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Sample records for jordanian organizations

  1. Biodegradation of total organic carbons (TOC) in Jordanian petroleum sludge.

    PubMed

    Mrayyan, Bassam; Battikhi, Mohammed N

    2005-04-11

    Biodegradation is cost-effective, environmentally friendly treatment for oily contaminated sites by the use of microorganisms. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to establish the performance of bacterial isolates in degradation of organic compounds contained in oily sludge from the Jordanian Oil Refinery plant. As a result of the laboratory screening, three natural bacterial consortia capable of degrading total organic carbons (TOC) were prepared from isolates enriched from the oil sludge. Experiments were conducted in Erlenmeyer flasks under aerobic conditions, with TOC removal percentage varied from 0.3 to 28% depending on consortia type and concentration. Consortia 7B and 13B exhibited the highest TOC removal percentage of 28 and 22%, respectively, before nutrient addition. TOC removal rate was enhanced after addition of nutrients to incubated flasks. The highest TOC reduction (43%) was estimated after addition of combination of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphur to consortia 7B. A significant variation (P<0.005) was observed between the effect of consortia type and concentration on TOC% reduction. No significant variation was observed between incubation at 10 and 18 days in TOC% reduction. This is the first report concerning biological treatment of TOC by bacteria isolated from the oil refinery plants, where it lays the ground for full integrated studies recommended for the degradation of organic compounds that assist in solving sludge problems.

  2. Basics of the "Learning Organization" at Jordanian Schools: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawamdeh, Basem; Jaradat, Mohammed H.

    2012-01-01

    The study aims at identifying the extent to which the basics of the "learning organization" (LO) principles are available at Jordanian schools (Pilot TQA schools in Jersah); to this effect, a specially customized questionnaire was developed--it was made of 19 items across three areas: a leadership that supports learning, an environment…

  3. Basics of the "Learning Organization" at Jordanian Schools: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawamdeh, Basem; Jaradat, Mohammed H.

    2012-01-01

    The study aims at identifying the extent to which the basics of the "learning organization" (LO) principles are available at Jordanian schools (Pilot TQA schools in Jersah); to this effect, a specially customized questionnaire was developed--it was made of 19 items across three areas: a leadership that supports learning, an environment…

  4. Synonymy in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alomoush, Omar Ibrahim Salameh

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of synonymy in Jordanian Arabic. It has been assumed that synonymy in Jordanian Arabic has partial rather than complete synonymy. This means that the abundance of Jordanian Arabic in synonyms can be attributed to a number of explanations, namely dialectical variations, the speaker's attitude, and origin…

  5. Assessment of Development of the Learning Organization Concept in Jordanian Industrial Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khadra, Marah F. Abu; Rawabdeh, Ibrahim A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to examine the impact on organizational performance of the application of management and human resource practices, and to attempt to outline key elements and assess development of the learning organization (LO) concept in Jordan. Design/methodology/approach: The tool described in this article assesses…

  6. Organizational Learning Culture, Learning Transfer Climate and Perceived Innovation in Jordanian Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Reid; Khasawneh, Samer

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between organizational learning culture, learning transfer climate, and organizational innovation. The objective was to test the ability of learning organization culture to account for variance in learning transfer climate and subsequent organizational innovation, and to examine the role of learning transfer…

  7. Organizational Learning Culture, Learning Transfer Climate and Perceived Innovation in Jordanian Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Reid; Khasawneh, Samer

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between organizational learning culture, learning transfer climate, and organizational innovation. The objective was to test the ability of learning organization culture to account for variance in learning transfer climate and subsequent organizational innovation, and to examine the role of learning transfer…

  8. Promoting emancipated decision-making for surgical treatment of early stage breast cancer among Jordanian women.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Rana F

    2015-01-01

    To use the critical social theory as a framework to analyze the oppression of Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer in the decision-making process for surgical treatment and suggest strategies to emancipate these women to make free choices. This is a discussion paper utilizing the critical social theory as a framework for analysis. The sexist and paternalistic ideology that characterizes Jordanian society in general and the medical establishment in particular as well as the biomedical ideology are some of the responsible ideologies for the fact that many Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer are denied the right to choose a surgical treatment according to their own preferences and values. The financial and political power of Jordanian medical organizations (e.g., Jordan Medical Council), the weakness of nursing administration in the healthcare system, and the hierarchical organization of Jordanian society, where men are first and women are second, support these oppressing ideologies. Knowledge is a strong tool of power. Jordanian nurses could empower women with early stage breast cancer by enhancing their knowledge regarding their health and the options available for surgical treatment. To successfully emancipate patients, education alone may not be enough; there is also a need for health care providers' support and unconditional acceptance of choice. To achieve the aim of emancipating women with breast cancer from the oppression inherent in the persistence of mastectomy, Jordanian nurses need to recognize that they should first gain greater power and authority in the healthcare system.

  9. Promoting emancipated decision-making for surgical treatment of early stage breast cancer among Jordanian women

    PubMed Central

    Obeidat, Rana F.

    2015-01-01

    To use the critical social theory as a framework to analyze the oppression of Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer in the decision-making process for surgical treatment and suggest strategies to emancipate these women to make free choices. This is a discussion paper utilizing the critical social theory as a framework for analysis. The sexist and paternalistic ideology that characterizes Jordanian society in general and the medical establishment in particular as well as the biomedical ideology are some of the responsible ideologies for the fact that many Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer are denied the right to choose a surgical treatment according to their own preferences and values. The financial and political power of Jordanian medical organizations (e.g., Jordan Medical Council), the weakness of nursing administration in the healthcare system, and the hierarchical organization of Jordanian society, where men are first and women are second, support these oppressing ideologies. Knowledge is a strong tool of power. Jordanian nurses could empower women with early stage breast cancer by enhancing their knowledge regarding their health and the options available for surgical treatment. To successfully emancipate patients, education alone may not be enough; there is also a need for health care providers’ support and unconditional acceptance of choice. To achieve the aim of emancipating women with breast cancer from the oppression inherent in the persistence of mastectomy, Jordanian nurses need to recognize that they should first gain greater power and authority in the healthcare system. PMID:27981122

  10. Jordanian School Counselors' Leadership Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsmadi, Rana; Mahasneh, Randa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the degree to which Jordanian school counselors were seen by teachers and principals to possess and display leadership behaviors related to Bolman and Deal's (1997) transformational "four framework approach" to leadership. This was based on the view that such leadership would relate to…

  11. Nuclear analysis of Jordanian tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saleh, K. A.; Saleh, N. S.

    The concentration of trace and minor elements in six different Jordanian and two foreign brands of cigarette tobacco and wrapping paper were determined using combined X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Rutherford backscatteing (RBS) analysis techniques. The cigarette filter and the ash were also analyzed to determine the trapped elements on the filter and their transference with smoke. The toxic effects of some elements have been briefly discussed.

  12. Multiple Intelligences of Students at Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khataybeh, Abdalla; Al-Sheikh, Kholoud

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating different intelligence types among Jordanian students at different public and private universities in Jordan. To achieve such aim, it sought to identify and rank multiple intelligences that characterize students at Jordanian universities, and to identify and rank the differences in multiple intelligences…

  13. Multiple Intelligences of Students at Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khataybeh, Abdalla; Al-Sheikh, Kholoud

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating different intelligence types among Jordanian students at different public and private universities in Jordan. To achieve such aim, it sought to identify and rank multiple intelligences that characterize students at Jordanian universities, and to identify and rank the differences in multiple intelligences…

  14. Nurses' perceptions of patient safety culture in Jordanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Khater, W A; Akhu-Zaheya, L M; Al-Mahasneh, S I; Khater, R

    2015-03-01

    Patients' safety culture is a key aspect in determining healthcare organizations' ability to address and reduce risks of patients. Nurses play a major role in patients' safety because they are accountable for direct and continuous patient care. There is little known information about patients' safety culture in Jordanian hospitals, particularly from the perspective of healthcare providers. The study aimed to assess patient safety culture in Jordanian hospitals from nurses' perspective. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was utilized. A total number of 658 nurses participated in the current study. Data were collected using an Arabic version of the hospital survey of patients' safety culture. Teamwork within unit dimensions had a high positive response, and was perceived by nurses to be the only strong suit in Jordanian hospitals. Areas that required improvement, as perceived by nurses, are as follows: communication openness, staffing, handoff and transition, non-punitive responses to errors, and teamwork across units. Regression analysis revealed factors, from nurses' perspectives, that influenced patients' safety culture in Jordanian hospital. Factors included age, total years of experience, working in university hospitals, utilizing evidence-based practice and working in hospitals that consider patient safety to be a priority. Participants in this study were limited to nurses. Therefore, there is a need to assess patient safety culture from other healthcare providers' perspectives. Moreover, the use of a self-reported questionnaire introduced the social desirability biases. The current study provides insight into how nurses perceive patient safety culture. Results of this study have revealed that there is a need to replace the traditional culture of shame/blame with a non-punitive culture. Study results implied that improving patient safety culture requires a fundamental transformation of nurses' work environment. New policies to improve collaboration between

  15. Remarks on simple interpolation between Jordanian twists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meljanac, Stjepan; Meljanac, Daniel; Pachoł, Anna; Pikutić, Danijel

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a simple generalization of the locally r-symmetric Jordanian twist, resulting in the one-parameter family of Jordanian twists. All the proposed twists differ by the coboundary twists and produce the same Jordanian deformation of the corresponding Lie algebra. They all provide the κ-Minkowski spacetime commutation relations. Constructions from noncommutative coordinates to the star product and coproduct, and from the star product to the coproduct and the twist are presented. The corresponding twist in the Hopf algebroid approach is given. Our results are presented symbolically by a diagram relating all of the possible constructions.

  16. A comparison of intimate partner violence between Jordanian nurses and Jordanian women.

    PubMed

    Al-Natour, Ahlam; Gillespie, Gordon Lee; Wang, Lihshing Leigh; Felblinger, Dianne

    2014-01-01

    Intimate partner violence is a serious international problem. It is not known if the extent of intimate partner violence for Jordanian nurses is similar to that of Jordanian women. Until the rate is known, implementation of nursing interventions for Jordanian women may be thwarted. The study purpose was to determine the rate of intimate partner violence among Jordanian nurses working in governmental health settings in a northern city of Jordan and to compare the rate to published statistics for a community sample of Jordanian women. A cross-sectional survey design was used for this study. A stratified random sample of 80 Jordanian nurses working in governmental women's health centers and public hospitals in a northern city of Jordan was invited to participate. Institutional review board approval was granted. Participants completed the Woman Abuse Screening Tool in a private room at their work site. No identifiers were added to the survey forms. Chi-squared goodness-of-fit tests were computed to compare the rate of intimate partner violence between the study sample and reported statistics for Jordanian women. Approximately 59% of participants experienced psychological violence, 12.5% experienced physical violence, and 5.1% experienced sexual violence. No significant differences were found in the rates of violence for the study sample and published data for a community sample of Jordanian women. Intimate partner violence is as prevalent against Jordanian nurses as it is for Jordanian women. Intimate partner violence needs to be addressed to prevent potential sequelae such as decreased work productivity and an inability to provide safe patient care.

  17. Expanding the Lexicon: The Case of Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sa'aida, Zainab

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore (non)morphological processes that native speakers of Jordanian Urban Arabic and Jordanian Rural Arabic use to expand their own lexicon. Three Jordanian female respondents were interviewed to collect data. The data consist of transcriptions of recorded tokens, which were categorised into groups according to the…

  18. Effectiveness of Teaching Approaches of In-Service Training Courses for EFL Teachers in Jordanian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Wreikat, Yazan Abdel Aziz Semreen; Bin Abdullah, Muhamad Kamarul Kabilan

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of the organization of teaching approaches on the effectiveness of training for Jordanian EFL teachers. The sample for this study is drawn from all government schools in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. The study uses a mixed-method approach whereby findings are triangulated throughout (in interviews, observations,…

  19. Investigating and profiling the leadership behaviours of Jordanian nursing leaders.

    PubMed

    Mrayyan, Majd; Khasawneh, Israa

    Leadership' is a social process in which a member or members of a group influence the interpretation of events, choice of goals/outcomes, organization of work activities, motivation, abilities, power relations, and shared orientations. This study identifies leadership behaviours of Jordanian nursing leaders. A descriptive comparative design was used to collect data from four governmental and three private hospitals. Data were collected during April 2005. The total number of recruited nursing leaders was 140 with a 70% response rate. T-tests and chi-squares were performed to compare the phenomenon of interest. The mean reported leadership behaviours were slightly higher in private hospitals than those in governmental hospitals. However, more than half of the time, leaders in both types of hospitals used supportive leadership behaviours. There were significant differences between governmental and private hospitals in most demographics of the sample. Based on types of hospitals and gender, differences in leadership behaviours were advantageous for nursing leaders in private hospitals, while differences based on units and wards were advantageous for nursing leaders in governmental hospitals. In general, Jordanian nursing leaders used supportive leadership behaviours. Differences in leadership behaviours have implications for nursing practice, research, and education.

  20. Agrammatism in Jordanian-Arabic Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albustanji, Yusuf M.; Milman, Lisa H.; Fox, Robert A.; Bourgeois, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    The studies of agrammatism show that not all morpho-syntactic elements are impaired to the same degree and that some of this variation may be due to language-specific differences. This study investigated the production of morpho-syntactic elements in 15 Jordanian-Arabic (JA) speaking individuals with agrammatism and 15 age-matched neurologically…

  1. Integrating Service Learning in Jordanian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahasneh, Randa; Tawalbeh, Aisheh; Al-Smadi, Rana; Ghaith, Souad; Dajani, Rana

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this exploratory study is to test "Service Learning" as a teaching and learning strategy in Jordanian universities by integrating service learning into a counselling course at the Hashemite University. After providing a 12-h service at 10 service locations, a 16-item questionnaire was administered to 60 senior counselling…

  2. Attitudes of Jordanian Society toward Wife Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Btoush, Rula; Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors conducted an exploratory study among a convenience sample of 260 Jordanian men and women, using self-administered open and closed questions to examine the participants' approach toward wife abuse. In general, there was high awareness of wife abuse and the different types of abuse (mainly physical and psychological), a general tendency…

  3. Analysis of Jordanian phosphate using nuclear techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, N.S.; Al-Saleh, K.A.

    1987-09-01

    The concentrations of major, minor and trace element content of Jordanian phosphate ores were determined using different complementary nuclear techniques. These techniques were: Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (GRS), X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Special emphasis was given to the determination of Uranium and rare earth element concentrations.

  4. Jordanian patients' satisfaction with pain management.

    PubMed

    Darawad, Muhammad W; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud; Saleh, Ali M; Al-Sutari, Manal

    2014-03-01

    Pain is still undertreated among hospitalized patients. Recently, patient satisfaction with pain management has received significant attention. This field has not yet been explored among Jordanian patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge regarding pain characteristics, beliefs, and satisfaction that can be included in planning pain management strategies and protocols within Jordanian hospitals. Using descriptive cross-sectional methodology, the American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire (APS-POQ) was used to survey 375 inpatients from Jordanian hospitals. Participants reported relatively severe pain and pain interferences while being hospitalized and seemed to be well informed regarding pain and pain management. Participants reported high levels of pain management satisfaction. Also, the Arabic version of the APS-POQ was found to be reliable among the Jordanian population. Findings of this study are similar to those reported by earlier studies in other countries and support the need for applying the caring attitude in managing patients' reports of having pain. This study is the first in Jordan, opening the door for future studies to be conducted in this important field.

  5. Agrammatism in Jordanian-Arabic Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albustanji, Yusuf M.; Milman, Lisa H.; Fox, Robert A.; Bourgeois, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    The studies of agrammatism show that not all morpho-syntactic elements are impaired to the same degree and that some of this variation may be due to language-specific differences. This study investigated the production of morpho-syntactic elements in 15 Jordanian-Arabic (JA) speaking individuals with agrammatism and 15 age-matched neurologically…

  6. Integrating Service Learning in Jordanian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahasneh, Randa; Tawalbeh, Aisheh; Al-Smadi, Rana; Ghaith, Souad; Dajani, Rana

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this exploratory study is to test "Service Learning" as a teaching and learning strategy in Jordanian universities by integrating service learning into a counselling course at the Hashemite University. After providing a 12-h service at 10 service locations, a 16-item questionnaire was administered to 60 senior counselling…

  7. Jordanian teachers' perceptions of voice handicap.

    PubMed

    Marie, Basem S; Natour, Yaser S; Haj-Tas, Maisa A

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate if Jordanian school teachers perceive their voice as handicapped using the Voice Handicap Index (VHI)-Arab. The effect of teachers' age, gender, years of teaching, class taught, and education level on VHI was examined. A total of 289 teachers and a control group of 100 participants took part in the study. The teachers' group differed significantly from the control group in the physical, emotional, and functional subscales and the total score of the VHI-Arab. There was no significant difference among teachers in any of the three VHI subscales or total regarding gender, age, years of teaching experience, education level, and classes taught. Jordanian teachers have a strong perception of voice handicap. Thus, preventive and treatment vocal programs are strongly advised.

  8. Lifestyle practices of Jordanian pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, M; Al-Ma'aitah, R; Al Jada, N

    2005-06-01

    Although many improvements have been made in the area of women's health in Jordan, women during pregnancy still face many health problems that put their lives at risk. This is evident in the relatively high Maternal Mortality Rate, anaemia, low birth weight and other problems related to their lifestyle practices during pregnancy (Jordanian Ministry of Health 1998). To describe the health-promoting lifestyle behaviours of Jordanian pregnant women. The Maternal Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile (MHPLP), based on the Health Promotion Model, was modified to measure maternal practices. A representative sample of 400 Jordanian pregnant women in their 20th week of gestation or beyond were recruited from five public Maternal and Child Health Centres in the city of Irbid, in the northern part of Jordan. The MHPLP measures six dimensions: physical activity, stress management, self-actualization, nutrition, health responsibility and interpersonal support. Data were analysed by using descriptive analysis. The women reported high scores on health responsibility and self-actualization, moderate scores on interpersonal support and nutrition, and low scores on physical activity and stress management behaviours. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY, PRACTICE AND RESEARCH: The findings have implications for the quality of care delivered through the maternal and child health services. Health promotion and healthy lifestyle need to be an integral part of health services provided for pregnant women. Further research is needed to develop an instrument that integrates the cultural beliefs relating to lifestyle practices of Jordanian pregnant women mainly in the areas of physical activities and stress management. Policy implications of the findings are discussed.

  9. American, Jordanian, and Other Middle Eastern National Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szalay, Lorand B.; Strohl, Jean Bryson

    International perceptions of Jordanian university students are compared with those of American, Egyptian, and Israeli students. The sample consisted of 50 students from each country; results concentrate on Jordanian perceptions. Assessments were based on the Associative Group Analysis (AGA) which reconstructs perceptions and attitudes…

  10. A Linguistic Analysis on Errors Committed by Jordanian EFL Undergraduate Students: A Case of News Headlines in Jordanian Newspapers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Karazoun, Ghada Abdelmajid

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated some linguistic errors committed by Jordanian EFL undergraduate students when translating news headlines in Jordanian newspapers from Arabic to English and vice versa. The data of the study was collected through a test composed of (30) English news headlines and (30) Arabic ones covering various areas of news occurring in a…

  11. Leadership Effectiveness in Jordanian Educational Institutions: A Comparison of Jordanian Female and Male leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Tineh, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Senior leadership positions in Jordanian Ministry of Education are held predominantly by men. Women are teachers and/or school principals. This under-representation of women is primarily due to culturally derived stereotypes that see women as teachers or school principals, but not as superintendents. The purpose of this study was to investigate,…

  12. Leadership Effectiveness in Jordanian Educational Institutions: A Comparison of Jordanian Female and Male leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Tineh, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Senior leadership positions in Jordanian Ministry of Education are held predominantly by men. Women are teachers and/or school principals. This under-representation of women is primarily due to culturally derived stereotypes that see women as teachers or school principals, but not as superintendents. The purpose of this study was to investigate,…

  13. Jordanian pharmaceutical companies: are their marketing efforts paying off?

    PubMed

    Al-Shaikh, Mustafa S; Torres, Ivonne M; Zuniga, Miguel A; Ghunaim, Ayman

    2011-04-01

    The pharmaceuticals industry is one of the main industries in Jordan. Jordanian pharmaceuticals rank third in the export industry of this country. This study aims to examine the strengths that Jordanian pharmaceutical companies have, which, in turn, form their competitiveness base. In addition, this study aims to identify their weaknesses and the effects of marketing their products in the local market. What is the relationship between Jordanian pharmaceutical product quality, price and value, and the competitiveness of pharmaceutical companies in the local market? Our study aims to answer this and other questions. Our results and practical implications are discussed.

  14. Assessment of Jordanian salt using nuclear techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saleh, K.A.; Arafah, D.E.; Jabr, I.J.; Saleh, N.S.

    1987-09-01

    Elemental study and concentration determinations have been conducted on Jordanian crude salt using Rutherford Back-Scattering (RBS) and X-ray Fluorescence (SRF) spectrometry techniques. Analysis have also been carried out on different purified salt samples available in the local market. The concentration of some elements, in particular bromide, content and its significance on human health and nutrition is discussed. Results reveal relatively high traces of elemental concentrations in crude salt. For example, bromide concentration ranges from 178 to 384 ppm in comparison to a tolerance limit of 30 ppm set by the Unites States Food and Drug Administration (USDA) and other International Agencies like FAO/WHO. It is suggested that refining crude salt may result in a reduction of bromide concentration and other traces considerably, thus making it feasible for human consumption.

  15. Knowledge and awareness about diabetes and periodontal health among Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Al Habashneh, Rola; Khader, Yousef; Hammad, Mohammed M; Almuradi, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the awareness, perception, sources of information, and knowledge of diabetes mellitus and periodontal health among Jordanians, to examine the factors related to their knowledge, and organize effective education programs. A random sample of 500 diabetic patients was recruited from three hospitals and three comprehensive health centers that represent both urban and rural populations in Jordan between September 25, 2006, and February 20, 2007. Completed questionnaires with the answers were returned by 405 participants (response rate was 81%). Only 28% indicated that they followed up gum diseases with the dentist; 48% were aware that diabetic patients are more prone to gum diseases and oral health complications. About a third (38%) recognized that their periodontal health might affect their glycaemic level. Television and Internet were the main source of knowledge for dentists with the rate of 50%. Knowledge about diabetes and periodontal health among diabetic patients is low, and majority of patients were unaware of the oral health complications of their disease and the need for proper preventive care. Issues on education need to be addressed. Therefore, appropriate educational programs should be planned according to community needs, and the target of these programs should be patients with irregular visits to the dentist and physicians. The clinical implication of our findings is that dentists, physicians, and other health providers should inspect diabetic patients for gum diseases each time they come for care and recommend that diabetic patient see a dentist regularly. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Jordanian nurses' barriers to screening for intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Al-Natour, Ahlam; Gillespie, Gordon L; Felblinger, Dianne; Wang, Leigh L

    2014-12-01

    Screening rates for intimate partner violence (IPV) among nurses are still very low. The study purpose is to evaluate IPV screening and barriers by Jordanian nurses. A cross-sectional design was used with a stratified random sample (N = 125) of Jordanian nurses. Findings included a significantly lower IPV screening rate among Jordanian nurses compared with those in the United States, no difference in screening between IPV victims compared with non-victimized nurses, and that the IPV screening barriers related to a lack of system support were the most clinically important barriers. Nurses can work in partnership with health care providers and managers to increase screening and overcome barriers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Burnout, social support, and job satisfaction among Jordanian mental health nurses.

    PubMed

    Hamaideh, Shaher H

    2011-01-01

    Burnout occurs in occupations, such as nursing, where a significant proportion of time is spent in close involvement with other people. Mental health nursing has been considered an area that is subjected to high levels of burnout. Burnout in mental health nursing affects both individuals and organizations. The purposes of this study were to measure the levels of burnout and identify the correlates of burnout among Jordanian mental health nurses. A descriptive correlational design was used to collect data from mental health nurses using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Social Support Scale, Job Satisfaction Scale, and demographic and work-related variables through a self-reported questionnaire. The sample consisted of 181 mental health nurses recruited from all mental health settings in Jordan. Jordanian mental health nurses showed high levels of emotional exhaustion and moderate levels of depersonalization and personal accomplishment. Scores of job satisfaction and social support were slightly higher than the midrange. Significant correlations were found among burnout categories, job satisfaction, social support, and demographic and work-related variables. Predictor variables accounted for 32.7% of emotional exhaustion, 27.7% of depersonalization, and 16.8% of personal accomplishment. Results revealed that a comprehensive interventional approach aimed at minimizing the risk of burnout among mental health nurses is needed. Such an approach should involve interventions at both individual and organizational levels.

  18. Obesity and Body Size Preferences of Jordanian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madanat, Hala; Hawks, Steven R.; Angeles, Heidi N.

    2011-01-01

    The nutrition transition is associated with increased obesity rates and increased desire to be thin. This study evaluates the relationship between actual body size and desired body size among a representative sample of 800 Jordanian women. Using Stunkard's body silhouettes, women were asked to identify their current and ideal body sizes, healthy…

  19. Negative Particles and Morphemes in Jordanian Arabic Dialects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mrayat, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating the negative particles and morphemes in three main Jordanian dialects (Urban, Rural and Bedouin). This quantitative and qualitative study includes 30 teachers from different disciplines who use these dialects. The sample of the study was selected randomly. The research used two research instruments, a checklist and…

  20. Jordanian School Counselors' Knowledge about and Attitudes toward Diabetes Mellitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannous, Adel G.; Khateeb, Jamal M.; Khamra, Hatem A.; Hadidi, Muna S.; Natour, Mayada M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and attitudes of Jordanian school counselors toward diabetes mellitus. A sample of 295 counselors completed a questionnaire consisting of two parts concerning knowledge and attitudes. The face validity of the questionnaire was assessed using an informed panel of judges, and its reliability was established…

  1. Quality of Work Life: Perceptions of Jordanian Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zboon, Eman K.; Al_Dababneh, Khuloud A. H.; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the level of quality of work life QOWL of Jordanian special education teachers. Participants of the study were 133 special education teachers. Results showed that special education teachers cited average level of QOWL. Furthermore, teachers rated administrators' and colleagues' respect as the…

  2. Overt and Null Subject Pronouns in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Momani, Islam M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims at examining the role that morphology plays in allowing and/or motivating sentences in Jordanian Arabic (hereafter JA) to be formed with or without subject pronouns. It also aims at giving a comprehensive and descriptive presentation of the distribution of overt and null subject pronouns in JA, and tries to determine to what extent…

  3. The Type of Curriculum Activities Implemented in Jordanian Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Jamal; Fayez, Merfat; Al-Zboon, Eman Khleif

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to ascertain the nature of curriculum activities in Jordanian preschools. Fifteen preschools participated in the study. Data were collected by observing the children in their daily routines, as well as analysing their writings and drawings. Data were translated from Arabic to English before analysing it. Four main categories were…

  4. Barriers of Using Educational Games in Jordanian Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljaraideh, Yousef Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the barriers that prevent Jordanian teachers at primary schools in Jerash governorate from using computer games into the classroom. To achieve this goal, a descriptive analysis procedure was used in this study. The sample of study consisted of (240) English, Mathematics and social studies teachers. The questionnaire…

  5. The Licensing of Negative Sensitive Items in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsarayreh, Atef

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the licensing conditions on Negative Sensitive Items (NSIs) in Jordanian Arabic (JA). JA exhibits both types of NSIs that are discussed in the literature: Negative Polarity Items (NPIs) and Negative Concord Items (NCIs). Although these two sets of items seem to form a natural class in the sense that they show certain…

  6. Quality of Life of Students with Disabilites Attending Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zboon, Eman; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Theeb, Raied Sheikh

    2014-01-01

    In spite of increasing number of students with disabilities in universities, there is limited research on quality of life of these students. This study aimed to identify the quality of life level of undergraduate students with disabilities at Jordanian universities. The sample consisted of (147) students. A quality of life scale was constructed,…

  7. The New Faculty Members' Concerns: The Case of Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qudais, Mahmoud Abu; Al-Omari, Aieman; Smadi, Rana

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify and interpret concerns of the new faculty members in Jordanian universities. A total of 336 new faculty members who participated in this study were asked to rate their perceptions of issues related to teaching, research, service, balancing work and home life and the academic culture of their workplace. Means and…

  8. Approaches To Teaching Science in the Jordanian Primary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qualter, Anne; Abu-Hola, I. R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a study of the influence of different approaches to teaching units from the Jordanian science curriculum on over 600 students from grades 6, 9, and 10. Trains a small sample of male and female teachers in the use of cooperative learning and lecture-demonstration approaches to teaching. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/YDS)

  9. The Type of Curriculum Activities Implemented in Jordanian Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Jamal; Fayez, Merfat; Al-Zboon, Eman Khleif

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to ascertain the nature of curriculum activities in Jordanian preschools. Fifteen preschools participated in the study. Data were collected by observing the children in their daily routines, as well as analysing their writings and drawings. Data were translated from Arabic to English before analysing it. Four main categories were…

  10. Jordanian School Counselors' Knowledge about and Attitudes toward Diabetes Mellitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannous, Adel G.; Khateeb, Jamal M.; Khamra, Hatem A.; Hadidi, Muna S.; Natour, Mayada M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and attitudes of Jordanian school counselors toward diabetes mellitus. A sample of 295 counselors completed a questionnaire consisting of two parts concerning knowledge and attitudes. The face validity of the questionnaire was assessed using an informed panel of judges, and its reliability was established…

  11. Jordanian Preservice Primary Teachers' Perceptions of Mentoring in Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abed, Osama H.; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    Quality mentoring is fundamental to preservice teacher education because of its potential to help student and novice teachers develop the academic and pedagogical knowledge and skills germane to successful induction into the profession. This study focused on Jordanian preservice primary teachers' perceptions of their mentoring experiences as these…

  12. Approaches To Teaching Science in the Jordanian Primary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qualter, Anne; Abu-Hola, I. R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a study of the influence of different approaches to teaching units from the Jordanian science curriculum on over 600 students from grades 6, 9, and 10. Trains a small sample of male and female teachers in the use of cooperative learning and lecture-demonstration approaches to teaching. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/YDS)

  13. Factors Affecting the Acquisition of Plural Morphology in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albirini, Abdulkafi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the development of plural morphology in Jordanian Arab children, and explores the role of the predictability, transparency, productivity, and frequency of different plural forms in determining the trajectory that children follow in acquiring this complex inflectional system. The study also re-examines the development of the…

  14. Instant Messaging Language in Jordanian Female School Students' Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabab'ah, Ghaleb A.; Rabab'ah, Bayan B.; Suleiman, Nour A.

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to examine the existence of Instant Messaging language phenomenon among female teenagers in some Jordanian private schools and its influence on their learning experience, mainly literacy. It also raises questions about the characteristics of textese as well as teachers' attitude towards their students' use of SMS language in their…

  15. Obesity and Body Size Preferences of Jordanian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madanat, Hala; Hawks, Steven R.; Angeles, Heidi N.

    2011-01-01

    The nutrition transition is associated with increased obesity rates and increased desire to be thin. This study evaluates the relationship between actual body size and desired body size among a representative sample of 800 Jordanian women. Using Stunkard's body silhouettes, women were asked to identify their current and ideal body sizes, healthy…

  16. Factors Affecting the Acquisition of Plural Morphology in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albirini, Abdulkafi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the development of plural morphology in Jordanian Arab children, and explores the role of the predictability, transparency, productivity, and frequency of different plural forms in determining the trajectory that children follow in acquiring this complex inflectional system. The study also re-examines the development of the…

  17. The Licensing of Negative Sensitive Items in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsarayreh, Atef

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the licensing conditions on Negative Sensitive Items (NSIs) in Jordanian Arabic (JA). JA exhibits both types of NSIs that are discussed in the literature: Negative Polarity Items (NPIs) and Negative Concord Items (NCIs). Although these two sets of items seem to form a natural class in the sense that they show certain…

  18. Quality of Work Life: Perceptions of Jordanian Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zboon, Eman K.; Al_Dababneh, Khuloud A. H.; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the level of quality of work life QOWL of Jordanian special education teachers. Participants of the study were 133 special education teachers. Results showed that special education teachers cited average level of QOWL. Furthermore, teachers rated administrators' and colleagues' respect as the…

  19. Preparing Teachers for Inclusion: Jordanian Preservice Early Childhood Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayez, Merfat; Dababneh, Kholoud; Jumiaan, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted during a period of national educational reforms in Jordan to investigate Jordanian preservice early childhood teachers' attitudes toward inclusion and the adequacy of their current preparation for implementing inclusion. The study also sought to identify the perceived concerns of preservice early childhood teachers about…

  20. Deixis in Spontaneous Speech of Jordanian Urban Arabic Native Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sa'aida, Zainab

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at describing types and usages of deixis in the speech of Jordanian Urban Arabic native speakers. The present study was conducted in different settings which researcher's family members, friends, colleagues, and acquaintances took part in. Data of the study were collected through observing spontaneous speech of native speakers of…

  1. Dual/Duel Identities: Jordanian Perceptions of Academic Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marar, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to address how the sociopolitical climate in Jordan facilitates, perpetuates, and/or alleviates negative or positive views of Palestinians from the perspective of Jordanian university graduates. The qualitative study looked specifically at how education and the "hidden curriculum" addresses coexistence. (Contains 1…

  2. Jordanian Preservice Primary Teachers' Perceptions of Mentoring in Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abed, Osama H.; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    Quality mentoring is fundamental to preservice teacher education because of its potential to help student and novice teachers develop the academic and pedagogical knowledge and skills germane to successful induction into the profession. This study focused on Jordanian preservice primary teachers' perceptions of their mentoring experiences as these…

  3. Information Technology in a Developing Country: An Exploration of the Factors Associated with Attitudes of Decision Makers in Jordanian Government Institutions toward the Utilization of Computer-Based Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khasawneh, Saleh

    2010-01-01

    In this era of rapidly advancing technologies, many governments around the globe are spending a great amount of money on these technologies, in order to increase their work performance. Therefore, the Jordanian government decided to implement IT in its public organizations. However, the picture is unclear about users' attitudes toward this…

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life Among Jordanian Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Eman Mohammad; Hammad, Sawsan Mohammad; Shaheen, Abeer; Amre, Huda Musa

    2017-06-01

    Adolescence is an unpredictable stage of life with varied and rapid changes. In Jordan, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been examined among diabetic and obese children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to assess the HRQoL of Jordanian healthy adolescents. Three hundred fifty-four male and female adolescents whose ages ranged from 12 to 19 participated in the study. A descriptive comparative design was employed to investigate adolescents' HRQoL. The results revealed statistically significant differences in physical well-being, psychosocial well-being, and autonomy in favor of male adolescents. In addition, statistically significant differences were observed in favor of nonsmoker adolescents in psychosocial well-being, self-perception, parent relations and home life, financial resources, social relations and peers and school environment. In conclusion, the creation of a school health nurse role in Jordanian schools is crucial for helping adolescents improve their health.

  5. On jordanian deformations of AdS5 and supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoare, Ben; van Tongeren, Stijn J.

    2016-10-01

    We consider various homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations of the {{AdS}}5× {{{S}}}5 superstring that can be obtained from the η-deformed superstring and related models by singular boosts. The jordanian deformations we obtain in this way behave similarly to the η-deformed model with regard to supergravity: T dualizing the classical sigma model it is possible to find corresponding solutions of supergravity, which, however, have dilatons that prevent T dualizing back. Hence the backgrounds of these jordanian deformations are not solutions of supergravity. Still, they do satisfy a set of recently found modified supergravity equations which implies that the corresponding sigma models are scale invariant. The abelian models that we obtain by singular boosts do directly correspond to solutions of supergravity. In addition to our main results we consider contraction limits of our main example, which do correspond to supergravity solutions.

  6. Jordanian deformation of the open XXX spin chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulish, P. P.; Manojlović, N.; Nagy, Z.

    2010-05-01

    We find the general solution of the reflection equation associated with the Jordanian deformation of the SL(2)-invariant Yang R-matrix. A special scaling limit of the XXZ model with general boundary conditions leads to the same K-matrix. Following the Sklyanin formalism, we derive the Hamiltonian with the boundary terms in explicit form. We also discuss the structure of the spectrum of the deformed XXX model and its dependence on the boundary conditions.

  7. Jordanian deformation of the open sℓ(2) Gaudin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    António, N. Cirilo; Manojlović, N.; Nagy, Z.

    2014-04-01

    We derive a deformed sℓ( 2) Gaudin model with integrable boundaries. Starting from the Jordanian deformation of the SL( 2)-invariant Yang R-matrix and generic solutions of the associated reflection equation and the dual reflection equation, we obtain the corresponding inhomogeneous spin- 1/2 XXX chain. The semiclassical expansion of the transfer matrix yields the deformed sℓ( 2) Gaudin Hamiltonians with boundary terms.

  8. A Survey of E-Learning Implementation Best Practices in Jordanian Government Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Tarawneh, Haroon Salem; Allahawiah, Sattam

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the research reported in this article is to understand the extent of e-learning implementation practices currently in use in Jordanian government universities. In order to achieve this objective, a survey of e-learning implementation practice in Jordanian universities was conducted. A detailed description of the survey procedures…

  9. Jordanian Mothers' Perceptions of Their Children's Social Competence: An Examination of Family Factors and Demographic Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Taleb, Tagreed Fathi; AlZoubi, Rifa Rafe

    2015-01-01

    Children's social competence is an area of research that receives minimal attention from Jordanian researchers. It is important to investigate this area of development so as to provide parents with information about the nature of social competence and possible factors affecting its development. This research study examined Jordanian mothers'…

  10. Self-Esteem Profile among the Female Futsal-Football Players at Jordanian Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khasawneh, Aman

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the level of physical and body self-esteem among the female futsal - football players at Jordanian clubs. The sample of the study was composed of (38) female players among the Jordanian clubs' players of futsal-football who were chosen randomly out of the study community, and the self-esteem scale was used,…

  11. Performing the "Knights of Change": Male Youth Narratives and Practices of Citizenship in Jordanian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirazi, Roozbeh

    2012-01-01

    Through educational campaigns and partnerships with the international community, the Jordanian government has indicated a desire to create a more loyal, democratic, and self-enterprising citizenry. While the participation of girls in public life is encouraged by the Jordanian regime and valorised by the international community, little effort is…

  12. A Study of Pragmatic Functions of Silence in Colloquial Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Harahsheh, Ahmad Mohammad Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The pragmatic study of silence has not got much concern in the Arab world in general and in Jordanian Arabic in particular. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the perception and practice of silence in casual conversation in Jordanian society from a pragmatic point of view. This study adapts Volosinov's notion of…

  13. Can People's Patriarchal Ideology Predict Their Beliefs about Wife Abuse? The Case of Jordanian Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.

    2005-01-01

    A self-administered questionnaire was filled out by 349 Jordanian men to examine the correlation between their patriarchal ideology and their beliefs about wife abuse. The results revealed that high percentages of Jordanian men tended to justify wife abuse, to blame women for violence against them, and to believe that women benefit from beating.…

  14. Jordanian Mothers' Perceptions of Their Children's Social Competence: An Examination of Family Factors and Demographic Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Taleb, Tagreed Fathi; AlZoubi, Rifa Rafe

    2015-01-01

    Children's social competence is an area of research that receives minimal attention from Jordanian researchers. It is important to investigate this area of development so as to provide parents with information about the nature of social competence and possible factors affecting its development. This research study examined Jordanian mothers'…

  15. The Effect of Colloquial Jordanian Arabic on Learning the English Definite Article and Negation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawalbeh, Ibrahim Z.

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the influence of Colloquial Jordanian Arabic upon the use of negation and the definite article in English. The sample of the study consisted of 100 male and 100 female Jordanian 10th graders in the academic year 2011-2012. The students were randomly selected from public schools in the region of Karak-Jordan.…

  16. A Survey of E-Learning Implementation Best Practices in Jordanian Government Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Tarawneh, Haroon Salem; Allahawiah, Sattam

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the research reported in this article is to understand the extent of e-learning implementation practices currently in use in Jordanian government universities. In order to achieve this objective, a survey of e-learning implementation practice in Jordanian universities was conducted. A detailed description of the survey procedures…

  17. A Study of Pragmatic Functions of Silence in Colloquial Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Harahsheh, Ahmad Mohammad Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The pragmatic study of silence has not got much concern in the Arab world in general and in Jordanian Arabic in particular. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the perception and practice of silence in casual conversation in Jordanian society from a pragmatic point of view. This study adapts Volosinov's notion of…

  18. Jordanian Nurses' involvement in health policy: perceived benefits and barriers.

    PubMed

    AbuAlRub, R F; Foudeh, F N

    2017-03-01

    To examine (1) the level of involvement of Jordanian nurses in health policy development and (2) perceived benefits, barriers and impacts on health outcomes of involvement in health policy process. Lack of nurses' political involvement may result in self-serving policies by policymakers who are in power and passing policies that are less than optimum. A descriptive cross-sectional design was adopted in this study. A convenience sample of 231 nurses was recruited with a response rate of 77%. The instrument of Registered Nurses' Involvement in Health Policies was used in this study. The results revealed that participants were most frequently involved in the health policy activity 'voting for a candidate or a health policy proposal'. The mean scores for involvement of participants as nurses and as citizens were low. The most perceived frequent barrier to involvement in health policy was lack of time. The low rate of Jordanian nurses' involvement in health policy could be explained by the fact that most participants had family roles in addition to work roles, which might leave little time for health policy activities. Lack of mentoring for nurses by nursing leaders could also negatively affect their involvement in health policy development. Results of this study could be baseline information for Jordanian nurse leaders to enhance the level of nurses' involvement in health policy development. Such findings could also add knowledge to the existing literature about nurses' involvement in health policy. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  19. Strategies used by Jordanian women to alleviate heartburn during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Khresheh, Reham

    2011-10-01

    to explore the strategies used by Jordanian women to manage heartburn during pregnancy. an exploratory descriptive study. 235 Jordanian women from the three regions of Jordan, aged between 18 and 54 years, who were pregnant at the time of the study or had previously had at least one full-term pregnancy. a number of strategies were used by Jordanian women in the sample for the alleviation of heartburn of pregnancy, including non-pharmacological strategies such as diet and lifestyle changes, pharmacological treatments such as antacids, and the use of home remedies such as drinking cold milk, 'baking powder' in liquid form or herbs, eating cucumber, lintel seeds, or dry tea leaves. Women aged 40 years and older, who had lower income, and were not employed were more likely to use home remedies to manage heartburn in pregnancy than the other groups. Overall, women rated their chosen strategy as useful. heartburn can be very uncomfortable and can affect food intake and appetite, daily routine and even sleep. Heartburn during pregnancy is at risk for being poorly managed given that birth is the cure. As a health-care provider, it is important to prepare women and their families to manage heartburn during pregnancy effectively. Midwives should encourage women to seek help from care providers when they need it, and continue to assess heartburn and the strategies used to manage symptoms during pregnancy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Managing Jordanian nurse migration to the Gulf Cooperation Council states.

    PubMed

    Al-Nawafleh, A H

    2015-05-19

    The migration of nurses from Jordan to the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states has occurred for decades, although substantial increases have been noted since the 1990s. This study aimed to identify the push and pull factors for Jordanian-trained nurses to work in the GCC states in order to inform retention policies that might address the issue of nurse migration. An online survey of a convenience sample of 1241 Jordanian nurses working in GCC states showed that 93% had been employed in Jordan before migration, 85% had migrated to obtain employment and 94% were motivated by higher salary and benefits. Although 93% planned to return to work in Jordan, only 15% planned to do so in the next 2 years. Major incentives to migrate were relocation assistance, salary and benefits and career advancement/professional education. Policy-makers and nurse leaders in Jordan and the GCC states are urged to use these findings to formulate strategies to retain Jordanian nurses in their workplaces.

  1. Hepatitis A virus age-specific sero-prevalence and risk factors among Jordanian children.

    PubMed

    Hayajneh, Wail A; Balbeesi, Adel; Faouri, Samir

    2015-04-01

    Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) has been a significant cause of infections among the children and adolescents of Jordan. Availability of safe vaccines made it necessary to identify the ill-defined temporal immunity trends for HAV and possible age-specific prevalence transitions. This community-based cross sectional study was conducted during the period July-August 2008 on 3,066 recruited subjects from the 12 governorates of Jordan, with pre-defined criteria. Several households were chosen at random within each selected block to enroll the subjects. They were interviewed and data were collected. Their sera were tested for total antibodies against HAV. A multivariate model was then performed to identify the possible risk factors. The HAV sero-prevalence rates among the age categories-second year, 2-4 years, 5-9 years, 10-14 years, 15-19 years, and those above 20 years were 26%, 32%, 44%, 63%, 78%, and 94%, respectively. The model revealed the association of several risk factors for higher HAV sero-prevalence rates: (i) older age groups; (ii) lower maternal education levels; (iii) residing in certain governorates; (iv) using public net drinking water; and (v) avoiding use of public net sewage system. This study provided strong evidence for continuous transition of HAV epidemiology towards intermediate endemicity in Jordan, with more susceptible adolescents and adults. Following the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations for countries with intermediate endemicity, large-scale hepatitis A vaccination is recommended for children in Jordan. This is strengthened by the availability of effective and safe HAV vaccines, improving the socio-economic status of the Jordanians, and increasing life expectancy among Jordanians. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Environmental quality of Jordanian coastal surface sediment, Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Badran, Mohammad I; Al Zibdah, Mohammad K

    2005-12-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected from five stations along the Jordanian coast of the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, during October and November over 2 years, 2000 and 2001. The monthly sedimentation rate also was estimated for the same stations. Collected sediments were analyzed for color, odor, redox potential, grain size, organic carbon, organic nitrogen, calcium carbonate, and total phosphorus. The Hotels area at the northernmost tip of the Gulf of Aqaba, characterized by sandy beaches and sea grass bottom habitat, exhibited the lowest values for redox potential and was associated with a black color. The Phosphate Port area exhibited the highest sedimentation rate, finest grain size, highest organic carbon content, and highest total phosphorus concentration. This is a deposition habitat that receives phosphate particles lost during shipment. The Marine Science Station and the Tourist Camp, typical coral reef habitats, had the highest calcium carbonate and organic nitrogen concentrations. This is directly attributed to the nature of the bottom habitat. Calcium carbonate deposits result from the erosion of hard corals, and organic nitrogen accumulates due to the rapid consumption and recycling of plankton in the coral reef framework. Comparison of the current records with old records from the 1970s and early 1980s indicates significant improvement in the environmental quality at the Phosphate Port. Tracking the coastal management practices over time shows that these improvements in the environmental quality can be attributed both to the zero discharge policy Jordan has followed since 1986 and to improvements in the phosphate handling system by the Ports Corporation.

  3. Spatial and temporal locations in child Jordanian Arabic.

    PubMed

    Khanji, R; Weist, R M

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the influence of cognitive development on the acquisition of the spatial and temporal systems in Jordanian Arabic. 60 Jordanian children 2 to 6 years old received a comprehension test based on a 1991 sentence-picture matching task of Weist, wherein each problem contained a minimal morphological contrast. These contrasts were either spatial, e.g., 'in/on', or temporal, e.g., past/future tense. Further, the contrasts required either a single referent object or event, e.g., 'in/on' and past/future tense, or they required two or more referent objects or events, e.g., 'between' and 'before/after'. Firstly, significant change across age groups was noted. Secondly, problems which required two referent objects or events were more difficult than those requiring one referent object or event. Finally, spatial contrasts were easier than temporal ones. The findings were related to the general issue of the interaction of language and thought during the acquisition of language.

  4. Jordanian mothers' knowledge of infants' childrearing and developmental milestones.

    PubMed

    Safadi, R R; Ahmad, M; Nassar, O S; Alashhab, S A; AbdelKader, R; Amre, H M

    2016-03-01

    This study explored Jordanian mothers' knowledge of infants' childrearing practices and developmental milestones, the socio-demographic variables of relevance to knowledge, and sources of information that guide childrearing practices. Parents' knowledge is considered the frame of reference for parents' interpretations of their children's behaviors and provides the basis for having the appropriate expectation of the child's developmental stage. Parents' knowledge of childrearing is essential for children's physical, cognitive and emotional development. A cross-sectional design using a modified version of MacPhee's 'Knowledge of Infant Development Inventory' was used to assess 400 mothers' knowledge of infants' childrearing and developmental milestones, in Amman, Jordan. Mothers were found to be more knowledgeable in physical and safety skills and less in cognitive, emotional, and parent-infant interaction skills. Parental age, education, parity and planned pregnancy had limited influence on developmental milestones knowledge. Formal and informal sources of information were used conforming to traditional societies. Results were congruent with findings from other studies in the region and similar traditional societies. Results allude to conclusion that mothers resort to informal sources and traditional practices to replace formally structured programmes when absent. Healthcare professionals, nursing schools and healthcare policy makers are encouraged to develop and institute a holistic approach encompassing physical, cognitive, emotional and parent-infant interaction domains in childrearing educational programmes. Structured parenting programmes for mothers and culturally accepted sources of information for fathers are essential to enhance parenting skills among Jordanian couples. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  5. Colostrum and complementary feeding practices among Jordanian women.

    PubMed

    Abuidhail, Jamila

    2014-01-01

    To identify the practice of Jordanian women regarding colostrum and complementary feeding during the postpartum period. A prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive design was used to investigate the practices of colostrum and complementary feeding. A convenience sample of 572 postpartum women was recruited from postpartum units at three governmental hospitals and three private hospitals. Data were collected in two phases. In the first phase, trained research assistants conducted face-to-face structured interviews with the participants at the hospital. In the second phase, follow-up phone interviews were conducted at the end of the first month after birth. Almost all of the postpartum women breastfeed colostrum to their infants. Further, 79% of postpartum women intended to give their infants fluids other than breast milk and 68% of them actually gave fluids to their infants by the end of the first month. Postpartum Jordanian women value colostrum and breastfeed it to their infants. However, they generally start introducing complementary feeding to their infants during the postpartum period, which would discontinue exclusive breastfeeding practices and alter the nutritional status of the infants later in their life. Therefore, nurses and midwives should emphasize, through their antenatal and postnatal care, the recommended practices of exclusive breastfeeding up to the sixth month and complementary feeding.

  6. Relation between copper, lipid profile, and cognition in elderly Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Al-khateeb, Eman; Al-zayadneh, Ebaa; Al-dalahmah, Osama; Alawadi, Zeinab; khatib, Faisal; Naffa, Randa; Shafagoj, Yanal

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the association of serum copper and lipid concentrations with changes in cognitive function in elderly Jordanian individuals. The study population consisted of two groups: 52 dementia patients and 50 control subjects. All individuals were screened using the Mini-Mental State Examination and Clock Drawing Test. Serum copper and lipid profile were also assessed. Results were statistically evaluated at p < 0.05 level of significance. The dementia group had 10.1% higher copper level than control subjects that was not statistically significant. No significant differences could be found between the two groups in lipid profile levels. There was no significant correlation between serum copper, lipid profile, and cognitive decline in elderly Jordanians. Demographic variables indicated that educational level less than 12 years and illiterate demonstrated a 3.29 fold (p = 0.026) and 6.29 fold (p = 0.002) increase in risk of developing dementia, respectively. Coffee intake demonstrated a protective effect against cognitive decline with 6.25 fold lower risk with increased coffee intake.

  7. Parenting their adolescents: the experiences of Jordanian immigrant women in California.

    PubMed

    Hattar-Pollara, M; Meleis, A I

    1995-01-01

    Having their children enter adolescence presents new demands on the role functions of Jordanian immigrant women in the United States. Such demands require modifications in traditional parenting approaches. The authors attempted to uncover and describe the experiences of Jordanian immigrant mothers (N = 30) in parenting their adolescents in the United States. Content and narrative analysis revealed the dynamic processes that the mothers used in raising their children. They continuously attempted to balance the need for their teens to maintain a Jordanian ethnic identity and the need for them to become integrated into the new community. Their parenting was driven by an attempt to avoid loss of honor and bad reputation. Four aspects of the maternal role emerged from the analysis: mothering through nurturing the adolescents and promoting cultural identity, disciplining for cultural adherence, advocacy and mediation, and vigilant parenting. The findings support a dynamic interplay between cultural and structural conditions in shaping the experiences of Jordanian immigrant women.

  8. Anatomy learning styles and strategies among Jordanian and Malaysian medical students: the impact of culture on learning anatomy.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Ayman G; Allouh, Mohammed Z; Mustafa, Intisar G; Hoja, Ibrahim M

    2013-07-01

    The study aims to investigate anatomy learning styles and strategies of Jordanian and Malaysian medical students at the Jordan University of Science and Technology. The study is a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study. Students' responses for the questionnaire were numerically coded, and the results were analyzed to reveal statistically significant differences between Jordanian and Malaysian students. The results showed that Jordanian medical students were less interested in using cadavers in learning anatomy than Malaysian medical students. However, similar to their Malaysian counterparts, they prefer to employ other tools to learn anatomy like plastinated models and Internet-based resources. In addition to the aforementioned tools, Malaysian students were more interested in using cross-sectional images and making their own revision cards. Both Jordanian and Malaysian medical students were more interested in learning anatomy through clinical cases, and by system rather than by region. Moreover, it was revealed that Jordanian medical students learn anatomy more efficiently when they formulate a general view of a particular topic. Both Jordanian and Malaysian medical students also relied on reciting definitions and memorizing facts to learn anatomy. The study also reported significant differences between Jordanian and Malaysian students' perspectives on learning anatomy. The findings of the study suggest that Jordanian and Malaysian medical students posses different cultures of learning. Jordanian anatomy instructors need to consider these different learning cultures when they prepare their instructional methods and teaching materials to fulfill the educational needs of their culturally diverse students.

  9. Understanding Jordanian Psychiatric Nurses' Smoking Behaviors: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Aldiabat, Khaldoun M.; Clinton, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Smoking is prevalent in psychiatric facilities among staff and patients. However, there have been few studies of how contextual factors in specific cultures influence rates of smoking and the health promotion role of psychiatric nurses. This paper reports the findings of a classical grounded theory study conducted to understand how contextual factors in the workplace influences the smoking behaviors of Jordanian psychiatric nurses (JPNs). Method. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with a sample of eight male JPNs smokers at a psychiatric facility in Amman, Jordan. Findings. Constant comparative analysis identified becoming a heavy smoker as a psychosocial process characterized by four sub-categories: normalization of smoking; living in ambiguity; experiencing workplace conflict; and, facing up to workplace stressors. Conclusion. Specific contextual workplace factors require targeted smoking cessation interventions if JPNs are to receive the help they need to reduce health risks associated with heavy smoking. PMID:23844286

  10. Perception of Jordanian nurses regarding involvement in decision-making.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamdan, Zaid M; Bawadi, Hala A; Redman, Richard W; Al-Nawafleh, Ahmad H

    2016-05-01

    Nurses in any organizational context are members of a team and cannot work independently. Teamwork requires making decisions frequently, and these decisions affect team performance on a regular basis. Ultimately, the team shapes the quality of patient care. This study examines nurse decision-making related to patient care, self-management and the work environment. Qualitative descriptive design was used to collect data. Eighteen staff nurses participated in semi-structured interviews to explore the perception of Jordanian staff nurses regarding their participation in decision-making. Variation in decision-making involvement was found to exist across unit types and from hospital to hospital. In general, the participants were not satisfied with their level of decision-making involvement and believed that they could participate more. The results have implications for nurse managers in facilitating the engagement of staff nurses in decision-making and creating an organizational culture to facilitate this engagement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Safety practices in Jordanian manufacturing enterprises within industrial estates.

    PubMed

    Khrais, Samir; Al-Araidah, Omar; Aweisi, Assaf Mohammad; Elias, Fadia; Al-Ayyoub, Enas

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates occupational health and safety practices in manufacturing enterprises within Jordanian industrial estates. Response rates were 21.9%, 58.6% and 70.8% for small, medium and large sized enterprises, respectively. Survey results show that most companies comply with state regulations, provide necessary facilities to enhance safety and provide several measures to limit and control hazards. On the negative side, little attention is given to safety training that might be due to the lack of related regulations and follow-up, financial limitations or lack of awareness on the importance of safety training. In addition, results show that ergonomic hazards, noise and hazardous chemicals are largely present. Accident statistics show that medium enterprises have the highest accident cases per enterprise, and chemical industries reported highest total number of accidents per enterprise. The outcomes of this study establish a base for appropriate safety recommendations to enhance the awareness and commitment of companies to appropriate safety rules.

  12. Attitudes of Jordanian University Students towards Using Online Chat Discourse with Native Speakers of English for Improving Their Language Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahfouz, Safi M.; Ihmeideh, Fathi M.

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to investigate Jordanian university students' attitudes towards using video and text chat discourse with anonymous native speakers of English to improve their English proficiency. To achieve this aim, a questionnaire was designed. The study sample consisted of 320 university students enrolled in two Jordanian universities. Results…

  13. Attitudes of Jordanian University Students towards Using Online Chat Discourse with Native Speakers of English for Improving Their Language Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahfouz, Safi M.; Ihmeideh, Fathi M.

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to investigate Jordanian university students' attitudes towards using video and text chat discourse with anonymous native speakers of English to improve their English proficiency. To achieve this aim, a questionnaire was designed. The study sample consisted of 320 university students enrolled in two Jordanian universities. Results…

  14. The Status of Corporal Punishment in Jordanian Primary Schools from the Perspectives Of: Teachers, Students, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khateeb, Linda Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the status of corporal punishment in Jordanian Primary schools from the perspectives of: Teachers, students, and parents. The corpus of the study comprises (95) Male and female teachers, (135) male and female students form Jordanian primary schools. Two questionnaire forms were used in this study: one for teachers and…

  15. The relationships between safety climate, teamwork, and intent to stay at work among Jordanian hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Abualrub, Raeda F; Gharaibeh, Huda F; Bashayreh, Alaa Eddin I

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to examine the relationships among safety climate, teamwork, and intent to stay at work as perceived by Jordanian hospital nurses. A descriptive correlational design was used to investigate these relationships among a convenience sample of 381 hospital nurses. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire that included the Safety Climate and Teamwork Scale and the McCain's Intent to Stay Scale. Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, analysis of variance, and hierarchical regression analysis were used to analyze the data. The findings showed (a) a strong positive correlation between safety climate and teamwork; and (b) moderate positive correlations between safety climate and intent to stay at work, and between teamwork and intent to stay at work. Moreover, the overall model of hierarchical regression showed that 45% of the variation in the level of intent to stay at work was explained by background variables, leadership styles, decision-making styles, and safety climate. The findings emphasized the positive effect of safety climate and teamwork on the level of nurses' intent to stay. Nurse administrators should design and implement strategies that create a culture of safety climate and teamwork in their organizations. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Human diversity in Jordan: polymorphic Alu insertions in general Jordanian and Bedouin groups.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Daniela; Sadiq, May; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Khabour, Omar; Alkaraki, Almuthanna; Esteban, Esther; Via, Marc; Moral, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Jordan, located in the Levant region, is an area crucial for the investigation of human migration between Africa and Eurasia. However, the genetic history of Jordanians has yet to be clarified, including the origin of the Bedouins today resident in Jordan. Here, we provide new genetic data on autosomal independent markers in two Jordanian population samples (Bedouins and the general population) to begin to examine the genetic diversity inside this country and to provide new information about the genetic position of these populations in the context of the Mediterranean and Middle East area. The markers analyzed were 18 Alu polymorphic insertions characterized by their identity by descent, known ancestral state (lack of insertion), and apparent selective neutrality. The results indicate significant genetic diffferences between Bedouins and general Jordanians (p = 0.038). Whereas Bedouins show a close genetic proximity to North Africans, general Jordanians appear genetically more similar to other Middle East populations. In general, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that Bedouins had an important role in the peopling of Jordan and constitute the original substrate of the current population. However, migration into Jordan in recent years likely has contributed to the diversity among current Jordanian population groups. Copyright © 2014 Wayne State University Press, Detroit, Michigan 48201-1309.

  17. Genetic differentiation and origin of the Jordanian population: an analysis of Alu insertion polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Bahri, Raoudha; El Moncer, Wifak; Al-Batayneh, Khalid; Sadiq, May; Esteban, Esther; Moral, Pedro; Chaabani, Hassen

    2012-05-01

    Although much of Jordan is covered by desert, its north-western region forms part of the Fertile Crescent region that had given a rich past to Jordanians. This past, scarcely described by historians, is not yet clarified by sufficient genetic data. Thus in this paper we aim to determine the genetic differentiation of the Jordanian population and to discuss its origin. A total of 150 unrelated healthy Jordanians were investigated for ten Alu insertion polymorphisms. Genetic relationships among populations were estimated by a principal component (PC) plot based on the analyses of the R-matrix software. Statistical analysis showed that the Jordanian population is not significantly different from the United Arab Emirates population or the North Africans. This observation, well represented in PC plot, suggests a common origin of these populations belonging respectively to ancient Mesopotamia, Arabia, and North Africa. Our results are compatible with ancient peoples' movements from Arabia to ancient Mesopotamia and North Africa as proposed by historians and supported by previous genetic results. The original genetic profile of the Jordanian population, very likely Arabian Semitic, has not been subject to significant change despite the succession of several civilizations.

  18. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Osteoporosis Among Jordanian Postmenopausal Women Attending the National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Genetics in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Hyassat, Dana; Alyan, Taghreed; Jaddou, Hashem; Ajlouni, Kamel M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To assess the prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia among Jordanian postmenopausal women attending the National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Genetics (NCDEG), and to determine the potential associated risk factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted at (NCDEG) in Amman, Jordan. A total of 1079 Jordanian postmenopausal women aged between 45 and 84 years were included in this study that was conducted during the period between April 2013 and December 2014. All patients underwent bone mineral density measurement through dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan. DEXA scan was interpreted in terms of T score as per World Health Organization guidelines. The overall prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia was 37.5% and 44.6%, respectively. The maximum prevalence of osteoporosis was observed at the lumbar spine (32.4%) followed by the left femoral neck (14.4%), while the maximum prevalence of osteopenia was observed at the left femoral neck (56.1%) followed by the lumbar spine (41.3%). Patients with longer menopausal duration, normal or overweight body mass index, high parity, physical inactivity, positive family history of osteoporosis, inadequate sun exposure, high daily caffeine intake, low daily calcium intake, and delay in the age of menarche were all positively associated with osteoporosis. On the other hand, women with type 2 diabetes mellitus had lower risk of osteoporosis. There is a high prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia among Jordanian postmenopausal women. Necessary steps are needed for more public education and a wider dissemination of information about osteoporosis and its prevention. PMID:28736691

  19. Jordanian quantum algebra Uh(sl(N)) via contraction method and mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdesselam, B.; Chakrabarti, A.; Chakrabarti, R.

    2002-04-01

    Using a contraction procedure developed earlier, we construct, in the first part of the present paper, the Jordanian quantum Hopf algebra Uh(sl(3)) which has a remarkably simple coalgebraic structure and contains the Jordanian algebra Uh(sl(2)), obtained by Ohn, as a Hopf subalgebra. A nonlinear map between the quantum Uh(sl(3)) and the classical U(sl(3)) algebras is then established; and the universal Rh-matrix of the Uh(sl(3)) algebra is given. In the second part, we give the higher dimensional Jordanian algebras Uh(sl(N)) for all N. The universal Rh-matrix of the Uh(sl(N)) algebra is also given.

  20. An ethnographic-feminist study of Jordanian women's experiences of domestic violence and process of resolution.

    PubMed

    Safadi, Reema; Swigart, Valerie; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Banimustafa, Radwan; Constantino, Rose E

    2013-01-01

    We interviewed 12 Jordanian women who had experienced domestic violence (DV) and were receiving assistance at the Jordanian Women's Union (JWU). Our aim was to explore the history and factors supporting attainment of freedom from DV. Narratives revealed themes of DV toward girls; forced marriage; physical, psychological, or sexual abuse before and during marriage; and escalation and enduring DV. Escaping from DV required family and JWU support. In the context of a strongly patriarchal, religious society, we observed a process of resolution by shifting cultural values and themes of empowerment, with an undercurrent of suffering blamed on inequalities in the legal process.

  1. Influence of Demographic Factors, Knowledge, and Beliefs on Jordanian Women’s Intention to Undergo Mammography Screening

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Areej K.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.; Wu, Yow-Wu B.; Lally, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of demographic characteristics, breast cancer knowledge, fatalistic beliefs, health beliefs, and subjective norms on Jordanian women’s intention to participate in mammography screening. Design A cross-sectional survey was used to collect data at 14 comprehensive healthcare centers in Amman and Zarqa, Jordan. A convenience sample of 142 Jordanian women 40 years of age or older with no history of breast cancer and able to read and write in Arabic participated. Methods Self-report surveys included a combination of researcher-designed and existing instruments to measure the study variables. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation, t tests, and multiple logistic regression. Findings Jordanian women surveyed lacked knowledge about breast cancer. Social norms and self-efficacy highly influenced these women’s intention to engage in mammography screening. Younger women were more willing to indicate intention to engage in mammographic screening. Conclusions Self-efficacy and the social connectedness of Jordanian society, but not religious beliefs or perceived barriers to screening, influence Jordanian women’s intention to undergo mammography. Future research should examine cultural influences, rather than religious beliefs, and investigate Jordanian women’s potentially unique perspectives on barriers to actual mammography screening behavior. Clinical Relevance The prevalence of mammography screening may be enhanced by focusing interventions on Jordanian women’s support systems and empowering women by providing knowledge and skills needed to engage in the procedure. PMID:22339890

  2. Career commitment and job performance of Jordanian nurses.

    PubMed

    Mrayyan, Majd T; Al-Faouri, Ibrahim

    2008-01-01

    Career commitment and job performance are complex phenomena that have received little attention in nursing research. A survey was used to assess nurses' career commitment and job performance, and the relationship between the two concepts. Predictors of nurses' career commitment and job performance were also studied. A convenience sample of 640 Jordanian registered nurses was recruited from 24 teaching, governmental, and private hospitals. Nurses "agreed" on the majority of statements about career commitment, and they reported performing "well" their jobs. Using total scores, nurses were equal in their career commitment but they were different in their job performance; the highest mean was scored for nurses in private hospitals. Using the individual items of subscales, nurses were willing to be involved, on their own time, in projects that would benefit patient care. The correlation of the total scores of nurses' career commitment and job performance revealed the presence of a significant and positive relationship (r = .457). Nurses' job performance, gender, and marital status were the best predictors of nurses' career commitment: they explained 21.8% of variance of nurses' career commitment. Nurses' career commitment, time commitment, marital status, and years of experience in nursing were the best predictors of nurses' job performance: they explained 25.6% of variance of nurses' job performance. The lowest reported means of nurses' job performance require managerial interventions.

  3. Assessment of nutritional status among ESRD patients in Jordanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tayyem, Reema F; Mrayyan, Majd T; Heath, Dennis D; Bawadi, Hiba A

    2008-05-01

    Our objective was to assess nutritional status and compare quality of treatment among hemodialysis patients in public and private hospitals in Jordan. We utilized a cross-sectional survey. Our setting involved hospital hemodialysis units. This study was undertaken in five large Jordanian hospitals between 2004 and 2005. One hundred and eighty participants diagnosed with end-stage renal failure (ESRD) were enrolled. These participants (91 women and 89 men) who underwent hemodialysis treatment were recruited using a convenience sampling technique. Data from participants who received hemodialysis treatment in public hospital settings were compared with equivalent data from participants treated in private hospital settings. Subjective global assessment (SGA), anthropometry, and biochemical measurements were used as evaluative tools. In the anthropometric measurement of triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), we found a statistically significant difference (P < .05) between participants treated in the two hospital settings. In addition, approximately 62% of all participants, regardless of treatment site, were found to be moderately to severely malnourished. Anthropometric measurements showed some significant increase between prehemodialysis and posthemodialysis weight and body mass index in private hospitals; this was not unexpected. There were no statistically significant differences in the measured mean levels of eight different biochemical parameters, with the exception of plasma phosphorus and sodium levels. The prevalence of malnutrition and the quality of treatment in our two groups of participants were similar.

  4. Public health knowledge levels of different types of jordanian teachers.

    PubMed

    Khalili, K Y

    1986-01-01

    This study examines the level of health knowledge of specific categories of Jordanian teachers to see which category is competent enough to teach health as a separate school subject. The Health Awareness Test (HAT) was administered to 670 teachers of whom there were seventy-four science teachers at the compulsory stage, 139 Arabic language teachers at the upper elementary stage, 342 elementary grades teachers, thirty-four high school physics teachers, thirty-three high school chemistry teachers, and forty-eight high school biology teachers. The data analysis revealed that of the target groups, only female teachers of biology, chemistry, and physics and male teachers of biology, reached the acceptable level in knowledge about health as measured by HAT. Sex as well as specialization (the subject the teacher teaches) differences were found to be significant favoring female over male and biology teachers followed by chemistry teachers over the rest of the groups. The interaction between sex and specialization was not significant The implications of the above results for curriculum planning are discussed.

  5. Predictors of Glycated Hemoglobin among Jordanian Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    HAMMAD, Sawsan; DARAWAD, Muhammad; HOURANI, Eman; DEMEH, Waddah

    2015-01-01

    Background: We explored the level of Jordanian patients' knowledge, diabetes related distress, self-management activities and these effects on the A1C level. Methodology: This descriptive cross-sectional correlational design (conducted in 2013) was utilized to recruit 289 diabetic patients from outpatient diabetes clinics, using self-reported questionnaires (Diabetes Knowledge Test, Diabetes Distress Scale, and Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire) in addition to chart review for selected variables. Results: Participants' had mean glycated hemoglobin of 7.88%. Good glycemic control was significantly associated with higher self-management activities (r= −.147), high income (r= −.171), older age (r= −.252), shorter duration of illness (r= .153), and low levels of distress. Despite these relationships only age, duration of illness and income significantly predicted A1C (F (5, 284) = 11.57, P<.001, R2 = .17). Further, diabetes knowledge, diabetes-related distress, and self-management could not predict A1C level. Conclusion: Only diabetes-related distress and self-management correlated with patients' A1C, with no predictive power. Thus, further research is required to shed the light on the large unexplained components of the A1C variance. PMID:26744705

  6. Jordanian Preservice Primary Teachers' Perceptions of Mentoring in Science Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abed, Osama H.; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2015-03-01

    Quality mentoring is fundamental to preservice teacher education because of its potential to help student and novice teachers develop the academic and pedagogical knowledge and skills germane to successful induction into the profession. This study focused on Jordanian preservice primary teachers' perceptions of their mentoring experiences as these pertain to science teaching. The Mentoring for Effective Primary Science Teaching instrument was administered to 147 senior preservice primary teachers in a university in Jordan. The results indicated that the greater majority of participants did not experience effective mentoring toward creating a supportive and reflexive environment that would bolster their confidence in teaching science; further their understanding of primary science curriculum, and associated aims and school policies; help with developing their pedagogical knowledge; and/or furnish them with specific and targeted feedback and guidance to help improve their science teaching. Substantially more participants indicated that their mentors modeled what they perceived to be effective science teaching. The study argues for the need for science-specific mentoring for preservice primary teachers, and suggests a possible pathway for achieving such a model starting with those in-service primary teachers-much like those identified by participants in the present study-who are already effective in their science teaching.

  7. E-Learning versus Traditional Learning as Perceived by Undergraduate Students in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Omari, Aieman A.; Salameh, Kayed M.

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to define the perception of e-learning and traditional learning among undergraduate students in Jordanian universities. The results of the study indicated that e-learning had significantly higher scores for perceived value among students than traditional learning. The perception of e-learning among male students…

  8. "An effect that is deeper than beating": family violence in Jordanian women.

    PubMed

    Morse, Diane S; Paldi, Yael; Egbarya, Samah Salaime; Clark, Cari Jo

    2012-03-01

    This study informs health care approaches to gender-based family violence through focus groups with Jordanian women. The authors conducted a thematic qualitative analysis of 12 focus groups among 70 married, divorced, or widowed women about their experiences and beliefs regarding family violence. Five themes relevant to health care providers were identified. Three of the themes addressed participant-perceived causes of gender-based family violence: (1) unmet gender role expectations; (2) stigma and social norms; and (3) extended family roles. The fourth theme reflected effects on victims. The fifth theme reflected protective qualities and help-seeking behaviors. The themes identified in the analysis revealed multiple ways that gender-based family violence can contribute to health problems and that it can be kept secret by Jordanian women as patients. Potential clues are described for the violence which may not be typically explored in a medical encounter. Additional ways that Jordanian families may seek help from other family or clergy instead of police and family violence agencies are described. Implications of these results for health care providers who care both for Jordanians and Arab immigrants in Western cultures are discussed.

  9. Maternal Socialization and Kindergarten Children's Behaviors from Jordanian Mothers' and Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Al Rub, Majedah Fawzy; Rababaeh, Ebtesam Qasim; Mustafa, Intisar Ghazy

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether Jordanian mothers' self-reported parenting practices were associated with their kindergarten children's prosocial or anti-social behavior based on three parental patterns: nurturance, respect, and power assertion. The participants were 95 mothers with children in the kindergarten level in Jordan. Additionally, 13…

  10. Parenting Styles and Children's Social Skills as Perceived by Jordanian Mothers of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Taleb, Tagreed Fathi

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the perceived parenting styles in a sample of Jordanian mothers and their perceptions of the social skills exhibited by their preschool children. The sample consisted of 802 ("N"=802) mothers who responded to a three-part questionnaire: demographic information, parenting styles, and social skills. The results of this…

  11. Fostering Jordanian University Students' Communicative Performance through Literature-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bataineh, Ruba Fahmi; Rabadi, Raghd Yaqoub Al; Smadi, Oqlah Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a literature-based program on eight Jordanian university students' communicative performance. The research design was essentially qualitative (observation was the primary instrument); however, triangulation was achieved through the use of other instruments, including pre- and posttests, interviews, journal…

  12. Content Analysis of Jordanian Elementary Textbooks during 1970-2013 as Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abed, Eman Rasmi; Al-Absi, Mohammad Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine types of mathematic disciplines (in term of topics) in Jordanian Elementary textbooks. This study evaluates mathematics text books especially in the period between 1970 and 2013 and identifies types and quantities of mathematics. To examine the relative quantity of mathematics, branches of mathematics, presentation…

  13. E-Learning versus Traditional Learning as Perceived by Undergraduate Students in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Omari, Aieman A.; Salameh, Kayed M.

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to define the perception of e-learning and traditional learning among undergraduate students in Jordanian universities. The results of the study indicated that e-learning had significantly higher scores for perceived value among students than traditional learning. The perception of e-learning among male students…

  14. The Effect of Electronic Dialogue Journaling on Jordanian Basic Stage EFL Students' Writing Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Koumy, Abdel Salam Abdel Khalek; Mirjan, Zahra' Imad

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of electronic dialogue journaling on Jordanian upper basic stage EFL students' writing performance. The study utilized a pretest-posttest control group experimental design. The subjects of the study consisted of fifty students enrolled in the Islamic Educational School during the first semester of the…

  15. Bringing Benefits and Warding off Blights in Due Commandment (Analytic Study Compared with the Jordanian Law)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Etoum, Niebal Mohd Ibrahim; Mowafi, Hanan Sami Mohammad; Al Zubaidi, Faraj Hamad Salem

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to highlight the benefits and blights of the due commandment (intestate law) under Jordanian law for the year (2010) in the article (279). The study came in two sections, the first one dealt with the concept of due commandment, its legitimacy, verdict and terms; in the second section, I've dealt with the persons entitled to due…

  16. Positive Thinking & Good Citizenship Culture: From the Jordanian Universities Students' Points of View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrar, Amani Ghazi

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at identifying the nature of the relationship between the mode of thinking among the students of Jordanian Universities if positive, and the extent to which that is related to their culture of citizenship, and therefore their positive practices towards the community. A sample of (654) students were selected randomly. And to achieve…

  17. The Effect of Home Computer Use on Jordanian Children: A Parental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khasawneh, Omar M.; Al-Awidi, Hamed M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of computer technology on Jordanian children from the perspectives of their parents. The sample of the study consisted of 127 participants. Each participant is a parent of a child or children who owned a personal computer. Our findings revealed some of the positive as well as negative changes…

  18. “An Effect That is Deeper Than Beating” Family Violence in Jordanian Women

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Diane S; Paldi, Yael; Egbarya, Samah Salaime; Clark, Cari Jo

    2012-01-01

    This study informs healthcare approaches to gender-based family violence through focus groups with Jordanian women. The authors conducted a thematic qualitative analysis of 12 focus groups among 70 married, divorced, or widowed women about their experiences and beliefs regarding family violence. Five themes relevant to healthcare providers were identified. Three of the themes addressed participant-perceived causes of gender-based family violence: 1) unmet gender role expectations, 2) stigma and social norms, and 3) extended family roles. The fourth theme reflects effects on victims. The fifth theme reflects protective qualities and help seeking behaviors. The themes identified in the analysis reveal multiple ways that gender-based family violence can contribute to health problems and that it can be kept secret by Jordanian women as patients. Potential clues are described for the violence which may not be typically explored in a medical encounter. Additional ways that Jordanian families may seek help from other family or clergy instead of police and family violence agencies are described. Implications of these results for healthcare providers who care both for Jordanians and Arab immigrants in Western cultures are discussed. PMID:22329396

  19. Difficulties EFL Jordanian University Students Encounter in Translating English Idioms into Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alrishan, Amal; Smadi, Oqlah

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the difficulties that Jordanian EFL University students encounter in translating English idioms into Arabic. The participants of the study were all M.A translation students at Yarmouk University and the University of Jordan who were selected purposefully. The total number of the students who participated in the…

  20. Attitudes of Jordanian Students towards Using Group Work in EFL Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ababneh, Sana'

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses itself to the outcomes of a field study which was carried out to identify Jordanian EFL students' attitudes towards using group work in EFL classrooms. The study sample consisted of 179 students enrolled in English 101, an elementary language skills course taught at Al- Huson University College, Al -Balqa' Applied University,…

  1. The Dimensions of the Citizenship Concept among the Jordanian University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Sabeelah, Amal M. S.; Alraggad, Fatima E. A.; Abou-Ameerh, Oraib A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined Jordanian university students' knowledge of the citizenship concept while also aiming to reveal whether there were any statistically significant differences in students' knowledge of the citizenship concept due to gender, residence, family income, college, academic level and accumulative grade point average. The study sample…

  2. Jordanian Early Childhood Teachers' Perspectives toward Science Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayez, Merfat; Sabah, Saed A.; Oliemat, Enass

    The purpose of this study was to examine Jordanian early childhood teachers' perspectives toward science teaching and learning and understand the contextual lived science experiences as realized by teachers in early childhood settings. The study has utilized mixed methods approach. An Arabic-validated version of the Early Childhood Teachers'…

  3. Observance of proper mercury hygiene practices by Jordanian general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Sawair, Faleh A; Hassoneh, Yazan; Jamleh, Ahmed O; Al-Rabab'ah, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    To assess the knowledge and observance of proper mercury hygiene and amalgam waste management (AWM) among Jordanian general dental practitioners (GDPs). Interviews were conducted with randomly selected 250 Jordanian GDPs, using a specially designed questionnaire. Out of the total of 250 GDPs, 228 (91.2%) agreed to participate. The questionnaire covered aspects related to professional information and total amalgam contact (TAC) of these practitioners. The second part focused on the degree of awareness of the protocols related to mercury hygiene and safe AWM. Mean TAC was 3.2+/-3.6 hours per week. Of the Jordanian practitioners, 22.6% reported no undergraduate training in amalgam safety measures. Almost a quarter of GDPs did not have proper ventilation in their clinics, around 20-25% did not use protective clothing or eye protection, 5.3% were mixing amalgam manually, and 13.9% used their bare fingers for inserting the freshly mixed amalgam. Most of unused amalgam ends up through the drain or in trash; there are no recycling facilities to be used. Most Jordanian GDPs do not strictly follow the mercury hygiene and AWM guidelines. Promoting the American Dental Association (ADA) guidelines through undergraduate and postgraduate training will help GDPs acquire proper attitude towards the proper hygiene practices described in these recommendations.

  4. The Impact of Using Music on Teaching English Poetry in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hijazi, Dima; Al-natour, Amal

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of using music on teaching English Poetry in Jordanian universities on students' performance. The researchers followed the equivalent pre/post T test two group designs. To achieve the aim of the study, a pre/post-test was constructed to measure students' performance in English poetry. The…

  5. Strategies Used by Jordanian EFL University Graduate Students in Translating Idioms into Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smadi, Oqlah; Alrishan, Amal

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the strategies utilized by Jordanian EFL University graduate students in translating idioms into Arabic. The participants of the study were all M.A translation students at the University of Jordan and Yarmouk University who were selected purposefully. The total number of the students was 90 who participated in a…

  6. Jordanian dentists' knowledge and implementation of eco-friendly dental office strategies.

    PubMed

    Al Shatrat, Sabha M; Shuman, Deanne; Darby, Michele L; Jeng, Hueiwang A

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the implementation of eco-friendly dental office strategies by Jordanian dentists. Self-designed questionnaires were provided to 150 dentists working in private dental practices in the city of Amman, the capital of Jordan. Dentists' names and addresses were obtained from the Jordanian Dental Association. Overall, the level of knowledge about eco-friendly dental offices strategies was high for amalgam, radiology, paper waste, infection control and energy and water conservation. In terms of implementation, the majority of Jordanian dentists apply few eco-friendly dental offices strategies. The most frequently identified barriers to implementation of eco-friendly dental offices strategies were cost and lack of incentives from the government. Most Jordanian dental practices are not eco-friendly. A continued focus on the impact of dental practices on the environment is needed through formal and continuing dental education. Results of this study can guide policy development to encourage implementation of eco-friendly strategies. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  7. Jordanian Social Studies Teachers' Perceptions of Competency Needed for Implementing Technology in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Bataineh, Mohammad; Anderson, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This study used a cross-sectional, ten-point Likert-type scale survey design, to examine the perception of Jordanian seventh to twelfth-grade social studies teachers of the competency needed for technology implementation in their classrooms. The instrument for this study was a modified version of a survey developed by Kelly (2003) called the…

  8. Teacher Self-Efficacy and Classroom Management Styles in Jordanian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Tineh, Abdullah M.; Khasawneh, Samar A.; Khalaileh, Huda A.

    2011-01-01

    Two main purposes guided this study. The first was to identify the degree to which Jordanian teachers practise classroom management styles in their classrooms and their level of teacher self-efficacy. The second purpose was to explore the relationships between classroom management styles and teacher self-efficacy. This study is quantitative in…

  9. The Acoustic and Perceptual Correlates of Emphasis in Urban Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Masri, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic and perceptual correlates of emphasis, a secondary articulation in the posterior vocal tract, in Urban Jordanian Arabic were studied. CVC monosyllables and CV.CVC bisyllables with emphatic and plain target consonants in word-initial, word-medial and word-final positions were examined. Spectral measurements on the target vowels at vowel…

  10. Attitudes toward Communication Skills among Students'-Teachers' in Jordanian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Omari, Aieman Ahmad; Al-Dababneh, Kholoud A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the positive and negative attitudes among 289 students of class teachers and childhood teachers' disciplines using the communication skills attitude scale (CSAS) in Jordanian public universities. GPA, year level of students were recorded. Overall results of study revealed that the mean of positive…

  11. Using Computers in Jordanian Pre-School Settings: The Views of Pre-School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jumiaan, Ibrahim F.; Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Hassan, Omayya M.

    2012-01-01

    Computer technology holds promise for facilitating learning and teaching in the current educational systems at all levels. This study examined computer use in Jordanian pre-school settings. The study surveyed 113 pre-school teachers from 43 pre-school settings, gathering information about their perception of using computer in their classrooms.…

  12. The Philosophy and Practice of Training and Development: The Case of the Jordanian Electricity Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensour, Waed Abdel Razzaq; Kharabsheh, Radwan Alyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to gain an understanding of training and development (T&D) as a philosophy and practice in Jordanian electricity companies and to explore factors that shape T&D. Data were gathered through in-depth interviews, observation and document analysis. Results indicate that T&D was interpreted in terms of learning, was…

  13. Sustainable Development and Values Education in the Jordanian Social Studies Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alelaimat, Abeer Rashed; Taha, Kelle

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at identifying the values function, its relationship with sustainable development, and the extent of taking in to consideration the national education book for Jordanian tenth graders in the years 2004-2010. This study will attempt to answer the following questions: what is the values function that should be followed in the social…

  14. Empowerment of Female Students for Participation in the Representative Councils in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleh, Al-Jufout; Ziad, Abu-Hamatteh; Lama, Al-Qaisy

    2008-01-01

    The current article presents an analytical study of female students' participation in the representative councils in various Jordanian Universities. The data-base applied in the present investigation has indicated a clear weak representation of female students in general. The possible reasons, behind this weakness, have been tracked using a…

  15. Improving English Pronunciation through Computer-Assisted Programs in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Qudah, Fatima Zaki Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of using computer- assisted programs for teaching English pronunciation on students' performance in English Language pronunciation in Jordanian universities. To achieve the purpose of the study, a pre/post-test was constructed to measure students' level in English pronunciation. The sample…

  16. The Effect of Arabic Proficiency on the English Writing of Bilingual-Jordanian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dweik, Bader S.; Abu Al Hommos, Mustafa D.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between first language (Arabic) proficiency and second language (English) performance in the writing skills of Jordanian bilingual second secondary school students. Despite the linguistic distance between English and Arabic, it is postulated that Arabic writing skills can be transferred positively to the…

  17. Jordanian Vocational, Secondary Education Teachers and Acquisition of the National Professional Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Dajeh, Hesham I.

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to estimate the level of acquisition of the Jordanian national professional standards by vocational, secondary education teachers. Two hundred teachers participated in the study. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 15.0. Questionnaire validity was assessed by content validity,…

  18. Counseling Gifted and Talented Students in Jordanian Inclusive Schools: Conclusion and Implication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Zraigat, Ibrahim A.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to review counseling services for students who are gifted and talented at Jordanian inclusive schools in relation to theoretical counseling literature. The present study is considered a theoretical study. Gifted and talented students exhibit a wide range of characteristics, among of which are intellectual…

  19. Students' Learning Assessment Practices Used by Jordanian Teachers of Mathematics for Grades (1-6)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abed, Eman Rasmi; Abu Awwad, Ferial Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the students' learning assessment practices used by Jordanian teachers of mathematics for grades (1-6) in Amman. The sample of the study consists of (402) teachers. A questionnaire of (72) items are developed on four domains, namely: questions, homework, exams, and alternative strategies. Validity and reliability are…

  20. Empowerment of Female Students for Participation in the Representative Councils in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleh, Al-Jufout; Ziad, Abu-Hamatteh; Lama, Al-Qaisy

    2008-01-01

    The current article presents an analytical study of female students' participation in the representative councils in various Jordanian Universities. The data-base applied in the present investigation has indicated a clear weak representation of female students in general. The possible reasons, behind this weakness, have been tracked using a…

  1. Scientific Research in Jordanian Higher Education Institutions: An Evaluation of the Status and Obstacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    bin Tareef, Atif

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the status and obstacles of scientific research in Jordanian higher education institutions. And defined by being an attempt to increase faculty member's, researcher's and educational leader's attention to the necessity of improving research planning or strategies, professional development, working conditions,…

  2. The New Workforce Generation: Understanding the Problems Facing Parental Involvement in Jordanian Kindergartens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihmeideh, Fathi; Khasawneh, Samer; Mahfouz, Safi; Khawaldeh, Moustafa

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the problems facing parental involvement in Jordanian kindergartens from the parents' perspectives. A 36-item questionnaire that addressed five domains was designed by the researchers and distributed among the study participants. The study sample consisted of 297 parents of kindergarten children from various…

  3. The Philosophy and Practice of Training and Development: The Case of the Jordanian Electricity Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensour, Waed Abdel Razzaq; Kharabsheh, Radwan Alyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to gain an understanding of training and development (T&D) as a philosophy and practice in Jordanian electricity companies and to explore factors that shape T&D. Data were gathered through in-depth interviews, observation and document analysis. Results indicate that T&D was interpreted in terms of learning, was…

  4. Maternal Socialization and Kindergarten Children's Behaviors from Jordanian Mothers' and Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Al Rub, Majedah Fawzy; Rababaeh, Ebtesam Qasim; Mustafa, Intisar Ghazy

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether Jordanian mothers' self-reported parenting practices were associated with their kindergarten children's prosocial or anti-social behavior based on three parental patterns: nurturance, respect, and power assertion. The participants were 95 mothers with children in the kindergarten level in Jordan. Additionally, 13…

  5. Occupational stress, social support, and quality of life among Jordanian mental health nurses.

    PubMed

    Hamaideh, Shaher H

    2012-01-01

    Occupational stress affects physical and mental health of mental health nurses. This study measured levels of occupational stress and identified the variables that are associated with occupational stress among Jordanian mental health nurses. A descriptive design was conducted, using self-report questionnaires and demographic characteristics. Data were collected from 181 mental health nurses who were recruited from all mental health settings in Jordan. Jordanian mental health nurses showed high levels of occupational stress regarding "client-related difficulties," "lack of resources," and "workload." The highest level of social support as indicated by these Jordanian mental health nurses was from a spouse/partner followed by colleagues. Regarding quality of life (QOL), physical health scores were higher than mental health scores. Occupational stress correlated significantly and negatively with QOL-physical scores, QOL-mental scores, and social support scores, and correlated positively with being physically assaulted, verbally assaulted, and the respondent having the intention to leave his or her current job. Social support, QOL-mental scores, verbal assault, ward type, and intention to leave the current job were the best predictors of occupational stress among Jordanian mental health nurses. Mental health nurses are under significant occupational stress levels; therefore, comprehensive interventions aimed at minimizing the risk of occupational stress and improving social support and quality of life among mental health nurses are needed.

  6. Parenting Styles and Children's Social Skills as Perceived by Jordanian Mothers of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Taleb, Tagreed Fathi

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the perceived parenting styles in a sample of Jordanian mothers and their perceptions of the social skills exhibited by their preschool children. The sample consisted of 802 ("N"=802) mothers who responded to a three-part questionnaire: demographic information, parenting styles, and social skills. The results of this…

  7. The Notion of Adminstrative Transparency among Academic Leaderships at Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaradat, Mohammed Hasan

    2013-01-01

    The study aims at identifying the notion of transparency among academic leaderships at Jordanian universities. To this effect, the interview-based approach was used in order to delineate the concept of transparency. Eighty individual academic leaderships were interviewed across various schools in Jordan. Upon collection of data and information,…

  8. Teacher Self-Efficacy and Classroom Management Styles in Jordanian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Tineh, Abdullah M.; Khasawneh, Samar A.; Khalaileh, Huda A.

    2011-01-01

    Two main purposes guided this study. The first was to identify the degree to which Jordanian teachers practise classroom management styles in their classrooms and their level of teacher self-efficacy. The second purpose was to explore the relationships between classroom management styles and teacher self-efficacy. This study is quantitative in…

  9. Folic acid and neural tube defects: are Jordanian pregnant women aware?

    PubMed

    Alebous, H D; Ma'aita, M E; Alkhazaleh, F A

    2014-01-01

    To assess Jordanian pregnant women's awareness of folic acid and its contribution to neural tube defects (NTDs) prevention and to their folic acid intake. One thousand pregnant women were interviewed about their knowledge of folic acid for NTDs prevention and their folic acid intake using a questionnaire. Of 1,000 women surveyed, 93.4% reported hearing of folic acid and 30.3% of NTDs. Only 16.2% knew that folic acid can reduce NTDs risk; 42.0% of those aware of folic acid believed it should be taken periconceptionally but only 16.9% did so. The most common information sources on folic acid were physicians (82.8%). Whereas a large percentage of pregnant Jordanian women were aware of folic acid, only a small proportion are aware that it prevents NTDs and should be taken periconceptionally. Also, there was a gap between awareness, knowledge, and intake of folic acid. Awareness and knowledge of NTDs was less prevalent among Jordanian women. Despite the efforts that have been undertaken, further effort is required to educate Jordanian women about folic acid contribution to NTDs prevention.

  10. Factors affecting intention to breastfeed among Syrian and Jordanian mothers: a comparative cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding is considered the ideal method of infant feeding for at least the first six months of life. This study aimed to compare breastfeeding intention between Syrian and Jordanian women and determine factors associated with breastfeeding intention among pregnant women in these two countries. Methods A cross-sectional design was used to collect data from1200 pregnant women aged 18 years and above (600 participants from each country). A self- administered questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic characteristics and breastfeeding intention. Results Intention to breastfeed was reported by 77.2% of Syrian and 76.2% of Jordanian pregnant women. There was no significant difference in intention to breastfeed between Syrian women and Jordanian women. In both countries, women with a more positive attitude to breastfeeding, women with previous breastfeeding experience and women with supportive partners were more likely to intend to breastfeed. Syrian women with a monthly family income of more than US$200, younger than 25 and primiparous or having one child were more likely to report an intention to breastfeed their infants. Jordanian women with an education level of less than high school and not living with their family-in-law were more likely to intend to breastfeed. Conclusions In Syria and Jordan, a more positive attitude to breastfeeding, previous breastfeeding experience and presence of supportive husbands are associated with intention to breastfeed. These factors should be considered when planning programs designed to promote breastfeeding in these two countries. PMID:20598137

  11. The Impact of Using Music on Teaching English Poetry in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hijazi, Dima; Al-natour, Amal

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of using music on teaching English Poetry in Jordanian universities on students' performance. The researchers followed the equivalent pre/post T test two group designs. To achieve the aim of the study, a pre/post-test was constructed to measure students' performance in English poetry. The…

  12. Necessary School Readiness Skills for Kindergarten Success According to Jordanian Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Taleb, Tagreed Fathi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the necessity levels of children's school readiness skills held by Jordanian kindergarten teachers. The sample consisted of 347 teachers drawn from the public and private kindergarten education sectors. The school readiness data collection instrument included seven readiness domains with a total of 39…

  13. Requirements of High-Quality Kindergarten Programs According to Jordanian Parents: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Taleb, Tagreed Fathi

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore what Jordanian parents of children attending "traditional" kindergartens recognize as high-quality education programs. The sample consisted of 509 families ("N"?=?509) of kindergarten-age children. Data were collected using a three-part questionnaire: curriculum domains, teacher…

  14. Scientific Research in Jordanian Higher Education Institutions: An Evaluation of the Status and Obstacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    bin Tareef, Atif

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the status and obstacles of scientific research in Jordanian higher education institutions. And defined by being an attempt to increase faculty member's, researcher's and educational leader's attention to the necessity of improving research planning or strategies, professional development, working conditions,…

  15. Requirements of High-Quality Kindergarten Programs According to Jordanian Parents: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Taleb, Tagreed Fathi

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore what Jordanian parents of children attending "traditional" kindergartens recognize as high-quality education programs. The sample consisted of 509 families ("N"?=?509) of kindergarten-age children. Data were collected using a three-part questionnaire: curriculum domains, teacher…

  16. Fostering Jordanian University Students' Communicative Performance through Literature-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bataineh, Ruba Fahmi; Rabadi, Raghd Yaqoub Al; Smadi, Oqlah Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a literature-based program on eight Jordanian university students' communicative performance. The research design was essentially qualitative (observation was the primary instrument); however, triangulation was achieved through the use of other instruments, including pre- and posttests, interviews, journal…

  17. Sustainable Development and Values Education in the Jordanian Social Studies Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alelaimat, Abeer Rashed; Taha, Kelle

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at identifying the values function, its relationship with sustainable development, and the extent of taking in to consideration the national education book for Jordanian tenth graders in the years 2004-2010. This study will attempt to answer the following questions: what is the values function that should be followed in the social…

  18. The Notion of Adminstrative Transparency among Academic Leaderships at Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaradat, Mohammed Hasan

    2013-01-01

    The study aims at identifying the notion of transparency among academic leaderships at Jordanian universities. To this effect, the interview-based approach was used in order to delineate the concept of transparency. Eighty individual academic leaderships were interviewed across various schools in Jordan. Upon collection of data and information,…

  19. Necessary School Readiness Skills for Kindergarten Success According to Jordanian Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Taleb, Tagreed Fathi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the necessity levels of children's school readiness skills held by Jordanian kindergarten teachers. The sample consisted of 347 teachers drawn from the public and private kindergarten education sectors. The school readiness data collection instrument included seven readiness domains with a total of 39…

  20. A Study on the Perception of Jordanian EFL Learners' Pragmatic Transfer of Refusals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huwari, Ibrahim Fathi; Al-Shboul, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the perception of Jordanian EFL learners' (JEFL) pragmatic transfer of refusal strategies in terms of contextual and cultural factors. Data were collected using a discourse completion test (DCT) and a scaled-response questionnaire (SRQ) to elicit perception data from the participants. Data from the SRQ were analyzed based…

  1. Source apportionments of ambient fine particulate matter in Israeli, Jordanian, and Palestinian cities.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jongbae; Wu, Bo; Abdeen, Ziad; Qasrawi, Radwan; Sarnat, Jeremy A; Sharf, Geula; Shpund, Kobby; Schauer, James J

    2017-06-01

    This manuscript evaluates spatial and temporal variations of source contributions to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in Israeli, Jordanian, and Palestinian cities. Twenty-four hour integrated PM2.5 samples were collected every six days over a 1-year period (January to December 2007) in four cities in Israel (West Jerusalem, Eilat, Tel Aviv, and Haifa), four cities in Jordan (Amman, Aqaba, Rahma, and Zarka), and three cities in Palestine (Nablus, East Jerusalem, and Hebron). The PM2.5 samples were analyzed for major chemical components, including organic carbon and elemental carbon, ions, and metals, and the results were used in a positive matrix factorization (PMF) model to estimate source contributions to PM2.5 mass. Nine sources, including secondary sulfate, secondary nitrate, mobile, industrial lead sources, dust, construction dust, biomass burning, fuel oil combustion and sea salt, were identified across the sampling sites. Secondary sulfate was the dominant source, contributing 35% of the total PM2.5 mass, and it showed relatively homogeneous temporal trends of daily source contribution in the study area. Mobile sources were found to be the second greatest contributor to PM2.5 mass in the large metropolitan cities, such as Tel Aviv, Hebron, and West and East Jerusalem. Other sources (i.e. industrial lead sources, construction dust, and fuel oil combustion) were closely related to local emissions within individual cities. This study demonstrates how international cooperation can facilitate air pollution studies that address regional air pollution issues and the incremental differences across cities in a common airshed. It also provides a model to study air pollution in regions with limited air quality monitoring capacity that have persistent and emerging air quality problems, such as Africa, South Asia and Central America. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evidence-based medicine among Jordanian family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Barghouti, Farihan; Halaseh, Lana; Said, Tania; Mousa, Abdel Halim; Dabdoub, Adel

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To assess family practitioners’ attitudes toward and awareness of evidence-based medicine (EBM). DESIGN A cross-sectional study from a questionnaire distributed between January and March 2007. SETTING Rural and urban family medicine centres throughout Jordan that are affiliated with the Ministry of Health, military centres, university medical centres, and the private sector. PARTICIPANTS Two hundred family physicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Family physicians’ attitudes toward EBM; training in EBM; barriers to practising EBM; level of awareness of and access to EBM journals and databases; and knowledge and understanding of related technical terms. RESULTS The response rate was 70.5%. Among those who responded, 56.7% were women and 42.6% were between the ages of 40 and 49 years. More than 50% of the respondents were working in mixed urban and rural practice settings. Most of the respondents had a positive attitude toward EBM: 63.5% welcomed the concept of EBM; more than 40% used EBM in their daily practices; and 90% agreed that practising EBM improved patient care. Of the respondents, 42.6% thought that the best way to move from opinion-based medicine to EBM was through learning the skills of EBM. Fifty percent of the respondents had access to MEDLINE, while only 20.4% of them had received formal training in research and critical appraisal. Lack of personal time was the main perceived barrier to practising EBM. Participants reported a low level of awareness of some of the technical terms. CONCLUSION Jordanian family physicians showed eagerness to learn and implement EBM in their daily practices. Nevertheless, they need more guidance and training to ensure the correct application of EBM ideals. PMID:19602641

  3. An e-health trend plan for the Jordanian health care system: a review.

    PubMed

    Rawabdeh, Ali Ahamd Awad

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the potential of e-health by focusing explicitly on the delivery of health care products and services. The examination of e-health activity is guided by one broad research question, "What is the potential for constructing e-health strategy as an innovative health technology?". A great amount of attention has been given to e-health activity in the present day. However important this form of e-health is, this type of service simply does not face the same constraints that must be addressed by those actually delivering health care services. The researchers employed a qualitative data collection technique to formulate more examples and cases to derive lessons for Jordan. Phone interviews in a random sample were conducted with corporate officers in Jordan in order to reveal the internal organizational structure and business trends, interface issues, marketing strategies, as well as comparing and contrasting the online health world to the traditional health care realm. Internet-related projects is a top priority for health care information technology executives in the present day, with a cautious approach toward "e-health", as many products have yet to mature, and that the "click and mortar" model may perhaps be the optimal strategy for e-health in Jordan. This paper reviews the e-health trends to demonstrate the tremendous potential for health-related commercial activity on the internet. However, the researcher examining the barriers facing e-health to the Jordanian health system also pointed out almost insurmountable challenges. Despite the apparent promise of e-health, its instability is measured by its failure so far to systematically penetrate the organization of health care. Beyond the pragmatic negotiation of e-health in the immediate context of clinical practice, there are wider issues about how the development/implementation of e-health is funded, about its organization and management at the policy level; and about its

  4. Contraceptive decision making in a sample of Jordanian Muslim women: delineating salient beliefs.

    PubMed

    Libbus, K; Kridli, S

    1997-01-01

    In this article, the authors identify attitudes, normative beliefs, and behavioral control beliefs of Muslim Jordanian women with regard to avoiding unplanned pregnancy and using specific contraceptive methods. Based on Ajzen and Fishbein's theory of planned behavior, open-ended questions were used in audio-taped face-to-face interviews with 25 married 19-44-year-old Jordanian Muslim women. A majority of respondents interviewed were currently using an intrauterine device (IUD) for contraception. Few women were using oral contraceptives, condoms, or the rhythm method and none of them reported using foam or a diaphragm. Content analyses of narrative transcriptions suggest the individual's concerns for family and individual well-being, as well as husbands' and families' opinions, may influence women's contraceptive behavior in this population.

  5. Psychological Correlates of Burden Among Jordanian Caregivers of Patients With Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Ghannam, Bushar M; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Al Abeiat, Dana D

    2017-10-01

    To examine prediction power of personality traits, expressed emotion, and coping strategies on caregivers' burden. Cross-sectional descriptive correlational design was used to collect data from 196 caregivers using the Self-Administered Questionnaire from Jordanian caregivers of patients with serious mental illness. Jordanian caregivers had a moderate-to-severe burden level (M = 47.1, SD = 11.5). Burden had a significant negative relationship with coping (r = -.15, p = .04) and significant positive relationship with personality dysfunction (r = .16, p = .021). Emotional expression, coping, and personality were found to be significant predictors of burden (F = 5.16, p = .002). Mental health professionals need to address family caregivers in their plans of care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Experience of Menarche Among Jordanian Adolescent Girls: An Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, Omar; Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Fooladi, Marjaneh M

    2016-06-01

    Menarche is a significant physical and emotional experience for adolescent girls, especially in certain cultures, where it is viewed as a rite of passage, affecting the meaning of lived experiences. The purpose of the study was to explore the menarche experience among Jordanian adolescent girls when they reach menarche. Interpretive phenomenological analysis. Az-Zarqa City, Jordan. A homogenous sample of 7 Jordanian girls, ages 12-14 years, who had their first menstruation within the past 6 months. Participants were asked to narrate their experiences through journal writing; their reports to be used for interpretive phenomenological analyses by 2 independent researchers, to ensure the findings' trustworthiness. Three major themes emerged as: (1) menstruation as a forbidden topic; (2) keeping the "topic" to oneself; and (3) no more secrets. Each theme was characterized according to distinct sets of emotions and knowledge-seeking patterns because Jordanian culture and Islamic teachings had greatly influenced the girls' experience of menarche. Menarche was considered a social taboo; not to be openly discussed. At the first signs of menarche, participants were shocked, scared, confused, and anxious. They had limited information and support from their family or school system. Therefore, they relied on self-perceptions about menarche, and viewed the experience of menstruation with profound negative emotions. Participants hesitated to share their experiences with their mothers and close friends. They felt alone and experienced their emotional turmoil in isolation and without support. Jordanian adolescent girls need formal health education to understand and manage the reproductive changes that occur in their bodies. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Jordanian oil shale future processing and its impact on the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hamarneh, Y.M. )

    1989-01-01

    According to the author, during mining, processing and direct combusting of Jordanian oil shales, major environmental effects can be expected testifying to the feasibility of the removal of some negative environmental consequences associated with oil shale industrial exploitation. The effects include atmospheric emissions, water pollution, solid and liquid waste; potentially hazardous health effects; and disruption of the land. This paper discusses how these effects can be kept at acceptable levels by careful advance planning.

  8. Phonological Processes in the Speech of Jordanian Arabic Children with Cleft Lip and/or Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Tamimi, Feda Y.; Owais, Arwa I.; Khabour, Omar F.; Khamaiseh, Zaidan A.

    2011-01-01

    The controlled and free speech of 15 Jordanian male and female children with cleft lip and/or palate was analyzed to account for the different phonological processes exhibited. Study participants were divided into three main age groups, 4 years 2 months to 4 years 7 months, 5 years 3 months to 5 years 6 months, and 6 years 4 months to 6 years 6…

  9. Jordanian Physicians’ Attitudes toward Disclosure of Cancer Information and Patient Participation in Treatment Decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Obeidat, Rana; Khrais, Huthaifah I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to determine the attitude of Jordanian physicians toward disclosure of cancer information, comfort and use of different decision-making approaches, and treatment decision making. Methods: A descriptive, comparative research design was used. A convenience sample of 86 Jordanian medical and radiation oncologists and surgeons practicing mainly in oncology was recruited. A modified version of a structured questionnaire was used for data collection. The questionnaire is a valid measure of physicians’ views of shared decision making. Results: Almost 91% of all physicians indicated that the doctor should tell the patient and let him/her decide if the family should know of an early-stage cancer diagnosis. Physicians provide abundant information about the extent of the disease, the side effects and benefits of the treatment, and details of the treatment procedures. They also provided less information on the effects of treatment on the sexuality, mood, and family of the patient. Almost 48% of the participating physicians reported using shared decision making as their usual approach for treatment decision making, and 67% reported that they were comfortable with this approach. The main setting of clinical activity was the only factor associated with physicians’ usual approach to medical decision making. Moreover, age, years of experience, and main setting of clinical activity were associated with physicians’ comfort level with the shared approach. Conclusions: Although Jordanian physicians appreciate patient autonomy, self-determination, and right to information, paternalistic decision making and underuse of the shared decision-making approach persist. Strategies that target both healthcare providers and patients must be employed to promote shared decision making in the Jordanian healthcare system. PMID:27981172

  10. Phonological Processes in the Speech of Jordanian Arabic Children with Cleft Lip and/or Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Tamimi, Feda Y.; Owais, Arwa I.; Khabour, Omar F.; Khamaiseh, Zaidan A.

    2011-01-01

    The controlled and free speech of 15 Jordanian male and female children with cleft lip and/or palate was analyzed to account for the different phonological processes exhibited. Study participants were divided into three main age groups, 4 years 2 months to 4 years 7 months, 5 years 3 months to 5 years 6 months, and 6 years 4 months to 6 years 6…

  11. SMS as Out-of-Class, Student-Instructor Interaction Tool: A Case Study of Jordanian Graduate Students' Perceptions and Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana M.; Qablan, Bassam Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the Jordanian university students' perceptions toward and use of Short Message Service (SMS) as out-of-class student-instructor interaction tool. The participants in this study were 33 graduate students who were enrolled in on-campus information technology course at a public Jordanian university. SMS was used in the…

  12. Lack of Association between Polymorphisms of Hepatic Lipase with Lipid Profile in Young Jordanian Adults.

    PubMed

    Khabour, Omar F; Alomari, Mahmoud A; Alzoubi, Karem H; Gharaibeh, Mohammad Y; Alhashimi, Farah H

    2014-01-01

    The human hepatic lipase (LIPC) gene encodes hepatic lipase, an enzyme involved in lipoprotein metabolism and regulation. Therefore, variants in LIPC gene may influence plasma lipoprotein levels. In this study, the association of LIPC C-514T and G-250A polymorphisms with plasma lipid profiles in 348 young Jordanians was investigated. Genotyping of C-514T and G-250A was performed by polymerase chain reaction and subsequent digestion with DraI and NiaIII restriction enzymes, respectively, while Roche analyzer was used to determine plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-and high-density lipoprotein. The G-250 and C-514 alleles were most abundant in Jordanians with 79 and 80% frequencies, respectively. Additionally, no difference was found in the lipid-lipoprotein profile between the different genotype groups of C-514T or G-250A polymorphisms, even when males and females were examined separately (P > 0.05). In young Jordanian adults, the examined LIPC polymorphisms seem to play a limited role in determining the lipid profile.

  13. Two novel mutations of FBN1 in Jordanian patients with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Saied A; Abujamous, Lama A; Al-Hawamdeh, Ali A; Alawneh, Khaldoon M; Rawashdeh, Tamara A; Jaradat, Zaher M

    2015-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant inheritance disorder with a 1/5000-live-birth prevalence. More than 3000 mutations have been characterized thus far in the FBN1 gene. The goal of this study is to facilitate Marfan syndrome diagnosis in Jordanian patients using a molecular genetic testing. All of the 65 coding exons and flanking intronic sequences of the FBN1 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction and were subjected to sequencing in five unrelated Jordanian patients suspected of having Marfan syndrome. Four different mutations were identified, including two novel mutations: the c.1553dupG frame-shift (p.Tyr519Ilefs*14) and the c.6650G>A (p.Cys2217Tyr) missense mutations. Two other missense mutations, c.2243G>A (p.Cys748Tyr) and c.2432G>A (p.Cys811Tyr), have been previously detected. Patient number five was heterozygous for the synonymous substitution variant c.1875T>C (p.Asn625Asn; rs#25458). Additionally, eight variants in the intronic sequence of the FBN1 gene were identified, of which the c.2168-46A>G mutation was a new variant. The data provide molecular-based evidence linking Marfan syndrome to pathogenic mutations in the FBN1 gene among Jordanians for the first time. Thus, our results will contribute to the better management of the disease using molecular tools and will help in genetic counseling of the patients' families.

  14. Spiritual Care Intervention and Spiritual Well-Being: Jordanian Muslim Nurses' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Musa, Ahmad S

    2016-04-22

    This study explored the frequency of providing aspects of spiritual care intervention and its association with nurses' own spiritual well-being in a convenience sample of 355 Jordanian Arab Muslim nurses. The nurses were recruited from different hospitals, representing both public and private health care sectors in northern and central Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive and correlational design was used. Results indicated that Jordanian Muslim nurses provided religious aspects of spiritual care intervention to their Muslim patients infrequently and that their own spiritual well-being was positively associated with the frequency of provision of spiritual care interventions. The study concluded that Jordanian Muslim nurses most frequently provided spiritual care interventions that were existential, not overtly religious, were commonly used, were more traditional, and did not require direct nurse involvement. Moreover, the findings revealed that spiritual well-being was important to those nurses, which has implications for improving the provision of spiritual care intervention. The study provides information that enables nurses, nursing managers, and nursing educators to evaluate the nurses' provision of various aspects of spiritual care to their Muslim patients, and to identify aspects of spiritual care intervention where nurses might receive training to become competent in providing this care.

  15. Health-related information exchange experiences of Jordanian women at breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Rana F; Lally, Robin M

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore Jordanian women's experiences of information exchange following diagnosis of early stage breast cancer. A purposive sample of 28 women who had surgery for early stage breast cancer within 6 months prior to the interview and had treatment at three hospitals in Central and Northern Jordan was recruited for the study. Data were collected using semi-structured individual interviews focused on women's communication experiences at diagnosis and during cancer treatment. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed verbatim in Arabic, and analyzed using conventional content analysis. Three main themes associated with information exchange were revealed as follows: (1) knowledge about breast cancer and its treatment, (2) communication of cancer diagnosis and treatment, and (3) educating on treatment side effects. Misconceptions about breast cancer risk factors, consequences of breast cancer treatment, and breast cancer-related symptoms were common among participants. Women made important health-related decisions based on misconceptions. Physician's information giving, availability, and responses to women's questions varied by their level of education and the type and location of treatment facility. Informational exchange experiences vary among Jordanian women diagnosed with breast cancer and raise concern over opportunities offered these women to engage in informed decision making. Findings suggest a need for nurses to assess the information needs of Jordanian women newly diagnosed with breast cancer and provide education tailored to individual needs. There is also a need to develop Arabic educational materials and make these available for patients at treatment facilities in all regions of Jordan.

  16. Characteristics of organosulphur compounds adsorption onto Jordanian zeolitic tuff from diesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Faisal; Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Khalili, Fawwaz I; Al-Degs, Yahya S

    2010-10-15

    The removal of organosulphur compounds (ORS) from diesel fuel is an important aspect of Jordanian's effort to reduce air pollution. Currently, the total sulphur content in Jordanian diesel fuel is 12,000 ppmw (1.2%, wt/wt), but Jordanian government has recently introduced new restrictions that will reduce this level gradually to internationally acceptable levels. The zeolitic tuff (ZT), from Tlul Al-Shahba region, was characterised using various analytical techniques. It was found that the Freundlich model fitted the adsorption isotherms more accurately than the Langmuir model; indicating that the ZT had a heterogeneous surface. The Langmuir adsorption capacity values for the three particle size ranges (100-200), (300-400), and (500-600) microm were 7.15, 6.32, and 5.52 mg/g and the column capacities were 4.45, 2.57, and 1.92 mg/g, respectively. The spent ZT was regenerated by washing with n-heptane with an efficiency of 81.5%. Two adsorption mechanisms were investigated. One is that the interaction of thiophene with the Brønsted site of the ZT through S atoms; the other is via C-S bond cleavage in thiophene-derived carbocations to form unsaturated fragments on the Brønsted acid sites.

  17. A retrospective study on imported malaria in Jordan. 2. Malaria among non-military Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Kanani, K A; Amr, Z S; Alkhatib, R; Shadfan, B; Al-Rashadan, M; Hani, R B

    2015-03-01

    Cases of imported malaria among civilian Jordanians returning from Asian and African countries from 1991-2011 are documented. A total of 511 cases of imported malaria were diagnosed among civilian Jordanians travelling abroad. Majority of cases were reported among adults over 21 year old accounting for or 87,67% of the total number of cases. Eighteen different categories of occupation were identified, where as students studying abroad showed the highest infection rate (33.2%), especially those returning from India (n=70). Infection among males was as high as 91.78%, compared to 8.22% in females. Females were mostly housewives accompanying their spouses. Cases were reported from 34 Asian and African countries.Most cases were reported among Jordanians returning from Pakistan (23.68%), Yemen (18.6%), India (18.4%) and Sudan (5.1%). The majority of infections were due to Plasmodium vivax (n=370, 72.4%), followed by Plasmodium falciparum (n=138, 27%). Only one case of Plasmodium malariae was observed. Few cases (n=3, 0.65%) of mixed infection with P. vivax and P. falciparum were reported. Sudan was the main source of P. falciparum (25.4%) followed by Yemen (20.3%), while Pakistan was the main source of P. vivax (28.9%) followed by India (22.7%). Most mixed infection cases were acquired in Sudan (66.7%).

  18. Candidate Gene Analysis of Breast Cancer in the Jordanian Population of Arab Descent: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Al-Eitan, Laith N; Jamous, Reem I; Khasawneh, Rame H

    2017-04-21

    This study aimed to investigate whether there are specific polymorphisms within six genes (BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, DAPK1, MMP9 promoter, and TOX3) that are associated with breast cancer among the Jordanian population. Sequenom MassARRAY system was used to genotype 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes in 230 Jordanian breast cancer patients and 225 healthy individuals. Three SNPs (MMP9 (rs6065912), TOX3 (rs1420546), and DAPK1 (rs11141901) were found to be significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (p < .05). This study is the first to provide evidence that genetic variation in MMP9, TOX3, and DAPK1 genes contribute to the development of breast cancer in the Jordanian population.

  19. Impact of Spiritual Well-Being, Spiritual Perspective, and Religiosity on the Self-Rated Health of Jordanian Arab Christians.

    PubMed

    Musa, Ahmad S; Pevalin, David J; Shahin, Francis I

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore associations of spiritual well-being, spiritual perspective, and religiosity with self-rated health in a convenience sample of 340 adult Jordanian Arab Christians. Data were collected through church and community groups. Results indicated that spiritual well-being and religiosity were positively associated with self-rated health, but in the final regression model only spiritual well-being retained a significant association after controlling for the other spiritual and religious measures. In conclusion, spirituality and religiosity are important to Jordanian Arab Christians' health and well-being, and the implications for nursing practice are explored.

  20. Effects of gender on the production of emphasis in Jordanian Arabic: A sociophonetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudalbuh, Mujdey D.

    Emphasis, or pharyngealization, is a distinctive phonetic phenomenon and a phonemic feature of Semitic languages such as Arabic and Hebrew. The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of gender on the production of emphasis in Jordanian Arabic as manifested on the consonants themselves as well as on the adjacent vowels. To this end, 22 speakers of Jordanian Arabic, 12 males and 10 females, participated in a production experiment where they produced monosyllabic minimal CVC pairs contrasted on the basis of the presence of a word-initial plain or emphatic consonant. Several acoustic parameters were measured including Voice Onset Time (VOT), friction duration, the spectral mean of the friction noise, vowel duration and the formant frequencies (F1-F3) of the target vowels. The results of this study indicated that VOT is a reliable acoustic correlate of emphasis in Jordanian Arabic only for voiceless stops whose emphatic VOT was significantly shorter than their plain VOT. Also, emphatic fricatives were shorter than plain fricatives. Emphatic vowels were found to be longer than plain vowels. Overall, the results showed that emphatic vowels were characterized by a raised F1 at the onset and midpoint of the vowel, lowered F2 throughout the vowel, and raised F3 at the onset and offset of the vowel relative to the corresponding values of the plain vowels. Finally, results using Nearey's (1978) normalization algorithm indicated that emphasis was more acoustically evident in the speech of males than in the speech of females in terms of the F-pattern. The results are discussed from a sociolinguistic perspective in light of the previous literature and the notion of linguistic feminism.

  1. Jordanian cancer patients' information needs and information-seeking behaviour: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Al Qadire, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    Cancer diagnosis can leave patients with uncertainty and anxiety that can be reduced by providing timely information and effective communication. Despite information provision being highly important in improving the quality of provided care, no study had been conducted to assess the information needs of Jordanian cancer patients. To investigate the information needs of Jordanian cancer patients. A quantitative research method and a descriptive cross-sectional survey design were used. The sample consisted of 182 Jordanian cancer patients. Participants were recruited from two hospitals; one of them was a university hospital and the second was governmental hospital. The mean age was 46.5 (SD 15.8 years); 52% of the sample were males. In addition, 38% of the patients had haematological tumours and 20% had gastro-intestinal tumours. The majority (157) wanted information about cancer. The results showed that patients would like to know everything about their disease (mean = 3.1, SD 0.9) and medical tests (mean = 3.0, SD 1.0). The results also revealed that younger patients, those who were working, and those with a high income had high information needs. However, patients who had reached the stage of palliative care seemed to require a lesser amount of information than those in the early stage of treatment. Many factors may cause variations in patients' information-seeking behaviour. Therefore, a notational policy for information provision is needed to satisfy different patients' information needs. Healthcare providers should be aware that cancer patients' will continue to need information at all stages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The cultural beliefs of Jordanian women during childbearing: implications for nursing care.

    PubMed

    Bawadi, H A; Al-Hamdan, Z

    2017-06-01

    To determine the cultural and religious beliefs and practices about childbirth among Jordanian women and to indicate how these beliefs and practices can be integrated into the maternity care of Muslim women in general, especially those immigrating to Western countries. The physiology of childbirth is similar for all women worldwide, but the surroundings in which it takes place makes it a unique experience for each woman. Every society has cultural practices and beliefs related to childbirth, and what is considered to be a vital practice in one culture may be seen as insignificant in another. A qualitative research design with an interpretative phenomenological approach was used to conduct semi-structured, audiotaped interviews with nine Jordanian mothers. Five main themes identified: childbearing is a blessing of Allah, a time for special maternal care, a time for maternal self-renewal, a time for maternal spiritual purification and a time to prepare for the sacrifices of motherhood. The findings reflected the sensitivity of the grace of God in all the interviews, illustrating the permeating influence of religious beliefs on traditional Jordanian childbirth practices. In planning policies, health services globally should acknowledge the diverse need of migrant women during childbirth, in order to gain women's trust in maternity services. To offer sensitive care, nurses need to address mothers' cultural and spiritual needs and meet these needs respectfully. To improve the childbearing experience, maternity staff should consider these themes to help build trust with mothers based on an appreciation of their spiritual and cultural beliefs. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  3. Experiencing transformation: the case of Jordanian nurse immigrating to the UK.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamdan, Zaid M; Al-Nawafleh, Ahmad H; Bawadi, Hala A; James, Veronica; Matiti, Milika; Hagerty, Bonnie M

    2015-08-01

    This study explored how Jordanian nurses experienced the transition from home to host country to illuminate the elements of transformation. Much research has been conducted on topics such as the current international nursing shortage and the recruitment of nurses from various countries. International nurses have unique needs with regard to adapting to new host cultures and workplaces; furthermore, the literature has revealed little evidence of nurses' professional and personal experiences related to migration. A qualitative study was conducted, collecting data via individual interviews. Twenty-five face-to-face and telephone interviews with Jordanian migrant nurses. This study showed that living and working in a host country changes the personal, social and professional attributes of migrant nurses. When nurses migrate, they encounter opportunities and significant challenges in their professional and personal lives. Although Jordanian nurses contributed their knowledge and skills to the UK healthcare system, they encountered enormous professional adaptation demands. Work setting discrepancies between source and host country are likely a major element behind the required nursing profession alteration. nurses' lives are transformed in terms of their personal and social networks in the host country. Social transformation is an integral and inseparable part of engagement with professional organisation(s) in the host community. Professional integration likely has far-reaching effects and consequences involving not only the individual but also their home and host country families and their professional networks. To provide high-quality nursing care, we must learn about the transformation experience, expand our sense of who we are and gain a degree of control over how we perform our nursing roles when we move away from our home. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Molecular analysis of the CTNS gene in Jordanian families with nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Saied; Al-Rababah, Bothina; Hazza, Issa; Akl, Kamal; Saca, Edward; Al-Younis, Doaa

    2015-01-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that is characterised by the accumulation of the amino acid cystine in several body tissues due to a mutation in the CTNS gene, which encodes the cystinosin protein. The aim of this study was to sequence the coding exons of the CTNS gene in five different Jordanian families and one family from Sudan with nephropathic cystinosis. Probands initially presented with Fanconi syndrome symptoms. An eye examination showed the accumulation of cystine crystals in the cornea by the age of 2 years, suggesting cystinosis. All of the coding exons and flanking intronic sequences and the promoter region of the CTNS gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction and subjected to sequencing. None of the probands in this study carried the European 57-kb deletion in the CTNS gene. Seven variants in the coding and promoter sequence of the CTNS gene were identified in the probands of this study. Two of these variants were a CTNS mutation that was previously identified in a heterozygous genotype in two different patients of European descendant. The two mutations were c.829dupA in exon 10 and c.890G>A in exon 11. The proband of family 2 was compound-heterozygous for the two mutations. This study is the first molecular study of infantile nephropathic cystinosis in Jordan. We successfully identified the causative CTNS mutations in Jordanian families. The results provide a basis for the early detection of the disease using molecular tools in a highly consanguineous Jordanian population. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. The Role of Religion in the Recovery from Alcohol and Substance Abuse Among Jordanian Adults.

    PubMed

    Al-Omari, Hasan; Hamed, Razan; Abu Tariah, Hashem

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand religious factors role during recovery period among Jordanian receiving treatment for alcohol and substances abuse. Participants were asked to answer open-ended questions related to role of religion on their recovery from alcohol and substances abuse. Content analysis was used to explore the role of religion on their recovery process. One hundred and forty-six clients from two treatment centers participated with two main themes that emerged from the analysis: role of religion and role of religious men. Religion not only helps during the recovery process, but also is considered as a protector from drug and alcohol abuse in the future.

  6. Pressure ulcer prevention knowledge among Jordanian nurses: a cross- sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcer remains a significant problem in the healthcare system. In addition to the suffering it causes patients, it bears a growing financial burden. Although pressure ulcer prevention and care have improved in recent years, pressure ulcer still exists and occurs in both hospital and community settings. In Jordan, there are a handful of studies on pressure ulcer. This study aims to explore levels of knowledge and knowledge sources about pressure ulcer prevention, as well as barriers to implementing pressure ulcer prevention guidelines among Jordanian nurses. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design and a self-administered questionnaire, data was collected from 194 baccalaureate and master’s level staff nurses working in eight Jordanian hospitals. From September to October of 2011, their knowledge levels about pressure ulcer prevention and the sources of this knowledge were assessed, along with the barriers which reduce successful pressure ulcer care and prevention. ANOVA and t-test analysis were used to test the differences in nurses’ knowledge according to participants’ characteristics. Means, standard deviation, and frequencies were used to describe nurses’ knowledge levels, knowledge sources, and barriers to pressure ulcer prevention. Results The majority (73%, n = 141) of nurses had inadequate knowledge about pressure ulcer prevention. The mean scores of the test for all participants was 10.84 out of 26 (SD = 2.3, range = 5–17), with the lowest score in themes related to PU etiology, preventive measures to reduce amount of pressure/shear, and risk assessment. In-service training was the second source of education on pressure ulcer, coming after university training. Shortage of staff and lack of time were the most frequently cited barriers to carrying out pressure ulcer risk assessment, documentation, and prevention. Conclusions This study highlights concerns about Jordanian nurses’ knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention. The

  7. Problems Accompanied Individuals with Learning Disability and Its Relationship to Gender and Family Economic Status Variables in a Jordanian Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Oweidi, Alia M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between problems that accompany individuals with learning disability and the variables of gender and family economic status for a selected sample of Jordanians. The sample of the study, which consisted of (239) male and female students, was chosen randomly. To achieve this aim, the…

  8. Combating Violence against Children: Jordanian Pre-Service Early Childhood Teachers' Perceptions towards Child Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayez, Merfat; Takash, Hanan Mahmoud; Al-Zboon, Eman Khleif

    2014-01-01

    Early childhood teachers play major roles in defying child abuse and neglect and alleviating its detrimental effects on young children. Therefore, this study aimed at exploring how Jordanian pre-service early childhood teachers define and perceive violence against children and their role in child abuse detection and prevention. Furthermore, the…

  9. Attitudes of Jordanian Nursing Students towards Mental Illness: The Effect of Teaching and Contact on Attitudes Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamaideh, Shaher H.; Mudallal, Rola

    2009-01-01

    Purposes: Attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental illness influence the treatment they receive and decisions of policy makers. The purposes of this study were to assess Jordanian nursing students' attitudes towards mental illness, and to assess the effectiveness of teaching and contact on changing nursing students' attitudes about…

  10. Jordanian Kindergarten and 1st-Grade Teachers' Beliefs about Child-Based Dimensions of School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayez, Merfat; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Oliemat, Enass

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the beliefs of Jordanian kindergarten and 1st-grade teachers regarding six child-based dimensions of school readiness: academic knowledge, basic thinking skills, socioemotional maturity, physical well-being and motor development, self-discipline, and communication skills. Questionnaires were used to collect…

  11. Assessing the Level of Performance of Sign Language Interpreters from Impaired Hearing Students' Perspectives at Public and Private Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanikat, Feryal Abdel-Hadi

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the level of performance of sign language interpreters in both public and private Jordanian universities, as well as to recognize the effect of the study variables specifically gender and qualifications for acoustically disabled and interpreter, and the experience of the interpreter on the level of the performance…

  12. Combating Violence against Children: Jordanian Pre-Service Early Childhood Teachers' Perceptions towards Child Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayez, Merfat; Takash, Hanan Mahmoud; Al-Zboon, Eman Khleif

    2014-01-01

    Early childhood teachers play major roles in defying child abuse and neglect and alleviating its detrimental effects on young children. Therefore, this study aimed at exploring how Jordanian pre-service early childhood teachers define and perceive violence against children and their role in child abuse detection and prevention. Furthermore, the…

  13. The Effect of Cognitive Learning Style-Based Reading Program on the Achievement of Jordanian Freshmen English Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hajaya, Nail; Al-Khresheh, Taisir

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cognitive learning style-based reading program on the achievement of Jordanian freshmen English majors. The subjects of the study consisted of 104 freshmen English majors enrolled for Reading Skills 1 in Tafila Technical University in Jordan in the fall semester 2007/2008. Students' learning styles,…

  14. Attitudes of Jordanian Nursing Students towards Mental Illness: The Effect of Teaching and Contact on Attitudes Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamaideh, Shaher H.; Mudallal, Rola

    2009-01-01

    Purposes: Attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental illness influence the treatment they receive and decisions of policy makers. The purposes of this study were to assess Jordanian nursing students' attitudes towards mental illness, and to assess the effectiveness of teaching and contact on changing nursing students' attitudes about…

  15. Jordanian Kindergarten and 1st-Grade Teachers' Beliefs about Child-Based Dimensions of School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayez, Merfat; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Oliemat, Enass

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the beliefs of Jordanian kindergarten and 1st-grade teachers regarding six child-based dimensions of school readiness: academic knowledge, basic thinking skills, socioemotional maturity, physical well-being and motor development, self-discipline, and communication skills. Questionnaires were used to collect…

  16. Predictors of Images towards the "Other": A Comparative Study between Jordanian and Greek Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostoulas-Makrakis, Nelly; Al-Said, Khaleel; Makrakis, Vassilios; Kalogiannakis, Pella; de Baz, Theodora

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the perceptions of Jordanian and Greek pre-service teachers (N = 489) towards the "Other" as well as towards tolerance and intolerance. Frequencies, "t"-tests and one-way analysis of variance, as well as multiple regression analyses, were performed for the data analysis. The results show that although…

  17. The Voice of Jordanian Parents of Young Children with Disabilities on Involvement in Their Children's Educational Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyassat, Mizyed A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the literature in the field of special education supports the argument that involving parents in the educational process is more likely to positively influence children's educational outcomes, this research aims at exploring the position of Jordanian parents of young children with disabilities in terms of their involvement. A qualitative…

  18. Problems Accompanied Individuals with Learning Disability and Its Relationship to Gender and Family Economic Status Variables in a Jordanian Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Oweidi, Alia M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between problems that accompany individuals with learning disability and the variables of gender and family economic status for a selected sample of Jordanians. The sample of the study, which consisted of (239) male and female students, was chosen randomly. To achieve this aim, the…

  19. A Study of Faculty Attitudes toward Internet-Based Distance Education: A Survey of Two Jordanian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes toward internet-based distance education by the faculty members of two Jordanian public universities, Al-Hussein Bin Talal University and Yarmouk University, as well as to explore the relationship between their attitudes toward internet-based distance education and their perceptions of their…

  20. Jordanian Prospective and Experienced Chemistry Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching and Learning and Their Potential Role for Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Amoush, Siham A.; Markic, Silvija; Abu-Hola, Imfadi; Eilks, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study of Jordanian chemistry student teachers' and experienced teachers' beliefs about teaching and learning. Different instruments were used, focusing on different aspects of teaching and learning. The first instrument is based on teachers' and students' drawings of teaching situations. It includes open…

  1. A Study of Jordanian University Students' Perceptions of Using Email Exchanges with Native English Keypals for Improving Their Writing Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahfouz, Safi Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    English foreign language learners generally tend to consider email exchanges with native speakers (NSs) as an effective tool for improving their foreign language proficiency. This study investigated Jordanian university students' perceptions of using email exchanges with native English keypals (NEKs) for improving their writing competency. A…

  2. The Effect of Explicit Instruction of Meta Cognitive Learning Strategies on Promoting Jordanian Language Learners' Reading Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Ghazo, Abeer

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of met cognitive strategies on reading comprehension among Jordanian university students. The participants of this research consists of two classes of English Course , Level one with 60 students, 30 in the control group and 30 in the experimental group. Then, Metacognitive reading…

  3. The Use of Metaphorical Connotation of Inanimate Objects to Describe People by Speakers of Jordanian Arabic: A Pragmatic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Soudi, Layth

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the use of connotations of inanimate objects to describe people by speakers of Jordanian Arabic. Its main goal is to analyze the positive and negative connotative meanings of inanimate object used to describe people in Jordan. Besides, the contribution of gender in making connotative meanings. The study provides a…

  4. Shared Leadership and Organizational Citizenship Behaviour in Jordanian Public Universities: Developing a Global Workforce for the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khasawneh, Samer

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of the impact of shared leadership on organizational citizenship behaviour among faculty members in Jordanian public universities. A sample of 558 faculty members employed by three public universities in Jordan participated in the study. The results indicated that shared leadership is moderately practised…

  5. A Study of Faculty Attitudes toward Internet-Based Distance Education: A Survey of Two Jordanian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes toward internet-based distance education by the faculty members of two Jordanian public universities, Al-Hussein Bin Talal University and Yarmouk University, as well as to explore the relationship between their attitudes toward internet-based distance education and their perceptions of their…

  6. Dialect and Cultural Contact, Shift and Maintenance among the Jordanians Living in Irbid City: A Sociolinguistic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abushihab, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The paper investigates the issue of dialect and cultural contact among Jordanians living in Irbid city in the north of Jordan. The objective of the paper is to find the extent of dialect and cultural shift and maintenance among them. The data are collected by means of interviews and observations. A sample of 100 participants has been selected on…

  7. Associations of variants in MTHFR and MTRR genes with male infertility in the Jordanian population.

    PubMed

    Mfady, Doaa S; Sadiq, May F; Khabour, Omar F; Fararjeh, Abdulfattah S; Abu-Awad, Aymen; Khader, Yousef

    2014-02-15

    Folate pathway is expected to play an important role in spermatogenesis since it is involved in DNA synthesis, repair and methylation. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between male infertility and the MTHFR (C677T and A1298C) and MTRR (A66G) polymorphisms. A group of 300 males was recruited in this study from different Jordanian infertility clinics. Of these, 150 cases of infertile men that included oligozoospermia cases (n=45), severe oligozoospermia (n=71) and azoospermia (n=34) were studied. The other 150 males were age matched fertile controls. Genotyping of MTHFR and MTRR polymorphisms was performed using PCR-RFLP technique. The results showed an association between MTHFR 677TT genotype and male infertility (P<0.05). However, the distribution of MTHFR A1298C and MTRR A66G genotypes were not different between the fertile and infertile groups (P>0.05). In addition, none of the examined polymorphisms was related to any of the semen parameters in the infertile group. In conclusion, this study showed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism is associated with male infertility in Jordanians. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Occupational-related back pain among Jordanian nurses: A descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Shawashi, Tagreed O; Subih, Maha M; Al Hadid, Lourance Abdel Razzaq; Abu Adas, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Back pain is the leading cause of disability, decreased physical performance at work and absenteeism. Activities leading to the occurrence of back pain include patient transfer and long standing hours. This study aimed to explore the prevalence and determine the activities responsible for the presence of back pain among Jordanian nurses. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on a convenience sample of nurses from governmental hospitals in Jordan. A self-report questionnaire was developed by Stubbs et al. and Harber et al. A descriptive method using mean, standard deviations and percentages was used, in addition to chi-square tests. Baseline findings indicated that more than three-quarters of the nurses studied suffered back pain during their work. Among nurses with back pain, about a fifth of them reported it to administration. The highest percentage of back pain was among critical care nurses. Further, the static factors contributed less commonly to back pain compared with the dynamic factors. Nearly half the participants with back pain reported taking days off more frequently. Jordanian nurses demonstrated one of the highest frequencies of back pain compared with other studies. Focus should be placed on education programmes about the appropriate body mechanics.

  9. Perceptions of Jordanian laypersons and dental professionals to altered smile aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Abu Alhaija, Elham S J; Al-Shamsi, Nada O; Al-Khateeb, Susan

    2011-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to rate the attractiveness of different smile variables, to compare the perception of Jordanian laypeople, general practitioners, and orthodontists to altered smile aesthetics, and to identify the threshold where different variables begin to impair smile aesthetics. A smiling photograph of a female dental student was selected and digitally manipulated to create changes in buccal corridor space (BCS), the amount of gingival display, and the midline diastema. These altered images were rated by three groups of Jordanians: 200 laypeople (100 females and 100 males), 200 general practitioners (100 females and 100 males), and 160 orthodontists (40 females and 120 males). Smile aesthetics scores were calculated and comparisons between groups were performed using the univariate general linear model. The results showed that profession and gender affected BCS and midline diastema attractiveness ratings (P<0.001). Wide BCSs, a gingival display of more than 2 mm, and the presence of a midline diastema of any size were rated as unattractive by all groups.

  10. Correlating Emotional Intelligence and Job Performance Among Jordanian Hospitals' Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamdan, Zaid; Oweidat, Islam Ali; Al-Faouri, Ibrahim; Codier, Estelle

    2017-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is an ability to recognize our and others' emotions, and manage emotions in ourselves and in relationships with other people. A large body of research evidence outside nursing shows that measured (EI) abilities correlated with employee performance, motivation, and job satisfaction; and preliminary nursing research evidence shows the correlation between EI ability and nurses' clinical performance. There is less research on the EI ability of Jordanian nurses, and the present study was undertaken to address this gap. A descriptive, cross-sectional, correlation comparative design (nonexperimental) was employed. Six Jordanian hospitals were included in the study. Two hundred fifty questionnaires were distributed to prospective participants. One hundred ninety-four questionnaires were returned, giving a response rate of 78%. EI was measured using the Genos Instrument. Clinical performance was measured using a self-report measure. Findings demonstrated significant positive relationships between all subscales of EI and job performance, ranging from r = .250, p = .000 to r = .193, p = .007. Regression analysis indicated working in medical-surgical wards, recognizing and expressing emotions scores (β = 0.186, p = .048), and controlling emotions (β = 0.255, p = .027) explained 19.1% of variance in nurses' job performance. The study findings confirm the correlation between nurse EI ability and clinical performance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Leadership behaviours, organizational culture and intention to stay amongst Jordanian nurses.

    PubMed

    AbuAlRub, R F; Nasrallah, M A

    2017-03-15

    To investigate the impact of leadership behaviours of nurse managers and organizational culture on Jordanian nurses' intention to stay at work in public, private and university hospitals. Leadership behaviours of nurses and organizational culture are considered important factors in enhancing retention of nurses. A correlational design was used in the study. A sample of 285 Jordanian nurses was conveniently selected to complete a self-administered questionnaire that consisted of three measures; Kouzes and Posner's Leadership Practise Inventory, Professional Organizational Culture questionnaire and McCain's Intent to Stay Scale. Nurse managers' leadership behaviours and organizational culture were positively associated with the level of intention to stay at work. The study variables explained almost 43% of the variance in nurses' intention to stay at work. The limitation of the study was the use of convenience sampling method. The results asserted that transformational leadership styles of nurse managers enhance positive hospitals' culture as well as the intention of nurses to stay at work. Nurse executives should promote leadership behaviours of nurse managers through training. The regulatory bodies of nursing profession in collaboration with nurse educators and administrators should help in developing competencies for nurse managers that are based on transformational leadership and incorporate such competencies in nursing education programs as well as continuous education programs. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  12. Attitudes of Jordanian mental health nurses toward mental illness and patients with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Wardam, Lina A

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Jordanian mental health nurses' attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental illness. A descriptive correlational design was utilized to collect data from 92 mental health nurses in Jordan. Data was collected on nurses' attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental disorder and their satisfaction with nursing care delivery. The Jordanian mental health nurses who participated in this study had negative attitudes toward mental illness and toward patients with mental disorders. About 60% of the mental health nurses had perceived patients with mental illness to be dangerous, immature, dirty, cold hearted, harmful, and pessimistic. In only two descriptions-being polite and adult-did nurses have positive perception about patients with mental illness. Mental health nurse were not satisfied with nursing care delivery. More than 70% of nurses were proud to be a mental health nurse. Age and gender were significant influential factors in forming the nurses' attitudes or satisfaction. Immediate intervention is needed to improve the quality of patient care provided by mental health nurses.

  13. Screening for breast cancer among young Jordanian women: ambiguity and apprehension.

    PubMed

    Al Dasoqi, K; Zeilani, R; Abdalrahim, M; Evans, C

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this study was to understand young Jordanian women's attitudes towards breast cancer screening practices in order to improve young women's uptake of screening and early detection. The incidence of breast cancer is increasing annually among younger Jordanian women; however, little is known about their attitudes towards breast cancer and associated screening practices. Young women's attitudes towards breast cancer must be taken into account when designing screening strategies and interventions specifically for this age group. Screening strategies must also acknowledge young women's cultural context; however, little is known about how culture shapes their understandings and practices. A qualitative interpretive approach was utilized to interview 45 young educated women about their breast cancer views and screening practices. Data were analysed thematically. Four overlapping themes emerged: (i) young women should not think about it, (ii) absence of a role model, (iii) cultural shame of breast cancer, and (iv) cancer means death and disability. The study found high levels of apprehension and ambiguity related to breast cancer. This was associated with the perceived impact of a cancer diagnosis on a young woman's social status and family role. Family support was perceived to be a necessary prerequisite for seeking treatment or screening. Understanding young women's perception about screening and early detection of breast cancer is essential for policy makers and healthcare providers to design culturally appropriate and age-appropriate health promotion campaigns and services. © 2013 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2013 International Council of Nurses.

  14. Jordanian nurses' job satisfaction, patients' satisfaction and quality of nursing care.

    PubMed

    Mrayyan, M T

    2006-09-01

    To study nurses' job satisfaction, patients' satisfaction, and quality of nursing care in a Jordanian educational hospital. A descriptive cross-sectional comparative design was used. The total populations at the educational hospital where the study was conducted were: 200 nurses (response rate 60%), 510 patients (response rate 49%), and 26 head nurses (NHs) (response rate 92%). Mueller/McCloskey Satisfaction Scale (MMSS) 1990; Eriksen's (1988) scale of The Satisfaction with Nursing Care; and Quality of Nursing Care Questionnaire-Head Nurse of Safford & Schlotfeldt (1960) were used to measure the phenomena of interest. Nurses were 'neither satisfied nor dissatisfied' in their jobs, nurses who work in wards reported a slightly better job satisfaction than nurses who work in critical care units. Patients reported that they were 'moderately' satisfied, and head nurses reported that nurses 'usually (practically)' provide a high of quality of nursing care. There were no significant differences between critical care units and wards in regard to patients' satisfaction and quality of nursing care. Jordanian nurses' job satisfaction is on the borderline, which arguably requires more interventions. Patients' satisfaction and quality of nursing care have to be enhanced to reach the levels of 'very satisfied' and 'always' consecutively.

  15. Predictors of breast self-examination performance among Jordanian university female students.

    PubMed

    Abu Sharour, L; Al-Ghabeesh, S; Suleiman, K; Salameh, A B; Jacoob, S; Al-Kalaldeh, M

    2016-12-27

    Breast cancer is considered one of the main types of cancer among female worldwide and in Jordan also. Early detection of it will improve the prognosis and decrease the mortality rate also. Thus, this study was conducted to assess the predictors of breast self-examination performance among Jordanian university female students. Across-sectional design was utilised in this study. A sample of 100 participants was completed the study survey (The Champion's Health Belief Model Scale). The main results or regression analysis showed that confidence (β = .71, p < .0001) and perceived barriers (β = -.061, p = .0004) were significant predictors of breast self-examination performance. In summary, other variables of Health belief model were found not be significant indicators of BSE performance in this study. However, the HBM is considered a valid framework to assess the predictors of breast self-examination knowledge, attitude, beliefs and barriers among Jordanian college female students. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The lived experience of Jordanian women who received family support during labor.

    PubMed

    Khresheh, Reham; Barclay, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    Policies regarding childbirth in Jordan currently exclude attendance by a female relative to provide support. This study was done in order to describe the experience of a group of Jordanian women who had been afforded support from a female relative during a nursing research project. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 25 women at 6 weeks postpartum. All of the women had given birth at the main hospital in the southern region of Jordan. Women had positive experiences with their female relative support. Four themes were identified as common to the women involved: (1) increased sense of security, (2) provision of physical help, (3) communicating the woman's needs/wishes to her professional caregivers, and (4) emotional support and encouragement. The results show that the support of a female relative was helpful for this small group of Jordanian women experiencing their first labor and birth. Since the literature clearly shows that support in labor is appropriate and produces improved outcomes, public health practitioners in maternal and child health, along with hospitals, should emphasize this as a valuable resource for pregnant women. Non-Western or developing countries could benefit from more fully using evidence currently in the literature on a range of practices, including that of emotional and social support in labor.

  17. The Effect of the Graphic Organizer Strategy on University Students' English Vocabulary Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hinnawi, Arwa N.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of the graphic organizer strategy on vocabulary building and vocabulary incremental growth of Jordanian university EFL students. One hundred and two students participated in the study which lasted for one academic semester of four months. Each student enrolled in one of two intact and equally-sized…

  18. Antioxidant activity of some Jordanian medicinal plants used traditionally for treatment of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Al-Mustafa, Ahmed H; Al-Thunibat, Osama Y

    2008-02-01

    Medicinal plants are being used extensively in Jordanian traditional medicinal system for the treatment of diabetes symptoms. Twenty one plant samples were collected from different Jordanian locations and used for antioxidant evaluation. The level of antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH and ABTS assays in relation to the total phenolic contents of the medically used parts. The most frequently used plant parts as medicines were fruit, shoot and leaves. The total phenolic contents of methanol and aqueous extracts, from plants parts, ranged from 6.6 to 103.0 and 3.0 to 98.6 GAE mg g(-1) of plant part dry weight, respectively. DPPH-TEAC of the methanol extracts of plants parts were varied from 4.1 to 365.0 mg g(-1) of plant dry weight versus 0.6 to 267.0 mg g(-1) in aqueous extracts. Moreover, the mean values of ABTS*- (IC50) varied from 6.9 to 400.0 microg dry weight mL(-1) ABTS in methanol extracts versus 9.8 to 580.5 microg mL(-1) in aqueous extracts. According to their antioxidant capacity, the plants were divided into three categories: high (DPPH-TEAC > or = 80 mg g(-1) ), (i.e., Punica granatum peel, Quercus calliprinos leave, Quercus calliprinos fruit, Cinchona ledgeriana and Juniperus communis leave), moderate (DPPH-TEAC range 20-80 mg g(-1)) (i.e., Salvia fruticosa shoot, Crataegus azarolus stem, Crataegus azarolus leave, Varthemia iphionoides shoot, Artemisia herba-alba shoot, Thymus capitatus shoot, Morus nigra leaves and Arum palaestinum leaves) and low antioxidant plants (DPPH-TEAC < 20 mg g(-1)), (i.e., Matricaria aurea shoot, Artemisia judaica shoot, Teucrium polium shoot, Pinus halepenss pollen grains, Sarcopoterium spinosum root, Crataegus azarolus fruit, Inula viscose shoot and Achillea fragrantissima shoot). The antioxidant activity of these plant's extracts and their potential rule in radical scavenging agreed with their potential use by Jordanian population as a traditional anti-diabetic agents.

  19. The correlates of stigma toward mental illness among Jordanian patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Rayan, Ahmad; Mahroum, Maryam Husnee; Khasawneh, Aws

    2017-05-23

    This study aims to assess the correlates of stigma toward mental illness among patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD). One hundred and sixty one Jordanian outpatients suffering from MDD completed the study. Participants completed the demographic questionnaire, the Center for Epidemiological Studies for the intensity of depression, and the Devaluation-Discrimination Scale to assess stigma. Participants reported a moderate level of perceived stigma toward mental illness. Age, perceived pain, the number of relapses, and severity of depressive symptoms were significantly correlated with stigma toward mental illness among the study sample. The severity of depressive symptoms was the strongest correlate of stigma toward mental illness. Factors associated with stigma toward mental illness should be carefully considered when implementing anti-stigma programs for patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Quality of life, social support, and severity of psychiatric symptoms in Jordanian patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hamaideh, S; Al-Magaireh, D; Abu-Farsakh, B; Al-Omari, H

    2014-06-01

    The major purposes of this study were to examine levels and correlations of quality of life (QOL), social support, and severity of psychiatric symptoms as well as to identify the variables that best predict QOL among Jordanian patients with schizophrenia. Descriptive cross-sectional design was used to collect data from 160 patients selected through systematic random sampling from two psychiatric outpatient clinics. Results showed that the highest domain of QOL was the social relationship domain, and the highest source of social support was perceived from significant others. Severity of affective symptoms was the highest, and severity of positive symptoms was the lowest. QOL correlated positively with social support, patients' educational and income level, and employment; and negatively with severity of psychiatric symptoms, duration of untreated illness, and duration of treatment. Support from friends, duration of untreated illness, income level, and severity of affective symptoms predicted QOL and accounting for 47.3% of the variance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Clinical teachers as caring mothers from the perspectives of Jordanian nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Violeta

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this transcultural qualitative study was to discover, describe and explain the meaning of a caring student-teacher encounter within the context of clinical education. Clinical teachers are registered nurses who have completed a university undergraduate nursing degree program and at least 1 year of post-registration clinical experience. They are employed as full-time staff of the faculty of nursing. Among the 19 Jordanian undergraduate nursing students interviewed, "clinical nurse teachers as caring mothers," emerged as an important theme. This paper describes the clinical teachers in their mothering roles, such as supporting, negotiating, reinforcing, transforming and releasing nursing students throughout their clinical practice. Understanding students' cultural beliefs and values provides possible predictors that could facilitate positive student-teacher relationships that could be used to plan the clinical education for nursing students. There is also a need to develop workshops in clinical teaching that would incorporate cultural awareness, especially in a multicultural student-teacher groups.

  2. Removal of copper(II) from aqueous solution by Jordanian pottery materials.

    PubMed

    Khazali, Omar; Abu-El-Halawa, Rajab; Al-Sou'od, Khaldoun

    2007-01-02

    The aim of this work was to assess the possibility of removing some heavy metals from water by a low-cost adsorbent, like Jordanian raw pottery. Five types of raw and modified pottery materials have been investigated. The effects of initial metal concentration, agitation time, pH and temperature on the removal of Cu(II) were studied. A pseudo-first order was used to test the adsorption kinetics. In order to investigate the sorption isotherm, two equilibrium models, the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms, were analyzed. The effect of solution pH on the adsorption onto pottery was studied in the pH range 1-5. The adsorption was exothermic at ambient temperature and the computation of the parameters, DeltaH, DeltaS and DeltaG, indicated the interactions to be thermodynamically favorable.

  3. Awareness and attitudes regarding breast cancer and breast self-examination among female Jordanian students

    PubMed Central

    Suleiman, Amal K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite huge efforts to increase the level of breast cancer awareness, breast self-examination (BSE) is still poorly practiced across Jordan. This baseline study aimed to assess the awareness of female Jordanian students about breast cancer and their practice of BSE. Materials and Methods: Using a cross-sectional research design, a self-administered survey was used, via a pre-validated pre-piloted questionnaire was distributed to 900 female students aged between 18 and 37 years recruited from the University of Jordan in Amman. The questionnaire was divided into four domains: Socio-demographic characteristics; the respondent's knowledge of breast cancer and BSE; their attitude towards risk factors for breast cancer; their experience of breast cancer screening and BSE. Statistical analysis was performed using Epi-Info version 6.4 statistical Software. Results: The overall response rate was 93.3%. Approximately half of the respondents 435 (51.8%) were aware of breast cancer. Of these, 99 (22.7%) believed that it was caused by a medical condition, followed by old age (71; 16.4%), lack of breastfeeding (58; 13.3%), heredity (56; 12.8%), late marriage (44; 10.3%), pregnancies in older women (33; 7.5%), the use of brassieres (18; 4.1%), excessive breastfeeding (17; 3.9%), being unmarried (14; 3.2%), and spirituality (11; 2.6%). Overall, 152 participants (34.9%) were aware of BSE, but only 93 (11%) had performed it. Conclusions: The current status of awareness of breast cancer in Jordanian students and their use of BSE are insufficient. Women need to be encouraged to self-monitor in order to detect abnormalities in their breasts. Appropriate educational interventions are urgently required to encourage women to engage in regular BSE. PMID:25278670

  4. Jordanian patients' perception of stressors in critical care units: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Hweidi, Issa M

    2007-02-01

    Critical care units' CCUs environment has been regarded as a leading stressor because of the complex nature of patient's health problems that require an extensive use of very sophisticated technology. Multiple and complex care predominates in CCUs have been described by patients to be stressful and emotionally demanding. Number of CCUs in Jordan has been increasing and so does the advanced technology, which calls for adaptability in dealing with unit stressors as they affect patient recovery and rehabilitation. To identify the principal physical and psychological stressors as perceived by Jordanian patients in CCUs and to examine the effects of selected patients' characteristics on their perception of stressors. In this cross-sectional study, data was collected from 165 patients, 2-3 days after being discharged from CCUs in two Jordanian governmental hospitals. A structured interview guide including the Intensive Care Unit Environmental Stressor Scale was used. Having tubes in nose or mouth, being in pain, not able to sleep and hearing the buzzers and alarms from the machinery, being thirsty, and not being in control of your-self were considered by patients as the main stressors. Psychological stressors were the least stressful items identified by patients. Marital status, educational level, age, and income were the most significant characteristics which affected patients' perception of stressors. The findings suggest that single and older patients with low income and low education experience more difficulties than their counterparts. Nurses must utilize more effective communication techniques and interventions to relieve patients' pain, and provide an atmosphere in which rest is possible, with less light, noise, and the fewest possible interruptions. Although the results of this study indicate the need to provide the best possible physical care, it is equally important to give adequate attention to patients' and families' psychological aspects.

  5. Natural Jordanian zeolite: removal of heavy metal ions from water samples using column and batch methods.

    PubMed

    Baker, Hutaf M; Massadeh, Adnan M; Younes, Hammad A

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption behavior of natural Jordanian zeolites with respect to Cd(2 + ), Cu(2 + ), Pb(2 + ), and Zn(2 + ) was studied in order to consider its application to purity metal finishing drinking and waste water samples under different conditions such as zeolite particle size, ionic strength and initial metal ion concentration. In the present work, a new method was developed to remove the heavy metal by using a glass column as the one that used in column chromatography and to make a comparative between the batch experiment and column experiment by using natural Jordanian zeolite as adsorbent and some heavy metals as adsorbate. The column method was used using different metal ions concentrations ranged from 5 to 20 mg/L with average particle size of zeolite ranged between 90 and 350 mum, and ionic strength ranged from 0.01 to 0.05. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used for analysis of these heavy metal ions, the results obtained in this study indicated that zeolitic tuff is an efficient ion exchanger for removing heavy metals, in particular the fine particle sizes of zeolite at pH 6, whereas, no clear effect of low ionic strength values is noticed on the removal process. Equilibrium modeling of the removal showed that the adsorption of Cd(2 + ), Cu(2 + ), Pb(2 + ), and Zn(2 + ) were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich (DKR). The sorption energy E determined in the DKR equation (9.129, 10.000, 10.541, and 11.180 kJ/mol for Zn(2 + ), Cu(2 + ), Cd(2 + ) and Pb(2 + ) respectively) which revealed the nature of the ion-exchange mechanism.

  6. Human Metapneumovirus Infection in Jordanian Children: Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Severe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Jennifer E.; Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Faouri, Samir; Shehabi, Asem; Johnson, Monika; Wang, Li; Fonnesbeck, Christopher; Williams, John V.; Halasa, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    Background Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a leading cause of acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) in young children. Our objectives were to define HMPV epidemiology and circulating strains and determine markers of severe disease in Jordanian children. Methods We conducted a prospective study March 16, 2010-March 31, 2013 using quantitative RT-PCR to determine the frequency of HMPV infection among children <2 years old admitted with fever and/or acute respiratory illness to a major government hospital in Amman, Jordan. Results HMPV was present in 273/3168 (8.6%) of children presenting with ARTI. HMPV A2, B1, and B2, but not A1, were detected during the 3-year period. HMPV-infected children were older and more likely to be diagnosed with bronchopneumonia than HMPV-negative children. HMPV-infected children with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) had higher rates of cough and shortness of breath than children with LRTI infected with other or no identifiable viruses. Symptoms and severity were not different between children with HMPV only compared with HMPV co-infection. Children with HMPV subgroup A infection were more likely to require supplemental oxygen. In a multivariate analysis, HMPV subgroup A and age <6 months were independently associated with supplemental oxygen requirement. Conclusions HMPV is a leading cause of acute respiratory tract disease in Jordanian children <2 years old. HMPV A and young age were associated with severe disease. Ninety percent of HMPV-infected hospitalized children were full-term and otherwise healthy, in contrast to high-income nations; thus, factors contributing to disease severity likely vary depending on geographic and resource differences. PMID:26372450

  7. Ultrasonographic assessment of splenic volume and its correlation with body parameters in a Jordanian population

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Darwish H.; Kalbouneh, Heba M.; Al-Hadidi, Maher T.; Shatarat, Amjad T.; Tarawneh, Emad S.; Hadidy, Azmy M.; Mahafza, Waleed S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate normal linear dimensions and volume of spleen in Jordanians using ultrasonography, and to correlate splenic volume with age and body parameters: height, weight, body surface area (BSA), and body mass index (BMI). Methods: A prospective pilot study was conducted on 205 volunteers (115 males and 90 females) not known to have any conditions likely to be associated with splenomegaly. The study was performed at the Radiology Department, Jordanian University Hospital, Amman, Jordan, between December 2013 and August 2014. All linear dimensions of spleen were measured, and splenic volume (index) was calculated using the standard prolate ellipsoid formula (length × width × depth × 0.523). The splenic volume was then analyzed with age and body parameters using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: The mean (± SD) splenic dimensions were 10.72±1.37 cm in length, 7.40±1.52 cm in width, 4.40±1.47 cm in depth, and 184.15±79.56 cm3 in volume. Men had larger spleens than women (p<0.0001). Age had no significant effect on spleen volume (r=0.11, p=0.12). There was a significant moderate positive correlation (p<0.0001), using Pearson’s correlation coefficient, between the spleen volume, and other parameters (height, weight, BSA, and BMI), with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.3. Conclusion: A local reference of spleen dimensions was established with a different range of values reported previously. PMID:26219448

  8. Leptin and uric acid as predictors of metabolic syndrome in jordanian adults

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mousa N.; Haddad, Fares H.; Azzeh, Firas S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a set of interrelated metabolic risk factors that increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Studies regarding the specificity and sensitivity of serum levels of leptin and uric acid as predictors of MetS are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum levels of leptin and uric acid in terms of their specificity and sensitivity as predictors of MetS in the studied Jordanian group. SUBJECTS/METHODS In this cross sectional study, 630 adult subjects (308 men and 322 women) were recruited from the King Hussein Medical Center (Amman, Jordan). The diagnosis of MetS was made according to the 2005 International Diabetes Federation criteria. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the efficacy of serum levels of leptin and uric acid as predictors of MetS in the studied Jordanian group. RESULTS Study results showed that for identification of subjects with MetS risk, area under the curve (AUC) for leptin was 0.721 and 0.683 in men and women, respectively. Serum uric acid levels in men showed no significant association with any MetS risk factors and no significant AUC, while uric acid AUC was 0.706 in women. CONCLUSION Serum leptin levels can be useful biomarkers for evaluation of the risk of MetS independent of baseline obesity in both men and women. On the other hand, serum uric acid levels predicted the risk of MetS only in women. PMID:27478548

  9. Vitamin D status and determinants of deficiency among non-pregnant Jordanian women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Nichols, E K; Khatib, I M D; Aburto, N J; Sullivan, K M; Scanlon, K S; Wirth, J P; Serdula, M K

    2012-06-01

    Vitamin D deficiency, a risk factor for osteomalacia and osteoporosis, is a re-emerging health problem globally. While sunlight is an important vitamin D source, previous investigations among women whose culture encourages skin covering have been small, not nationally representative, or both. We investigated serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D(3)) status and factors associated with deficiency in a nationally representative survey of 2013 Jordanian women of reproductive age in Spring 2010. We measured 25(OH)D(3) concentrations by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and calculated prevalence ratios for deficiency associated with skin covering and other factors. Results showed 60.3% (95% CI: 57.1-63.4%) deficiency (<12 ng/ml) and 95.7% (95% CI: 94.4-96.8%) insufficiency (<20 ng/ml) among women. Prevalence of deficiency was 1.60 times higher for women who covered with a scarf/hijab (95% CI: 1.06-2.40, P = 0.024) and 1.87 times higher for women who wore full cover, or a niqab (95% CI: 1.20-2.93, P = 0.006), compared with the women who did not wear a scarf/hijab or niqab. Compared with rural women completing at least secondary education, prevalence of deficiency was 1.30 times higher for urban women of the same education level (95% CI: 1.08-1.57, P = 0.006), 1.18 times higher for urban women completing less than secondary education (95% CI: 0.98-1.43, P = 0.09), and 0.66 times lower for rural women completing less than secondary education (95% CI: 0.52-0.84, P = 0.001). Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency pose significant public health problems in Jordanian women. Prevalence of deficiency is significantly higher among urban women and among women who cover with a scarf/hijab or niqab.

  10. Awareness and attitudes regarding breast cancer and breast self-examination among female Jordanian students.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Amal K

    2014-06-01

    Despite huge efforts to increase the level of breast cancer awareness, breast self-examination (BSE) is still poorly practiced across Jordan. This baseline study aimed to assess the awareness of female Jordanian students about breast cancer and their practice of BSE. Using a cross-sectional research design, a self-administered survey was used, via a pre-validated pre-piloted questionnaire was distributed to 900 female students aged between 18 and 37 years recruited from the University of Jordan in Amman. The questionnaire was divided into four domains: Socio-demographic characteristics; the respondent's knowledge of breast cancer and BSE; their attitude towards risk factors for breast cancer; their experience of breast cancer screening and BSE. Statistical analysis was performed using Epi-Info version 6.4 statistical Software. The overall response rate was 93.3%. Approximately half of the respondents 435 (51.8%) were aware of breast cancer. Of these, 99 (22.7%) believed that it was caused by a medical condition, followed by old age (71; 16.4%), lack of breastfeeding (58; 13.3%), heredity (56; 12.8%), late marriage (44; 10.3%), pregnancies in older women (33; 7.5%), the use of brassieres (18; 4.1%), excessive breastfeeding (17; 3.9%), being unmarried (14; 3.2%), and spirituality (11; 2.6%). Overall, 152 participants (34.9%) were aware of BSE, but only 93 (11%) had performed it. The current status of awareness of breast cancer in Jordanian students and their use of BSE are insufficient. Women need to be encouraged to self-monitor in order to detect abnormalities in their breasts. Appropriate educational interventions are urgently required to encourage women to engage in regular BSE.

  11. Determining responsibility for smoking in society: accountability continuum for Jordanian college students and its implication on FCTC implementation.

    PubMed

    Madanat, Hala N; Barnes, Michael D; Cole, Eugene C; Njord, Rebecca

    As one of the first countries to ratify the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, Jordan has signaled an interest in stronger anti-tobacco restrictions. This study examines whether Jordanian students believe smoking is an individual right or a social issue, and if they would support more stringent policies and enforcement. Undergraduate Jordanian students (n = 1211) from public and private universities completed the survey. Never smokers scored significantly higher on smoking being a social issue that required public policy response (p-value < .001); whereas smokers scored significantly higher with all individual right items. Ample opportunity exists for developing and enforcing stronger tobacco policies both on college campus and generally in the country. However, increasing tobacco taxes may need to be preceded by health communication campaigns that increase knowledge of the effectiveness of the tobacco tax in reducing use and resultant premature deaths.

  12. The Efficacy of Arabic Version of the Developmental Assessment of Young Children Second Edition (DAYC-2) Scale in Detecting Developmental Delay among Jordanian Children Aged Birth to 71 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleh, Rawan M. Abu; Smadi, Jamil M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of the developmental assessment of young children second edition (DAYC-2) Scale in detecting Developmental Delay among Jordanian children aged birth to 71 months. Firstly, the scale was translated and reviewed for language and cultural appropriateness. Secondly, the Arabic Jordanian version of the scale was…

  13. The influence of using Jordanian natural zeolite on the adsorption, physical, and mechanical properties of geopolymers products.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Rushdi Ibrahim; El-Eswed, Bassam; Alshaaer, Mazen; Khalili, Fawwaz; Khoury, Hani

    2009-06-15

    Geopolymers consist of an amorphous, three-dimensional structure resulting from the polymerization of aluminosilicate monomers that result from dissolution of kaolin in an alkaline solution at temperatures around 80 degrees C. One potential use of geopolymers is as Portland cement replacement. It will be of great importance to provide a geopolymer with suitable mechanical properties for the purpose of water storage and high adsorption capacity towards pollutants. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of using Jordanian zeolitic tuff as filler on the mechanical performance and on the adsorption capacity of the geopolymers products. Jordanian zeolitic tuff is inexpensive and is known to have high adsorption capacity. The results confirmed that this natural zeolitic tuff can be used as a filler of stable geopolymers with high mechanical properties and high adsorption capacity towards methylene blue and Cu(II) ions. The XRD measurements showed that the phillipsite peaks (major mineral constituent of Jordanian zeolite) were disappeared upon geopolymerization. The zeolite-based geopolymers revealed high compressive strength compared to reference geopolymers that employ sand as filler. Adsorption experiments showed that among different geopolymers prepared, the zeolite-based geopolymers have the highest adsorption capacity towards methylene blue and copper(II) ions.

  14. Epidemiological characteristics of Candida species colonizing oral and rectal sites of Jordanian infants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is evidence that Candida colonization contributes to increasing invasion of candidiasis in hospitalized neonates. Few studies investigated the epidemiology and risk factors of Candida colonization among hospitalized and non-hospitalized infants. This prospective study investigated the major epidemiological characteristics of Candida species colonizing oral and rectal sites of Jordanian infants. Methods Infants aged one year or less who were examined at the pediatrics outpatient clinic or hospitalized at the Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan, were included in this study. Culture swabs were collected from oral and rectal sites and inoculated on Sabouraud dextrose agar. All Candida isolates were confirmed by the Remel RapID yeast plus system, and further investigated for specific virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility MIC using E-test. Genotyping of C. albicans isolates was determined using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis method. Results A total of 61/492 (12.4%) infants were colonized with Candida species by either their oral/rectal sites or both. Rectal colonization was significantly more detected than oral colonization (64.6% verses 35.4%), particularly among hospitalized infants aged more than one month. The pattern and rates of colonization were as follows: C. albicans was the commonest species isolated from both sites and accounted for 67.1% of all isolates, followed by C.kefyr (11.4%), each C. tropicalis and C. glabrata (8.9%) and C. parapsilosis (3.8%). A various rates of Candida isolates proved to secrete putative virulence factors in vitro; asparatyl proteinase, phospholipase and hemolysin. C. albicans were associated significantly (P < 0.05) with these enzymes than other Candida species. All Candida isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B and caspofungin, whereas 97% of Candida species isolates were susceptible to fluconazole using E-test. The genetic similarity of 53 C. albicans isolates as

  15. Storage and wastage of drug products in Jordanian households: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Abushanab, Amani S; Sweileh, Waleed M; Wazaify, Mayyada

    2013-06-01

    Appropriate household storage and use of drug products can reduce drug wastage and unnecessary hazards. We aimed to quantify the amounts and types of medications that were stored in Jordanian households and the extent of drug wastage in terms of the amount and cost of these medications. The setting was households in Amman, Jordan. This was a cross-sectional survey study using a pre-piloted questionnaire. Family members were interviewed in person about use of drug products, and where drug products were stored. The main outcomes were types, storage methods, cost and quantities of drug products in every household. Two hundred and forty-three households were approached, out of which 219 agreed to participate. A total of 2393 (mean 10.9, SD 5.2) drug products were recorded from the 219 households surveyed. A significant positive correlation was noted between the number of drug products in a household and family size (r = 0.19, P < 0.01), the level of the mother's education (r = 0.24, P < 0.01), the level of the father's education (r = 0.28, P < 0.01) and income (r = 0.14, P = 0.034). Eighty nine (40.6%) households had at least one child younger than 6 years of age, and 1122 (46.9%) drug products were stored in unsafe places in the houses, within the reach of children. More than a quarter of drug products (1509, 27.2%) were not in their original containers, 360 (15%) were unused since dispensing, 261 (10.9%) had expired and 44 (1.8%) had no clear expiry date. We estimated that the cost of drug wastage in the 219 households was US$5414. Paracetamol (202, 8.4%), diclofenac (98, 4.1%) and amoxicillin (79, 3.3%) were the most commonly reportedly stored individual drugs. Drug products are stored in large quantities in Jordanian households. Unsafe storage practices have the potential to pose safety hazards, especially to children. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Late-presenting developmental dysplasia of the hip in Jordanian males

    PubMed Central

    Samarah, Omar Q.; Hadidi, Fadi A. Al; Hamdan, Mohammad Q.; Hantouly, Ashraf T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the pattern of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in late presenting Jordanian male patients and identify the risk factors and associated findings. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 1145 male patients who attended the Pediatric Orthopedic Clinic for a DDH check up. This study was carried out in the Orthopedic Section, Special Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan between March 2011 and October 2014. Data was collected from medical records, and x-ray measurements were evaluated. Results: Of the 1145 male patients, 43 (3.75%) with 70 involved hips were diagnosed with late- presenting DDH. Being a first-born baby resulted in 41.9% increased risk for DDH. Cesarian delivery was significantly associated with an increased risk of hip dislocation (p=0.004) while normal delivery was significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia (p=0.004). No predictable risk factors were found in 44.2% patients with DDH. Bilateral cases were more common than unilateral cases: (26 [60.5%] versus 17 [39.5%]). Limited abduction was a constant finding in all dislocated hips (p<0.001). Associated conditions, such as club foot and congenital muscular torticollis were not observed. Conclusion: Cesarian section is a significant risk for dislocated hips while normal delivery is significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia. Bilateral DDH is more common than the unilateral. Club foot and torticollis were not observed in this series. PMID:26837397

  17. Secondhand smoke exposure among young adults in a developing country – a Jordanian case

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Linda; Abu Baker, Nesrin; El-Shahawy, Omar; Al-Ali, Nahla; Shudayfat, Tamadur

    2013-01-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure is a potentially preventable environmental pollutant that remains a major global public health concern. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used to assess secondhand smoke exposure, knowledge, attitudes, and avoidance behaviors, as well as policy agreements related to SHS among young adult university students in the northern part of Jordan. A convenience sample of 800 university students from three public universities participated in the present study. They completed four questionnaires: the Sociodemographic Questionnaire, the Household SHS Exposure Questionnaire, the Knowledge and Attitudes Toward SHS Exposure Questionnaire, and the Avoidance of SHS Exposure Scale. Findings showed that SHS exposure among nonsmoking university students was 96%. In addition, the mean hours of exposure per day was 4.64 hours (standard deviation = 4.28), and the mean days of exposure per week was 5.14 days (standard deviation = 2.1). Based on the students reported high hours of exposure, our results suggest that even though a student has knowledge of the dangers of SHS and suitable avoidance behaviors, he or she is unable to avoid SHS. Advocacy for effective interventions to avoid exposure to SHS should be initiated for Jordanian society as a whole. PMID:24648787

  18. Dispositional optimism among American and Jordanian college students: are Westerners really more upbeat than Easterners?

    PubMed

    Khallad, Yacoub

    2010-02-01

    The present study aimed at assessing some previous research conclusions, based primarily on comparisons of North Americans and East Asians, that Westerners tend to be optimistic while Easterners tend to be pessimistic. Two samples of European American and Jordanian college students were administered a questionnaire consisting of items measuring dispositional optimism along with items pertaining to risk and self-protective behaviors (e.g., seatbelt use, vehicular speeding, smoking) and social and demographic factors (e.g., sex, socioeconomic status, religiosity). The findings uncovered dispositional optimism to be stronger for American compared to Jordanian participants. Separate analyses of optimism versus pessimism revealed that Jordanian participants were more pessimistic, but not less optimistic than their American counterparts. No significant correlations were found between dispositional optimism and sex, socioeconomic status, or religiosity. The levels of optimism displayed by Jordanians in this study are inconsistent with previous claims of an optimistic West and a pessimistic East, and suggest that self-enhancing processes may not be confined to Western or highly individualistic groups. The findings did not uncover an association between dispositional optimism and risk or self-protective behaviors. Multiple regression analyses showed cultural background and sex to be the best predictors of these behaviors. The implications of these findings are discussed. La présente étude avait pour but d'évaluer quelques conclusions de recherches passées, fondées principalement sur des comparaisons de nord-américains et d'asiatiques de l'est, indiquant que les occidentaux tendent à être optimistes alors que les orientaux tendent à être pessimistes. Deux échantillons d'étudiants américains-européens et jordaniens du collège ont rempli un questionnaire ayant des items mesurant l'optimisme dispositionnel avec d'autres items qui portent sur les comportements de

  19. Attributing regional effects of the 2014 Jordanian extreme drought to external climate drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergaoui, Karim; Mitchell, Dann; Zaaboul, Rashyd; Otto, Friederike; McDonnell, Rachael; Dadson, Simon; Allen, Myles

    2015-04-01

    Throughout 2014, the regions of Jordan, Israel, Lebanon and Syria have experienced a persistent draught with clear impacts on the local populations. In this study we perform an extreme event attribution analysis of how such a draught has changed under climate change, with a specific focus on the flow rate of the Upper Jordan river and the water level of Lake Tiberious (AKA the Sea of Galilee). Both of which hold major societal, political and religious importance. To perform the analysis we make use of distributed computing power to run thousands of modelled years of 2014 with slightly different initial conditions. We use an atmosphere only model (HadAM3p) with a nested 50 km regional model covering Africa and the Middle East. The 50 km model atmospheric variables will be used directly to force offline our 1 km LIS surface model. Two separate experiments and simulations are performed, 1. for all known climate forcings that are present in 2014, and 2. for a naturalised 2014 scenario where we assume humans never impacted the climate. We perform sensitivity analyses on the observed precipitation over the regions of interest, and determine that the TRMM data is in good agreement with station data obtained from the Jordanian Ministry of Water. Using a combination of the TRMM and model data we are able to make clear statements on the attribution of a 2014-like extreme draught event to human causal factors.

  20. Phenol content, antioxidant capacity and antibacterial activity of methanolic extracts derived from four Jordanian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Irshaid, Fawzi I; Tarawneh, Khalid A; Jacob, Jacob H; Alshdefat, Aisha M

    2014-02-01

    This study was performed to assess the antioxidant and antibacterial properties of methanolic extracts derived from aerial parts of four Jordanian medicinal plants (Artemisia sieberi, Peganum harmala, Rosmarinus officinalis (Green-Flowered) and Sarcopterium spinosium). The possible relationship between these biological properties and the total phenolic concentrations of these extracts were also be determined. The antioxidant capacity and total phenolic concentrations were assessed by the ABTS method and Folin-Ciocalteu method, respectively. The amount of the extract required to scavenge 50% of ABTS (IC50) was also measured. Broth dilution and disc diffusion assays were performed to measure the antibacterial activity of these extracts against available bacterial strains. Variations were observed among the examined plants in antioxidant and antibacterial activities as well as in their phenol contents. According to ABTS assay and IC50 value, the highest free radical scavenging potential was found in Sarcopterium spinosium, followed by Rosmarinus officinalis, Peganum harmala and Artemisia sieberi, respectively. Similarly, the results of antibacterial assays showed that Sarcopterium spinosium exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against all tested bacterial strains as compared to Rosmarinus officinalis, Peganum harmala and Artemisia sieberi. Moreover, Sarcopterium spinosium contained the highest amount of phenolic compounds followed by, Rosmarinus officinalis, Artemisia sieberi and Peganum harmala, respectively. In conclusion, these plants are not only interesting sources for antimicrobial agents but also have a considerable amount of antioxidants. In addition, these findings revealed that the antioxidant capacity and antibacterial activity of these plant extracts do not necessary be attributed to their total phenolic concentrations.

  1. Job stress, recognition, job performance and intention to stay at work among Jordanian hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    AbuAlRub, Raeda Fawzi; Al-Zaru, Ibtisam Moawiah

    2008-04-01

    To investigate: (1) relationships between job stress, recognition of nurses' performance, job performance and intention to stay among hospital nurses; and (2) the buffering effect of recognition of staff performance on the 'stress-intention to stay at work' relationship. Workplace stress tremendously affects today's workforce. Recognition of nurses' performance needs further investigation to determine if it enhances the level of intention to stay at work and if it can buffer the negative effects of stress on nurses' intention to stay at work. The sample of the present study was a convenience one. It consisted of 206 Jordanian staff nurses who completed a structured questionnaire. The findings of the study indicated a direct and a buffering effect of recognition of nurses' performance on job stress and the level of intention to stay at work. The results of the study indicated the importance of recognition for outstanding performance as well as achievements. Implications for nursing management The results of this study support the need to focus on the implementation of recognition strategies in the workplace to reduce job stress and enhance retention.

  2. Waterpipe Smoking among Middle and High School Jordanian Students: Patterns and Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Alzyoud, Sukaina; Weglicki, Linda S.; Kheirallah, Khalid A.; Haddad, Linda; Alhawamdeh, Khalid A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increase in attention to waterpipe tobacco smoking, the patterns and predictors of this method of tobacco use among Jordanian youth are not well known. The current study was conducted to assess the patterns and the predictors of waterpipe tobacco smoking among school aged students in one of Jordan’s Central Governorates. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to investigate the patterns and predictors of waterpipe tobacco smoking among youth (grades 6, 8, 10 and 12). Using a multistage random sampling more than 1,000 students was selected. Data were collected using the Arabic Youth Tobacco Use Composite Measure (YTUCM). Waterpipe smoking was assessed for “past 12 months”, “past month” and “past week”. Students’ ages ranged from 11 to 18 years, (mean age ± 14.7; SD ± 1.9 years). The percentage of girls who smoked waterpipe was greater for all frequencies of use than it was for boys. Age, gender, and belief that smoking makes more friends were predictors of smoking among study participants. This is the first known study to examine waterpipe smoking among youth aged 11 and 12. Our findings illustrate the need for public health campaigns to reach and educate youth, their families, teachers and school systems regarding the growing recognized health risks of waterpipe smoking. PMID:24351734

  3. Waterpipe smoking among middle and high school Jordanian students: patterns and predictors.

    PubMed

    Alzyoud, Sukaina; Weglicki, Linda S; Kheirallah, Khalid A; Haddad, Linda; Alhawamdeh, Khalid A

    2013-12-12

    Despite the increase in attention to waterpipe tobacco smoking, the patterns and predictors of this method of tobacco use among Jordanian youth are not well known. The current study was conducted to assess the patterns and the predictors of waterpipe tobacco smoking among school aged students in one of Jordan's Central Governorates. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to investigate the patterns and predictors of waterpipe tobacco smoking among youth (grades 6, 8, 10 and 12). Using a multistage random sampling more than 1,000 students was selected. Data were collected using the Arabic Youth Tobacco Use Composite Measure (YTUCM). Waterpipe smoking was assessed for "past 12 months", "past month" and "past week". Students' ages ranged from 11 to 18 years, (mean age ± 14.7; SD ± 1.9 years). The percentage of girls who smoked waterpipe was greater for all frequencies of use than it was for boys. Age, gender, and belief that smoking makes more friends were predictors of smoking among study participants. This is the first known study to examine waterpipe smoking among youth aged 11 and 12. Our findings illustrate the need for public health campaigns to reach and educate youth, their families, teachers and school systems regarding the growing recognized health risks of waterpipe smoking.

  4. Understanding of School Related Factors Associated with Emotional Health and Bullying Behavior among Jordanian Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    SHAHEEN, Abeer; NASSAR, Omayyah; SALEH, Mohammad; ARABIA T, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Students emotional health and bullying behavior are receiving greater attention worldwide due to their long-term effects on students’ health. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between perceived school climate, peer support, teacher support, school pressure and emotional health and bullying among adolescent school students in Jordan. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to recruit a sample of 1166 in-school adolescents in Amman between November 2013 and January 2014. A multi-stage cluster sampling technique was used to select respondents and Health Behavior in School Aged Children questionnaire was used to collect the data. Data were analyzed using Pearson Correlation to detect relationships among study variables. Results Significant correlations (P value was ≤.05) were found between school climate including teacher and peer support and emotional health and bullying behavior of school students. School pressure was not correlated significantly with emotional health and bullying. Conclusion Study findings emphasize the importance of school related factors in influencing students’ emotional health and bullying behavior. This indicates that the issue of bullying and emotional health of students in Jordanian schools requires further attention, both for future research and preventive intervention. PMID:26060720

  5. Restructuring of the Jordanian Utility Sector and its Associated Ghg Emissions: a Future Projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouad, Rami Hikmat; Al-Ghandoor, Ahmed; Al-Khateeb, Mohammad; Bata, Hamada

    2008-10-01

    As a small, non-oil producing, Middle Eastern country of a young and growing population and rapid urbanization, Jordan, like many countries all over the world, was and is still facing the problem of meeting the rapidly increasing demand of electricity. The main objective of this study is to review many current aspects of the Jordanian electricity sector, including electricity generation, electricity consumption, energy related emissions, and future possibilities, based on time series forecasting, through the term of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) arrangement under the Kyoto Protocol, in which the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan had signed lately, which allows industrialized countries with a greenhouse gas reduction commitment to invest in projects that reduce emissions in developing countries as an alternative to more expensive emission reductions in their own countries. Several scenarios are proposed in this study, based on projected electricity consumption data until year 2028. Without attempting to replace the currently existing fossil-fuel based power plant technologies in Jordan by clean ones, electricity consumption and associated GHG emissions are predicted to rise by 138% by year 2028; however, if new clean technologies are adopted gradually over the same period, electricity consumption as well as GHG emissions will ascend at a lower rate.

  6. Treatment, Conservation and Restoration of the Bedouin Dyed Textiles in the Museum of Jordanian Heritage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Alfaisal, R.

    This study aims to establish and design effective methods to conserve two Bedouin dyed textile objects selected from the museum of Jordanian heritage and to improve the physical and environmental conditions in which items are kept to optimize their longterm chances of survival. The conservation processes that were used in conservation of the selected objects can be used a guide for conservators to conserve other similar textile objects. Investigations and analysis were used to identify the fibers and the extent of deterioration by using noninvasive methods. Transmitted Light Microscopy (TLM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy associated with EDAX (SEM-EDAX) were used for identifying the fibers and the deterioration. The results showed that the textile artifacts studied were very dirty, had white spots occupying cavities and holes, wrinkles and creases, fiber damages. Previous damage may due to the improper display methods in the museum or due to the incompatible environmental conditions surrounded the artifacts during exhibition such as: light, temperature, relative humidity, pollutants and microorganisms. For these reasons, the textile objects were cleaned using wet cleaning methods that improved the physical and mechanical properties of textile objects and returned them to their original shape as much as possible. Then the textile objects were mounted and supported by stitching on to backing fabric stretched on wooden frames. Finally, and according to the requirements of the museum, the objects were displayed temporarily inside showcases in an aesthetically pleasing manner.

  7. The removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution using natural Jordanian zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taamneh, Yazan; Sharadqah, Suhail

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the adsorption process of cadmium and copper using natural Jordanian (NJ) zeolite as adsorbent has been experimentally estimated. The samples of NJ zeolite were obtained from Al Mafraq discrete, north east of Jordan. The influence of the bulk concentration (C o), contact time (t) and different adsorbent masses (m) of NJ zeolite on the removal of heavy metal were evaluated. These variables had a considerable function in promoting the sorption process of heavy metal using the NJ zeolite. The initial concentration of heavy metals in the stock solution was extended between 80 and 600 mg/L. The batch adsorption method was employed to investigate the adsorption process. The experimental data were correlated using Freundlich and Langmuir empirical formula. The ability of NJ zeolite to eliminate cadmium and copper was estimated according to Langmuir isotherm empirical formula and found 25.9 and 14.3 mg/g for cadmium and copper, respectively. The kinetics of adsorption of cadmium and copper have been analyzed and correlated by first-order and second-order reaction model. It was noticed that adsorption of cadmium and copper was better correlated with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The results presented that NJ zeolite is practical adsorbent for removing cadmium and copper ion metal.

  8. The removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution using natural Jordanian zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taamneh, Yazan; Sharadqah, Suhail

    2017-07-01

    In this article, the adsorption process of cadmium and copper using natural Jordanian (NJ) zeolite as adsorbent has been experimentally estimated. The samples of NJ zeolite were obtained from Al Mafraq discrete, north east of Jordan. The influence of the bulk concentration ( C o), contact time ( t) and different adsorbent masses ( m) of NJ zeolite on the removal of heavy metal were evaluated. These variables had a considerable function in promoting the sorption process of heavy metal using the NJ zeolite. The initial concentration of heavy metals in the stock solution was extended between 80 and 600 mg/L. The batch adsorption method was employed to investigate the adsorption process. The experimental data were correlated using Freundlich and Langmuir empirical formula. The ability of NJ zeolite to eliminate cadmium and copper was estimated according to Langmuir isotherm empirical formula and found 25.9 and 14.3 mg/g for cadmium and copper, respectively. The kinetics of adsorption of cadmium and copper have been analyzed and correlated by first-order and second-order reaction model. It was noticed that adsorption of cadmium and copper was better correlated with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The results presented that NJ zeolite is practical adsorbent for removing cadmium and copper ion metal.

  9. The relationship between spiritual intelligence and personality traits among Jordanian university students.

    PubMed

    Mahasneh, Ahmad M; Shammout, Nizar A; Alkhazaleh, Ziad M; Al-Alwan, Ahmed F; Abu-Eita, Jawhara D

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying the level of spiritual intelligence and its correlation with personality traits among a group of Jordanian undergraduate students. A purposive sample of 716 male and female students was chosen from different faculties at the Hashemite University. Two questionnaires on spiritual intelligence and personality traits were distributed to members of the sample during the academic year 2013-2014. Results illustrated a medium level of spiritual intelligence in students, and indicated a positive and statistically significant relationship between spiritual intelligence dimensions (critical existential thinking, personal meaning production, transcendental awareness, and conscious state expansion) and personality traits (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness), but no significant correlation between personal meaning production and transcendental awareness dimensions and neuroticism personality traits. Finally, regression analysis results indicate that critical existential thinking is the first predictor dimension of spiritual intelligence in terms of neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. In the light of the results of this study, many recommendations were written by the researchers.

  10. Factors associated with sexual dysfunction in Jordanian women and their sexual attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Abu Ali, Ruba M.; Al Hajeri, Rabaa M.; Khader, Yousef S.; Ajlouni, Kamel M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is defined as disorders of libido, arousal, and orgasm, as well as sexual pain, that leads to personal distress or interpersonal difficulties. Social aspects of FSD have been understudied. The aim of this study was to explore the social aspects of FSD and sexual attitudes of Jordanian women. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Six hundred thirteen married females were studied between October 2006 and August 2007 at the National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Genetics (NCDEG), Amman, Jordan. Females were interviewed using a special questionnaire that was suitable to our culture and added to the Arabic translation of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) Questionnaire. RESULTS: Older age was associated with a decreased total FSD index and its domain scores. Women with obesity were more likely to have impaired arousability and impaired capability of reaching orgasm. About 58.5% of women reported that they prepared themselves if they had sexual desire and 68.2% reported wearing special attire for this purpose. Only 37.2% of women could ask their husband for a special excitement. CONCLUSIONS: FSD is prevalent in Jordan. Its social aspects are understudied and need more research in the future. PMID:19584582

  11. Periodontal treatment need of the 6th-grade Jordanian pupils.

    PubMed

    Hamasha, A A; Albashaireh, Z

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the periodontal treatment needs of 6th-grade Jordanian pupils aged 12 years old. Forty-eight classes teaching 6th-grade pupils were randomly selected from the six education zones in Irbid region, Jordan. The data were collected during interviews and clinical examinations using the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) criteria. The findings revealed that 27.5% of the examined pupils had healthy periodontium, 22.9% showed gingival bleeding on probing but no calculus, and 31.4% had calculus deposits. Pockets in the 4-5 mm range were found in 17.6% and those in the>6 mm range in 0.6% of the pupils. Healthy periodontium was found in 2.9 sextants, whereas 2.7 sextants showed gingival bleeding and calculus. Periodontal pockets were demonstrated in less than 0.4 sextants. Periodontal therapy was not required for 27.5% of the pupils. The rest of the pupils (72.5%), however, needed oral hygiene improvement, and of these 50% required professional calculus removal. This study indicated that about 73% of the sample needed oral hygiene instructions and motivation, 50% needed professional scaling, and 0.6% needed periodontal therapy. The data of this study establish a baseline data, which may help in planning dental services and initiating further research.

  12. The association between work stress and inflammatory biomarkers in Jordanian male workers.

    PubMed

    Almadi, Tawfiq; Cathers, Ian; Hamdan Mansour, Ayman M; Chow, Chin Moi

    2012-02-01

    The study aimed to establish the association of work stress, expressed as effort-reward imbalance (ERI), and C-reactive protein (CRP) in 152 healthy Jordanian male employees. Self-report work stress, anthropometric data, and blood for CRP analysis were collected. A significant correlation between ERI and CRP (r = 0.29, p < .01), and between waist circumference with CRP (r = 0.44, p < .01) was found. Central obesity explained most of the variance in CRP after controlling for various covariates, and ERI was not a significant predictor of CRP (ΔR2  = 0.02; β = 0.15, p = .052). However, when only the centrally obese group was considered, ERI accounted for 5.0% of the variability in the CRP (β = 0.24, p < .05). Results of this study confirm previous findings that obesity is significantly associated with CRP, and support the notion that higher ERI amongst obese workers is one small but significant predictor of increased levels of CRP. Copyright © 2011 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  13. Predictors of stress of parents of a child with cancer: a Jordanian perspective.

    PubMed

    Masa'Deh, Rami; Collier, Jacqueline; Hall, Carol; Alhalaiqa, Fadwa

    2013-09-04

    Most paediatric oncology studies agree that being parents of a child with cancer is an emotionally stressful event. Although an increasing number of studies have investigated psychological stress of parents of a child with cancer, few of these studies have included both parents or investigated the predictors of high stress levels for the mothers and the fathers. Moreover, studies published over the last few decades were limited to Western countries and have shown inconsistent findings about parental perceived stress whose children have cancer. This study explored differences in predictors of perceived stress between Jordanian mothers and fathers of children with cancer. This study involved a survey of 300 couples parenting a child with cancer. Participants answered the Arabic version of the Perceived Stress Scale 10-items, demographic and characteristics check list questionnaires. The main aims were to measure perceived stress levels for mothers and fathers, explore the predictors associated with high perceived stress levels and make a comparison between them. Mothers reported significantly higher stress levels than fathers (p<0.001), with a large effect size (0.30). Some of the factors associated with mothers and fathers high stress levels affected both parents whereas employment status affected only fathers' stress levels. These findings indicate the need to work with the mothers and the fathers with a child with cancer in Jordan to recognise their psychological needs at the time of diagnosis and followed by on-going psychological support for both parents.

  14. Predictors of Stress of Parents of a Child with Cancer: A Jordanian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Masa’Deh, Rami; Collier, Jacqueline; Hall, Carol; Alhalaiqa, Fadwa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Most paediatric oncology studies agree that being parents of a child with cancer is an emotionally stressful event. Although an increasing number of studies have investigated psychological stress of parents of a child with cancer, few of these studies have included both parents or investigated the predictors of high stress levels for the mothers and the fathers. Moreover, studies published over the last few decades were limited to Western countries and have shown inconsistent findings about parental perceived stress whose children have cancer. This study explored differences in predictors of perceived stress between Jordanian mothers and fathers of children with cancer. Methods: This study involved a survey of 300 couples parenting a child with cancer. Participants answered the Arabic version of the Perceived Stress Scale 10-items, demographic and characteristics check list questionnaires. The main aims were to measure perceived stress levels for mothers and fathers, explore the predictors associated with high perceived stress levels and make a comparison between them. Findings: Mothers reported significantly higher stress levels than fathers (p<0.001), with a large effect size (0.30). Some of the factors associated with mothers and fathers high stress levels affected both parents whereas employment status affected only fathers’ stress levels. Conclusions: These findings indicate the need to work with the mothers and the fathers with a child with cancer in Jordan to recognise their psychological needs at the time of diagnosis and followed by on-going psychological support for both parents. PMID:24171877

  15. Antibiotics prescribing practices in oral implantology among jordanian dentists. A cross sectional, observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In oral implantology, there is no consensus on the most appropriate regimen for antibiotics prescribing, the decision to prescribe antibiotic is usually based on procedure, patient and clinician related factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the rationale of antibiotic prescribing among Jordanian clinicians who practice oral implantology. Findings The target sample for the study was the 250 Jordan Dental Implant Group members. A five page questionnaire contained 41 questions, both closed and open questions were used to collect data. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS Windows 16.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Descriptive statistics were generated. The response rate was (70.4%) 176/250. Mean age was 37.2 yrs, 49.4% always prescribe antibiotics mainly oral amoxicillin and amoxicillin with clavulinic acid. Antibiotics prescribing increased with flap raising, multiple implants and sinus or bone augmentation. Patient medical condition, periodontitis and oral hygiene were the most important clinical factors in antibiotic prescribing, non-clinical factors were; reading scientific materials, courses and lectures, knowledge gained during training, and the effectiveness and previous experience with the drug. Conclusions Wide variations in antibiotics types, routes, dose and duration of administration were found. Recommendations on antibiotic prescribing are needed to prevent antibiotic overprescribing and misuse. PMID:21798040

  16. Symptom management strategies of Jordanian patients following coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

    PubMed

    Al-Daakak, Zaher Mohammed; Ammouri, Ali Ahmad; Isac, Chandrani; Gharaibeh, Huda; Al-Zaru, Ibtisam

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the symptom management strategies utilized by post coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients and its associations with demographic variables. A clear understanding of the use of symptom management strategies following CABG surgery may help nurses in developing educational program and interventions that help patients and their families during recovery period after discharge. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was utilized. A convenience sample of 100 Jordanian patients post CABG surgery selected from five hospitals was surveyed between November 2012 and June 2013 using the Cardiac Symptom Survey. Chi squared analyses were used to examine the associations between the symptoms management strategies and selected demographic variables. Frequency of symptom management strategies utilized by post CABG patients revealed that most frequently employed strategies were use of medications (79%), repositioning (54%) and the rest (45%). Symptom management strategies utilized for poor appetite, sleeping problem and fatigue had significant associations with demographic variables. By providing information about the symptoms expected after surgery and possible ways to manage them, will strengthen the patients psychologically and will make CABG experience within the realm of self-management and coping.

  17. The relationship between spiritual intelligence and personality traits among Jordanian university students

    PubMed Central

    Mahasneh, Ahmad M; Shammout, Nizar A; Alkhazaleh, Ziad M; Al-Alwan, Ahmed F; Abu-Eita, Jawhara D

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying the level of spiritual intelligence and its correlation with personality traits among a group of Jordanian undergraduate students. A purposive sample of 716 male and female students was chosen from different faculties at the Hashemite University. Two questionnaires on spiritual intelligence and personality traits were distributed to members of the sample during the academic year 2013–2014. Results illustrated a medium level of spiritual intelligence in students, and indicated a positive and statistically significant relationship between spiritual intelligence dimensions (critical existential thinking, personal meaning production, transcendental awareness, and conscious state expansion) and personality traits (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness), but no significant correlation between personal meaning production and transcendental awareness dimensions and neuroticism personality traits. Finally, regression analysis results indicate that critical existential thinking is the first predictor dimension of spiritual intelligence in terms of neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. In the light of the results of this study, many recommendations were written by the researchers. PMID:25834470

  18. Validity of test stimuli for nasalance measurement in speakers of Jordanian Arabic.

    PubMed

    Khwaileh, Fadwa A; Alfwaress, Firas S D; Kummer, Ann W; Alrawashdeh, Ma'moun

    2017-09-07

    The objective of the study was to establish the validity of passages for measuring nasalance of Jordanian speakers of Arabic. Two Arabic text passages were constructed; the Spring Passage is devoid of nasal consonants and the Home Passage contains both oral and nasal consonants. Nasalance was measured for participants while reciting each passage three times. Perceptual ratings of hypernasality were also obtained for each participant on each passage using a 5-point equal-appearing rating scale. Forty-seven children and adults ranging in age between 9 and 26 years participated in the study. Twenty-three participants had no history of communication disorders, and 24 had repaired cleft palate. Correlation coefficient between ratings of hypernasality and the nasalance scores was significant for the Spring Passage (r = 0.88, p > 0.001) and for the Home Passage (r = 0.78, p > .001). Using cutoff scores of 17% and 36% of nasalance for the Spring and the Home Passages, respectively, and a threshold score of 1.5 for hypernasality, sensitivity for the Spring Passage was 88% and the Home Passage was 78%. Results showed the validity of the Spring Passage and the Home Passage in measuring nasalance scores as proved by their high sensitivity and strong correlation with perceptual rating of hypernasality.

  19. Factors influencing job satisfaction among Jordanian occupational therapists: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Abu Tariah, Hashem Salman; Hamed, Razan T; AlHeresh, Rawan A; Abu-Dahab, Sana M N; AL-Oraibi, Saleh

    2011-12-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore factors influencing job satisfaction and dissatisfaction among Jordanian occupational therapists. Ours was an explorative qualitative study involving the use of structured open-ended written questions. Participants were asked to answer in narrative their perception about the factors behind their job satisfaction and dissatisfaction. In addition, they were asked to express their suggestions, ideas, or solutions for increasing job satisfaction. Ninety-three occupational therapists responded to the survey. For job satisfaction questions, four themes emerged: a humanistic profession; professional issues; work benefits; and work environment. Participant's comments at the end of the survey revealed one general theme for improving job satisfaction, 'a call for improvement'. This qualitative study revealed that the humanistic nature of occupational therapist was counterbalanced by several dissatisfying factors for occupational therapy practitioners in Jordan. The need for better supported working conditions in terms of financial rewards, recognition, awareness and resources as well as public and professional recognition of occupational therapists are needed to enhance the occupational therapy profile in Jordan. A comprehensive collaboration is highly needed between the individual practitioners, representatives of the profession, government and hospital administrators. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  20. Litter pollution on the Jordanian shores of the Gulf of Aqaba (Red Sea).

    PubMed

    Abu-Hilal, Ahmad H; Al-Najjar, Tariq

    2004-07-01

    Litter was assessed on three beaches along the Jordanian coast of the Gulf of Aqaba, south of the town Aqaba, monthly during 1994 and 1995, in order to determine its nature, extent and possible sources. The overall mean was about 5 and 3 items/m(2) in 1994 and 1995, respectively. Approximately a total of 14,000 m(2) were examined and a total of 101,000 items were noted, 67,000 during 1994 and 34,000 in 1995. More than 50% of the litter was plastic and the remainder wood, glass, cardboard, Styrofoam, metal and other materials. Most litter appears to be from local land-based or near shore sources, although there are some regional influences as well. The main local sources are the passenger port, the cargo port and the beach goers. The findings are compared with other regions of the world. The amount of litter is related to distance of the beach from the main sources, and shape, physiography and orientation of the beach. Spatial and seasonal variations are examined and discussed, and actions and measures to combat the problem on local and regional levels are suggested.

  1. Jordanian dialysis patients' perceived exercise benefits and barriers: a correlation study.

    PubMed

    Darawad, Muhammad W; Khalil, Amani A

    2013-01-01

    To investigate Jordanian end-stage renal disease (ESRD)patients' perceived exercise benefits and barriers, and their correlation with patients' demographic variables and dialysis measures. A descriptive correlational study was conducted using cross-sectional survey, using a convenience sample of 190 ESRD dialyzed patients who were recruited from eight hospitals in Jordan. Participants significantly perceived exercise benefits (M= 2.88/4, SD± .67) higher than barriers (M= 2.66, SD± .62). The most frequent perceived exercise benefits were preventing muscular atrophy and improving mood, whereas tiredness and lower-extremity fatigue were the most frequent exercise barriers. Finally, acceptable values of Cronbach's Alpha were revealed for perceived exercise subscale, barriers subscale, and total scale (α= .88, .81, and .70, respectively). Participants focused more on exercise benefits than barriers, and on direct exercise benefits and barriers than the indirect. The results of this study have important implications for the efforts that aim at improving ESRD patients' exercise behaviors. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  2. Symptoms Experienced by Jordanian Men and Women After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ammouri, Ali Ahmad; Al-Daakak, Zaher Mohammed; Isac, Chandrani; Gharaibeh, Huda; Al-Zaru, Ibtisam

    2016-01-01

    Patients who undergo coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery experience a wide spectrum of physical and psychological symptoms after surgery. Studies have shown that symptoms usually decline over time; however, some can persist up to months after discharge. This study aims to assess symptoms experienced by patients after CABG surgery and any associations with demographic variables. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 100 Jordanian post-CABG surgery patients was selected from 5 hospitals in Jordan. Patients were surveyed using the Cardiac Symptom Survey. To examine the associations between the symptoms experienced and selected demographic variables, χ(2) analyses were used. Chest incisional pain (65%) was the most frequently perceived symptom by the participants. Leg swelling (60%) was also reported by a nearly equivalent number of respondents. Symptoms like fluttering (15%), angina (8%), and depression (3%) were reported by a handful of participants. Three symptoms (poor appetite, sleeping problem, and fatigue) had significant associations with demographic variables. The identification of frequently perceived symptoms among post-CABG patients enables health care providers to focus their assessments in identifying and alleviating them. The demographic associations identified facilitate nurses to forecast certain specific symptoms in targeted populations, like women are more prone to experience poor appetite and sleeping difficulties and strengthen these groups with strategies to prevent themselves from these distressing symptoms.

  3. Jordanian Parents' Beliefs about the Causes of Disability and the Progress of Their Children with Disabilities: Insights on Mainstream Schools and Segregated Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Dababneh, Kholoud Adeeb; Al-Zboon, Eman K.; Baibers, Haitham

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify the beliefs of Jordanian parents of children with disabilities (CWD), including intellectual disabilities, specific learning disorders and Autism Spectrum Disorder: both in terms of the causes of these disabilities, and the ability of their children to make progress. A qualitative interpretive methodology was employed.…

  4. The Role of Age and Gender in the Relationship between (Attitude, Subjective Norm and Perceived Behavioural Control) and Adoption of E-Learning at Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    altawallbeh, Manal; Thiam, Wun; alshourah, Sultan; Fong, Soon Fook

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the moderating factors that effect on adaption e-learning among students in Jordanian universities. Two models of e-learning that are observed among adopting institutions are: E-learning as a supplement to traditional classroom model have been introduced by the respondents in this research. The paper takes a…

  5. Negotiating the Dimensions of the Digital Divide: A Phenomenological Study of Jordanian Pre-Service Teachers' Experiences with Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arouri, Yousef Mhmoud Said

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study was designed to explore and learn how six pre-service teachers, studying at one of the Jordanian universities in the capital of Amman, identify, experience, and negotiate the barriers to Information and Communication Technology (ICT) access in their schooling experiences. The process of collecting…

  6. Linguistic Knowledge Aspects in Academic Reading: Challenges and Deployed Strategies by English-Major Undergraduates at a Jordanian Institution of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albashtawi, Abeer H.; Jaganathan, Paramaswari; Singh, Manjet

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the linguistic knowledge aspect in academic reading, the challenges and the deployed strategies by English major undergraduates at a Jordanian institution of higher education. The importance of the study is attributed to the importance of the academic reading at university which is closely related to the academic…

  7. Obstacles Faced by Heads of Departments and Faculty Members in the Jordanian Public Universities in the Implementation of Vocational and Technical Education Programs from Their Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammad, Heba Ibraheem; Airout, Mostafa Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to find out the obstacles faced by heads of departments and faculty members at Jordanian public universities in the implementation of vocational and technical education programs from their perspective, and to find out the effect of gender, experience, and academic rank on their perspective. To achieve the aim of the…

  8. The Role of Religious Institutions, Electronic Games, Books, and Educational Stories in the Development of the Child's Culture from the Perspective of Jordanian Mothers According to Some Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Harbat, Rima; Al Saqarat, Khalaf

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of religious institutions, electronic games, books and educational stories in the development of the child's culture from the perspective of some of Jordanian mothers in Al Karak Governorate, and to achieve the objective of the study a questionnaire was build, it consisted of (33) items divided…

  9. Investigation of the Effects of the Social Power and Social Distance on the Realization of Apology between Jordanian and English Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Khaza'leh, Bilal Ayed; ZainalAriff, Tun Nur Afizah

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the influence of context-external variables; social power (High, Equal and Low) and social distance (Familiar and Unfamiliar) on the perception of Jordanian and English speech act of apology. Discourse Completion Test (DCT) and Scaled Response Questionnaire (SRQ) were used to elicit data from three groups: 40…

  10. Negotiating the Dimensions of the Digital Divide: A Phenomenological Study of Jordanian Pre-Service Teachers' Experiences with Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arouri, Yousef Mhmoud Said

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study was designed to explore and learn how six pre-service teachers, studying at one of the Jordanian universities in the capital of Amman, identify, experience, and negotiate the barriers to Information and Communication Technology (ICT) access in their schooling experiences. The process of collecting…

  11. Prevalence of osteoporosis and its reproductive risk factors among Jordanian women: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Shilbayeh, Sireen

    2003-11-01

    Extensive differences in the osteoporosis epidemiological pattern among geographic and ethnic groups have been reported. The evidence concerning association of multiple pregnancies, lactations, and other menstrual history factors with low bone mineral density (BMD) remains inconclusive. Previous local studies addressing these issues in Jordan are very restricted. We present a cross-sectional study of Jordanian women who visited outpatient clinics between August 2000 and August 2002 at two community hospitals in Amman City. BMD measurement was performed for all subjects, while comprehensive appraisal of clinical issues related to reproductive status and past medical history was carried out using a structured questionnaire administered to 50% of the subjects. We also attempted to examine the current hypothesis of possible influence of hyperlipidemia and thyroid abnormalities on decreased BMD. According to WHO criteria, 119 (29.6%) were identified as having osteoporosis, 176 (43.8%) were osteopenic, and 107 (26.6%) had normal BMD. The multiple-linear regression analyses at different bone sites revealed that age, years of menopause, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) have strong independent associations with decreased BMD at all lumbar and femoral neck regions. The negative effect associated with number of children (live births) and frequency of lactations was only evident at femoral neck. Although years of menstruation, age at menopause, days of menstrual cycle, number of pregnancies, and duration of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) were positively correlated with BMD, they had weaker associations than previous variables. Moreover, in the final multivariable logistic regression model, variables which rendered significantly independent risk factors after adjustment for age and BMI were: current smokers of more that 25 cigarettes/day, postmenopausal women irrespective of HRT use, menopausal years of > or =5 year intervals, natural

  12. Exploring knowledge and attitudes towards counselling about vitamin supplements in Jordanian community pharmacies

    PubMed Central

    Shilbayeh, Sireen A.

    The use of multivitamins within a pharmaceutical setting has been the subject of considerable debate. Objective This research aimed to provide a platform for assessing and evaluating knowledge, attitudes and professional practices of Jordanian community pharmacists in counselling patients about the safe consumption of vitamins. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between October 2009 and May 2010. Data collection was carried out using a 44-item semi-structured self-administrated questionnaire. Setting: Community pharmacies in Amman with target sample of 400 pharmacists. Results A total of 388 pharmacists participated in this study. The majority (77.8%) of pharmacists believed that a balanced diet is more achievable by eating healthily than by vitamins supplements. 78.1% of participants believed that vitamins deficiency would not shorten life spans, while 80.7% agreed that vitamin supplements could be toxic or might contain unlabelled harmful ingredients. Less than half of pharmacists were aware that some antioxidant vitamins have been verified to be of unproven value, or may even cause cancer. While over 80% of pharmacists would recommend vitamins on a regular basis without prescription, the majority agreed that counselling on vitamin supplements is part of their role in pharmaceutical care (93.3%), in addition to providing relevant information to other healthcare professionals (78.4%). Moreover, responses to specific knowledge questions, such as the interactions of vitamins with drugs or the recommended dietary allowance of vitamins for infants, children, and pregnant women, were negative. Furthermore, only a minority of pharmacists would recheck the accuracy of dose regimens in prescriptions and symptoms of true vitamins deficiency or would follow up patients to record any consequences of vitamins consumption. Conclusions The questionnaire revealed satisfactory awareness of community pharmacists about their role in counselling; however, further

  13. Development and validation of a self-reported periodontal disease measure among Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Khader, Yousef; Alhabashneh, Rola; Alhersh, Fadi

    2015-08-01

    The development of self-reported measures of periodontal disease would be of great benefit to facilitate epidemiological studies of periodontal disease on a larger scale, and to allow for surveillance of the periodontal condition of populations over time. To develop a culturally adapted self-reported measure of periodontal disease, test its predictive and discriminative validity and establish a cut-off value for this measure to diagnose periodontal disease. A total of 288 Jordanian adults completed the questionnaire assessing self-reported periodontal health (18 questions) and underwent periodontal examination. Of the 18 questions, six were significantly associated with at least one clinical definition of periodontitis and were used to constitute the self-reported periodontal disease measure. Receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve analyses were used to examine the overall discriminatory power, sensitivity and specificity, and corresponding cut-off points of the self-reported periodontal disease measure. ROC analysis showed that the self-reported periodontal disease measure had an excellent performance to discriminate between those with and without periodontal disease, regardless of the clinical definition used. A score of 2, on a scale of 0 to 6, had the highest sensitivity and specificity to detect periodontal disease when defined by all study criteria. Significant associations were observed between self-reported periodontal disease measures and all clinical definitions in the regression analysis (the odds ratio ranged from 8.31 to 18.96), according to the clinical definition to be predicted. Self-reported periodontal disease measures have excellent predictive and discriminative validity when tested against clinical definitions, and severity and extent of periodontal disease. © 2015 FDI World Dental Federation.

  14. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of the methanolic extracts of selected Jordanian medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Hudaib, Mohammad M.; Tawaha, Khaled A.; Mohammad, Mohammad K.; Assaf, Areej M.; Issa, Ala Y.; Alali, Feras Q.; Aburjai, Talal A.; Bustanji, Yasser K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The search for novel xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors with a higher therapeutic activity and fewer side effects are desired not only to treat gout but also to combat various other diseases associated with the XO activity. At present, the potential of developing successful natural products for the management of XO-related diseases is still largely unexplored. In the present study, we have screened the methanolic extracts of various Jordanian medicinal plants for their XO inhibitory activities using an optimized protocol. Materials and Methods: The methanolic extracts of 23 medicinal plants, belonging to 12 families, were tested in vitro, at 200 μg/ml concentrations, for their XO inhibitory potential. The dose-dependent inhibition profiles of the most active plants were further evaluated by estimating the IC50 values of their corresponding extracts. Results: Six plants were found most active (% inhibition more than 39%). These plants are Salvia spinosa L. (IC50 = 53.7 μg/ml), Anthemis palestina Boiss. (168.0 μg/ml), Chrysanthemum coronarium L. (199.5 μg/ml), Achillea biebersteinii Afansiev (360.0 μg/ml), Rosmarinus officinalis L. (650.0 μg/ml), and Ginkgo biloba L. (595.8 μg/ml). Moreover, four more plants, namely Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (28.7% inhibition), Helianthemum ledifolium (L.) Mill. (28.4%), Majorana syriaca (L.) Kostel. (25.1%), and Mentha spicata L. (22.5%) showed a XO inhibitory activity in the range of 22–30%. Conclusion: The study showed that many of the tested plant species are potential sources of natural XO inhibitors that can be developed, upon further investigation, into successful herbal drugs for treatment of gout and other XO-related disorders. PMID:22262935

  15. Compliance with safe handling guidelines of antineoplastic drugs in Jordanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Awawdeh, Banan T; Alzoubi, Karem H; Khader, Yousef S; Alkafajei, Ahmed M

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the compliance of healthcare workers with standard safety guidelines during the preparation and administrations of antineoplastic medications. A cross-sectional survey study. All hospitals in Jordan where healthcare workers are involved in preparation and administration of antineoplastic medications. All healthcare workers who are involved in preparation and administration of antineoplastic medications in Jordanian hospitals. A questionnaire that covered information about work place, healthcare workers, and use of personal protective equipments during handling of antineoplastic medications was self-filled by each participant. Compliance rates with workplace requirements, healthcare workers, and use of personnel protective equipments. Majority of participants (74.2%), representing nine out of 15 (60%) hospitals, reported full compliance of workplace with all requirements of the guidelines. Items with full compliance in all hospitals were availability of policies and procedures for safe handling of antineoplastic agents, availability of reporting system, and availability of sharp containers. Concerning healthcare workers' guidelines, worker with full compliance were 46.4% of participants. Items with least compliance rate were working inside biological safety cabinet (65.1%) and having training program on handling chemotherapy medications (66.7%). Finally, concerning items-related personal protective equipments, only 10.7% of participants reported full compliance. Items with least compliance rates were wearing goggles (eye protection), shoe cover, and hair cover. Results of this study showed the levels of compliance with guidelines pertaining to work place and workers who prepare and administer antineoplastic medications. Among other points, compliance with guidelines pertaining to wearing personnel protective equipments was limited and required further improvement. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  16. Consumption of Whole Grains, Refined Cereals, and Legumes and Its Association With Colorectal Cancer Among Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Tayyem, Reema F; Bawadi, Hiba A; Shehadah, Ihab; Agraib, Lana M; Al-Awwad, Narmeen J; Heath, Dennis D; Bani-Hani, Kamal E

    2016-09-01

    Background The role of whole grains, refined cereals, and legumes in preventing or initiating colorectal cancer (CRC) is still uncertain. The aim of this study is to examine the possible association between the consumption of whole grains, refined cereals, and legumes and the risk of developing CRC among Jordanian population. Methods A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to collect dietary data with regard to intake of whole grains, refined cereals, and legumes. A total of 220 diagnosed CRC participants and 281 CRC-free control participants matched by age, gender, occupation, and marital status were recruited. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of developing CRC in relation to the consumption of different types of whole grains, refined cereals, and legumes. Results The odds ratio (OR) for developing CRC among cases consumed refined wheat bread at all meals was 3.1 compared with controls (95% CI: 1.2-7.9, P-Trend = 0.001); whereas the OR associated with whole wheat bread was 0.44 (95% CI: 0.22-0.92, P-Trend = 0.001). The statistical evaluation for daily consumption of rice suggested a direct association with the risk of developing CRC, OR = 3.0 (95% CI: 0.27-33.4, P-Trend = 0.020). Weekly consumption of macaroni was associated with CRC with OR of 2.4 (95% CI: 1.1-5.3, P-Trend = 0.001). The consumption of corn, bulgur, lentils, and peas suggested a protective trend, although the trend was not statistically significant. Conclusion This study provides additional indicators of the protective role of whole grains and suggests a direct association between consumption of refined grains and higher possibility for developing CRC.

  17. Women's oral and dental health aspects in humanitarian missions and disasters: Jordanian experience.

    PubMed

    Smadi, Leena; Sumadi, Aiman Al

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to review oral and dental health aspects in female patients presented to Jordanian Royal Medical Services (RMS) international humanitarian missions over a 3-year period. Analysis of humanitarian missions of RMS data and records over a 3-year period (2011-2013) in regard to women's oral and dental health issues was done. The data were analyzed in regard to the number of women seen, the presenting conditions, and the prevalence of oral and dental diseases and procedures in these cases. During the 3-year period, 72 missions were deployed in four locations (Gaza, Ram Allah-West Bank, Jeneen-West Bank, and Iraq). The total number of females seen in this period was 86,436 women, accounting for 56 percent of adult patients seen by RMS humanitarian missions. Dental Clinics were deployed to only two missions (Iraq and Gaza), during which they received 13,629 visits; of these, 41 percent were females (5,588 patients), 29 percent were males, and 30 percent were in the pediatric age group. Trauma accounts for only 7 percent of the cases, while nonacute dental problems (caries and gingivitis) were responsible for the majority of cases (31.6 and 28.7 percent, respectively). RMS dental services during humanitarian mission deployment are a vital part of comprehensive healthcare. Women usually seek more dental care than men, with the majority of treatments for nonacute conditions. RMS experiences demonstrate the tremendous need for a well-defined preparedness plan for deployment of humanitarian missions that considers the contributions of all types of health professionals, the appropriate mobile technology to respond to emergent health risks, and a competent workforce ready and able to respond. Such preparation will require our dental education programs to develop disaster preparedness competencies to achieve the desired level of understanding.

  18. Evidence-based medicine among Jordanian family physicians: awareness, attitude, and knowledge.

    PubMed

    Barghouti, Farihan; Halaseh, Lana; Said, Tania; Mousa, Abdel Halim; Dabdoub, Adel

    2009-07-01

    To assess family practitioners' attitudes toward and awareness of evidence-based medicine (EBM). A cross-sectional study from a questionnaire distributed between January and March 2007. Rural and urban family medicine centres throughout Jordan that are affiliated with the Ministry of Health, military centres, university medical centres, and the private sector. Two hundred family physicians. Family physicians' attitudes toward EBM; training in EBM; barriers to practising EBM; level of awareness of and access to EBM journals and databases; and knowledge and understanding of related technical terms. The response rate was 70.5%. Among those who responded, 56.7% were women and 42.6% were between the ages of 40 and 49 years. More than 50% of the respondents were working in mixed urban and rural practice settings. Most of the respondents had a positive attitude toward EBM: 63.5% welcomed the concept of EBM; more than 40% used EBM in their daily practices; and 90% agreed that practising EBM improved patient care. Of the respondents, 42.6% thought that the best way to move from opinion-based medicine to EBM was through learning the skills of EBM. Fifty percent of the respondents had access to MEDLINE, while only 20.4% of them had received formal training in research and critical appraisal. Lack of personal time was the main perceived barrier to practising EBM. Participants reported a low level of awareness of some of the technical terms. Jordanian family physicians showed eagerness to learn and implement EBM in their daily practices. Nevertheless, they need more guidance and training to ensure the correct application of EBM ideals.

  19. Assessment of anxiety and depression after lower limb amputation in Jordanian patients

    PubMed Central

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M; Othman, Yasmin S; Ibrahim, Alaa I

    2008-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depression among Jordanian lower limb amputees with different clinical characteristics and sociodemographic data (gender, marital status, social support, income, type and level of amputation, and occupation). Methods Participants were 56 patients with unilateral lower limb amputation with mean duration (8.4 ± 5.75 years). They were recruited from inpatient and outpatient clinics of Jordan University hospital, Royal Farah Rehabilitation Center, and Al-basheer hospital in Amman, Jordan. Participants responded to a questionnaire that included a battery of questions requesting brief information about sociodemographic variables and characteristics of amputation. The level of depression and anxiety in each participating patient was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms were 37% and 20%, respectively. Factors associated with high prevalence of psychological symptoms included female gender, lack of social support, unemployment, traumatic amputation, shorter time since amputation, and amputation below the knee. These findings were confirmed by a significant reduction of anxiety and depression scores in patients who received social support, patients with amputation due to disease, and patients with amputation above the knee. Presence of pain and use of prosthesis had no effect on the prevalence. Conclusions The findings of the present study highlight the high incidence of psychiatric disability and depression in amputees; it also showed the importance of sociodemographic factors in psychological adjustment to amputation. It is suggested that psychiatric evaluation and adequate rehabilitation should form a part of their overall management. PMID:18830394

  20. Adsorption behaviour of methylene blue onto Jordanian diatomite: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Khraisheh, Majeda A M; Ahmad, Mohammad N M; Allen, Stephen

    2009-06-15

    The effect of initial concentration, particle size, mass of the adsorbent, pH and agitation speed on adsorption behaviour of methylene blue (MB) onto Jordanian diatomite has been investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity, q, increased from 75 to 105 mg/g when pH of the dye solution increased from 4 to 11. It is clear that the ionisable charge sites on the diatomite surface increased when pH increased from 4 to 11. When the solution pH was above the pH(ZPC), the diatomite surface had a negative charge, while at low pH (pH<5.4) it has a positive charge. The adsorption capacity increased from 88.6 to 143.3mg/g as the initial MB concentrations increased from 89.6 to 225.2mg/dm(3). The experimental results were also applied to the pseudo-first and -second order kinetic models. It is noticed that the whole experimental data of MB adsorption onto diatomite did not follow the pseudo-first order model and had low correlation coefficients (R(2)<0.3). The calculated adsorption capacity, q(e,cal), values obtained from pseudo-first order kinetic model did not give acceptable values, q(e,exp.) The maximum uptake capacity seems to be independent of the particle size of the diatomite when the particle size distribution is less than 250-500 microm. While at larger particle size 250-500 microm, the maximum uptake capacity was dependent on the particle size. It would imply that the MB adsorption is limited by the external surface and that intraparticle diffusion is reduced. The effect of the agitation speeds on the removal of MB from aqueous solution using the diatomite is quite low. The MB removal increased from 43 to 100% when mass of the diatomite increased from 0.3 to 1.7 g.

  1. Monitoring, Controlling And Prevention Of The Fungal Deterioration Of Textile Artifacts In The Museum Of Jordanian Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.

    This study aims at monitoring, controlling and prevention the fungal deterioration of the museum textiles in the museum of Jordanian heritage as a case study. In this study valuable fungal deteriorated textile samples collected from different areas in the storage rooms and the display halls in the selected museum, were used for isolating fungi. Both of the plate method with the manual key and the direct observation method by SEM were used for identification of the fungi. The results show that the most dominant fungi isolated from tested samples belong to Aspergillus, Penicillium, Chaetomium and Alternaria species. The results show that all kinds of textile fibers in both storage room and display halls in the selected museum suffer from fungal attack. This study confirms that the textile collections are displayed and storied in very poor environmental conditions. This study established a strategy for controlling and prevention of the fungal deterioration problem on textile objects in the Museum of Jordanian Heritage and includes disinfection of the biodeteriorated textile objects, and then controlling the environmental conditions surrounding the objects in display showcases and storage cabinets. For disinfection of fungal deteriorated textiles with active fungal infestation the study suggested some fungicides that are safe for both textile objects and conservators.

  2. Bullying among Jordanian schoolchildren, its effects on school performance, and the contribution of general physical and dentofacial features.

    PubMed

    Al-Bitar, Zaid B; Al-Omari, Iyad K; Sonbol, Hawazen N; Al-Ahmad, Hazem T; Cunningham, Susan J

    2013-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the experience of bullying in a representative sample of Jordanian schoolchildren in Amman, to look at its effect on school attendance and perception of academic performance, and to look at the contribution of general physical and dentofacial features to this phenomenon. This was a cross-sectional study in which a representative sample of sixth-grade students (11-12 years of age) from randomly selected schools was asked to complete questionnaires distributed in the classroom in the presence of the researchers. The final sample size was 920 children (470 girls, 450 boys). The prevalence of bullying was 47% (n = 433); significantly more boys reported being bullied than girls (P <0.001). The percentage of students subjected to name-calling was 40.9%. A significantly greater proportion of victims of bullying reported playing truant from school and disliking school than those who were not bullied. Teeth were the number 1 feature targeted for bullying, followed by strength and weight. The 3 most commonly reported dentofacial features targeted by bullies were spacing between the teeth or missing teeth, shape or color of the teeth, and prominent maxillary anterior teeth. This study demonstrated a high prevalence of bullying in Jordanian schools, with many children experiencing bullying because of their dental or facial appearance. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Screening for mutations in RPGR and RP2 genes in Jordanian families with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Haddad, M F; Khabour, O F; Abuzaideh, K A Y; Shihadeh, W

    2016-06-03

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease causing progressive degeneration of retinal photoreceptor cells. X-linked RP (XLRP), in which photoreceptor degeneration begins in early childhood and complete blindness often occurs by the fourth decade of life, constitutes the most severe form of this disease. Two genes commonly associated with XLRP have previously been cloned: retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) and retinitis pigmentosa 2 (RP2). We sought to identify mutations in these genes in Jordanian families suffering from this disease. Five unrelated Jordanian families with confirmed XLRP were screened for such mutations using direct sequencing. Three mutations were identified in the ORF15 exon of RPGR. The silent g.ORF15+470G>A substitution and the g.ORF15+1822insA insertion in the 3ꞌ-untranslated region were found in both normal and affected male family members at comparable frequencies, and thus were considered normal variants. The third mutation, g.ORF15+588G>A, in which alanine is substituted by threonine, was found in all affected men and one unaffected man in the two families harboring this variant. Thus, this mutation may be pathogenic, but with incomplete penetrance. No RP2 mutations were found among the examined families. Mutation screening of RP patients is essential to understand the mechanism behind this disease and develop treatments. A complete family history is required to identify its inheritance pattern and provide genetic counseling for patients and their families.

  4. Cross-cultural comparison of fertility specific quality of life in German, Hungarian and Jordanian couples attending a fertility center.

    PubMed

    Sexty, Réka E; Hamadneh, Jehan; Rösner, Sabine; Strowitzki, Thomas; Ditzen, Beate; Toth, Bettina; Wischmann, Tewes

    2016-02-24

    Only a few studies have reported cross-cultural comparisons regarding psychosocial consequences of infertility. Differences between societies with different cultural backgrounds were revealed and seemed to be based on the importance of pronatalism. Our aim was to measure cross-cultural differences in fertility specific quality of life of infertile couples in Germany, Hungary and Jordan who attend a fertility center in a cross-sectional study. A cross-sectional study was conducted in one fertility clinic in Germany, in five fertility clinics in Hungary and in one fertility clinic in Jordan. Overall 750 couples (252 couples in Jordan, 246 couples in Germany and 252 couples in Hungary) attending the first medical infertility consultation were asked to fill out our questionnaire set. Fertility specific quality of life (FertiQoL) and sociodemographic differences were measured between couples from three countries. Jordanian couples had the shortest relationship (5.8 ± 4.3 yrs.), though they reported the longest duration of child wish (4.2 ± 3.6 yrs.) and fertility treatments (3.0 ± 3.3 yrs.). The proportion of high education was considerably higher in Jordanian women and men (60 % and 66 %, respectively) compared to the other two samples. First, marked cross-country differences were obtained on Emotional, Mind/Body and Relational subscales of the FertiQoL, indicating that Jordanian couples reported poorer fertility-related quality of life than Germans and Hungarians (p < 0.001). After controlling for the sociodemographic and medical variables, a significant difference only in the Emotional domain was observed (p < 0.001). The study revealed only a few cultural based differences in fertility specific quality of life between the couples of the three countries. Thus, infertility counselors should pay attention to psychosocial problems rooted in individual sociocultural aspects of the infertile couple regardless of cultural stereotypes. Further studies should identify

  5. Knowledge and attitude of Jordanian school health teachers with regards to emergency management of dental trauma.

    PubMed

    Al-Jundi, Suhad H; Al-Waeili, Haydar; Khairalah, Khaled

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, by means of a self administered structured questionnaire, the level of knowledge of school health teachers in northern Jordan with regards to the immediate emergency management of dental trauma. The questionnaire surveyed teacher's background, Knowledge of management of tooth fracture, avulsion, and loss of consciousness, it also investigated teacher's attitudes, and self assessed knowledge, as well as knowledge of availability of emergency services in Jordan. The sample consisted of all school health teachers in northern Jordan (220) who attended an oral health education course held by the Jordanian dental association. Only 190 were included in the survey. Sixty-three percent were females, 44% were in their twenties, and 43% in their forties. Their school health teaching experience ranged from 1 to 7 years. Only 20% were officially trained in school health. Less than half of the teachers received first aid training only once in their teaching career, not necessarily as part of school health training. Only 10 teachers were trained in dental first aid, and more than half had a previous experience with handling dental trauma in children. Overall the teachers' knowledge with regards to the emergency management of the trauma cases presented in the report was deficient. Chi-square test showed that, the difference in their responses to the knowledge part of the questionnaire was not statistically significant with regards to age, gender, years of teaching experience, first aid training, or number of seen trauma cases. Generally, the attitude was positive, most teachers wanting further education on the topic, however those who were trained in first aid, thought they were able to give proper action when needed in cases of trauma (P = 0.026). Most teachers were unsatisfied with their level of knowledge, and only 30% knew of the availability of after hour emergency services for dental trauma. The present report indicated the gross lack

  6. Patients' Adherence to Healthy Behavior in Coronary Heart Disease: Risk Factor Management Among Jordanian Patients.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Sultan M; Darawad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    .54, P = .011) or regular physical activity (Mann-Whitney Z = -3.60, P = .001) and in those who had more comorbidity diseases (r = 0.34, P = .001). Our findings highlight poor adherence to secondary prevention behaviors among Jordanian CHD patients. Most participants did not adopt healthy behaviors in managing their CHD risk factors and they demonstrated a higher risk of hospital readmission. There is an urgent need for aggressive and targeted strategies to enhance adherence levels.

  7. Organics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  8. Organizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  9. Organics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  10. Organizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  11. Correlates of Stress and Coping among Jordanian Nursing Students during Clinical Practice in Psychiatric/Mental Health Course.

    PubMed

    Alzayyat, Abdulkarim; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas

    2016-10-01

    Training in psychiatric settings is stressful for nursing students. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlations between the students' characteristics, their stress degrees, stressors and types of coping strategies they experience during training in psychiatric course. A descriptive, correlational, longitudinal design was used. Sixty-five undergraduate nursing students were recruited randomly from five Jordanian universities. Self-report questionnaires were administered at the second semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. The findings showed that students who utilized avoidance or transference strategies reported high stress degrees. Moreover, the results showed that those students who were in the fourth year, with a low family income, who avoid extracurricular activities, with a low academic grade or who registered in other clinical course(s) reported high stress degrees. These findings present a worthy data for the clinical instructors that facilitate students training in psychiatric settings and promote their psychosocial well-being. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Perception of efficacy and safety as determinants for use and discontinuation of birth control methods in Muslim Jordanian women.

    PubMed

    Albsoul-Younes, A M; Saleh, F; El-Khateeb, W

    2003-09-01

    This study was conducted to identify the perceptions of working Muslim Jordanian women regarding the efficacy and safety of their contraceptive methods, and whether these perceptions affected method choice or discontinuation. A prospective study on 207 married working women of reproductive age was conducted between March and June 2002. The majority of women were using an intrauterine device (IUD), fewer were using traditional methods and oral contraceptive pills. Effectiveness was the main reason for choosing IUD and pill methods, while concerns about safety were the main reason for discontinuation. Safety was the main reason for choosing traditional methods and poor efficacy was the reason for discontinuation. Health-care professionals need to increase the use of proper contraceptive methods and compliance by providing counseling services and correcting any misperceptions regarding birth control methods before and during use.

  13. Screening depressive symptoms in Jordanian women: evaluation of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CES-D).

    PubMed

    Al-Modallal, Hanan

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the psychometric qualities of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CES-D) in Jordanian women. Cronbach's alpha for the 20-item CES-D was .90. Factor analysis yielded three components. Four of the items had poor factor loadings and, therefore, were dropped. Cronbach's alpha for the remaining 16 items was .85. Validity testing using independent samples t-test provided evidence of discriminant validity for the 20-item and the 16-item CES-D. Attributes of the CES-D items indicated that depression status can be easily identified by clinicians. Co morbidity of depressive symptoms with physical and mental problems necessitates routine screening for depressed mood.

  14. Reduction in breast cancer susceptibility due to XbaI gene polymorphism of alpha estrogen receptor gene in Jordanians

    PubMed Central

    Atoum, Manar Fayiz; Alzoughool, Foad

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a global health concern among women worldwide. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) mediates diverse polymorphic effects in breast tissues that may relate to breast cancer susceptibility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of −397 PvuII (T/C) and −351 XbaI (A/G) restriction fragment length polymorphism within intron 1 of ERα, and its effect on breast cancer susceptibility. A total of 156 women who were histopathologically diagnosed with breast cancer and 142 healthy Jordanian women were enrolled in this case–control study. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole peripheral blood, and the desired fragment was amplified using polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction digestion with PvuII and XbaI restriction enzymes. The results showed no significant association between PvuII polymorphism and breast cancer risk. However, a significant association was found between XbaI polymorphism and reduction in breast cancer risk within the “x” allele of heterozygotes (odds ratio [OR] 0.199, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.09–0.044) and heterozygotes (OR 0.208, 95% CI 0.09–0.047). The combined analysis of PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms revealed a synergistic effect of Pp/Xx and pp/xx genotypes and a significant reduction in breast cancer risk with these genotypes. The results also showed no statistical differences among PvuII or XbaI polymorphisms based on stage, ER, progesterone receptor and expression of hormone receptor such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. This case–control study showed that XbaI polymorphism of alpha estrogen gene modified and reduced breast cancer susceptibility among Jordanians. PMID:28182136

  15. Perceived Exercise Self-Efficacy, Benefits and Barriers, and Commitment to a Plan for Exercise among Jordanians with Chronic Illnesses.

    PubMed

    Darawad, Muhammad W; Khalil, Amani A; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Nofal, Basema M

    2016-11-01

    To explore Jordanian chronic illnesses patients' perceived exercise self-efficacy, benefits and barriers, and commitment to exercise planning, and to assess the relationship between those variables. Descriptive cross-sectional design. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 402 outpatient Jordanians with chronic illnesses, using Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale, Exercise Benefits and Barriers Scale, and Commitment to a Plan for Exercise Scale. The average BMI was 28.3, and exercise period 3.2 hours/ week. Participants reported moderate perceived self-efficacy (M= 47.5%, SD= 11.7), commitment to exercise planning (M=2.0/3, SD=0.3), exercise barriers (M=2.4/4, SD=0.3), and benefits (M=2.3/4, SD=0.3). Commitment to exercise planning had a significant correlation with barriers (r=0.11) and benefits (r=0.10). Self-efficacy was not found to correlate with other variables. Even though participants reported higher perceived self-efficacy and commitment to exercise plan than that reported in literature, they were found to be overweight and inactive, which indicates the importance of such study. Exercise education programs are needed taking into considerations patients' individual differences. However, the broad grouping of diseases may not produce a homogenous sample, for which disease categories are recommended in future studies. Patients with chronic illness need more encouragement to engage themselves in exercise practices. Exercise educational program for patients with chronic illnesses should consider patients' reported exercise benefits and barriers. © 2014 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  16. Factor Structure of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale: Cross-Cultural Comparisons Between Jordanian Arab and Malaysian Muslim University Students in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Musa, Ahmad S

    2016-03-01

    This study reported the differences in factor structure of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS) among Jordanian Arab and Malaysian Muslim participants and further examined its validity and reliability. A convenience sample of 553 Jordanian Arab and 183 Malaysian Malay Muslim university students was recruited from governmental universities in northern Jordan. The findings of this study revealed that this scale consists of two factors for the Jordanian Arab group, representing the "Religious Well-Being" and the "Existential Well-Being" subscales, and consists of three factors for the Malaysian group, representing the "Affiliation/Meaning and Purpose," "Positive Existential Well-Being/God Caring and Love," and "Alienation/Despair" subscales. In conclusion, the factor structure of the SWBS for both groups in this study was psychometrically sound with evidence of acceptable to good validity and reliability. Furthermore, this study supported the multidimensional nature of the SWBS and the earlier notion that ethnicity shapes responses to this scale. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Cr(VI)/Cr(III) and As(V)/As(III) ratio assessments in Jordanian spent oil shale produced by aerobic combustion and Anaerobic Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    El-Hasan, Tayel; Szczerba, Wojciech; Buzanich, Günter; Radtke, Martin; Riesemeier, Heinrich; Kersten, Michael

    2011-11-15

    With the increase in the awareness of the public in the environmental impact of oil shale utilization, it is of interest to reveal the mobility of potentially toxic trace elements in spent oil shale. Therefore, the Cr and As oxidation state in a representative Jordanian oil shale sample from the El-Lajjoun area were investigated upon different lab-scale furnace treatments. The anaerobic pyrolysis was performed in a retort flushed by nitrogen gas at temperatures in between 600 and 800 °C (pyrolytic oil shale, POS). The aerobic combustion was simply performed in porcelain cups heated in a muffle furnace for 4 h at temperatures in between 700 and 1000 °C (burned oil shale, BOS). The high loss-on-ignition in the BOS samples of up to 370 g kg(-1) results from both calcium carbonate and organic carbon degradation. The LOI leads to enrichment in the Cr concentrations from 480 mg kg(-1) in the original oil shale up to 675 mg kg(-1) in the ≥ 850 °C BOS samples. Arsenic concentrations were not much elevated beyond that in the average shale standard (13 mg kg(-1)). Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis revealed that within the original oil shale the oxidation states of Cr and As were lower than after its aerobic combustion. Cr(VI) increased from 0% in the untreated or pyrolyzed oil shale up to 60% in the BOS ash combusted at 850 °C, while As(V) increased from 64% in the original oil shale up to 100% in the BOS ash at 700 °C. No Cr was released from original oil shale and POS products by the European compliance leaching test CEN/TC 292 EN 12457-1 (1:2 solid/water ratio, 24 h shaking), whereas leachates from BOS samples showed Cr release in the order of one mmol L(-1). The leachable Cr content is dominated by chromate as revealed by catalytic adsorptive stripping voltammetry (CAdSV) which could cause harmful contamination of surface and groundwater in the semiarid environment of Jordan.

  18. The Arabic culture of Jordan and its impacts on a wider Jordanian adoption of business continuity management.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Ihab H; Meaton, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Culture is important to individuals and societies, as well as organisations. Failing to address cultural aspects will hinder the wider adoption and development of business continuity management (BCM) and will subsequently increase the vulnerabilities of organisations to crises, disasters and business interruptions. Three main issues are discussed in this paper. The first is the background to culture and the characteristics of the Jordanian culture. Secondly, the influence of the Arab culture on the wider adoption and development of BCM in Jordan is considered. Thirdly, the paper looks at potential factors that underpin the role of culture in the BCM process in Jordan. These issues are significant, as they represent the characteristics and influence of the Arab culture. This paper contributes to the understanding of the significance of culture in the adoption and development of BCM for organisations operating in Jordan and in the Arab world more generally. It also highlights current cultural changes and trends taking place in the Arab world in a time of huge political instability in the Middle East and Arab countries.

  19. Perceived stress and coping strategies among Jordanian nursing students during clinical practice in psychiatric/mental health courses.

    PubMed

    Al-Zayyat, Abdulkarim Subhi; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas

    2014-08-01

    Clinical practice in the psychiatric/mental health nursing (PMHN) field is considered a highly-stressful experience for nursing students. The purpose of the present study was to identify the degrees of stress, the types of stressors, and coping strategies perceived by undergraduate nursing students during their clinical practice in PMHN courses. A descriptive, longitudinal design was used. Sixty-five students registered in PMHN clinical courses were recruited from five Jordanian universities using a systematic random-sampling method. Data collection was conducted in the second semester of the 2012-2013 academic year at two points of time: pre-PMHN clinical training and post-PMHN training. The Basic Information Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, and Coping Behavior Inventory were administered. Students' ages ranged from 20 to 25 years. The findings illustrate that the highest reported types of stressors at both data-collection times were taking care of patients, stress related to teachers and nursing staff, and from assignments and workloads. The most utilized coping strategy at both data-collection times was problem solving. The findings of the present study are useful for clinical educators in identifying nursing students' stressors, easing their learning in the clinical setting, and establishing an efficient PMHN course programme. © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  20. Association Between Gasdermin A and Gasdermin B Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Adult and Childhood Asthma Among Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Zihlif, Malek; Obeidat, Nathir M; Zihlif, Nadwa; Mahafza, Tareq; Froukh, Tawfiq; Ghanim, Marcel T; Beano, Hamza; Al-Akhras, Fatima M; Naffa, Randa

    2016-03-01

    Gasdermin A (GSDMA) and gasdermin B (GSDMB) have been associated with childhood, and to a lesser extent with adult, asthma in many populations. In this study, we investigated the association between GSDMA and GSDMB variants and the incidence of adult and childhood asthma among Jordanians. Subjects were divided into two groups: adults and children. Within the adult group there were 129 asthma patients and 111 healthy controls. In the pediatric group there were 98 asthma patients and 112 healthy children. Gasdermin A (GSDMA) (rs7212938, T/G) and Gasdermin B (rs7216389, T/C) polymorphisms were genotyped using the PCR-RFLP method. Three analysis models were applied to the genotype data: co-dominant, dominant and recessive. An association between the GSDMB T/C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype and the incidence of childhood asthma was found (< 0.05). GSDMB T/C SNP in children also showed a very high tendency toward significance with p = 0.0532 in the single locus analysis. In adults, no significant differences in the allelic frequencies of any of the SNPs analyzed were found between the case and control populations. At the haplotype level, GC haplotype was found to be associated with the risk of asthma in children while none of the tested haplotypes were found to be associated with asthma risk in adults. The findings of this study confirm the previously reported association between the GSDMB gene and the risk of childhood asthma.

  1. Association between mass media and body weight concern among Jordanian adolescents' residents of Amman: the role of gender and obesity.

    PubMed

    Tayyem, Reema F; Bawadi, Hiba A; AbuMweis, Suhad S; Allehdan, Sabika; Agraib, Lana; Ghazzawi, Hadeel A; Al-Mannai, Mariam A; Musaiger, AbdulRahman O

    2016-11-01

    Body image in the mass media promotes an unrealistic picture of body shape that leads to body dissatisfaction among adolescentsQuery. Therefore, the study presented in this paper aimed to assess the association between mass media and adolescents' weight concerns and perceptions of body weight and shape. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on school adolescents aged between 15 and 18 years during the academic year 2013-2014. Multistage stratified sampling method was used. The number of participants in the study was 795 students: 400 boys and 395 girls. All participants have a common behavior in rarely reading magazines, but they spend more than 2 h in watching television or less than 3 h using the internet. However, most of obese/non-obese adolescents, boys or girls, have shown high influence (p < 0.05) of reading magazines on the subject of dieting to lose weight. While obese students read more magazines on dieting to lose weight, other mass media did not show the same results on weight concerns and body shape among Jordanian adolescents.

  2. Analysis of Turner syndrome patients within the Jordanian population, with a focus on four patients with Y chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Daggag, H; Srour, W; El-Khateeb, M; Ajlouni, K

    2013-01-01

    This study presents findings in Turner syndrome (TS) patients from the Jordanian population, with focus on 4 patients with Y chromosomal abnormalities. From 1989 to 2011, 504 patients with TS stigmata were referred to our institute for karyotyping, resulting in 142 positive TS cases. Of these, 62 (43.7%) had the typical 45,X karyotype and the remaining individuals (56.3%) were found to be mosaics. Fifteen TS patients (10.5%) carried a structural abnormality of the Y chromosome and presented with the mosaic 45,X/46,XY karyotype. From these, 4 TS cases were investigated further. Karyotyping revealed that 1 patient carried a small supernumerary marker chromosome, whereas cytogenetic and molecular analyses showed that 3 patients carried 2 copies of the SRY gene. Further analysis by SRY sequencing revealed no mutations within the gene. The analyzed patients were found to be phenotypically either females or males, depending on the predominance of the cell line carrying the Y chromosome. This study demonstrates the importance of detailed cytogenetic analysis (such as FISH) in TS patients, and it also emphasizes the need for molecular analysis (such as PCR and sequencing) when fragments of the Y chromosome are present.

  3. Self-care Management Intervention to Improve Psychological Wellbeing for Jordanian Patients with Type Two Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Albikawi, Zainab Fatehi; Petro-Nustas, Wasileh; Abuadas, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of self-care management intervention on psychological wellbeing for Jordanian patients with type two diabetes mellitus. A quasi-experimental design was used. The study was conducted in a diabetes clinic of a specialized diabetes center in Amman. One hundred and forty-nine participants completed the three-month post-treatment assessments (76 in the intervention group and 73 in the control group). Both the control and intervention groups received a standard diabetic educational program. The intervention group received the following additional interventions: (1) Diabetes Self-care Management booklet, (2)DVD viewing, (3) counseling rehearsal session, and (4) a telephone follow-up. The main study instrument was an Arabic version 20 of the depression anxiety stress scales: To assess the group differences of dependent variable changes, repeated measure ANOVA was used. It was found that psychological wellbeing was not significant at 2-week post-intervention and significant change was observed at 3-month post-intervention. The findings from this study can guide the health providers to be trained to provide relevant diabetic interventions into their nursing interventions, education, and research.

  4. Multidimensional and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography of dichloromethane soluble products from a high sulfur Jordanian oil shale.

    PubMed

    Amer, Mohammad W; Mitrevski, Blagoj; Jackson, W Roy; Chaffee, Alan L; Marriott, Philip J

    2014-03-01

    A high sulfur Jordanian oil shale was converted into liquid hydrocarbons by reaction at 390 °C under N2, and the dichloromethane soluble fraction of the products was isolated then analyzed by using gas chromatography (GC). Comprehensive two-dimensional GC (GC×GC) and multidimensional GC (MDGC) were applied for component separation on a polar - non-polar column set. Flame-ionization detection (FID) was used with GC×GC for general sample profiling, and mass spectrometry (MS) for component identification in MDGC. Multidimensional GC revealed a range of thiophenes (th), benzothiophenes (bth) and small amounts of dibenzothiophenes (dbth) and benzonaphthothiophenes (bnth). In addition, a range of aliphatic alkanes and cycloalkanes, ethers, polar single ring aromatic compounds and small amounts of polycyclic aromatics were also identified. Some of these compound classes were not uniquely observable by conventional 1D GC, and certainly this is true for many of their minor constituent members. The total number of distinct compounds was very large (ca.>1000). GC×GC was shown to be appropriate for general sample profiling, and MDGC-MS proved to be a powerful technique for the separation and identification of sulfur-containing components and other polar compounds.

  5. Comparison of Coconut Water and Jordanian Propolis on Survival of Bench-dried Periodontal Ligament Cells: An in vitro Cell Culture Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jundi, Suhad; Mhaidat, Nizar

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The aim of this study is to assess and compare the efficacy of Jordanian propolis and full concentration mature coconut water in their ability to preserve periodontal ligament (PDL) cell viability after exposure of PDL cells to up to 120 minutes dry storage. Materials and methods: PDL cells were obtained from sound permanent first molars which were cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM). Cultures were subjected to 0, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes dry storage times then incubated with 100% mature coconut water, Jordanian propolis and DMEM for 45 minutes at room temperature (18-26°C). Untreated cells served as controls at each dry storage time tested. PDL cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Statistical analysis of data was accomplished by using one-way analysis of variance complemented by Tukey test and the level of significance was 5% ( p < 0.05). Results: Up to 60 minutes dry storage, no significant improvement on the percentage of viable cells was found from soaking in all tested media. On the other hand, soaking in mature coconut water only resulted in higher percentages of viable cells at >60 minutes dry storage. However, this improvement was not significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Avulsed teeth which have been left dry for <45 minutes should be replanted immediately, whereas avulsed teeth which have been left dry for >45 minutes may benefit from soaking for 45 minutes in mature coconut water. How to cite this article: Al-Haj Ali SN, Al-Jundi S, Mhaidat N. Comparison of Coconut Water and Jordanian Propolis on Survival of Bench-dried Periodontal Ligament Cells: An in vitro Cell Culture Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):161-165. PMID:25206215

  6. Comparison of Coconut Water and Jordanian Propolis on Survival of Bench-dried Periodontal Ligament Cells: An in vitro Cell Culture Study.

    PubMed

    Al-Haj Ali, Sanaa Najeh; Al-Jundi, Suhad; Mhaidat, Nizar

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess and compare the efficacy of Jordanian propolis and full concentration mature coconut water in their ability to preserve periodontal ligament (PDL) cell viability after exposure of PDL cells to up to 120 minutes dry storage. PDL cells were obtained from sound permanent first molars which were cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM). Cultures were subjected to 0, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes dry storage times then incubated with 100% mature coconut water, Jordanian propolis and DMEM for 45 minutes at room temperature (18-26°C). Untreated cells served as controls at each dry storage time tested. PDL cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Statistical analysis of data was accomplished by using one-way analysis of variance complemented by Tukey test and the level of significance was 5% ( p < 0.05). Up to 60 minutes dry storage, no significant improvement on the percentage of viable cells was found from soaking in all tested media. On the other hand, soaking in mature coconut water only resulted in higher percentages of viable cells at >60 minutes dry storage. However, this improvement was not significant (p > 0.05). Avulsed teeth which have been left dry for <45 minutes should be replanted immediately, whereas avulsed teeth which have been left dry for >45 minutes may benefit from soaking for 45 minutes in mature coconut water. How to cite this article: Al-Haj Ali SN, Al-Jundi S, Mhaidat N. Comparison of Coconut Water and Jordanian Propolis on Survival of Bench-dried Periodontal Ligament Cells: An in vitro Cell Culture Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):161-165.

  7. Multiple lingual cusps trait on mandibular premolars and hypoconulid reduction trait on mandibular first molar in living Jordanian population. Intra- and inter-trait interactions.

    PubMed

    Khraisat, Ameen; Alsoleihat, Firas; Subramani, Karthikeyan; Al-Rabab'ah, Mohammad A; Al-Omiri, Mahmoud K; Abu-Tahun, Ibrahim

    2013-09-01

    The objective was to determine the expression and fluctuating asymmetry of two dental morphological traits in the living Jordanians: The lingual cusp number on the lower premolars (LP1 and LP2) and the hypoconulid (distal cusp) reduction on the lower first molar (LM1). In addition, both intra- trait and inter- trait interactions were analyzed. Three hundred school children (15.5 +/- 0.4 years) were involved. Impressions for the mandibular dental arches were taken, and dental casts were reproduced. The above-mentioned traits were observed. Paired sample t test and nonparametric correlation analysis were used for data analysis. Three-cusped LP1 was found in 11.40 % of the examined students, while the two-cusped LP1 was found in 88.60%. In comparison, the Three-cusped LP2 was found in 61.40% while the two-cusped LP2 was found in 38.60% of the observed subjects. The frequencies of the 4-cusped and 5-cusped LM1 were found to be 8.65% and 91.35%, respectively. Nonparametric correlation analysis revealed positive and statistically significant association between the expression of two lingual cusps on LP1 and on LP2 in both genders (p < 0.01), while there was no significant correlation between expression of two lingual cusps on either LP1 or LP2 and the hypoconulid loss on LM1 in both genders (p > 0.05). Bilateralism was highly significant in the tested traits in both genders (p < 0.001). This finding might be a sign of relatively low environmental stresses experienced by the living Jordanians and/or great ability of its individuals to buffer the adverse effects of such stresses on dental development. This study is a useful addition to the existing literature in that it examines a previously poorly characterized population and assists in placing the contemporary Jordanian population within the current framework of human population groups globally.

  8. Quantifying selected morphometric characteristics for Jordanian side of the Jordan river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Rukah, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The Jordanian part of the Jordan river basin is almost 3679.692 km2. The river flows within the Jordan Rift Valley, a structurally complicated region which is cover almost by Upper Cretaceous chalky marls, bituminous limestone and nodular limestone, while the Quaternary sediments are mainly fluvitile deposits and Lisan marls. Other deposits are Tertiary and Jurassic. The present study includes the selected drainage basin characteristics, part of these characteristics refer as primary characteristics measurements and the others are found and concluded from the primary drainage basin characteristics and name as calculated basin characteristics. The drainage pattern is mainly dendritic but in some part is shows parallel pattern but not very mature. To simplify the study more and based on the detailed analysis of the drainage selected characteristics of the study area using various techniques and both topographic and geologic maps, the Jordan river basin is furtherly divided into 10 sub basin. Keywords: Jordan side of Jordan River Basin, Drainage Basin Morphology (Primary Basin Characteristics measurements, Calculated Basin Characteristics), Jordan. Table (1): Combined (Primary + Calculated) Basin Characteristics, Based on Toposheets 1:50,000 and Equations. Code Name of Catchment Area TDA (km2) 1 NCDA (km2) 2 BL (km2) 3 BP (km2) Total 4 BS (m) area 5 BR (m) 6 CDA (km2) 7 BW (km2) 8 SF 9 A Wadi Arab 413.905 302.02 239.3 27.8 34.4 636 ♢111. 0.467 512.42 B Wadi Zeglab 130.039 95.23 95 15.7 25 966 32.81 0.37 256.26 C Wadi Jurum 84.62 50.28 61.6 22.4 36.36 400 34.34 ♢1.7 34.4 D Wadi Yabis 208.02 150.930 122.1 25.2 46.29 400 57.09 0.47 259.78 E Wadi Kufanga 214.564 189.953 120.9 19.3 41.66 123 26.61 0.22 549.55 F Wadi Rajib 405.6 374.23 118.5 29.5 37.33 1285 31.37 0.27 438.88 G Wadi Siel Ezzarqa 476.293 394.83 258.1 29 28.56 1277 81.46 0.32 806.56 H Wadi el Mallaha 554.251 485.1 ♢385 ♢35 ♢48.25 ♢1435 69.25 0.18 ♢2142.7 I Wadi Nimrin ♢601.9 ♢520.3 282.5 30

  9. Mediating Role of Attitude, Subjective Norm and Perceived Behavioural Control in the Relationships between Their Respective Salient Beliefs and Behavioural Intention to Adopt E-Learning among Instructors in Jordanian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altawallbeh, Manal; Soon, Fong; Thiam, Wun; Alshourah, Sultan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the factors that determine intention to adopt e-learning in Jordanian universities. Two models of e-learning that are observed among adopting institutions: E-learning as a supplement to traditional classroom mode, and total electronic learning. The respondents in this research have just been introduced to…

  10. The Effectiveness of Training Program Based on the Six Hats Model in Developing Creative Thinking Skills and Academic Achievements in the Arabic Language Course for Gifted and Talented Jordanian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziadat, Ayed H.; Al Ziyadat, Mohammad T.

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a training program based on the six hats model in developing creative thinking skills and academic achievements in the Arabic language for gifted and talented Jordanian students. The study sample consisted of 59 gifted male and female students of the 7th grade from King Abdullah…

  11. Genetic polymorphism of CYP2C19 in a Jordanian population: influence of allele frequencies of CYP2C19*1 and CYP2C19*2 on the pharmacokinetic profile of lansoprazole.

    PubMed

    Zalloum, Imad; Hakooz, Nancy; Arafat, Tawfiq

    2012-04-01

    To relate the pharmacokinetics of orally administered lansoprazole in healthy adult Jordanian men with CYP2C19 polymorphisms and to determine the percentage of CYP2C19 polymorphism in Jordanian population and the allelic frequency of CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3. A total of 78 healthy Jordanian volunteers were included in this study from three different bioequivalence studies, one of these studies which included 26 volunteers was done on lansoprazole. Genotyping for CYP2C19*1, CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*3 was done for all 78 volunteers, the data of genotyping of all subjects used for screening the frequency of different genotypes and the allelic frequency of different polymorphisms in healthy Jordanian men, the pharmacokinetics and genotyping data for the study of lansoprazole was matched and compared to investigate presence of statistical differences in pharmacokinetic parameters. In Jordanian subjects, the allele frequencies of the CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3 mutation were 0.16 and 0, respectively. The concentration-time curves in the two groups [homozygote extensive metabolizer (homEM, n = 19) and heterozygote extensive metabolizer (homEM, n = 7)] groups were fitted to a non-compartment model. In the homEM and in the hetEM groups, the main kinetic parameters were as follows: T(max) (2.1875 ± 0.777) and (2.54 ± 1.87) h, C(max) (697.875 ± 335) and (833.58 ± 436.26) mg/l, t(1/2) (1.3 ± 0.43) and (2.38 ± 1.64) h, AUC((0→∞)) were (1,684.9 ± 888) and (3,609.8 ± 318) mg h l(-1), respectively. The Jordanian population showed similarities in CYP2C19 allele and genotype distribution pattern with Caucasians and Africans. CYP2C19 allele and poor metabolizer (PM) genotype frequencies in the Jordanian population are distinct from populations' from East Asia such as Japanese and Koreans. Although lower pharmacokinetic parameters were found in homEM compared to hetEM but there was no significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.05).

  12. Hereditary angioedema in a Jordanian family with a novel missense mutation in the C1-inhibitor N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Saied A; Caccia, Sonia; Rawashdeh, Rifaat; Melhem, Motasem; Al-Hawamdeh, Ali; Carzaniga, Thomas; Haddad, Hazem

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the SERPING1 gene. A Jordanian family, including 14 individuals with C1-INH-HAE clinical symptoms, was studied. In the propositus and his parents, SERPING1 had four mutations leading to amino acid substitutions. Two are known polymorphic variants (c.167T>C; p.Val34Ala and c.1438G>A; p.Val458Met), the others are newly described. One (c.203C>T; p.Thr46Ile) is located in the N-terminal domain of the C1-inhibitor protein and segregates with angioedema symptoms in the family. The other (c.800C>T; p.Ala245Val) belongs to the serpin domain, and derives from the unaffected father. DNA from additional 24 family members were screened for c.203C>T mutation in the target gene. All individuals heterozygous for the c.203C>T mutation had antigenic and functional plasma levels of C1-inhibitor below 50% of normal, confirming the diagnosis of type I C1-INH-HAE. Angioedema symptoms were present in 14 of 16 subjects carrier for the c.203T allele. Among these subjects, those carrying the c.800T variation had more severe and frequent symptoms than subjects without this mutation. This family-based study provides the first evidence that multiple amino acid substitutions in SERPING1 could influence C1-INH-HAE phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Profiling Amino Acids of Jordanian Scalp Hair as a Tool for Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Rashaid, Ayat H B; Harrington, Peter de B; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-07-21

    Hair analysis is an area of increasing interest in the fields of medical and forensic sciences. Human scalp hair has attractive features in clinical studies because hair can be sampled easily and noninvasively from human subjects, and unlike blood and urine samples, it contains a chronological record of medication use. Keratin protein is the major component of scalp hair shaft material and it is composed of 21 amino acids. The method used herein for the amino acid determination in hair included keratin protein acid hydrolysis using 6 M hydrochloric acid (HCl), followed by amino acids derivatization using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA), and the determination of derivatized amino acids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Amino acid profiles of scalp hair of 27 Jordanian subjects (15 diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 patients and 12 control subjects) were analyzed. A fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES) classified the amino acid profiles into diabetic and control groups based on multivariate analyses of the abundance of 14 amino acids. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% for diabetes detection using leave-one-individual-out cross-validation. The areas under the receiver operative characteristics (ROC) curves were 1.0, which represents a highly sensitive and specific diabetes test. The nonessential amino acids Gly and Glu, and the essential amino acid Ile were more abundant in the scalp hair of diabetic patients compared to the hair of control subjects. The associations between the abundance of amino acids of human hair and health status may have clinical applications in providing diagnostic indicator or predicting other chronic or acute diseases.

  14. Comparison between once weekly, twice weekly, and daily oral iron therapy in Jordanian children suffering from iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Hawamdeh, Hasan M; Rawashdeh, Mohammad; Aughsteen, Adib Abdulahad

    2013-02-01

    The efficacy of daily versus twice weekly and once weekly oral iron therapy was analyzed to optimize a protocol for treatment of IDM among Jordanian children. One hundred and forty-eight children aged between 6 and 60 months with Hb estimate less than 11 gm/dl were screened. They were randomly divided into three regimens of oral iron therapy for a period of 12 weeks; a group was supplemented with a single weekly dose of iron; a second group received two doses weekly; and a third group had a daily dose of iron. Hb was assayed 3 and 12 weeks after therapy, while ferritin was assayed after 12 weeks of treatment. A significant rise in Hb concentration was observed which was most significant 12 weeks after treatment. Iron supplementation after 3 weeks was similar in all treated groups, and no significant difference in Hb concentration among the three groups was noticed. By the end of the third week, the anemia had respectively resolved by 18, 11.8 and 23.4% in the daily, twice weekly, and once weekly groups. On the other hand, the percentage of recovery of anemia respectively was 78, 90.2 and 74.5% at the end of 12 weeks of iron therapy. Hb recovery percentage was comparable in the three treated groups, and no significant difference was reported between them either at 3 or at 12 weeks of therapy. Ferritin levels in the daily and twice weekly treated groups were similar after 12 weeks of iron therapy and were significantly higher than the ferritin levels of weekly treated group. Although the anemia in the three treated groups was resolved after 3 and 12 weeks of oral iron therapy, we conclude that the regimen of two doses per week is the most effective in resolving anemia with less cost and fewer side effects.

  15. Traumatic dental injuries among 12-year-old Jordanian schoolchildren: an investigation on obesity and other risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Traumatic dental injury (TDI) is an important public dental health problem among schoolchildren. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between TDIs, obesity, and other possible associated factors like gender, overjet, lip coverage, parents’ education level and family income among 12-year old Jordanian schoolchildren. Methods A cross-sectional population-based study examined a total of 1015 schoolchildren attending 34 schools randomly selected from urban and rural areas of Amman-the capital city of Jordan. The epidemiological classification adopted by WHO and modified by Andreasen et al. was used to classify TDIs. Obesity was defined according to the international cut-off points of body mass index for boys and girls between 2 and 20 years old. Results The prevalence of TDIs was 16.3%. Enamel fracture was the most common type of TDIs (65%). Neither parents’ education level nor family income had a significant effect on TDI occurrence (P > 0.05). Results of multiple logistic regression showed that TDIs were significantly more prevalent among males (OR = 1.42, CI; 1.01-2.01, P < 0.05), and children with inadequate lip coverage (OR = 1.95, CI; 1.35-2.81, P < 0.05). The relationship between TDIs and obesity was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusions Being a male with inadequate lip coverage was associated with higher probability of having a TDI. Obesity had no significant effect on the occurrence of TDIs. PMID:25099379

  16. Assessing the spatial and temporal variability of fine particulate matter components in Israeli, Jordanian, and Palestinian cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnat, Jeremy A.; Moise, Tamar; Shpund, Jacob; Liu, Yang; Pachon, Jorge E.; Qasrawi, Radwan; Abdeen, Ziad; Brenner, Shmuel; Nassar, Khaled; Saleh, Rami; Schauer, James J.

    2010-07-01

    This manuscript presents results from an extensive, multi-country comparative monitoring study of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) and its primary chemical components in Israeli, Jordanian and Palestinian cities. This study represented the first time that researchers from these countries have worked together to examine spatial and temporal relationships for PM 2.5 and its major components among the study sites. The findings indicated that total PM 2.5 mass was relatively homogenous among many of the 11 sites as shown from strong between-site correlations. Mean annual concentrations ranged from 19.9 to 34.9 μg m -3 in Haifa and Amman, respectively, and exceeded accepted international air quality standards for annual PM 2.5 mass. Similarity of total mass was largely driven by SO 42- and crustal PM 2.5 components. Despite the close proximity of the seven, well correlated sites with respect to PM 2.5, there were pronounced differences among the cities for EC and, to a lesser degree, OC. EC, in particular, exhibited spatiotemporal trends that were indicative of strong local source contributions. Interestingly, there were moderate to strong EC correlations ( r > 0.65) among the large metropolitan cities, West Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and Amman. For these relatively large cities, (i.e., West Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and Amman), EC sources from the fleet of buses and cars typical for many urban areas predominate and likely drive spatiotemporal EC distributions. As new airshed management strategies and public health interventions are implemented throughout the Middle East, our findings support regulatory strategies that target integrated regional and local control strategies to reduce PM 2.5 mass and specific components suspected to drive adverse health effects of particulate matter exposure.

  17. 'Half a woman, half a man; that is how they make me feel': a qualitative study of rural Jordanian women's experience of infertility.

    PubMed

    Daibes, Mayada A; Safadi, Reema R; Athamneh, Tarek; Anees, Iman F; Constantino, Rose E

    2017-08-16

    Infertility is a health problem encompassing physical, psychological and social consequences that may threaten women's quality of life. Few studies have been conducted in Jordan examining rural women's experiences of infertility. This study aimed to explore responses to infertility and its consequences in the Jordanian rural sociocultural context. Using a descriptive qualitative design, data were collected between April and September 2016 from a fertility clinic in a military hospital in Northern Jordan. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 purposively selected Jordanian women. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings revealing women's responses to infertility included: submission and docility, self-isolation, internalisation and persistence in getting pregnant by seeking modern and traditional methods of treatment. The impact of infertility complicated women's everyday living through their experiences of violence, kinship and patriarchal interference, stigma, negative perceptions of the infertile woman, and other's surveillance of their sexuality. Women living in rural areas of Jordan have negative experiences of infertility that are ingrained in sociocultural beliefs about fertility and reproduction. Healthcare professionals are encouraged to raise public awareness about infertility's adverse consequences and to help families by enhancing positive responses to infertility.

  18. X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 and 3 polymorphisms and susceptibility of breast cancer in a Jordanian population

    PubMed Central

    Zoubi, Mazhar S. Al

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To elucidate the contribution of x-ray repair cross-complementing (XRCC) protein 1 399Gln, XRCC3 241M, and XRCC3-5’-UTR polymorphisms to the susceptibility of breast cancer (BC) in a Jordanian population. Methods: Forty-six formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue samples from BC diagnosed female patients, and 31 samples from the control group were subjected to DNA sequencing. Samples were collected between September 2013 and December 2014. Results: The XRCC1 Arg399Gln genotype did not exhibit any significant correlation with the susceptibility of BC (odds ratio [OR]=1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.60-3.51) (p=0.47). Likewise, XRCC3 M241T genotype did not show significant correlation with BC (OR=2.02, 95% CI: 0.50-8.21) (p=0.40). However, distribution of XRCC3-5’UTR (rs1799794 A/G) genotype showed a significant difference between the patient and control group (OR=0.73, 95% CI: 0.06-8.46) (p=0.02). Conclusion: The XRCC3-5’UTR (rs1799794) G allele frequency was higher in cancer patients while XRCC1 (rs25487) and XRCC3 (rs861539) did not show any significant correlation with susceptibility of BC in the selected Jordanian population. Contribution of other environmental factors should be studied in future works, as well as the response of cancer therapy. PMID:26446325

  19. Major bleeding events in Jordanian patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI): Incidence, associated factors, impact on prognosis, and predictability of the CRUSADE bleeding risk score. Results from the First Jordanian PCR (PCR1).

    PubMed

    Jarrah, Mohamad; Hammoudeh, Ayman; Okkeh, Osama; Khader, Yousef; Gharaibeh, Sahem; Nasser, Laith; Rasheed, Amro; Al-Hindi, Ayed; Mohealdeen, Mohammad; Kharabsheh, Haneen; Abunimeh, Hanan; Hijjih, Enas; Tashman, Lina; Omar, Delia; Kufoof, Nadeen

    2017-06-01

    Determine the incidence of major bleeding events, their risk factors, and their impact on prognosis in Jordanian patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Evaluate the ability of the CRUSADE bleeding risk score (BRS) to predict major bleeding. Major bleeding events were defined according to the CRUSADE classification and their incidence was evaluated from hospital admission to one year of follow up. The CRUSADE bleeding risk score was calculated for each patient during the index admission. Incidence of major bleeding events was evaluated in each of the bleeding score quintiles. JoPCR1 is a prospective, observational, multicenter registry of consecutive patients who underwent PCI at 12 tertiary care centers in Jordan. A case report form was used to record data prospectively at hospital admission, at discharge, and at 1 and 12 months of follow-up. The study included 2426 consecutive patients who underwent PCI. During the index hospitalization, major and minor bleeding events occurred in 0.95% and 2.6% of patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that only two variables were significantly associated with major bleeding: female gender (OR=3.7; 95% CI 1.6, 8.5; p=0.002) and past history of cardiovascular disease (OR=2.6; 95% CI 1.1, 5.9; p=0.026). Patients who had in-hospital major bleeding events had higher cardiac mortality during index hospitalization (13.0% vs. 0.7%, p<0.005) and at one year of follow up (13.0% vs. 1.8%, p<0.005) compared to those who had no such events. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the CRUSADE BRS has a high ability to predict major bleeding. Major bleeding events were uncommon in this ME registry of a contemporary cohort of patients undergoing PCI but were associated with a higher mortality rate compared with those who did not have major bleeding events. CRUSADE BRS was highly predictive of the incidence of major bleeding events.

  20. Female public Jordanian university undergraduate students' intentions and attitudes toward breastfeeding: application of self-objectification theory.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, Nahla; Hatamleh, Reem; Khader, Yousef

    2013-11-01

    results of this study support the relationship between self-objectification and Jordanian young women's attitudes and intention to breastfeed and reinforce that in a culture where breastfeeding is encouraged, accepted and widely practised, positive attitudes to breastfeeding intention prevail.

  1. Monitoring and modeling of sinkholes affecting the Jordanian coast of the Dead Sea through satellite interferometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessari, Giulia; Pasquali, Paolo; Floris, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) techniques have been applied to investigate sinkholes affecting the Jordanian coast of the Dead Sea. The Dead Sea is a hyper saline terminal lake located in a pull-apart basin. Most of the area is characterized by highly karstic and fractured rock formations that are connected with faults. Karstic conduits extend from the land into the sea. Since the 1960s, the Dead Sea level is dropping at an increasing rate: from about 60 cm/yr in the 1970s up to 1 m/yr in the 2000s. From about the mid-1980s, sinkholes appeared more and more frequently over and around the emerged mudflats and salt flats. Strong subsidence and landslides also affect some segments of the coast. Nowadays, several thousands of sinkholes attest that the degradation of the Dead Sea coast is worsening. Deformation analysis has been focused on the Ghor Al Haditha area, located in the South-Eastern part of the lake coast. SAR data acquired by three different sensors, ERS, ENVISAT and COSMO- SkyMed have been analysed. 70 ERS images from 1992 to 2009 and 30 ENVISAT images from 2003 to 2010 have been processed. SBAS technique has been applied to define surface velocity and displacement maps. Results obtained from the SBAS technique, applied to ERS and Envisat data, highlight a diffuse subsiding of the entire Eastern coast of the Dead Sea. It was not possible to detect single sinkholes because of the resolution of these sensors (25m2) and the small size of each punctual event that is generally varying from a few meters to a hundred meters diameter. Furthermore, SBAS has been applied to 23 COSMO-SkyMed SAR satellite images from December 2011 to May 2013. The high resolution of these data (3m x 3m) and the short revisiting time allowed precise information of the displacement of punctual sinkholes beyond the overall subsidence of the coast. A specific sinkhole has been identified in order to understand its temporal evolution. The considered

  2. Evaluation of Serum Testosterone, Progesterone, Seminal Antisperm Antibody, and Fructose Levels among Jordanian Males with a History of Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghistani, Hala I.; Hamad, Abdul-Wahab R.; Abdel-Dayem, Muna; Al-Swaifi, Mohammad; Abu Zaid, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    which influence the motility of ejaculated spermatozoa among Jordanian infertile males. PMID:21188073

  3. Perceived maternal parenting as a mediator of the intergenerational similarity of dependency and self-criticism: a study with Arab Jordanian adolescents and their mothers.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ikhlas; Soenens, Bart

    2010-12-01

    This study investigated the intergenerational similarity of personality vulnerability to depression as conceptualized by Blatt (1974) in a sample of Arab Jordanian mothers and their adolescents. Perceived maternal parenting was examined as a mediator of the intergenerational similarity of two personality vulnerabilities; that is, dependency and self-criticism. Both mothers and adolescents (N = 298 families) completed the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (DEQ) to tap into personality vulnerability and adolescents additionally provided ratings of maternal parenting (support and psychological control) and depressive symptoms. Findings showed significant and specific associations between mothers' and adolescents' dependency and self-criticism. Perceived maternal parenting was found to mediate this intergenerational similarity at least partially. This study is among the first to test developmental hypotheses derived from Blatt's theory in a non-Western sample. Findings show striking similarity with data obtained in the West and, as such, contribute to the cross-cultural generalization of the theory.

  4. Social Understanding in Israeli-Jewish, Israeli-Palestinian, Palestinian, and Jordanian 5-year-old Children: Moral Judgments and Stereotypes

    PubMed Central

    Brenick, Alaina; Killen, Melanie; Lee-Kim, Jennie; Fox, Nathan; Leavitt, Lewis; Raviv, Amiram; Masalha, Shafiq; Murra, Farid; Smadi, Yahia

    2015-01-01

    An empirical investigation was conducted of young Palestinian, Jordanian, Israeli-Palestinian, and Israeli-Jewish children’s (N = 433; M = 5.7 years of age) cultural stereotypes and their evaluations of peer intergroup exclusion based upon a number of different factors, including being from a different country and speaking a different language. Children in this study live in a geographical region that has a history of cultural and religious tension, violence, and extreme intergroup conflict. Our findings revealed that the negative consequences of living with intergroup tension are related to the use of stereotypes. At the same time, the results for moral judgments and evaluations about excluding peers provided positive results about the young children’s inclusive views regarding peer interactions. PMID:25741172

  5. Chemical and structural properties of Jordanian zeolitic tuffs and their admixtures with urea and thiourea: Potential scavengers for phenolics in aqueous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Yousef, R.I.; Tutunji, M.F.; Derwish, G.A.W.; Musleh, S.M.

    1999-08-15

    Native Jordanian zeolitic tuffs, rich in phillipsite, were treated with urea and thiourea. The chemical and structural properties of the tuffs and their urea and thiourea admixtures were studied using SEM, XRF, XRD, and FTIR techniques, and their adsorption capacities were estimated by the methylene blue method. The urea and thiourea treatment has not affected the mineral constitution of the tuffs. The results revealed that urea and thiourea were linked by hydrogen bonding through the NH{sub 2} moiety to the zeolite substrate, with urea showing the strongest effect. Experiments were carried out to investigate the possible use of the prepared materials for the removal of phenol and chlorinated phenols from aqueous solutions. Although thiourea caused a reduction in the relative surface area, both urea and thiourea admixtures were more effective than the free zeolitic tuff in the removal of phenol and chlorinated phenols from water, with urea admixture displaying the largest removal capacity.

  6. Effect of mint drink on metabolism of nicotine as measured by nicotine to cotinine ratio in urine of Jordanian smoking volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Abdulrahman M; Salhab, Abdulazim S; Arafat, Tawfiq A; Irshaid, Yacoub M

    2011-08-01

    Variation in nicotine metabolism may be due to genetic alterations in CYP 2A6, environmental factors, and diet. The purpose of this research was to evaluate mint drink effect on nicotine metabolism as judged by nicotine/cotinine ratio in urine of Jordanian smokers. Twenty-four Jordanian smoker volunteers were allocated randomly into two groups. They either received mint drink 3 times a day for 1 week during the mint drink period or avoided menthol-containing products and mint drink for 1 week during the off-menthol period. One group treatment sequence was mint drink, off-menthol, while the other group treatment was off-menthol, mint drink. Early morning urine samples were collected at baseline and at the end of each period. Samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for the nicotine and cotinine concentrations. Nicotine/cotinine ratio was calculated and compared among the different periods for each participant using the paired t test. All participants showed a consistent pattern of higher nicotine/cotinine ratios during mint drink compared with off-menthol periods, although to a variable extent. Mean nicotine/cotinine ratio during mint drink for all participants (1.327 ± 0.707) was higher than that during off-menthol (0.993 ± 0.547). Paired t test statistical analysis revealed a p < .0001. The mean difference in nicotine/cotinine ratio between the two periods was (-0.335), and the 95% confidence interval of the mean difference was (-0.451) - (-0.219). Mint drink increased nicotine/cotinine ratio in urine, suggesting a reduction in conversion of nicotine to cotinine.

  7. “Would a man smell a rose then throw it away?” Jordanian men’s perspectives on women's breast cancer and breast health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most common malignancy afflicting women, and the most common cancer overall in Jordan. A woman’s decision to go for screening is influenced by her social support network. This study aims to explore Jordanian men’s individual and contextual perspectives on women’s breast cancer and their own role in the breast health of the females within their families. Methods An explorative qualitative design was used to purposively recruit 24 married men aged 27 to 65 years (median 43 years) from four governorates in Jordan. Data in the form of interviews transcriptions was subjected to qualitative content analysis. Results Three themes were identified: a) Supporting one’s wife; b) Marital needs and obligations; c) Constrained by a culture of destiny and shame. The first theme was built on men’s feelings of responsibility for the family’s health and well-being, their experiences of encouraging their wives to seek health care and their providing counselling and instrumental support. The second theme emerged from men’s views about other men’s rejection of a wife inflicted by breast cancer, their own perceptions of diminished femininity due to mastectomy and their own concerns about protecting the family from the hereditary risk of breast cancer. The third theme was seen in men’s perception of breast cancer as an inevitable act of God that is far away from one’s own family, in associating breast cancer with improper behaviour and in their readiness to face the culture of Eib (shame). Conclusions Jordanian men perceive themselves as having a vital role in supporting, guiding and encouraging their wives to follow breast cancer early detection recommendations. Breast health awareness campaigns could involve husbands to capitalize on family support. PMID:24160268

  8. The impact of body mass index and Western advertising and media on eating style, body image and nutrition transition among Jordanian women.

    PubMed

    Madanat, Hala N; Brown, Ralph B; Hawks, Steven R

    2007-10-01

    To identify the impact of body mass index (BMI) and Western advertising and media on the stage of the nutrition transition among Jordanian women, and to evaluate their impact on eating styles and body image. A randomised cross-sectional survey that included a variety of culturally measured Likert-type scales and body size images. In addition, BMI was calculated based on measured height and weight. In the homes of the participants. The data were collected by female interviewers who worked for the Jordan Department of Statistics. The sample was based on a random and representative selection of 800 mostly urban Jordanian women. A pre-test sample of 100 women was also used to validate the instruments. Women tended to agree that they ate based on emotional cues. They had high levels of disordered eating attitudes and behaviours and 42.1% were considered restrained eaters. However, these women also had higher than expected body esteem levels and desired a healthy body size. As expected, being obese was associated with a desire to lose weight, being a restrained and emotional eater, and having more disordered eating attitudes and behaviours. Similarly, Western advertising and media were associated with restrained and emotional eating, desired weight loss, and disordered eating attitudes and behaviours. There is a need to develop health education materials that explain the influence of obesity on health and the negative psychological and physical consequences of restrained and emotional eating, building on the current cultural preferences of healthy body size. Further implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  9. Conflict management style of Jordanian nurse managers and its relationship to staff nurses' intent to stay.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamdan, Zaid; Nussera, Hayat; Masa'deh, Rami

    2016-03-01

    To explore the relationship between conflict management styles used by nurse managers and intent to stay of staff nurses. Nursing shortages require managers to focus on the retention of staff nurses. Understanding the relationship between conflict management styles of nurse managers and intent to stay of staff nurses is one strategy to retain nurses in the workforce. A cross-sectional descriptive quantitative study was carried out in Jordan. The Rahim organization conflict inventory II (ROCI II) was completed by 42 nurse managers and the intent to stay scale was completed by 320 staff nurses from four hospitals in Jordan. The anova analysis was carried out. An integrative style was the first choice for nurse managers and the last choice was a dominating style. The overall level of intent to stay for nurses was moderate. Nurses tend to keep their current job for 2-3 years. There was a negative relationship between the dominating style as a conflict management style and the intent to stay for nurses. The findings of the present study support the claim that leadership practices affect the staff nurses' intent to stay and the quality of care. Nurse managers can improve the intent to stay for staff nurses if they use the appropriate conflict management styles. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Monitoring of sinkholes and subsidence affecting the Jordanian coast of the Dead Sea through Synthetic Aperture Radar data and last generation Sentinel-1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessari, Giulia; Riccardi, Paolo; Lecci, Daniele; Pasquali, Paolo; Floris, Mario

    2017-04-01

    Since the mid-1980s the coast of the Dead Sea is affected by sinkholes occurring over and around the emerged mud and salt flats. Strong subsidence and landslides also affect some segments of the coast. Nowadays, several thousands of sinkholes attest that the degradation of the Dead Sea coast is worsening. Furthermore, soil deformations are interesting the main streets running along both the Israeli and Jordanian sides of the Dead Sea. These hazards are due to the dramatic dropping of the Dead Sea level, characterized by an increasing rate from about 60 cm/yr in the 1970s up to 1 m/yr in the 2000s, which provokes a lowering of the fresh-saline groundwater interface, replacing the hypersaline groundwater with fresh water and causing a consequent erosion of the subsurface salt layers. Subsidence, sinkholes, river erosion and landslides damage bridges, roads, dikes, houses, factories worsening this ongoing disaster. One of the most emblematic effects is the catastrophic collapse of a 12-km newly constructed dyke, located on the Lisan Peninsula (Jordan), occurred in 2000. Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) techniques and Advanced stacking DInSAR techniques (A-DInSAR) were applied to investigate sinkholes and subsidence affecting the Jordanian coast of the Dead Sea. The use of SAR data already proof to be efficient on the risk management of the area, allowing to identify a vulnerable portion of an Israeli highway, averting a possible collapse. Deformation analysis has been focused on the Ghor Al Haditha area and Lisan peninsula, located in the South-Eastern part of the lake coast. The availability of a huge database of SAR data, since the beginning of the 90s, allowed to observe the evolution of the displacements which are damaging this area. Furthermore, last generation Sentinel-1 data, acquired by the ESA mission, were processed to obtain information about the recent evolution of the subsidence and sinkholes affecting the study area, from

  11. The Effect of Micro/Nano-metrics Size on the Interaction of Jordanian Aluminosilicate Raw Materials with High pH Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldabsheh, Islam; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Martinez, Salvador

    2014-05-01

    Environmental preservation has become a driving force behind the search for new sustainable and environmentally friendly composites to replace conventional concrete produced from ordinary Portland cement (OPC). Current researches concentrate on developing building products (geopolymers) through geopolymerization. The goal is to produce low cost construction materials for green housing. Geopolymerization is the process of polymerizing minerals with high silica and alumina at low temperature by the use of alkali solutions. Dissolution is the most important process for supplying the high initial Al and Si concentrations to produce the gel phase that is responsible for geopolymerization. This study has been focused on the influence of different micrometric particle sizes of three Jordanian raw materials on their dissolution behavior in sodium hydroxide solution. The samples are kaolinite, volcanic tuff and silica sand. The dissolution properties of each material, alone and mixed with the other two materials were studied in different concentrations (5 and 10 M) using (NaOH) at 25ºC, and shaking time for 24 and 168 h. To better understand the dissolution process, the alkaline solution was renewed after the desired time in order to know if the Al-Si raw material is completely dissolved or not. Different analytical techniques were used to characterize raw materials physically, mineralogically, chemically and thermally. All processed samples either centrifuged solutions or solid residues were fully characterized. The leached concentrations of Al and Si were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP). X-ray Diffraction Technique (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used to evaluate the solid residue characterization compared with the original ones. The three aluminosilicate raw materials have indicated variable degrees of solubility under highly alkaline conditions. The method for the size reduction of the used raw

  12. Evaluation of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb in selected cosmetic products from Jordanian, Sudanese, and Syrian markets.

    PubMed

    Massadeh, A M; El-Khateeb, M Y; Ibrahim, S M

    2017-08-01

    There is no sufficient data that evaluate heavy metal content in cosmetic products in Jordan as well as Sudan and Syria. This study aims to assess metal levels which include Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Copper (Cu), Nickel (Ni), and Lead (Pb) in cosmetic products. These elements have draft limits because they are identified as potential impurities and are known to be toxic. This study aims to provide information to the population that may be beneficial to public health. Samples were collected from different brands obtained from markets in Jordan, Sudan, and Syria. Some of the selected cosmetic products were eyeliner, eye pencil, mascara, lipstick, powder, face cream, body cream, sun block, Vaseline, and the traditional eye cosmetic (kohl). The heavy metal content in these samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Based on analysis of variance analysis, a significant difference in heavy metal levels was found for samples obtained from Jordanian and Sudanese markets. The acid digestion method used in this study was based on procedures recommended by Nnorom et al. with some modifications as follows. (i) A weight of 2.0 g of cosmetic sample was dissolved in a mixture of 6 mL of high quality concentrated 69% nitric acid (HNO3; Merck, Darmstadt, Germany) and 4 mL of concentrated 37% hydrochloric acid (Scharlau, Spain) in a porcelain crucible and heated on a hotplate to near dryness. (ii) An aliquot of 15 mL HNO3 (1.00 M) was added to the digested sample and filtered through a Whatman No. 40 filter paper. (iii) The digested sample was transferred quantitatively into a 25 mL volumetric flask and then diluted with deionized water. (iv) Each digested sample was evaporated at 70 °C to about 1 mL and transferred into a polyethylene flask and diluted with 25 mL deionized water. (v) Blank was treated in the same procedure. In Jordan the concentration ranges of heavy metals in the collected samples were: Cd (0.03-0.10 μg/g), Cr (0.0-1.00

  13. The relations of Arab Jordanian adolescents' perceived maternal parenting to teacher-rated adjustment and problems: the intervening role of perceived need satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ikhlas; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Soenens, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Although the effects of important parenting dimensions, such as responsiveness and psychological control, are well documented among Western populations, research has only recently begun to systematically identify psychological processes that may account for the cross-cultural generalization of these effects. A first aim of this study was to examine whether perceived maternal responsiveness and psychological control would relate differentially to teacher ratings of adolescent adjustment in a vertical-collectivist society (i.e., Jordan). The most important aim of this study was to examine, on the basis of self-determination theory, whether these associations would be accounted for by perceived satisfaction of the basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Results in a large sample of Jordanian adolescents (N = 545) showed that perceived maternal psychological control and responsiveness yielded, respectively, a positive and negative association with teacher-rated problems, whereas psychological control was negatively related to teacher-rated adjustment. Further, these 2 parenting dimensions related to adjustment and problems via perceived satisfaction of the basic psychological needs for autonomy and competence (but not relatedness). The findings are discussed in light of the ongoing debate between universalistic and relativistic perspectives on parenting and adolescent adjustment.

  14. Waterpipe use and cognitive susceptibility to cigarette smoking among never-cigarette smoking Jordanian youth: analysis of the 2009 Global Youth Tobacco Survey.

    PubMed

    Kheirallah, Khalid A; Alzyoud, Sukaina; Ward, Kenneth D

    2015-03-01

    Susceptibility to cigarette smoking, defined as lack of a firm decision to not initiate smoking, predicts youth smoking initiation and experimentation and is a first step in the transition to regular smoking. This study investigated whether waterpipe (WP) smoking, an increasingly prevalent form of tobacco use among Arab adolescents, was associated with increased susceptibility to cigarette smoking. A secondary analysis of the 2009 Jordan Global Youth Tobacco Survey was conducted to assess the association between WP use and cigarette susceptibility, after adjusting for important confounders. A total of 1,476 youth aged 13-15 years old who had never smoked cigarettes were identified and represented 166,593 never-cigarette smoking Jordanian youth. We found 40% of boys and 29% of girls were susceptible to cigarette smoking, and both boys (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.41-1.54) and girls (AOR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.83-2.04) who had ever smoked WP were more susceptible to cigarette smoking than those who never smoked WP. This is the first study to report that WP use may increase youth's susceptibility to initiate cigarette smoking. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Readiness of organizations for change, motivation and conflict-handling intentions: senior nursing students' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Mrayyan, Majd T; Modallal, Rola; Awamreh, Khitam; Atoum, Maysoun; Abdullah, Muna; Suliman, Samah

    2008-03-01

    This study examined the perceptions of 62 senior nursing students of the readiness of Jordanian organizations for change, students' motivators and their conflict-handling intentions. Such concepts should be taught at Schools of Nursing in order to prepare the students as nurses in the near future. It is found that the course of "Nursing Leadership and Management" has positive influence on students' understanding of the studied concepts. This descriptive study was conducted in seven hospitals. Grossman and Valiga's (2000) [Grossman, S., Valiga, T.M., 2000. The New Leadership Challenge: Creating the Future of Nursing. F.A. Davis, Philadelphia, pp. 147-148.] instrument was used to measure the readiness of organizations for change. As they progress in the course, the students' perceptions about the organizational readiness to change increased; the students "somehow" perceived that the Jordanian organizations were ready to change. The students were asked what motivates and they were asked about their conflict-handling techniques. Senior nursing students reported that private hospitals were better than governmental hospitals in their readiness for change. In general, male students perceived the readiness of organizations for change more positively than female students. The students were mainly motivated by "achievement" and used "collaboration" as a primary conflict-handling technique. Further studies are needed to explore in-depth the concept of the readiness of organizations for change. Achievement is a strong motivator that should be encouraged among students. Conflict-handling techniques in general and collaboration in particular should be taught for nursing students as these techniques will influence their future professional lives.

  16. Heavy metal contents in growth bands of Porites corals: record of anthropogenic and human developments from the Jordanian Gulf of Aqaba.

    PubMed

    Al-Rousan, Saber A; Al-Shloul, Rashid N; Al-Horani, Fuad A; Abu-Hilal, Ahmad H

    2007-12-01

    In order to assess pollutants and impact of environmental changes in the coastal region of the Jordanian Gulf of Aqaba, concentrations of six metals were traced through variations in 5 years growth bands sections of recent Porties coral skeleton. X-radiography showed annual growth band patterns extending back to the year 1925. Baseline metal concentrations in Porites corals were established using 35 years-long metal record from late Holocene coral (deposited in pristine environment) and coral from reef that is least exposed to pollution in the marine reserve in the Gulf of Aqaba. The skeleton samples of the collected corals were acid digested and analyzed for their Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn content using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (FAAS). All metal profiles (except Fe and Zn) recorded the same metal signature from recent coral (1925-2005) in which low steady baseline levels were displayed in growth bands older than 1965, similar to those obtained from fossil and unpolluted corals. Most metals showed dramatic increase (ranging from 17% to 300%) in growth band sections younger than 1965 suggesting an extensive contamination of the coastal area since the mid sixties. This date represents the beginning of a period that witnessed increasing coastal activities, constructions and urbanization. This has produced a significant reduction in coral skeletal extension rates. Results from this study strongly suggest that Porites corals have a high tendency to accumulate heavy metals in their skeletons and therefore can serve as proxy tools to monitor and record environmental pollution (bioindicators) in the Gulf of Aqaba.

  17. A single-step extraction method for the determination of nicotine and cotinine in Jordanian smokers' blood and urine samples by RP-HPLC and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Massadeh, Adnan M; Gharaibeh, Ahmad A; Omari, Khaled W

    2009-02-01

    A simple, rapid, reliable, and low cost one-step extraction method is developed and validated for the determination of nicotine and cotinine in human plasma and urine in smokers using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The run times are 16 and 10 min for HPLC and GC-MS, respectively. The method is validated over a wide linear range of 1-5000 ng/mL with correlation coefficients being consistently greater than 0.9985. The criteria considered for validation are: limit of quantitation, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, specificity, and selectivity. This study is aimed to estimate the nicotine and cotinine in Jordanian smokers' blood and urine samples; to study the relationship between the concentration of nicotine in urine and plasma samples; and to investigate the effect of pH on the extraction of nicotine and cotinine in urine samples. In the presented study, one hundred blood and urine samples are collected from eighty smokers and twenty nonsmokers. Samples are taken from the same volunteer at the same time after each volunteer fills in a questionnaire. Results of nicotine concentrations in smokers' plasma are in the range of 181-3702 ng/mL with an average of 1263.1 ng/mL, whereas nicotine in urine samples is in the range of 1364-1972 ng/mL, with an average of 1618 ng/mL. Cotinine concentrations in smokers' plasma are in the range of 21-4420 ng/mL with an average of 379.4 ng/mL, whereas cotinine in urine is in the range of 6-3946 ng/mL with an average of 865 ng/mL. Statistical analysis indicates highly significant differences in nicotine and cotinine concentrations in smoker samples compared with nonsmoker samples (p<0.05).

  18. Is the use of plants in Jordanian folk medicine for the treatment of male sexual dysfunction scientifically based? Review of in vitro and in vivo human and animal studies.

    PubMed

    Abbas, M A

    2017-04-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is a serious problem which has an impact on the quality of life. In Jordanian folk medicine, 56 plant species were reported to be used by males to improve sexual potency and as aphrodisiacs. The aim of this study was to search for scientific evidence justifying their folk use. Of the 15 studied plants, only five were found to enhance spermatogenesis. The other 10 were reported to decrease spermatogenesis at least by one study. The majority of the studied plants possessed a protective effect on testis in different in vivo models as well as antioxidant activities. The effect of these plants on steroidogenesis and the hypothalamic-gonadal axis was also reviewed. The effect of only five plants was studied on sexual behaviour enhancement and three of them were active. Three of the four studied plants enhanced erection. The mechanism of action of active constituents isolated from the studied plants was also investigated. In conclusion, many plants used in Jordanian folk medicine decreased or had no effect on spermatogenesis in animal models. These plants have antioxidant and/or adaptogenic effects, and this may result in a beneficial action on male reproductive system.

  19. Measurement of natural radioactivity in Jordanian building materials and their contribution to the public indoor gamma dose rate.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, J M; Hamideen, M S

    2013-10-01

    This study is undertaken to determine the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in samples of commonly used building materials in Jordan. Samples of seven different materials were collected from construction sites and local agencies supplying raw construction materials and analyzed using a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer, taking into account self-attenuation in bulk samples. The average specific activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K ranged from 2.84 to 41.52, 0.78 to 58.42. and 3.74 to 897 Bq/kg, respectively. All the samples had radium equivalent activities well below the limit of 370 Bq/kg set by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, 1979). External and internal hazard indices, absorbed dose and annual effective dose rate associated with the radionuclides of interest were calculated and compared with the international legislation and guidance. In general, most of the activities did not exceed the recommended international limits, except for granite and ceramic samples which are usually used as secondary building materials in Jordan.

  20. Deep COI sequencing of standardized benthic samples unveils overlooked diversity of Jordanian coral reefs in the northern Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Al-Rshaidat, Mamoon M D; Snider, Allison; Rosebraugh, Sydney; Devine, Amanda M; Devine, Thomas D; Plaisance, Laetitia; Knowlton, Nancy; Leray, Matthieu

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of DNA barcodes (metabarcoding), particularly when combined with standardized sampling protocols, is one of the most promising approaches for censusing overlooked cryptic invertebrate communities. We present biodiversity estimates based on sequencing of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene for coral reefs of the Gulf of Aqaba, a semi-enclosed system in the northern Red Sea. Samples were obtained from standardized sampling devices (Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS)) deployed for 18 months. DNA barcoding of non-sessile specimens >2 mm revealed 83 OTUs in six phyla, of which only 25% matched a reference sequence in public databases. Metabarcoding of the 2 mm - 500 μm and sessile bulk fractions revealed 1197 OTUs in 15 animal phyla, of which only 4.9% matched reference barcodes. These results highlight the scarcity of COI data for cryptobenthic organisms of the Red Sea. Compared with data obtained using similar methods, our results suggest that Gulf of Aqaba reefs are less diverse than two Pacific coral reefs but much more diverse than an Atlantic oyster reef at a similar latitude. The standardized approaches used here show promise for establishing baseline data on biodiversity, monitoring the impacts of environmental change, and quantifying patterns of diversity at regional and global scales.

  1. Microbiological analysis, antimicrobial activity, and heavy-metals content of Jordanian Ma'in hot-springs water.

    PubMed

    Shakhatreh, Muhamad Ali K; Jacob, Jacob H; Hussein, Emad I; Masadeh, Majed M; Obeidat, Safwan M; Juhmani, Abdul-Salam F; Abd Al-Razaq, Mutaz A

    2017-02-14

    Ma'in hot springs are known as sites of balneotherapy. However, little is known about their microbiology and chemistry. In this study, we aim at evaluating the antimicrobial activity of Ma'in hot-springs water (MHSW), studying its microbiology, and determining its physicochemical properties including the heavy metals content. Therefore, water samples were collected from Ma'in hot springs and tested for antimicrobial activity using agar diffusion method. Water was then cultivated on nutrient agar to isolate and identify the dominant bacteria by chemical and molecular methods. The identified strains were tested by cross streak method to evaluate their antimicrobial activity against different clinical and standard strains. Finally, water samples were chemically analyzed and the heavy-metals content was assessed. Results revealed that MHSW was not active against any of the clinical isolates. Nevertheless, MHSW was found to be active against five standard bacterial strains, namely, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228 (inhibition zone: 20mm), Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 (inhibition zone: 19mm), Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341 (inhibition zone: 15.3mm), and Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778 (inhibition zone: 12.3mm). After cultivation of MHSW, five bacterial isolates were obtained and identified based on 16S rRNA gene analysis as new strains of Anoxybacillus flavithermus (identity percentage ranges between 96-99%). Physicochemical analysis revealed that the in situ temperature was 59°C, pH was 7.8, salinity was 1.6ppt, and dissolved oxygen was 3.8mgl(-1). In respect to heavy-metals content in MHSW, the following metals were present in the order: Cr (0.571ppm)>Mn(0.169ppm)>Fe (0.124ppm)>Zn (0.095)>Cu(0.070ppm)>Ni(0.058ppm)>Cd (0.023ppm)>Pb (0ppm). Cd, Cr, Ni and Mn were found to be higher than permissible levels set by international organizations and countries. This study highlights new chemical and microbiological data about Ma'in hot springs.

  2. Remnants of Miocene fluvial sediments in the Negev Desert, Israel, and the Jordanian Plateau: Evidence for an extensive subsiding basin in the northwestern margins of the Arabian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberman, Ezra; Calvo, Ran

    2013-06-01

    Relics of a thick, widely spread, fluvial sequence of Early Miocene age are scattered throughout southern Israel, eastern Sinai, the Dead Sea Rift Valley and the western margins of the Jordanian Plateau. These relics are mainly preserved in structural lows, karstic systems, and abandoned stream valleys. The paleogeography of this fluvial system was reconstructed based on the relations between the sequence remnants and the main structural and morphological features of the southeastern Levant region. Three sedimentary associations were identified in the Miocene sequence: a lower part dominated by locally derived clastic sediments; a thicker middle part, composed mostly of far-field allochthonous clastic sediments; and an upper part composed of local as well as allochthonous sediments. The two lower parts are regionally distributed whereas the upper part is syn-tectonic and confined to the Dead Sea basin and the Karkom graben in the central Negev. The composition of the far-field allochthonous sediments points to a provenance of Precambrian crystalline rocks of the Arabo-Nubian massif that were exposed along the uplifted shoulders of the Red Sea Rift as the upper drainage basin of the fluvial system. The diverse mammal remains found in this fluvial sequence suggest a complex of savanna, forests and fluvial habitats similar to those of present East Africa, with monsoon-type rains, which were the dominant water source of the rivers. The thickness of the Miocene sequence in the central Negev is at least 1700 m, similar to that of the subsurface sequence encountered in the Dead Sea basin. This similarity suggests that both were parts of an extensive subsiding sedimentary basin that developed between the Neo-Tethys and the uplifted margins of the Red Sea. The relations between the reconstructed pre-depositional landscape of southern Israel during the Early Miocene and the overlying fluvial sequence indicate that the entire area was buried under several hundred meters of

  3. English in the Jordanian Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamdan, Jihad M.; Hatab, Wafa A. Abu

    2009-01-01

    The paper explores the status of English in Jordan as reflected in newspaper job advertisements (ads) published in 1985, 1995 and 2005, and English language documents in the educational domain. The study shows a steady increase in the percentage of English ads paralleled with a steady decrease in the percentage of Arabic ads. Further, it reports a…

  4. Use of the Arabic version of Oral Health Impact Profile-14 to evaluate the impact of periodontal disease on oral health-related quality of life among Jordanian adults.

    PubMed

    Al Habashneh, Rola; Khader, Yousef S; Salameh, Shatha

    2012-03-01

    We used the short-form of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) to assess the impact of periodontal diseases on the quality of life of Jordanian adults. A systematic random sample of 400 individuals was selected from patients referred to the periodontics clinic at the Dental Teaching Center in Irbid, Jordan. Those willing to participate were examined by specifically trained dentists and requested to complete the Arabic short-form version of the OHIP-14 questionnaire. Multivariate analysis of differences in OHIP-14 subscales among the periodontal disease groups was conducted using the general linear model multivariate procedure. This study included 400 adults (164 men and 236 women) aged between 18 and 60 years, with a mean (SD) of 36.7 (11.9) years. Of the 400 participants, 41.8% had chronic gingivitis, 19.8% had mild periodontitis, 23.3% had moderate periodontitis, and 15.3% had severe periodontitis. "Fairly often" or "very often" was reported for one or more items of the OHIP-14 by fewer than one-third of patients with gingivitis (32.9%) or mild periodontitis (31.6%), by about one-half of patients with moderate periodontitis (53.8%), and by about two-thirds of those with severe periodontitis (63.9%). There was a statistically significant association between the severity of periodontal disease and OHIP-14 scores (P < 0.05). Severe chronic periodontitis had a significantly greater impact on quality of life, specifically with regard to physical pain and physical disability (P < 0.05). Physical pain and physical disability were the dimensions most affected, and all OHIP-14 scores were significantly associated with severity of periodontal disease after adjusting for common confounders.

  5. The Effect of Contextual Material on Evolution in the Jordanian Secondary-School Curriculum on Students' Acceptance of the Theory of Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Baz, Theodora; El-Weher, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect the extent to which contextual material of a unit on "The origin and evolution of living organisms" included in the high-school biology curriculum in Jordan affected students' acceptance of the theory of evolution. The participants of this study consisted of 107 tenth-grade students randomly drawn…

  6. The Effect of Contextual Material on Evolution in the Jordanian Secondary-School Curriculum on Students' Acceptance of the Theory of Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Baz, Theodora; El-Weher, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect the extent to which contextual material of a unit on "The origin and evolution of living organisms" included in the high-school biology curriculum in Jordan affected students' acceptance of the theory of evolution. The participants of this study consisted of 107 tenth-grade students randomly drawn…

  7. Organization Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huse, Edgar F.

    1978-01-01

    Organization Development (OD) is the application of behavioral-science knowledge to enhance an organization's effectiveness and efficiency. This article discusses the evolution of organization development, the basic components of an OD program, typologies of OD interventions, problems with organization development, and organization development in…

  8. Organ Donation

    MedlinePlus

    Organ donation takes healthy organs and tissues from one person for transplantation into another. Experts say that the ... lungs Skin Bone and bone marrow Cornea Most organ and tissue donations occur after the donor has died. But some ...

  9. Potential of organic filter materials for treating greywater to achieve irrigation quality: a review.

    PubMed

    Dalahmeh, Sahar S; Hylander, Lars D; Vinnerås, Björn; Pell, Mikael; Oborn, Ingrid; Jönsson, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this literature review were to: (i) evaluate the impact of greywater generated in rural communities, with the emphasis on Jordanian conditions, on soil, plant and public health and assess the need for treatment of this greywater before it is used for irrigation, and (ii) assess the potential of different types of organic by-products as carrier material in different filter units for removal of pollutants from greywater. Greywater with high BOD5, COD, high concentrations of SS, fat, oil and grease and high levels of surfactants is commonly found in rural areas in Jordan. Oxygen depletion, odour emission, hydrophobic soil phenomena, plant toxicity, blockage of piping systems and microbiological health risks are common problems associated with greywater without previous treatment. Organic by-products such as wood chips, bark, peat, wheat straw and corncob may be used as carrier material in so-called mulch filters for treating wastewater and greywater from different sources. A down-flow-mode vertical filter is a common setup used in mulch filters. Wastewaters with a wide range of SS, cBOD5 and COD fed into different mulch filters have been studied. The different mulch materials achieved SS removal ranging between 51 and 91%, a BOD5 reduction range of 55-99.9%, and COD removal of 51-98%. Most types of mulches achieved a higher organic matter removal than that achieved by an ordinary septic tank. Bark, peat and wood chips filters removed organic matter better than sand and trickling filters, under similar conditions. Release of filter material and increase in COD in the effluent was reported using some mulch materials. In conclusion, some mulch materials such as bark, peat and woodchips seem to have a great potential for treatment of greywater in robust, low-tech systems. They can be expected to be resilient in dealing with variable low and high organic loads and shock loads.

  10. Organ Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Living Donor About the Operation Financing Living Donation Home / Before The Transplant / Organ Facts Organ Facts Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney ... Contacting my donor family Data Facts about living donation Financing a transplant Matching organs Member directory Newsroom Online store Stories of hope ...

  11. Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Arthur

    2009-03-01

    In recent years a broad range of magnetoresistance phenomena have been reported for organic-based semiconductors, conductors and magnets. Organic systems illustrating magnetoresistance, include molecular- and polymer-based nonmagnetic semiconductors[1], organic-based spin polarized magnetic semiconductors,[2] nonmagnetic conducting polymers, and ferromagnet/organic semiconductor/ferromagnet heterojunctions. Examples of each of these organic-based systems will be presented together with a discussion of the roles of magnetotransport mechanisms including interconversion of singlets and triplets, compression of the electronic wavefunction in presence of a magnetic field, quantum interference phenomena, effects of a ``Coulomb gap'' in π* subbands of organic magnetic semiconductors with resulting near complete spin polarization in conduction and valence bands of magnetic organic semiconductors.[2,3] Opportunities for magnetotransport in Ferromagnet/Organic Semiconductor/Ferromagnet heterojunctions will be discussed.[4] [4pt] [1] V.N. Prigodin et al., Synth. Met. 156, 757 (2006); J.D. Bergeson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 067201 (2008) [0pt] [2] V.N. Prigodin et al., Adv. Mater. 14, 1230 (2002. [0pt] [3] J.B. Kortright et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, 257204 (2008). [0pt] [4] J.D. Bergeson, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 172505 (2008).

  12. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  13. Organic food.

    PubMed

    Jukes, T H

    1977-01-01

    "Organic" or "organically grown" foods are commonly represented as "food grown without pesticides; grown without artificial fertilizers; grown in soil whose humus content is increased by the additions of organic matter; grown in soil whose mineral content is increased with applications of natural mineral fertilizers; has not been treated with preservatives, hormones, antibiotics etc." The substitution of "organic" for "chemical" fertilizers during the growth of plants produces no change in the nutritional or chemical properties of foods. All foods are made of "chemicals." Traces of pesticides have been reported to be present in about 20 to 30% of both "organic" and conventional foods. These traces are usually within the official tolerance levels. Such levels are set low enough to protect consumers adequately. Indeed, there is no record of a single case of injury to a consumer resulting from the application of pesticides to food crops at permitted levels.

  14. Organic spintronics.

    PubMed

    Bergenti, I; Dediu, V; Prezioso, M; Riminucci, A

    2011-08-13

    Organic semiconductors are emerging materials in the field of spintronics. Successful achievements include their use as a tunnel barrier in magnetoresistive tunnelling devices and as a medium for spin-polarized current in transport devices. In this paper, we give an overview of the basic concepts of spin transport in organic semiconductors and present the results obtained in the field, highlighting the open questions that have to be addressed in order to improve devices performance and reproducibility. The most challenging perspectives will be discussed and a possible evolution of organic spin devices featuring multi-functional operation is presented.

  15. Organic Nomenclature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, David B.; Yindra, Laura R.

    2003-10-01

    Organic Nomenclature requires the following software, which is available for free download from the Internet: Netscape Navigator, version 6.2 or higher, or Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 5.0 or higher.

  16. Organic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mielke

    2009-02-27

    Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

  17. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Karl

    2016-08-01

    Organic photovoltaics are on the verge of revolutionizing building-integrated photovoltaics. For other applications, however, several basic open scientific questions need answering to, in particular, further improve energy-conversion efficiency and lifetime.

  18. Prevalence of colour blindness in young Jordanians.

    PubMed

    Al-Aqtum, M T; Al-Qawasmeh, M H

    2001-01-01

    Colour blindness is one of the common genetic disorders observed in all human populations. It is a sex-linked recessive trait. The genes are located on the X chromosome within the Xq28 band. 1,418 university students (1,200 female and 218 male) from Zarka Private University and the Hashemite University were randomly selected and tested for congenital red/green colour blindness, by using Ishihara pseudo-isochromatic colour plates. A total of 23 individuals were found to be colour blind. In females, 4 students (0.33%) were colour blind: 1 of them showed protanomalia, 1 protanopia and 2 deuteranomalia. In males, 19 students (8.72%) were colour blind: 4 showed protanomalia, 3 protanopia, 8 deuteranomalia and 4 deuteranopia. The allelic frequencies of the colour vision gene were found to be 0.087 in males, 0.003 in females and 0.016 in the total population. Studies on colour blindness in Jordan are very few; this population-based investigation is meant to fill a gap in this field.

  19. Dentistry for Jordanians with special needs.

    PubMed

    Waldman, H Barry; Perlman, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    There are thousands of residents with disabilities in Jordan. Despite national legislation to assure individuals with disabilities needed services, including education and employment, social inclusion of these individuals is difficult since societal views exclude them from functioning as members of a community. While there are no national studies of the dental needs of individuals with disabilities in Jordan, local reports indicates limited use of dental services and the need for increased oral hygiene and restorative services. Examples of dental education accreditation standards in other countries are used as models for the improvement in the preparation of dental students to provide services for individuals with special needs.

  20. PIXE analysis of ancient Jordanian pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Naser; Carlsson, Lars-Eric; Hallak, Awni B.; Bennet, Crystal

    1981-03-01

    Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been applied for the determination of 18 elements (Si, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba and Pb) in two groups of pottery from two different sites in Jordan, Biblical Bozrah (BB) and Amman Citadel (AC). The analysis showed that the elements Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr and Ba were the most useful elements to study to be able to differentiate between the two groups of pottery.

  1. Agrammatism in Jordanian-Arabic Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albustanji, Yusuf Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Agrammatism is a frequent sequela of Broca's aphasia that manifests itself in omission and/or substitution of the grammatical morphemes in spontaneous and constrained speech. The hierarchical structure of syntactic trees has been proposed as an account for difficulty across grammatical morphemes (e.g., tense, agreement, and negation). Supporting…

  2. Heuristic Evaluation of Three Jordanian University Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasan, Layla

    2013-01-01

    Generally, universities have complex and large websites, which include a collection of many sub-sites related to the different parts of universities (e.g. registration unit, faculties, departments). Managers of academic institutions and educational websites need to know types of usability problems that could be found on their websites. This would…

  3. [Artificial organs].

    PubMed

    Raguin, Thibaut; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Debry, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Research has been fighting against organ failure and shortage of donations by supplying artificial organs for many years. With the raise of new technologies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, many organs can benefit of an artificial equivalent: thanks to retinal implants some blind people can visualize stimuli, an artificial heart can be proposed in case of cardiac failure while awaiting for a heart transplant, artificial larynx enables laryngectomy patients to an almost normal life, while the diabetic can get a glycemic self-regulation controlled by smartphones with an artificial device. Dialysis devices become portable, as well as the oxygenation systems for terminal respiratory failure. Bright prospects are being explored or might emerge in a near future. However, the retrospective assessment of putative side effects is not yet sufficient. Finally, the cost of these new devices is significant even if the advent of three dimensional printers may reduce it. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  4. Organizing chordates with an organizer.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi; D'Aniello, Salvatore; Escrivà, Hector

    2007-07-01

    Understanding how the chordate body plan originated and evolved is still controversial. The discovery by Spemann and Mangold in 1924 of the vertebrate organizer and its inductive properties in patterning the AP and DV axis was followed by a long gap until the 1960s when scientists started characterizing the molecular events responsible for such inductions. However, the evolutionary origin of the organizer itself remained obscure until very recently; did it appear together with the origin and radiation of vertebrates, or was it a chordate affair? A recent study by Yu and collaborators,1 which analyses the expression of several organizer-specific genes in amphioxus together with recent phylogenetic data that reversed the position of invertebrate extant chordates (e.g. urochordates and cephalochordates), indicates that the organizer probably appeared in early chordates. It likely had separate signalling centres generating BMP and Wnt signalling gradients along the DV and AP axis. The organizer was then lost in the urochordate lineage, most probably as an adaptation to a rapid and determinate development.

  5. Textual Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, David G.

    Aside from phonological and syntactical structures, text is organized by its dramatis personae, plot, figures, point of view, and theme. These are, respectively, the entities mentioned, the spatial-temporal and causal linkages of events, comparisons and contrasts, propositional attitudes, and correspondence to some pattern. These modes of…

  6. Classroom Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Good organization skills are key to running an efficient classroom, and having the right tools makes it easier to manage all of the tasks, save time, and be more productive. Having the power of information when and where anyone need it makes a difference in how well any teacher runs the classroom and knows his or her students. A Palm handheld…

  7. IVS Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  8. Organized DFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takashi; Honma, Michio; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Iriki, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Miyazaki, Norihiko; Onodera, Toshio; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Arima, Sumika; Kadota, Kazuya

    2009-04-01

    The category and objective of DFM production management are shown. DFM is not limited to an activity within a particular unit process in design and process. A new framework for DFM is required. DFM should be a total solution for the common problems of all processes. Each of them must be linked to one another organically. After passing through the whole of each process on the manufacturing platform, quality of final products is guaranteed and products are shipped to the market. The information platform is layered with DFM, APC, and AEC. Advanced DFM is not DFM for partial optimization of the lithography process and the design, etc. and it should be Organized DFM. They are managed with high-level organizational IQ. The interim quality between each step of the flow should be visualized. DFM will be quality engineering if it is Organized DFM and common metrics of the quality are provided. DFM becomes quality engineering through effective implementation of common industrial metrics and standardized technology. DFM is differential technology, but can leverage standards for efficient development.

  9. Organic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jérome, D.

    1994-10-01

    The discovery of organic superconductors in 1980 was an happy conclusion of a search for high T c superconductors (although T c was modestly in the Kelvin range). The first generation of organic superconductors belonged to a large family of quasi-one-dimensional conducting cation radical salts. Most of them exhibit a wide range of new phenomena, including the competition between ground states, the influence of a magnetic field on the non ordered phase of a quasi-one-dimensional electron gas and the onset of spin density wave phases at high magnetic field with quantized Hall effect. The extensive study of the (TM) 2X series has shown that electron interactions are repulsive and of the order of the electron bandwidth. However, the nature of the ground states relies essentially on the balance between charge localisation boosted by the Umklapp scattering and the interchain hopping intergal. Second and third generation organic superconductors are two and three dimensional molecular conductors respectively with maximum T c of 12K (ET) 2X and 33 K (fullerides).

  10. Organic superconductors.

    PubMed

    Saito, Gunzi; Yoshida, Yukihiro

    2011-06-01

    The present status of organic superconductors of charge-transfer (CT) type based on donor molecules is reviewed. Along with the superconducting phases of such materials and also of oxide superconductors, reside spin-ordered phases such as spin-density wave (SDW) and antiferromagnetic (AF) phases. We briefly describe the recent development of superconductors having a superconducting phase next to a spin-disorder state (quantum spin liquid state). In addition to the CT type superconductors, there are a few single-component superconductors under high pressure.

  11. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Krebs, Frederik C.; Chen, Hongzheng

    2013-12-01

    Energy inflation, the constant encouragement to economize on energy consumption and the huge investments in developing alternative energy resources might seem to suggest that there is a global shortage of energy. Far from it, the energy the Sun beams on the Earth each hour is equivalent to a year's supply, even at our increasingly ravenous rate of global energy consumption [1]. But it's not what you have got it's what you do with it. Hence the intense focus on photovoltaic research to find more efficient ways to harness energy from the Sun. Recently much of this research has centred on organic solar cells since they offer simple, low-cost, light-weight and large-area flexible photovoltaic structures. This issue with guest editors Frederik C Krebs and Hongzheng Chen focuses on some of the developments at the frontier of organic photovoltaic technology. Improving the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic systems, while maintaining the inherent material, economic and fabrication benefits, has absorbed a great deal of research attention in recent years. Here significant progress has been made with reports now of organic photovoltaic devices with efficiencies of around 10%. Yet operating effectively across the electromagnetic spectrum remains a challenge. 'The trend is towards engineering low bandgap polymers with a wide optical absorption range and efficient hole/electron transport materials, so that light harvesting in the red and infrared region is enhanced and as much light of the solar spectrum as possible can be converted into an electrical current', explains Mukundan Thelakkat and colleagues in Germany, the US and UK. In this special issue they report on how charge carrier mobility and morphology of the active blend layer in thin film organic solar cells correlate with device parameters [2]. The work contributes to a better understanding of the solar-cell characteristics of polymer:fullerene blends, which form the material basis for some of the most

  12. The Organic Solid State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Dwaine O.; Wlygul, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews interesting and useful electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of the organic solid state. Offers speculation as to areas of fruitful research. Discusses organic superconductors, conducting organic polymers, organic metals, and traces recent history of creation of organic metals. (JM)

  13. The Organic Solid State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Dwaine O.; Wlygul, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews interesting and useful electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of the organic solid state. Offers speculation as to areas of fruitful research. Discusses organic superconductors, conducting organic polymers, organic metals, and traces recent history of creation of organic metals. (JM)

  14. Ordered organic-organic multilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lunt, Richard R.

    2016-04-05

    An ordered multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure is formed by depositing at least two layers of thin film crystalline organic materials successively wherein the at least two thin film layers are selected to have their surface energies within .+-.50% of each other, and preferably within .+-.15% of each other, whereby every thin film layer within the multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure exhibit a quasi-epitaxial relationship with the adjacent crystalline organic thin film.

  15. Ordered organic-organic multilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Lunt, Richard R

    2015-01-13

    An ordered multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure is formed by depositing at least two layers of thin film crystalline organic materials successively wherein the at least two thin film layers are selected to have their surface energies within .+-.50% of each other, and preferably within .+-.15% of each other, whereby every thin film layer within the multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure exhibit a quasi-epitaxial relationship with the adjacent crystalline organic thin film.

  16. Influence of Selected Organic Micropollutants on Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Włodarczyk-Makuła, Maria

    2017-03-01

    This article describes the toxicity of organic micropollutants on tested microorganisms. Itis a current issue because organic micropollutants are identified in all elements of environmental (surface water, ground water, soils) and in food products. The organic micropollutants include: polychlorinated dibenzodioxyns PCDD, polychlorinated dibenzofurans PCDF, polychlorinated biphenyls PCB, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAH, halogenated compounds and by-products of water treatment. Some organic compounds cause hazard for health and human life due to their estrogenic biological activity, carcinogenic, mutagenic or teratogenic activity. The influence on organisms indicators of these compounds based on literature data were presented. The level of TEQ (toxic equivalency) in response to organic chlorine derivatives (PCDDs, PCDF, PCBs) is usually determined by toxic equivalency factor (TEF). The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies organic micropollutants as carcinogenic to humans (Group 1), possibly carcinogenic (Group 2A) or probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2B).

  17. Industrial Arts Student Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, James D.

    1980-01-01

    A national survey attempted to identify (1) the number and size of student organizations in industrial arts, (2) the perceptions that principals and guidance personnel had of the student organizations, and (3) the activities offered to student organization members. (LRA)

  18. A Scarcity of Organs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Areen, Judith

    1988-01-01

    Resistance to organ donation and the continuing shortage of donated organs is discussed and four legal approaches to organ acquisition are examined. A fifth, based on the principle of supported individual autonomy, is proposed. (MSE)

  19. A Scarcity of Organs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Areen, Judith

    1988-01-01

    Resistance to organ donation and the continuing shortage of donated organs is discussed and four legal approaches to organ acquisition are examined. A fifth, based on the principle of supported individual autonomy, is proposed. (MSE)

  20. Agriculture: Organic Farming

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Organic Farming - Organically grown food is food grown and processed using no synthetic fertilizers or pesticides. Pesticides derived from natural sources (such as biological pesticides) may be used in producing organically grown food.

  1. Organ transplant group formed.

    PubMed

    Gunby, Phil

    1983-10-28

    In response to a call from Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, the American Council on Transplantation (ACT)--a federation of organizations, health professionals, and others interested in human organ donation--has been organized and expects to hold its first formal meeting in January 1984. ACT's goals include ensuring equitable access to available organs, promoting effective use of multiple organ donations, improving donor identification and referral, and motivating the public to donate organs.

  2. Yersinia enterocolitica organism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture shows the organism Yersinia enterocolitica . Yersinia organisms cause a wide range of disease but are most often associated with diarrhea or gastrointestinal symptoms. Yersinia infection ...

  3. Successful organic dairy systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Demand for organic dairy products has continually increased and at times outpaced supply for a number of years. This has created favorable milk pricing for certified organic dairy farmers, as the stability of organic milk prices has provided organic dairy farmers with a security not found in the con...

  4. Learning Organization Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on learning organization issues. "How Action Learning Builds the Learning Organization: A Conceptual Analysis" (Michael Marquardt, Ty Alexander) is a systematic examination of four subsystems of learning organizations (learning dynamics, organization renewal, people empowerment, knowledge…

  5. Soluble organic nutrient fluxes

    Treesearch

    Robert G. Qualls; Bruce L. Haines; Wayne Swank

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives in this study were (i) compare fluxes of the dissolved organic nutrients dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in a clearcut area and an adjacent mature reference area. (ii) determine whether concentrations of dissolved organic nutrients or inorganic nutrients were greater in clearcut areas than in reference areas,...

  6. Learning Organization Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on learning organization issues. "How Action Learning Builds the Learning Organization: A Conceptual Analysis" (Michael Marquardt, Ty Alexander) is a systematic examination of four subsystems of learning organizations (learning dynamics, organization renewal, people empowerment, knowledge…

  7. From Learning Organization to Practically Wise Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Jennifer; Gibbs, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although the notion of wisdom confronts the economic rationale of business organizations, this paper aims to argue that organizations are coming under increasing pressure not only to learn, change and adapt, but also to take actions that are ethically acceptable and respond to the expectations of multiple stakeholders, or in other words…

  8. From Learning Organization to Practically Wise Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Jennifer; Gibbs, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although the notion of wisdom confronts the economic rationale of business organizations, this paper aims to argue that organizations are coming under increasing pressure not only to learn, change and adapt, but also to take actions that are ethically acceptable and respond to the expectations of multiple stakeholders, or in other words…

  9. Organizing and "The Social Psychology of Organizing."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bantz, Charles R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes Karl E. Weick's role in developing organizational communication research and illustrates how others have adopted and utilized some of his pivotal concepts. Summarizes ways in which ongoing research has enhanced understanding of organizing as communicating, organizing as sense-making, and organizational culture. (SG)

  10. Physics of Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brütting, Wolfgang

    2005-08-01

    Filling the gap in the literature currently available, this book presents an overview of our knowledge of the physics behind organic semiconductor devices. Contributions from 18 international research groups cover various aspects of this field, ranging from the growth of organic layers and crystals, their electronic properties at interfaces, their photophysics and electrical transport properties to the application of these materials in such different devices as organic field-effect transistors, photovoltaic cells and organic light-emitting diodes. From the contents: * Excitation Dynamics in Organic Semiconductors * Organic Field-Effect Transistors * Spectroscopy of Organic Semiconductors * Interfaces between Organic Semiconductors and Metals * Analysis and Modeling of Devices * Exciton Formation and Energy Transfer in Organic Light Emitting Diodes * Deposition and Characterization

  11. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  12. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs when the tissue and muscles of the pelvic floor no longer support the pelvic organs resulting in ... organ prolapse. Supporting muscles and tissue of the pelvic floor may become torn or stretched because of labor ...

  13. Organic Pesticide Ingredients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control a pest Integrated Pest Management What are pesticides? Herbicides Disinfectants Fungicides Insecticides Natural and Biological Pesticides ... Other types of pesticides Disponible en español Organic Pesticide Ingredients Organic foods are not necessarily pesticide-free. ...

  14. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  15. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  16. Organic Electrolyte Permselective Membranes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ORGANIC SOLVENTS), (*STORAGE BATTERIES, (*BATTERY SEPARATORS, MEMBRANES ), (* MEMBRANES , TRANSPORT PROPERTIES), LITHIUM, COPPER COMPOUNDS, DIFFUSION, CHLORIDES, IONS, ELECTRODIALYSIS , ION EXCHANGE RESINS.

  17. Cultural Issues in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on cultural issues in organizations. "Emotion Management and Organizational Functions: A Study of Action in a Not-for-Profit Organization" (Jamie Callahan Fabian) uses Hochschild's emotion systems theory and Parsons' social systems theory to explain why members of an organization managed their…

  18. The Semantic Learning Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sicilia, Miguel-Angel; Lytras, Miltiadis D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is introducing the concept of a "semantic learning organization" (SLO) as an extension of the concept of "learning organization" in the technological domain. Design/methodology/approach: The paper takes existing definitions and conceptualizations of both learning organizations and Semantic Web technology to develop…

  19. Organic watermelon production systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The increasing perception by consumers that organic food tastes better and is healthier continues to expand the demand for organically produced crops. Research investigating certified organic production requires a systems approach to determine the optimum combination of individual components to max...

  20. Organ Harvesting and Transplants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskette, Kimberly G.; Ritz, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and animals need healthy organs to live. Due to medical conditions and accidents, some organs fail to function properly. For these reasons, the medical community has experimented and can now perform successful organ transplants, allowing patients to continue to live their lives. Many countries have medical programs where individuals can…

  1. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  2. Organic chemistry in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Organic cosmochemistry, organic materials in space exploration, and biochemistry of man in space are briefly surveyed. A model of Jupiter's atmosphere is considered, and the search for organic molecules in the solar system and in interstellar space is discussed. Materials and analytical techniques relevant to space exploration are indicated, and the blood and urine analyses performed on Skylab are described.

  3. Organic herbicide update

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weed research is the top research priority among organic producers. Very few chemical weed control options are approved for organic use (corn gluten meal, vinegar, clove oil, and most recently ammonium pelargonate ), but additional compounds are under investigation and pursuing organic approval. C...

  4. Inverted organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Bailey-Salzman, Rhonda F.

    2016-12-06

    The present disclosure relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices grown in an inverted manner. An inverted organic photosensitive optoelectronic device of the present disclosure comprises a reflective electrode, an organic donor-acceptor heterojunction over the reflective electrode, and a transparent electrode on top of the donor-acceptor heterojunction.

  5. Cultural Issues in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on cultural issues in organizations. "Emotion Management and Organizational Functions: A Study of Action in a Not-for-Profit Organization" (Jamie Callahan Fabian) uses Hochschild's emotion systems theory and Parsons' social systems theory to explain why members of an organization managed their…

  6. Organics go hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzani, Guglielmo; Petrozza, Annamaria; Caironi, Mario

    2017-01-01

    From displays to solar cells, the field of organic optoelectronics has come a long way over the past 50 years, but the realization of an electrically pumped organic laser remains elusive. The answer may lie with hybrid organic-inorganic materials called perovskites.

  7. The Semantic Learning Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sicilia, Miguel-Angel; Lytras, Miltiadis D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is introducing the concept of a "semantic learning organization" (SLO) as an extension of the concept of "learning organization" in the technological domain. Design/methodology/approach: The paper takes existing definitions and conceptualizations of both learning organizations and Semantic Web technology to develop…

  8. What is organic certification?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Certified organic crop production is a holistic approach to sustainable and healthy food production to enhance the well being of the consumer, while protecting natural resources. Organic certification was implemented by the National Organic Program (NOP) in 2002 in recognition of the necessity for c...

  9. Teaching Organic Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reemer, Rita, Ed.

    This teaching guide is designed as a text composed of factual outlines to help teachers interpret the organic method of gardening. Organized as a practical course for elementary through adult education levels, it presents examples and activities on how to plan, start, and maintain an organic garden. The first five chapters cover history and…

  10. Organizations as Social Inventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, T. Barr

    In discussing what is meant by the concept "organization," the author raises the questions, "What is an organization that it can have such a thing as a goal?" and, assuming it appropriate to speak of organizational goals, "how do the goals of individuals bear on those of the organization?" The author submits that answers to these questions raise…

  11. Organic chemistry in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Organic cosmochemistry, organic materials in space exploration, and biochemistry of man in space are briefly surveyed. A model of Jupiter's atmosphere is considered, and the search for organic molecules in the solar system and in interstellar space is discussed. Materials and analytical techniques relevant to space exploration are indicated, and the blood and urine analyses performed on Skylab are described.

  12. Teaching Organic Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reemer, Rita, Ed.

    This teaching guide is designed as a text composed of factual outlines to help teachers interpret the organic method of gardening. Organized as a practical course for elementary through adult education levels, it presents examples and activities on how to plan, start, and maintain an organic garden. The first five chapters cover history and…

  13. Organ Harvesting and Transplants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskette, Kimberly G.; Ritz, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and animals need healthy organs to live. Due to medical conditions and accidents, some organs fail to function properly. For these reasons, the medical community has experimented and can now perform successful organ transplants, allowing patients to continue to live their lives. Many countries have medical programs where individuals can…

  14. Challenges in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Beyar, Rafael

    2011-04-01

    Organ transplantation has progressed tremendously with improvements in surgical methods, organ preservation, and pharmaco-immunologic therapies and has become a critical pathway in the management of severe organ failure worldwide. The major sources of organs are deceased donors after brain death; however, a substantial number of organs come from live donations, and a significant number can also be obtained from non-heart-beating donors. Yet, despite progress in medical, pharmacologic, and surgical techniques, the shortage of organs is a worldwide problem that needs to be addressed internationally at the highest possible levels. This particular field involves medical ethics, religion, and society behavior and beliefs. Some of the critical ethical issues that require aggressive interference are organ trafficking, payments for organs, and the delicate balance in live donations between the benefit to the recipient and the possible harm to the donor and others. A major issue in organ transplantation is the definition of death and particularly brain death. Another major critical factor is the internal tendency of a specific society to donate organs. In the review below, we will discuss the various challenges that face organ donation worldwide, and particularly in Israel, and some proposed mechanisms to overcome this difficulty.

  15. Organs as inheritable property?

    PubMed

    Voo, Teck Chuan; Holm, Soren

    2014-01-01

    It has been argued that organs should be treated as individual tradable property like other material possessions and assets, on the basis that this would promote individual freedom and increase efficiency in addressing the shortage of organs for transplantation. If organs are to be treated as property, should they be inheritable? This paper seeks to contribute to the idea of organs as inheritable property by providing a defence of a default of the family of a dead person as inheritors of transplantable organs. In the course of discussion, various succession rules for organs and their justifications will be suggested. We then consider two objections to organs as inheritable property. Our intention here is to provoke further thought on whether ownership of one's body parts should be assimilated to property ownership.

  16. Organically bound tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Diabate, S.; Strack, S. )

    1993-12-01

    Tritium released into the environment may be incorporated into organic matter. Organically bound tritium in that case will show retention times in organisms that are considerably longer than those of tritiated water which has significant consequences on dose estimates. This article reviews the most important processes of organically bound tritium production and transport through food networks. Metabolic reactions in plant and animal organisms with tritiated water as a reaction partner are of great importance in this respect. The most important production process, in quantitative terms, is photosynthesis in green plants. The translocation of organically bound tritium from the leaves to edible parts of crop plants should be considered in models of organically bound tritium behavior. Organically bound tritium enters the human body on several pathways, either from the primary producers (vegetable food) or at a higher tropic level (animal food). Animal experiments have shown that the dose due to ingestion of organically bound tritium can be up to twice as high as a comparable intake of tritiated water in gaseous or liquid form. In the environment, organically bound tritium in plants and animals is often found to have higher specific tritium concentrations than tissue water. This is not due to some tritium enrichment effects but to the fact that no equilibrium conditions are reached under natural conditions. 66 refs.

  17. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Peumans, Peter; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2013-01-22

    A photoactive device is provided. The device includes a first electrode, a second electrode, and a photoactive region disposed between and electrically connected to the first and second electrodes. The photoactive region further includes an organic donor layer and an organic acceptor layer that form a donor-acceptor heterojunction. The mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region are different by a factor of at least 100, and more preferably a factor of at least 1000. At least one of the mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region is greater than 0.001 cm.sup.2/V-sec, and more preferably greater than 1 cm.sup.2/V-sec. The heterojunction may be of various types, including a planar heterojunction, a bulk heterojunction, a mixed heterojunction, and a hybrid planar-mixed heterojunction.

  18. Organic contaminant separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, Peter; Hemberger, Barbara J.

    1991-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a polyolefin tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.01 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the tube, (b) passing a solvent through the tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the tube. Further, a chromatographic apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a polyolefin tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.01 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the tube is disclosed.

  19. Organic matter in meteorites.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Jordi

    2004-12-01

    Some primitive meteorites are carbon-rich objects containing a variety of organic molecules that constitute a valuable record of organic chemical evolution in the universe prior to the appearance of microorganisms. Families of compounds include hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, amino acids, amines, amides, heterocycles, phosphonic acids, sulfonic acids, sugar-related compounds and poorly defined high-molecular weight macromolecules. A variety of environments are required in order to explain this organic inventory, including interstellar processes, gas-grain reactions operating in the solar nebula, and hydrothermal alteration of parent bodies. Most likely, substantial amounts of such organic materials were delivered to the Earth via a late accretion, thereby providing organic compounds important for the emergence of life itself, or that served as a feedstock for further chemical evolution. This review discusses the organic content of primitive meteorites and their relevance to the build up of biomolecules.

  20. Organized Improvisation: 20 Years of Organizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weick, Karl E.

    1989-01-01

    Uses 20 years of research on organizing as a way of viewing current research efforts and of laying a foundation for future efforts. Compares organizational adjustments to jazz improvisations. Argues that, because of the relationship between organizational quality and criticism, there is no need for the additional trappings of hierarchy, rules,…

  1. The Knowing Organization as Learning Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choo, Chun Wei

    2001-01-01

    In organizational knowledge cycles there is continuous flow of information between sensemaking, knowledge creation, and decision making. The outcome of information use in one provides the context and resources for use in another. The example of the World Health Organization's smallpox eradication program illustrates a continuous cycle of…

  2. The Knowing Organization as Learning Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choo, Chun Wei

    2001-01-01

    In organizational knowledge cycles there is continuous flow of information between sensemaking, knowledge creation, and decision making. The outcome of information use in one provides the context and resources for use in another. The example of the World Health Organization's smallpox eradication program illustrates a continuous cycle of…

  3. Organics on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Kate, Inge L.

    2010-08-01

    Organics are expected to exist on Mars based on meteorite infall, in situ production, and any possible biological sources. Yet they have not been detected on the martian surface; are they there, or are we not capable enough to detect them? The Viking gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer did not detect organics in the headspace of heated soil samples with a detection limit of parts per billion. This null result strongly influenced the interpretation of the reactivity seen in the Viking biology experiments and led to the conclusion that life was not present and, instead, that there was some chemical reactivity in the soil. The detection of perchlorates in the martian soil by instruments on the Phoenix lander and the reports of methane in the martian atmosphere suggest that it may be time to reconsider the question of organics. The high-temperature oxidizing properties of perchlorate will promote combustion of organics in pyrolytic experiments and may have affected the ability of both Phoenix's organic analysis experiment and the Viking mass spectrometer experiments to detect organics. So the question of organics on Mars remains open. A primary focus of the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory will be the detection and identification of organic molecules by means of thermal volatilization, followed by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry - as was done on Viking. However, to enhance organic detectability, some of the samples will be processed with liquid derivatization agents that will dissolve organics from the soil before pyrolysis, which may separate them from the soil perchlorates. Nonetheless, the problem of organics on Mars is not solved, and for future missions other organic detection techniques should therefore be considered as well.

  4. Organics on Mars?

    PubMed

    ten Kate, Inge L

    2010-01-01

    Organics are expected to exist on Mars based on meteorite infall, in situ production, and any possible biological sources. Yet they have not been detected on the martian surface; are they there, or are we not capable enough to detect them? The Viking gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer did not detect organics in the headspace of heated soil samples with a detection limit of parts per billion. This null result strongly influenced the interpretation of the reactivity seen in the Viking biology experiments and led to the conclusion that life was not present and, instead, that there was some chemical reactivity in the soil. The detection of perchlorates in the martian soil by instruments on the Phoenix lander and the reports of methane in the martian atmosphere suggest that it may be time to reconsider the question of organics. The high-temperature oxidizing properties of perchlorate will promote combustion of organics in pyrolytic experiments and may have affected the ability of both Phoenix's organic analysis experiment and the Viking mass spectrometer experiments to detect organics. So the question of organics on Mars remains open. A primary focus of the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory will be the detection and identification of organic molecules by means of thermal volatilization, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry--as was done on Viking. However, to enhance organic detectability, some of the samples will be processed with liquid derivatization agents that will dissolve organics from the soil before pyrolysis, which may separate them from the soil perchlorates. Nonetheless, the problem of organics on Mars is not solved, and for future missions other organic detection techniques should therefore be considered as well.

  5. Organic substances in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeson, Phillip E.

    1981-01-01

    This is the third of several compilations of briefing papers on water quality by the U.S. Geological Survey. Each briefing paper is prepared in a simple, nontechnical, easy-to-understand manner. This U.S. Geological Survey Circular contains papers on selected organic substances in water. Briefing papers are included on ' Why study organic substances in water. ', ' Taste and odor in water ', and ' Classification and fractionation of organic solutes in natural waters'. (USGS)

  6. Origins of organic geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    When organic geochemistry actually began as a recognized geoscience is a matter of definition and perspective. Constraints on its beginning are placed by the historical development of its parent disciplines, geology and organic chemistry. These disciplines originated independently and developed in parallel, starting in the latter half of the 18th century and flourishing thereafter into the 21st century. Organic geochemistry began sometime between 1860 and 1983; I argue that 1930 is the best year to mark its origin.

  7. Organ donation in Australia.

    PubMed

    Oberender, Felix

    2011-09-01

    Organ donation in Australia has undergone a series of important changes in the past 3 years. An ethically complex and emotionally profound subject, important questions are being raised about the approach to organ donation by the government, by health-care professionals and also by the public. This paper highlights some of the changes within the Australian organ donation community and explores several controversies that accompany the widespread implementation of measures aimed at significantly improving organ donation throughout the country. © 2011 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  8. Titan's organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager discovered nine simple organic molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. Complex organic solids, called tholins, produced by irradiation of the simulated Titanian atmosphere, are consistent with measured properties of Titan from ultraviolet to microwave frequencies and are the likely main constituents of the observed red aerosols. The tholins contain many of the organic building blocks central to life on earth. At least 100-m, and possibly kms thicknesses of complex organics have been produced on Titan during the age of the solar system, and may exist today as submarine deposits beneath an extensive ocean of simple hydrocarbons.

  9. The organization of thanatology.

    PubMed

    Doka, Kenneth J; Heflin-Wells, E Neil; Martin, Terry L; Redmond, Lula M; Schachter, Sherry R

    2011-01-01

    This article explores, using Wilensky's Model of Professionalization, the emergence of professional organizations within the thanatology. The authors review the history of four organizations--The Foundation of Thanatology, Ars Moriendi, The Forum for Death Education and Counseling (now the Association for Death Education and Counseling: A Thanatology Organization [ADEC]), and The International Work Group on Death, Dying, and Bereavement (IWG). The authors speculate on some of the reasons that the first two failed while IWG and ADEC remain viable-while noting challenges that these remaining thanatological organizations will experience as they seek to continue to stay relevant.

  10. ORGANIC CATATONIA: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Niraj

    2000-01-01

    Catatonia is a clinical syndrome associated with a wide variety of psychiatric, medical and neurological disorders. Despite several reports in the literature of a wide range of medical and neurological diseases causing catatonia, there has been a tendency to consider catatonia as purely psychiatric disorder. The review attempts to look at the concept of organic catatonia from a historical viewpoint, including its place in the psychiatric classification, discusses the various etiological causes of organic catatonia, and them goes through some important management issues in organic catatonia. The review suggests that organic catatonic disorder must be first considered in every patient with catatonic signs, particularly in a patient with new onset catatonia. PMID:21407969

  11. Titan's organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager discovered nine simple organic molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. Complex organic solids, called tholins, produced by irradiation of the simulated Titanian atmosphere, are consistent with measured properties of Titan from ultraviolet to microwave frequencies and are the likely main constituents of the observed red aerosols. The tholins contain many of the organic building blocks central to life on earth. At least 100-m, and possibly kms thicknesses of complex organics have been produced on Titan during the age of the solar system, and may exist today as submarine deposits beneath an extensive ocean of simple hydrocarbons.

  12. Stress and the Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Richard H., Ed.

    The proceedings of a conference on stress and the organization, sponsored by the Business Institute in Gerontology, are presented. The materials address the following areas of concern related to the problem of stress, including: (1) physiology and psychological effects; (2) organization-induced stress and its manifestations; (3) mid-life…

  13. Computer-Assisted Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, David James

    2009-01-01

    Organizing refers to methods of distributing physical and symbolic tasks among multiple agents in order to achieve goals. My dissertation investigates the dynamics of organizing in hybrid information processing systems that incorporate both humans and computers. To explain the behavior of these hybrid systems, I develop and partially test a theory…

  14. Enamides: valuable organic substrates.

    PubMed

    Carbery, David R

    2008-10-07

    Enamides display a fine balance of stability and reactivity, which is now leading to their increasing use in organic synthesis. Enamides offer multiple opportunities for the inclusion of nitrogen based functionality into organic systems. Recent examples of these compounds as substrates are discussed in this article.

  15. Organization Theory as Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Thomas B.

    The theory that organizations are ideological inventions of the human mind is discussed. Organizational science is described as an ideology which is based upon social concepts and experiences. The main justification for organizational theory is that it attempts to answer why we behave as we do in social organizations. Ways in which ideas and…

  16. Sustainable Learning Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velazquez, Luis E.; Esquer, Javier; Munguia, Nora E.; Moure-Eraso, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to debate how companies may better become a sustainable learning organization by offering the most used and insightful concepts of sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: Through literature review, learning organization and sustainability perspectives are explored and compared. Findings: Learning…

  17. HRD Function in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on the human resource development (HRD) function in organizations. In "Comparing Quality Profiles of Training Organizations--A Multi-Level Approach" (Martin Mulder), analysis of over 1,300 training projects indicates that variation in quality is almost entirely explained by the…

  18. Get Organized around Assets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferlazzo, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Educators, Ferlazzo claims, often perceive English language learners through a lens of deficits. We would serve these learners better, especially as readers, if we viewed them through a lens focused on assets. The author, who was a community organizer for 19 years before becoming an ESL teacher, relates the process of community organizing--helping…

  19. Managing the environmental organization

    SciTech Connect

    Ries, K.M.

    1994-12-31

    The volume and variety of challenges involved in environmental management of a business are great. Unfortunately, the staff available to address these challenges is far too small in most organizations. This chapter examines how to maximize the effectiveness of a small staff by managing the internal organization and properly selecting outside consultants.

  20. Are Learning Organizations Pragmatic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleri, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the future prospects of the popular concept known as the learning organization; to trace the influence of philosophical pragmatism on the learning organization and to consider its potential impact on the future; and to emphasize how pragmatic theories have shaped the development of Deming's total…

  1. THE QUASI NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PIFER, ALAN

    ORGANIZED TO MEET URGENT NATIONAL NEEDS, PROVIDE INDEPENDENT JUDGMENT, AND OFFER FRESH SOLUTIONS TO COMPLEX PROBLEMS, THE QUASI NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION IS DEFINED AS A NONPROFIT ASSOCIATION OR INSTITUTION LODGED IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR OF SOCIETY BUT FINANCED LARGELY OR ENTIRELY BY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, RESPONSIBLE TO ITS OWN BOARD OF…

  2. Resources for Community Organizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valadez, Cristina, Comp.

    This document is composed of two parts: a bibliography of community organizing and support materials and a directory of community organizing resource centers. The 25 bibliographic entries are grouped according to subject, and include author, title, publication date, publisher, number of pages, annotation, and ordering information. Subjects…

  3. Organization Development. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains four papers on organization development and human resources. "Identification of Key Predictors of Rapid Change Adaptation in a Service Organization" (Constantine Kontoghiorghes, Carol Hansen) reports on the results of an exploratory study, which suggests that rapid change adaptation will be more likely to occur in…

  4. Computer-Assisted Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, David James

    2009-01-01

    Organizing refers to methods of distributing physical and symbolic tasks among multiple agents in order to achieve goals. My dissertation investigates the dynamics of organizing in hybrid information processing systems that incorporate both humans and computers. To explain the behavior of these hybrid systems, I develop and partially test a theory…

  5. Sustainable Learning Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velazquez, Luis E.; Esquer, Javier; Munguia, Nora E.; Moure-Eraso, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to debate how companies may better become a sustainable learning organization by offering the most used and insightful concepts of sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: Through literature review, learning organization and sustainability perspectives are explored and compared. Findings: Learning…

  6. Resources for Community Organizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valadez, Cristina, Comp.

    This document is composed of two parts: a bibliography of community organizing and support materials and a directory of community organizing resource centers. The 25 bibliographic entries are grouped according to subject, and include author, title, publication date, publisher, number of pages, annotation, and ordering information. Subjects…

  7. The Effective Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesselbein, Frances

    1992-01-01

    The former Girl Scouts CEO discusses her hierarchy-flattening circular management concept. Traditionally, organizations have been bureaucracies dominated by a command-and-control orientation. As Drucker advises, nonprofit organizations, like corporations, must reexamine their mission's workability, consider who is the customer, and underscore what…

  8. Are Learning Organizations Pragmatic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleri, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the future prospects of the popular concept known as the learning organization; to trace the influence of philosophical pragmatism on the learning organization and to consider its potential impact on the future; and to emphasize how pragmatic theories have shaped the development of Deming's total…

  9. Mr. Learning Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumaine, Brian

    1994-01-01

    Peter Senge's learning organization theory suggests that the new challenges of the information age demand radical transformation of businesses, schools, and governments. Examples from Ford, Federal Express, and GS Technologies illustrate the use of the tools of the learning organization. (JOW)

  10. MICROWAVES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of microwaves, a non-ionizing radiation, on organic reactions is described both in polar solvents and under solvent-free conditions. The special applications are highlighted in the context of solventless organic synthesis which involve microwave (MW) exposure of neat r...

  11. Person-Organization Pairing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scirotino, P. T.; Madden, Denis

    1973-01-01

    Malfunctioning organizations do not facilitate the accomplishment of the purposes of their members in a number of ways and for a number of reasons. This paper used Maslow's hierarchy of needs model in an attempt to describe one view of that malfunction. Leadership is examined briefly as a functioning organization's facilitating arrangement.…

  12. The use of medicinal herbs by diabetic Jordanian patients.

    PubMed

    Otoom, S A; Al-Safi, S A; Kerem, Z K; Alkofahi, A

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder worldwide. To date, there have been no reports on the frequency of use of herb medicines in the managements of diabetes mellitus in Jordan. This cross-sectional study was conducted by interviewing 310 diabetic patients visiting two medical centers in Jordan: Jordan University of Science & Technology Medical Center and Sarih Medical Center between December 2003 and August 2004. It is found that 31% of interviewed patients have used herbal products (96 patients). The results revealed that the most commonly used herbs by diabetic patients in Jordan were Trigonella foenumgraecum (22.9%), Lupinus albus (14.6%), Allium sativum (11.5%), Allium cepa (5.2%), Nigella sativa (7.3%), Zea mays L. (6.3%), Urtica dioica L. (8.3%), Eucalyptus globules LA (9.4%), Olea europea L. (3.1%), Cumminum cyminum (9.4%), Coriandrum sativum (10.4%), Salvia officinalis L. (3.1%), and Tilia cordata (1%). Furthermore, it is found that 47.9% of the patients used herbs according to advice from their friends on a daily basis. The side effects were reported by 36.5% of the patients and include headache, nausea, dizziness, itching, palpitation, and sweating. Among the patients, 72.9% used the herbs as adjunctive therapy along with their anti-diabetic drugs and 80.2% of the patients informed their physicians about their use. A 79.2% of the sample confirmed their intention to re-use these herbs as 86.5% of them were satisfied with their diabetes control. There was a significant relationship between the use of herbs, the patient's place of residence and his/her level of education. The main conclusion of this survey is that the use of medicinal herbs among diabetic patient in Jordan is common. Therefore, it is essential to increase the level of awareness among diabetic patients and health care providers regarding the efficacy and toxicity of these medicinal herbs.

  13. Jordanian National Security and the Future of Middle East Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    from cholera , which has become an increasing problem in Iraq.146 All of these restrictions have helped to limit the number of Iraqis able to enter...the region in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks. In April 2002, Jordan sent a special forces training unit to Yemen to assist U.S. military...CO: Westview, 2004, pp. 271-273. 42. See Jillian Schwedler, Faith in Moderation: Islamist Parties in Jordan and Yemen , Cambridge, United Kingdom

  14. Learning Styles and Preferences of Jordanian EFL Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ababneh, Sana'

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comparative investigation into the learning styles of successful and unsuccessful language learners. Subjects of the study were seventeen graduate university students at Yarmouk University, Jordan. They were categorized as "successful" or "unsuccessful" learners, on the basis of their final…

  15. Predictors of career commitment and job performance of Jordanian nurses.

    PubMed

    Mrayyan, Majd T; Al-Faouri, Ibrahim

    2008-04-01

    Few studies focused on nurses' career commitment and nurses' job performance. This research aimed at studying variables of nurses' career commitment and job performance, and assessing the relationship between the two concepts as well as their predictors. A survey was used to collect data from a convenient sample of 640 Registered Nurses employed in 24 hospitals. Nurses 'agreed' to be committed to their careers and they were performing their jobs 'well'. As a part of career commitment, nurses were willing to be involved, in their own time, in projects that would benefit patient care. The highest and lowest means of nurses' job performance were reported for the following aspects: leadership, critical care, teaching/collaboration, planning/evaluation, interpersonal relations/communications and professional development. Correlating of total scores of nurses' career commitment and job performance revealed the presence of a significant and positive relationship between the two concepts. Stepwise regression models revealed that the explained variance in nurses' career commitment was 23.9% and that in nurses' job performance was 29.9%. Nurse managers should promote nursing as a career and they should develop and implement various strategies to increase nurses' career commitment and nurses' job performance. These strategies should focus on nurse retention, staff development and quality of care. Nurses' career commitment and job performance are inter-related complex concepts that require further studies to understand, promote and maintain these positive factors in work environments.

  16. Implementation E-Learning among Jordanian School's Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamadin, Khaled

    2017-01-01

    This study is designed to determine the level of E-learning Implementation in Jordan schools management. The study also investigated the Implementation of secondary School management towards the use of e-learning. A survey research design was used. A questionnaire was adopted and sent to secondary School management (N = 250) in Jordan schools in…

  17. Jordanian Nursing Work Environments, Intent to Stay, and Job Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamdan, Zaid; Manojlovich, Milisa; Tanima, Banerjee

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine associations among the nursing work environment, nurse job satisfaction, and intent to stay for nurses who practice in hospitals in Jordan. A quantitative descriptive cross-sectional survey design was used. Data were collected through survey questionnaires distributed to 650 registered nurses (RNs) who worked in three hospitals in Jordan. The self-report questionnaire consisted of three instruments and demographic questions. The instruments were the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI), the McCain Intent to Stay scale, and Quinn and Shepard's (1974) Global Job Satisfaction survey. Descriptive statistics were calculated for discrete measures of demographic characteristics of the study participants. Multivariate linear regression models were used to explore relationships among the nursing work environment, job satisfaction, and intent to stay, adjusting for unit type. There was a positive association between nurses' job satisfaction and the nursing work environment (t = 6.42, p < .001). For each one-unit increase in the total score of the PES-NWI, nurses' average job satisfaction increased by 1.3 points, controlling for other factors. Overall, nurses employed in public hospitals were more satisfied than those working in teaching hospitals. The nursing work environment was positively associated with nurses' intent to stay (t = 4.83, p < .001). The Intent to Stay score increased by 3.6 points for every one-unit increase in the total PES-NWI score on average. The highest Intent to Stay scores were reported by nurses from public hospitals. The work environment was positively associated with nurses' intent to stay and job satisfaction. More attention should be paid to create positive work environments to increase job satisfaction for nurses and increase their intent to stay. Hospital and nurse managers and healthcare policymakers urgently need to create satisfactory work environments supporting nursing practice in order to increase nurses' job satisfaction and intent to stay. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Jordanian School Counselor Involvement in School-Family-Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaith, Souad Mansour; Banat, Suhaila Mahmood; Hamad, Ghada Esmail; Albadareen, Ghaleb Salman

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the level of partnership between the school counselor, families and the local community in Jordan, as well as highlighting the factors that affect this partnership. A "School Counselor Involvement in School-Family-Community Partnerships Scale" was developed and administered to a sample of 152…

  19. Finiteness in Jordanian Arabic: A Semantic and Morphosyntactic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Aqarbeh, Rania

    2011-01-01

    Previous research on finiteness has been dominated by the studies in tensed languages, e.g. English. Consequently, finiteness has been identified with tense. The traditional definition influences the morphological, semantic, and syntactic characterization of finiteness which has also been equated with tense and its realization. The present study…

  20. Kindergarten Curriculum for Children with Hearing Impairments: Jordanian Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zboon, Eman

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a kindergarten curriculum for children with hearing impairments, from their teachers' perspectives. Qualitative research data from interviews with 20 teachers were analysed using content analysis methodology. The results pinpoint a collection of proposed curriculum components (i.e. a general framework and outcomes document;…

  1. Jordanian School Counselor Involvement in School-Family-Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaith, Souad Mansour; Banat, Suhaila Mahmood; Hamad, Ghada Esmail; Albadareen, Ghaleb Salman

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the level of partnership between the school counselor, families and the local community in Jordan, as well as highlighting the factors that affect this partnership. A "School Counselor Involvement in School-Family-Community Partnerships Scale" was developed and administered to a sample of 152…

  2. Jordanian Children in the Eye of the Storm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Amman (Jordan). Regional Office for the Middle East and North Africa.

    The Gulf Crisis that erupted in August, 1990 brought Jordan widespread economic devastation, increased poverty, the threat of hunger, health setbacks, and other hardships. Just as the country's economy was beginning to pull out of a lingering recession, Jordan was struck by the economic embargo against Iraq, the influx of over a million evacuees…

  3. Jordanian Chemistry Teachers' Views on Teaching Practices and Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Amoush, Siham A.; Markic, Silvija; Eilks, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates experienced teachers' views of chemistry teaching and learning and educational reform in Jordan. The main focus is an investigation of applied teaching practices in chemistry education, including educators' perception of the intentions and effects of ongoing educational reforms. The study is based on semi-structured interviews…

  4. Jordanian and British Primary Schoolchildren's Attitudes Towards the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ivan; Sa'di, Imad

    1997-01-01

    Explores the important but neglected field of primary schoolchildren's attitudes toward the environment, particularly toward issues of pollution, waste, and plants and animals, using a scale in Arabic and English. Shows that environmental-education programs produce only slightly positive results. Gives consideration to further research required to…

  5. Jordanian Children in the Eye of the Storm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Amman (Jordan). Regional Office for the Middle East and North Africa.

    The Gulf Crisis that erupted in August, 1990 brought Jordan widespread economic devastation, increased poverty, the threat of hunger, health setbacks, and other hardships. Just as the country's economy was beginning to pull out of a lingering recession, Jordan was struck by the economic embargo against Iraq, the influx of over a million evacuees…

  6. Perceptions of Jordanian Secondary Schools Teachers towards Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bataineh, Osamah; Alazzi, Khaled F.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover themes or concepts, generated from the collected data, that formed building blocks of grounded theory in the study of secondary school social studies teachers' perspectives. This research study was conducted in Jordan, where secondary school social studies teachers were interviewed regarding their…

  7. Associations between patient factors and medication adherence: A Jordanian experience.

    PubMed

    Basheti, Iman A; Hait, Sami Saqf El; Qunaibi, Eyad A; Aburuz, Salah; Bulatova, Nailya

    2016-01-01

    To explore the effect of patient characteristics and health beliefs on their medication adherence. Patients (n=167) with chronic conditions (mean age 58.9; SD=13.54, 53% males) were recruited from March 2009- to March 2010 using a cross sectional study design. Data collected included patients' demographics, medical conditions, medications therapeutic regimen, frequency of physician visits and health beliefs. Patient self-reported adherence to medications was assessed by the researcher using a validated and published scale. Treatment related problems (TRPs) were evaluated for each patient by competent clinical pharmacists. Associations between patient characteristics/health beliefs with adherence were explored. About half of the patients (46.1%) were non-adherent. A significant association was found between lower adherence and higher number of disease states (p<0.001), higher number of medications (p=0.001), and higher number of identified TRPs (p = 0.003). Patient adherence was positively affected by older age, higher educational level, and higher number of physician visits per month, while it was negatively affected by reporting difficulties with getting prescription refills on time. This study identified different factors that may negatively affect adherence, including higher number of medications and disease states, higher number of identified TRPs and inability to getting prescription refills on time. Hence, more care needs to be provided to patients with complex therapeutic regimens in order to enhance adherence.

  8. Jordanian Critical Care Nurses' Practices Regarding Enteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Sawsam Mohammad; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud; Darawad, Muhammad Waleed

    2015-01-01

    In Jordan, there is a gap in literature regarding nurses' practices of enteral nutrition. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess nurses' practices regarding enteral nutrition of critically ill adult patients. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used to collect data through self-reported questionnaires and descriptive analyses were used to display the results of the study. The results revealed that some aspects of enteral nutrition practices were consistent with the current best evidences such as initiation time of enteral nutrition and backrest elevation. On the contrary, some aspects showed variations and inconsistency with current best evidences such as the amount of high gastric residual volume and its management. Nurses' practices regarding enteral nutrition were not consistent with international guidelines. This inconsistency can predispose patients to underfeeding. Enhancement of research utilization is highly recommended as well as establishing evidence-based guidelines.

  9. Kindergarten Curriculum for Children with Hearing Impairments: Jordanian Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zboon, Eman

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a kindergarten curriculum for children with hearing impairments, from their teachers' perspectives. Qualitative research data from interviews with 20 teachers were analysed using content analysis methodology. The results pinpoint a collection of proposed curriculum components (i.e. a general framework and outcomes document;…

  10. Multidimensional Perfectionism in a Sample of Jordanian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaradat, Abdul-Kareem M.

    2013-01-01

    Counsellors need to be able to understand perfectionism in students, and the different forms that this perfectionism may take, in order to provide their students with the appropriate counselling services. This study investigated gender differences in perfectionism, and examined the relationship of perfectionism to general self-efficacy,…

  11. Multidimensional Perfectionism in a Sample of Jordanian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaradat, Abdul-Kareem M.

    2013-01-01

    Counsellors need to be able to understand perfectionism in students, and the different forms that this perfectionism may take, in order to provide their students with the appropriate counselling services. This study investigated gender differences in perfectionism, and examined the relationship of perfectionism to general self-efficacy,…

  12. From placement to employment: Career preferences of Jordanian nursing students.

    PubMed

    Shoqirat, Noordeen; Abu-Qamar, Ma'en Zaid

    2015-09-01

    This study examined employment planning and career preferences of final year nursing students in Jordan. Focus group discussions (n = 4) were conducted by the first author with a convenience sample of 27 nursing students. N-Vivo 9 was used to analyze the qualitative data. The analysis revealed two themes. The first theme focused on "moving from study to work", and comprised two sub-themes: being uncertain and hesitant and being a real nurse. The second theme was "the place where I want to be", and referred to participants' preferences concerning their future career. Participants showed interest in critical care units but they were not optimistic about their future career prospects due to the possibility of being jobless and the perceived low public image of nurses. In addition to the nature of placement atmosphere, gender, family and cultural issues were found to shape participants' preferences. It is therefore important to periodically review the considerations of employment planning and career preferences of nursing students, otherwise devising interventions for sound recruitment of nurses in the future will be flawed.

  13. Psychosocial correlates of Internet addiction among Jordanian university students.

    PubMed

    Alzayyat, Abdulkarim; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas; Ahmad, Muayyad M

    2015-04-01

    Internet addiction is a significant international mental health problem among university students. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the correlation of Internet addiction with university students' characteristics in Jordan using a descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design. The Internet Addiction Test, Beck Depression Inventory, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support were administered to a random sample of 587 undergraduate university students. The findings demonstrated that university year level, student age, depression, and family support were significant correlates of Internet addiction. The current study should raise awareness in nurses and other health care providers that Internet addiction is a potential mental health problem for this student population. The findings from the current study will help develop appropriate interventions for these students and inform future research.

  14. Fear of failure among a sample of Jordanian undergraduate students

    PubMed Central

    Alkhazaleh, Ziad M; Mahasneh, Ahmad M

    2016-01-01

    Background Fear of failure (FoF) is the motivation to avoid failure in achievement tests, and involves cognitive, behavioral, and emotional experiences. Aims The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of FoF among students at The Hashemite University, Jordan. We were also interested in identifying the difference in the level of FoF between the sexes, the academic level, and grade-point average (GPA). Method A total of 548 students participated in the study by completing the Performance Failure Appraisal Inventory. Descriptive statistics (mean and SD), independent sample t-test, and one-way analysis of variance were used to analyze the data collected. Results The results indicated the overall mean FoF to be −0.34. There were also significant differences between male and female students’ level of fear in experiencing shame and embarrassment. Significant differences were found between the four academic level groups in the following fear categories: experiencing shame and embarrassment, important others losing interest, and fear of upsetting important others. The results also showed significant differences between the GPA level groups in the following fear categories: experiencing shame and embarrassment, diminishing of one’s self-esteem, having an uncertain future, fear of important others losing interest, and fear of upsetting important others. Conclusion FoF may be an important consideration when trying to understand student behavior in the university. Moreover, the level of FoF differs between sexes, academic levels, and GPA levels. PMID:27099537

  15. Organic chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    The course of organic chemical evolution preceding the emergence of life on earth is discussed based on evidence of processes occurring in interstellar space, the solar system and the primitive earth. Following a brief review of the equilibrium condensation model for the origin and evolution of the solar system, consideration is given to the nature and organic chemistry of interstellar clouds, comets, Jupiter, meteorites, Venus and Mars, and the prebiotic earth. Major issues to be resolved in the study of organic chemical evolution on earth are identified regarding condensation and accretion in the solar nebula, early geological evolution, the origin and evolution of the atmosphere, organic production rates, organic-inorganic interactions, environmental fluctuations, phase separation and molecular selectivity.

  16. Self-organizing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Sato, T.; Complexity Simulation Group

    1999-03-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to extract a grand view of self-organization through an extensive computer simulation of plasmas. The assertion is made that self-organization is governed by three key processes, i.e. the existence of an open complex system, the existence of information (energy) sources and the existence of entropy generation and expulsion processes. We find that self-organization takes place in an intermittent fashion when energy is supplied continuously from outside. In contrast, when the system state is suddenly changed into a non-equilibrium state externally, the system evolves stepwise and reaches a minimum energy state. We also find that the entropy production rate is maximized whenever a new ordered structure is created and that if the entropy generated during the self-organizing process is expelled from the system, then the self-organized structure becomes more prominent and clear.

  17. Organic chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    The course of organic chemical evolution preceding the emergence of life on earth is discussed based on evidence of processes occurring in interstellar space, the solar system and the primitive earth. Following a brief review of the equilibrium condensation model for the origin and evolution of the solar system, consideration is given to the nature and organic chemistry of interstellar clouds, comets, Jupiter, meteorites, Venus and Mars, and the prebiotic earth. Major issues to be resolved in the study of organic chemical evolution on earth are identified regarding condensation and accretion in the solar nebula, early geological evolution, the origin and evolution of the atmosphere, organic production rates, organic-inorganic interactions, environmental fluctuations, phase separation and molecular selectivity.

  18. Liver sharing and organ procurement organization performance.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Sommer E; Chow, Eric K H; Massie, Allan; Luo, Xun; Zaun, David; Snyder, Jon J; Israni, Ajay K; Kasiske, Bert; Segev, Dorry L

    2015-03-01

    Whether the liver allocation system shifts organs from better performing organ procurement organizations (OPOs) to poorer performing OPOs has been debated for many years. Models of OPO performance from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients make it possible to study this question in a data-driven manner. We investigated whether each OPO's net liver import was correlated with 2 performance metrics [observed to expected (O:E) liver yield and liver donor conversion ratio] as well as 2 alternative explanations [eligible deaths and incident listings above a Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score of 15]. We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that the allocation system transfers livers from better performing OPOs to centers with poorer performing OPOs. Also, having fewer eligible deaths was not associated with a net import. However, having more incident listings was strongly correlated with the net import, both before and after Share 35. Most importantly, the magnitude of the variation in OPO performance was much lower than the variation in demand: although the poorest performing OPOs differed from the best ones by less than 2-fold in the O:E liver yield, incident listings above a MELD score of 15 varied nearly 14-fold. Although it is imperative that all OPOs achieve the best possible results, the flow of livers is not explained by OPO performance metrics, and instead, it appears to be strongly related to differences in demand.

  19. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (<30%) consists of a rich organic inventory of soluble organic compounds, including key compounds important in terrestrial biochemistry [2-4]. Different carbonaceous meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10

  20. Organic Compounds in Stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Clemett. Simon J.; Sandford, Scott A.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Hoerz, Fredrich

    2011-01-01

    The successful return of the STARDUST spacecraft provides a unique opportunity to investigate the nature and distribution of organic matter in cometary dust particles collected from Comet 81P/Wild-2. Analysis of individual cometary impact tracks in silica aerogel using the technique of two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) demonstrates the presence of complex aromatic organic matter. While concerns remain as to the organic purity of the aerogel collection medium and the thermal effects associated with hypervelocity capture, the majority of the observed organic species appear indigenous to the impacting particles and are hence of cometary origin. While the aromatic fraction of the total organic matter present is believed to be small, it is notable in that it appears to be N-rich. Spectral analysis in combination with instrumental detection sensitivities suggest that N is incorporated predominantly in the form of aromatic nitriles (R-C N). While organic species in the STARDUST samples do share some similarities with those present in the matrices of carbonaceous chondrites, the closest match is found with stratospherically collected interplanetary dust particles. These findings are consistent with the notion that a fraction of interplanetary dust is of cometary origin. The presence of complex organic N-containing species in comets has astrobiological implications since comets are likely to have contributed to the prebiotic chemical inventory of both the Earth and Mars.

  1. Organisms in evolution.

    PubMed

    Martens, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Organisms constitute one of the most remarkable features of our living world. However, they have not yet received any accepted characterization within the framework of the evolutionary theory. The reasons for this contrast between the saliency of organisms in the biological landscape and their theoretical status are multiple and they are analyzed in the first part of this paper. Starting from this contrast, I argue for a theoretically grounded concept of organism within the framework of evolutionary theory itself. To this effect I argue that the theory of major transitions in evolution (Maynard Smith and Szathmáry 1995; Michod 1999) provides us with the theoretical basis for an understanding of the individuality of organisms and I propose a first characterization of organisms as evolutionary units structured by a division of reproductive labor among their parts. I also discuss one of the most important implications of this definition, namely that some colonial entities are to be counted as superorganisms. Finally, I show that though theoretically satisfying, this definition does not suffice in order fully to individuate the organisms and superorganisms in practice. To this end, physiology is needed, because it offers us some criteria for their individuation in ecological space. These criteria, however, are not immune to errors through misidentification and their shortcomings are discussed in the last section. In conclusion, I emphasize the positive implications of these criteria concerning the ecological significance of organisms.

  2. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  3. Organic nonlinear optical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umegaki, S.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, it became clear that organic compounds with delocalized pi electrons show a great nonlinear optical response. Especially, secondary nonlinear optical constants of more than 2 digits were often seen in the molecular level compared to the existing inorganic crystals such as LiNbO3. The crystallization was continuously tried. Organic nonlinear optical crystals have a new future as materials for use in the applied physics such as photomodulation, optical frequency transformation, opto-bistabilization, and phase conjugation optics. Organic nonlinear optical materials, e.g., urea, O2NC6H4NH2, I, II, are reviewed with 50 references.

  4. Hydrothermal organic synthesis experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Ways in which heat is useful in organic synthesis experiments are described, and experiments on the hydrothermal destruction and synthesis of organic compounds are discussed. It is pointed out that, if heat can overcome kinetic barriers to the formation of metastable states from reduced or oxidized starting materials, abiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions is a distinct possibility. However, carefully controlled experiments which replicate the descriptive variables of natural hydrothermal systems have not yet been conducted with the aim of testing the hypothesis of hydrothermal organic systems.

  5. Neurology and international organizations.

    PubMed

    Mateen, Farrah J

    2013-07-23

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private-public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and colleges. The continued engagement of neurologists is essential for the growing number of international organizations that can and should incorporate neurologic disease into their global agendas.

  6. Cryopreservation of Living Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasawa, Ichiro; Nagata, Shinichi; Kimura, Naohiro

    Cryopreservation is considered to be the most promising way of preserving living organs or tissues for a long period of time without casuing any damage to their biological functions. However, cryopreservation has been succeeded only for simple and small-size tissues such as spermatozoon, ovum, erythrocyte, bone marrow and cornea. Cryopreservation of more complex and large-scale organs are not yet succssful. The authors have attempted to establish a technique for cryopreservation of larger living organs. An experiment was carried out using daphnia (water flea). The optimum rates of freezing and thawing were determined together with the optimum selection of cryoprotectant. High recovery rate was achieved under these conditions.

  7. Biomaterials in Artificial Organs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kambic, Helen E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Biomaterials are substances or combinations of substances that can be used in a system that treats, augments, or replaces any tissue, organ, or body function. The nature and role of these substances, particularly in the cadiovascular system, are discussed. (JN)

  8. Trace Organic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ember, Lois R.

    1978-01-01

    Trace organic analysis (TOA) is seen as a more useful way to quantify environmental pollutants. Current practices and future trends are discussed in detail. Seven steps in TOA are identified: collection, storage, extraction, concentration, isolation, identification, and quantification. (MA)

  9. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  10. Micro-Organ Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steven R.; Leslie, Julia; Chang, Robert C.; Starly, Binil; Sun, Wei; Culbertson, Christopher; Holtorf, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Micro-organ devices (MODs) are being developed to satisfy an emerging need for small, lightweight, reproducible, biological-experimentati on apparatuses that are amenable to automated operation and that imp ose minimal demands for resources (principally, power and fluids). I n simplest terms, a MOD is a microfluidic device containing a variety of microstructures and assemblies of cells, all designed to mimic a complex in vivo microenvironment by replicating one or more in vivo micro-organ structures, the architectures and composition of the extr acellular matrices in the organs of interest, and the in vivo fluid flows. In addition to microscopic flow channels, a MOD contains one or more micro-organ wells containing cells residing in microscopic e xtracellular matrices and/or scaffolds, the shapes and compositions o f which enable replication of the corresponding in vivo cell assembl ies and flows.

  11. Virtual Organizations: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nami, Mohammad Reza

    The need to remain competitive in the open market forces companies to concentrate on their core competencies while searching for alliances when additional skills or resources are needed to fulfill business opportunities. The changing business situation of companies and customer needs have motivated researchers to introduce Virtual Organization (VO) idea. A Virtual Organization is always a form of partnership and managing partners and handling partnerships are crucial. Virtual organizations are defined as a temporary collection of enterprises that cooperate and share resources, knowledge, and competencies to better respond to business opportunities. This paper presents base concepts of virtual organizations including properties, management concepts, operational concepts, and main issues in collaboration such as security and authentication.

  12. Soil Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, G.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review is presented of some of the organic compounds and reactions that occur in soil. Included are nitrogenous compounds, compounds of phosphorus and sulfur, carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, and aliphatic acids. (BB)

  13. The Main Idea Organizer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Presents the Main Idea Organizer (MIO) to help students who may struggle with writing, reading, and thinking--though in different ways and for different reasons. Describes many different ways the author uses the MIO. (SG)

  14. The NASA Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This Handbook, effective 13 September 1994, documents the NASA organization, defines terms, and sets forth the policy and requirements for establishing, modifying, and documenting the NASA organizational structure and for assigning organizational responsibilities.

  15. Biomaterials in Artificial Organs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kambic, Helen E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Biomaterials are substances or combinations of substances that can be used in a system that treats, augments, or replaces any tissue, organ, or body function. The nature and role of these substances, particularly in the cadiovascular system, are discussed. (JN)

  16. Organization of Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Chakalova, Lyubomira; Fraser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Investigations into the organization of transcription have their origins in cell biology. Early studies characterized nascent transcription in relation to discernable nuclear structures and components. Advances in light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and in situ hybridization helped to begin the difficult task of naming the countless individual players and components of transcription and placing them in context. With the completion of mammalian genome sequences, the seemingly boundless task of understanding transcription of the genome became finite and began a new period of rapid advance. Here we focus on the organization of transcription in mammals drawing upon information from lower organisms where necessary. The emerging picture is one of a highly organized nucleus with specific conformations of the genome adapted for tissue-specific programs of transcription and gene expression. PMID:20668006

  17. Small Scale Organic Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, V.; Crist, DeLanson R.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using small scale experimentation in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Describes small scale filtration techniques as an example of a semi-micro method applied to small quantities of material. (MLH)

  18. Organic Chemistry in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical observations, theoretical modeling, laboratory simulation and analysis of extraterrestrial material have enhanced our knowledge of the inventory of organic matter in the interstellar medium (ISM) and on small bodies such as comets and asteroids (Ehrenfreund & Charnley 2000). Comets, asteroids and their fragments, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), contributed significant amounts of extraterrestrial organic matter to the young Earth. This material degraded and reacted in a terrestrial prebiotic chemistry to form organic structures that may have served as building blocks for life on the early Earth. In this talk I will summarize our current understanding of the organic composition and chemistry of interstellar clouds. Molecules of astrobiological relevance include the building blocks of our genetic material: nucleic acids, composed of subunits such as N-heterocycles (purines and pyrimidines), sugars and amino acids. Signatures indicative of inheritance of pristine and modified interstellar material in comets and meteorites will also be discussed.

  19. Soil Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, G.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review is presented of some of the organic compounds and reactions that occur in soil. Included are nitrogenous compounds, compounds of phosphorus and sulfur, carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, and aliphatic acids. (BB)

  20. Porous organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, James R.; Trewin, Abbie; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2010-11-01

    Most synthetic materials that show molecular-scale porosity consist of one-, two- or three-dimensional networks. Porous metal-organic frameworks in particular have attracted a lot of recent attention. By contrast, discrete molecules tend to pack efficiently in the solid state, leaving as little empty space as possible, which leads to non-porous materials. This Perspective discusses recent developments with discrete organic molecules that are porous in the solid state. Such molecules, which may be either crystalline or amorphous, can be categorized as either intrinsically porous (containing permanent covalent cavities) or extrinsically porous (inefficiently packed). We focus on the possible advantages of organic molecules over inorganic or hybrid systems in terms of molecular solubility, choice of components and functionalities, and structural mobility and responsiveness in non-covalent extended solids. We also highlight the potential for 'undiscovered' porous systems among the large number of cage-like organic molecules that are already known.