical evolution preceding the emergence of life on earth is discussed based on evidence of processes occurring in interstellar space, the solar system and the primitive earth. Following a brief review of the equilibrium condensation model for the origin and evolution of the solar system, consideration is given to the nature and organic chemistry of interstellar clouds, comets, Jupiter, meteorites, Venus and Mars, and the prebiotic earth. Major issues to be resolved in the study of organic chemical evolution on earth are identified regarding condensation and accretion in the solar nebula, early geological evolution, the origin and evolution of the atmosphere, organic production rates, organic-inorganic interactions, environmental fluctuations, phase separation and molecular selectivity.

  14. Organic dust in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Recent space infrared telescopes, Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, and AKARI have made significant progress in our understanding of organic dust in the Universe. In this review, we discuss recent observations with these space telescopes of the unidentified infrared emission (UIE) features in the near to mid-infrared, which come from very small organic dust, and the absorption features from 3 to 7 µm, which characterize large organic dust. They provide us with a new view of organic dust in galaxies. We also briefly discuss latest AKARI observations of H2O and CO2 ices in 2.5-5 µm in the Large Magellanic Cloud in comparison with observations in our Galaxy, which suggests the importance of dust surface chemistry in the formation of organic matters in the Universe.

  15. Agreements in Virtual Organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankowska, Malgorzata

    This chapter is an attempt to explain the important impact that contract theory delivers with respect to the concept of virtual organization. The author believes that not enough research has been conducted in order to transfer theoretical foundations for networking to the phenomena of virtual organizations and open autonomic computing environment to ensure the controllability and management of them. The main research problem of this chapter is to explain the significance of agreements for virtual organizations governance. The first part of this chapter comprises explanations of differences among virtual machines and virtual organizations for further descriptions of the significance of the first ones to the development of the second. Next, the virtual organization development tendencies are presented and problems of IT governance in highly distributed organizational environment are discussed. The last part of this chapter covers analysis of contracts and agreements management for governance in open computing environments.

  16. Liver sharing and organ procurement organization performance.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Sommer E; Chow, Eric K H; Massie, Allan; Luo, Xun; Zaun, David; Snyder, Jon J; Israni, Ajay K; Kasiske, Bert; Segev, Dorry L

    2015-03-01

    Whether the liver allocation system shifts organs from better performing organ procurement organizations (OPOs) to poorer performing OPOs has been debated for many years. Models of OPO performance from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients make it possible to study this question in a data-driven manner. We investigated whether each OPO's net liver import was correlated with 2 performance metrics [observed to expected (O:E) liver yield and liver donor conversion ratio] as well as 2 alternative explanations [eligible deaths and incident listings above a Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score of 15]. We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that the allocation system transfers livers from better performing OPOs to centers with poorer performing OPOs. Also, having fewer eligible deaths was not associated with a net import. However, having more incident listings was strongly correlated with the net import, both before and after Share 35. Most importantly, the magnitude of the variation in OPO performance was much lower than the variation in demand: although the poorest performing OPOs differed from the best ones by less than 2-fold in the O:E liver yield, incident listings above a MELD score of 15 varied nearly 14-fold. Although it is imperative that all OPOs achieve the best possible results, the flow of livers is not explained by OPO performance metrics, and instead, it appears to be strongly related to differences in demand.

  17. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (<30%) consists of a rich organic inventory of soluble organic compounds, including key compounds important in terrestrial biochemistry [2-4]. Different carbonaceous meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10

  18. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  19. Organic Compounds in Stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Clemett. Simon J.; Sandford, Scott A.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Hoerz, Fredrich

    2011-01-01

    The successful return of the STARDUST spacecraft provides a unique opportunity to investigate the nature and distribution of organic matter in cometary dust particles collected from Comet 81P/Wild-2. Analysis of individual cometary impact tracks in silica aerogel using the technique of two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) demonstrates the presence of complex aromatic organic matter. While concerns remain as to the organic purity of the aerogel collection medium and the thermal effects associated with hypervelocity capture, the majority of the observed organic species appear indigenous to the impacting particles and are hence of cometary origin. While the aromatic fraction of the total organic matter present is believed to be small, it is notable in that it appears to be N-rich. Spectral analysis in combination with instrumental detection sensitivities suggest that N is incorporated predominantly in the form of aromatic nitriles (R-C N). While organic species in the STARDUST samples do share some similarities with those present in the matrices of carbonaceous chondrites, the closest match is found with stratospherically collected interplanetary dust particles. These findings are consistent with the notion that a fraction of interplanetary dust is of cometary origin. The presence of complex organic N-containing species in comets has astrobiological implications since comets are likely to have contributed to the prebiotic chemical inventory of both the Earth and Mars.

  20. Cryopreservation of Living Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasawa, Ichiro; Nagata, Shinichi; Kimura, Naohiro

    Cryopreservation is considered to be the most promising way of preserving living organs or tissues for a long period of time without casuing any damage to their biological functions. However, cryopreservation has been succeeded only for simple and small-size tissues such as spermatozoon, ovum, erythrocyte, bone marrow and cornea. Cryopreservation of more complex and large-scale organs are not yet succssful. The authors have attempted to establish a technique for cryopreservation of larger living organs. An experiment was carried out using daphnia (water flea). The optimum rates of freezing and thawing were determined together with the optimum selection of cryoprotectant. High recovery rate was achieved under these conditions.

  1. Organic nonlinear optical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umegaki, S.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, it became clear that organic compounds with delocalized pi electrons show a great nonlinear optical response. Especially, secondary nonlinear optical constants of more than 2 digits were often seen in the molecular level compared to the existing inorganic crystals such as LiNbO3. The crystallization was continuously tried. Organic nonlinear optical crystals have a new future as materials for use in the applied physics such as photomodulation, optical frequency transformation, opto-bistabilization, and phase conjugation optics. Organic nonlinear optical materials, e.g., urea, O2NC6H4NH2, I, II, are reviewed with 50 references.

  2. Neurology and international organizations.

    PubMed

    Mateen, Farrah J

    2013-07-23

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private-public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and colleges. The continued engagement of neurologists is essential for the growing number of international organizations that can and should incorporate neurologic disease into their global agendas.

  3. Hydrothermal organic synthesis experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Ways in which heat is useful in organic synthesis experiments are described, and experiments on the hydrothermal destruction and synthesis of organic compounds are discussed. It is pointed out that, if heat can overcome kinetic barriers to the formation of metastable states from reduced or oxidized starting materials, abiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions is a distinct possibility. However, carefully controlled experiments which replicate the descriptive variables of natural hydrothermal systems have not yet been conducted with the aim of testing the hypothesis of hydrothermal organic systems.

  4. soil organic matter fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osat, Maryam; Heidari, Ahmad

    2010-05-01

    Carbon is essential for plant growth, due to its effects on other soil properties like aggregation. Knowledge of dynamics of organic matter in different locations in the soil matrix can provide valuable information which affects carbon sequestration and soil the other soil properties. Extraction of soil organic matter (SOM) fractions has been a long standing approach to elucidating the roles of soil organic matter in soil processes. Several kind fractionation methods are used and all provide information on soil organic matter function. Physical fractionation capture the effects on SOM dynamics of the spatial arrangement of primary and secondary organomineral particles in soil while chemical fractionation can not consider the spatial arrangement but their organic fractions are suitable for advanced chemical characterization. Three method of physical separation of soil have been used, sieving, sedimentation and densitometry. The distribution of organic matter within physical fractions of the soil can be assessed by sieving. Sieving separates soil particles based strictly on size. The study area is located on north central Iran, between 35° 41'- 36° 01' N and 50° 42'- 51° 14' E. Mean annual precipitation about 243.8 mm and mean annual air temperature is about 14.95 °C. The soil moisture and temperature regime vary between aridic-thermic in lower altitudes to xeric-mesic in upper altitudes. More than 36 surface soil samples (0-20 cm) were collected according to land-use map units. After preliminary analyzing of samples 10 samples were selected for further analyses in five size fractions and three different time intervals in September, January and April 2008. Fractionation carried out by dry sieving in five classes, 1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm, 270 μm-0.5mm, 53-270 μm and <53 μm. Organic matter and C/N ratio were determined for all fractions at different time intervals. Chemical fractionation of organic matter also carried out according to Tan (2003), also Mineralogical

  5. Trace Organic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ember, Lois R.

    1978-01-01

    Trace organic analysis (TOA) is seen as a more useful way to quantify environmental pollutants. Current practices and future trends are discussed in detail. Seven steps in TOA are identified: collection, storage, extraction, concentration, isolation, identification, and quantification. (MA)

  6. The Main Idea Organizer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Presents the Main Idea Organizer (MIO) to help students who may struggle with writing, reading, and thinking--though in different ways and for different reasons. Describes many different ways the author uses the MIO. (SG)

  7. Organic Chemistry in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical observations, theoretical modeling, laboratory simulation and analysis of extraterrestrial material have enhanced our knowledge of the inventory of organic matter in the interstellar medium (ISM) and on small bodies such as comets and asteroids (Ehrenfreund & Charnley 2000). Comets, asteroids and their fragments, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), contributed significant amounts of extraterrestrial organic matter to the young Earth. This material degraded and reacted in a terrestrial prebiotic chemistry to form organic structures that may have served as building blocks for life on the early Earth. In this talk I will summarize our current understanding of the organic composition and chemistry of interstellar clouds. Molecules of astrobiological relevance include the building blocks of our genetic material: nucleic acids, composed of subunits such as N-heterocycles (purines and pyrimidines), sugars and amino acids. Signatures indicative of inheritance of pristine and modified interstellar material in comets and meteorites will also be discussed.

  8. Micro-Organ Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steven R.; Leslie, Julia; Chang, Robert C.; Starly, Binil; Sun, Wei; Culbertson, Christopher; Holtorf, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Micro-organ devices (MODs) are being developed to satisfy an emerging need for small, lightweight, reproducible, biological-experimentati on apparatuses that are amenable to automated operation and that imp ose minimal demands for resources (principally, power and fluids). I n simplest terms, a MOD is a microfluidic device containing a variety of microstructures and assemblies of cells, all designed to mimic a complex in vivo microenvironment by replicating one or more in vivo micro-organ structures, the architectures and composition of the extr acellular matrices in the organs of interest, and the in vivo fluid flows. In addition to microscopic flow channels, a MOD contains one or more micro-organ wells containing cells residing in microscopic e xtracellular matrices and/or scaffolds, the shapes and compositions o f which enable replication of the corresponding in vivo cell assembl ies and flows.

  9. Campylobacter jejuni organism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Campylobacter jejuni infection causes cramping, diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever within 2 to 5 days after a person has been exposed to the organism. Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common bacterial causes ...

  10. Perioperative Organ Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Karsten; Karhausen, Jörn; Clambey, Eric T.; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the fact that a surgical procedure may have been performed for the appropriate indication and in a technically perfect manner, patients are threatened by perioperative organ injury. For example, stroke, myocardial infarction, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute kidney injury, or acute gut injury are among the most common causes for morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. In the present review, we discuss the pathogenesis of perioperative organ injury, and provide select examples for novel treatment concepts that have emerged over the past decade. Indeed, we believe that research to provide mechanistic insight into acute organ injury and to identify novel therapeutic approaches for the prevention or treatment of perioperative organ injury represents the most important opportunity to improve outcomes of anesthesia and surgery. PMID:24126264

  11. Small Scale Organic Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, V.; Crist, DeLanson R.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using small scale experimentation in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Describes small scale filtration techniques as an example of a semi-micro method applied to small quantities of material. (MLH)

  12. Biomaterials in Artificial Organs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kambic, Helen E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Biomaterials are substances or combinations of substances that can be used in a system that treats, augments, or replaces any tissue, organ, or body function. The nature and role of these substances, particularly in the cadiovascular system, are discussed. (JN)

  13. Spatial Organization of Epigenomes

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Jonathan Christopher; Wang, Xue Qing David; Dostie, Josée

    2016-01-01

    The role of genome architecture in transcription regulation has become the focus of an increasing number of studies over the past decade. Chromatin organization can have a significant impact on gene expression by promoting or restricting the physical proximity between regulatory DNA elements. Given that any change in chromatin state has the potential to alter DNA folding and the proximity between control elements, the spatial organization of chromatin is inherently linked to its molecular composition. In this review, we explore how modulators of chromatin state and organization might keep gene expression in check. We discuss recent findings and present some of the less well-studied aspects of spatial genome organization such as chromatin dynamics and regulation by non-coding RNAs. PMID:26986719

  14. The NASA Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This Handbook, effective 13 September 1994, documents the NASA organization, defines terms, and sets forth the policy and requirements for establishing, modifying, and documenting the NASA organizational structure and for assigning organizational responsibilities.

  15. Virtual Organizations: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nami, Mohammad Reza

    The need to remain competitive in the open market forces companies to concentrate on their core competencies while searching for alliances when additional skills or resources are needed to fulfill business opportunities. The changing business situation of companies and customer needs have motivated researchers to introduce Virtual Organization (VO) idea. A Virtual Organization is always a form of partnership and managing partners and handling partnerships are crucial. Virtual organizations are defined as a temporary collection of enterprises that cooperate and share resources, knowledge, and competencies to better respond to business opportunities. This paper presents base concepts of virtual organizations including properties, management concepts, operational concepts, and main issues in collaboration such as security and authentication.

  16. Soil Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, G.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review is presented of some of the organic compounds and reactions that occur in soil. Included are nitrogenous compounds, compounds of phosphorus and sulfur, carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, and aliphatic acids. (BB)

  17. Organic semiconductors: Healing contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risko, Chad; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-01

    Traps in organic semiconducting crystals are healed when a perfluoropolyether oil is deposited on the surface of these materials, thus making possible the detection of intrinsic features of charge-carrier transport in rubrene and tetracene.

  18. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  19. Interstellar organic chemistry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1972-01-01

    Most of the interstellar organic molecules have been found in the large radio source Sagittarius B2 toward the galactic center, and in such regions as W51 and the IR source in the Orion nebula. Questions of the reliability of molecular identifications are discussed together with aspects of organic synthesis in condensing clouds, degradational origin, synthesis on grains, UV natural selection, interstellar biology, and contributions to planetary biology.

  20. Marketing of human organs?

    PubMed

    Bernat, E

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the highly controversial question whether human organs should be allowed to be the object of a contract aimed at profit. The author comes to the conclusion that--seen from a consequentialist viewpoint--the legislature is not well-advised to allow organ donations for consideration. However, it is admitted that a more deontological approach could come to quite the opposite conclusion.

  1. Committees and supporting organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edvard Chubaryan, Professor; Aram Saharian, Professor; Armen Sedrakian, Professor

    2014-03-01

    International advisory boardOrganizing committee M Alford (St Louis)R Avagyan E R Bezerra de Mello (Paraiba)E Chubaryan G S Bisnovaty-Kogan (Moscow)A Saharian F Burgio (Catania)A Sedrakian K Kokkotas (Tbingen)A Yeranyan D Lai (Cornell)G Colucci (secretary) B Link (Montana) J Margueron (Orsay) C Pethick (Copenhagen) M Oertel (Meudon) L Rezzolla (Potsdam) D Rischke (Frankfurt Main) M Sargsian (Miami) F Weber (San Diego) D N Yakovlev (St Petersburg) Supporting organizations

  2. Deposition of organic facies

    SciTech Connect

    Huc, A.Y.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to present recent advances in organic sedimentology. The papers discuss a wide range of aspects of this field of research. The diverse nature of these papers includes modern environments, considered as present-day analogs of source rock formation; numerical modeling of paleoproductivity; and studies related to specific time periods during which organic matter accumulation has been particularly impressive (the Kimmeridgian, Cenomanian-Turonian, and others).

  3. Paying organ donors.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J

    1990-09-01

    Following an earlier paper in the journal in which Evans argued that it was commercial exploitation, not mere payment, that was morally objectionable about certain sorts of organ donation, this paper looks at the moral issues when commercial exploitation is eliminated from systems of paid organ donation. It argues that there are no conclusive moral arguments against such schemes for non-exploitative paid kidney donation.

  4. Inverted organic photosensitive device

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Tong, Xiaoran; Lee, Jun Yeob; Cho, Yong Joo

    2015-09-08

    There is disclosed a method for preparing the surface of a metal substrate. The present disclosure also relates to an organic photovoltaic device including a metal substrate made by such method. Also disclosed herein is an inverted photosensitive device including a stainless steel foil reflective electrode, an organic donor-acceptor heterojunction over the reflective electrode, and a transparent electrode over the donor-acceptor heterojunction.

  5. Phytodegradation of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lee A; Reynolds, Charles M

    2004-06-01

    The phytodegradation of organic compounds can take place inside the plant or within the rhizosphere of the plant. Many different compounds and classes of compounds can be removed from the environment by this method, including solvents in groundwater, petroleum and aromatic compounds in soils, and volatile compounds in the air. Although still a relatively new area of research, there are many laboratories studying the underlying science necessary for a wide range of applications for plant-based remediation of organic contaminants.

  6. Is old organic matter simple organic matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunan, Naoise; Lerch, Thomas; Pouteau, Valérie; Mora, Philippe; Changey, Fréderique; Kätterer, Thomas; Herrmann, Anke

    2016-04-01

    Bare fallow soils that have been deprived of fresh carbon inputs for prolonged periods contain mostly old, stable organic carbon. In order to shed light on the nature of this carbon, the functional diversity profiles (MicroResp™, Biolog™ and enzyme activity spectra) of the microbial communities of long-term barefallow soils were analysed and compared with those of the microbial communities from their cultivated counterparts. The study was based on the idea that microbial communities adapt to their environment and that therefore the catabolic and enzymatic profiles would reflect the type of substrates available to the microbial communities. The catabolic profiles suggested that the microbial communities in the long-term bare-fallow soil were exposed to a less diverse range of substrates and that these substrates tended to be of simpler molecular forms. Both the catabolic and enzyme activity profiles suggested that the microbial communities from the long-term bare-fallow soils were less adapted to using polymers. These results do not fit with the traditional view of old, stable carbon being composed of complex, recalcitrant polymers. An energetics analysis of the substrate use of the microbial communities for the different soils suggested that the microbial communities from the long-term bare-fallow soils were better adapted to using readily oxidizable,although energetically less rewarding, substrates. Microbial communities appear to adapt to the deprivation of fresh organic matter by using substrates that require little investment.

  7. Building a learning organization.

    PubMed

    Garvin, D A

    1993-01-01

    Continuous improvement programs are proliferating as corporations seek to better themselves and gain an edge. Unfortunately, however, failed programs far outnumber successes, and improvement rates remain low. That's because most companies have failed to grasp a basic truth. Before people and companies can improve, they first must learn. And to do this, they need to look beyond rhetoric and high philosophy and focus on the fundamentals. Three critical issues must be addressed before a company can truly become a learning organization, writes HBS Professor David Garvin. First is the question of meaning: a well-grounded, easy-to-apply definition of a learning organization. Second comes management: clearer operational guidelines for practice. Finally, better tools for measurement can assess an organization's rate and level of learning. Using these "three Ms" as a framework, Garvin defines learning organizations as skilled at five main activities: systematic problem solving, experimentation with new approaches, learning from past experience, learning from the best practices of others, and transferring knowledge quickly and efficiently throughout the organization. And since you can't manage something if you can't measure it, a complete learning audit is a must. That includes measuring cognitive and behavioral changes as well as tangible improvements in results. No learning organization is built overnight. Success comes from carefully cultivated attitudes, commitments, and management processes that accrue slowly and steadily. The first step is to foster an environment conducive to learning. Analog Devices, Chaparral Steel, Xerox, GE, and other companies provide enlightened examples.

  8. Organic contaminant separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, P.

    1993-12-28

    A process is presented of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube. The solvent is capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus is presented for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium. The apparatus includes a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester. The composite tube has an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and has sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube. 2 figures.

  9. Organic contaminant separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube is disclosed.

  10. Organic contaminant separator

    DOEpatents

    Mar, Peter D.

    1994-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube including a polymeric base material selected from the group of polyolefins and polyfluorocarbons and particles of a carbon allotrope material adfixed to the inner wall of the polymeric base material, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a composite tube including a polymeric base material selected from the group of polyolefins and polyfluorocarbons and particles of a carbon allotrope material adfixed to the inner wall of the polymeric base material, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube is disclosed.

  11. Organic containment separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, Peter

    1995-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube including a polymeric base material selected from the group of polyolefins and polyfluorocarbons and particles of a carbon allotrope material adfixed to the inner wall of the polymeric base material, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a composite tube including a polymeric base material selected from the group of polyolefins and polyfluorocarbons and particles of a carbon allotrope material adfixed to the inner wall of the polymeric base material, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube is disclosed.

  12. Organic contaminant separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, Peter

    1995-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube is disclosed.

  13. Physics of Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brütting, Wolfgang

    2004-05-01

    Organic semiconductors are of steadily growing interest as active components in electronics and optoelectronics. Due to their flexibility, low cost and ease-of-production they represent a valid alternative to conventional inorganic semiconductor technology in a number of applications, such as flat panel displays and illumination, plastic integrated circuits or solar energy conversion. Although first commercial applications of this technology are being realized nowadays, there is still the need for a deeper scientific understanding in order to achieve optimum device performance.This special issue of physica status solidi (a) tries to give an overview of our present-day knowledge of the physics behind organic semiconductor devices. Contributions from 17 international research groups cover various aspects of this field ranging from the growth of organic layers and crystals, their electronic properties at interfaces, their photophysics and electrical transport properties to the application of these materials in different devices like organic field-effect transistors, photovoltaic cells and organic light-emitting diodes.Putting together such a special issue one soon realizes that it is simply impossible to fully cover the whole area of organic semiconductors. Nevertheless, we hope that the reader will find the collection of topics in this issue useful for getting an up-to-date review of a field which is still developing very dynamically.

  14. Micro-Organ Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  15. Micro-organ device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); von Gustedt-Gonda, legal representative, Iris (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  16. Hydrothermal organic synthesis experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    The serious scientific debate about spontaneous generation which raged for centuries reached a climax in the nineteenth century with the work of Spallanzani, Schwann, Tyndall, and Pasteur. These investigators demonstrated that spontaneous generation from dead organic matter does not occur. Although no aspects of these experiments addressed the issue of whether organic compounds could be synthesized abiotically, the impact of the experiments was great enough to cause many investigators to assume that life and its organic compounds were somehow fundamentally different than inorganic compounds. Meanwhile, other nineteenth-century investigators were showing that organic compounds could indeed be synthesized from inorganic compounds. In 1828 Friedrich Wohler synthesized urea in an attempt to form ammonium cyanate by heating a solution containing ammonia and cyanic acid. This experiment is generally recognized to be the first to bridge the artificial gap between organic and inorganic chemistry, but it also showed the usefulness of heat in organic synthesis. Not only does an increase in temperature enhance the rate of urea synthesis, but Walker and Hambly showed that equilibrium between urea and ammonium cyanate was attainable and reversible at 100 C. Wohler's synthesis of urea, and subsequent syntheses of organic compounds from inorganic compounds over the next several decades dealt serious blows to the 'vital force' concept which held that: (1) organic compounds owe their formation to the action of a special force in living organisms; and (2) forces which determine the behavior of inorganic compounds play no part in living systems. Nevertheless, such progress was overshadowed by Pasteur's refutation of spontaneous generation which nearly extinguished experimental investigations into the origins of life for several decades. Vitalism was dealt a deadly blow in the 1950's with Miller's famous spark-discharge experiments which were undertaken in the framework of the Oparin

  17. Organ procurement organization (OPO), best practices.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, R R; Heinrichs, D R; Seem, D L; Rosendale, J D; Johnson, K S

    2001-01-01

    There are currently 59 organ procurement organizations (OPOs) in the United States which serve their assigned geographic areas with variable productivity. Knowledge of organizational characteristics, programs and practices of more successful OPOs may be useful to increase the productivity of less successful OPOs. A preliminary survey of all OPO executive directors in the United States ascertained the most important beneficial and detrimental factors affecting their success. Site visits were then conducted at OPOs based on a selection process utilizing population size, geographic location, minority population, donors per million population and donors per thousand deaths among potential donors. All OPOs were categorized and the highest ranking OPOs in each of seven categories, based on 4 years of national data, were selected for the site visits. Regression analysis and correlation analysis using Pearson's product-moment correlation were performed. The survey to identify the important factors was returned by 47 (77%) of 61 OPOs existent in 1999. The most important beneficial factors identified by responding OPOs were adequate staffing and experience, allocation of responsibilities, hospital development and leadership. The most important detrimental factors were inadequate staffing and experience, poor donor hospital/transplant center/ OPO relationships and failure in the consent process. Site visits of the highest-ranking OPOs demonstrated all had respected, experienced leadership focused on the donation process; efficient mechanisms for resolving allocation or transplant center conflicts; systems for monitoring activity and tracking outcomes; excellent communication between OPO and transplant centers; open internal communication at all levels of the OPO; immediate, on-site response to vascular donor referrals; and volunteer support of public and/or professional education. Regression and correlation analysis demonstrated that as minority population increases, OPO

  18. Managing mechanistic and organic structure in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Olden, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Managers at all levels in a health care organization must organize work to achieve the organization's mission and goals. This requires managers to decide the organization structure, which involves dividing the work among jobs and departments and then coordinating them all toward the common purpose. Organization structure, which is reflected in an organization chart, may range on a continuum from very mechanistic to very organic. Managers must decide how mechanistic versus how organic to make the entire organization and each of its departments. To do this, managers should carefully consider 5 factors for the organization and for each individual department: external environment, goals, work production, size, and culture. Some factors may push toward more mechanistic structure, whereas others may push in the opposite direction toward more organic structure. Practical advice can help managers at all levels design appropriate structure for their departments and organization.

  19. [Women's organizations in India].

    PubMed

    Patel, V

    1985-01-01

    Community development projects in India during the 1950s and 60s viewed women as beneficiaries, but in fact few women benefitted measurably. The realization among field motivators of the necessity of improving the status of women prompted formation of women's organizations based on the participation of women in development. Non-government organizations and militant organizations have had greater success than government sponsored organizations in creation of employment for women. Some employment-generating organizations directed by high caste women or by men merely continue the oppression of poor women, providing abysmal pay for long hours, but a women's cooperative serving textile workers in Bombay has been successful because of the large number of unaccompanied males migrating to the city who desire reasonably priced home-cooked food. Other organizations have attempted to mobilize women to allow them to benefit from development. Struggles of women in the electronics, pharmaceutical, textile, mining, clothing, and other small scale industries have been supported by women's organizatinns. Rural women's organizations have forced village authorities to provide drinkig water and have demanded creation of employment for unemployed rural workers. The "Self-Employed Women's Association" supports negotiations of such women in their respective professions, and others struggling for women's rights have also undertaken development projects in health, education, and employment with a view to increasing women's independence. Some organizations provide child care services and others assist women in obtaining credit. Numerous cooperatives for food and housework have been formed but their ultimate effect on the distribution of power between castes and classes remains uncertain. Government sponsored cooperatives and women's organizations have benefitted mainly the intermediaries and have tended to use women as a source of cheap labor. A strategic plan for the emancipation of women

  20. Organ transplantation in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Paris, Wayne; Nour, Bakr

    2010-09-01

    Concern has increasingly been expressed about the growing number of reports of medical personnel participating in the transplantation of human organs or tissues taken from the bodies of executed prisoners, handicapped patients, or poor persons who have agreed to part with their organs for commercial purposes. Such behavior has been universally considered as ethically and morally reprehensible, yet in some parts of the world the practice continues to flourish. The concept of justice demands that every person have an equal right to life, and to protect this right, society has an obligation to ensure that every person has equal access to medical care. Regrettably, the Egyptian system does not legally recognize brain death and continues to allow the buying and selling of organs. For more than 30 years in Egypt, the ability to pay has determined who receives an organ and economic need has determined who will be the donor. As transplant professionals, it is important that we advocate on behalf of all patients, potential recipients, and donors and for those who are left out and not likely to receive a donor organ in an economically based system. Current issues associated with this debate are reviewed and recommendations about how to address them in Egypt are discussed. PMID:20929113

  1. Organ Transplants in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Baigenzhin, Abay; Doskaliyev, Zhaksylyk; Tuganbekova, Saltanat; Zharikov, Serik; Altynova, Sholpan; Gaipov, Abduzhappar

    2015-11-01

    The Republic of Kazakhstan is one of the fastest developing countries in the world and has a health care system that is unique in Central Asia. Its organ transplant services are also developing rapidly. We aimed to analyze and briefly report on the current status of organ transplant in the Republic of Kazakhstan. We analyzed organ transplant activities in that country for the period 2012 to 2014. All data were collected from the official database of the National Transplant Coordinating Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. At the end of 2014, the number of transplant centers had increased to 10, three of which could perform multiorgan transplants; during the same period, the number of deceased-donor organ-donating hospitals increased up to 37. By 2013, the transplant activity rate for all centers had reached 9.22 per million population. During the previous 3 years (2012-2014), there was a 3-fold increase in the number of living donors and an 18-fold increase in the number of kidney transplants. Between 2012 and 2014, the number of living-donor liver transplants increased from 17 to 25, and the number of deceased-donor transplants increased from 3 to 7. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), the number of heart transplants increased to 7 cases. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), Kazakhstan achieved a significant improvement in the organization of its transplant services, and a noticeable upward trend in the system continues.

  2. Microtubule dynamics and organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogterom, Marileen

    2000-03-01

    Microtubules are rigid biopolymers found in all higher order cells. They are a mayor part of the cytoskeleton, the network of protein polymers that gives the cell its shape and rigidity and allows for various forms of (intra)cellular motility. The intracellular spatial organization of the microtubule network is constantly changing as the microtubules adapt to their different functions. In part, this spatial organization depends on the assembly dynamics (including microtubule nucleation) and forces generated by the microtubules themselves. To understand these mechanisms, we study the physical aspects connected with the assembly, force generation and spatial organization of microtubules in simplified model systems, in the absence of other cellular components. We measure the forces generated by individual microtubules by making them grow against a microfabricated barrier. These experiments show that a single microtubule can generate at least several picoNewton of force, comparable to what is known for motor proteins. Theoretical modeling of force-generation by multi-protofilament polymers is used to predict force-velocity relations that can be compared to experimental data. We study the self-organization of microtubules by confining them to microfabricated chambers that mimic the geometry of living cells. The distribution of microtubule nucleation sites in these chambers is controlled to study its effect on the organization of the microtubule network. We find that so-called microtubule asters position themselves in response to forces generated by dynamic microtubules. Experiments aimed at measuring the forces acting on these asters using optical trapping techniques will be described.

  3. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-06-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  4. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1979-01-01

    Features taken from various models of Titan's atmosphere are combined in a working composite model that provides environmental constraints within which different pathways for organic chemical synthesis are determined. Experimental results and theoretical modeling suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite is dominated by two processes: photochemistry and energetic particle bombardment. Photochemical reactions of CH4 in the upper atmosphere can account for the presence of C2 hydrocarbons. Reactions initiated at various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic rays, Saturn 'wind', and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4-N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the UV-visible absorbing stratospheric haze, the reddish appearance of the satellite, and some of the C2 hydrocarbons. In the lower atmosphere photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. It is concluded that the surface of Titan may contain ancient or recent organic matter (or both) produced in the atmosphere.

  5. Organic Chemistry of Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the molecular structures and C,N,H-isotopic compositions of organic matter in meteorites reveal a complex history beginning in the parent interstellar cloud which spawned the solar system. Incorporation of interstellar dust and gas in the protosolar nebula followed by further thermal and aqueous processing on primordial parent bodies of carbonaceous, meteorites have produced an inventory of diverse organic compounds including classes now utilized in biochemistry. This inventory represents one possible set of reactants for chemical models for the origin of living systems on the early Earth. Evidence bearing on the history of meteoritic organic matter from astronomical observations and laboratory investigations will be reviewed and future research directions discussed.

  6. The geothermal power organization

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, K.L.

    1997-12-31

    The Geothermal Power Organization is an industry-led advisory group organized to advance the state-of-the-art in geothermal energy conversion technologies. Its goal is to generate electricity from geothermal fluids in the most cost-effective, safe, and environmentally benign manner possible. The group achieves this goal by determining the Member`s interest in potential solutions to technological problems, advising the research and development community of the needs of the geothermal energy conversion industry, and communicating research and development results among its Members. With the creation and adoption of a new charter, the Geothermal Power Organization will now assist the industry in pursuing cost-shared research and development projects with the DOE`s Office of Geothermal Technologies.

  7. Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Hujsak, Karl A.; Ferris, Daniel P.; Prokofjevs, Aleksandrs; Majerz, Irena; Szklarz, Przemysław; Zhang, Huacheng; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Jakubas, Ryszard; Hong, Seungbum; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2016-10-01

    Flexible organic materials possessing useful electrical properties, such as ferroelectricity, are of crucial importance in the engineering of electronic devices. Up until now, however, only ferroelectric polymers have intrinsically met this flexibility requirement, leaving small-molecule organic ferroelectrics with room for improvement. Since both flexibility and ferroelectricity are rare properties on their own, combining them in one crystalline organic material is challenging. Herein, we report that trisubstituted haloimidazoles not only display ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity--the properties that originate from their non-centrosymmetric crystal lattice--but also lend their crystalline mechanical properties to fine-tuning in a controllable manner by disrupting the weak halogen bonds between the molecules. This element of control makes it possible to deliver another unique and highly desirable property, namely crystal flexibility. Moreover, the electrical properties are maintained in the flexible crystals.

  8. Groundwater and organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, H.E.

    1995-12-01

    Groundwater is a major source of drinking water for many communities. Unfortunately, organic chemicals such as dry cleaning fluids, solvent, fuels, and pesticides have contaminated groundwater in many areas, rendering the groundwater useless as a drinking water resource. In many cases, the groundwater cannot be cleaned up with current technologies, particularly if the groundwater has been contaminated with immiscible (low solubility) organic liquids. In this talk, I will describe the path I have followed from geologist to geochemist and finally to environmental engineer. As a geologist, I studied the chemistry of rock metamorphosis. As a geochemist, I explored for gold and other metals. Now as an environmental engineer, I investigate the behavior of organic liquids in the subsurface. While these fields all appear very different, in reality I have always focused on the interaction of rocks or sediments with the fluids with which they come in contact.

  9. Treatment of organic waste

    DOEpatents

    Grantham, LeRoy F.

    1979-01-01

    An organic waste containing at least one element selected from the group consisting of strontium, cesium, iodine and ruthenium is treated to achieve a substantial reduction in the volume of the waste and provide for fixation of the selected element in an inert salt. The method of treatment comprises introducing the organic waste and a source of oxygen into a molten salt bath maintained at an elevated temperature to produce solid and gaseous reaction products. The gaseous reaction products comprise carbon dioxide and water vapor, and the solid reaction products comprise the inorganic ash constituents of the organic waste and the selected element which is retained in the molten salt. The molten salt bath comprises one or more alkali metal carbonates, and may optionally include from 1 to about 25 wt.% of an alkali metal sulfate.

  10. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kong, Fung-Ming; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  11. Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Hujsak, Karl A.; Ferris, Daniel P.; Prokofjevs, Aleksandrs; Majerz, Irena; Szklarz, Przemysław; Zhang, Huacheng; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Jakubas, Ryszard; Hong, Seungbum; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2016-01-01

    Flexible organic materials possessing useful electrical properties, such as ferroelectricity, are of crucial importance in the engineering of electronic devices. Up until now, however, only ferroelectric polymers have intrinsically met this flexibility requirement, leaving small-molecule organic ferroelectrics with room for improvement. Since both flexibility and ferroelectricity are rare properties on their own, combining them in one crystalline organic material is challenging. Herein, we report that trisubstituted haloimidazoles not only display ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity—the properties that originate from their non-centrosymmetric crystal lattice—but also lend their crystalline mechanical properties to fine-tuning in a controllable manner by disrupting the weak halogen bonds between the molecules. This element of control makes it possible to deliver another unique and highly desirable property, namely crystal flexibility. Moreover, the electrical properties are maintained in the flexible crystals. PMID:27734829

  12. Organizing the thymus gland.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Juan José; García-Ceca, Javier; Alfaro, David; Stimamiglio, Marco Augusto; Cejalvo, Teresa; Jiménez, Eva; Zapata, Agustín G

    2009-02-01

    Eph receptors and their ligands, ephrins, are molecules involved in the morphogenesis of numerous tissues, including the central nervous system in which they play a key role in determining cell positioning and tissue domains containing or excluding nerve fibers. Because common features have been suggested to occur in the microenvironmental organization of brain and thymus, a highly compartmentalized organ central for T cell differentiation, we examined the expression and possible role of Eph/ephrins in the biology of the thymus gland. We reviewed numerous in vivo and in vitro results that confirm a role for Eph and ephrins in the maturation of the thymic epithelial cell (TEC) network and T cell differentiation. Their possible involvement in different steps of early thymus organogenesis, including thymus primordium branching, lymphoid colonization, and thymocyte-TEC interactions, that determine the organization of a mature three-dimensional thymic epithelial network is also analyzed.

  13. Bioethics of Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    As the ability to transplant organs and tissues has grown, the demand for these procedures has increased as well—to the point at which it far exceeds the available supply creating the core ethical challenge for transplantation—rationing. The gap between supply and demand, although large, is worse than it appears to be. There are two key steps to gaining access to a transplant. First, one must gain access to a transplant center. Then, those waiting need to be selected for a transplant. Many potential recipients do not get admitted to a program. They are deemed too old, not of the right nationality, not appropriate for transplant as a result of severe mental impairment, criminal history, drug abuse, or simply because they do not have access to a competent primary care physician who can refer them to a transplant program. There are also financial obstacles to access to transplant waiting lists in the United States and other nations. In many poor nations, those needing transplants simply die because there is no capacity or a very limited capacity to perform transplants. Although the demand for organs now exceeds the supply, resulting in rationing, the size of waiting lists would quickly expand were there to suddenly be an equally large expansion in the number of organs available for transplantation. Still, even with the reality of unavoidable rationing, saving more lives by increasing organ supply is a moral good. Current public policies for obtaining organs from cadavers are not adequate in that they do not produce the number of organs that public polls of persons in the United States indicate people are willing to donate. PMID:24478386

  14. Organic Pillared Clays.

    PubMed

    Meier, L. P.; Nueesch, R.; Madsen, F. T.

    2001-06-01

    Commonly used organophilic clays are modified by alkylammonium cations which hold apart the aluminosilicate layers permanently. The cations fill the interlayer space and are contemplated as flexible pillars, resulting from the mobility of the alkyl chains. Therefore, the interlayer distance varies depending on the layer charge and on the alkyl chain length. Contrary to these cations, rigid pillaring cations guarantee a constant interlayer distance without occupying the interlayer by themselves and show special adsorption properties such as hydrophilic behavior contrary to the generally hydrophobic ones. Smectites were modified by flexible organic cations, e.g., dimethyldioctadecylammonium, and by rigid ones, e.g., tetraphenylphosphonium. Their adsorption properties are compared. Our investigations showed improved adsorption properties for rigid organic cations on smectites using 2-chlorophenol as pollutant. Best adsorption results are achieved using pillaring cations in combination with low charged smectites, especially at low pollutant concentrations. The properties of organic modified smectites are discussed by a pollution intercalation model. The intercalation process of an organic pollutant into an organic modified smectite is expressed by a two-step Born-Haber cycle process: (i) the formation of an adsorbing position by layer expansion and (ii) the occupation of the adsorbing position by the pollutant. The first step of the formation of the adsorbing position is an endothermal transition state which lowers the total intercalation energy and therefore worsens the adsorption behavior. Thus, an already expanded organophilic smectite will show improved adsorption behavior. The formed adsorbing position state on organic modified smectites is comparable to the pillared state of inorganic pillared clays. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11350131

  15. Dental Support Organizations.

    PubMed

    Dufurrena, Quinn

    2015-01-01

    The Association of Dental Support Organizations is a recently formed association of 33 companies representing a range of management and support services for dental practices. These organizations do not engage in the practice of dentistry, although in some cases they operate as holding companies for practices that do, thus separating the legal responsibility of providing treatment from the management and flow of funds. This report summarizes some of the recent trends in oral health care and dentists' practice patterns that are prompting the increased prevalence of this model. The general functioning of the DSO model is described, including some common variations, and the core values of ADSO are featured. PMID:26455048

  16. [Organ allocation. Ethical issues].

    PubMed

    Cattorini, P

    2010-01-01

    The criteria for allocating organs are one of the most debated ethical issue in the transplantation programs. The article examines some rules and principles followed by "Nord Italia Transplant program", summarized in its Principles' Charter and explained in a recent interdisciplinary book. General theories of justice and their application to individual clinical cases are commented and evaluated, in order to foster a public, democratic, transparent debate among professionals and citizens, scientific associations and customers' organizations. Some specific moral dilemmas are focused regarding the concepts of proportionate treatment, unselfish donation by living persons, promotion of local institutions efficiency. PMID:20677677

  17. Sludge organics bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Eiceman, G.E.; Bellin, C.A.; Ryan, J.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Concern over the bioavailability of toxic organics that can occur in municipal sludges threatens routine land application of sludge. Available data, however, show that concentrations of priority organics in normal sludges are low. Sludges applied at agronomic rates yield chemical concentrations in soil-sludge mixtures 50 to 100 fold lower. Plant uptake at these pollutant concentrations (and at much higher concentrations) is minimal. Chemicals are either (1) accumulated at extremely low levels (PCBs), (2) possibly accumulated, but then rapidly metabolized within plants to extremely low levels (DEHP), or (3) likely degraded so rapidly in soil that only minor contamination occurs (PCP and 2,4-DNP).

  18. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1984-11-21

    A device for detection of neutrons comprises: as an active neutron sensing element, a conductive organic polymer having an electrical conductivity and a cross-section for said neutrons whereby a detectable change in said conductivity is caused by impingement of said neutrons on the conductive organic polymer which is responsive to a property of said polymer which is altered by impingement of said neutrons on the polymer; and means for associating a change in said alterable property with the presence of neutrons at the location of said device.

  19. Collagen in organ development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know whether microgravity will adversely affect developmental processes. Collagens are macromolecular structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which may be altered by perturbations in gravity. Interstitial collagens have been shown to be necessary for normal growth and morphogenesis in some embryonic organs, and in the mouse salivary gland, the biosynthetic pattern of these molecules changes during development. Determination of the effects of microgravity on epithelial organ development must be preceded by crucial ground-based studies. These will define control of normal synthesis, secretion, and deposition of ECM macromolecules and the relationship of these processes to morphogenesis.

  20. Organic neurotoxins in seafoods.

    PubMed

    Watters, M R

    1995-05-01

    Toxins formed by organic micro-organisms may accumulate within certain tissues of predacious sea animals, which may serve as a source of seafood poisoning for the higher food chain. Such toxins are distinct from inorganic chemicals or infectious agents which may have contaminated the seafoods. Distinct clinical syndromes have emerged, and the individual toxins have been identified. Clinical manifestations of each begin with a gastrointestinal prodrome and headache, followed by sensorimotor deficits. Bulbar and cognitive changes are associated with the more lethal tetrodotoxin, saxitoxin, and domoic acid toxin. Tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin block sodium channels, while ciguatoxin opens them. Domoic acid stimulates excitatory amino acids at the NMDA receptors.

  1. Water purification using organic salts

    DOEpatents

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  2. Organizing Schools for Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryk, Anthony S.

    2010-01-01

    How schools are organized and interact with the local community can dramatically alter the odds for improving student achievement. There are five essential supports for school improvement: a coherent instructional guidance system, the professional capacity of its faculty, strong parent-community-school ties, a student-centered learning climate,…

  3. [Relationship-Based Organizations].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The six articles in this newsletter theme issue focus on three successful infant/family organizations serving families with young children either at risk for a disability or having a disability: Southwest Human Development (Phoenix, Arizona); The Ounce of Prevention Fund (Chicago, Illinois); and New Horizons Center for Children and Families of…

  4. Change Processes in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    The first of the four papers in this symposium, "The Role of the Survey in the Assessment of an Organization for High Performance Redesign: A Case Study" (Teresa K. Moyers, Oris T. Griffin), looks at how one company used a survey to analyze the way the social system currently is designed and operates. "Thriving on Change: An Organizational…

  5. Building a Healthy Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencioni, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    For the last 15 years, the author's firm has been helping organizations become healthier and maximize their human potential by using the model outlined in his latest book, "The Advantage," which is the culmination of his previous books and models. Schools and school districts have embraced the model and enjoyed the competitive advantage…

  6. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of nonequilibrium phenomena on the Saturn satellite Titan indicate the occurrence of organic chemical evolution. Greenhouse and thermal inversion models of Titan's atmosphere provide environmental constraints within which various pathways for organic chemical synthesis are assessed. Experimental results and theoretical modeling studies suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite may be dominated by two atmospheric processes: energetic-particle bombardment and photochemistry. Reactions initiated in various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic ray, Saturn wind, and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4 - N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the C2-hydrocarbons, the UV-visible-absorbing stratospheric haze, and the reddish color of the satellite. Photochemical reactions of CH4 can also account for the presence of C2-hydrocarbons. In the lower Titan atmosphere, photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. Hot H-atom reactions initiated by photo-dissociation of NH3 can couple the chemical reactions of NH3 and CH4 and produce organic matter.

  7. Organizing for Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    The classroom should be organized for optimal pupil achievement. Learners should be free to view and read diverse forms and kinds of printed work in a relaxed atmosphere. An area in the classroom should be designated for large group instruction where pupils may work together as a unit. Another area in the classroom should be used to stress…

  8. Organic Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silversmith, Ernest F.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a listing of 35 demonstrations designed to generate interest in organic chemistry and help put points across. Topics include opening lecture; molecular structure and properties; halogenation; nucleophilic substitution, alkenes and dienes, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, alcohols and phenols, aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, amines,…

  9. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  10. Photochemistry in Organized Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendler, Janos H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes common artificially produced organized media such as colloids, surfactants, and polymers and their usefulness in studying complex biochemical processes. Discusses selected recent photophysical and photochemical exploitations of these systems, including artificial photosynthesis, in situ generation of colloidal gold and platinum,…

  11. Programmed Organic Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusler, Karl

    1975-01-01

    Describes recent attempts to program computers to map synthetic routes to organic compounds. The computer is provided with structural information for many molecules and reaction descriptions; when a target compound is specified, the computer lists possible precursors, thus indicating possible synthetic routes. (MLH)

  12. Organizing for Space Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Daniel A.

    1989-01-01

    Given the increasing costs for planning, building, and maintaining higher educational facilities, organizing for space management is critical. Ten current, national trends related to space management in higher education are discussed. Each trend is related to a situation at the University of Virginia. (Author/MLW)

  13. Industrial Organic Electrosynthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagenknecht, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Four examples of industrial electrochemical synthesis of organic compounds are described. These include acrylonitrile dimerization, tetramethyl lead, electrochemical fluorination, and production of diacetone-2-keto-L-gulonic acid. Additional examples are also cited, including the production of several compounds by the BASF company of Germany. (JN)

  14. Directory of Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NICHY News Digest, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This directory lists over 80 national organizations that provide information, services, and/or referrals to individuals in the disability field, including parents, special educators and general educators, early interventionists, administrators, related services personnel, persons with disabilities, and others. Addresses, telephone and fax numbers,…

  15. Training Student Organizers Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamm, Michael; Hurtado, Denise

    The purpose of this curriculum is to help teachers and field supervisors at the college, high school, and advanced junior high school level train students to organize environmental improvement projects. It can also be used by graduate/undergraduate students who are supervising secondary school students. The curriculum may be started at any point…

  16. On National Laboratory Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, James O.; And Others

    This paper discusses the problems and issues involved in the organizational structure of the National Laboratory on Early Childhood Education. The National Laboratory, which consisted of a coordination center and six university based research and development centers, was organized for the purpose of planning, sponsoring and conducting research and…

  17. Consent for organ donation.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A; Logan, L

    2012-01-01

    Improving the consent rate for solid organ donation from deceased donors is a key component of strategies in the UK and other countries to increase the availability of organs for transplantation. In the UK, the law is currently clear on what forms consent may take, with the views of the individual expressed previously in life taking priority. Such views may have been expressed prospectively, via membership of the Organ Donor Register or by talking to family members. The factors determining such actions include both positive altruistic motives and negative psychological responses. Studies have examined why some families of potential donors refuse consent, while others have demonstrated a key set of 'modifiable' factors relating to the family approach. These include ensuring the right timing of a request in an appropriate setting, providing emotional support, and imparting specific information, particularly concerning the nature of brain death. If these are optimized and the right personnel with adequate training are involved in a planned process, then consent rates may be improved as reported in other countries with organized donation systems.

  18. Building a Learning Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Nancy; Dichter, Alan

    2001-01-01

    Faculties must pass through several stages when becoming learning organizations: the honeymoon, conflict, confusion, messy, scary, and mature-group stages. Mature school communities have learned to view power differently, make learning more meaningful for students, and model a just and democratic society. Consensus is the starting point. (MLH)

  19. Opposing Creationism: Scientists Organize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saladin, Kenneth S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the response of the scientific community to creationist activism. A symposium entitled "Science and Belief" was held at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science to debate creationism. A network was organized to facilitate communication and political efficiency among anticreationist citizen lobbies.…

  20. Learning in Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palos, Ramona; Veres Stancovici, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims at identifying the presence of the dimensions of learning capabilities and the characteristics of a learning organization within two companies in the field of services, as well as identifying the relationships between their learning capability and the organizational culture. Design/methodology/approach: This has been a…

  1. An Organic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adshead, Mary Lois Timbes

    2001-01-01

    A former student reminisces about attending the Organic School in Fairhope, Alabama, in the 1950s. Founded in 1903, the school pioneered child-centered education; had multigraded classes; incorporated dance, pottery, weaving, and art into the curriculum; and was guided generally by the philosophy that education is not preparation for life, but…

  2. Student Veterans Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerlot, John; Green, Sean-Michael; Parker, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Students who have experienced conflict as members of the military come to college expecting to be supported, if not honored for their service. One way that campus administrators can facilitate transitions for student veterans is to assist in founding and maintaining campus-based student organizations for veterans. Military service is a bonding…

  3. Organic Elemental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, T. S.; Gutterson, Milton

    1980-01-01

    Reviews general developments in computerization and data processing of organic elemental analyses; carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen analyzers; procedures for determining oxygen, sulfur, and halogens, as well as other nometallic elements and organometallics. Selected papers on trace analysis of nonmetals and determination of metallic elements are…

  4. Organic Elemental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, T. S.; Wang, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a literature review on methods used to analyze organic elements. Topic areas include methods for: (1) analyzing carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen; (2) analyzing oxygen, sulfur, and halogens; (3) analyzing other elements; (4) simultaneously determining several elements; and (5) determing trace elements. (JN)

  5. ORGANIC SPECIATION SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling artifacts for molecular markers from organic speciation of particulate matter were investigated by analyzing forty-one samples collected in Philadelphia as a part of the Northeast Oxidant and Particulate Study (NEOPS). Samples were collected using a high volume sampler ...

  6. Motivation in Work Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Edward E., III

    Written with the student audience in mind, this book is about the motivational determinants of behavior in work organizations. For practicing managers, helpful information may be found in the chapters dealing with day-to-day motivational problems. Three chapters deal specifically with motivational theory, and five chapters emphasize research and…

  7. Halley's polymeric organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, W. F.; Boice, D. C.; Korth, A.

    1989-01-01

    The detection of polymeric organic compounds in the mass spectrum of Comet Halley obtained with the Positive Ion Cluster Composition analyzer on Giotto are examined. It is found that, in addition to polyoxymethylene, other polymers and complex molecules may exist in the comet. It is suggested that polymerized hydrogen cyanide may be a source for the observed CN and NH2 jets.

  8. Mathematical Graphic Organizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zollman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    As part of a math-science partnership, a university mathematics educator and ten elementary school teachers developed a novel approach to mathematical problem solving derived from research on reading and writing pedagogy. Specifically, research indicates that students who use graphic organizers to arrange their ideas improve their comprehension…

  9. Learning in Youth Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirshner, Ben

    2014-01-01

    This response identifies several strengths of the article, "Pushing the Boundaries: What Youth Organizers at Boston's Hyde Square Task Force Have to Teach Us about Civic Engagement" and draws connections to recent developments in sibling fields, including social and emotional learning and internet activism. These developments offer…

  10. SCSE organic Rankine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Boda, F.P.

    1981-01-01

    The Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) engine is described which has been developed by FACC for the Small Community Solar Thermal Power Experiment (SCSE). This engine is part of a Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS) located at the focal plant of a sun-tracking parabolic dish concentrator.

  11. Change Processes in Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on change processes in organizations. "Mid-stream Corrections: Decisions Leaders Make during Organizational Change Processes" (David W. Frantz) analyzes three organizational leaders to determine whether and how they take corrective actions or adapt their decision-making processes when…

  12. Online Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janowicz, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    This is a comprehensive study of the many facets of an entirely online organic chemistry course. Online homework with structure-drawing capabilities was found to be more effective than written homework. Online lecture was found to be just as effective as in-person lecture, and students prefer an online lecture format with shorter Webcasts. Online…

  13. Matrix Embedded Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakolanu, U. G.; Freund, F. T.

    2016-05-01

    In the matrix of minerals such as olivine, a redox reaction of the low-z elements occurs. Oxygen is oxidized to the peroxy state while the low-Z-elements become chemically reduced. We assign them a formula [CxHyOzNiSj]n- and call them proto-organics.

  14. Career Issues in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on career issues in organizations. "Learning During Downsizing: Stories from the Survivors" (Sharon J. Confessore) describes a study to demonstrate that survivors of corporate downsizings undertake learning activities and use many resources to accomplish the learning tasks. "Organizational Career…

  15. The Culturally Competent Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorter-Gooden, Kumea

    2013-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, organizations need to actively work to foster diversity. This is important because it is the just response to an uneven playing field, because the rapidly changing demographics in the United States demand that institutions be responsive if they are to survive, and because heterogeneous groups are more effective than…

  16. World Presidents Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Members of the World Presidents' Organization enjoy exhibits at StenniSphere, the museum and visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center during a tour of the space facility Jan. 26. WPO members from several states toured Stennis facilities during a daylong visit that included a presentation by Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise of Biloxi.

  17. Organizing an Intramural Triathlon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Bruce

    1984-01-01

    Suggestions for developing an intramural triathlon consisting of a 1000-yard swim, 15-mile bike ride, and 5-mile run are presented in this article. Topics to consider when organizing this event include course selection, publicity, personnel, equipment, and awards. (DF)

  18. Organic greenhouse soil media + supplemental fertilizer = better organic tomato transplants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumer perceptions that organic food tastes better and is healthier are two major factors driving the increasing demand for organically produced crops in the U.S. All components entering into the organic crop production system must be approved for organic use, including seed, soil media, and fert...

  19. Organics In Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sherwood

    1996-01-01

    The variety of classes of organic compounds that occur in carbonaceous meteorites suggests a rich pre-planetary chemistry with possible connections to interstellar, solar nebular and parent body processes. Structural diversity prevails within all classes examined in detail. Among amino acids for instance, all possible isomers are found up to species containing 4-6 carbon atoms, with abundances decreasing with increasing molecular weight. Such diversity seems limited to those carbonaceous meteorites which show evidence of having been exposed to liquid water; meteorites lacking such evidence also show much lower abundances and less structural diversity in their organic contents. This apparent dependency on water suggests a role for cometary ices in the chemical evolution of organic compounds on parent bodies. Measurements of the stable isotope compositions of C, H, N and S in classes of compounds and at the individual compound level show strong deviations from average chondritic values. These deviations are difficult to explain by solar system or parent body processes, and precedents for some of these isotopic anomalies exist in interstellar (e.g., high D/H ratios) and circumstellar chemistry. Therefore, presolar origins for much if not all of the meteoritic organic compounds (or their precursors) is a distinct possibility. In contrast, evidence of solar nebular origins is either lacking or suspect. Results from molecular and isotopic analyses of meteoritic organics, from laboratory simulations and from a model of interstellar grain reactions will be used to flesh out the hypothesis that this material originated with interstellar chemistry, was distributed within the early solar system as cometary ices, and was subsequently altered on meteorite parent bodies to yield the observed compounds.

  20. Transforming your manufacturing organization into a learning organization.

    PubMed

    Kapp, K M

    1999-05-01

    Many experts believe the only sustainable advantage an organization will have in the future is its ability to learn faster than its competitors. This competitive advantage can be achieved by transforming the organization into a learning organization. This article describes the basic elements of a learning organization and how to transform an organization to focus on learning. The article also describes methods for evaluating the training and learning that occurs within the organization to ensure that training dollars are wisely spent. Finally, the article describes what individuals can do to focus on their own learning and personal development within an organization.

  1. Using matrix organization to manage health care delivery organizations.

    PubMed

    Allcorn, S

    1990-01-01

    Matrix organization can provide health care organization managers enhanced information processing, faster response times, and more flexibility to cope with greater organization complexity and rapidly changing operating environments. A review of the literature informed by work experience reveals that the use of matrix organization creates hard-to-manage ambiguity and balances of power in addition to providing positive benefits for health care organization managers. Solutions to matrix operating problems generally rely on the use of superior information and decision support systems and extensive staff training to develop attitudes and behavior consistent with the more collegial matrix organization culture. Further improvement in understanding the suitability of matrix organization for managing health care delivery organizations will involve appreciating the impact of partial implementation of matrix organization, temporary versus permanent uses of matrix organization, and the impact of the ambiguity created by dual lines of authority upon the exercise of power and authority.

  2. [Knowledge management and healthcare organizations].

    PubMed

    Favaretti, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    The present scenario is characterized by a high "environmental turbulence". Healthcare professionals and organizations must increase their knowledge, skills and attitudes for choosing wisely. Healthcare organizations are complex adaptive systems which should use integrated governance systems: knowledge management should be a strategic goal. These organizations should become learning organizations: they should build and renovate their knowledge in a systematic, explicit and definite way.

  3. Hollow Microporous Organic Capsules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Buyi; Yang, Xinjia; Xia, Lingling; Majeed, Muhammad Irfan; Tan, Bien

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of hollow microporous organic capsules (HMOCs) could be very useful because of their hollow and porous morphology, which combines the advantages of both microporous organic polymers and non-porous nanocapsules. They can be used as storage materials or reaction chambers while supplying the necessary path for the design of controlled uptake/release systems. Herein, the synthesis of HMOCs with high surface area through facile emulsion polymerization and hypercrosslinking reactions, is described. Due to their tailored porous structure, these capsules possessed high drug loading efficiency, zero-order drug release kinetics and are also demonstrated to be used as nanoscale reactors for the prepareation of nanoparticles (NPs) without any external stabilizer. Moreover, owing to their intrinsic biocompatibility and fluorescence, these capsules exhibit promising prospect for biomedical applications. PMID:23820511

  4. Marketing in nursing organizations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, S B

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of chapter 3 is to provide a conceptual framework for understanding marketing. Although it is often considered to be, marketing is not really a new activity for nursing organizations. What is perhaps new to most nursing organizations is the conduct of marketing activities as a series of interrelated events that are part of a strategic marketing process. The increasingly volatile nursing environment requires a comprehensive approach to marketing. This chapter presents definitions of marketing, the marketing mix, the characteristics of nonprofit marketing, the relationship of strategic planning and strategic marketing, portfolio analysis, and a detailed description of the strategic marketing process. While this chapter focuses on marketing concepts, essential components, and presentation of the strategic marketing process, chapter 4 presents specific methods and techniques for implementing the strategic marketing process.

  5. Organic compounds in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, E.; Hayatsu, R.; Studier, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of whether organic compounds originated in meteorites as a primary condensate from a solar gas or whether they were introduced as a secondary product into the meteorite during its residence in a parent body is examined by initially attempting to reconstruct the physical conditions during condensation (temperature, pressure, time) from clues in the inorganic matrix of the meteorite. The condensation behavior of carbon under these conditions is then analyzed on the basis of thermodynamic calculations, and compounds synthesized in model experiments on the condensation of carbon are compared with those actually found in meteorites. Organic compounds in meteorites seem to have formed by catalytic reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and ammonia in the solar nebula at 360 to 400 K temperature and about 3 to 7.6 microtorr pressure. The onset of these reactions was triggered by the formation of suitable catalysts (magnetite, hydrated silicates) at these temperatures.

  6. World Presidents Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Members of the World Presidents' Organization enjoy a buffet luncheon during a Jan. 26 visit to NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. WPO members from several states toured Stennis facilities during a daylong visit that included a river ride with Special Boat Team 22, the U.S. Navy's elite boat warriors group that trains at Stennis. Visiting president also had an opportunity to learn about the ongoing work of the nation's premier rocket engine testing site.

  7. Nitrite in organ protection

    PubMed Central

    Rassaf, Tienush; Ferdinandy, Peter; Schulz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has emerged to therapeutical importance. Modulation of endogenous nitrate and nitrite levels with the subsequent S-nitros(yl)ation of the downstream signalling cascade open the way for novel cytoprotective strategies. In the following, we summarize the actual literature and give a short overview on the potential of nitrite in organ protection. PMID:23826831

  8. Bugs digest chlorinated organics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    This article describes a new bioreactor that uses a consortium of aerobic bacteria to biodegrade chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. Methanotrophic bacteria are cultivated for their MMO enzyme. After the MMO enzyme breaks down the chlorinated organics by oxidation, non-methanotrophic bacteria consume the byproducts. Pilot-scale testing has demonstrated successful treatment of groundwater containing coal-tar constituents, toluene, trichloroethylene, vinyl chlorides, chlorobenzene, and methyl methacrylate from three Superfund sites.

  9. Adaptation as organism design

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andy

    2009-01-01

    The problem of adaptation is to explain the apparent design of organisms. Darwin solved this problem with the theory of natural selection. However, population geneticists, whose responsibility it is to formalize evolutionary theory, have long neglected the link between natural selection and organismal design. Here, I review the major historical developments in theory of organismal adaptation, clarifying what adaptation is and what it is not, and I point out future avenues for research. PMID:19793739

  10. Organic electroluminescent devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sheats, J.R.; Antoniadis, H.; Hueschen, M.; Leonard, W.; Miller, J.; Moon, R.; Roitman, D.; Stocking, A.

    1996-08-16

    Electroluminscene from organic materials has the potential to enable low-cost, full-color flat-panel displays, as well as other emissive products. Some materials have now demonstrated adequate efficiencies (1 to 15 lumens/watt) and lifetimes (>5000 hours) for practical use; however, the factors that govern lifetime remain poorly understood. This article provides a brief review of device principles and applications requirements and focuses on the understanding of reliability issues. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  11. B. F. Skinner, organism.

    PubMed

    Catania, A C

    1992-11-01

    B. F. Skinner illustrated the power of behavior analysis by turning it upon his own behavior. This article considers parallels in the life and work of Charles Darwin and places Skinner's views on life and death in the context of his selectionist paradigm for psychology. The term organism plays a special role, and the account shows why B. F. Skinner might have regarded it as an appropriate title.

  12. World Presidents Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Members of the World Presidents' Organization take a try at 'piloting' a mock-up of the space shuttle cockpit during a Jan. 26 visit to StenniSphere, the museum and visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. WPO members from several states spent the day touring Stennis facilities and learning about the work of the nation's premier rocket engine testing site.

  13. World Presidents Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Members of the World Presidents' Organization enjoy exhibits at StenniSphere, the visitor center and museum at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center during a Jan. 26 visit to the site. WPO members from several states spent the day touring Stennis facilities and learning about the work of the nation's premier rocket engine testing site. Exhibits enjoyed included a mockup of the International Space Station and the interactive Science on a Sphere globe.

  14. World Presidents Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour speaks to members of the World Presidents' Organization during the group's visit to NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center on Jan. 26. WPO members from several states spent the day touring Stennis facilities and learning about the work of the nation's premier rocket engine testing site. Barbour visited with group members during a morning session in StenniSphere, the center's visitors center and museum.

  15. Thunderstorms: Thermodynamics and Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinner, Tobias; Groenemeijer, Pieter

    Thunderstorm research is strongly motivated by the wish to reduce the harm they do to people and their property. Thunderstorms are a global phenomenon, although some areas in the mid-latitudes and tropics are particularly at risk. They form where and whenever the ingredients for their formation come together: instability, moisture and lift. Especially upon interaction with vertical wind shear, they may develop into well-organized systems that produce hazards such as large hail, severe winds, heavy precipitation, and tornadoes.

  16. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  17. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Initially known as multiple system organ failure, the term multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) was first described in the 1960s in adults with bleeding, respiratory failure, and sepsis. It is defined as "the development of potentially reversible physiologic derangement involving two or more organ systems not involved in the disorder that resulted in ICU admission, and arising in the wake of a potentially life threatening physiologic insult."(3) There are many risk factors predisposing to MODS; however, the most common risk factors are shock due to any cause, sepsis, and tissue hypoperfusion. A dysregulated immune response, or immuneparalysis, in which the homeostasis between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory reaction is lost is thought to be key in the development of MODS. The clinical course and evolution of MODS is dependent on a combination of acquired and genetic factors. There are several nonspecific therapies for the prevention and resolution of MODS, mostly care is supportive. Mortality from MODS in septic pediatric patients varies between 11% and 54%.

  18. Organic Synthesis in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk will review our current understanding of the synthesis of organic molecules in space, with particular emphasis on the synthesis of those compounds that may be of prebiotic interest. The talk will address the possibility that molecules created in the interstellar medium may play a role in the origin and evolution of life on planetary surfaces. The various organic and volatile compounds that are now known or suspected to exist in a variety of space environments (stellar outflows, the diffuse interstellar medium, dense molecular clouds, protostellar nebulae, and planetesimal parent bodies in planetary systems) will be reviewed. This information comes largely from the combined applications of observational infrared and radio spectroscopy, laboratory astrophysical simulations, and theoretical astrochemistry. This will be followed by a discussion of the evidence, largely gathered from the laboratory isotopic study of extraterrestrial materials (meteorites and cosmic dust), that interstellar materials, including organics, can and do survive the transition from the interstellar space into forming stellar systems. Once there, some of this material can be delivered largely unaltered to planetary surfaces where it can play key roles in the origin and subsequent evolution of life.

  19. [Organ manifestations of hyperthyroidism].

    PubMed

    Hörmann, R; Schumm-Draeger, P M

    2010-05-01

    Patients with hyperthyroidism tend to feel well and procrastinate the visit to the doctor and hence diagnosis of the disease. Among a whole variety of more or less distinct symptoms affecting many organs, cardiovascular disease is most prevalent and serious, because it relates to an increase in mortality of patients with hyperthyroidism. Recent epidemiological studies have clearly demonstrated that the disease already begins with the subclinical states of hyperthyroidism and, as a consequence, treatment should also be commenced early on. Novel insights into the mechanisms and actions of thyroid hormones at the pathophysiological level offer a potential for the development and future therapeutic use of selective hormone analogues. Despite the high frequency and importance of thyroid disorders, awareness appears to be decreasing and over-dosage of thyroid hormones in benign thyroid conditions is frequent. This review should emphasize that the thyroid gland affects the structure and function of a multitude of organs and, on the other hand, many symptoms and complaints, related to various organ systems, should raise suspicion of thyroid disease.

  20. Organ transplantation in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    El Matri, Aziz; Ben Abdallah, Taieb

    2015-04-01

    Kidney transplants were first performed in Tunisia in 1986, and transplants soon extended to other organs including the heart, liver, and pancreas. Live-related donor and deceased-donor kidney transplants were both began in the summer of 1986. An organ procurement and transplant law was passed in March 1991, and the National Centre for Advancement of Organ Transplantation was created in 1995. The number of transplantation units has increased to 7 throughout the country, and the yearly transplant number has progressively increased to 139 in 2010, including 20% from deceased kidney donors. Despite these gains, the need continues to grow. Heart transplants began in January 1993, and Tunisia and Jordan are currently the only Arab countries where it is practiced. However, only 16 patients have received a heart transplant as of 2004, and the number of recipients has decreased in the past 10 years. Liver transplants are rare in other Arab countries, but began in Tunisia in January 1998. Over 10 years, 38 patients benefited from this procedure. After a few years of stagnation, the number of liver transplants is increasing. While all types of transplantation are needed, kidney transplantation is a priority in Tunisia. The target is to perform 400 transplants annually, which would require a long-term strategy to provide full financial coverage using the National Health Insurance Funds in both the public and private sectors.

  1. Self-organized criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Per Bak ); Kan Chen )

    1991-01-01

    Just as the proverbial straw broke the camel's back, catastrophes, from earthquakes and avalanches to a stock market crash, can be triggered by a minor event. The authors argue that complex systems naturally evolve to a critical state. Their theory already has improved understanding of motion in the earth's crust, economies and ecosystems. The theory of self-organized criticality states that many composite systems naturally evolve to a critical state in which a minor event starts a chain reaction that can affect any number of elements in the system. Although composite systems produce more minor events than catastrophes, chain reactions of all sizes are an integral part of the dynamics. According to the theory, the mechanism that leads to minor events is the same one that leads to major events. Furthermore, composite systems never reach equilibrium but instead evolve from one metastable state to the next. Self-organized criticality is a holistic theory: the global features, such as the relative number of large and small events, do not depend on the microscopic mechanisms. Consequently, global features of the system cannot be understood by analyzing the parts separately. To the authors' knowledge, self-organized criticality is the only model or mathematical description that has led to a holistic theory for dynamic systems.

  2. Decellularization for whole organ bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Herrera, J E; Ko, I K; Atala, A; Yoo, J J

    2013-02-01

    Organ transplantation in an orthotopic location is the current treatment for end-stage organ failure. However, the need for transplantable organs far exceeds the number of available donor organs. As a result, new options, such as tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, have been explored to achieve functional organ replacement. Although there have been many advances in the laboratory leading to the reconstruction of tissue and organ structures in vitro, these efforts have fallen short of producing organs that contain intact vascular networks capable of nutrient and gas exchange and are suitable for transplantation. Recently, advances in whole organ decellularization techniques have enabled the fabrication of scaffolds for engineering new organs. These scaffolds, consisting of naturally-derived extracellular matrix (ECM), provide biological signals and maintain tissue microarchitecture, including intact vascular systems that could integrate into the recipient's circulatory system. The decellularization techniques have led to the development of scaffolds for multiple organs, including the heart, liver, lung and kidney. While the experimental studies involving the use of decellularized organ scaffolds are encouraging, the translation of whole organ engineering into the clinic is still distant. This paper reviews recently described techniques used to decellularize whole organs such as the heart, lung, liver and kidney and describes possible methods for using these matrices for whole organ engineering.

  3. Self-Organized Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Holliday, J. R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Klein, W.

    2011-12-01

    Self-Organized Criticality was proposed by the Per Bak et al. [1] as a means of explaining scaling laws observed in driven natural systems, usually in (slowly) driven threshold systems. The example used by Bak was a simple cellular automaton model of a sandpile, in which grains of sand were slowly dropped (randomly) onto a flat plate. After a period of time, during which the 'critical state' was approached, a series of self-similar avalanches would begin. Scaling exponents for the frequency-area statistics of the sandpile avalanches were found to be approximately 1, a value that characterizes 'flicker noise' in natural systems. SOC is associated with a critical point in the phase diagram of the system, and it was found that the usual 2-scaling field theory applies. A model related to SOC is the Self-Organized Spinodal (SOS), or intermittent criticality model. Here a slow but persistent driving force leads to quasi-periodic approach to, and retreat from, the classical limit of stability, or spinodal. Scaling exponents for this model can be related to Gutenberg-Richter and Omori exponents observed in earthquake systems. In contrast to SOC models, nucleation, both classical and non-classical types, is possible in SOS systems. Tunneling or nucleation rates can be computed from Langer-Klein-Landau-Ginzburg theories for comparison to observations. Nucleating droplets play a role similar to characteristic earthquake events. Simulations of these systems reveals much of the phenomenology associated with earthquakes and other types of "burst" dynamics. Whereas SOC is characterized by the full scaling spectrum of avalanches, SOS is characterized by both system-size events above the nominal frequency-size scaling curve, and scaling of small events. Applications to other systems including integrate-and-fire neural networks and financial crashes will be discussed. [1] P. Bak, C. Tang and K. Weisenfeld, Self-Organized Criticality, Phys. Rev. Lett., 59, 381 (1987).

  4. Management services organizations.

    PubMed

    DeMuro, P R

    1994-01-01

    This chapter defines a management services organization (MSO), and discusses the goals and objectives of hospitals and physicians in creating an MSO and the advantages and disadvantages of an MSO. It stresses the necessity of developing a business plan in the formation of an MSO and discusses organizational forms and MSO activities, such as managed care contracting, billing, information systems, utilization management and review, the provision of supplies, medical office space, equipment, staff, and turnkey arrangements. In addition, it discusses the structuring of MSO fees and a number of organizational structures for MSOs and legal issues affecting them.

  5. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  6. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  7. Just a Community Organizer: Community/Campus Connections through Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Judith; Kelly, Donald P.

    2010-01-01

    The 2008 presidential election catapulted "community organizers" into the media fray and raised awareness about community organizing. At the University of San Diego (USD), a course teaching consensus organizing techniques to address community issues was instituted in 2004. The course incorporates traditional undergraduate students and "Community…

  8. Organic weed control in certified organic watermelon production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing perception by consumers that organic food tastes better and is healthier continues to expand the demand for organically produced crops. Field research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma to determine the impact of organic production systems on weed control and watermelon (Citrullus l...

  9. Organic contamination of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.

    1991-01-01

    A brown stain of varying thickness was present on most of the exterior surface of the retrieved Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Tape lifts of Earth-end LDEF surfaces taken showed that the surface particle cleanliness immediately after retrieval was very good, but faint footprints of the tape strips on the tested surfaces indicated a very faint film was removed by the tape. Solvent wipes of these surfaces showed that the stain was not amenable to standard organic solvent removal. Infrared spectra of optical windows from tray E5 show that the organic film is hydrocarbon in composition, but is not similar to the oil that seeped from tray C12. Very dark and heavy deposits of the stain is present at openings and vents to the interior of LDEF. Heavy brown and blue-green deposits are present in the interior of LDEF where sunlight penetrated through cracks and vent openings. The exterior of LDEF had significant areas painted with a white polyurethane paint for thermal control, and almost all of the interior was painted with a black polyurethane paint. Brown staining is consistent with outgassing of hydrocarbons from these paints by rapid solar UV induced polymerization of the outgassed hydrocarbons when they hit sunlight exposed areas.

  10. Organic contamination of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.

    1992-01-01

    A brown stain of varying thickness was present on most of the exterior surface of the retrieved Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Tape lifts of Earth-end LDEF surfaces taken in Feb. 1990 showed that the surface particle cleanliness immediately after retrieval was very good, but faint footprints of the tape strips on the tested surfaces indicated a very faint film was removed by the tape. Solvent wipes of these surfaces showed that the stain was not amenable to standard organic solvent removal. Infrared spectra of optical windows from tray E5 and scrapings indicate that the film is primarily of organic composition, but is not similar to the oil that seeped from tray C12. Very dark and heavy deposits of the stain are present at openings and vents to the interior of the LDEF. Heavy brown and blue-green deposits are present in the interior of LDEF where sunlight penetrated through cracks and vent openings. Photographs of the deintegrated LDEF graphically show the stain distribution. The exterior of the LDEF had significant areas painted with a white polyurethane paint for thermal control, and almost all of the interior was painted with a black polyurethane paint for thermal control. The brown staining of the LDEF is consistent with long-term outgassing of hydrocarbons from these paints followed by rapid solar-ultraviolet-induced polymerization of the outgassed hydrocarbons when the outgassed molecules stuck to surfaces exposed to sunlight.

  11. An organic thyristor.

    PubMed

    Sawano, F; Terasaki, I; Mori, H; Mori, T; Watanabe, M; Ikeda, N; Nogami, Y; Noda, Y

    2005-09-22

    Thyristors are a class of nonlinear electronic device that exhibit bistable resistance--that is, they can be switched between two different conductance states. Thyristors are widely used as inverters (direct to alternating current converters) and for the smooth control of power in a variety of applications such as motors and refrigerators. Materials and structures that exhibit nonlinear resistance of this sort are not only useful for practical applications: they also provide systems for exploring fundamental aspects of solid-state and statistical physics. Here we report the discovery of a giant nonlinear resistance effect in the conducting organic salt theta-(BEDT-TTF)2CsCo(SCN)4, the voltage-current characteristics of which are essentially the same as those of a conventional thyristor. This intrinsic organic thyristor works as an inverter, generating an alternating current when a static direct-current voltage is applied. Whereas conventional thyristors consist of a series of diodes (their nonlinearity comes from interface effects at the p-n junctions), the present salt exhibits giant nonlinear resistance as a bulk phenomenon. We attribute the origin of this effect to the current-induced melting of insulating charge-order domains, an intrinsically non-equilibrium phenomenon in the sense that ordered domains are melted by a steady flow.

  12. Organic Experiments for Introductory Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner-Canham, Geoff

    1985-01-01

    Describes test-tube organic chemistry procedures (using comparatively safe reagents) for the beginning student. These procedures are used to: examine differences between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons; compare structural isomers; and compare organic and inorganic acids and bases. (DH)

  13. Gender disparity in organ donation.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Judith L

    2006-12-01

    Organ donation is affected by legal, cultural, religious, and racial factors, as well as by health considerations. Although organs in and of themselves are gender neutral and can be exchanged between the sexes, women account for up to two thirds of all organ donations. There are no clear reasons why women are more willing to undergo the risks of surgery than are men, nor is this gender disparity mirrored in the demand for donated organs. More men than women are recipients, and women are less likely to complete the necessary steps to receive donated organs. Internationally, ethical concern has been focused on possible human rights violations in the harvesting of organs from prisoners and, in poor countries, on the trafficking of organs from girls and women who are expected to financially help their families by selling their organs.

  14. The Birthday of Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benfey, Otto Theodor; Kaufman, George B.

    1979-01-01

    Describes how the synthesis of urea, 150 years ago, was a major factor in breaking the artificial barrier that existed between organic and inorganic chemistry, and this contributed to the rapid growth of organic chemistry. (GA)

  15. Organizations That Offer Support Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... help finding support services? View more than 100 organizations nationwide that provide emotional, practical, and financial support ... Groups Treatment Review our tips to find helpful organizations and resources in your community. Print E-mail ...

  16. Leadership Development for Small Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarley, Marshall

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how a small to mid-sized organization can create a leadership development program using the same approach that is used in large companies like General Electric. Identifies the factors that can transfer successfully to smaller organizations. (JOW)

  17. Organic Superconductor, Made without Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The discovery of a superconducting organic compound is reported. The compound, (TMTSF)-2, has no metal in its composition, and the author believes that it is the precursor of a family of superconducting organics. (Author/SA)

  18. Public awareness of organ donation.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, S; Farewell, V T; Halloran, P F

    1988-01-01

    A telephone survey of public attitudes toward organ donation and transplantation was conducted in a community in southwestern Ontario. The subjects were selected at random; the response rate was 57%. Of the 50 respondents 62% stated that they had signed the organ donor card accompanying their driver's licence. These respondents were more likely than those who did not sign it to have discussed organ donation with their families. At least 80% of the respondents said they would agree to donate their organs and those of their next-of-kin, and 80% said that the organ donor card should be considered a legal document. Organ transplantation was regarded by all but one respondent as an acceptable medical procedure. Also discussed were concerns about organ donation and possible strategies to improve the availability of organs for transplantation. PMID:3337991

  19. [Knowledge management and healthcare organizations].

    PubMed

    Favaretti, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    The present scenario is characterized by a high "environmental turbulence". Healthcare professionals and organizations must increase their knowledge, skills and attitudes for choosing wisely. Healthcare organizations are complex adaptive systems which should use integrated governance systems: knowledge management should be a strategic goal. These organizations should become learning organizations: they should build and renovate their knowledge in a systematic, explicit and definite way. PMID:24326705

  20. Organophosphorus Compounds in Organic Electronics.

    PubMed

    Shameem, Muhammad Anwar; Orthaber, Andreas

    2016-07-25

    This Minireview describes recent advances of organophosphorus compounds as opto-electronic materials in the field of organic electronics. The progress of (hetero-) phospholes, unsaturated phosphanes, and trivalent and pentavalent phosphanes since 2010 is covered. The described applications of organophosphorus materials range from single molecule sensors, field effect transistors, organic light emitting diodes, to polymeric materials for organic photovoltaic applications. PMID:27276233

  1. Organophosphorus Compounds in Organic Electronics.

    PubMed

    Shameem, Muhammad Anwar; Orthaber, Andreas

    2016-07-25

    This Minireview describes recent advances of organophosphorus compounds as opto-electronic materials in the field of organic electronics. The progress of (hetero-) phospholes, unsaturated phosphanes, and trivalent and pentavalent phosphanes since 2010 is covered. The described applications of organophosphorus materials range from single molecule sensors, field effect transistors, organic light emitting diodes, to polymeric materials for organic photovoltaic applications.

  2. Advances in cryopreservation of organs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Pan, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Organ transplantation is an effective approach for the treatment of end-stage organ failures. Currently, the donor organs used for clinical transplantation are all preserved at above-zero temperatures. These preservation methods are well-established and simple but the storage time lasts for only 4-12 h. Some researchers tried to extend the organ storage time by improving protectant and HLA matching to raise the use of stored organs and prolong the long-term survival of organs. These efforts still fall short of the clinical demand for organ transplantation. Moreover, a great many organs were wasted due to limited storage time, HLA mismatch, patients' conditions or distance involved. Therefore, preserving organs for several weeks or even months and establishing Organ Bank are the tough challenges and have become a shared goal of global scholars. This article reviews some issues involved in the cryopreservation of organs, such as use of cryoprotecting agents, freezing and thawing methods in the cryopreservation of hearts, kidneys and other organs.

  3. Diagnostic Tools for Learning Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moilanen, Raili

    2001-01-01

    The Learning Organization Diamond Tool was designed for holistic analysis of 10 learning organization elements at the individual and organizational levels. A test in 25 Finnish organizations established validity. Comparison with existing tools showed that differences derive from their different purposes. (Contains 33 references.) (SK)

  4. Chaos, Topology, and Social Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, Russ

    1992-01-01

    Applies chaos theory to complex social organization, beginning with a mathematical definition of chaos. Shows how a nonlinear equation might be used to describe organization. The conclusion section identifies three approaches to analyzing chaos in social organization: metaphorical analysis, mathematical modeling, and data collection. (36…

  5. Leadership in the Learning Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratton, Margaret

    1993-01-01

    Offers insights into the features of a learning organization. Delineates a context for leadership without elaborate structures, chains of command, or approving and authorizing. Underscores the importance of personal networks in boundaryless organizations. Suggests that each part of the organization continually learns about the interrelatedness of…

  6. Six Pillars of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, Joseph J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an approach to teaching organic chemistry, which is to have students build their knowledge of organic chemistry upon a strong foundation of the fundamental concepts of the subject. Specifically, the article focuses upon a core set of concepts that I call "the six pillars of organic chemistry": electronegativity, polar…

  7. Accounting Procedures for Student Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This two-part handbook presents information on accounting procedures for student organizations, with a focus on the laws, policies, and procedures that affect student body organizations. Part 1 contains information about: (1) legal status of a school's student body organization; (2) principles governing student body finance; (3) administration of…

  8. Organic compounds in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies of carbonaceous chondrites provide evidence that certain organic compounds are indigenous and the result of an abiotic, chemical synthesis. The results of several investigators have established the presence of amino acids and precursors, mono- and dicarboxylic acids, N-heterocycles, and hydrocarbons as well as other compounds. For example, studies of the Murchison and Murray meteorites have revealed the presence of at least 40 amino acids with nearly equal abundances of D and L isomers. The population consists of both protein and nonprotein amino acids including a wide variety of linear, cyclic, and polyfunctional types. Results show a trend of decreasing concentration with increasing carbon number, with the most abundant being glycine (41 n Moles/g). These and other results to be reviewed provide persuasive support for the theory of chemical evolution and provide the only natural evidence for the protobiological subset of molecules from which life on earth may have arisen.

  9. Total organic carbon analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godec, Richard G.; Kosenka, Paul P.; Smith, Brian D.; Hutte, Richard S.; Webb, Johanna V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The development and testing of a breadboard version of a highly sensitive total-organic-carbon (TOC) analyzer are reported. Attention is given to the system components including the CO2 sensor, oxidation reactor, acidification module, and the sample-inlet system. Research is reported for an experimental reagentless oxidation reactor, and good results are reported for linearity, sensitivity, and selectivity in the CO2 sensor. The TOC analyzer is developed with gravity-independent components and is designed for minimal additions of chemical reagents. The reagentless oxidation reactor is based on electrolysis and UV photolysis and is shown to be potentially useful. The stability of the breadboard instrument is shown to be good on a day-to-day basis, and the analyzer is capable of 5 sample analyses per day for a period of about 80 days. The instrument can provide accurate TOC and TIC measurements over a concentration range of 20 ppb to 50 ppm C.

  10. Organic Matter Management

    SciTech Connect

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Cerri, Carlos C.

    2002-01-01

    Soil organic matter (S)M) is an essential attribute of soil quality with a key role in soil conservation and sustainable agriculture. Many practices-some involving land use changes-have been shown to increase SOM and thus received considerable attention for their possible role in climate change mitigation. Carbon sequestration in managed soils occurs when there is a net removal of atmospheric CO2 because of the balance between carbon inputs (net primary productivity) and outputs (soil respiration, management-related C emissions). Soil C sequestration has the additional appeal that all its practices conform to principles of sustainable agriculture (e.g., reduced tillage, erosion control, diverse cropping systems, improved soil fertility). Long-term field experiments have been instrumental to increase our understanding of SOM dynamics. This chapter presents fundamental concepts to guide readers on the role of SOM in sustainable agriculture and climate change mitigation.

  11. Community Organic Gardening Project

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, S.

    1982-01-01

    Final recommendations as to the further use and development of solar pods, developed by the participants of the Community Organic Gardening Project, are presented. The solar pods tested were dome-shaped, double glazed, fiberglass covers which were hinged to a permanent insulated frame enabling fall and late winter crops to survive outdoor temperatures as low as 10/sup 0/F. A list of materials and the instructions for constructing the pods is provided. Temperature performance and crop yields of the pods are briefly discussed. Very brief discussions of other solar gardening devices include Dutch lights and frames, slitted-row covers, and the Swiss made Xiro-Ag plant protection film. Cost information is included for each of the solar devices discussed. (BCS)

  12. Stacked organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Xue, Jiangeng; Uchida, Soichi; Rand, Barry P.

    2007-03-27

    A device is provided having a first electrode, a second electrode, a first photoactive region having a characteristic absorption wavelength .lamda..sub.1 and a second photoactive region having a characteristic absorption wavelength .lamda..sub.2. The photoactive regions are disposed between the first and second electrodes, and further positioned on the same side of a reflective layer, such that the first photoactive region is closer to the reflective layer than the second photoactive region. The materials comprising the photoactive regions may be selected such that .lamda..sub.1 is at least about 10% different from .lamda..sub.2. The device may further comprise an exciton blocking layer disposed adjacent to and in direct contact with the organic acceptor material of each photoactive region, wherein the LUMO of each exciton blocking layer other than that closest to the cathode is not more than about 0.3 eV greater than the LUMO of the acceptor material.

  13. Breakdown of organic insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    Solar cells and their associated electrical interconnects and leads were encapsulated in transparent elastomeric materials. Their purpose in a photovoltaic module, one of the most important for these elastomeric encapsulation materials, is to function as electrical insulation. This includes internal insulation between adjacent solar cells, between other encapsulated electrical parts, and between the total internal electrical circuitry and external metal frames, grounded areas, and module surfaces. Catastrophic electrical breakdown of the encapsulant insulation materials or electrical current through these materials or module edges to external locations can lead to module failure and can create hazards to humans. Electrical insulation stability, advanced elastomeric encapsulation materials are developed which are intended to be intrinsically free of in-situ ionic impurities, have ultralow water absorption, be weather-stable (UV, oxygen), and have high mechanical flexibility. Efforts to develop a method of assessing the life potential of organic insulation materials in photovoltaic modules are described.

  14. Inverted organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Chang; Meng, Tianyu; Yi, Chao; Gong, Xiong

    2016-05-21

    The advance in lifestyle, modern industrialization and future technological revolution are always at high expense of energy consumption. Unfortunately, there exist serious issues such as limited storage, high cost and toxic contamination in conventional fossil fuel energy sources. Instead, solar energy represents a renewable, economic and green alternative in the future energy market. Among the photovoltaic technologies, organic photovoltaics (OPVs) demonstrate a cheap, flexible, clean and easy-processing way to convert solar energy into electricity. However, OPVs with a conventional device structure are still far away from industrialization mainly because of their short lifetime and the energy-intensive deposition of top metal electrode. To address the stability and cost issue simultaneously, an inverted device structure has been introduced into OPVs, bridging laboratory research with practical application. In this review, recent progress in device structures, working mechanisms, functions and advances of each component layer as well their correlations with the efficiency and stability of inverted OPVs are reviewed and illustrated.

  15. Organizing research data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Research relies on ever larger amounts of data from experiments, automated production equipment, questionnaries, times series such as weather records, and so on. A major task in science is to combine, process and analyse such data to obtain evidence of patterns and correlations. Most research data are on digital form, which in principle ensures easy processing and analysis, easy long-term preservation, and easy reuse in future research, perhaps in entirely unanticipated ways. However, in practice, obstacles such as incompatible or undocumented data formats, poor data quality and lack of familiarity with current technology prevent researchers from making full use of available data. This paper argues that relational databases are excellent tools for veterinary research and animal production; provides a small example to introduce basic database concepts; and points out some concerns that must be addressed when organizing data for research purposes. PMID:21999359

  16. Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Stieger, Bruno; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides or OATPs are central transporters in the disposition of drugs and other xenobiotics. In addition, they mediate transport of a wide variety of endogenous substrates. The critical role of OATPs in drug disposition has spurred research both in academia and in the pharmaceutical industry. Translational aspects with clinical questions are the focus in academia, while the pharmaceutical industry tries to define and understand the role these transporters play in pharmacotherapy. The present overview summarizes our knowledge on the interaction of food constituents with OATPs, and on the OATP transport mechanisms. Further, it gives an update on the available information on the structure-function relationship of the OATPs, and finally, covers the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of OATPs. PMID:24745984

  17. Organic chemistry in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Oliver

    2002-11-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain a suite of soluble organic compounds that possess characteristics that help to understand their formation and to trace back the early history of the solar system. Relative amino acid abundances can be used to discriminate between different parent bodies. The Tagish Lake meteorite is a unique sample from a new type of solar system object that will help to further constrain the physical and chemical conditions found on parent bodies. Enantiomeric excesses have been detected in nonbiological amino acids in the Murchison and Murray meteorites that are still difficult to explain in the current scenario for the synthesis of extraterrestrial amino acids. Finally, new classes of compounds, dipeptides and sugar-related molecules, have been detected in CM carbonaceous chondrites.

  18. Inverted organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Chang; Meng, Tianyu; Yi, Chao; Gong, Xiong

    2016-05-21

    The advance in lifestyle, modern industrialization and future technological revolution are always at high expense of energy consumption. Unfortunately, there exist serious issues such as limited storage, high cost and toxic contamination in conventional fossil fuel energy sources. Instead, solar energy represents a renewable, economic and green alternative in the future energy market. Among the photovoltaic technologies, organic photovoltaics (OPVs) demonstrate a cheap, flexible, clean and easy-processing way to convert solar energy into electricity. However, OPVs with a conventional device structure are still far away from industrialization mainly because of their short lifetime and the energy-intensive deposition of top metal electrode. To address the stability and cost issue simultaneously, an inverted device structure has been introduced into OPVs, bridging laboratory research with practical application. In this review, recent progress in device structures, working mechanisms, functions and advances of each component layer as well their correlations with the efficiency and stability of inverted OPVs are reviewed and illustrated. PMID:27087582

  19. Self-organizing biochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    I examine the plausibility of theories that postulate the development of complex chemical organization without requiring the replication of genetic polymers such as RNA. One conclusion is that theories that involve the organization of complex, small-molecule metabolic cycles such as the reductive citric acid cycle on mineral surfaces make unreasonable assumptions about the catalytic properties of minerals and the ability of minerals to organize sequences of disparate reactions. Another conclusion is that data in the Beilstein Handbook of Organic Chemistry that have been claimed to support the hypothesis that the reductive citric acid cycle originated as a self-organized cycle can more plausibly be interpreted in a different way.

  20. Bioengineering of Artificial Lymphoid Organs.

    PubMed

    Nosenko, M A; Drutskaya, M S; Moisenovich, M M; Nedospasov, S A

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses the issue of bioengineering of artificial lymphoid organs.Progress in this field may help to better understand the nature of the structure-function relations that exist in immune organs. Artifical lymphoid organs may also be advantageous in the therapy or correction of immunodefficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. The structural organization, development, and function of lymphoid tissue are analyzed with a focus on the role of intercellular contacts and on the cytokine signaling pathways regulating these processes. We describe various polymeric materials, as scaffolds, for artificial tissue engineering. Finally, published studies in which artificial lymphoid organs were generated are reviewed and possible future directions in the field are discussed.

  1. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  2. Mandatory autopsies and organ conscription.

    PubMed

    Hershenov, David B; Delaney, James J

    2009-12-01

    Laws requiring autopsies have generated little controversy. Yet it is considered unconscionable to take organs without consent for transplantation. We think an organ draft is justified if mandatory autopsies are. We reject the following five attempts to show why a mandatory autopsy policy is legitimate, but organ conscription is not: (1) The social contract gives the state a greater duty to protect its citizens from each other than from disease. (2) There is a greater moral obligation to prevent murders than disease-caused deaths because killing people is morally worse than allowing people to die. (3) Autopsies do not confiscate body parts, but organ transplants do. (4) The citizenry's knowledge that their organs are very likely to be taken will generate more anxiety than the remote possibility of a mandatory autopsy. (5) A religious conviction that one's organs will be needed in order to be resurrected is threatened by organ transplantation but not by autopsies that "return" body parts. PMID:20191949

  3. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm2 V−1 s−1. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m−2 and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics. PMID:26620323

  4. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J.

    2015-12-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm2 V-1 s-1. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m-2 and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics.

  5. Organics in APOLLO Lunar Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    One of many unknowns prior to the Apollo landings concerned the possibility of life, its remains, or its organic precursors on the surface of the Moon. While the existence of lunar organisms was considered highly unlikely, a program of biological quarantine and testing for the astronauts, the Apollo Command Modules, and the lunar rock and soil samples, was instituted in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL). No conclusive evidence of lunar organisms, was detected and the quarantine program was ended after Apollo 14. Analyses for organic compounds were also con-ducted. Considerable effort was expended, during lunar surface operations and in the LRL, to minimize and quantify organic contamination. Post-Apollo curatorial operations and cleaning minimize contamination from particulates, oxygen, and water but no longer specifically address organic contamination. The organic compounds measured in Apollo samples are generally consistent with known sources of contamination.

  6. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m(-2) and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics.

  7. Organic Semiconductors and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalasanan, M. N.

    2011-10-01

    Organic semiconductors in the form of evaporated or spin coated thin films have many optoelectronic applications in the present electronic industry. They are frequently used in many type of displays, photo detectors, photoconductors for photocopiers and photovoltaic cells. But many p-conjugated molecules and polymer based devices do not provide satisfactory device performance and operational stability. Most of these problems are related to the interfaces they make with other organic materials and electrodes and the low conductivity of the organic layers. The study of organic-metal and organic—organic interfaces as well as electrical doping of organic semiconductors are very important areas of research at present. In this talk, I will be discussing some of the recent advances in this field as well as some of our own results in the area of interface modification and electrical doping of organic semiconductors.

  8. Ethical issues in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abouna, George M

    2003-01-01

    Clinical organ transplantation has been recognized as one of the most gripping medical advances of the century as it provides a way of giving the gift of life to patients with terminal failure of vital organs, which requires the participation of other fellow human beings and of society by donating organs from deceased or living individuals. The increasing incidence of vital organ failure and the inadequate supply of organs, especially from cadavers, has created a wide gap between organ supply and organ demand, which has resulted in very long waiting times to receive an organ as well as an increasing number of deaths while waiting. These events have raised many ethical, moral and societal issues regarding supply, the methods of organ allocation, the use of living donors as volunteers including minors. It has also led to the practice of organ sale by entrepreneurs for financial gains in some parts the world through exploitation of the poor, for the benefit of the wealthy. The current advances in immunology and tissue engineering and the use of animal organs, xenotransplantation, while offering very promising solutions to many of these problems, also raise additional ethical and medical issues which must be considered by the medical profession as well as society. This review deals with the ethical and moral issues generated by the current advances in organ transplantation, the problem of organ supply versus organ demand and the appropriate allocation of available organs. It deals with the risks and benefits of organ donation from living donors, the appropriate and acceptable methods to increase organ donation from the deceased through the adoption of the principle of 'presumed consent', the right methods of providing acceptable appreciation and compensation for the family of the deceased as well as volunteer and altruistic donors, and the duties and responsibilities of the medical profession and society to help fellow humans. The review also deals with the appropriate

  9. The information processing organisms.

    PubMed

    Arianova, L

    1996-06-01

    In spite of the tremendous progress in recent decades of biological science, many aspects of the behaviour of organisms in general and of humans in particular remain still somewhat obscure. A new approach towards the study of the behaviour of man was presented by Heisenberg when he emphasized that a Cartesian view of nature as an object "out there" is an illusion in so far as "the observer is always part of the formula, the man viewing nature must be figured in, the experimenter into his experiment and the artist in the scene he paints." (Heisenberg, 1969). The present study is an attempt to make a step forward in this direction by focusing on the ways and means of involvement of the observer which make him an indelible part of the observation. To get a fresh start let us have a look at the physical universe. Although showing an immense variety, all objects, living and non-living, have some characteristics in common. They all obey the physical laws and they all are engaged in perpetual interactions. How do we tell then the difference between living and non-living objects? According to the traditional concept it is the capacity for reproduction that distinguishes living from non-living objects. (Luria et al., 1981). The non-traditional concept presented in this study stresses the way in which objects interact as the crucial point of difference between living and non-living objects. This concept claims that living objects assert themselves as such only when and while interacting in terms of information processing. Under such conditions only, living objects are able to display relative independence of the physical laws, for instance active movement. This display of relative independence is governed by biological laws and defines the behaviour of the living objects as active in principle. All objects who share these characteristics are called living, they behave as wholes assessing themselves as individuals. The definition suggests that they all share the same internal

  10. Organ printing: from bioprinter to organ biofabrication line.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Markwald, Roger R

    2011-10-01

    Organ printing, or the layer by layer additive robotic biofabrication of functional three-dimensional tissue and organ constructs using self-assembling tissue spheroid building blocks, is a rapidly emerging technology that promises to transform tissue engineering into a commercially successful biomedical industry. It is increasingly obvious that similar well-established industries implement automated robotic systems on the path to commercial translation and economic success. The use of robotic bioprinters alone however is not sufficient for the development of large industrial scale organ biofabrication. The design and development of a fully integrated organ biofabrication line is imperative for the commercial translation of organ printing technology. This paper presents recent progress and challenges in the development of the essential components of an organ biofabrication line.

  11. 11 CFR 100.134 - Internal communications by corporations, labor organizations, and membership organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... administer the organization, pursuant to the organization's articles, bylaws, constitution or other formal... organizations, and membership organizations. 100.134 Section 100.134 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION... communications by corporations, labor organizations, and membership organizations. (a) General provision....

  12. Ultraflexible organic photonic skin.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Tomoyuki; Zalar, Peter; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Jinno, Hiroaki; Matsuhisa, Naoji; Kitanosako, Hiroki; Tachibana, Yutaro; Yukita, Wakako; Koizumi, Mari; Someya, Takao

    2016-04-01

    Thin-film electronics intimately laminated onto the skin imperceptibly equip the human body with electronic components for health-monitoring and information technologies. When electronic devices are worn, the mechanical flexibility and/or stretchability of thin-film devices helps to minimize the stress and discomfort associated with wear because of their conformability and softness. For industrial applications, it is important to fabricate wearable devices using processing methods that maximize throughput and minimize cost. We demonstrate ultraflexible and conformable three-color, highly efficient polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) and organic photodetectors (OPDs) to realize optoelectronic skins (oe-skins) that introduce multiple electronic functionalities such as sensing and displays on the surface of human skin. The total thickness of the devices, including the substrate and encapsulation layer, is only 3 μm, which is one order of magnitude thinner than the epidermal layer of human skin. By integrating green and red PLEDs with OPDs, we fabricate an ultraflexible reflective pulse oximeter. The device unobtrusively measures the oxygen concentration of blood when laminated on a finger. On-skin seven-segment digital displays and color indicators can visualize data directly on the body. PMID:27152354

  13. White organic electroluminescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Chuan-Cheng; Lu, Huei-Tzong; Yokoyama, Meiso

    2006-04-01

    This study investigates energy transfer between N, N'-bis-(1-naphthyl)- N, N'-diphenyl-1,1-biphenyl-4-4'-diamine (NPB) host material and 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-[2-(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-1 H,5 H-benzo[ ij]quinolizin-8-yl) vinyl]-4 H-pyran (DCM2) fluorescent dye in organic electroluminescent (OEL) devices to produce white-color emission. Bathocuproine (BCP) was applied as a hole-blocking layer (HBL) due to its significantly large HOMO, while tris-(8-hydroxy-quinoline) aluminum (Alq 3) was employed in the electron transport layer (ETL). Two OEL device structures were investigated, ITO/NPB:DCM2 ( x%)/Alq 3/Al, and ITO/NPB:DCM2 ( y%)/BCP/Alq 3/Al. In this study, doping DCM2 into the NPB host material could not yield red emission in the case of ITO/NPB:DCM2 ( x%)/Alq 3/Al structure device, even when the DCM2 doping concentration was increased from x=1% to 10%. However, when BCP was inserted between the NPB:DCM2 layer and the Alq 3 layer, the color turned when the concentration of DCM2 doped into NPB was changed. Consequently, the white OEL device with CIE coordinates (0.34,0.34) was observed for the device containing 1% DCM2 doping into NPB host material.

  14. Organic rankine cycle fluid

    DOEpatents

    Brasz, Joost J.; Jonsson, Ulf J.

    2006-09-05

    A method of operating an organic rankine cycle system wherein a liquid refrigerant is circulated to an evaporator where heat is introduced to the refrigerant to convert it to vapor. The vapor is then passed through a turbine, with the resulting cooled vapor then passing through a condenser for condensing the vapor to a liquid. The refrigerant is one of CF.sub.3CF.sub.2C(O)CF(CF.sub.3).sub.2, (CF.sub.3).sub.2 CFC(O)CF(CF.sub.3).sub.2, CF.sub.3(CF.sub.2).sub.2C(O)CF(CF.sub.3).sub.2, CF.sub.3(CF.sub.2).sub.3C(O)CF(CG.sub.3).sub.2, CF.sub.3(CF.sub.2).sub.5C(O)CF.sub.3, CF.sub.3CF.sub.2C(O)CF.sub.2CF.sub.2CF.sub.3, CF.sub.3C(O)CF(CF.sub.3).sub.2.

  15. Ultraflexible organic photonic skin.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Tomoyuki; Zalar, Peter; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Jinno, Hiroaki; Matsuhisa, Naoji; Kitanosako, Hiroki; Tachibana, Yutaro; Yukita, Wakako; Koizumi, Mari; Someya, Takao

    2016-04-01

    Thin-film electronics intimately laminated onto the skin imperceptibly equip the human body with electronic components for health-monitoring and information technologies. When electronic devices are worn, the mechanical flexibility and/or stretchability of thin-film devices helps to minimize the stress and discomfort associated with wear because of their conformability and softness. For industrial applications, it is important to fabricate wearable devices using processing methods that maximize throughput and minimize cost. We demonstrate ultraflexible and conformable three-color, highly efficient polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) and organic photodetectors (OPDs) to realize optoelectronic skins (oe-skins) that introduce multiple electronic functionalities such as sensing and displays on the surface of human skin. The total thickness of the devices, including the substrate and encapsulation layer, is only 3 μm, which is one order of magnitude thinner than the epidermal layer of human skin. By integrating green and red PLEDs with OPDs, we fabricate an ultraflexible reflective pulse oximeter. The device unobtrusively measures the oxygen concentration of blood when laminated on a finger. On-skin seven-segment digital displays and color indicators can visualize data directly on the body.

  16. Evaluating Service Organization Models

    PubMed Central

    TOUATI, NASSERA; PINEAULT, RAYNALD; CHAMPAGNE, FRANÇOIS; DENIS, JEAN-LOUIS; BROUSSELLE, ASTRID; CONTANDRIOPOULOS, ANDRÉ-PIERRE; GENEAU, ROBERT

    2016-01-01

    Based on the example of the evaluation of service organization models, this article shows how a configurational approach overcomes the limits of traditional methods which for the most part have studied the individual components of various models considered independently of one another. These traditional methods have led to results (observed effects) that are difficult to interpret. The configurational approach, in contrast, is based on the hypothesis that effects are associated with a set of internally coherent model features that form various configurations. These configurations, like their effects, are context-dependent. We explore the theoretical basis of the configuration approach in order to emphasize its relevance, and discuss the methodological challenges inherent in the application of this approach through an in-depth analysis of the scientific literature. We also propose methodological solutions to these challenges. We illustrate from an example how a configurational approach has been used to evaluate primary care models. Finally, we begin a discussion on the implications of this new evaluation approach for the scientific and decision-making communities. PMID:27274682

  17. Prebiotic organic microstructures.

    PubMed

    Bassez, Marie-Paule; Takano, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Kensei

    2012-08-01

    Micro- and sub-micrometer spheres, tubules and fiber-filament soft structures have been synthesized in our experiments conducted with 3 MeV proton irradiations of a mixture of simple inorganic constituents, CO, N(2) and H(2)O. We analysed the irradiation products, with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). These laboratory organic structures produced a wide variety of proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous amino acids after HCl hydrolysis. The enantiomer analysis for D,L-alanine confirmed that the amino acids were abiotically synthesized during the laboratory experiment. We discuss the presence of CO(2) and the production of H(2) during exothermic processes of serpentinization and consequently we discuss the production of hydrothermal CO in a ferromagnesian silicate mineral environment. We also discuss the low intensity of the Earth's magnetic field during the Paleoarchaean Era and consequently we conclude that excitation sources arising from cosmic radiation were much more abundant during this Era. We then show that our laboratory prebiotic microstructures might be synthesized during the Archaean Eon, as a product of the serpentinization process of the rocks and of their mineral contents. PMID:22886610

  18. Ultraflexible organic photonic skin

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Tomoyuki; Zalar, Peter; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Jinno, Hiroaki; Matsuhisa, Naoji; Kitanosako, Hiroki; Tachibana, Yutaro; Yukita, Wakako; Koizumi, Mari; Someya, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Thin-film electronics intimately laminated onto the skin imperceptibly equip the human body with electronic components for health-monitoring and information technologies. When electronic devices are worn, the mechanical flexibility and/or stretchability of thin-film devices helps to minimize the stress and discomfort associated with wear because of their conformability and softness. For industrial applications, it is important to fabricate wearable devices using processing methods that maximize throughput and minimize cost. We demonstrate ultraflexible and conformable three-color, highly efficient polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) and organic photodetectors (OPDs) to realize optoelectronic skins (oe-skins) that introduce multiple electronic functionalities such as sensing and displays on the surface of human skin. The total thickness of the devices, including the substrate and encapsulation layer, is only 3 μm, which is one order of magnitude thinner than the epidermal layer of human skin. By integrating green and red PLEDs with OPDs, we fabricate an ultraflexible reflective pulse oximeter. The device unobtrusively measures the oxygen concentration of blood when laminated on a finger. On-skin seven-segment digital displays and color indicators can visualize data directly on the body. PMID:27152354

  19. [Organ donation after circulatory death].

    PubMed

    de Jonge, J; Kalisvaart, M; van der Hoeven, M; Epker, J; de Haan, J; IJzermans, J N M; Grüne, F

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 17 million inhabitants live in the Netherlands. The number of potential organ donors in 1999 was the lowest in Europe with only 10 donors per million inhabitants. Medical associations, public health services, health insurance companies and the government had to find common solutions in order to improve organ allocation, logistics of donations and to increase the number of transplantations. After a prolonged debate on medical ethical issues of organ transplantation, all participants were able to agree on socio-medico-legal regulations for organ donation and transplantation. In addition to improving the procedure for organ donation after brain death (DBD) the most important step was the introduction of organ donation after circulatory death (DCD). Measures such as the introduction of a national organ donor database, improved information to the public, further education on intensive care units (ICU), guidelines for end of life care on the ICU, establishment of transplantation coordinators on site, introduction of autonomous explantation teams and strict procedures on the course of organ donations, answered many practical issues about logistics and responsibilities for DBD and DCD. In 2014 the number of postmortem organ donations rose to 16.4 per million inhabitants. Meanwhile, up to 60 % of organ donations in the Netherlands originate from a DCD procedure compared to approximately 10 % in the USA. This overview article discusses the developments and processes of deceased donation in the Netherlands after 15 years of experience with DCD. PMID:26810404

  20. Government influence on patient organizations.

    PubMed

    Van de Bovenkamp, Hester M; Trappenburg, Margo J

    2011-12-01

    Patient organizations increasingly play an important role in health care decision-making in Western countries. The Netherlands is one of the countries where this trend has gone furthest. In the literature some problems are identified, such as instrumental use of patient organizations by care providers, health insurers and the pharmaceutical industry. To strengthen the position of patient organizations government funding is often recommended as a solution. In this paper we analyze the ties between Dutch government and Dutch patient organizations to learn more about the effects of such a relationship between government and this part of civil society. Our study is based on official government documents and existing empirical research on patient organizations. We found that government influence on patient organizations has become quite substantial with government influencing the organizational structure of patient organizations, the activities these organizations perform and even their ideology. Financing patient organizations offers the government an important means to hold them accountable. Although the ties between patient organizations and the government enable the former to play a role that can be valued as positive by both parties, we argue that they raise problems as well which warrant a discussion on how much government influence on civil society is acceptable.

  1. [Organ donation after circulatory death].

    PubMed

    de Jonge, J; Kalisvaart, M; van der Hoeven, M; Epker, J; de Haan, J; IJzermans, J N M; Grüne, F

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 17 million inhabitants live in the Netherlands. The number of potential organ donors in 1999 was the lowest in Europe with only 10 donors per million inhabitants. Medical associations, public health services, health insurance companies and the government had to find common solutions in order to improve organ allocation, logistics of donations and to increase the number of transplantations. After a prolonged debate on medical ethical issues of organ transplantation, all participants were able to agree on socio-medico-legal regulations for organ donation and transplantation. In addition to improving the procedure for organ donation after brain death (DBD) the most important step was the introduction of organ donation after circulatory death (DCD). Measures such as the introduction of a national organ donor database, improved information to the public, further education on intensive care units (ICU), guidelines for end of life care on the ICU, establishment of transplantation coordinators on site, introduction of autonomous explantation teams and strict procedures on the course of organ donations, answered many practical issues about logistics and responsibilities for DBD and DCD. In 2014 the number of postmortem organ donations rose to 16.4 per million inhabitants. Meanwhile, up to 60 % of organ donations in the Netherlands originate from a DCD procedure compared to approximately 10 % in the USA. This overview article discusses the developments and processes of deceased donation in the Netherlands after 15 years of experience with DCD.

  2. Method of doping organic semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Kloc,; Christian Leo; Ramirez; Arthur Penn; So, Woo-Young

    2010-10-26

    An apparatus has a crystalline organic semiconducting region that includes polyaromatic molecules. A source electrode and a drain electrode of a field-effect transistor are both in contact with the crystalline organic semiconducting region. A gate electrode of the field-effect transistor is located to affect the conductivity of the crystalline organic semiconducting region between the source and drain electrodes. A dielectric layer of a first dielectric that is substantially impermeable to oxygen is in contact with the crystalline organic semiconducting region. The crystalline organic semiconducting region is located between the dielectric layer and a substrate. The gate electrode is located on the dielectric layer. A portion of the crystalline organic semiconducting region is in contact with a second dielectric via an opening in the dielectric layer. A physical interface is located between the second dielectric and the first dielectric.

  3. Ethical issues in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Richard B; Bernat, James L

    2012-01-01

    We discuss ethical issues of organ transplantation including the stewardship tension between physicians' duty to do everything possible for their patients and their duty to serve society by encouraging organ donation. We emphasize consideration of the role of the principles of justice, utility and equity in the just distribution of transplantable organ as scarce resources. We then consider ethical issues of determining death of the organ donor including the remaining controversies in brain death determination and the new controversies raised by circulatory death determination. We need uniformity in standards of death determination, agreement on the duration of asystole before death is declared, and consensus on the allowable circulatory interventions on the newly declared organ donor that are intended to improve organ function. We discuss the importance of maintaining the dead donor rule, despite the argument of some scholars to abandon it. PMID:23217432

  4. Ethical issues in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Richard B; Bernat, James L

    2012-01-01

    We discuss ethical issues of organ transplantation including the stewardship tension between physicians' duty to do everything possible for their patients and their duty to serve society by encouraging organ donation. We emphasize consideration of the role of the principles of justice, utility and equity in the just distribution of transplantable organ as scarce resources. We then consider ethical issues of determining death of the organ donor including the remaining controversies in brain death determination and the new controversies raised by circulatory death determination. We need uniformity in standards of death determination, agreement on the duration of asystole before death is declared, and consensus on the allowable circulatory interventions on the newly declared organ donor that are intended to improve organ function. We discuss the importance of maintaining the dead donor rule, despite the argument of some scholars to abandon it.

  5. Teaching biology with model organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, Dolores A.

    The purpose of this study is to identify and use model organisms that represent each of the kingdoms biologists use to classify organisms, while experiencing the process of science through guided inquiry. The model organisms will be the basis for studying the four high school life science core ideas as identified by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): LS1-From molecules to organisms, LS2-Ecosystems, LS3- Heredity, and LS4- Biological Evolution. NGSS also have identified four categories of science and engineering practices which include developing and using models and planning and carrying out investigations. The living organisms will be utilized to increase student interest and knowledge within the discipline of Biology. Pre-test and posttest analysis utilizing student t-test analysis supported the hypothesis. This study shows increased student learning as a result of using living organisms as models for classification and working in an inquiry-based learning environment.

  6. How to teach artificial organs.

    PubMed

    Zapanta, Conrad M; Borovetz, Harvey S; Lysaght, Michael J; Manning, Keefe B

    2011-01-01

    Artificial organs education is often an overlooked field for many bioengineering and biomedical engineering students. The purpose of this article is to describe three different approaches to teaching artificial organs. This article can serve as a reference for those who wish to offer a similar course at their own institutions or incorporate these ideas into existing courses. Artificial organ classes typically fulfill several ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) criteria, including those specific to bioengineering and biomedical engineering programs.

  7. Organic electrolytes for sodium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestergaard, B.

    1992-09-01

    A summary of earlier given status reports in connection with the project on organic electrolytes for sodium batteries is presented. The aim of the investigations was to develop new room temperature molten salts electrolytes mainly with radical substituted heterocyclic organic chlorides mixed with aluminum chloride. The new electrolytes should have an ionic conductivity comparable with MEIC1:AlCl3 or better. A computer model program MOPAC (Molecular Orbital Package) was to be included to calculate theoretically reduction potentials for a variety of organic cations. Furthermore, MOPAC could be utilized to predict the electron densities, and then give a prediction of the stability of the organic cation.

  8. Arctic River organic matter transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Peter; Gustafsson, Orjan; Vonk, Jorien; Spencer, Robert; McClelland, Jim

    2016-04-01

    Arctic Rivers have unique hydrology and biogeochemistry. They also have a large impact on the Arctic Ocean due to the large amount of riverine inflow and small ocean volume. With respect to organic matter, their influence is magnified by the large stores of soil carbon and distinct soil hydrology. Here we present a recap of what is known of Arctic River organic matter transport. We will present a summary of what is known of the ages and sources of Arctic River dissolved and particulate organic matter. We will also discuss the current status of what is known about changes in riverine organic matter export due to global change.

  9. Physiologically relevant organs on chips.

    PubMed

    Yum, Kyungsuk; Hong, Soon Gweon; Healy, Kevin E; Lee, Luke P

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in integrating microengineering and tissue engineering have generated promising microengineered physiological models for experimental medicine and pharmaceutical research. Here we review the recent development of microengineered physiological systems, or also known as "ogans-on-chips", that reconstitute the physiologically critical features of specific human tissues and organs and their interactions. This technology uses microengineering approaches to construct organ-specific microenvironments, reconstituting tissue structures, tissue-tissue interactions and interfaces, and dynamic mechanical and biochemical stimuli found in specific organs, to direct cells to assemble into functional tissues. We first discuss microengineering approaches to reproduce the key elements of physiologically important, dynamic mechanical microenvironments, biochemical microenvironments, and microarchitectures of specific tissues and organs in microfluidic cell culture systems. This is followed by examples of microengineered individual organ models that incorporate the key elements of physiological microenvironments into single microfluidic cell culture systems to reproduce organ-level functions. Finally, microengineered multiple organ systems that simulate multiple organ interactions to better represent human physiology, including human responses to drugs, is covered in this review. This emerging organs-on-chips technology has the potential to become an alternative to 2D and 3D cell culture and animal models for experimental medicine, human disease modeling, drug development, and toxicology.

  10. Students' Understandings of Human Organs and Organ Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, Michael J.; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    2001-01-01

    Discusses students' understandings of their own internal structure. Analysis shows the extent to which student understanding increases with age and the degree to which students know more about some organs and organ systems than others. Gender differences in the drawings were generally not large and there were some intriguing differences in the…

  11. Diagnosing Organization-Environment "Fit": Implications for Organization Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabarro, John J.

    1974-01-01

    This article has attempted to: (1) describe several dimensions of organization-environment fit; (2) describe some concepts which can be used in diagnosing the degree to which a school system's organization matches the demands and needs of its environment; (3) present some implications of such a diagnosis for OD [organizational development]…

  12. EFFECT OF NON-TARGET ORGANICS ON ORGANIC CHEMICAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To improve our standard of living, man has synthesized organic compounds for use in products considered essential for life. These compounds are having and will continue to have a significant impact on the terrestrial environment. Understanding organic chemical transport through s...

  13. Development and organization of a multiple organ transplantation program.

    PubMed Central

    Bahnson, H T; Starzl, T E; Hakala, T R; Hardesty, R L; Griffith, B P; Iwatsuki, S

    1986-01-01

    Multiple organ transplantation has come of age. Indications are that it will continue to grow, if not flourish. The complexity of modern surgical care, its multiperson dependency, and the need for the surgeon to retain knowledge and involvement with his patient's care and problems are nowhere more evident than in multiple organ transplantation. Each organ presents its own associated challenges, the prime solution of which lies with a skillful and dedicated surgeon; but with all organs there are challenges of expectantly waiting patients, housing during the wait and for postoperative observation, procurement, erratic scheduling of the operating room, nursing, social service, immunosuppression, immunopathology, interest of hospital public relations and of the news media, and perennial care. This report concerns the growth and development of the multiple organ transplant program at the University Health Center of Pittsburgh and describes some answers to the challenges presented. PMID:3521507

  14. Survival strategies of polyphosphate accumulating organisms and glycogen accumulating organisms under conditions of low organic loading.

    PubMed

    Carvalheira, Mónica; Oehmen, Adrian; Carvalho, Gilda; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-11-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is usually limited by organic carbon availability in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) were operated under extended periods with low organic carbon loading in order to examine its impact on their activity and survival. The decrease in organic carbon load affected PAOs and GAOs in different ways, where the biomass decay rate of GAOs was approximately 4times higher than PAOs. PAOs tended to conserve a relatively high residual concentration of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under aerobic conditions, while GAOs tended to deplete their available PHA more rapidly. This slower oxidation rate of PHA by PAOs at residual concentration levels enabled them to maintain an energy source for aerobic maintenance processes for longer than GAOs. This may provide PAOs with an advantage over GAOs in surviving the low organic loading conditions commonly found in full-scale wastewater treatment plants. PMID:25270044

  15. Ensuring ethical behavior in organizations

    SciTech Connect

    Milter, R.G.

    1994-12-31

    This paper examines both the industrial-age and the information-age organization`s attempts to ensure ethical behavior. Organizational responses to deal with this task include establishing written codes, appointing ethics officers, developing ethics committees, training, and impacting educational systems.

  16. Organic Addict. And Why Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilliaud, Denis

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the practice of organic farming as used in Japan. Defines the biodynamic agricultural method based on the principle of the dynamics that control life on earth from the cosmos. Argues that organic farming does not benefit from chemicals used on neighboring farms. (MDH)

  17. Vote No! Managing Organized Opposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lifto, Don E.; Senden, J. Bradford

    2008-01-01

    Organized opposition from A to Z symbolizes both the breadth and the core values of organized opposition groups that have emerged across the nation in recent years. Technological advances have expanded the reach and impact of oppositional messages. Anti-public school websites, group e-mail, the mushrooming blogosphere and web-based marketing…

  18. Acquiring and Organizing Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lare, Gary A.

    This book addresses two areas of need in a curriculum materials center--where to find curriculum materials for acquisition and how to organize these materials for efficient and effective access once they are acquired. The book is arranged in two parts: "Acquiring and Organizing the Collection" and "Resources." The book brings together many…

  19. Diagnosing and Measuring Learning Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moilanen, Raili

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To explore and analyse various learning organizations and to attempt to outline the form of a holistic learning organization. Design/methodology/approach: The tool described in this article is a continuation of the work published in a Licentiate thesis in 1996 and developed further in a doctoral dissertation in 2001. The Learning…

  20. Toward a Science of Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, R. Jean

    Major elements of the theory of social behavior formulated by Talcott Parsons are applied to a study of organization. The organizational model developed is based on Parsons' four functional imperatives of goal attainment, adaptation, integration, and pattern maintenance. Organizations are regarded as social systems distinguished by different…

  1. Managing Careers. Strategies for Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Andrew

    This book is a practical handbook of ideas and tools to set up and implement a framework of "career management." A glossary of terms is provided. Chapter 1 considers what the organization needs. Chapter 2 focuses on the importance of organizational culture in successful change. It looks at sources of influence on an organization's culture and…

  2. Tissue bioengineering and artificial organs.

    PubMed

    Llames, Sara; García, Eva; Otero Hernández, Jesús; Meana, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    The scarcity of organs and tissues for transplant and the need of immunosuppressive drugs to avoid rejection constitute two reasons that justify organ and tissue production in the laboratory. Tissue engineering based tissues (TE) could allow to regenerate the whole organ from a fragment or even to produce several organs from an organ donor for grafting purposes. TE is based in: (1) the ex vivo expansion of cells, (2) the seeding of these expanded cells in tridimensional structures that mimic physiological conditions and, (3) grafting the prototype. In order to graft big structures it is necessary that the organ or tissue produced "ex vivo" bears a vascular tree to ensure the nutrition of its deep layers. At present, no technology has been developed to provide this vascular tree to TE derived products. Thus, these tissues must be thin enough to acquire nutrients during the first days by diffusion from surrounding tissues. This fact constitutes nowadays the greatest limitation of technologies for organ development in the laboratory.In this chapter, all these problems and their possible solutions are commented. Also, the present status of TE techniques in the regeneration of different organ systems is reviewed.

  3. Creating an Innovative Learning Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how to create an innovative learning (iLearning) organization. It begins by discussing the life cycle of knowledge in an organization, followed by a description of the theoretical foundation for iLearning. Next, the article presents an example of iLearning, followed by a description of the distributed nature of work, the…

  4. Organization Development: Strategies and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckhard, Richard

    This book, written for managers, specialists, and students of management, is based largely on the author's experience in helping organization leaders with planned-change efforts, and on related experience of colleagues in the field. Chapter 1 presents the background and causes for the increased concern with organization development and planned…

  5. Genetically modified organisms and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Diamand, E

    1999-12-01

    The genetic modification of organisms for food use has raised serious concern about the potential for adverse effects on the environment, ecosystems and on the health of humans and animals. As a relatively new technology, its impacts remain uncertain but could range from disturbances to the genetic functioning of individual organisms to a reduction in the biodiversity of farmland. As a result, the question of how to monitor for potential impacts is beset with problems. The fact that genetic modification can be used on a range of organisms for a variety of purposes means that those developing monitoring systems will need to be as imaginative as those developing GMOs. In the case of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for food use, concern has focussed on the transfer of genes to other organisms, the potential for effects on non-target organisms, or on the health of humans and animals, and the likelihood of adverse effects on wildlife due to changes in farming practice. As with other new and unfamiliar technologies, genetic modification is also plagued by the problem of uncertainty. Novel genes are inserted randomly into the genome of the host organisms, and this leads to the possibility of unexpected effects. Unanticipated environmental disasters, such as the concentration of persistent organic pollutants in ecosystems at high latitudes, have highlighted the need for monitoring despite the obvious difficulties inherent in monitoring for unexpected effects.

  6. Organic solar cell exploratory research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalenty, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Principles governing the photovoltaic effect in organic materials on the molecular level are studied and applied to the design and fabrication of laboratory devices having a photovoltaic organic polymer film as their key element. Progress to date has been in three areas: (1) materials synthesis; (2) apparatus development; and (3) ultra-thin film fabrication.

  7. Organ printing: promises and challenges.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Drake, Christopher; Markwald, Roger R

    2008-01-01

    Organ printing or biomedical application of rapid prototyping, also defined as additive layer-by-layer biomanufacturing, is an emerging transforming technology that has potential for surpassing traditional solid scaffold-based tissue engineering. Organ printing has certain advantages: it is an automated approach that offers a pathway for scalable reproducible mass production of tissue engineered products; it allows a precised simultaneous 3D positioning of several cell types; it enables creation tissue with a high level of cell density; it can solve the problem of vascularization in thick tissue constructs; finally, organ printing can be done in situ. The ultimate goal of organ-printing technology is to fabricate 3D vascularized functional living human organs suitable for clinical implantation. The main practical outcomes of organ-printing technology are industrial scalable robotic biofabrication of complex human tissues and organs, automated tissue-based in vitro assays for clinical diagnostics, drug discovery and drug toxicity, and complex in vitro models of human diseases. This article describes conceptual framework and recent developments in organ-printing technology, outlines main technological barriers and challenges, and presents potential future practical applications.

  8. Application of Organic Solid Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekido, S.

    1982-01-01

    If ions are considered to be solid material which transport electric charges, polymer materials can then be considered as organic solid electrolytes. The role of these electrolytes is discussed for (1) ion concentration sensors; (2) batteries using lithium as the cathode and a charge complex of organic material and iodine in the anode; and (3) elements applying electrical double layer capability.

  9. Certified organic herb mulching demonstration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of organo-pestiphytology (the study of organic weed control) is to investigate and develop weed control strategies that are fundamental to the cropping system rather than afterthoughts to a production system. The scarcity of approved organic herbicides reinforces the necessity for org...

  10. [Archaebacteria and phylogeny of organisms].

    PubMed

    Kandler, O

    1981-04-01

    The determination of the sequence similarity of the ribosomal 16S RNA of many bacteria and a few higher organisms has shown that the methanogenic, halophilic, and acido-thermophilic organisms are phylogenetically separated from the kingdoms of the Eubacteria and Eukaryotes thus representing a third kingdom called "Archaebacteria". Many biochemical and molecular biological features support this conclusion.

  11. Modeling and Measuring Organization Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkeson, Andrew; Kehoe, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    Manufacturing plants have a clear life cycle: they are born small, grow substantially with age, and eventually die. Economists have long thought that this life cycle is driven by organization capital, the accumulation of plant-specific knowledge. The location of plants in the life cycle determines the size of the payments, or organization rents,…

  12. What's Pragmatic about Community Organizing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, educational researchers and scholars have turned new attention to the theory and practice of community organizing as a method for addressing education injustices. While there are diverse traditions of community organizing work, by far the most influential model in US contexts is that of Saul Alinsky, whose "Rules for Radicals"…

  13. Organ printing: promises and challenges.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Drake, Christopher; Markwald, Roger R

    2008-01-01

    Organ printing or biomedical application of rapid prototyping, also defined as additive layer-by-layer biomanufacturing, is an emerging transforming technology that has potential for surpassing traditional solid scaffold-based tissue engineering. Organ printing has certain advantages: it is an automated approach that offers a pathway for scalable reproducible mass production of tissue engineered products; it allows a precised simultaneous 3D positioning of several cell types; it enables creation tissue with a high level of cell density; it can solve the problem of vascularization in thick tissue constructs; finally, organ printing can be done in situ. The ultimate goal of organ-printing technology is to fabricate 3D vascularized functional living human organs suitable for clinical implantation. The main practical outcomes of organ-printing technology are industrial scalable robotic biofabrication of complex human tissues and organs, automated tissue-based in vitro assays for clinical diagnostics, drug discovery and drug toxicity, and complex in vitro models of human diseases. This article describes conceptual framework and recent developments in organ-printing technology, outlines main technological barriers and challenges, and presents potential future practical applications. PMID:18154465

  14. YOUTH ORGANIZATIONS OTHER THAN CHURCHES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SORENSON, ROY

    THIS PAPER PRESENTS THE ORGANIZATIONS, OTHER THAN CHURCHES, WHICH SERVE RURAL YOUTH. IT DESCRIBES PROGRAMS OF SUCH ORGANIZATIONS AS--(1) THE 4-H CLUB WHICH IS THE LARGEST IN VOLUME AND SPREAD, THE FUTURE FARMERS AND YOUNG FARMERS OF AMERICA, THE GRANGE, THE AMERICAN FARM BUREAU FEDERATION, THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF COOPERATION, THE FUTURE AND NEW…

  15. Organic control of plant diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic agriculture refers to agricultural production systems that are managed according to a number of standards which vary by governing body or political entity, but which share a common philosophy and set of general management practices. In popular culture, organic crop production is generally un...

  16. The Tax Exempt Educational Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Law and Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Outlines the Internal Revenue Service interpretation of qualification for tax-exempt status for educational organizations. Points out that tax-exempt status is revocable and that not all income of tax-exempt organizations is tax free. Reviews the Revenue Act of 1950. (MD)

  17. Organic weed control in watermelons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrated pest management (IPM) is an essential element for certified organic crop production and producers place weed control as their highest research priority within their IPM programs. The objective of these experiments was to investigate the impact of integrated organic weed control systems o...

  18. Integrity in Student Affairs Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    "Integrity" is a term that is intuitively appealing, but hard to define and implement. This chapter discusses those conceptual complexities as well as an ideal portrait of organizations with integrity, a description of the challenges to the integrity of organizations, a discussion of the enhancement of integrity through compliance programs and…

  19. University Organization for Environmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, John E.

    Whether or not environmental concerns provide a visable and continuing basis of university organization is the situation scrutinized in this speech. Apparently part of the problem has been the generation of some theme or model around which a core of interested faculty and students could work. It is implied that some conceptual organization of an…

  20. Placeless Organizations: Collaborating for Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardi, Bonnie A.

    2007-01-01

    This article defines and discusses placeless organizations as sites and generators of learning on a large scale. The emphasis is on how placeless organizations structure themselves to carry out social transformation--necessarily involving intensive learning--on a national or global scale. The argument is made that place is not a necessary…

  1. Extraction of soil organic phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Turner, Benjamin L; Cade-Menun, Barbara J; Condron, Leo M; Newman, Susan

    2005-04-15

    Organic phosphorus is an important component of soil biogeochemical cycles, but must be extracted from soil prior to analysis. Here we critically review the extraction of soil organic phosphorus, including procedures for quantification, speciation, and assessment of biological availability. Quantitative extraction conventionally requires strong acids and bases, which inevitably alter chemical structure. However, a single-step procedure involving sodium hydroxide and EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetate) is suitable for most soils and facilitates subsequent speciation by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Analysis of extracts by molybdate colorimetry is a potential source of error in all procedures, because organic phosphorus is overestimated in the presence of inorganic polyphosphates or complexes between inorganic phosphate and humic substances. Sequential extraction schemes fractionate organic phosphorus based on chemical solubility, but the link to potential bioavailability is misleading. Research should be directed urgently towards establishing extractable pools of soil organic phosphorus with ecological relevance.

  2. Bioengineering of Artificial Lymphoid Organs.

    PubMed

    Nosenko, M A; Drutskaya, M S; Moisenovich, M M; Nedospasov, S A

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses the issue of bioengineering of artificial lymphoid organs.Progress in this field may help to better understand the nature of the structure-function relations that exist in immune organs. Artifical lymphoid organs may also be advantageous in the therapy or correction of immunodefficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. The structural organization, development, and function of lymphoid tissue are analyzed with a focus on the role of intercellular contacts and on the cytokine signaling pathways regulating these processes. We describe various polymeric materials, as scaffolds, for artificial tissue engineering. Finally, published studies in which artificial lymphoid organs were generated are reviewed and possible future directions in the field are discussed. PMID:27437136

  3. Psychiatric Aspects of Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, G.; Desousa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Surgical transplantation of human organs from deceased as well as living donors to sick and dying patients began after the Second World War. Over the past 50 years the transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells has become a worldwide practice which has extended, and greatly enhanced the quality of hundreds of thousands of lives. The field of transplantation medicine provides an important chance for liaison between psychiatric professionals and other transplant physicians and surgeons. The discrepancy between the ever-increasing demand for organs but the decreasing supply makes it important to evaluate and prioritize individuals who are in dire need of the organ. However, this also gives rise to certain ethical questions. The following paper discusses various psychiatric aspects of organ transplantation in general. PMID:25013589

  4. Self-organizing biochemical cycles

    PubMed Central

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    2000-01-01

    I examine the plausibility of theories that postulate the development of complex chemical organization without requiring the replication of genetic polymers such as RNA. One conclusion is that theories that involve the organization of complex, small-molecule metabolic cycles such as the reductive citric acid cycle on mineral surfaces make unreasonable assumptions about the catalytic properties of minerals and the ability of minerals to organize sequences of disparate reactions. Another conclusion is that data in the Beilstein Handbook of Organic Chemistry that have been claimed to support the hypothesis that the reductive citric acid cycle originated as a self-organized cycle can more plausibly be interpreted in a different way. PMID:11058157

  5. Bioengineering of Artificial Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Nosenko, M. A.; Drutskaya, M. S.; Moisenovich, M. M.; Nedospasov, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses the issue of bioengineering of artificial lymphoid organs.Progress in this field may help to better understand the nature of the structure-function relations that exist in immune organs. Artifical lymphoid organs may also be advantageous in the therapy or correction of immunodefficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. The structural organization, development, and function of lymphoid tissue are analyzed with a focus on the role of intercellular contacts and on the cytokine signaling pathways regulating these processes. We describe various polymeric materials, as scaffolds, for artificial tissue engineering. Finally, published studies in which artificial lymphoid organs were generated are reviewed and possible future directions in the field are discussed. PMID:27437136

  6. Tumour of the juxtaoral organ.

    PubMed

    Bénateau, H; Rigau, V; Comoz, F; Benchemam, Y; Galateau, F; Compère, J F

    2003-02-01

    The juxtaoral organ is a normal and constant structure of the oral cavity. It consists of benign epithelial nests. We describe an intraoral tumour of the juxtaoral organ in a child. The tumour was not diagnosed after clinical and radiological examinations because it is extremely rare. A histological examination revealed a tumour of the juxtaoral organ, presumed to be neuroid hamartoma. This is only the second time that a tumour of the juxtaoral organ has been described in a child. We also describe the location, the embryology, the histology and the function of this organ. This is important because this structure can be confused with carcinomas of the oral cavity when examining frozen sections.

  7. Interaction of Organic Cations with Organic Anion Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sun-Young; Eraly, Satish A.; Tsigelny, Igor; Nigam, Sanjay K.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the organic anion transporters (Oats) have focused mainly on their interactions with organic anionic substrates. However, as suggested when Oat1 was originally identified as NKT (Lopez-Nieto, C. E., You, G., Bush, K. T., Barros, E. J., Beier, D. R., and Nigam, S. K. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 6471–6478), since the Oats share close homology with organic cation transporters (Octs), it is possible that Oats interact with cations as well. We now show that mouse Oat1 (mOat1) and mOat3 and, to a lesser degree, mOat6 bind a number of “prototypical” Oct substrates, including 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium. In addition to oocyte expression assays, we have tested binding of organic cations to Oat1 and Oat3 in ex vivo assays by analyzing interactions in kidney organ cultures deficient in Oat1 and Oat3. We also demonstrate that mOat3 transports organic cations such as 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and cimetidine. A pharmacophore based on the binding affinities of the tested organic cations for Oat3 was generated. Using this pharmacophore, we screened a chemical library and were able to identify novel cationic compounds that bound to Oat1 and Oat3. These compounds bound Oat3 with an affinity higher than the highest affinity compounds in the original set of prototypical Oct substrates. Thus, whereas Oat1, Oat3, and Oat6 appear to function largely in organic anion transport, they also bind and transport some organic cations. These findings could be of clinical significance, since drugs and metabolites that under normal physiological conditions do not bind to the Oats may undergo changes in charge and become Oat substrates during pathologic conditions wherein significant variations in body fluid pH occur. PMID:19737926

  8. Putting "Organizations" into an Organization Theory Course: A Hybrid CAO Model for Teaching Organization Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannah, David R.; Venkatachary, Ranga

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a retrospective analysis of an instructor's multiyear redesign of a course on organization theory into what is called a hybrid Classroom-as-Organization model. It is suggested that this new course design served to apprentice students to function in quasi-real organizational structures. The authors further argue…

  9. COSOLVENT EFFECTS ON ORGANIC CHEMICAL PARTITIONING TO SEDIMENT ORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption-desorption hysteresis, slow desorption kinetics and resultant bioavailability, and other nonideal phenomena have been attributed to the differing sorptive characteristics of the natural organic polymers associated with soils and sediments. The objectives of this study we...

  10. Extraterrestrial Organic Compounds in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botta, Oliver; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Many organic compounds or their precursors found in meteorites originated in the interstellar or circumstellar medium and were later incorporated into planetesimals during the formation of the solar system. There they either survived intact or underwent further processing to synthesize secondary products on the meteorite parent body. The most distinct feature of CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites, two types of stony meteorites, is their high carbon content (up to 3% of weight), either in the form of carbonates or of organic compounds. The bulk of the organic carbon consists of an insoluble macromolecular material with a complex structure. Also present is a soluble organic fraction, which has been analyzed by several separation and analytical procedures. Low detection limits can be achieved by derivatization of the organic molecules with reagents that allow for analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. The CM meteorite Murchison has been found to contain more than 70 extraterrestrial amino acids and several other classes of compounds including carboxylic acids, hydroxy carboxylic acids, sulphonic and phosphonic acids, aliphatic, aromatic and polar hydrocarbons, fullerenes, heterocycles as well as carbonyl compounds, alcohols, amines and amides. The organic matter was found to be enriched in deuterium, and distinct organic compounds show isotopic enrichments of carbon and nitrogen relative to terrestrial matter.

  11. Organizing Diverse, Distributed Project Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    SemanticOrganizer is a software application designed to organize and integrate information generated within a distributed organization or as part of a project that involves multiple, geographically dispersed collaborators. SemanticOrganizer incorporates the capabilities of database storage, document sharing, hypermedia navigation, and semantic-interlinking into a system that can be customized to satisfy the specific information-management needs of different user communities. The program provides a centralized repository of information that is both secure and accessible to project collaborators via the World Wide Web. SemanticOrganizer's repository can be used to collect diverse information (including forms, documents, notes, data, spreadsheets, images, and sounds) from computers at collaborators work sites. The program organizes the information using a unique network-structured conceptual framework, wherein each node represents a data record that contains not only the original information but also metadata (in effect, standardized data that characterize the information). Links among nodes express semantic relationships among the data records. The program features a Web interface through which users enter, interlink, and/or search for information in the repository. By use of this repository, the collaborators have immediate access to the most recent project information, as well as to archived information. A key advantage to SemanticOrganizer is its ability to interlink information together in a natural fashion using customized terminology and concepts that are familiar to a user community.

  12. Extraterrestrial organic matter: a review.

    PubMed

    Irvine, W M

    1998-10-01

    We review the nature of the widespread organic material present in the Milky Way Galaxy and in the Solar System. Attention is given to the links between these environments and between primitive Solar System objects and the early Earth, indicating the preservation of organic material as an interstellar cloud collapsed to form the Solar System and as the Earth accreted such material from asteroids, comets and interplanetary dust particles. In the interstellar medium of the Milky Way Galaxy more than 100 molecular species, the bulk of them organic, have been securely identified, primarily through spectroscopy at the highest radio frequencies. There is considerable evidence for significantly heavier organic molecules, particularly polycyclic aromatics, although precise identification of individual species has not yet been obtained. The so-called diffuse interstellar bands are probably important in this context. The low temperature kinetics in interstellar clouds leads to very large isotopic fractionation, particularly for hydrogen, and this signature is present in organic components preserved in carbonaceous chondritic meteorites. Outer belt asteroids are the probable parent bodies of the carbonaceous chondrites, which may contain as much as 5% organic material, including a rich variety of amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, and other species of potential prebiotic interest. Richer in volatiles and hence less thermally processed are the comets, whose organic matter is abundant and poorly characterized. Cometary volatiles, observed after sublimation into the coma, include many species also present in the interstellar medium. There is evidence that most of the Earth's volatiles may have been supplied by a 'late' bombardment of comets and carbonaceous meteorites, scattered into the inner Solar System following the formation of the giant planets. How much in the way of intact organic molecules of potential prebiotic interest survived delivery to the Earth has become an

  13. Extraterrestrial organic matter: a review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.

    1998-01-01

    We review the nature of the widespread organic material present in the Milky Way Galaxy and in the Solar System. Attention is given to the links between these environments and between primitive Solar System objects and the early Earth, indicating the preservation of organic material as an interstellar cloud collapsed to form the Solar System and as the Earth accreted such material from asteroids, comets and interplanetary dust particles. In the interstellar medium of the Milky Way Galaxy more than 100 molecular species, the bulk of them organic, have been securely identified, primarily through spectroscopy at the highest radio frequencies. There is considerable evidence for significantly heavier organic molecules, particularly polycyclic aromatics, although precise identification of individual species has not yet been obtained. The so-called diffuse interstellar bands are probably important in this context. The low temperature kinetics in interstellar clouds leads to very large isotopic fractionation, particularly for hydrogen, and this signature is present in organic components preserved in carbonaceous chondritic meteorites. Outer belt asteroids are the probable parent bodies of the carbonaceous chondrites, which may contain as much as 5% organic material, including a rich variety of amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, and other species of potential prebiotic interest. Richer in volatiles and hence less thermally processed are the comets, whose organic matter is abundant and poorly characterized. Cometary volatiles, observed after sublimation into the coma, include many species also present in the interstellar medium. There is evidence that most of the Earth's volatiles may have been supplied by a 'late' bombardment of comets and carbonaceous meteorites, scattered into the inner Solar System following the formation of the giant planets. How much in the way of intact organic molecules of potential prebiotic interest survived delivery to the Earth has become an

  14. Impact of Organic Contamination on Some Aquatic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Yasser, El-Nahhal; Shawkat, El-Najjar; Samir, Afifi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Contamination of water systems with organic compounds of agricultural uses pose threats to aquatic organisms. Carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, and diuron were considered as model aquatic pollutants in this study. The main objective of this study was to characterize the toxicity of organic contamination to two different aquatic organisms. Materials and Methods: Low concentrations (0.0–60 µmol/L) of carbaryl, diuron and very low concentration (0.0–0.14 µmol/L) of chlorpyrifos and their mixtures were tested against fish and Daphnia magna. Percentage of death and immobilization were taken as indicators of toxicity. Results: Toxicity results to fish and D. magna showed that chlorpyrifos was the most toxic compound (LC50 to fish and D. magna are 0.08, and 0.001 µmol/L respectively), followed by carbaryl (LC50 to fish and D. magna are 43.19 and 0.031 µmol/L), while diuron was the least toxic one (LC50 values for fish and D. magna are 43.48 and 32.11 µmol/L respectively). Mixture toxicity (binary and tertiary mixtures) showed antagonistic effects. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference among mixture toxicities to fish and D. magma. Conclusion: Fish and D. magam were sensitive to low concentrations. These data suggest potent threats to aquatic organisms from organic contamination. PMID:26862260

  15. Probing Molecular Organization and Electronic Dynamics at Buried Organic Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Sean

    2015-03-01

    Organic semiconductors are a promising class of materials due to their ability to meld the charge transport capabilities of semiconductors with many of the processing advantages of plastics. In thin film organic devices, interfacial charge transfer often comprises a crucial step in device operation. As molecular materials, the density of states within organic semiconductors often reflect their intermolecular organization. Truncation of the bulk structure of an organic semiconductor at an interface with another material can lead to substantial changes in the density of states near the interface that can significantly impact rates for interfacial charge and energy transfer. Here, we will present the results of experiments that utilize electronic sum frequency generation (ESFG) to probe buried interfaces in these materials. Within the electric dipole approximation, ESFG is only sensitive to regions of a sample that experience a breakage of symmetry, which occurs naturally at material interfaces. Through modeling of signals measured for thin organic films using a transfer matrix-based formalism, signals from buried interfaces between two materials can be isolated and used to uncover the interfacial density of states.

  16. Organic geochemical analysis of sedimentary organic matter associated with uranium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leventhal, J.S.; Daws, T.A.; Frye, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of sedimentary organic matter from several geologic environments and ages which are enriched in uranium (56 ppm to 12%) have been characterized. The three analytical techniqyes used to study the samples were Rock-Eval pyrolysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and solid-state C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In samples with low uranium content, the pyrolysis-gas chromatography products contain oxygenated functional groups (as hydroxyl) and molecules with both aliphatic and aromatic carbon atoms. These samples with low uranium content give measurable Rock-Eval hydrocarbon and organic-CO2 yields, and C-13 NMR values of > 30% aliphatic carbon. In contrast, uranium-rich samples have few hydrocarbon pyrolysis products, increased Rock-Eval organic-CO2 contents and > 70% aromatic carbon contents from C-13 NMR. The increase in aromaticity and decrease in hydrocarbon pyrolysis yield are related to the amount of uranium and the age of the uranium minerals, which correspond to the degree of radiation damage. The three analytical techniques give complementary results. Increase in Rock-Eval organic-CO2 yield correlates with uranium content for samples from the Grants uranium region. Calculations show that the amount of organic-CO2 corresponds to the quantity of uranium chemically reduced by the organic matter for the Grants uranium region samples. ?? 1986.

  17. Organ Procurement Organizations and the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Howard, R J; Cochran, L D; Cornell, D L

    2015-10-01

    The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) has adversely affected the ability of organ procurement organizations (OPOs) to perform their federally mandated function of honoring the donation decisions of families and donors who have signed the registry. The difficulties gaining access to potential donor medical record has meant that assessment, evaluation, and management of brain dead organ donors has become much more difficult. Delays can occur that can lead to potential recipients not receiving life-saving organs. For over 40 years, OPO personnel have had ready access to paper medical records. But the widespread adoption of EHRs has greatly limited the ability of OPO coordinators to readily gain access to patient medical records and to manage brain dead donors. Proposed solutions include the following: (1) hospitals could provide limited access to OPO personnel so that they could see only the potential donor's medical record; (2) OPOs could join with other transplant organizations to inform regulators of the problem; and (3) hospital organizations could be approached to work with Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to revise the Hospital Conditions of Participation to require OPOs be given access to donor medical records.

  18. Photoredox Catalysis in Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, photoredox catalysis has come to the forefront in organic chemistry as a powerful strategy for the activation of small molecules. In a general sense, these approaches rely on the ability of metal complexes and organic dyes to convert visible light into chemical energy by engaging in single-electron transfer with organic substrates, thereby generating reactive intermediates. In this Perspective, we highlight the unique ability of photoredox catalysis to expedite the development of completely new reaction mechanisms, with particular emphasis placed on multicatalytic strategies that enable the construction of challenging carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bonds. PMID:27477076

  19. Strategic marketing for charitable organizations.

    PubMed

    Barnes, N G; Fitzgibbons, D A

    1992-01-01

    A new marketing strategy unites major for-profit corporations with charitable organizations in such a way that both benefit. Most major charitable organizations are finding cause related marketing a new strategy for fund raising. The largest charities in the country including the Red Cross, Special Olympics and the American Heart Association have all become involved with cause related marketing and have all realized its benefits. With these benefits come some risks. The decade of the 1990s should include increased awareness and participation among charitable organizations regarding cause related marketing. PMID:10118945

  20. Organic Micro/Nanoscale Lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yao, Jiannian; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2016-09-20

    Micro/nanoscale lasers that can deliver intense coherent light signals at (sub)wavelength scale have recently captured broad research interest because of their potential applications ranging from on-chip information processing to high-throughput sensing. Organic molecular materials are a promising kind of ideal platform to construct high-performance microlasers, mainly because of their superiority in abundant excited-state processes with large active cross sections for high gain emissions and flexibly assembled structures for high-quality microcavities. In recent years, ever-increasing efforts have been dedicated to developing such organic microlasers toward low threshold, multicolor output, broadband tunability, and easy integration. Therefore, it is increasingly important to summarize this research field and give deep insight into the structure-property relationships of organic microlasers to accelerate the future development. In this Account, we will review the recent advances in organic miniaturized lasers, with an emphasis on tunable laser performances based on the tailorable microcavity structures and controlled excited-state gain processes of organic materials toward integrated photonic applications. Organic π-conjugated molecules with weak intermolecular interactions readily assemble into regular nanostructures that can serve as high-quality optical microcavities for the strong confinement of photons. On the basis of rational material design, a series of optical microcavities with different structures have been controllably synthesized. These microcavity nanostructures can be endowed with effective four-level dynamic gain processes, such as excited-state intramolecular charge transfer, excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, and excimer processes, that exhibit large dipole optical transitions for strongly active gain behaviors. By tailoring these excited-state processes with molecular/crystal engineering and external stimuli, people have effectively