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Sample records for josef kng norman

  1. Norman Geschwind Lecture: Geschwind's Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duane, Drake D.

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the contributions of Norman Geschwind on behavioral neurology. It discusses his novel associations between brain function/structure and behavior and findings from a recent study of 200 individuals with developmental disorders that indicate altered neuroanatomy in dyslexia may be accompanied by altered clinical neurophysiology.…

  2. Norman Garmezy (1918-2009).

    PubMed

    Masten, Ann S; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Wright, Margaret O'Dougherty

    2011-01-01

    Norman Garmezy, a pioneer in research on risk and resilience, died in Nashville, Tennessee, on November 21, 2009, at the age of 91. He was a legendary mentor as well as an eminent scientist in clinical psychology. Norm was born on June 18, 1918, in New York City and grew up in the Bronx in a Jewish neighborhood where educational attainment was highly valued. The scientific study of resilience as conceived by Norman Garmezy, his peers, and students has transformed the science and practice of multiple disciplines, from the molecular level to the global ecosystem, infusing a strength-based and recovery-oriented approach into psychology, education, social work, and psychiatry. Current research on resilience ranges from studies of plasticity in brain development to effective planning for resilience in the context of disaster. Norm's influential ideas and research earned him international acclaim and many honors for lifetime achievements in science. Throughout his career, Norm held many leadership roles. Throughout his life, Norm spoke with great love about his wife of 63 years, Edie Garmezy (who died just months before him in 2009), and their children. In addition to his work and his family, Norm had three abiding passions-theater, movies, and politics. During the last two decades of his life, Norm and those who loved him endured his long decline from Alzheimer's, which slowly stole his brilliant mind and hilarious sense of humor. Nonetheless, the incredible spirit and humanity of this giant scholar continued to shine through this terrible disease. To the end of his life, Norm's face would light up with a smile as he greeted the people he loved, and he would often exclaim, "Wonderful!" Norman Garmezy was a remarkable person and scholar who left an extraordinary legacy of love and work to inspire future generations in their efforts to understand and promote the human capacity for competence and resilience. PMID:21299255

  3. American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    Norman Rockwell was the quintessential painter of American life. His images reflect the history of America as told through the eyes of this idealistic and patriotic artist who sought to show America at its best, and to present the lives, hopes and dreams of the average American in the middle-20th century. Few artists have produced so many images…

  4. Franz Josef and Fox Glaciers, New Zealand: Historic length records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdie, Heather; Anderson, Brian; Chinn, Trevor; Owens, Ian; Mackintosh, Andrew; Lawson, Wendy

    2014-10-01

    Compilation of modern and historical length change records for Franz Josef and Fox Glaciers demonstrates that these glaciers have lost ~ 3 km in length and at least 3-4 km2 in area since the 1800s, with the greatest overall loss occurring between 1934 and 1983. Within this dramatic and ongoing retreat, both glaciers have experienced periods of re-advance. The record from Franz Josef Glacier is the most detailed, and shows major advances from 1946 to 1951 (340 m), 1965-1967 (400 m), 1983-1999 (1420 m) and 2004-2008 (280 m). At Fox Glacier the record is similar, with advances recorded during 1964-1968 (60 m), 1985-1999 (710 m) and 2004-2008 (290 m). Apart from the latest advance event, the magnitude of advance has been greater at Franz Josef Glacier, suggesting a higher length sensitivity. Analysis of the relationship between glacier length and a reconstructed annual equilibrium line altitude (ELA) record shows that the glaciers react very quickly to ELA variations - with the greatest correlation at 3-4 years' lag. The present (2014) retreat is the fastest retreat in the records of both glaciers. While decadal length fluctuations have been linked to hemispheric ocean-atmosphere variability, the overall reduction in length is a clear sign of twentieth century warming. However, documenting glacier length changes can be challenging; especially when increased surface debris-cover makes identification of the 'true' terminus a convoluted process.

  5. The medical life of Henry Norman Bethune

    PubMed Central

    Deslauriers, Jean; Goulet, Denis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Henry Norman Bethune is one of the most exciting and incredible surgeons that Canada has ever produced. Indeed, he is often characterized as one of the world’s best-known surgeons. He was an innovator and his scientific contributions have stood the test of time. In Canada, he will forever be remembered as a social activist committed to the welfare of the poor and to the reform of the health care system. In the People’s Republic of China, he is idolized and remains the only foreigner to ever become a national hero. OBJECTIVE: To detail the numerous and significant achievements of Henry Norman Bethune in the field of thoracic surgery and as a social activist and describe his heroic war-time actions on the battlefields of both Spain and China. METHOD: Information was gathered through the reading of the numerous publications written about the life and work of Bethune, interviews with knowledgeable people from Canadian and Chinese universities, analysis of Bethune’s own publications, and extensive experience of one of the authors in China. RESULTS: In the social sense, Henry Norman Bethune had a difficult personality, but he was deeply caring about the plight of his patients, especially the poor. As a thoracic surgeon, he could be ingenious, thoughtful and effective but he could also be abrasive, restless and temperamental. His scientific contributions were sound and, at the time, gained worldwide attention. As an activist, he led a crusade to reform the Canadian health care system, demanding free health care for all. His outstanding work during the Spanish Civil War, where he organized the first ever mobile blood transfusion unit, and during the Sino-Japanese war, where he was totally committed to the welfare of both soldiers and civilian population, were deliberate acts of resistance against Fascist onslaught and enthusiasm for the Communist cause. CONCLUSIONS: Henry Norman Bethune was unconventional and a revolutionary, but he was brilliant. He will

  6. PsychoNeuroImmunology Research Society's Norman Cousins Award.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Rainer H. Straub, University Hospital, Regensburg, Germany, is the recipient of the 2015 Norman Cousins Award and will present the memorial lecture at the PsychoNeuroImmunology Research Society (PNIRS) meeting, June 3–6, Seattle, WA. The Norman Cousins award is the highest honor bestowed by the PNIRS and recognizes sustained and outstanding research contributions in psychoneuroimmunology.

  7. 168. ARAIV Index of drawings prepared by Norman Engineering Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    168. ARA-IV Index of drawings prepared by Norman Engineering Company in preparation for construction of ARA-IV. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/ML-1index. Date: March 1961. Ineel index code no. 066-9999-90-613-102731. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. J. Norman Lockyer: The Early Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, M. A.

    2005-12-01

    Joseph Norman Lockyer was born in 1836 in Rugby, where his father was a surgeon-apothecary and a leading member of the Literary and Scientific Institution. In the 1840s the family moved to Leicester, where his father became a manufacturer of matches. After his mother's death, he lived with an uncle and attended school in Kenilworth. His main interests then were classical and modern languages, which he taught in a Somerset school before going to Switzerland in 1856-57. On his return, the patronage of Lord Leigh of Stoneleigh helped him to become a clerk in the War Office. He developed an interest in astronomy that led to his election as a Fellow of the Royal Society, and to the editorship of the science journal Nature.

  9. Genome-wide association study for adiponectin levels in Filipino women identifies CDH13 and a novel uncommon haplotype at KNG1–ADIPOQ

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying; Li, Yun; Lange, Ethan M.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; McDade, Thomas W.; Qin, Li; Curocichin, Ghenadie; Borja, Judith B.; Lange, Leslie A.; Adair, Linda S.; Mohlke, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted protein involved in a variety of metabolic processes, including glucose regulation and fatty acid catabolism. We conducted a genome-wide association study to investigate the genetic loci associated with plasma adiponectin in 1776 unrelated Filipino women from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey (CLHNS). Our strongest signal for adiponectin mapped to the gene CDH13 (rs3865188, P ≤ 7.2 × 10−16), which encodes a receptor for high-molecular-weight forms of adiponectin. Strong association was also detected near the ADIPOQ gene (rs864265, P = 3.8 × 10−9) and at a novel signal 100 kb upstream near KNG1 (rs11924390, P = 7.6 × 10−7). All three signals were also observed in 1774 young adult CLHNS offspring and in combined analysis including all 3550 mothers and offspring samples (all P ≤ 1.6 × 10−9). An uncommon haplotype of rs11924390 and rs864265 (haplotype frequency = 0.050) was strongly associated with lower adiponectin compared with the most common C–G haplotype in both CLHNS mothers (P = 1.8 × 10−25) and offspring (P = 8.7 × 10−32). Comprehensive imputation of 2653 SNPs in a 2 Mb region using as reference combined CHB, JPT and CEU haplotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project revealed no variants that perfectly tagged this haplotype. Our findings provide the first genome-wide significant evidence of association with plasma adiponectin at the CDH13 locus and identify a novel uncommon KNG1–ADIPOQ haplotype strongly associated with adiponectin levels in Filipinos. PMID:20876611

  10. [Jirí Josef Camel, pharmacist and botanist].

    PubMed

    Entner, J

    1990-02-01

    Jirí Josef Camel (1661-1706), a pharmacist and botanist, was born in Brno, educated at a grammar school and then joined the Jesuit Order as a laic brother. He worked in the college pharmacies in Brno, Jindrichův Hradec and Ceský Krumlov. In 1687 he left for a religious mission to the Philippine Islands, where he worked for 17 years in a hospital as a pharmacist. He died in Manila in 1706. He wrote 19 treatises, in which he acquainted European medicine and pharmacy with the flora and fauna of the Philippines. Camel sent his papers to London to J. Ray, the then most distinguished authority in botany. Ray published them in the 3rd volume of Historia Plantarum in 1704. The most valuable part of his work are drawings of plants, published by Petiver in the journal Gazophylacei naturae et artis (1702-1709). More than 400 of them have survived till nowadays in the collection of the British Museum. Further 260 drawings were acquired in the course of years by the University Library in Louvain.

  11. 33 CFR 208.34 - Norman Dam and Lake Thunderbird, Little River, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Norman Dam and Lake Thunderbird... OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.34 Norman Dam and Lake Thunderbird, Little River, Okla. The Bureau of Reclamation, or its designated agent, shall operate Norman Dam and...

  12. 33 CFR 208.34 - Norman Dam and Lake Thunderbird, Little River, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Norman Dam and Lake Thunderbird... OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.34 Norman Dam and Lake Thunderbird, Little River, Okla. The Bureau of Reclamation, or its designated agent, shall operate Norman Dam and...

  13. Franz Josef Land: extreme northern outpost for Arctic fishes

    PubMed Central

    Chernova, Natalia V.; Turchik, Alan; Sala, Enric

    2014-01-01

    The remote Franz Josef Land (FJL) Archipelago is the most northerly land in Eurasia and its fish fauna, particularly in nearshore habitats, has been poorly studied. An interdisciplinary expedition to FJL in summer 2013 used scuba, seines, and plankton nets to comprehensively study the nearshore fish fauna of the archipelago. We present some of the first underwater images for many of these species in their natural habitats. In addition, deep water drop cameras were deployed between 32 and 392 m to document the fish fauna and their associated habitats at deeper depths. Due to its high latitude (79°–82°N), extensive ice cover, and low water temperatures (<0 °C much of the year), the fish diversity at FJL is low compared to other areas of the Barents Sea. Sixteen species of fishes from seven families were documented on the expedition, including two species previously unknown to the region. One Greenland shark, Somniosus microcephalus (Somniosidae), ca. 2 m in length, was recorded by drop camera near Hayes Island at 211 m, and Esipov’s pout, Gymnelus esipovi (Zoarcidae), was collected at Wilton Island at 15 m in a kelp forest. Including the tape-body pout, Gymnelus taeniatus, described earlier from the sub-littoral zone of Kuhn Island, 17 fish species are now known from FJL’s nearshore waters. Species endemic to the Arctic accounted for 75% of the nearshore species observed, followed by species with wider ranges. A total of 43 species from 15 families are known from FJL with the majority of the records from offshore trawl surveys between 110 and 620 m. Resident species have mainly high Arctic distributions, while transient species visit the archipelago to feed (e.g., Greenland shark), and others are brought by currents as larvae and later migrate to spawn grounds in the south (e.g., Atlantic cod Gadus morhua, Capelin Mallotus villosus, Beaked redfish Sebastes mentella). Another species group includes warmer-water fishes that are rare waifs (e.g., Glacier

  14. Franz Josef Land: extreme northern outpost for Arctic fishes.

    PubMed

    Chernova, Natalia V; Friedlander, Alan M; Turchik, Alan; Sala, Enric

    2014-01-01

    The remote Franz Josef Land (FJL) Archipelago is the most northerly land in Eurasia and its fish fauna, particularly in nearshore habitats, has been poorly studied. An interdisciplinary expedition to FJL in summer 2013 used scuba, seines, and plankton nets to comprehensively study the nearshore fish fauna of the archipelago. We present some of the first underwater images for many of these species in their natural habitats. In addition, deep water drop cameras were deployed between 32 and 392 m to document the fish fauna and their associated habitats at deeper depths. Due to its high latitude (79°-82°N), extensive ice cover, and low water temperatures (<0 °C much of the year), the fish diversity at FJL is low compared to other areas of the Barents Sea. Sixteen species of fishes from seven families were documented on the expedition, including two species previously unknown to the region. One Greenland shark, Somniosus microcephalus (Somniosidae), ca. 2 m in length, was recorded by drop camera near Hayes Island at 211 m, and Esipov's pout, Gymnelus esipovi (Zoarcidae), was collected at Wilton Island at 15 m in a kelp forest. Including the tape-body pout, Gymnelus taeniatus, described earlier from the sub-littoral zone of Kuhn Island, 17 fish species are now known from FJL's nearshore waters. Species endemic to the Arctic accounted for 75% of the nearshore species observed, followed by species with wider ranges. A total of 43 species from 15 families are known from FJL with the majority of the records from offshore trawl surveys between 110 and 620 m. Resident species have mainly high Arctic distributions, while transient species visit the archipelago to feed (e.g., Greenland shark), and others are brought by currents as larvae and later migrate to spawn grounds in the south (e.g., Atlantic cod Gadus morhua, Capelin Mallotus villosus, Beaked redfish Sebastes mentella). Another species group includes warmer-water fishes that are rare waifs (e.g., Glacier lanternfish

  15. Astronaut Norman Thagard changes tray in RAHF for rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Astronaut Norman Thagard changes a tray in the research animal holding facility (RAHF) for rodents at the Ames double rack facility aboard the Spacelab 3 science module in the cargo bay of the shuttle Challenger. Lending a hand is payload specialist Lodewijk van den Berg. Both men are wearing protective clothing and surgical masks for this procedure.

  16. A School Transformed: The Case of Norman S. Weir.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmons, Christine L.; Hagopian, Gloria; Efimba, Maloke O.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Norman S. Weir Elementary School, Paterson (New Jersey), which epitomizes the transformation that occurs when the Comer School Development Program is implemented well. The school has risen from being one of the lowest achieving schools in its district to one of the highest achievers. The role of the principal is highlighted. (SLD)

  17. Maintaining Excellence While Managing Transitions: Norman S. Weir Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmons, Christine L.; Baskerville, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    In a national education climate where change is the only constant, Norman S. Weir Elementary School has maintained and expanded the reform efforts that have resulted in striking academic achievement and improved school climate. Despite changes in administration and staffing, a highly professional and committed staff has continued the…

  18. Recharge processes in an alluvial aquifer riparian zone, Norman Landfill, Norman, Oklahoma, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, Martha; Christenson, Scott; Cozzarelli, Isabelle; Ferree, Dale; Jaeshke, Jeanne

    2005-01-01

    Analyses of stable isotope profiles (d2H and d18O) in the saturated zone, combined with water-table fluctuations, gave a comprehensive picture of recharge processes in an alluvial aquifer riparian zone. At the Norman Landfill U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology research site in Norman, Oklahoma, recharge to the aquifer appears to drive biodegradation, contributing fresh supplies of electron acceptors for the attenuation of leachate compounds from the landfill. Quantifying recharge is a first step in studying this process in detail. Both chemical and physical methods were used to estimate recharge. Chemical methods included measuring the increase in recharge water in the saturated zone, as defined by isotopic signature, specific conductance or chloride measurements; and infiltration rate estimates using storm event isotopic signatures. Physical methods included measurement of water-table rise after individual rain events and on an approximately monthly time scale. Evapotranspiration rates were estimated using diurnal watertable fluctuations; outflux of water from the alluvial aquifer during the growing season had a large effect on net recharge at the site. Evaporation and methanogenesis gave unique isotopic signatures to different sources of water at the site, allowing the distinction of recharge using the offset of the isotopic signature from the local meteoric water line. The downward movement of water from large, isotopically depleted rain events in the saturated zone yielded recharge rate estimates (2.2 - 3.3 mm/day), and rates also were determined by observing changes in thickness of the layer of infiltrated recharge water at the top of the saturated zone (1.5 - 1.6 mm/day). Recharge measured over 2 years (1998-2000) in two locations at the site averaged 37 percent of rainfall, however, part of this water had only a short residence time in the aquifer. Isotopes showed recharge water entering the ground-water system in winter and spring, then being

  19. Norman Borlaug: the man I worked with and knew.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Sanjaya

    2011-01-01

    Much has been written about Norman Borlaug the agricultural scientist and humanitarian whose achievements are recognized with many accolades; to add to those writings is a difficult task. This brief paper is an attempt to provide a personal perspective on Norman Borlaug that can come only from someone who has worked closely with him throughout his professional life. I have endeavored to recollect my early impressions of working with Borlaug as a wheat breeder in Mexico and to highlight his innovative approach to wheat breeding, as well as his views on global population and food security, fertilizers, organic agriculture, biotechnology, and conventional academia. His work ethic was instrumental in his vision for the international agricultural system as an instrument of change in the world. His spirit serves as a reminder to future agricultural scientists that the battle must be vigorously engaged and can be won. PMID:21370972

  20. [Justice in health. Comment on the theory by Norman Daniels].

    PubMed

    Rauprich, O

    2009-05-01

    This comment outlines the current approach of Norman Daniels and illustrates its connection to the important theory of political justice by John Rawls. Despite some conceptual imprecision and a lack of coherency between his substantial and procedural account of justice, Daniels' approach qualifies as a benchmark for other current and future theories of justice and health. The social and political implications of his theory are far reaching: We are still far from protecting our health in the way we owe it to each other.

  1. Understanding Art Testing: Past Influences, Norman C. Meier's Contributions, Present Concerns, and Future Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Gilbert; And Others

    This collection of 10 papers focuses on art testing and Norman C. Meier's role in this area of study. The titles written by Gilbert Clark are: (1) "Early Inquiry, Research, and Testing of Children's Art Abilities"; (2) "Norman C. Meier: A Critique of His Tests and Research"; and (3) "Recent Inquiry and Testing of Children's Art Abilities." The…

  2. Norman L. Bowen Award to John Barry Dawson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joseph V.; Dawson, J. B.

    Barry Dawson is just right for th e first Norman L. Bowen Award in Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology. Like Norman L. Bowen, he has the inspiration to combine ideas from different disciplines to obtain a higher synthesis. Consider his brilliant talk of yesterday morning (Eos 69, p. 502, abstract V11C-06, Veined and metasomatised upper mantle beneath the Eastern African Rift: Evidence from N. Tanzania xenoliths). Barry rapidly reviewed the tectonic setting of east Africa, showed some nice photographs of the volcanic cones of Pello and Oldoinyo Lengai, focused on the upper-mantle xenoliths in scoria at Pello, moved in on the microscopy and mineral chemistry of the metasomatic veins in the peridotites, snowed how the lower density of a metasomatized peridotite would fit the middle of a geophysical profile from seismic surveys, and brought off a grand finale in which the Kenya dome was interpreted to result from inflation related to metasomatization of underlying peridotite. Undoubtedly, this will lead to many further studies of doming adjacent to rift systems around the world.

  3. Geologic environment of the Van Norman Reservoirs area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yerkes, R.F.; Bonilla, M.G.; Youd, T.L.; Sims, J.D.

    1974-01-01

    The upper and lower Van Norman dams, in northwesternmost San Fernando Valley about 20 mi (32 km) northwest of downtown Los Angeles, were severely damaged during the 1971 San Fernando earthquake. An investigation of the geologic-seismologic setting of the Van Norman area indicates that an earthquake of at least M 7.7 may be expected in the Van Norman area. The expectable transitory effects in the Van Norman area of such an earthquake are as follows: peak horizontal acceleration of at least 1.15 g, peak velocity of displacement of 4.43 ft/sec (135 cm/sec), peak displacement of 2.3 ft (70 cm), and duration of shaking at accelerations greater than 0.05 g, 40 sec. A great earthquake (M 8+) on the San Andreas fault, 25 mi distant, also is expectable. Transitory effects in the Van Norman area from such an earthquake are estimated as follows: peak horizontal acceleration of 0.5 g, peak velocity of 1.97 ft/sec (60 cm/sec), displacement of 1.31 ft (40 cm), and duration of shaking at accelerations greater than 0.05 g, 80 sec. The permanent effects of the expectable local earthquake could include simultaneous fault movement at the lower damsite, the upper damsite, and the site proposed for a replacement dam halfway between the upper and lower dams. The maximum differential displacements due to such movements are estimated at 16.4 ft (5 m) at the lower damsite and about 9.6 ft (2.93 m) at the upper and proposed damsites. The 1971 San Fernando earthquake (M 6?) was accompanied by the most intense ground motions ever recorded instrumentally for a natural earthquake. At the lower Van Norman dam, horizontal accelerations exceeded 0.6 g, and shaking greater than 0.25 g lasted for about 13 see; at Pacoima dam, 6 mi (10 km) northeast of the lower dam, high-frequency peak horizontal accelerations of 1.25 g were recorded in two directions, and shaking greater than 0.25 g lasted for about 7 sec. Permanent effects of the earthquake include slope failures in the embankments of the upper

  4. Younger Dryas Age advance of Franz Josef Glacier in the Southern Alps of New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, G.H. ); Hendy, C.H. )

    1994-06-03

    A corrected radiocarbon age of 11,050 [+-] 14 years before present for an advance of the Franz Josef Glacier to the Waiho Loop terminal moraine on the western flank of New Zealand's Southern Alps shows that glacier advance on a South Pacific island was synchronous with initiation of the Younger Dryas in the North Atlantic region. Hence, cooling at the beginning of the Younger Dryas probably reflects global rather than regional forcing. The source for Younger Dryas climatic cooling may thus lie in the atmosphere rather than in a North Atlantic thermohaline switch. 36 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Brno Studies in English. Volume Eight. Charisteria Iosepho Vachek Sexagenario Oblata (Festschrift in Honor of Josef Vachek's Sixtieth Birthday).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firbas, Jan, Ed.; Hladky, Josef, Ed.

    This festscrift is presented in honor of Josef Vachek, founder of the linguistic section of the Department of English and American studies of the Purkyne University. Papers in the collection represent a wide spectrum of research and thought in linguistics and the English language and are authored by the following: (1) J. Firbas, Brno; (2) M.…

  6. Temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes at the Norman Landfill site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Bhavna; Mohanty, Binayak P.; McGuire, Jennifer T.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2013-10-01

    The temporal variability observed in redox sensitive species in groundwater can be attributed to coupled hydrological, geochemical, and microbial processes. These controlling processes are typically nonstationary, and distributed across various time scales. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate biogeochemical data sets from a municipal landfill site to identify the dominant modes of variation and determine the physical controls that become significant at different time scales. Data on hydraulic head, specific conductance, δ2H, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon were collected between 1998 and 2000 at three wells at the Norman Landfill site in Norman, OK. Wavelet analysis on this geochemical data set indicates that variations in concentrations of reactive and conservative solutes are strongly coupled to hydrologic variability (water table elevation and precipitation) at 8 month scales, and to individual eco-hydrogeologic framework (such as seasonality of vegetation, surface-groundwater dynamics) at 16 month scales. Apart from hydrologic variations, temporal variability in sulfate concentrations can be associated with different sources (FeS cycling, recharge events) and sinks (uptake by vegetation) depending on the well location and proximity to the leachate plume. Results suggest that nitrate concentrations show multiscale behavior across temporal scales for different well locations, and dominant variability in dissolved organic carbon for a closed municipal landfill can be larger than 2 years due to its decomposition and changing content. A conceptual framework that explains the variability in chemical concentrations at different time scales as a function of hydrologic processes, site-specific interactions, and/or coupled biogeochemical effects is also presented.

  7. Temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes at the Norman Landfill site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arora, Bhavna; Mohanty, Binayak P.; McGuire, Jennifer T.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2013-01-01

    The temporal variability observed in redox sensitive species in groundwater can be attributed to coupled hydrological, geochemical, and microbial processes. These controlling processes are typically nonstationary, and distributed across various time scales. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate biogeochemical data sets from a municipal landfill site to identify the dominant modes of variation and determine the physical controls that become significant at different time scales. Data on hydraulic head, specific conductance, δ2H, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon were collected between 1998 and 2000 at three wells at the Norman Landfill site in Norman, OK. Wavelet analysis on this geochemical data set indicates that variations in concentrations of reactive and conservative solutes are strongly coupled to hydrologic variability (water table elevation and precipitation) at 8 month scales, and to individual eco-hydrogeologic framework (such as seasonality of vegetation, surface-groundwater dynamics) at 16 month scales. Apart from hydrologic variations, temporal variability in sulfate concentrations can be associated with different sources (FeS cycling, recharge events) and sinks (uptake by vegetation) depending on the well location and proximity to the leachate plume. Results suggest that nitrate concentrations show multiscale behavior across temporal scales for different well locations, and dominant variability in dissolved organic carbon for a closed municipal landfill can be larger than 2 years due to its decomposition and changing content. A conceptual framework that explains the variability in chemical concentrations at different time scales as a function of hydrologic processes, site-specific interactions, and/or coupled biogeochemical effects is also presented.

  8. Late-Quaternary exhumation rates constrained by OSL thermochronometry at the Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duverger, Arnaud; King, Georgina; Valla, Pierre; Cox, Simon; Herman, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Alps of New Zealand are often cited as the primary example of a mountain range that has reached exhumation and topographic steady state, especially on the West Coast where exhumation rates reach up to about 10 mm/yr. However, cyclic climatic changes, throughout the Quaternary period have meant that the Alps cycled between being completely glaciated and ice free. The impact that such glacial cycles may have had on the spatial variability of erosion rates remains poorly constrained. Here we use Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) as a very low temperature thermochronometer to constrain rock cooling histories at 10-100 kyr timescales on samples collected near the Franz Josef glacier. OSL-thermochronometry is based on the amount of electrons accumulated in the lattice defects of natural minerals such as quartz or feldspar, due to the competing effects of charge trapping due to the natural radioactivity within the rock and charge detrapping due to thermal loss during rock exhumation towards the surface. We collected 9 samples along the Waiho valley (crossing the Alpine Fault) and the Franz Josef glacier to quantify late-Quaternary exhumation rates and their potential spatial variations. Bedrock samples have been crushed to extract the light-safe rock interiors which have then been processed to isolate potassium-rich feldspars (K-feldspars). We used the Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence at 50°C (IRSL50) protocol, including the measurement of the natural IRSL50 trapped charge population and the laboratory characterization of sample-specific thermal and athermal kinetic parameters. Once measured, the luminescence signal can be inverted into cooling histories. We also explored the potential of the recently developed multi-OSL-thermochronometer (King et al., accepted) to better constrain the cooling path. Our first OSL measurements show that samples are not in saturation and thus contain useful thermochronometric information over the last ~100 kyr. Inverse

  9. New Paleomagnetic Data for the Franz Josef Land Archipelago and their Tectonic Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abashev, V.; Mikhaltsov, N.

    2014-12-01

    On the base of field work on the Franz Josef Land archipelago (FJL) in 2010 and 2011 the new paleomagnetic data are obtained from the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous magmatic complexes. Main focus of this work was concentrated on the Early-Jurassic basalts widely represented on the Hooker island [1]. Together with the previous data [2] statistically reasonable paleomagnetic pole for the age boundary of 190 million years for the FJL is received (PLat.=62.4; PLon.=140.2; dp/dm=5.5/5.0; N=13). Paleomagnetic data allow to assume that the position of the FJL relative to the Europe in the Early Jurassic significantly differs from the present one. But to the Early Cretaceous it reached relative position very close to the presently observed [2]. We suggest that at least during Early-Middle Jurassic there was rifting processes between the North Barentz terrane (FJL and (may be) Svalbard) and the other part of the European tectonic domain. This rift was accompanied by shifting of the FLJ to the north-eastward on about 500 km. Also obtained paleomagnetic data agree with a hypothesis assuming that the FJL was passing over the Icelandic-Siberian hot spot during Jurassic-Cretaceous time: main paleolatitudes correspond to the Island's present latitude and the paleolatitude of the Siberian trapps. Paleomagnetic study of FJL has a reconnaissance character and cannot lead to any ultimate deductions as the data is obviously not enough. And further work on the basaltic covers of the archipelago seems to be very promising. Research was supported by grant RFBR 13-05-00177. 1. Karyakin Yu.V., Shipilov E.V. Geochemical Specialization and the 40Ar/39Ar Age of Basaltoid Magmatism in the Aleksandra Land, Northbrook, Hooker, and Hayes Island (Franz Josef Land Archipelago) // Doklady Akademii Nauk, 2009, Vol.425, No.2, P. 213-217 (in Russian). 2. Bragin V.Yu., Karyakin Yu.V., Mikhaltsov N.E. The Franz Josef Land archipelago: reconnaissance paleomagnetic data // Large igneous provinces of Asia

  10. Reconstruction of mass balance variations for Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand, 1913 to 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Mingko Woo ); Fitzharris, B.B. )

    1992-11-01

    A model of mass balance is constructed for the Franz Josef Glacier on the west coast of New Zealand. It uses daily data from a nearby, but short-record climate station. The model is extended back to 1913 by creating hybrid climate data from a long-record, but more distant, climate station. Its monthly data provide long-term temperature and precipitation trends, and daily fluctuations are simulated using a stochastic approach that is tuned to the characteristics of the short-record station. The glacier model provides estimates of equilibrium-line altitudes which are in reasonable agreement with those observed, and variations of cumulative mass balance that correspond with patterns of advance and retreat of the glacier terminus.

  11. Relations between phytoplankton growth rates and nutrient dynamics in Lake Norman, North Carolina. Technical report series

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    A baseline study of phytoplankton production and nutrient dynamics was conducted on Lake Norman, NC, a 13000-ha, warm-monomictic reservoir, prior to the initiation of thermal inputs from an 1180-MW nuclear electric generation facility. The objective of the study was to identify the major physical, chemical and biological processes controlling nutrient dynamics in Lake Norman, with specific reference to the impact of phytoplankton production on the cycling of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus.

  12. Recent breakthroughs on C-2U: Norman's legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Tuszewski, M.; Schmitz, L.; Smirnov, A.; Gota, H.; Garate, E.; Barnes, D.; Deng, B. H.; Trask, E.; Yang, X.; Putvinski, S.; Andow, R.; Bolte, N.; Bui, D. Q.; Ceccherini, F.; Clary, R.; Cheung, A. H.; Conroy, K. D.; Dettrick, S. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Feng, P.; Galeotti, L.; Giammanco, F.; Granstedt, E.; Gupta, D.; Gupta, S.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kinley, J. S.; Knapp, K.; Korepanov, S.; Hollins, M.; Magee, R.; Mendoza, R.; Mok, Y.; Necas, A.; Primavera, S.; Onofri, M.; Osin, D.; Rath, N.; Roche, T.; Romero, J.; Schroeder, J. H.; Sevier, L.; Sibley, A.; Song, Y.; Steinhauer, L. C.; Thompson, M. C.; Van Drie, A. D.; Walters, J. K.; Waggoner, W.; Yushmanov, P.; Zhai, K.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional field-reversed configurations (FRC) face notable stability and confinement concerns, which can be ameliorated by introducing and maintaining a significant fast ion population in the system. This is the conjecture first introduced by Norman Rostoker multiple decades ago and adopted as the central design tenet in Tri Alpha Energy's advanced beam driven FRC concept. In fact, studying the physics of such neutral beam (NB) driven FRCs over the past decade, considerable improvements were made in confinement and stability. Next to NB injection, the addition of axially streaming plasma guns, magnetic end plugs, as well as advanced surface conditioning lead to dramatic reductions in turbulence driven losses and greatly improved stability. In turn, fast ion confinement improved significantly and allowed for the build-up of a dominant fast particle population. This recently led to the breakthrough of sustaining an advanced beam driven FRC, thereby demonstrating successful maintenance of trapped magnetic flux, plasma dimensions and total pressure inventory for times much longer than all characteristic system time scales and only limited by hardware and electric supply constraints.

  13. [To the centennial of Norman Holter (1914-1983)].

    PubMed

    Makarov, L M

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to the centennial of the founder of ambulatory ECG monitoring Norman Jeffrey Holter (1914-1983). It contains brief history of the scientist's family, and depiction of his own educational way from magister of chemistry and physics to specialist in nuclear research. His activity during World War II, research related to impact of nuclear tests on environment after the war is also described. The fact is stressed that N. Holter was organizer and first president of Society of Nuclear Medicine. But most prominent contribution of N. Holter was elaboration of the method of long-term ECG monitoring of freely active patients--the method which was later named Holter Monitoring (HM). The article also contains data of first clinical trials of HM systems and stresses contribution of Holter team-mates and colleagues (B. Del Mar, G. Kennedy, S. Stern and others) in their conduct. It shows technical and ideological evolution of HM systems from large apparatuses weighting 40 kg to modern portable devices capable of collecting, storing and processing huge amounts of information, transmitting it over internet to any distance. Nontriviality and serendipity of N. Holter's approach to obtaining novel unpredictable knowledge allowed him to realize his numerous talents and abilities.

  14. MCNPX Cosmic Ray Shielding Calculations with the NORMAN Phantom Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Michael R.; Durkee, Joe W.; McKinney, Gregg; Singleterry Robert

    2008-01-01

    The United States is planning manned lunar and interplanetary missions in the coming years. Shielding from cosmic rays is a critical aspect of manned spaceflight. These ventures will present exposure issues involving the interplanetary Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) environment. GCRs are comprised primarily of protons (approx.84.5%) and alpha-particles (approx.14.7%), while the remainder is comprised of massive, highly energetic nuclei. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) has commissioned a joint study with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to investigate the interaction of the GCR environment with humans using high-fidelity, state-of-the-art computer simulations. The simulations involve shielding and dose calculations in order to assess radiation effects in various organs. The simulations are being conducted using high-resolution voxel-phantom models and the MCNPX[1] Monte Carlo radiation-transport code. Recent advances in MCNPX physics packages now enable simulated transport over 2200 types of ions of widely varying energies in large, intricate geometries. We report here initial results obtained using a GCR spectrum and a NORMAN[3] phantom.

  15. On Norman Daniels' interpretation of the moral significance of healthcare.

    PubMed

    Schramme, T

    2009-01-01

    According to Norman Daniels, the moral significance of health needs stem from their impact on the normal opportunity range: pathological conditions involve comparative disadvantage. In this paper I defend an alternative reading of the moral importance of healthcare, which focuses on non-comparative aspects of disease. In the first section I distinguish two contrasting perspectives on pathological conditions, viz a comparative versus a non-comparative. By using this distinction I introduce a related disparity regarding the moral importance of personal responsibility for disease. I claim that people are usually prepared to disregard individual responsibility for disease, if it involves non-comparative harm, but not if it entails mere disadvantage. Since disadvantage means to have less than equal opportunities, Daniels' conception of opportunity is vital for his theory. It is therefore scrutinised more closely. I try to show that he wavers between two interpretations of the notion of opportunity, which are again linked to the distinction between a comparative and a non-comparative point of view. Finally, I criticise Daniels' supposition that persons have an interest in the normal opportunity range.

  16. [To the centennial of Norman Holter (1914-1983)].

    PubMed

    Makarov, L M

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to the centennial of the founder of ambulatory ECG monitoring Norman Jeffrey Holter (1914-1983). It contains brief history of the scientist's family, and depiction of his own educational way from magister of chemistry and physics to specialist in nuclear research. His activity during World War II, research related to impact of nuclear tests on environment after the war is also described. The fact is stressed that N. Holter was organizer and first president of Society of Nuclear Medicine. But most prominent contribution of N. Holter was elaboration of the method of long-term ECG monitoring of freely active patients--the method which was later named Holter Monitoring (HM). The article also contains data of first clinical trials of HM systems and stresses contribution of Holter team-mates and colleagues (B. Del Mar, G. Kennedy, S. Stern and others) in their conduct. It shows technical and ideological evolution of HM systems from large apparatuses weighting 40 kg to modern portable devices capable of collecting, storing and processing huge amounts of information, transmitting it over internet to any distance. Nontriviality and serendipity of N. Holter's approach to obtaining novel unpredictable knowledge allowed him to realize his numerous talents and abilities. PMID:26050493

  17. Spatial variation in hydraulic conductivity determined by slug tests in the Canadian River alluvium near the Norman Landfill, Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, Martha A.; Christenson, Scott C.

    1998-01-01

    Slug tests were used to characterize hydraulic conductivity variations at a spatial scale on the order of meters in the alluvial aquifer downgradient of the Norman Landfill. Forty hydraulic conductivity measurements were made, most along a 215-meter flow path transect. Measured hydraulic conductivity, excluding clayey layers, ranged from 8.4 ? 10-7 to 2.8 ? 10-4 meters per second, with a median value of 6.6 ? 10-5 meters per second. The hydraulic conductivity measurements yield a preliminary concept of the permeability structure of the aquifer along this transect. A low hydraulic conductivity silt-clay layer at about 4 meters below the water table and a high hydraulic conductivity layer at the base of the aquifer appear to have the most potential to affect contaminant transport. Specific conductance measurements show the leachate plume along this transect becomes attenuated between 150 and 200 meters downgradient of the landfill, except at the base of the aquifer, where it extends at least 225 meters downgradient of the landfill.

  18. Biogeochemical evolution of a landfill leachate plume, Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Masoner, Jason R.; Breit, George N.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Jaeschke, Jeanne B.

    2011-01-01

    Leachate from municipal landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that may last for decades to centuries. The fate of reactive contaminants in leachate-affected aquifers depends on the sustainability of biogeochemical processes affecting contaminant transport. Temporal variations in the configuration of redox zones downgradient from the Norman Landfill were studied for more than a decade. The leachate plume contained elevated concentrations of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) (up to 300 mg/L), methane (16 mg/L), ammonium (650 mg/L as N), iron (23 mg/L), chloride (1030 mg/L), and bicarbonate (4270 mg/L). Chemical and isotopic investigations along a 2D plume transect revealed consumption of solid and aqueous electron acceptors in the aquifer, depleting the natural attenuation capacity. Despite the relative recalcitrance of NVDOC to biodegradation, the center of the plume was depleted in sulfate, which reduces the long-term oxidation capacity of the leachate-affected aquifer. Ammonium and methane were attenuated in the aquifer relative to chloride by different processes: ammonium transport was retarded mainly by physical interaction with aquifer solids, whereas the methane plume was truncated largely by oxidation. Studies near plume boundaries revealed temporal variability in constituent concentrations related in part to hydrologic changes at various time scales. The upper boundary of the plume was a particularly active location where redox reactions responded to recharge events and seasonal water-table fluctuations. Accurately describing the biogeochemical processes that affect the transport of contaminants in this landfill-leachate-affected aquifer required understanding the aquifer's geologic and hydrodynamic framework.

  19. Norman Rockwell's "Man's First Step On The Moon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Timothy

    2011-05-01

    Rockwell's painting, which appeared in the January 10, 1967 issue of Look magazine, is perhaps the most famous ever done of an astronaut's first step on the Moon. But it has a number of astronomical misconceptions, many of which are apparent to sharp-eyed introductory astronomy students: the size of the Earth in the lunar sky is too large compared to the Big Dipper, the orbiting Command Service Module is illuminated from a different direction than the Earth is, and the lighting on the lunar surface is also inconsistent, among other errors. This raises the question: How could Rockwell, a notoriously meticulous illustrator, have apparently been so careless? It turns out that Rockwell was anything but careless, but rather was typically obsessive about every detail in the painting. He was in constant communication with experts, even traveling to Huston to meet with NASA officials. He went so far as to enlist the help of space artist Pierre Mion, who ended up doing part of the painting, one of only two known collaborations between Rockwell and another artist. When the Look article was published, readers responded with praise but also criticism about the technical errors that still slipped through, to Rockwell's great frustration. The most important part of the painting, however, is accurate and compelling: the astronaut is shown stepping off the LM exactly as Neil Armstrong would do over two years later. The astronaut's boot covers part of the shadow that it casts. Does the shadow run all the way to the heel, or is the boot poised just above the lunar surface? Has the artist captured the instant after, or, perhaps, the instant before, humanity's first contact with another world? I am grateful to the curators at the Norman Rockwell Museum Archives for their assistance.

  20. A new Little Ice Age chronology of the Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinzey, K. M.; Lawson, W.; Kelly, D.

    2003-04-01

    The Little Ice Age (LIA) chronology of the Franz Josef Glacier (FJG), New Zealand, was reassessed due to previous uncertainty surrounding the timing of its maximum extent, eg. 1450 (Burrows 1990), 1600 (Wardle 1973) or 1750 AD (Lawrence and Lawrence 1965). Tree age-size relationships based on data from 75 ring counts and diameters collected from southern rata (Metrosideros umbellata) and kamahi (Weinmannia racemosa) allowed the ages of 1340 trees measured within fifty, 150 m2 quadrats in the Waiho Valley to be predicted. Ages of the oldest trees were then used to determine the time elapsed since deglaciation, or alternatively, the culmination of the preceding advance. The revised chronology showed that the LIA maximum of the FJG culminated by c. 1470-1530 AD, when the terminus was located approximately 4.5 km down-valley of its position in 2001. Subsequent, but smaller magnitude, re-advances culminated by c. 1580-1610 and c. 1790-1840 AD. Average terminus retreat rates after the LIA maximum varied between 7-9 m a-1 and reached 23 m a-1 by the early to mid-1800's, which suggests that climatic amelioration signalling the end of the LIA occurred in New Zealand by the early 19th Century.

  1. Obituary: Norman Hodgson Baker, Jr., 1931-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, David J.

    2005-12-01

    Norman H. Baker, a key contributor to the foundation of modern stellar pulsation theory and former editor of the "Astronomical Journal", died on 11 October 2005 in Watertown, New York near his beloved summer home in Natural Bridge. He succumbed to complications of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, a bone marrow lymphoma that he had successfully surmounted for twenty-two years. Norm, as he was known to all, was born 23 October 1931 in Fergus Falls, Minnesota to Norman Hodgson and Jeannette (née Lieber) Baker. He attended the University of Minnesota where he met the first of many lifelong astronomical friends, Bill Erickson. He received his BA in 1952. He went on to do his PhD, "Radiation from Particle Interactions which Create Current," at Cornell University under Phil Morrison. He then moved to a postdoctoral position at the Max Planck Institut für Physik und Astrophysik in München with the intent of pursuing his work in plasma physics with Ludwig Biermann and Arnulf Schlüter. However, Rudolf (Rudi) Kippenhan snatched him away to pursue what became his lifelong interest, stellar physics. This was the dawn of the era in which electronic computers were becoming practical for scientific calculations, and Norm immediately adopted this new tool. Indeed, he remained at the forefront of computing technology throughout his life: He was certainly the first member of the Astronomy Department at Columbia to buy a Mac, and was undoubtedly one of the few emeritus professors in the world known by all the administrative staff as the first person to turn to when stumped by a computer problem. Following his first paper with Kippenhan on stellar rotation, Norm turned his attention to stellar pulsations, a topic he would pursue throughout his career. His 1962 paper in "Zeitschrift für Astrophysik" on pulsational models of Cepheids (Baker and Kippenhan 1962, 54, 155) is a classic in the field. The first figure displays the three dimensional model of the atmospheric absorption

  2. Obituary: Norman Hodgson Baker, Jr., 1931-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, David J.

    2005-12-01

    Norman H. Baker, a key contributor to the foundation of modern stellar pulsation theory and former editor of the "Astronomical Journal", died on 11 October 2005 in Watertown, New York near his beloved summer home in Natural Bridge. He succumbed to complications of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, a bone marrow lymphoma that he had successfully surmounted for twenty-two years. Norm, as he was known to all, was born 23 October 1931 in Fergus Falls, Minnesota to Norman Hodgson and Jeannette (née Lieber) Baker. He attended the University of Minnesota where he met the first of many lifelong astronomical friends, Bill Erickson. He received his BA in 1952. He went on to do his PhD, "Radiation from Particle Interactions which Create Current," at Cornell University under Phil Morrison. He then moved to a postdoctoral position at the Max Planck Institut für Physik und Astrophysik in München with the intent of pursuing his work in plasma physics with Ludwig Biermann and Arnulf Schlüter. However, Rudolf (Rudi) Kippenhan snatched him away to pursue what became his lifelong interest, stellar physics. This was the dawn of the era in which electronic computers were becoming practical for scientific calculations, and Norm immediately adopted this new tool. Indeed, he remained at the forefront of computing technology throughout his life: He was certainly the first member of the Astronomy Department at Columbia to buy a Mac, and was undoubtedly one of the few emeritus professors in the world known by all the administrative staff as the first person to turn to when stumped by a computer problem. Following his first paper with Kippenhan on stellar rotation, Norm turned his attention to stellar pulsations, a topic he would pursue throughout his career. His 1962 paper in "Zeitschrift für Astrophysik" on pulsational models of Cepheids (Baker and Kippenhan 1962, 54, 155) is a classic in the field. The first figure displays the three dimensional model of the atmospheric absorption

  3. Norman Rockwell's "The Problem We All Live With:" Teaching "Bush v. Orleans Parish School Board"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Tiffany

    2011-01-01

    "The Problem We All Live With" is one of Norman Rockwell's most famous, and provocative, images. First printed in the January 14, 1964, issue of "Look" magazine, the image features an approximately six-year-old African American girl walking. She is wearing a white dress, white socks and white shoes. Her hair is parted in neat braids and she is…

  4. Norman C. Gysbers: Reflections on Three Decades as Editor of the "Journal of Career Development"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppner, Mary J.; Wagner, Julie

    2011-01-01

    As many regular readers of the journal have noticed, the editorship of the "Journal of Career Development" has been passed from Norman C. Gysbers to Lisa Y. Flores. Unlike other journals whose editorships are more typically 3 to 6 years, Dr. Gysbers has guided the journal for almost three decades. Although Dr. Gysbers' life and enormous…

  5. The Contradictions of Contemporary Culture: A Tribute to Norman Jay Levitt (1943-2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Norman Jay Levitt was the author's good friend, collaborator, and co-author. He was--above, before, and after politics--an honest inquirer. His socio-cultural views evolved continuously. Levitt, truth-seeker and liberal, was impatient with, and a devastating critic of, the political correctness and--even worse--the philosophic triviality that…

  6. The Brown University Traumatic Brain Injury Research Consortium and the Norman Prince Neurosciences Institute.

    PubMed

    Rogg, Jeffrey; Spader, Heather; Wilcox, Bethany J; Ellermeier, Anna; Correira, Steven; Chodobski, Adam; Szmydynger-Chodobska, Joanna; Raukar, Neha; Machan, Jason T; Crisco, Joseph J; LaFrance, W Curt

    2014-05-01

    This article provides an overview of the Brown University Traumatic Brain Injury Research Consortium (TBIRC) and summarizes the multidisciplinary basic and clinical neuroscience work being conducted by investigators at Brown University and the affiliate hospitals in association with the Norman Prince Neurosciences Institute (NPNI).

  7. Visibility and Rhetoric: The Power of Visual Images in Norman Rockwell's Depictions of Civil Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Victoria; Zagacki, Kenneth S.

    2005-01-01

    This essay demonstrates how visual works of art may operate rhetorically to articulate public knowledge, to illustrate the moral challenges facing citizens, and to shape commemorative practices, through an analysis of Norman Rockwell's civil rights paintings of the 1960s. By examining the rhetorical aspects of these paintings, including their form…

  8. Climate Change of Franz Josef Land in the XX-XXI Centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilovtseva, Olga; Romanenko, Fedor

    2016-04-01

    The results of climatic observations on the most northern land of Eurasia - Franz Josef Land, that was discovered in 1874, are presented. The gaps in the observations of the observatory named after Ernst Krenkel (Hayes's Island) were supplemented by calculations using reanalysis ERA Interim. It was received the positive trend in surface air temperature during 1958-2013. It is mainly achieved by increasing of the air temperature in winter but the summer trend is not statistically significant. Data of observation and reanalysis are perfectly correlated in cold period when underlying surface is uniform (correlation coefficient of more than 0.95). In summer, the correlation coefficients between the calculated and the real data are significantly lower (up to 0.68). This fact may be a consequence of the small values of the mean air temperatures of summer months (for example, during the July they varied in the interval -1-+2 degrees C.). Furthermore, it may be caused by the difficulty of model reproduction of the real state of the underlying surface, where land, ice, snow and water are chaotically combined. The analysis of circulation types by B.L. Dzerdzeevsky has shown that in the mid-XX Century, the northern meridional and western zonal types of circulation were replaced by southern meridional one, which prevailed during the first decade of the XXI too. This causes a reduction of the ice cover period, which resulted in a strengthening of the beach erosion and of slope processes. But short-term flows of warm air from the south, causing a catastrophic melting of glaciers, were also repeatedly marked in the past. This work is supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project № 14-37-00038) and by the national park "Russian Arctic".

  9. Josef Hammar (1868-1927) - a Swedish physician in the Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902).

    PubMed

    Bro, Tomas

    2016-05-01

    It is well-known that the Anglo-Boer War attracted support and sympathy for the Boer cause from all over Europe. One topic that has not received much scholarly attention, however, is the contribution of Scandinavian medical doctors and nurses in the conflict. One of them was the Swedish surgeon Josef Hammar. This article argues that his participation was for both idealistic and pragmatic reasons. Further, it presents new sources for understanding the day-to-day work in military medicine in the Boer war from an outside perspective and discusses the issue of medical neutrality in a conflict that has been called the rehearsal for the First World War.

  10. Naturally Occurring Arsenic in Ground Water, Norman, Oklahoma, 2004, and Remediation Options for Produced Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S. Jerrod; Christenson, Scott

    2005-01-01

    In 2000, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reviewed the arsenic drinking water standard for public water supplies. Considering the available research and statistics on the health effects of arsenic ingestion, the EPA reduced the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for public drinking water from 50 micrograms per liter (?g/L) to 10 ?g/L (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2001a). As a result of the more stringent standard, the EPA estimates that about 3,000 public water providers across the United States must take action to meet the new standard before it becomes effective on January 23, 2006 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2001b). The City of Norman (City) is one of several Oklahoma municipalities affected by the new arsenic standard. About 20 percent of Norman?s water is supplied by wells completed in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer; the rest is supplied by Lake Thunderbird (fig. 1) or purchased from Oklahoma City. The Norman well field is composed of 24 active wells, and water produced from about half of the wells will not be in compliance with the new MCL (figs. 2 and 3). Chemical treatment of water with elevated arsenic is possible, but it is generally cost prohibitive. Another costly solution is simply to abandon the high-arsenic wells and replace them with new wells in low-arsenic areas. In the next phase of well construction beginning in 2005, the City plans to construct as many as 30 new wells in northeast Norman (Bryan Mitchell, City of Norman, oral commun., 2005). The new wells will replace production lost to the new arsenic standard and add new production to keep pace with rapidly growing consumer demand. Well modification to exclude arsenic-bearing water from existing wells is a more cost-effective solution, but it requires a great deal of knowledge about local aquifer properties and individual well dynamics to decide which wells are good candidates for modification. With the goal of determining if well modification

  11. Pestalozzi in Dewey's Realm? Bauhaus Master Josef Albers among the German-Speaking Emigres' Colony at Black Mountain College (1933-1949)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fussl, Karl Heinz

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with German academic emigres who fled Hitler after 1933 and established their refuge at the American-based Black Mountain College in North Carolina, founded as an alternative to traditional institutions of higher education in that very year. Of particular consideration are the contributions of noted Bauhaus master Josef Albers…

  12. Stable-isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen in precipitation at Norman, Oklahoma, 1996-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaeschke, Jeanne B.; Scholl, Martha A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Masoner, Jason R.; Christenson, Scott; Qi, Haiping

    2011-01-01

    Precipitation samples for measurement of stable-isotope ratios of hydrogen (delta2H) and oxygen (delta18O) were collected at the Norman Landfill Research Site in Norman, Oklahoma, from May 1996 to October 2008. Rainfall amounts also were measured at the site (U.S. Geological Survey gaging station 07229053) during the collection period. The delta2H of precipitation samples ranged from -121.9 to +8.3 per mil, and the delta18O of precipitation ranged from -16.96 to +0.50 per mil. The volume-weighted average values for delta2H and delta18O of precipitation over the 12-year measurement period were -31.13 per mil for delta2H and -5.57 per mil for delta18O. Average summer-season delta2H and delta18O values of precipitation usually were more positive (enriched in the heavier isotopes) than winter values.

  13. [Norman Bethune (1890-1939), an involved doctor, icon of the blood transfusion history].

    PubMed

    Gentili, M E

    2016-05-01

    Norman Bethune was born in 1890, in Gravenhurst (Ontario, Canada). Thereafter a strong surgical training, he implied in thoracic surgery and fight against tuberculosis. His political opinions led him to join the Republicans in the Spanish Civil War. He played an important part in the development of blood transfusion on the battlefield. Then he joined China with communist troops and therein developed surgical units and accelerated training for health personal. He died of septicemia in 1939. PMID:26921106

  14. Botany and zoology in the late seventeenth-century Philippines: the work of Georg Josef Camel SJ (1661-1706).

    PubMed

    Reyes, Raquel A G

    2009-10-01

    Georg Josef Camel (1661-1706) went to the Spanish colony of the Philippine Islands as a Jesuit lay brother in 1687, and he remained there until his death. Throughout his time in the Philippines, Camel collected examples of the flora and fauna, which he drew and described in detail. This paper offers an overview of his life, his publications and the Camel manuscripts, drawings and specimens that are preserved among the Sloane Manuscripts in the British Library and in the Sloane Herbarium at the Natural History Museum, London. It also discusses Camel's links and exchanges with scientifically minded plant collectors and botanists in London, Madras and Batavia. Among those with whom Camel corresponded were John Ray, James Petiver, and the Dutch physician Willem Ten Rhijne.

  15. Botany and zoology in the late seventeenth-century Philippines: the work of Georg Josef Camel SJ (1661-1706).

    PubMed

    Reyes, Raquel A G

    2009-10-01

    Georg Josef Camel (1661-1706) went to the Spanish colony of the Philippine Islands as a Jesuit lay brother in 1687, and he remained there until his death. Throughout his time in the Philippines, Camel collected examples of the flora and fauna, which he drew and described in detail. This paper offers an overview of his life, his publications and the Camel manuscripts, drawings and specimens that are preserved among the Sloane Manuscripts in the British Library and in the Sloane Herbarium at the Natural History Museum, London. It also discusses Camel's links and exchanges with scientifically minded plant collectors and botanists in London, Madras and Batavia. Among those with whom Camel corresponded were John Ray, James Petiver, and the Dutch physician Willem Ten Rhijne. PMID:20014508

  16. Earthquake-induced structures in sediments of Van Norman Lake, San Fernando, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sims, J.D.

    1973-01-01

    The 9 February 1971 earthquake in the San Fernando Valley damaged the Lower Van Norman Dam severely enough to warrant draining the reservoir. In March 1972 the sediment deposited on the reservoir floor was examined to determine whether the 1971 earthquake had induced sediment deformation and, if so, what types. A zone of deformational structures characterized by small-scale loads and slightly recumbent folds associated with the 1971 earthquake was discovered, in addition to two older zones of load structures. Each of the zones has been tentatively correlated with an historic earthquake.

  17. Norman Jolliffe, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the origins of the modern alcoholism movement.

    PubMed

    Roizen, R

    1994-07-01

    Archival sources shed new light on and offer a fuller picture of the story of Norman Jolliffe's early, but finally unsuccessful, effort to interest the Rockefeller Foundation's Division of Medical Sciences in funding a comprehensive program of alcoholism research in the late 1930s. New documentation also casts doubt on Mark Keller's contention that the Research Council on Problems of Alcohol--the organizational flagship of the "new scientific approach" to alcohol-related problems in this period--emerged directly from Jolliffe's failed Rockefeller Foundation request.

  18. New Indo-Pacific species of the genus Teretia Norman, 1888 (Gastropoda: Raphitomidae).

    PubMed

    Morassi, Mauro; Bonfitto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Four new species are assigned to the genus Teretia Norman, 1888 in the family Raphitomidae Bellardi, 1875 and herein described: Teretia neocaledonica sp. nov., T. sysoevi sp. nov., T. tongaensis sp. nov. from the southeastern Pacific and Teretia tavianii sp. nov. from the Gulf of Aden. The new species represent the first Indo-Pacific record of a genus previously known in the recent molluscan fauna by only two species from the Atlantic Ocean-Mediterranean Sea and Southern Africa. A possible Tethyan origin for the genus Teretia is suggested.  PMID:25661630

  19. New Indo-Pacific species of the genus Teretia Norman, 1888 (Gastropoda: Raphitomidae).

    PubMed

    Morassi, Mauro; Bonfitto, Antonio

    2015-01-21

    Four new species are assigned to the genus Teretia Norman, 1888 in the family Raphitomidae Bellardi, 1875 and herein described: Teretia neocaledonica sp. nov., T. sysoevi sp. nov., T. tongaensis sp. nov. from the southeastern Pacific and Teretia tavianii sp. nov. from the Gulf of Aden. The new species represent the first Indo-Pacific record of a genus previously known in the recent molluscan fauna by only two species from the Atlantic Ocean-Mediterranean Sea and Southern Africa. A possible Tethyan origin for the genus Teretia is suggested. 

  20. Preliminary studies on neutron conversion coefficients calculated with MCNPX in NORMAN voxel phantom.

    PubMed

    Gualdrini, G; Ferrari, P

    2007-01-01

    Effective dose is the main radiation protection quantity. Progresses in radiation studies brought ICRP to revise ICRP 60 recommendations. A new publication, already circulated in form of draft, is expected to change some aspects of effective dose evaluation method. The organ absorbed doses for neutrons at various energies and incidence angles, necessary to estimate the effective dose, have been published in ICRU 57 and ICRP 74 reports for ADAM and EVA analytical male and female phantoms and similar calculations were also performed, based on the MCNP code, for VIP-MAN voxel phantom. The NORMAN voxel phantom, developed on the basis of magnetic resonance data of an adult male at HPA (formerly NRPB), is an accurate model (with a voxel element of approximately 8 mm(3)), which well approximates the standard man and has been already employed for radiation protection studies with photons. In the present paper, a modified version, called NORMAN-05, including a new organ, the salivary glands (as suggested in the mentioned ICRP draft), and a more detailed skeletal description, especially devoted to red bone marrow dose evaluation, has been employed with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX to calculate neutron conversion coefficients from thermal energies to 20 MeV. Some preliminary results, for antero-posterior and postero-anterior irradiation conditions, are presented and compared with the available published data. PMID:17502319

  1. Expectable Earthquakes and their ground motions in the Van Norman Reservoirs Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wesson, R.L.; Page, R.A.; Boore, D.M.; Yerkes, R.F.

    1974-01-01

    The upper and lower Van Norman dams, in northwesternmost San Fernando Valley about 20 mi (32 km) northwest of downtown Los Angeles, were severely damaged during the 1971 San Fernando earthquake. An investigation of the geologic-seismologic setting of the Van Norman area indicates that an earthquake of at least M 7.7 may be expected in the Van Norman area. The expectable transitory effects in the Van Norman area of such an earthquake are as follows: peak horizontal acceleration of at least 1.15 g, peak velocity of displacement of 4.43 ft/sec (135 cm/sec), peak displacement of 2.3 ft (70 cm), and duration of shaking at accelerations greater than 0.05 g, 40 sec. A great earthquake (M 8+) on the San Andreas fault, 25 mi distant, also is expectable. Transitory effects in the Van Norman area from such an earthquake are estimated as follows: peak horizontal acceleration of 0.5 g, peak velocity of 1.97 ft/sec (60 cm/sec), displacement of 1.31 ft (40 cm), and duration of shaking at accelerations greater than 0.05 g, 80 sec. The permanent effects of the expectable local earthquake could include simultaneous fault movement at the lower damsite, the upper damsite, and the site proposed for a replacement dam halfway between the upper and lower dams. The maximum differential displacements due to such movements are estimated at 16.4 ft (5 m) at the lower damsite and about 9.6 ft (2.93 m) at the upper and proposed damsites. The 1971 San Fernando earthquake (M 6?) was accompanied by the most intense ground motions ever recorded instrumentally for a natural earthquake. At the lower Van Norman dam, horizontal accelerations exceeded 0.6 g, and shaking greater than 0.25 g lasted for about 13 see; at Pacoima dam, 6 mi (10 km) northeast of the lower dam, high-frequency peak horizontal accelerations of 1.25 g were recorded in two directions, and shaking greater than 0.25 g lasted for about 7 sec. Permanent effects of the earthquake include slope failures in the embankments of the upper

  2. "The environment as a cause of disease in children": Josef Friedjung's transnational influence on modern child welfare theory.

    PubMed

    Danto, Elizabeth Ann

    2013-01-01

    Josef K. Friedjung's Advanced Pediatrics--A Companion to Traditional Textbooks (Erlebte Kinderheilkunde--eine Ergänzung er gebräuchlichen Lehrbucher), published in 1919 in Vienna, has cast a long but nearly-vanished shadow over modern child welfare theory. The originality of his focus on "the whole child" was in some ways a commentary on Sigmund Freud, but its overtly progressive political character gave Friedjung's argument visible applicability within the field of urban social welfare. As a pediatrician and an ardent cosmopolitan, Friedjung was willing to consider conflicting values between traditional family systems and the state. Had the Nazis not forced him into exile in Palestine, where he died in 1946, Friedjung's pioneering oeuvre would have joined our child welfare narrative long ago. Fortunately today archival evidence on which this study draws, fragmented as it is in both German and English, does confirm that the first and second generation psychoanalysts, Friedjung among them, built a mental health movement around a social justice core closely allied to the cultural context of central Europe from 1918 to 1933. In many ways, child welfare as we know it emerged as a practical implementation of that ideology.

  3. The structure and diversity of freshwater diatom assemblages from Franz Josef Land Archipelago: a northern outpost for freshwater diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Paul B.; Ballesteros, Enric; Gavrilo, Maria; Friedlander, Alan M.; Sala, Enric

    2016-01-01

    We examined diatom assemblages from 18 stream and pond samples in the Franz Josef Land Archipelago (FJL), the most northern land of Eurasia. More than 216 taxa were observed, revealing a rich circumpolar diatom flora, including many undescribed taxa. Widely distributed taxa were the most abundant by cell densities, while circumpolar taxa were the most species rich. Stream and pond habitats hosted different assemblages, and varied along a pH gradient. Diatoma tenuis was the most abundant and ubiquitous taxon. However, several circumpolar taxa such as Chamaepinnularia gandrupii, Cymbella botellus, Psammothidium sp. and Humidophila laevissima were also found in relatively high abundances. Aerophilic taxa were an important component of FJL diatom assemblages (Humidophila spp., Caloneis spp. and Pinnularia spp.), reflecting the large and extreme seasonal changes in Arctic conditions. We predict a decrease in the abundance of circumpolar taxa, an increase in local (α-) freshwater diatom diversity, but a decrease in regional diversity (circumpolar homogenization) as a result of current warming trends and to a lesser extent the increasing human footprint in the region. PMID:26925329

  4. The unexpected confluence of plasma physics and climate science: On the lives and legacies of Norman Rostoker and Sherry Rowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Katherine R. M.

    2016-03-01

    The Norman Rostoker Memorial Symposium brought together approximately 150 attendees to share their recent work and to reflect on the contributions of Norman Rostoker to the field of plasma physics and the advancement of fusion as a source of renewable clean energy. The field has changed considerably in a few short decades, with theoretical advances and technological innovations evolving in lock step. Over those same decades, our understanding of human induced climate change has also evolved; measurable changes in Earth's physical, chemical, and biological processes have already been observed, and these will likely intensify in the coming decades. Never before has the need for clean energy been more pronounced, or the need for transformative solutions more pressing. As scientists work with legislators, journalists, and the public to take actions to address the threat of climate change, there is much to be learned from the legacies of innovators like Norman Rostoker, who have tackled complex problems with scientific insight and determination even when the odds were stacked against them. I write this from the perspective on an Earth system scientist who studies photosynthesis and the biogeochemistry of the oceans, and my statements about plasma physics and Norman Rostoker are based on information I gathered from the colloquium and from many enjoyable conversations with his friends and colleagues.

  5. Subsurface imaging of an abandoned solid waste landfill site in Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zume, J.T.; Tarhule, A.; Christenson, S.

    2006-01-01

    Leachate plume emanating from an old unlined municipal landfill site near the city of Norman, Oklahoma, is discharging into the underlying alluvial aquifer. Subsurface imaging techniques, electrical resistivity tomography and electrical conductivity (EC) logging, were used on the site to detect and map the position of the leachate plume. Anomalous EC zones, delineated with the two methods, correlated with the occurrence of the plume detected by water chemistry analyses from multilevel monitoring wells. Specific conductance, a potential indicator of leachate contamination, ranged from 1861 to 7710 ??S/cm in contaminated zones and from 465 to 2180 ??S/cm in uncontaminated ground water. Results are in agreement with those from earlier studies that the leachate plume emerges from the landfill along preferential pathways. Additionally, there are indications that the leading edge of the plume has migrated, at least, 200 m away from the landfill in the direction of ground water flow. ?? 2006 National Ground Water Association.

  6. A new species of Gastrosaccus Norman, 1868 (Mysida, Mysidae, Gastrosaccinae) from a sandy shore of Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Hanamura, Yukio; Mantiri, Rose O.S.E.; Ohtsuka, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the mysid crustacean genus Gastrosaccus Norman, 1868 (Mysida, Mysidae, Gastrosaccinae) is reported from a sandy shore of Lombok Island, Indonesia. These specimens resemble G. sorrentoensis Wooldridge & McLachlan, 1986 and G. yuyu Bamber and Morton, 2012 by the possession of an articulated process on the fifth abdominal somite together with a fringe of spine-like filaments on the posterodorsal margin of the carapace. The Lombok population differs from the known congeners by having comparatively fewer numbers of carpopropod segments on the endopod of the third to eighth thoracic limbs and the conformation in the telson and in the male third pleopod. Hence, G. lombokiensis sp. n. is proposed herein as a third species of “G. sorrentoensis” species group. PMID:25197216

  7. Ground water in the alluvial deposits of the Canadian River valley near Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacy, Bill L.

    1961-01-01

    Unconsolidated water-bearing alluvial deposits border the Canadian River in the vicinity of Norman, Oklahoma. These Quaternary materials are divided on the basis of topgraphic position into 'high terrace deposits' and 'alluvium.' The high terrace lies at an elevation of 50 to 60 feet above the alluvium, which in turn lies 7 to 15 feet above the channel of the Canadian River. Southwest of Norman a relatively thick section of these deposits occur as a hydrologic unit and overlie impermeable Permian shale. The high terrace deposits contain thick beds of clay, silt, and fine sand, whereas the alluvium contains a higher percentage of coarse sand and gravel. Ground-water recharge is estimated to be 23 percent of the normal annual precipitation of 33.22 inches; the specific yield is about 15 percent, and the coefficient of permeability is about 1,000 gpd/ft2. Using these figures 17,000 acre-feet of water is computed to be in storage within the area acting as a hydrologic unit. About 3.6 million gallons of water is discharged daily from the high terrace deposits through a 16,000-foot section of alluvium having a saturated thickness of 40 feet along the river. The quality of water in the high terrace deposits meets the standards of the U.S. Public Health Service for domestic water used by Interstate carriers but nitrate content of one well is higher than recommended by the Oklahoma Department of Public Health. Water in the alluvium is of poorer quality because the water is concentrated by evapotranspiration. (available as photostat copy only)

  8. Water chemistry near the closed Norman Landfill, Cleveland County, Oklahoma 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlottmann, Jamie L.

    2001-01-01

    The Norman Landfill was selected for study as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program in 1994. The landfill is located south of the City of Norman on alluvial deposits of the Canadian River. Type of waste deposited in the landfill from 1922 to 1973 was largely unrestricted and may include substances now recognized as hazardous. Dissolved and suspended substances leached from wastes in the closed and capped landfill are now in ground water extending toward the Canadian River as a plume of leachate. Water samples were collected from two stock wells, one domestic well, temporary drive-point wells, the Canadian River, and a small intermittent stream hydraulically downgradient of the capped landfill known as the slough. Most constituent concentrations were greater in ground water downgradient from the capped landfill than in background ground water and were greater in the slough than in the Canadian River. Concentrations of most constituents in the Canadian River, other than sulfate, manganese, and iron, were similar to concentrations in background ground water. Some constituents measured in ground-water for this investigation are potential indicators of leachate contamination. Potential indicators that could be used to differentiate leachate contaminated water from uncontaminated ground water of the alluvial aquifer include specific conductance, chloride, alkalinity, dissolved organic carbon, boron, and dD. Specific conductance and chloride were greater in water from wells downgradient of the landfill than water from background wells. Dissolved organic carbon and boron also were greater in the leachate contaminated ground water than in background ground water.

  9. [Botanical journey of Josef A. Knapp in Galicia as a part of exploration of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy].

    PubMed

    Wysokińska, Beata

    2011-01-01

    Josef Armin Knapp (1843-1899) as Austrian botanist was interested in development of botanical knowledge of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy--his maternal country. Monarchy, during the long regency of emperor Franz Josef I, was multinational, very much diversified geographically territory. This large empire had included, among others, such countries as present Austria, Hungary, Slovakia, Croatia, Ukraine, Romania and the southern part of present Poland--previously known as Galicia. J. A. Knapp was interested in studying these parts of empire which were considered peripheries and less-known. It seems to have met the requirements of science, economy and administration of Vienna. J. A. Knapp in his large floristic researches had included explorations of considerable part of the Monarchy and had left an interesting scientific legacy. His research papers were results of botanical explorations in selected areas of the Monarchy--area of Nitra (currently a city in Slovakia), Slavonia (presently a land in Croatia) and Galicia (the historical area in the south of Poland). This article refers to the botanical journey of J. A. Knapp in Galicia in summer 1868. The main purpose of his journey was to visit and explore selected places in Galicia--the surroundings of Jaslo and Sanok towns and some specific areas within the Bieszczady Mountains, which are part of the Carpathians Mountains. Botanical researches in the Bieszczady Mountains provided by J. A. Knapp can be considered nowadays as very important and pioneering in that area. In the second part of XIX century this area was highly populated and the observed anthropogenic pressure applied to the nature was strong. Now, the area is considered a very valuable natural territory--since 1973 it has been occupied by the Bieszczady National Park--one of Polish national parks. J. A. Knapp had spent more than two months in Galicia thanks to the great hospitality of Polish people, especially botanists: A. Rehmann, I. R. Czerwiakowski, W. Jab

  10. [Botanical journey of Josef A. Knapp in Galicia as a part of exploration of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy].

    PubMed

    Wysokińska, Beata

    2011-01-01

    Josef Armin Knapp (1843-1899) as Austrian botanist was interested in development of botanical knowledge of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy--his maternal country. Monarchy, during the long regency of emperor Franz Josef I, was multinational, very much diversified geographically territory. This large empire had included, among others, such countries as present Austria, Hungary, Slovakia, Croatia, Ukraine, Romania and the southern part of present Poland--previously known as Galicia. J. A. Knapp was interested in studying these parts of empire which were considered peripheries and less-known. It seems to have met the requirements of science, economy and administration of Vienna. J. A. Knapp in his large floristic researches had included explorations of considerable part of the Monarchy and had left an interesting scientific legacy. His research papers were results of botanical explorations in selected areas of the Monarchy--area of Nitra (currently a city in Slovakia), Slavonia (presently a land in Croatia) and Galicia (the historical area in the south of Poland). This article refers to the botanical journey of J. A. Knapp in Galicia in summer 1868. The main purpose of his journey was to visit and explore selected places in Galicia--the surroundings of Jaslo and Sanok towns and some specific areas within the Bieszczady Mountains, which are part of the Carpathians Mountains. Botanical researches in the Bieszczady Mountains provided by J. A. Knapp can be considered nowadays as very important and pioneering in that area. In the second part of XIX century this area was highly populated and the observed anthropogenic pressure applied to the nature was strong. Now, the area is considered a very valuable natural territory--since 1973 it has been occupied by the Bieszczady National Park--one of Polish national parks. J. A. Knapp had spent more than two months in Galicia thanks to the great hospitality of Polish people, especially botanists: A. Rehmann, I. R. Czerwiakowski, W. Jab

  11. Eugenics ideals, racial hygiene, and the emigration process of German-American neurogeneticist Franz Josef Kallmann (1897-1965).

    PubMed

    Pow, Stephen; Stahnisch, Frank W

    2016-01-01

    Biological psychiatry in the early twentieth century was based on interrelated disciplines, such as neurology and experimental biology. Neuropsychiatrist Franz Josef Kallmann (1897-1965) was a product of this interdisciplinary background who showed an ability to adapt to different scientific contexts, first in the field of neuromorphology in Berlin, and later in New York. Nonetheless, having innovative ideas, as Kallmann did, could be an ambiguous advantage, since they could lead to incommensurable scientific views and marginalization in existing research programs. Kallmann followed his Dr. Med. degree (1919) with training periods at the Charité Medical School in Berlin under psychiatrist Karl Bonhoeffer (1868-1948). Subsequently, he collaborated with Ernst Ruedin (1874-1952), investigating sibling inheritance of schizophrenia and becoming a protagonist of genetic research on psychiatric conditions. In 1936, Kallmann was forced to immigrate to the USA where he published The Genetics of Schizophrenia (1938), based on data he had gathered from the district pathological institutes of Berlin's public health department. Kallmann resumed his role as an international player in biological psychiatry and genetics, becoming president (1952) of the American Society of Human Genetics and Director of the New York State Psychiatric Institute in 1955. While his work was well received by geneticists, the idea of genetic differences barely took hold in American psychiatry, largely because of émigré psychoanalysts who dominated American clinical psychiatry until the 1960s and established a philosophical direction in which genetics played no significant role, being regarded as dangerous in light of Nazi medical atrocities. After all, medical scientists in Nazi Germany had been among the social protagonists of racial hygiene which, under the aegis of Nazi philosophies, replaced medical genetics as the basis for the ideals and application of eugenics.

  12. Eugenics ideals, racial hygiene, and the emigration process of German-American neurogeneticist Franz Josef Kallmann (1897-1965).

    PubMed

    Pow, Stephen; Stahnisch, Frank W

    2016-01-01

    Biological psychiatry in the early twentieth century was based on interrelated disciplines, such as neurology and experimental biology. Neuropsychiatrist Franz Josef Kallmann (1897-1965) was a product of this interdisciplinary background who showed an ability to adapt to different scientific contexts, first in the field of neuromorphology in Berlin, and later in New York. Nonetheless, having innovative ideas, as Kallmann did, could be an ambiguous advantage, since they could lead to incommensurable scientific views and marginalization in existing research programs. Kallmann followed his Dr. Med. degree (1919) with training periods at the Charité Medical School in Berlin under psychiatrist Karl Bonhoeffer (1868-1948). Subsequently, he collaborated with Ernst Ruedin (1874-1952), investigating sibling inheritance of schizophrenia and becoming a protagonist of genetic research on psychiatric conditions. In 1936, Kallmann was forced to immigrate to the USA where he published The Genetics of Schizophrenia (1938), based on data he had gathered from the district pathological institutes of Berlin's public health department. Kallmann resumed his role as an international player in biological psychiatry and genetics, becoming president (1952) of the American Society of Human Genetics and Director of the New York State Psychiatric Institute in 1955. While his work was well received by geneticists, the idea of genetic differences barely took hold in American psychiatry, largely because of émigré psychoanalysts who dominated American clinical psychiatry until the 1960s and established a philosophical direction in which genetics played no significant role, being regarded as dangerous in light of Nazi medical atrocities. After all, medical scientists in Nazi Germany had been among the social protagonists of racial hygiene which, under the aegis of Nazi philosophies, replaced medical genetics as the basis for the ideals and application of eugenics. PMID:27388255

  13. GeoChip-based Analysis of Groundwater Microbial Diversity in Norman Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zhenmei; He, Zhili; Parisi, Victoria; Kang, Sanghoon; Deng, Ye; Nostrand, Joy Van; Masoner, Jason; Cozzarelli, Isabelle; Suflita, Joseph; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    The Norman Landfill is a closed municipal solid waste landfill located on an alluvium associated with the Canadian River in Norman, Oklahoma. It has operated as a research site since 1994 because it is typical of many closed landfill sites across the U.S. Leachate from the unlined landfill forms a groundwater plume that extends downgradient approximately 250 m from the landfill toward the Canadian River. To investigate the impact of the landfill leachate on the diversity and functional structure of microbial communities, groundwater samples were taken from eight monitoring wells at a depth of 5m, and analyzed using a comprehensive functional gene array covering about 50,000 genes involved in key microbial processes, such as biogeochemical cycling of C, N, P, and S, and bioremediation of organic contaminants and metals. Wells are located within a transect along a presumed flow path with different distances to the center of the leachate plume. Our analyses showed that microbial communities were obviously impacted by the leachate-component from the landfill. The number of genes detected and microbial diversity indices in the center (LF2B) and its closest (MLS35) wells were significantly less than those detected in other more downgradient wells, while no significant changes were observed in the relative abundance (i.e., percentage of each gene category) for most gene categories. However, the microbial community composition or structure of the landfill groundwater did not clearly show a significant correlation with the distance from well LF2B. Burkholderia sp. and Pseudomonas sp. were found to be the dominant microbial populations detected in all wells, while Bradyrhizobium sp. and Ralstonia sp. were dominant populations for seven wells except LF2B. In addition, Mantel test and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicate that pH, sulfate, ammonia nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have significant effects on the microbial community structure. The results

  14. Racist appearance standards and the enhancements that love them: Norman Daniels and skin-lightening cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Lamkin, Matt

    2011-05-01

    Darker skin correlates with reduced opportunities and negative health outcomes. Recent discoveries related to the genes associated with skin tone, and the historical use of cosmetics to conform to racist appearance standards, suggest effective skin-lightening products may soon become available. This article examines whether medical interventions of this sort should be permitted, subsidized, or restricted, using Norman Daniels's framework for determining what justice requires in terms of protecting health. I argue that Daniels's expansive view of the requirements of justice in meeting health needs offers some support for recognizing a societal obligation to provide this kind of 'enhancement,' in light of the strong connections between skin tone and health outcomes. On balance, however, Daniels's framework offers compelling reasons to reject insurance coverage for skin-lightening medical interventions, including the likely ineffectiveness of such technologies in mitigating racial health disparities, and the danger that covering skin-lightening enhancements would undermine public support for cooperative schemes that protect health. In fact, justice may require limiting access to these technologies because of their potential to exacerbate the negative effects of racism.

  15. Age rationing and prudential lifespan account in Norman Daniels’ Just health

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, S

    2009-01-01

    Could age be a valid criterion for rationing? In Just health, Norman Daniels argues that under certain circumstances age rationing is prudent, and therefore a morally permissible strategy to tackle the problem of resource scarcity. Crucial to his argument is the distinction between two problem-settings of intergenerational equity: equity among age groups and equity among birth cohorts. While fairness between age groups can involve unequal benefit treatment in different life stages, fairness between birth cohorts implies enjoying approximate equality in benefit ratios. Although both questions of fairness are distinct, the resolution of the one depends on resolution of the other. In this paper, I investigate whether Daniels’ account of age rationing could be defended as a fair way of setting limits to healthcare entitlements. I will focus on two main points. First, I will consider whether the age group problem could be resolved without appealing to a conception of the good. Second, I will demonstrate that the connection between the age group problem and the birth cohort problem runs deeper than Daniels initially thought—and that it ultimately suggests a method for prioritisation in problem solving strategies. PMID:19103939

  16. An Integrated Approach to Quantify Groundwater - Surface Water Interactions: the Norman Research Site, Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Sanchez, I.; Phanikumar, M. S.; Masoner, J.; Cozzarelli, I.; McGuire, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    An intensive investigation of hydrogeologic and biogeochemical processes controlling contaminant migration and attenuation is in progress at the Norman Landfill Research Site in Oklahoma. The site involves a wetland that overlies a landfill leachate plume. The wetland-aquifer system actively exchanges contaminants and nutrients. These chemicals move from the wetland to the aquifer and vice versa depending on the groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) exchange rate and flow direction. The GW-SW flux has to be quantified to better understand the fate and transport of contaminants and nutrients. Different types of data have been collected at the site over a period of ten years including meteorological data, isotopic composition of water samples, water levels, pan evaporation rates, and seepage fluxes. This paper reports the development and application of a process-based water balance model based on long-term climate, soil, vegetation and hydrological dynamics of the system to determine the GW-SW flow rates. Our integrated approach involved model evaluation by means of the following independent measurements: (a) groundwater inflow calculation using stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen ( ) (b) seepage flux measurements in the wetland hyporheic sediment and c) pan evaporation measurements on land and in the wetland. The approach was found to be useful for identifying the dominant hydrological processes at the site, including recharge and subsurface flows. Recharge results from the model compared well with estimates obtained using isotope methods from previous studies and allowed us to identify specific annual signatures of this important process during the period of study. Results indicate that subsurface flow components in the system are seasonal and readily respond to rainfall events. The wetland water balance is dominated by local groundwater inputs and regional groundwater flow contributes little to the overall water balance.

  17. Two copepod species largely confused: Asterocheres echinicola (Norman, 1868) and A. violaceus (Claus, 1889). Taxonomical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandera, M. Eugenia; Conradi, Mercedes

    2009-12-01

    Due to its extremely brief description, Asterocheres echinicola (Norman, 1868) has been confused with some Asterocheres species such as Asterocheres suberitis Giesbrecht, 1897, Asterocheres parvus Giesbrecht, 1897 and Asterocheres latus (Brady, 1872). Furthermore, this species has been considered conspecific with Cyclopicera lata (Brady, 1872) and Asterocheres kervillei Canu, 1898. The objective of this paper is to study the syntypes of Asterocheres echinicola deposited in the Museum of Natural History of London together with abundant material from this and other institutions. Re-examination of these syntypes revealed that Asterocheres echinicola was conspecific with the currently known Asterocheres species, A. violaceus. Therefore, this latter species should be considered as a junior synonym of the former. The specimens described by Brady as Cyclopicera lata represent distinctively Asterocheres echinicola (= Asterocheres violaceus) and are identical to Sars’s Ascomyzom parvum and to Giesbrecht’s Asterocheres echinicola. We propose to rename Cyclopicera lata as Asterocheres latus (Brady, 1872), and raise Sars’ Ascomyzon latus, a species which is different from Asterocheres echinicola (= Asterocheres violaceus) and from Asterocheres latus (= Cyclopicera lata), as a new species. In this paper, we not only redescribe both species A. echinicola and A. latus, but also compare them with their previous descriptions, with the new material available and with their congeners. The redescription of Asterocheres latus revealed new specific differences between this species and Asterocheres kervillei, a species considered as synonymous of Asterocheres latus for almost 40 years. We strongly recommend that these differences are sufficient to consider these two species different. Finally, we analyzed the implications of all these taxonomical changes with respect to the diversity of the hosts utilized by these copepods and their geographical distribution.

  18. Geomorphic and hydrologic assessment of erosion hazards at the Norman municipal landfill, Canadian River floodplain, Central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, J.A.; Whitney, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    The Norman, Oklahoma, municipal landfill closed in 1985 after 63 years of operation, because it was identified as a point source of hazardous leachate composed of organic and inorganic compounds. The landfill is located on the floodplain of the Canadian River, a sand-bed river characterized by erodible channel boundaries and by large variation in mean monthly discharges. In 1986, floodwaters eroded riprap protection at the southern end of the landfill and penetrated the landfill's clay cap, thereby exposing the landfill contents. The impact of this moderate-magnitude flood event (Q12) was the catalyst to investigate erosion hazards at the Norman landfill. This geomorphic investigation analyzed floodplain geomorphology and historical channel changes, flood-frequency distributions, an erosion threshold, the geomorphic effectiveness of discharge events, and other factors that influence erosion hazards at the landfill site. The erosion hazard at the Norman landfill is a function of the location of the landfill with respect to the channel thalweg, erosional resistance of the channel margins, magnitude and duration of discrete discharge events, channel form and hydraulic geometry, and cumulative effects related to a series of discharge events. Based on current climatic conditions and historical channel changes, a minimum erosion threshold is set at bankfull discharge (Q = 572 m3/s). The annual probability of exceeding this threshold is 0.53. In addition, this analysis indicates that peak stream power is less informative than total energy expenditures when estimating the erosion potential or geomorphic effectiveness of discrete discharge events. On the Canadian River, long-duration, moderate-magnitude floods can have larger total energy expenditures than shorter-duration, high-magnitude floods and therefore represent the most serious erosion hazard to floodplain structures.

  19. "The blood fights on in other veins": Norman Bethune and the transfusion of cadaver blood in the Spanish Civil War.

    PubMed

    Lethbridge, David

    2012-01-01

    During the Spanish Civil War, Dr. Norman Bethune instituted a research laboratory to determine whether the blood from cadavers could be transfused into wounded soldiers and civilians at the front. Dr. Herman J. Muller joined him in this effort carrying out extensive experimentation into the technique and practice of such transfusions. At the same time, Bethune was in frequent contact with Dr. Reginald Saxton who later publicly advocated that the Spanish government should organize a large-scale supply of cadaver blood to the front-line hospitals. Recent evidence suggests that Saxton carried out cadaveric transfusions to an extent not previously recognized.

  20. Hydrological Perturbations Drive Biogeochemical Processes in Experimental Soil Columns from the Norman Landfill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B.; Mohanty, B. P.; McGuire, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    Fate and transport of contaminants in saturated and unsaturated zones is governed by biogeochemical processes that are complex and non-linearly coupled to each other. A fundamental understanding of the interactions between transport and reaction processes is essential to better characterize contaminant movement in the subsurface. The objectives of this study are to: i) develop quantitative relationships between hydrological (initial and boundary conditions, hydraulic conductivity ratio, and soil layering), geochemical (mineralogy, surface area, redox potential, and organic matter) and microbiological factors (MPN) that alter the biogeochemical processes, and ii) characterize the effect of hydrologic perturbations on coupled processes occurring at the column scale. The perturbations correspond to rainfall intensity, duration of wet and dry conditions, and water chemistry (pH). Soils collected from two locations with significantly different geochemistry at the Norman landfill site are used in this study. Controlled flow experiments were conducted on: i) two homogeneous soil columns, ii) a layered soil column, iii) a soil column with embedded clay lenses, and iv) a soil column with embedded clay lenses and one central macropore. Experimental observations showed enhanced biogeochemical activity at the interface of the layered and lensed columns over the texturally homogeneous soil columns. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that the most important processes were microbial reduction of Fe(III) and SO42-, and oxidation of reduced products in the columns. Modeling results from HP1 indicate least redox activity in the homogeneous sand column while the structurally heterogeneous columns utilize oxygen and nitrate from recharge as well as iron sulfide minerals already present in the columns as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the interface of the layered and lensed soil columns acts as a hotspot of biogeochemical activity due to increased transport timescale as a

  1. Hydrogeology and leachate plume delineation at a closed municipal landfill, Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, Carol J.

    2002-01-01

    The City of Norman operated a solid-waste municipal landfill at two sites on the Canadian River alluvium in Cleveland County, Oklahoma from 1970 to 1985. The sites, referred to as the west and east cells of the landfill, were originally excavations in the unconsolidated alluvial deposits and were not lined. Analysis of ground-water samples indicate that leachate from the west cell is discharging into an adjacent abandoned river channel, referred to as the slough, and is migrating downgradient in ground water toward the Canadian River. The report describes the hydrogeologic features at the landfill, including the topography of the bedrock, water-level changes in the alluvial aquifer, and delineates the leachate plume using specific conductance data. The leading edge of the leachate plume along the 35-80 transect extended over 250 meters downgradient of the west cell. The leading edge of the leachate plume along the 40-SOUTH transect had moved about 60 meters from the west cell in a south-southwesterly direction and had not moved past the slough as of 1997. Specific conductance measurements exceeding 7,000 microsiemens per centimeter at site 40 indicate the most concentrated part of the plume remained in the upper half of the alluvial aquifer adjacent to the west cell. The direction of ground-water flow in the alluvial aquifer surrounding the landfill was generally north-northeast to south-southwest toward the river. However, between the west cell and the slough along the 40-SOUTH transect, head measurements indicate a directional change to the east and southeast toward a channel referred to as the sewage outfall. Near the 35-80 transect, at 0.5 meter below the water table and at the base of the aquifer, the direction of ground-water flow was south-southeast with a gradient of about 30 centimeters per 100 meters. Generally, ground-water levels in the alluvial aquifer were higher during the winter months and lower during summer months, due to a normal decrease in

  2. Microbial Community Structure and Function at an Aquifer Contaminated with Landfill Leachate (Norman,OK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, J. V.; Voytek, M. A.; Lowit, M. B.; Cozzarelli, I. M.; Kirshtein, J. D.

    2006-05-01

    Geochemical research at an aquifer contaminated with landfill leachate (Norman, OK) has shown that contaminated areas have significant increases in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and persistent anaerobic conditions as compared to uncontaminated areas. As a result, sulfate is depleted in the center of the contaminant plume with concomitant increases in Fe(II) and methane. These observations have been used to infer the dominant biogeochemical processes in this ecosystem which include Fe reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. Because each of these processes is microbially-mediated, the goal of this study was to use a combination of culture-based and molecular methods to determine the composition and diversity of the microbial community in the contaminant plume. Groundwater and sediment samples were collected along the flow path of contamination in June 2005. We used most probable number (MPN) analyses to determine the abundances of key functional groups of bacteria including methanogens, sulfate-reducers (SRB), and iron-reducers (FeRB). Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed to determine abundances of functional genes of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsr) and methyl coenzyme M-reductase (mcr) genes and the 16 rRNA genes targeting Geobacter spp. Results from the MPN analyses confirmed the presence of a relatively abundant and diverse anaerobic community in the groundwater at the landfill (e.g. 102 SRB, FeRB ml-1. In general, with increasing distance from the source of contamination, abundances of FeRB, SRB, and methanogens decreased to < 101 cells ml-1 groundwater and < 102 cells g soil. In fact, most of these groups were undetectable throughout much of the sampling transect, particularly in the groundwater. For example, methanogens were largely absent despite the presence of high concentrations of methane. In contrast to these estimates obtained with MPN analyses, the results of qPCR indicated that there were measurable, and many

  3. Flow Contribution and Water Quality with Depth in a Test Hole and Public-Supply Wells: Implications for Arsenic Remediation Through Well Modification, Norman, OK 2003-2006.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The City of Norman, Oklahoma, is one municipality affected by a change in the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Primary Drinking Water Regulation for arsenic. In 2006, the maximum contaminant level for arsenic in drinking-water was lowered from 50 to 10 micrograms per li...

  4. Book review of “Joining and assembly of medical materials and devices” edited by Y. (Norman) Zhou and Mark D. Breyen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article is a review of the book “Joining and assembly of medical materials and devices” edited by Y. (Norman) Zhou and Mark D. Breyen. This book (hardcover) was published by Woodhead Publishing, Cambridge, UK in 2013. The contents of the book and its relevance to medical device design and education are discussed in this invited review.

  5. STS-42 MS/PLC Norman E. Thagard adjusts Rack 10 FES equipment in IML-1 module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Norman E. Thagard, wearing bifocals and a lightweight headset (HDST), adjusts Rack 10 Fluids Experiment System (FES) equipment in the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) spacelab (SL) module. FES is a NASA-developed facility that produces optical images of fluid flows during the processing of materials in space. The system's sophisticated optics consist of a laser to make holograms of samples and a video camera to record images of flows in and around samples. Thagard and other crewmembers spent most of their on-duty time in the IML-1 science module, positioned in the payload bay (PLB) and attached via an SL tunnel to Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, airlock.

  6. Dietary Studies on the Predatory Fishes of the Norman River Estuary, with Particular Reference to Penaeid Prawns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salini, J. P.; Brewer, D. T.; Blaber, S. J. M.

    1998-06-01

    The predatory fish community and their prey in the Norman Rivere estuary, Gulf of Carpentaria Australia, are compared with the communities of other tropical inshore areas, to investigate patterns of predation in tropical inshore areas particularly in relation to penaeid prawns. Abiotic factors (turbidity, freshwater input) and diversity of habitat types affect the composition of both prey and predator communities, resulting in large differences in the communities of tropical inshore waters. The stomach contents of 2059 predatory fish from the Norman River estuary were analysed over four sampling trips in the wet and dry seasons. The stomachs of 61% (1255 fish) of 54 species contained a total of 676·2 g (dry weight) of food, while 39% (804 fish) were empty. Teleosts were the main component of the diet (by dry weight) of 13 of the 22 species analysed, followed by annelids for two species. Five species had only teleosts in their stomachs. Most predator species ate benthic or bentho-pelagic prey, while three species— Rhizoprionodon taylori, Scomberoides commersonianusand Leptobrama mulleri—ate mainly pelagic prey. Although 19 species ate some penaeids, only Polydactylus sheridaniate little else. This species, Lates calcariferand Eleutheronema tetradactylumate 94·5% of all the penaeid prey and 97·9% of all the commercially important penaeid prey recorded in the study. Penaeid predation indices (calculated from gillnet catch rates, proportion of penaeids in the diet and a consumption rate of 3% body weight per day) were 0·23 g of penaeid per net-metre per day for P. sheridani, 0·15 for L. calcariferand 0·03 for E. tetradactylum. Commercially important penaeid predation indices were 0·11, 0·13 and 0·01, respectively. These values are intermediate between those previously recorded for the main penaeid predators in other inshore areas of the Gulf of Carpentaria (Embley River estuary and Groote Eylandt).

  7. KNG1 Ile581Thr and susceptibility to venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Cohen, William; Germain, Marine; Saut, Noémie; Antoni, Guillemette; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Bertrand, Marion; Dupuy, Anne-Marie; Letenneur, Luc; Lathrop, Mark; Lopez, Lorna M; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Emmerich, Joseph; Amouyel, Philippe; Trégouët, David-Alexandre

    2011-03-31

    Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were recently found to be associated with activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). Because shortened aPTT levels have been observed in patients experiencing venous thrombosis (VT), we investigated the effects of these 3 aPTT-associated SNPs, rs2731672, rs9898, and rs710446, on the risk of VT in a sample of 1110 healthy patients and 1542 patients with VT. Among the 3 tested SNPs, only rs710446 was associated with VT risk; the rs710446-C allele was associated with an increased risk of VT (odds ratio 1.196, 95% confidence interval 1.071-1.336, P = .0012). This association also was observed in an independent sample of 590 controls and 596 patients (odds ratio 1.171, 95% confidence interval 0.889-1.541, P = .059). We also confirmed that the rs710446-C allele was associated with decreased aPTT levels, making this nonsynonymous Ile581Thr variant a new genetic risk factor for VT.

  8. Integration of geospatial techniques in the assessment of vulnerability of trees to ice storms in Norman, Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Muhammad Tauhidur

    Every year, natural hazards such as hurricanes, floods, wild fires, droughts, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and ice storms destroy millions of trees across the World and cause extensive damage to their species composition, structure, and dynamics. Recently within the last decade, ice storms has caused catastrophic damage to trees, infrastructures, power lines in Oklahoma, and has taken over several dozen human lives. However, studies pertaining to the vulnerability and assessment of tree damage from ice storms in Oklahoma are almost non-existent. This study aims to fulfill that gap by first integrating remote sensing (RS) and geographic information systems (GIS) to assess and estimate tree damage caused by the December 8-11, 2007 ice storm that struck the north-central part of Oklahoma. It also explores the factors that contributed to the tree damage and created multiple regression models based on the factors. Finally, it examines the vulnerability of trees to ice storms by creating an ice storm tree damage vulnerability index for the City of Norman, Oklahoma. The integrated RS and GIS method assessed tree height and crown damage with high degree of accuracy. The thickness of ice accumulation has emerged as the most important predictor, followed by tree branch angle and pre-storm crown, wind, stem, and branch diameters for tree damage from ice storms. Results indicate that the vulnerability index accurately predicted several areas that are highly vulnerable. Results from this study are significant from both theoretical, and methodological and implication perspectives. The present study contributes significantly by identifying the geographic conditions of the City of Norman that make its urban forestry vulnerable to ice storm damage. In doing so, it initiates steps for future tree vulnerability research. Methodologically, the study contributes significantly to geospatial technology paradigm in geography by integrating RS and GIS to assess tree damage not only on

  9. Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy: key players in the resurrection and preservation of transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Smruti K; Husain, Qasim; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Couldwell, William T; Liu, James K

    2012-08-01

    Developed over a century ago, the transsphenoidal approach to access lesions of the pituitary gland and sella turcica has transformed the field of neurosurgery, largely due to the work of Oskar Hirsch and Harvey Cushing. Furthermore, its use and modification in the early 1900s was perhaps one of Cushing's greatest legacies to skull base surgery. However, Cushing, who had worked relentlessly to improve the transsphenoidal route to the pituitary region, abandoned the approach by 1929 in his pursuit to master transcranial approaches to the suprasellar region. Hirsch and a few other surgeons continued to perform transsphenoidal operations, but they were unable to maintain the popularity of the approach among their peers. During a time when transsphenoidal surgery was on the brink of extinction, a critical lineage of 3 key surgeons--Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy--would resurrect the art, each working to further improve the procedure. Dott, Cushing's apprentice from 1923 to 1924, brought his experiences with transsphenoidal surgery to Edinburgh, Scotland, and along the way, developed the lighted nasal speculum to provide better illumination in the narrow working area. Guiot, inspired by Dott, adopted his technique and used intraoperative radiofluoroscopic technique for image guidance. Hardy, a fellow of Guiot, from Montreal, Canada, revolutionized transsphenoidal microsurgery with the introduction of the binocular microscope and selective adenomectomy. The teachings of these pioneers have endured over time and are now widely used by neurosurgeons worldwide. In this paper, we review the lineage and contributions of Dott, Guiot, and Hardy who served as crucial players in the preservation of transsphenoidal surgery.

  10. Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy: key players in the resurrection and preservation of transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Smruti K; Husain, Qasim; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Couldwell, William T; Liu, James K

    2012-08-01

    Developed over a century ago, the transsphenoidal approach to access lesions of the pituitary gland and sella turcica has transformed the field of neurosurgery, largely due to the work of Oskar Hirsch and Harvey Cushing. Furthermore, its use and modification in the early 1900s was perhaps one of Cushing's greatest legacies to skull base surgery. However, Cushing, who had worked relentlessly to improve the transsphenoidal route to the pituitary region, abandoned the approach by 1929 in his pursuit to master transcranial approaches to the suprasellar region. Hirsch and a few other surgeons continued to perform transsphenoidal operations, but they were unable to maintain the popularity of the approach among their peers. During a time when transsphenoidal surgery was on the brink of extinction, a critical lineage of 3 key surgeons--Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy--would resurrect the art, each working to further improve the procedure. Dott, Cushing's apprentice from 1923 to 1924, brought his experiences with transsphenoidal surgery to Edinburgh, Scotland, and along the way, developed the lighted nasal speculum to provide better illumination in the narrow working area. Guiot, inspired by Dott, adopted his technique and used intraoperative radiofluoroscopic technique for image guidance. Hardy, a fellow of Guiot, from Montreal, Canada, revolutionized transsphenoidal microsurgery with the introduction of the binocular microscope and selective adenomectomy. The teachings of these pioneers have endured over time and are now widely used by neurosurgeons worldwide. In this paper, we review the lineage and contributions of Dott, Guiot, and Hardy who served as crucial players in the preservation of transsphenoidal surgery. PMID:22853837

  11. Nonlinear soil response in the vicinity of the Van Norman Complex following the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cultrera, G.; Boore, D.M.; Joyner, W.B.; Dietel, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    Ground-motion recordings obtained at the Van Norman Complex from the 1994 Northridge, California, mainshock and its aftershocks constitute an excellent data set for the analysis of soil response as a function of ground-motion amplitude. We searched for nonlinear response by comparing the Fourier spectral ratios of two pairs of sites for ground motions of different levels, using data from permanent strong-motion recorders and from specially deployed portable instruments. We also compared the amplitude dependence of the observed ratios with the amplitude dependence of the theoretical ratios obtained from 1-D linear and 1-D equivalent-linear transfer functions, using recently published borehole velocity profiles at the sites to provide the low-strain material properties. One pair of sites was at the Jensen Filtration Plant (JFP); the other pair was the Rinaldi Receiving Station (RIN) and the Los Angeles Dam (LAD). Most of the analysis was concentrated on the motions at the Jensen sites. Portable seismometers were installed at the JFP to see if the motions inside the structures housing the strong-motion recorders differed from nearby free-field motions. We recorded seven small earthquakes and found that the high-frequency, low-amplitude motions in the administration building were about 0.3 of those outside the building. This means that the lack of high frequencies on the strong-motion recordings in the administration building relative to the generator building is not due solely to nonlinear soil effects. After taking into account the effects of the buildings, however, analysis of the suite of strong- and weak-motion recordings indicates that nonlinearity occurred at the JFP. As predicted by equivalent-linear analysis, the largest events (the mainshock and the 20 March 1994 aftershock) show a significant deamplification of the high-frequency motion relative to the weak motions from aftershocks occurring many months after the mainshock. The weak-motion aftershocks

  12. The ancestors of Norman Bethune (1890-1939) traced back to the Bethunes of Skye, leading members of the MacBeth/Beaton medical dynasty.

    PubMed

    Munro, A; Macintyre, I M C

    2013-01-01

    Norman Bethune became famous through his work in the Spanish Civil War, his advocacy of socialised medicine in North America and his association with Mao Zedong's revolutionary movement in China. It has been suggested that he may have been descended from the Bethune or Beaton medical dynasty, who for generations served as physicians to kings of Scotland, the Lords of the Isles and to some of the larger Scottish clans. This paper traces his lineage back to the Isle of Skye. In the absence of old parish records as aids to tracing genealogy, other available evidence has confirmed that Bethune was indeed in the direct line of descent from the Bethunes or Beatons of Husabost, in Skye, one of the largest branches of this medical kindred, who were physicians to the MacLeods of Dunvegan. PMID:24087809

  13. The ancestors of Norman Bethune (1890-1939) traced back to the Bethunes of Skye, leading members of the MacBeth/Beaton medical dynasty.

    PubMed

    Munro, A; Macintyre, I M C

    2013-01-01

    Norman Bethune became famous through his work in the Spanish Civil War, his advocacy of socialised medicine in North America and his association with Mao Zedong's revolutionary movement in China. It has been suggested that he may have been descended from the Bethune or Beaton medical dynasty, who for generations served as physicians to kings of Scotland, the Lords of the Isles and to some of the larger Scottish clans. This paper traces his lineage back to the Isle of Skye. In the absence of old parish records as aids to tracing genealogy, other available evidence has confirmed that Bethune was indeed in the direct line of descent from the Bethunes or Beatons of Husabost, in Skye, one of the largest branches of this medical kindred, who were physicians to the MacLeods of Dunvegan.

  14. Pilot study of natural attenuation of arsenic in well water discharged to the Little River above Lake Thunderbird, Norman, Oklahoma, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, William J.; Masoner, Jason R.; Rendon, Samuel H.; Smith, Kevin A.; Greer, James R.; Chatterton, Logan A.

    2013-01-01

    The City of Norman, Oklahoma, wanted to augment its water supplies to meet the needs of an increasing population. Among the city’s potential water sources are city wells that produce water that exceeds the 10 micrograms per liter primary drinking-water standard for arsenic. The City of Norman was interested in investigating low-cost means of using natural attenuation to remove arsenic from well water and augment the water supply of Lake Thunderbird, the primary water source for the city. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Norman, conducted a preliminary investigation (pilot study) to determine if discharge of water from those wells into the Little River over a 12-day period would reduce arsenic concentrations through natural-attenuation processes. Water in the Little River flows into Lake Thunderbird, the principal water source for the city, so the discharged well water would improve the water balance of that reservoir. During this pilot study, 150–250 gallons per minute from each of six city wells were discharged to the Little River over a 12-day period. Water-quality samples were collected from the wells during discharge and from the river before, during, and after well discharges. Streambed-sediment samples were collected at nine sites in the river before and after the well-discharge period. Water discharge from the six wells added 0.3 kilogram per day of arsenic to the river at the nearest downstream streamflow-gaging station. Dissolved arsenic concentration in the Little River at the closest downstream sampling site from the wells increased from about 4 micrograms per liter to as much as 24 micrograms per liter. Base flow in the river increased by about 1.7 cubic feet per second at the nearest downstream streamflow-gaging station. Streamflow in the river was two-thirds of that expected from the amount of water discharged from the wells because of seepage to soils and evapotranspiration of well water along drainage ways to the river

  15. An Integrated Approach to Determine Ground-water Surface Water Flux in a Contaminated Aquifer-Wetland System at the Norman Landfill Research Site, Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Sanchez, I.; Phanikumar, M.; McGuire, J. T.; Masoner, J.; Cozzarelli, I.

    2008-12-01

    An area of research in progress at the Norman Landfill Research Site in Oklahoma involves a small wetland that overlies a landfill leachate plume. The wetland-aquifer system actively exchanges contaminants and nutrients. These chemicals move from the wetland to the aquifer and vice versa depending on the ground- water/surface-water exchange rate and flow direction. The ground-water/surface-water flow has to be quantified in order to better understand the influence of contaminants and nutrients on the transport and fate of landfill leachates. Different types of data have been collected at the site over a period of ten years including isotopic composition of water samples, ion concentrations, water levels, evaporative and seepage fluxes and meteorological variables. After identifying key processes influencing the water exchange between the wetland and ground-water based on time series analysis, we used process-based modeling to determine the ground-water/surface-water flow rates in the system using an integrated water balance model. Other methods used to constrain processes and parameters in the study include: (a) ground-water inflow calculation with stable environmental isotopes mass balance (b) ground-water input to the wetland with solute mass balance, and (c) Darcy's flow calculation of ground-water/surface-water exchange based on measurements from a network of piezometers. Preliminary results show that it is possible to differentiate between regional and local ground-water influences, as well as precipitation and evapotranspiration contributions in the exchange behavior.

  16. Results of chemical and isotopic analyses of sediment and water from alluvium of the Canadian River near a closed municipal landfill, Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breit, George N.; Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Christenson, Scott C.; Jaeschke, Jeanne B.; Fey, David L.; Berry, Cyrus J.

    2005-01-01

    Results of physical and chemical analyses of sediment and water collected near a closed municipal landfill at Norman, Oklahoma are presented in this report. Sediment analyses are from 40 samples obtained by freeze-shoe coring at 5 sites, and 14 shallow (depth <1.3 m) sediment samples. The sediment was analyzed to determine grain size, the abundance of extractable iron species and the abundances and isotopic compositions of forms of sulfur. Water samples included pore water from the freeze-shoe core, ground water, and surface water. Pore water from 23 intervals of the core was collected and analyzed for major and trace dissolved species. Thirteen ground-water samples obtained from wells within a few meters of the freeze-shoe core sites and one from the landfill were analyzed for major and trace elements as well as the sulfur and oxygen isotope composition of dissolved sulfate. Samples of surface water were collected at 10 sites along the Canadian River from New Mexico to central Oklahoma. These river-water samples were analyzed for major elements, trace elements, and the isotopic composition of dissolved sulfate.

  17. Results of the Chemical and Isotopic Analyses of Sediment and Ground Water from Alluvium of the Canadian River Near a Closed Municipal Landfill, Norman, Oklahoma, Part 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breit, George N.; Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Berry, Cyrus J.; Christenson, Scott C.; Jaeschke, Jeanne B.

    2008-01-01

    Analytical results on sediment and associated ground water from the Canadian River alluvium collected subsequent to those described in Breit and others (2005) are presented in this report. The data presented herein were collected primarily to evaluate the iron and sulfur species within the sediment at well sites IC 36, IC 54, and IC South located at the USGS Norman Landfill study site. Cored sediment and water samples were collected during October 2004 and April 2005. The 52 sediment samples collected by coring were analyzed to determine grain size, the abundance of extractable iron species, and the abundance of sulfur forms and their isotopic compositions. Ground water was collected from cluster wells that sampled ground water from 11 to 15 screened intervals at each of the three sites. The depth range of the wells overlapped the interval of cored sediment. Concentrations of major ions, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ammonium, and iron are reported with pH, specific conductance, and the isotopic composition of the water for the 75 water samples analyzed. Dissolved sulfate in selected water samples was analyzed to determine its sulfur and oxygen isotope composition.

  18. Diagenesis and evolution of microporosity of Middle-Upper Devonian Kee Scarp reefs, Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada: Petrographic and chemical evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Aasm, I.S.; Azmy, K.K.

    1996-01-01

    The Middle-Upper Devonian Kee Scarp reef complexes of Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada, are oil-producing, stromatoporoid-dominated carbonates. Episodic increases in the rate of sea level rise produced multiple cycles of reef growth that exhibit backstepping characteristics. These carbonates, composed of invariably altered limestones, have original interskeletal, intraskeletal, and intergranular porosity, mostly occluded by nonferroan, dull luminescent cements. Secondary porosity, represented by micropores of various types, developed during diagenesis by aggrading neomorphism and dissolution. The micropores represent the main reservoir porosity in the Kee Scarp limestone. Petrographic, chemical, and isotopic studies of Kee Scarp reef components reveal a complex diagenetic history involving marine fluids modified by increasing water/rock interaction and burial. Neomorphic stabilization of skeletal components caused further depletion in {gamma}{sup 18}O but very little change in {gamma}{sup 13}C, an argument for modification of the original marine fluids with increasing burial. Variations in magnitude of water/rock interaction with depth, facies changes, and porosity modifications probably exerted some control on fractionation and distribution of stable isotopes and trace elements in reef components.

  19. Assessment of lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis using hyperpolarized 3-Helium MRI: comparison with Shwachman score, Chrispin-Norman score and spirometry.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Edwin J R; Hill, Catherine; Woodhouse, Neil; Fichele, Stanislao; Fleming, Sally; Howe, Bridget; Bott, Sandra; Wild, Jim M; Taylor, Christopher J

    2007-04-01

    This study assesses the feasibility of hyperpolarized 3-Helium MRI in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and correlates the findings with standard clinical parameters based on chest radiograph (CXR) and pulmonary function tests (PFT). An uncontrolled, observational study in eighteen children with cystic fibrosis aged 5 - 17 years (median 12.1 years), with different severity of disease was carried out. All subjects underwent routine clinical assessment including PFT and standard auxology; CXR was obtained and Shwachman and Chrispin-Norman scores calculated. Hyperpolarized 3-He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out using a spin-exchange polarizer and a whole body 1.5 T scanner. Ventilation distribution images were obtained during a 21-second breath-hold and scored according to previously defined criteria. Spearman's non-parametric correlations test was performed to assess for statistical significance at the p<0.05 level. The children tolerated the procedure well. No desaturation events were observed during 3-He MRI. A significant, albeit moderate, correlation was found between MRI score and FEV1% predicted (r=-0.41; p=0.047) and FVC% predicted (r=-0.42; p=0.04), while there were trends of correlations between Shwachman score and MRI score (r=-0.38; p=0.06) and Shwachman score and FEV1% predicted (r=0.39; p=0.055). The feasibility of hyperpolarized 3-He MRI in children with CF was demonstrated. MRI appears to be able to demonstrate functional lung changes, although correlations with routine clinical tests are only moderate to poor. This non-ionising radiation technique could be useful for monitoring lung disease and assessing therapy in this patient population.

  20. Spatial averaging of fields from half-wave dipole antennas and corresponding SAR calculations in the NORMAN human voxel model between 65 MHz and 2 GHz.

    PubMed

    Findlay, R P; Dimbylow, P J

    2009-04-21

    If an antenna is located close to a person, the electric and magnetic fields produced by the antenna will vary in the region occupied by the human body. To obtain a mean value of the field for comparison with reference levels, the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) recommend spatially averaging the squares of the field strength over the height the body. This study attempts to assess the validity and accuracy of spatial averaging when used for half-wave dipoles at frequencies between 65 MHz and 2 GHz and distances of lambda/2, lambda/4 and lambda/8 from the body. The differences between mean electric field values calculated using ten field measurements and that of the true averaged value were approximately 15% in the 600 MHz to 2 GHz range. The results presented suggest that the use of modern survey equipment, which takes hundreds rather than tens of measurements, is advisable to arrive at a sufficiently accurate mean field value. Whole-body averaged and peak localized SAR values, normalized to calculated spatially averaged fields, were calculated for the NORMAN voxel phantom. It was found that the reference levels were conservative for all whole-body SAR values, but not for localized SAR, particularly in the 1-2 GHz region when the dipole was positioned very close to the body. However, if the maximum field is used for normalization of calculated SAR as opposed to the lower spatially averaged value, the reference levels provide a conservative estimate of the localized SAR basic restriction for all frequencies studied.

  1. John Updike and Norman Mailer: Sport Inferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upshaw, Kathryn Jane

    The phenomenon of writer use of sport inferences in the literary genre of the novel is examined in the works of Updike and Mailer. Novels of both authors were reviewed in order to study the pattern of usage in each novel. From these patterns, concepts which illustrated the sport philosophies of each author were used for general comparisons of the…

  2. Political non-speak. Gadfly: Norman Myers.

    PubMed

    Myers, N

    1992-01-01

    Election years in Britain, the USA, France, and Italy have not granted the environment a high place on the political agenda even in the year of the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). The erosion of the natural resources base is not included as natural resource accounting in the computation of gross national product (GNP). In countries such as Germany, Australia, Indonesia, and Costa Rica, 50% of GNP growth annually is cancelled out by soil erosion, pollution, excessive logging, and other environmental degradation. The economic health of the country including recovery from recessions is related to environmental protection. The economic practices involve ecological deficit accounting. It has been suggested by Lester Brown of the Worldwatch Institute that an economical deflator is needed to gage economic progress. The ecological illiteracy of politicians prevents the American people from realizing the actual cost of ignoring the problems. Politicians fight against raising taxes on gasoline and ignore the cost of carbon dioxide emissions and destabilization of climate. Americans pay a 1/4 the price Europeans pay for gasoline. Energy conservation must be expanded from current levels. Improvements have been made since the first OPEC price hike in 1973; the economy saved $100 billion a year and improved efficiency and production. American conservation in line with European conservation would save $200 billion a year; matching Japanese conservation would generate a savings of $300 billion. This sum exceeds the Federal deficit or the Pentagon budget. It is enough to save 8 million children who die from preventable causes or provide $4.5 billion/year annually to the year 2000 for foreign aid for UN family planning programs. The savings compares favorable with the UNCED estimates of $125 billion/year for environmental protection in the South. The question is whether politicians really would be committing political suicide by listening less to oil and car lobbyists and listening more to those promoting long term interests and security. PMID:12317383

  3. Norman-Bloodsaw v. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

    PubMed

    1998-02-01

    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit overturned the lower court's dismissal and allowed clerical or administrative workers to sue their employer for testing for "highly private and sensitive medical genetic information such as syphilis, sickle cell trait, and pregnancy" without either their consent or their knowledge during a general employee health examination. The court noted that "the most basic violation possible" of constitutional privacy interests involves the performance of unauthorized testing for medical information and that such testing may be viewed as illegal search under the Fourth Amendment in addition to violation of due process under the Fifth or Fourteenth Amendments. Because there are "few subject areas more personal and more likely to implicate privacy interests than that of one's health or genetic make-up," the court concluded that the unauthorized testing constituted a significant invasion of the right to privacy under the Fourth Amendment. The court reasoned that neither consent to a general medical examination nor consent to providing blood or urine samples abolishes the privacy right not to be tested for intimate, personal matters involving one's health. Also, because black employees were singled out for sickle cell trait testing and female employees for pregnancy testing, the employer discriminated against them concerning terms or conditions of employment, thus violating Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. PMID:11648435

  4. Political non-speak. Gadfly: Norman Myers.

    PubMed

    Myers, N

    1992-01-01

    Election years in Britain, the USA, France, and Italy have not granted the environment a high place on the political agenda even in the year of the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). The erosion of the natural resources base is not included as natural resource accounting in the computation of gross national product (GNP). In countries such as Germany, Australia, Indonesia, and Costa Rica, 50% of GNP growth annually is cancelled out by soil erosion, pollution, excessive logging, and other environmental degradation. The economic health of the country including recovery from recessions is related to environmental protection. The economic practices involve ecological deficit accounting. It has been suggested by Lester Brown of the Worldwatch Institute that an economical deflator is needed to gage economic progress. The ecological illiteracy of politicians prevents the American people from realizing the actual cost of ignoring the problems. Politicians fight against raising taxes on gasoline and ignore the cost of carbon dioxide emissions and destabilization of climate. Americans pay a 1/4 the price Europeans pay for gasoline. Energy conservation must be expanded from current levels. Improvements have been made since the first OPEC price hike in 1973; the economy saved $100 billion a year and improved efficiency and production. American conservation in line with European conservation would save $200 billion a year; matching Japanese conservation would generate a savings of $300 billion. This sum exceeds the Federal deficit or the Pentagon budget. It is enough to save 8 million children who die from preventable causes or provide $4.5 billion/year annually to the year 2000 for foreign aid for UN family planning programs. The savings compares favorable with the UNCED estimates of $125 billion/year for environmental protection in the South. The question is whether politicians really would be committing political suicide by listening less to oil and car lobbyists and listening more to those promoting long term interests and security.

  5. Conversations with Norman Augustine. Interview by Linda Voss.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Norman

    2003-11-01

    Topics discussed in the interview include trends and economic issues in the aerospace industry, the role of the aerospace industry in national security, and mergers and new ventures in the aerospace industry.

  6. Genes, Environment, and Dyslexia: The 2005 Norman Geschwind Memorial Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Richard K.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an overview of some methods and results from our continuing studies of genetic and environmental influences on dyslexia, and on individual differences across the normal range that have been conducted over the past 25 years in the Colorado Learning Disabilities Research Center (CLDRC) and in related projects. CLDRC…

  7. [Norman Bethune and field surgery of the Eighth Route Army].

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Luo, Chang-Kun; Wang, Lin; Chen, Hong; Zhu, Jian-Wu

    2013-05-01

    With long-term war experience abroad, combined with the actual situation of health work in China, Bethune put forward a series of strategy and theory used in battlefield conditions of rescuing the wounded in China, such as "fire rescue, early debridement", "emergency blood transfusion in battlefield" and "the crowd blood bank", which effectively improved the rate of saving the battlefield wounded rate in the actual war. Combining with his own practice, he invented a variety of surgical instruments and equipment, such as "lugou bridge" medicine cabinet, "Bipp ointment", which have been widely used in the battlefield. He paid more attention to the construction of battlefield hospital, proposed the establishment of "Model Hospital" and "Special Surgery Hospital" in the rear of Anti-Japanese War, founded the health school, and wrote many battlefield medical books and skills data. Bethune trained a large number of medical personnel for the war front, laid the foundation for the field surgery education of the Eighth Route Army. PMID:24060028

  8. [Blood group characteristics of Hapsburgs belonging to the line of Josef, Palatine of Hungary].

    PubMed

    Lontainé, S Z; Susa, E; Varga, T

    1980-10-01

    Results of the reported examination of blood-group characteristics and inheritance of historical personalities of Hungary evidence that blood-group determination or identification can be successfully carried out from bone or/and hair specimens having been buried and/or conserved for a long time. It should be mentioned, that determination of blood-group in such specimens and evaluation of results requires an exceptional carefulness since specific reactions may occur.

  9. Paleomagnetism of Jurassic-Cretaceous basalts from the Franz Josef Land Archipelago: tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abashev, Victor; Mikhaltsov, Nikolay; Vernikovsky, Valery

    2015-04-01

    New paleomagnetic data were obtained from a total of 158 oriented samples collected from the Jurassic magmatic complexes exposed on the Franz Joseph Land Archipelago (FJL). The field work was conducted during 2011 field season. Present study was focused on the tholeiitic basaltic lava flows that crop out on the Hooker Island. The samples were subjected to a detailed step-wise thermal demagnetization in temperatures up to 600 deg C or alternating field demagnetization with maximum filed up to 140 mT. Natural remanent magnetization (NRM) was measured with a 2G cryogenic magnetometer or a JR-6A spin-magnetometer housed in a magnetically shielded room at the Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences. The main NRM carriers in the FJL samples are titanomagnetites with varying Ti-content. Magnetic remanence was unblocked in temperatures of 350-400 deg C. Some samples are characterized by unblocking temperatures of 560 deg C. The new paleomagnetic data were combined with those previously obtained from the early Cretaceous volcanics exposed on the FJL. A new mean paleomagnetic direction for the Jurassic rocks was calculated as D=78.3 deg, I=74.7 deg, a95=3.1 deg, k=194.3, N=13. A corresponding paleomagnetic pole is now located at Plat=62.1 deg; Plon=136.5 deg, A95=5.5 deg, K=63.6. New results suggest that the JFL occupied a significantly different position from that of the present day. However, in early Cretaceous the JFL was already located close to its present day position. We propose a rifting event between the North Barentz terrane (FJL and possibly Svalbard) and the counterpart of European tectonic domain. The rifting occurred during Early-Middle Jurassic. This event was accompanied by a significant shift of the FJL to the north-east for approximately 500 km. New results are in good agreement with a hypothesis that the FJL was passing over the Icelandic-Siberian hot spot during the Jurassic-Cretaceous time. Paleolatitudes for the Hooker Island correspond to its present latitude and the paleolatitude of the Siberian trapps. The reported results are preliminary and cannot lead to any ultimate interpretation. Further investigations are needed. This and future studies are supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant 13-05-00177 and Russian Science Foundation grant 14-37-00030.

  10. [Primal psychoanalytic manuscript. 100 years "Studies of Hysteria" by Josef Breuer and Sigmund Freud].

    PubMed

    Grubrich-Simitis, I

    1995-12-01

    In 1895 Breuer and Freud jointly published the Studies on Hysteria, a work that Grubrich-Simitis regards as the very first psychoanalytic monograph. The author begins by outlining the intellectual context in which the work took shape and the initial reception accorded to it by contemporary medical science and sexology. The main focus of the discussion centres around those aspects of the book that mark it out as a genuinely psychoanalytic work - hitherto unknown quality of seeing and hearing, a radical change in the relationship between doctor and patient, the establishment of a new form of case presentation and the development of approaches adumbrating psychoanalytic theory and technique. In conclusion the author describes the scientific cooperation between Freud and Breuer, assigning to the latter his rightful place in the history of psychoanalysis, a status frequently denied him by Freudians.

  11. Mechanisms of Cytokine-Induced Behavioral Changes: Psychoneuroimmunology at the Translational Interface Norman Cousins Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Timmie, William P.

    2009-01-01

    Work in our laboratory has focused on the mechanisms by which cytokines can influence the brain and behavior in humans and non-human primates. Using administration of interferon (IFN)-alpha as a tool to unravel these mechanisms, we have expanded upon findings from the basic science literature implicating cytokine-induced changes in monoamine metabolism as a primary pathway to depression. More specifically, a role for serotonin metabolism has been supported by the clinical efficacy of serotonin reuptake inhibitors in blocking the development of IFN-alpha-induced depression, and the capacity of IFN-alpha to activate metabolic enzymes (indolamine 2,3 dioxygenase) and cytokine signaling pathways (p38 mitogen activated protein kinase) that can influence the synthesis and reuptake of serotonin. Our data also support a role for dopamine depletion as reflected by IFN-alpha-induced changes in behavior (psychomotor slowing and fatigue) and regional brain activity, which implicate the involvement of the basal ganglia, as well as the association of IFN-alpha-induced depressive-like behavior in rhesus monkeys with decreased cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of the dopamine metabolite, homovanillic acid. Neuroimaging data in IFN-alpha-treated patients also suggest that activation of neural circuits (dorsal anterior cingulate cortex) associated with anxiety and alarm may contribute to cytokine-induced behavioral changes. Taken together, these effects of cytokines on the brain and behavior appear to subserve competing evolutionary survival priorities that promote reduced activity to allow healing, and hypervigilance to protect against future attack. Depending on the relative balance between these behavioral accoutrements of an activated innate immune response, clinical presentations may be distinct and warrant individualized therapeutic approaches. PMID:18793712

  12. Computer-Assisted Video Instruction at Moore-Norman Vocational Technical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapleton, Marles Long

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes Computer-Assisted Video Instruction (CAVI) programs developed for use with young adult hearing-impaired students. The programs provide individualized instruction in vocabulary, activities, and concepts for specific areas of study (accounting and shop safety). The program provides visual examples of vocabulary, activities, and…

  13. Norman Cousins Lecture. The uses and abuses of psychoneuroimmunology: a global overview.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nicholas

    2006-03-01

    Studies of interactions between the nervous and immune systems that effect immunological and behavioral changes are relevant to our understanding biological issues pertinent to evolution, ethology, ecology, and aging, in addition to our understanding the immune and nervous systems per se. Psychoneuroimmunology also relates to homeland security, science education, and the practice of conventional as well as complementary and alternative medicine. This paper will highlight just some of these global implications of psychoneuroimmunology.

  14. Silencing the New Woman: Ethnic and Social Mobility in the Melodramas of Norman Talmadge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Greg M.

    1996-01-01

    Explores silent film actress Norma Talmadge's "star persona" in the 1920s. Focuses on the public discourses that provide the background for Talmadge's departure from the screen. Analyzes why her two "talkies" failed commercially and critically. Concentrates on promotional and publicity materials and on the films themselves. (PA)

  15. Preimpoundment water quality of the Wild Rice River, Norman County, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tornes, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    Water samples have been collected at two sites on the Wild Rice River since September 1974 to establish baseline water-quality characteristics before construction of a reservoir for recreation and flood control near Twin Valley, Minn. A decline in water quality between the sites is shown by mean total phosphorus concentrations, which increase from 0.06 to 0.10 milligram per liter downstream, and mean turbidity, which increases from 12 to 24 units downstream. Phosphorus and ammonia concentrations, as high as 0.31 and 2.7 milligrams per liter, respectively, could be the result of domestic waste input to the river upstream from Hendrum. Biochemical oxygen demand concentrations were significantly higher during spring runoff than during the rest of the year. Four out of 90 bacteria samples taken at Twin Valley indicate the presence of human fecal material, though bacteria densities do not exceed recommendations of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for public-water supplies. The dominace of organic-pollution tolerant phytoplankton in 49 out of 78 samples also indicates degradation of the river quality at Twin Valley. Nutrient concentrations at Twin Valley have no apparent effect on phytoplankton concentrations. None of the consitituents sampled were found to exceed recommended concentrations for public-water supplies.

  16. 77 FR 19691 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman, OK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... gorget and cup fragments), 1 spoon, 1 shell figurine, 63,892 beads, 17 bone awls, 1 bone digging stick fragment, 1 bird effigy (bone), 479 animal bone fragments (16 polished/ worked), 290 copper fragments... has 78,485 associated funerary objects, comprised of: 963 points, 92 knives/knife fragments, 16...

  17. Liver Rapid Reference Set Application: Gary Norman-INOVA (2012) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    We have developed a new and novel assay for the detection of Golgi protein 73 (GP73), also known as Golgi membrane protein 1 (Golm1) or Golgi phosphoprotein 2 (Golph2), in serum/plasma. The clinical question is to determine the clinical utility of gp73 antigen detection by the new assay for early hepatocullular carcinoma (HCC) diagnosis, for risk-assessment of patients at high risk for progression of their liver disease, and for prognosis.

  18. 33 CFR 208.34 - Norman Dam and Lake Thunderbird, Little River, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of bankfull on the Little River downstream of the reservoir. Controlling bankfull stages and corresponding flows, as presently estimated, are as follows: A 7.5-foot stage (1,800 c.f.s.) on the U.S.G.S. gage on Little River near Tecumseh, Okla., river mile 77.2 and a 17-foot stage (6,500 c.f.s.) on the...

  19. 33 CFR 208.34 - Norman Dam and Lake Thunderbird, Little River, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of bankfull on the Little River downstream of the reservoir. Controlling bankfull stages and corresponding flows, as presently estimated, are as follows: A 7.5-foot stage (1,800 c.f.s.) on the U.S.G.S. gage on Little River near Tecumseh, Okla., river mile 77.2 and a 17-foot stage (6,500 c.f.s.) on the...

  20. 33 CFR 208.34 - Norman Dam and Lake Thunderbird, Little River, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of bankfull on the Little River downstream of the reservoir. Controlling bankfull stages and corresponding flows, as presently estimated, are as follows: A 7.5-foot stage (1,800 c.f.s.) on the U.S.G.S. gage on Little River near Tecumseh, Okla., river mile 77.2 and a 17-foot stage (6,500 c.f.s.) on the...

  1. Adult Education Research Annual Conference Proceedings (32nd, Norman, Oklahoma, May 30-June 2, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langenbach, Michael, Comp.

    Papers in this volume include: "Retirement Learning" (Adair); "Effect of Literacy on Personal Income" (Blunt); "Popular Discourse Concerning Women and AIDS" (Boshier); "John Steinbeck's Learning Project" (Brockett); "Faculty Careers of Professors of Adult Education" (Caffarella); "Racism in Canada" (Carriere); "Perspectives on Program Planning in…

  2. Meteorological Investigation of an Accident on December 2001 with a Britten Norman / BN-2B-26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, U.; Sturm, K.; Leykauf, H.; Lorenzen, E.

    2003-04-01

    In Germany the BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accidents Investigation) is authorized to investigate accidents and serious incidents to civil aircraft in Germany, to determine the causes of the occurrences. The German National Meteorological Service (DWD) is responsible for the meteorological part of the investigation. The results of these determinations form the basis for safety recommendations and advisory notices, statistical analyses, research, safety studies and ultimately accident prevention programs. In this work the authors would like to present the meteorological investigation of an accident on 26 December 2001. The accident took place just a few seconds after take-off from the regional airport Bremerhaven near the German North Sea coast. This day the temperature was arround 0^o C, the wind was weak and several snow, snow/rain and rain showers were observed. Approximate half an hour before take-off a snow shower results in 1-4 cm snow at the airport area of Bremerhaven. The pilot attemped to brush some of the snow from the top of the aircraft wings, but was unable to get all of it. He decided to go. Once airborne, the aircraft stalled and crashed into a river approximate 1 km behind the runway. The question of the meteorological investigation was, could a snow or ice cover adhere on top of the wings of the aircraft after take-off.

  3. Two new species of Aulospongus Norman, 1878 with a key to the Atlantic species (Poecilosclerida; Demospongiae; Porifera).

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Thaynã; Santos, George Garcia; Pinheiro, Ulisses

    2014-07-03

    We describe two new species: Aulospongus trirhabdostylus sp. nov. and Aulospongus mandela sp. nov. from Potiguar Basin (Rio Grande do Norte State, Northeastern Brazil). Both species were compared with their congeners and an identification key for the Atlantic species of Aulospongus is provided. The genus Aulospongus now contains 16 species.

  4. Dr. Josef Steiner Cancer Research Prize Lecture: the role of physiological cell death in neoplastic transformation and in anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Strasser, A

    1999-05-17

    Cell death is a physiological process which is required for normal development and existence of multi-cellular organisms. Physiological cell death, or apoptosis, is controlled by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Abnormalities in this process are implicated as a cause or contributing factor in a variety of diseases. Inhibition of apoptosis can promote neoplastic transformation, particularly in combination with dysregulated cell-cycle control, and can influence the response of tumour cells to anti-cancer therapy. Molecular biological and biochemical approaches are used to find missing cell-death regulators and to define signalling cascades, while experiments in genetically modified mice will identify the essential function of these molecules. Discoveries from cell death research should provide clues for designing therapies for a variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders, auto-immunity and cancer.

  5. Dr. Josef Steiner Cancer Research Prize Lecture: the role of physiological cell death in neoplastic transformation and in anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Strasser, A

    1999-05-17

    Cell death is a physiological process which is required for normal development and existence of multi-cellular organisms. Physiological cell death, or apoptosis, is controlled by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Abnormalities in this process are implicated as a cause or contributing factor in a variety of diseases. Inhibition of apoptosis can promote neoplastic transformation, particularly in combination with dysregulated cell-cycle control, and can influence the response of tumour cells to anti-cancer therapy. Molecular biological and biochemical approaches are used to find missing cell-death regulators and to define signalling cascades, while experiments in genetically modified mice will identify the essential function of these molecules. Discoveries from cell death research should provide clues for designing therapies for a variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders, auto-immunity and cancer. PMID:10225436

  6. Education and Training beyond the Doctoral Degree. Proceedings of the American Psychological Association National Conference on Postdoctoral Education and Training in Psychology (Norman, Oklahoma, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.

    These conference proceedings address a broad range of issues related to postgraduate education and training beyond the doctoral degree for maintaining expertise in all areas of psychology. They focus on six general issues: (1) models for education and training beyond the doctoral degree; (2) societal needs, changing demographics, and national…

  7. 2008 Sir Norman McAlister Gregg Lecture: 150 years of practical observations on the conical cornea--what have we learned?

    PubMed

    McGhee, Charles N J

    2009-03-01

    The first detailed descriptions of keratoconus were published exactly 150 years ago in the original work of Dr John Nottingham, bringing a degree of clarity to a previously confusing clinical phenomenon--further supported by observations of other contemporaries in the field such as Sir William Bowman. However, it would be another 100 years before knowledge of keratoconus would grow substantially; indeed, our current level of understanding is primarily a result of extensive clinical and laboratory research conducted over the last 50 years--particularly based upon the enormous technological advances of the last two decades. Large clinical studies have confirmed that keratoconus is a non-inflammatory corneal disease with central or paracentral corneal thinning, which exhibits progressive corneal steepening and protrusion that typically results in increasing regular and thereafter irregular astigmatism. Ultimately, disease progression may lead to corneal scarring, corneal hydrops and loss of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity. Although visual rehabilitation may be effected by expert contact lens fitting, 20% of subjects may require corneal transplantation. This Gregg lecture provides a highly referenced, wide-ranging overview of both historical and contemporary aspects of keratoconus, including diagnostic, phenotypic and prognostic factors revealed by large clinical studies, critical diagnostic advances enabled by Placido and slit-scanning computerized corneal topography, the emerging roles of higher order aberration wave-front analysis and corneal hysteresis in delineating early and subclinical keratoconus, inheritance and genetic predisposition to keratoconus, corneal microstructural changes unveiled by in vivo confocal microscopy, unifying theories to explain associations between keratoconus, atopy, eye rubbing and keratocyte apoptosis, and surgical options for keratoconus, such as corneal transplantation, intrastromal ring segments, collagen cross-linking and keratocyte transplantation. However, 150 years along the path our knowledge of keratoconus remains incomplete, but technological advances should enable us to put together the final pieces of the jigsaw in the foreseeable future.

  8. THE RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF NUTRIENT ENRICHMENT AND HERBIVORY ON MACROALGAL COMMUNITIES NEAR NORMAN'S POND CAY, EXUMAS CAYS, BAHAMAS: A "NATURAL" ENRICHMENT EXPERIMENT. (R830414)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The simultaneous effects of grazing and nutrient enrichment on macroalgal communities were experimentally investigated using plastic mesh enclosure/exclosure cages along a natural nutrient (DIN, SRP) gradient from the discharge of a tidal mangrove creek on the west side of Nor...

  9. Statement of Norman J. Latker, Patent Counsel, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare Before the Subcommittee on Science, Research, and Technology, House of Representatives. May 26, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latker, Norman J.

    Patent protection is important in bringing technology arising from government-sponsored research and nonprofit organizations to fruition. This is an area of vital interest to the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare since it is the largest single source of funding for such research in the United States, and a substantial portion of its…

  10. The complete mitogenome of the whale shark parasitic copepod Pandarus rhincodonicus norman, Newbound & Knott (Crustacea; Siphonostomatoida; Pandaridae)--a new gene order for the copepoda.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher M; Tan, Mun Hua; Lee, Yin Peng; Croft, Laurence J; Meekan, Mark G; Pierce, Simon J; Gan, Han Ming

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the parasitic copepod Pandarus rhincodonicus was obtained from a partial genome scan using the HiSeq sequencing system. The Pandarus rhincodonicus mitogenome has 14,480 base pairs (62% A+T content) made up of 12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and a putative 384 bp non-coding AT-rich region. This Pandarus mitogenome sequence is the first for the family Pandaridae, the second for the order Siphonostomatoida and the sixth for the Copepoda.

  11. [The frequency of seizures in patients with primary brain tumors or cerebral metastases. An evaluation from the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Neuro-Oncology and the Department of Neurology, Kaiser Franz Josef Hospital, Vienna].

    PubMed

    Oberndorfer, Stefan; Schmal, Thomas; Lahrmann, Heinz; Urbanits, Sabine; Lindner, Klaus; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2002-11-30

    Epileptic seizures are common in patients with cerebral metastases as well as in patients with primary brain tumors. In cancer patients without primary brain tumors or brain metastasis, epileptic seizures may occur due to metabolic or toxic causes, or due to infections. We performed a retrospective analysis from our neurooncological database concerning the occurrence of seizures in patients with primary brain tumors, patients with cerebral metastases and in cancer patients without brain tumors. Patients with low grade gliomas, such as astrocytoma WHO I + II (69%), oligodendroglioma WHO II (50%), and mixed glioma WHO II-III (56%) were more likely to have seizures than patients with anaplastic glioma WHO III (44%), glioblastoma WHO IV (48%) or meningeoma (45%). In patients with brain metastasis, melanoma (67%), cancer of the lung (29%), and gastrointestinal tumors (21%) were the primaries with the highest frequency of seizures. In cancer patients without brain metastases or primary brain tumors, seizures occurred in 4%. In conclusion, the occurrence of epileptic seizures in patients suffering from primary brain tumors, as well as in patients with cerebral metastases, varied within the tumor entity. Therefore, especially in brain tumors where a higher probability of epileptic seizures is expected, they should be taken into account in the care of cancer patients.

  12. Lack of plasma kallikrein-kinin system cascade in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Wong, Marty Kwok-Shing; Takei, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) consists of two major cascades in mammals: "plasma KKS" consisting of high molecular-weight (HMW) kininogen (KNG), plasma kallikrein (KLKB1), and bradykinin (BK); and "tissue KKS" consisting of low molecular-weight (LMW) KNG, tissue kallikreins (KLKs), and [Lys(0)]-BK. Some components of the KKS have been identified in the fishes, but systematic analyses have not been performed, thus this study aims to define the KKS components in teleosts and pave a way for future physiological and evolutionary studies. Through a combination of genomics, molecular, and biochemical methods, we showed that the entire plasma KKS cascade is absent in teleosts. Instead of two KNGs as found in mammals, a single molecular weight KNG was found in various teleosts, which is homologous to the mammalian LMW KNG. Results of molecular phylogenetic and synteny analyses indicated that the all current teleost genomes lack KLKB1, and its unique protein structure, four apple domains and one trypsin domain, could not be identified in any genome or nucleotide databases. We identified some KLK-like proteins in teleost genomes by synteny and conserved domain analyses, which could be the orthologs of tetrapod KLKs. A radioimmunoassay system was established to measure the teleost BK and we found that [Arg(0)]-BK is the major circulating form instead of BK, which supports that the teleost KKS is similar to the mammalian tissue KKS. Coincidently, coelacanths are the earliest vertebrate that possess both HMW KNG and KLKB1, which implies that the plasma KKS could have evolved in the early lobe-finned fish and descended to the tetrapod lineage. The co-evolution of HMW KNG and KLKB1 in lobe-finned fish and early tetrapods may mark the emergence of the plasma KKS and a contact activation system in blood coagulation, while teleosts may have retained a single KKS cascade. PMID:24278376

  13. 7 CFR 613.5 - PMCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS PLANT MATERIALS CENTERS § 613.5 PMCs. (a) The Norman A. Berg National PMC. The Norman A. Berg National PMC at Beltsville, Maryland, focuses on national initiatives and...

  14. 7 CFR 613.5 - PMCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS PLANT MATERIALS CENTERS § 613.5 PMCs. (a) The Norman A. Berg National PMC. The Norman A. Berg National PMC at Beltsville, Maryland, focuses on national initiatives and...

  15. 7 CFR 613.5 - PMCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS PLANT MATERIALS CENTERS § 613.5 PMCs. (a) The Norman A. Berg National PMC. The Norman A. Berg National PMC at Beltsville, Maryland, focuses on national initiatives and...

  16. Looking beneath Snake River Plain using gravity and magnetic methods Murari Khatiwada and G. Randy Keller, ConocoPhillips School of Geology and Geophysics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73069

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatiwada, M.; Keller, G.

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic evolution and structural complexities of the Snake River Plain (SRP), the role of extension in its formation, and the effects of the YellowStone (YS) hotspot track have been a topic of scientific discussion for decades. In this research, we are addressing some of these issues by focusing on the Western Snake River Plain (WRSP) using a pre-existing gravity and magnetic database compiled through a community effort. These data are available at the Pan American Center for Environmental studies (http://research.utep.edu/paces). In the regional context of the SRP, the Complete Bouguer Anomaly (CBA) ranges by about 210 mGal with the highest value in the vicinity of the WRSP. We used upward continuation filters, bandpass filters, and directional derivative filters to delineate features by wavelength and trend. Total Magnetic Intensity (TMI) was also analyzed. The magnetic intensity ranges over 600 nT with much more complex and erratic magnetic signatures that arise from the shallow basalt and rhyolite deposits within the region. We used pseudogravity and tilt derivative filters for further processing of the magnetic data. We are able to identify the major structural components in the area using gravity and magnetic data and their processing. The bounding normal faults of the WSRP are well observed. We constructed an axial gravity profile along the SRP starting at Walla Walla, Washington and extending through Yellowstone to Reygate, Montana. CBA values along this profile show that the western and central sections of the SPR have higher gravity anomaly values than the eastern sections and the YS area. We used forward gravity modeling of the subsurface structures across the WSRP starting from the Basin and Range province on the southwest to the Atlanta Lobe of the Idaho Batholith on the northeast. From the model, we observed that the Moho depth increases northeastward and varies between 30 and 46 km along the profile. These results match with receiver function Moho depth estimates from the EARTHSCOPE US Array. We used borehole data and shallow seismic survey results to constrain the upper 5 km of the model along the profile. A number of normal faults that form a series of grabens and half grabens were also modeled beneath the SRP. The gravity profile suggests that a higher density mafic intrusive body of about 8-10 km thickness lies directly beneath the WSRP. This body is possibly a mafic intrusion into the upper crust or could be a region of the middle and upper crust that was extensively intruded by sills and dikes during the time of extension in the area. This result agrees with other scientific results in the eastern SRP based on seismic data. On the southwest part of the WSRP profile, the Idaho-Oregon graben that separates the WSRP from the High Lava Plains was also modeled.

  17. Secondary Math and Science Education. Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Science, Research and Technology of the Committee on Science and Technology. House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session (Norman, Oklahoma).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    A field hearing on secondary science and mathematics (S/M) education focused on the growing problem of scientific and technical literacy and on scientific mathematics and science education problems in Oklahoma. Testimony presented at, discussions held during, and documentation related to the hearing are provided. Issues addressed included S/M…

  18. THE RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF NUTRIENT ENRICHMENT AND HERBIVORY ON MACROALGAL COMMUNITIES NEAR NORMAN&RSQUO;S POND CAY, EXUMAS CAYS, BAHAMAS: A &LDQUO;NATURAL&RDQUO; ENRICHMENT EXPERIMENT. (R830414)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. American Science 1800-1850.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Allan

    1977-01-01

    Describes the American contributions to scientific discovery in the first half of the nineteenth century. The article also discusses the accomplishments of three American scientists of that time: Nathaniel Bowditch, Josef Henry, and Benjamin Silliman. (HM)

  20. Comparative Survey of Rumen Microbial Communities and Metabolites across One Caprine and Three Bovine Groups, Using Bar-Coded Pyrosequencing and 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo Jung; Jung, Ji Young; Oh, Young Kyoon; Lee, Sang-Suk; Madsen, Eugene L.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes (targeting Bacteria and Archaea) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance were applied to investigate the rumen microbiota and metabolites of Hanwoo steers in the growth stage (HGS), Hanwoo steers in the late fattening stage (HFS), Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle (HDC), and Korean native goats (KNG) in the late fattening stage. This was a two-part investigation. We began by comparing metabolites and microbiota of Hanwoo steers at two stages of husbandry. Statistical comparisons of metabolites and microbial communities showed no significant differences between HFS and HGS (differing by a dietary shift at 24 months and age [67 months versus 12 months]). We then augmented the study by extending the investigation to HDC and KNG. Overall, pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that the rumens had highly diverse microbial communities containing many previously undescribed microorganisms. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the bacterial sequences were predominantly affiliated with four phyla—Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Fibrobacteres, and Proteobacteria—in all ruminants. However, interestingly, the bacterial reads belonging to Fibrobacteres were present at a very low abundance (<0.1%) in KNG. Archaeal community analysis showed that almost all of these reads fell into a clade related to, but distinct from, known cultivated methanogens. Statistical analyses showed that the microbial communities and metabolites of KNG were clearly distinct from those of other ruminants. In addition, bacterial communities and metabolite profiles of HGS and HDC, fed similar diets, were distinctive. Our data indicate that bovine host breeds override diet as the key factor that determines bacterial community and metabolite profiles in the rumen. PMID:22706048

  1. Comparative survey of rumen microbial communities and metabolites across one caprine and three bovine groups, using bar-coded pyrosequencing and ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo Jung; Jung, Ji Young; Oh, Young Kyoon; Lee, Sang-Suk; Madsen, Eugene L; Jeon, Che Ok

    2012-09-01

    Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes (targeting Bacteria and Archaea) and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance were applied to investigate the rumen microbiota and metabolites of Hanwoo steers in the growth stage (HGS), Hanwoo steers in the late fattening stage (HFS), Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle (HDC), and Korean native goats (KNG) in the late fattening stage. This was a two-part investigation. We began by comparing metabolites and microbiota of Hanwoo steers at two stages of husbandry. Statistical comparisons of metabolites and microbial communities showed no significant differences between HFS and HGS (differing by a dietary shift at 24 months and age [67 months versus 12 months]). We then augmented the study by extending the investigation to HDC and KNG. Overall, pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that the rumens had highly diverse microbial communities containing many previously undescribed microorganisms. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the bacterial sequences were predominantly affiliated with four phyla-Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Fibrobacteres, and Proteobacteria-in all ruminants. However, interestingly, the bacterial reads belonging to Fibrobacteres were present at a very low abundance (<0.1%) in KNG. Archaeal community analysis showed that almost all of these reads fell into a clade related to, but distinct from, known cultivated methanogens. Statistical analyses showed that the microbial communities and metabolites of KNG were clearly distinct from those of other ruminants. In addition, bacterial communities and metabolite profiles of HGS and HDC, fed similar diets, were distinctive. Our data indicate that bovine host breeds override diet as the key factor that determines bacterial community and metabolite profiles in the rumen.

  2. A genetic association study of activated partial thromboplastin time in European Americans and African Americans: the ARIC Study.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lu-Chen; Cushman, Mary; Pankow, James S; Basu, Saonli; Boerwinkle, Eric; Folsom, Aaron R; Tang, Weihong

    2015-04-15

    Reduced activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is a risk marker for incident and recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE). Genetic factors influencing aPTT are not well understood, especially in populations of non-European ancestry. The present study aimed to identify aPTT-related gene variants in both European Americans (EAs) and African Americans (AAs). We conducted a genetic association study for aPTT in 9719 EAs and 2799 AAs from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium candidate gene array, the analyses were based on ∼50 000 SNPs in ∼2000 candidate genes. In EAs, the analyses identified a new independent association for aPTT in F5 (rs2239852, P-value = 1.9 × 10(-8)), which clusters with a coding variant rs6030 (P-value = 7.8 × 10(-7)). The remaining significant signals were located on F5, HRG, KNG1, F11, F12 and ABO and have been previously reported in EA populations. In AAs, significant signals were identified in KNG1, HRG, F12, ABO and VWF, with the leading variants in KNG1, HRG and F12 being the same as in the EAs; the significant variant in VWF (rs2229446, P-value = 1.2 × 10(-6)) was specific to the AA sample (minor allele frequency = 19% in AAs and 0.2% in EAs) and has not been previously reported. This is the first study to report aPTT-related genetic variants in AAs. Our findings in AAs demonstrate transferability of previously reported associations with KNG1, HRG and F12 in EAs. We also identified new associations at F5 in EAs and VWF in AAs that have not been previously reported for aPTT. PMID:25552651

  3. A genetic association study of activated partial thromboplastin time in European Americans and African Americans: the ARIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lu-Chen; Cushman, Mary; Pankow, James S.; Basu, Saonli; Boerwinkle, Eric; Folsom, Aaron R.; Tang, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Reduced activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is a risk marker for incident and recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE). Genetic factors influencing aPTT are not well understood, especially in populations of non-European ancestry. The present study aimed to identify aPTT-related gene variants in both European Americans (EAs) and African Americans (AAs). We conducted a genetic association study for aPTT in 9719 EAs and 2799 AAs from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium candidate gene array, the analyses were based on ∼50 000 SNPs in ∼2000 candidate genes. In EAs, the analyses identified a new independent association for aPTT in F5 (rs2239852, P-value = 1.9 × 10−8), which clusters with a coding variant rs6030 (P-value = 7.8 × 10−7). The remaining significant signals were located on F5, HRG, KNG1, F11, F12 and ABO and have been previously reported in EA populations. In AAs, significant signals were identified in KNG1, HRG, F12, ABO and VWF, with the leading variants in KNG1, HRG and F12 being the same as in the EAs; the significant variant in VWF (rs2229446, P-value = 1.2 × 10−6) was specific to the AA sample (minor allele frequency = 19% in AAs and 0.2% in EAs) and has not been previously reported. This is the first study to report aPTT-related genetic variants in AAs. Our findings in AAs demonstrate transferability of previously reported associations with KNG1, HRG and F12 in EAs. We also identified new associations at F5 in EAs and VWF in AAs that have not been previously reported for aPTT. PMID:25552651

  4. Urinary Kininogen-1 and Retinol binding protein-4 respond to Acute Kidney Injury: predictors of patient prognosis?

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Ramos-Barron, Angeles; Ruiz-Criado, Jorge; Maroto, Aroa S.; Ortiz, Alberto; Gomez-Alamillo, Carlos; Arias, Manuel; Vivanco, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of therapy for acute kidney injury (AKI) depends on successful prediction of individual patient prognosis. Clinical markers as serum creatinine (sCr) have limitations in sensitivity and early response. The aim of the study was to identify novel molecules in urine which show altered levels in response to AKI and investigate their value as predictors of recovery. Changes in the urinary proteome were here investigated in a cohort of 88 subjects (55 AKI patients and 33 healthy donors) grouped in discovery and validation independent cohorts. Patients’ urine was collected at three time points: within the first 48 h after diagnosis(T1), at 7 days of follow-up(T2) and at discharge of Nephrology(T3). Differential gel electrophoresis was performed and data were confirmed by Western blot (WB), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) and kininogen-1 (KNG1) were found significantly altered following AKI. RBP4 increased at T1, and progressively decreased towards normalization. Maintained decrease was observed for KNG1 from T1. Individual patient response along time revealed RBP4 responds to recovery earlier than sCr. In conclusion, KNG1 and RBP4 respond to AKI. By monitoring RBP4, patient’s recovery can be anticipated pointing to a role of RBP4 in prognosis evaluation. PMID:26792617

  5. Development of Prototype Occupational Information Network (O*NET) Content Model. Volume I: Report [and] Volume II: Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Norman G.; Mumford, Michael D.; Borman, Walter C.; Jeanneret, P. Richard; Fleishman, Edwin A.

    This document reports on the content model of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET), which is intended to replace the "Dictionary of Occupational Titles." The following chapters are included: "Introduction" (Michael D. Mumford and Norman G. Peterson); "Content Model" (Michael D. Mumford and Norman G. Peterson); "Skills" (Michael D. Mumford…

  6. 75 FR 7471 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... water intake facilities and withdraw water from Lake Norman. The Catawba-Wateree Project (FERC No. 2232... Mooresville's water intake facilities and increase Mooresville's water withdrawal rate from Lake Norman. The existing water intake structure would be expanded by connecting a new pipe to the existing water...

  7. Better than Optimal by Taking a Limit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betounes, David

    2012-01-01

    Designing an optimal Norman window is a standard calculus exercise. How much more difficult (or interesting) is its generalization to deploying multiple semicircles along the head (or along head and sill, or head and jambs)? What if we use shapes beside semi-circles? As the number of copies of the shape increases and the optimal Norman windows…

  8. Molecular plant breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    “Nevertheless, the number of farmers, small as well as large, who are adopting the new seeds and new technology is increasing very rapidly, and the increase in numbers during the past three years has been phenomenal.” – Dr. Norman Borlaug This excerpt from Dr. Norman Borlaug’s Nobel Lecture at the...

  9. Are bursts of green leaf volatile emissions from plants following light to dark transitions associated with de-novo biosynthesis of free fatty acids and not stress-induced membrane degradation? J. Norman- University of North Carolina K. Jardine- University of Arizona G. Barron-Gafford- University of Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, J. P.; Jardine, K. J.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Green Leaf Volatiles (GLVs) are a diverse group of fatty acid-derived Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emitted by all plants. These GLVs are involved in a wide variety of stress-related biological functions, as well as the formation of secondary organic aerosols and ozone in the troposphere. To date, GLV emissions have primarily been associated with acute stress responses wherein fatty acids are released from plant membranes and enzymatically oxidized to GLVs via the lipoxygenase pathway. However the biochemical role of these gases within unwounded plants has remained unknown so far. Recently, GLV emissions were reported following light-dark transitions and were hypothesized to also be related to a mechanical stress response (i.e. leaf cutting). However in this study we show that GLV emissions from mesquite trees have a separate biochemical pathway for their production that is unrelated to stress. GLV emission rates following light-dark transitions were quantified from young and mature Mesquite branches. It was found that young branches had very high photosynthetic rates and displayed strong bursts of a wide array of GLVs following darkening, while mature branches had much lower photosynthetic rates showed much weaker or no bursts. This is interesting because neither the mature nor the juvenile plants were subjected to any type of stress during measurement. Moreover, the older plant samples (which had the lower emissions) were collected by clipping branches from a tree and re-clipping their stems under water. Given what has previously been established concerning the relationship of GLV emissions to mechanical stress, one would expect these older branches to have higher emissions than their juvenile counterparts rather than lower emissions. We speculate that the emission of GLVs during light-dark transitions is not the result of a stress response, but rather the result of rapid de-novo fatty acid biosynthesis occurring in chloroplasts of young branches fed by a direct connection to recently assimilated carbon in the light and the sudden activation of lipoxygenase enzymes upon darkening. These findings have important implications for understanding fatty acid metabolism in plants and the impact of GLV emissions on air quality and climate. If this link between GLV emissions and fatty acid biosynthesis can be well characterized for other plants, it could hypothetically be used as a diagnostic tool to monitor the health of agricultural crops or monitor the rate of plant growth. Furthermore, by understanding and quantifying the emission of these reactive compounds from plants one could begin to incorporate their presence into meteorological or climatic models.

  10. A Group of Novel Serum Diagnostic Biomarkers for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis by iTRAQ-2D LC-MS/MS and Solexa Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Liu, Chang-Ming; Wei, Li-Liang; Shi, Li-Ying; Pan, Zhi-Fen; Mao, Lian-Gen; Wan, Xiao-Chen; Ping, Ze-Peng; Jiang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Zhong-Liang; Li, Zhong-Jie; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), especially multidrug-resistance tuberculosis (MDR-TB) presented a major challenge for TB treatment today. We performed iTRAQ labeling coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D LC-MS/MS) and Solexa sequencing among MDR-TB patients, drug-sensitive tuberculosis (DS-TB) patients, and healthy controls. A total of 50 differentially expressed proteins and 43 differentially expressed miRNAs (fold change >1.50 or <0.60, P<0.05) were identified in the MDR-TB patients compared to both DS-TB patients and healthy controls. We found that 22.00% of differentially expressed proteins and 32.56% of differentially expressed miRNAs were related, and could construct a network mainly in complement and coagulation cascades. Significant differences in CD44 antigen (CD44), coagulation factor XI (F11), kininogen-1 (KNG1), miR-4433b-5p, miR-424-5p, and miR-199b-5p were found among MDR-TB patients, DS-TB patients and healthy controls (P<0.05) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and SYBR green qRT-PCR validation. A strong negative correlation, consistent with the target gene prediction, was found between miR-199b-5p and KNG1 (r=-0.232, P=0.017). Moreover, we established the MDR-TB diagnostic model based on five biomarkers (CD44, KNG1, miR-4433b-5p, miR-424-5p, and miR-199b-5p). Our study proposes potential biomarkers for MDR-TB diagnosis, and also provides a new experimental basis to understand the pathogenesis of MDR-TB. PMID:26884721

  11. Origins of astronautics in Switzerland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadlis, A.

    1977-01-01

    Swiss contributions to astronautics are recounted. Scientists mentioned include: Bernoulli and Euler for their early theoretical contributions; the balloonist, Auguste Piccard; J. Ackeret, for his contributions to the study of aerodynamics; the rocket propulsion pioneer, Josef Stemmer; and the Swiss space scientists, Eugster, Stettbacker, Zwicky, and Schurch.

  12. Construyendo Puentes (Building Bridges): Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Spanish. AAHE's Series on Service-Learning in the Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellebrandt, Josef, Ed.; Varona, Lucia T., Ed.

    This volume is part of a series of 18 monographs on service learning and the academic disciplines. It is designed to help teachers, administrators, and students realize the potential of service learning in Spanish. Following a Foreword by Carmen Chaves Tesser and an Introduction by Josef Hellebrandt and Lucia T. Varona, the four essays in Part 1,…

  13. Institutional Approaches to Teacher Education within Higher Education in Europe: Current Models and New Developments. Studies on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Bob, Ed.; Vlasceanu, Lazar, Ed.; Barrows, Leland Conley, Ed.

    These 15 papers include: (1) "Current Models and New Developments in Teacher Education in Austria" (Michael Schratz and Paul Josef Resinger); (2) "Teacher Education in Canada: Renewing Scholarly, Pedagogical, and Organizational Practices" (Therese LaFerriere, Nancy Sheehan, and Tom Russell); (3) "Current Models and New Developments in Croatian…

  14. Liberating Foundations of Art and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Fern

    2012-01-01

    Research concerning the basic course known as Foundations of Art and Design strengthens the pedagogical approach for K-16 art and design education. The version of Foundations introduced to America by Josef Albers, although hardly changed, is shown to have continued, timeless relevance. Next, a sequential, implicit logic is revealed in linking the…

  15. The Anti-Tobacco Movement of Nazi Germany: A Historiographical Re-Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboul-Enein, Basil

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The infamy of Nazi medical research conjures up images of horrific experiments in the concentration camps and SS (Schutzstaffel) doctors like Josef Mengele. However, the anti-smoking campaign of Nazi Germany is perhaps one of the least examined aspects of public health history and state sponsored anti-tobacco advocacy. Nazi public…

  16. A NOVEL S-ADENOSYL-L-METHIONINE: ARSENIC (III) METHYLTRANSFERASE FROM RAT LIVER CYTOSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Novel S-Adenosyl-L-methionine: Arsenic(III) Methyltransferase from Rat Liver Cytosol
    Shan Lin, Qing Shi, F. Brent Nix, Miroslav Styblo, Melinda A. Beck, Karen M. Herbin-Davis, Larry L. Hall, Josef B. Simeonsson, and David J. Thomas
    S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet): ar...

  17. Liberal Education and the Teleological Question; or Why Should a Dentist Read Chaucer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    This essay consists of an examination of the work of three thinkers who conceive of liberal education primarily in teleological terms, and, implicitly if not explicitly, attempt to offer some answer to the question: what does it mean to be fully human? John Henry Newman, T. S. Eliot, and Josef Pieper developed their understanding of liberal…

  18. Bowen, Dufek, and Shelly Receive 2012 James B. Macelwane Medals: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachos, James

    2013-01-01

    Gabriel J. Bowen, Josef Dufek, and David Richard Shelly were awarded the 2012 James B. Macelwane Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by an outstanding young scientist".

  19. Regional Education Profile: Asia. China, Hong Kong, Macau, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of International Education, New York, NY.

    Developments in international education in Asia during 1985 are considered in three essays presented in the Biennial International Education Seminars conducted by the Institute of International Education. Countries covered by the essays and the authors are: China, Hong Kong, and Thailand (Jay Henderson); Macau (Josef Silny and Jay Henderson); and…

  20. 75 FR 55315 - Seminole Energy Services, LLC; Seminole Gas Company, LLC; Seminole High Plains, LLC; Lakeshore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... Office of Enforcement's Division of Investigations (DOI) as non- decisional staff in deliberations by the... Commission also adds Norman Bay, Director, Office of Enforcement, Larry Parkinson, Director, DOI, and...

  1. 58. HAIWEE POWER PLANT LOOKING NORTH ALONG PATH OF AQUEDUCT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. HAIWEE POWER PLANT LOOKING NORTH ALONG PATH OF AQUEDUCT - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 78 FR 26867 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... BEATRICE ] HAGMANN WALTER HAKOZAKI SEIJI HALEY-UHLMANN ALICE HALL KATRINA FAVELL HAMILTON WILLIAM NEILSON... ANN SILVERSTEIN A JAY SIMON DOUGLAS NORMAN SIMONI ANNE WINKLER SIMONI CARLO ALBERTO SLEE...

  3. Darwin of the Inorganic World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Gregor A.

    1977-01-01

    Briefly described are the theories of Newton, Fraunhofer and others (related to spectra) followed by a detailed description of the theory of J. Norman Lockyer. The various theories are presented in chronological order with attention given to historical perspectives. (AJ)

  4. 25. LONG VALLEY DAM AT SOUTHEAST END OF CROWLEY LAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. LONG VALLEY DAM AT SOUTHEAST END OF CROWLEY LAKE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 26. VIEW NORTH CROWLEY LAKE AND OWENS RIVER VALLEY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. VIEW NORTH CROWLEY LAKE AND OWENS RIVER VALLEY - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 24. LOWER END OF CROWLEY LAKE LOOKING SOUTHEAST TO LONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. LOWER END OF CROWLEY LAKE LOOKING SOUTHEAST TO LONG VALLEY DAM - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. 23. OWENS RIVER DELTA JUST NORTH OF CROWLEY LAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. OWENS RIVER DELTA JUST NORTH OF CROWLEY LAKE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. 14. UPPER OWENS RIVER ABOVE CROWLEY LAKE LOOKING SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. UPPER OWENS RIVER ABOVE CROWLEY LAKE LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. 79. COVERED CONDUIT ACROSS ANTELOPE VALLEY WITH WIND FARM IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. COVERED CONDUIT ACROSS ANTELOPE VALLEY WITH WIND FARM IN DISTANCE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 65. ONE OF SIPHONS NORTH OF JAWBONE LOOKING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. ONE OF SIPHONS NORTH OF JAWBONE LOOKING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 66. ONE OF SIPHONS NORTH OF JAWBONE LOOKING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. ONE OF SIPHONS NORTH OF JAWBONE LOOKING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. 67. FIRST AND SECOND AQUEDUCTS GOING UNDERGROUND PARALLEL TO DIRT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. FIRST AND SECOND AQUEDUCTS GOING UNDERGROUND PARALLEL TO DIRT ROADS, MOJAVE DESERT LOOKING NORTH - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 82. FIRST AND SECOND AQUEDUCTS LOOKING NORTHEAST Los Angeles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    82. FIRST AND SECOND AQUEDUCTS LOOKING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 83. FIRST AND SECOND AQUEDUCTS LOOKING EAST/NORTHEAST Los Angeles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. FIRST AND SECOND AQUEDUCTS LOOKING EAST/NORTHEAST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 76. PINETREE SIPHON, SECOND AQUEDUCT IN FOREGROUND LOOKING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. PINETREE SIPHON, SECOND AQUEDUCT IN FOREGROUND LOOKING WEST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 87. AQUEDUCT IN COVERED CONDUIT LOOKING NORTHWEST Los Angeles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    87. AQUEDUCT IN COVERED CONDUIT LOOKING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 47. LINED SECTION OF AQUEDUCT LOOKING NORTHWEST, COTTONWOOD Los ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. LINED SECTION OF AQUEDUCT LOOKING NORTHWEST, COTTONWOOD - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. 46. LINED SECTION OF AQUEDUCT LOOKING NORTH TO ALABAMA HILLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. LINED SECTION OF AQUEDUCT LOOKING NORTH TO ALABAMA HILLS - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. 78. SECOND AQUEDUCT LOOKING SOUTH NEAR PINETREE SIPHON Los ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. SECOND AQUEDUCT LOOKING SOUTH NEAR PINETREE SIPHON - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 84. LA AQUEDUCT CROSSING CALIFORNIA AQUEDUCT LOOKING NORTH Los ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    84. LA AQUEDUCT CROSSING CALIFORNIA AQUEDUCT LOOKING NORTH - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Antievolutionary Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Robert P.

    1977-01-01

    This article is essentially a rebuttal to Norman Macbeth's arguments against Darwinism. The author argues that one must identify the real weaknesses of evolutionary theory and not use the misconceptions put forth by Macbeth to make valid judgments. (MA)

  2. Study Gives Good Odds on Nuclear Reactor Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Cristine

    1974-01-01

    Summarized is data from a recent study on nuclear reactor safety completed by Norman C. Rasmussen and others. Non-nuclear events are about 10,000 times more likely to produce large accidents than nuclear plants. (RH)

  3. 78 FR 63573 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Threatened Status for Dakota Skipper and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Minnesota, Iowa, and North Dakota, were needed (60 FR 10535). In a December 5, 1996 (61 FR 64481) decision... 6 counties: Clay, Lincoln, Murray, Norman, Pipestone, and Pope, although 2 of those sites have not...- mesic prairie in Lincoln County,...

  4. The Sloan Foundation Microbiology of the Built Environment Program: What's There? Where Does it Come From? And What Does it Mean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsiewski, P. J.

    2015-03-01

    Sloan began supporting basic research in this area by coaxing prominent life scientists Norman Pace and J. Craig Venter to move from studying natural outdoor environments to indoor built environments.

  5. View of secondfloor Blue Lodge lobby from the southwest. Left ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of second-floor Blue Lodge lobby from the southwest. Left door leads to the hallway to Norman Hall. Central door opens to the Egyptian Hall inner vestibule. - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. The Vocabulary of English Punctuation (Coming to Terms).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuidema, Leah A.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the vocabulary of English punctuation terms, largely unchanged since the Norman conquest in 1066. Discusses the meaning of the period, colon, comma, question mark, exclamation point, slash, parenthesis, brackets, asterisk, hyphen, and ampersand. (RS)

  7. Astronauts and cosmonauts sign Gagarin's diary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In keeping with Russian tradition, astronaut Norman E. Thagard (left), guest researcher, signs the diary of the late Yuriy A. Gagarin, the first Russian cosmonaut, as his Mir 18 crew mates members look on. Cosmonauts Vladimir Dezhurov (center), misson com

  8. 91. FAIRMONT RESERVOIR, LOOKING WEST/NORTHWEST Los Angeles Aqueduct, From ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. FAIRMONT RESERVOIR, LOOKING WEST/NORTHWEST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. 95. BOUQUET RESERVOIR LOOKING UP VALLEY TO RESERVOIR LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    95. BOUQUET RESERVOIR LOOKING UP VALLEY TO RESERVOIR LOOKING EAST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 40. PLEASANT VALLEY RESERVOIR DAM LOOKING NORTHWEST Los Angeles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. PLEASANT VALLEY RESERVOIR DAM LOOKING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. NASA Now: Engineering Design: Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Norman W. Schaeffler, a NASA aerospace research engineer, describes how wind tunnels work and how aircraft designers use them to understand aerodynamic forces at low speeds. Learn the advantage...

  12. Technique for making a customized shade guide.

    PubMed

    Askinas, S W; Kaiser, D A

    1979-08-01

    A technique has been presented for making a custom shade guide that provides a direct visual means for conveying color information to the laboratory technician. The technique consists of applying pigment directly to acrylic resin denture teeth using colored drawing pencils. This technique was originated by Dr. Royal Norman of Omaha, Nebraska. One of the authors (S. W. A.) first saw Dr. Norman present it to the USAF Area Dental Laboratory Workshop, Westover AFB, Mass., in 1969.

  13. Challenge theme 4: people in the Borderlands: Chapter 6 in United States--Mexican Borderlands--facing tomorrow’s challenges through USGS science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norman, Laura M.; Shuster, Rudy M.; Parcher, Jean W.

    2013-01-01

    The management of shared resources in the United States–Mexican border region requires cooperation from the people of both countries to assess and understand their relation to the environment. Society is dependent on the long-term healthy functioning of ecosystems and their ability to supply food and raw materials. Likewise, resources and services obtained from nature could be used efficiently within the society. A more equitable distribution of costs and benefits related to goods and services can lead to fewer tensions and a higher quality of life for all the people in the Borderlands. Urban development, background contamination from mineral ore deposits, irrigation, sewage effluent, and even global climate change all have the potential to alter the stability of the fragile systems in the Borderlands (Brady and others, 2001, 2002; Norman, 2007, 2010; Gu and others, 2008; Norman, Gray, and others, 2008; Norman, Hirsch, and Ward, 2008; Norman, Callegary, and others, 2010; Norman, Huth, and others, 2010; Norman, Levick, and others, 2010; Norman, Tallent-Halsell, and others, 2010; Norman, Villarreal, and others 2012). Social efficiency means that because resources should be used where they are needed most, they should be distributed proportionally among human societies and individuals (Azar and others, 1996). Despite the critical role natural resources play in maintaining human and environmental health, current knowledge of the manner in which natural and human-caused forces interact to limit these resources—including their quality and quantity (such as through spatiotemporal changes in precipitation, evapotranspiration, pumping of groundwater, and release of contaminants)—is inadequate. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is trying to understand the relation between changing landscapes, changing demographics, and a changing climate in the Borderlands while the environmental, economic, and societal issues continue to be intertwined between the two nations.

  14. Features of seismicity of the Euro-Arctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhin, E. A.; Antonovskaya, G. N.; Kapustian, N. K.; Fedorenko, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    New results from seismic monitoring in the Euro-Arctic region, including the seismicity of Gakkel Ridge and the Barents-Kara Sea shelf, are presented. The data used were obtained from the Arkhan-gelsk seismic network. The role of island-based seismic stations, in particular, those in Franz Josef Land, in the monitoring network is discussed. The possibility of specifying the nature of seismicity by waveform spectral-temporal analysis, even in the case of a single station, is considered.

  15. Mach, Thirring & Lense, Gödel getting dizzy in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embacher, Franz

    2007-11-01

    Contrary to Newton's concept of inertia, general relativity predicts an influence of rotating matter on the structure of space and time. Anticipated by Ernst Mach, effects of this type have first been derived by Hans Thirring and Josef Lense. Almost ninety years later, we face their experimental verification. An even more dramatic scenario is provided by Kurt Gödel's cosmological model, in which nearby observers rotate with respect to each other and are free to travel to their own past.

  16. Metagenomic and satellite analyses of red snow in the Russian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Hisakawa, Nao; Quistad, Steven D; Hester, Eric R; Martynova, Daria; Maughan, Heather; Sala, Enric; Gavrilo, Maria V; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-01-01

    Cryophilic algae thrive in liquid water within snow and ice in alpine and polar regions worldwide. Blooms of these algae lower albedo (reflection of sunlight), thereby altering melting patterns (Kohshima, Seko & Yoshimura, 1993; Lutz et al., 2014; Thomas & Duval, 1995). Here metagenomic DNA analysis and satellite imaging were used to investigate red snow in Franz Josef Land in the Russian Arctic. Franz Josef Land red snow metagenomes confirmed that the communities are composed of the autotroph Chlamydomonas nivalis that is supporting a complex viral and heterotrophic bacterial community. Comparisons with white snow communities from other sites suggest that white snow and ice are initially colonized by fungal-dominated communities and then succeeded by the more complex C. nivalis-heterotroph red snow. Satellite image analysis showed that red snow covers up to 80% of the surface of snow and ice fields in Franz Josef Land and globally. Together these results show that C. nivalis supports a local food web that is on the rise as temperatures warm, with potential widespread impacts on alpine and polar environments worldwide. PMID:26713242

  17. Metagenomic and satellite analyses of red snow in the Russian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Hisakawa, Nao; Quistad, Steven D; Hester, Eric R; Martynova, Daria; Maughan, Heather; Sala, Enric; Gavrilo, Maria V; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-01-01

    Cryophilic algae thrive in liquid water within snow and ice in alpine and polar regions worldwide. Blooms of these algae lower albedo (reflection of sunlight), thereby altering melting patterns (Kohshima, Seko & Yoshimura, 1993; Lutz et al., 2014; Thomas & Duval, 1995). Here metagenomic DNA analysis and satellite imaging were used to investigate red snow in Franz Josef Land in the Russian Arctic. Franz Josef Land red snow metagenomes confirmed that the communities are composed of the autotroph Chlamydomonas nivalis that is supporting a complex viral and heterotrophic bacterial community. Comparisons with white snow communities from other sites suggest that white snow and ice are initially colonized by fungal-dominated communities and then succeeded by the more complex C. nivalis-heterotroph red snow. Satellite image analysis showed that red snow covers up to 80% of the surface of snow and ice fields in Franz Josef Land and globally. Together these results show that C. nivalis supports a local food web that is on the rise as temperatures warm, with potential widespread impacts on alpine and polar environments worldwide.

  18. Metagenomic and satellite analyses of red snow in the Russian Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Hisakawa, Nao; Quistad, Steven D.; Hester, Eric R.; Martynova, Daria; Sala, Enric; Gavrilo, Maria V.

    2015-01-01

    Cryophilic algae thrive in liquid water within snow and ice in alpine and polar regions worldwide. Blooms of these algae lower albedo (reflection of sunlight), thereby altering melting patterns (Kohshima, Seko & Yoshimura, 1993; Lutz et al., 2014; Thomas & Duval, 1995). Here metagenomic DNA analysis and satellite imaging were used to investigate red snow in Franz Josef Land in the Russian Arctic. Franz Josef Land red snow metagenomes confirmed that the communities are composed of the autotroph Chlamydomonas nivalis that is supporting a complex viral and heterotrophic bacterial community. Comparisons with white snow communities from other sites suggest that white snow and ice are initially colonized by fungal-dominated communities and then succeeded by the more complex C. nivalis-heterotroph red snow. Satellite image analysis showed that red snow covers up to 80% of the surface of snow and ice fields in Franz Josef Land and globally. Together these results show that C. nivalis supports a local food web that is on the rise as temperatures warm, with potential widespread impacts on alpine and polar environments worldwide. PMID:26713242

  19. [Adsorption kinetics of reactive dyes on activated carbon fiber].

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yue, Qin-Yan; Gao, Bao-Yu; Yang, Jing; Zheng, Yan

    2007-11-01

    The adsorption capability of activated carbon fiber (ACF) to four reactive dyes (reactive brilliant red K-2BP, reactive turquoise blue KN-G, reactive golden yellow K-3RP, reactive black KN-B) in aqueous solution was studied, and adsorption mechanism was focused on from kinetics point of view. The results show that the equilibrium adsorbing capacity (q(e)) of each dye increases with the addition of initial concentration or temperature. On the same condition, the order of q(e) is: reactive brilliant red > reactive golden yellow > reactive black > reactive turquoise blue. The adsorption processes follow a pseudo second-order kinetic rate equation, and the steric structure, size and polarity of dyes are important influence factors to initial adsorption rate. The adsorption activation energy of each dye is low (16.42, 3.56, 5.21, 26.38 kJ x mol(-1) respectively), which indicates that it belongs to physics adsorption.

  20. Evidence for the absence of intron H of the histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) gene: Genetic mapping and in situ localization of HRG to chromosome 3q28-q29

    SciTech Connect

    Hennis, B.C.; Poort, E.W. van der; Kluft, C.; Frants, R.R.; Bakker, E.; Vossen, R.H.A.M.; Blonden, L.A.; Khan, P.M. ); Cox, S.; Spurr, N.K. )

    1994-01-01

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) belongs to the cystatin superfamily and appears to be a potential risk factor for thrombosis. An increased prevalence of elevated HRG plasma levels in patients with venous thrombosis and families with thrombophilia has been reported. It is interesting to note that the genes of four different members of the cystatin superfamily are located on the distal section of the long arm of chromosome 3: Stefin A (STF1) on 3q21, Kininogen (KNG) on 3q26-qter, [alpha]-2-HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) on 3q27-q28, and HRG on 3q21-qter. To further investigate the evolutionary relationship between HRG and members of the cystatin superfamily, the authors isolated a cosmid that was used to refine the chromosomal localization of HRG by in situ hybridization. In addition, they used a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism to localize HRG on the linkage map of chromosome 3q. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Relationship between the gene polymorphisms of kallikrein-kinin system and Alzheimer’s disease in a Hunan Han Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yanyao; Hou, Deren; Tian, Mi; Li, Wei; Feng, Xialu; Yu, Zhuling

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the connection between polymorphisms of kallikrein kinin system including KLK1 (rs5516), KNG1 (rs710446, rs2304456) and ACE (rs4291, rs4309, rs4343) and late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD). The research was conducted as a case-control study, comprising 201 AD patients in the AD group, and 257 healthy subjects as the control group. PCR amplification and matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were used to detect the six polymorphisms (rs5516 in KLK1; rs710446, rs2304456 in KNG1; rs4291, rs4309, rs4343 in ACE) from both groups. No statistically significant difference was found between the genotype and allelotype distributions of rs5516, rs710446, rs2304456, rs4291 and rs4343 (P>0.05). The differences between the genotype and allelotype distributions of the rs4309 were statistically significant (P<0.05). Haplotype analysis confirmed the existence of three haplotypes (AG, AT, GT) composed of rs710446/rs2304456, and six haplotypes (ATA, ACA, TCA, TCG, TTA, TTG) composed of rs4291/rs4309/rs4343, among which the distribution of ATA, ACA, TCA between the two groups was statistically significant difference (P<0.05). Our study showed that the polymorphisms of rs5516, rs710446, rs2304456, rs4291 and rs4343 is not related to the incidence of LOAD. The polymorphisms of rs4309 may be related to LOAD, as well as ATA, ACA, and TCA haplotype composed of rs4291/rs4309/rs4343. PMID:26884824

  2. Population-specific coding variant underlies genome-wide association with adiponectin level

    PubMed Central

    Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Wu, Ying; Li, Yun; Fogarty, Marie P.; Lange, Leslie A.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; McDade, Thomas W.; Borja, Judith B.; Luo, Jingchun; AbdelBaky, Omar; Combs, Terry P.; Adair, Linda S.; Lange, Ethan M.; Mohlke, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Adiponectin is a protein hormone that can affect major metabolic processes including glucose regulation and fat metabolism. Our previous genome-wide association (GWA) study of circulating plasma adiponectin levels in Filipino women from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey (CLHNS) detected a 100 kb two-SNP haplotype at KNG1–ADIPOQ associated with reduced adiponectin (frequency = 0.050, P = 1.8 × 10−25). Subsequent genotyping of CLHNS young adult offspring detected an uncommon variant [minor allele frequency (MAF) = 0.025] located ∼800 kb from ADIPOQ that showed strong association with lower adiponectin levels (P = 2.7 × 10−15, n = 1695) and tagged a subset of KNG1–ADIPOQ haplotype carriers with even lower adiponectin levels. Sequencing of the ADIPOQ-coding region detected variant R221S (MAF = 0.015, P = 2.9 × 10−69), which explained 17.1% of the variance in adiponectin levels and largely accounted for the initial GWA signal in Filipinos. R221S was not present in 12 514 Europeans with previously sequenced exons. To explore the mechanism of this substitution, we re-measured adiponectin level in 20 R221S offspring carriers and 20 non-carriers using two alternative antibodies and determined that the presence of R221S resulted in artificially low quantification of adiponectin level using the original immunoassay. These data provide an example of an uncommon variant responsible for a GWA signal and demonstrate that genetic associations with phenotypes measured by antibody-based quantification methods can be affected by uncommon coding SNPs residing in the antibody target region. PMID:22010046

  3. Abraham Flexner and the black medical schools. 1992.

    PubMed Central

    Savitt, Todd

    2006-01-01

    "Abraham Flexner and the Black Medical Schools" first appeared in Beyond Flexner: Medical Education in the Twentieth Century, Barbara Barzansky and Norman Gevitz, eds. Copyright 1992 by Barbara Barzansky and Norman Gevitz. Reproduced with permission of Greenwood Publishing Group Inc., Westport, CT. The article will be reprinted in a collection of the author's writings on African-American medical history called Race and Medicine in Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century America, to be published in December 2006 by Kent State University Press and published here with permission of the Kent State University Press. PMID:17019906

  4. Astronaut Claude Nicollier participates in RMS training at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Swiss scientits Claude Nicollier (left), STS-61 mission specialist, waits his turn at the controls for the remote manipulator system (RMS) during a training session in the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Mark Norman of MSFC has control of the RMS in this frame.

  5. New Emerging Careers: Today, Tomorrow and in the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feingold, S. Norman; Atwater, Maxine H.

    This book focuses on 10 of the most promising new technologies and the careers that they will foster, picking up where the 1983 book, "Emerging Careers" by Norman Feingold, left off. The book talks about the work that must be done in new ways as technological breakthroughs open new applications. By looking first at the technologies and their…

  6. Understanding the Comorbidity of Dyslexia: Acceptance of the Samuel Torrey Orton Award November 15, 2002, Atlanta, Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Bruce F.

    2003-01-01

    This speech by a researcher into the genetic bases of dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and their etiological overlap, first honors four pioneers in the field (Samuel Orton, Bertil Hallgren, Isabelle Liberman, and Norman Geschwind); then updates knowledge about the genetics of dyslexia and comorbidity with ADHD and certain…

  7. Perspectives: Should Mandatory Voting Laws Be Implemented in the United States?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Norman; Stoilov, Vassia

    2011-01-01

    Many countries around the world have compulsory voting laws. In the United States, where voter turnout tends to be lower than in other developed democracies, experts wonder whether voting laws would have a positive impact. In two distinct essays, voting and elections experts Norman Ornstein and Vassia Stoilov debate the implementation of…

  8. 78 FR 28887 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... Norman S. Building Department, February 20, 2013 360916 No.: B-1279). (12-02-1302P). Rosenblum, Mayor.... Bexar County Public February 19, 2013 480035 1290). of Bexar County (12- Wolff, Bexar County Works... Allen (12-06- The Honorable Stephen City Hall, February 8, 2013 480131 1290). 1794P). Terrell,...

  9. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors That Impact the Retention and Completion of African-American Male and Female High School Students in the Pre-Engineering Program: Project Lead the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Patrice Tolbert

    2012-01-01

    African Americans have a long and very important history in the engineering fields. With a tradition that includes accomplished scientists such as George Washington Carver, Norman Buknor, and Mark Dean, African Americans have been very important to the development of new products, technology, inventions, and innovations (Gordon, 2008). The…

  10. Support from the President: A Sure Way to Keep the Placement Function Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisbord, Anne

    1991-01-01

    Presents two interviews with college presidents on the importance of career planning and placement in their institutions: Norman C. Francis of Xavier University of Louisiana in New Orleans and John C. Light of Hocking Technical College in Nelsonville, Ohio. Discusses the presidents' relationship with their college placement offices and their…

  11. Reconsidering Constructivism in Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Cheu-Jey George

    2012-01-01

    This article examines constructivism, a paradigm in qualitative research that has been propagated by Egon Guba, Yvonna Lincoln, and Norman Denzin. A distinction is made between whether the basic presuppositions of constructivism are credible compared to those of a competing paradigm and whether constructivism's beliefs are internally consistent.…

  12. Towards Useful and Dangerous Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikes, Pat

    2006-01-01

    Like Norman Denzin and Yvonna Lincoln, and many others, the author "wants a social science that is committed up front to issues of social justice, equity, non-violence, peace, and universal human rights" (Denzin & Lincoln, 2005). Educational research, as she and the three authors whose papers make up this symposium of "Discourse" conceptualise it,…

  13. Focus on Learning. Proceedings of the National Conference on Innovation, Diffusion, and Delivery in Education. (Newport Beach, California, March 6-8, 1978)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    League for Innovation in the Community Coll., Los Angeles, CA.

    This proceedings contains the full texts of five keynote speeches: "The Continuing Challenge of the Disadvantaged Student" by Nolen Ellison; "Fostering Creativity in the Teaching-Learning Process" by Norman Watson; "From Junior College to Community College and the Significance of the Change" by John Dunn; Robert Heinich's "From Learning Theory to…

  14. A Celebration of Richard Feynman

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-11

    In honor of the 2005 World Year of Physics, on the birthday of Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman, BSA sponsored this celebration. Actor Norman Parker reads from Feynman's bestselling books, and Ralph Leighton and Tom Rutishauser, who played bongos with Feynman, reminisce on what it was like to drum with him.

  15. 75 FR 14627 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... Marine Mammals Applicant: Robert F. Rockwell, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY; PRT.... Applicant: Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman, OK; PRT - 075249 The applicant requests a...; PRT - 212266 The applicant requests a permit to export and re-import non-living museum specimens...

  16. Hephaestus--The God We Love to Hate: The Lingering Pro- and Anti-Technology Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berbekar, Rosalia

    1988-01-01

    Describes the nature of technology. Summarizes the claims of the anti-technologists, such as Marcuse and Ellul, and the moderate pro-technologists, such as Ferkiss, Mesthene, Brooks and Bowers, National Academy of Engineering, Norman, and Weizenbaum. Provides 79 references. (YP)

  17. Biographical Sketches from Interviews Conducted by Lourdes Ruiz, Teacher, Dulce Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pono, Filomena P., Comp.

    Eight biographical sketches of some Jicarilla Apache and Spanish American people who live and work in Dulce, New Mexico are given. These sketches contain brief descriptions of the lives of Jose Gabriel Abeyta, Cevero Caramillo, Chon LaBrier, Espeedie Garcia Ruiz, Raleigh Tafoya, Norman Tecube, Hubert Velarde, and Henry "Buster" L. Vicenti. At the…

  18. Trade Unions Mirror Society in Conflict between Collectivism and Individualism. A Century of Struggle: A Labor History Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler-Harris, Alice; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This symposium includes the title article by Alice Kessler-Harris and the following responses: "The Extension of Solidarity Conficts with the Spirit of Individualism" (Melvyn Dubofsky); "The Black Labor Movement and the Fight for Social Advance" (William H. Harris); "Forging a Partnership between Blacks and Unions" (Norman Hill); and "Protecting…

  19. 77 FR 50092 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... approval to amend the layout of Stutts Marina on Lake Norman. The Commission originally approved this commercial marina in 1983. In 2006, Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC authorized modifications to the marina, which... ramp. The modified marina layout is mostly similar to the originally-approved design except that...

  20. 7 CFR 613.5 - PMCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false PMCs. 613.5 Section 613.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS PLANT MATERIALS CENTERS § 613.5 PMCs. (a) The Norman A. Berg National...

  1. Facility Focus: Academic Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Humanities Building at Rice University, the Health Sciences Center at Lake Sumter Community College, and the Norman S. and Lida M. Smith Academic Technology Center at Bentley College as examples of the importance of academic buildings in helping define campus image. Includes photographs. (EV)

  2. Toward a Broader Dialectic: Joining Marxism with Mailer to Forge a Multilectics That Advances Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fellner, Gene

    2014-01-01

    I contrast the lenses that Norman Mailer, Herbert Marcuse, and Karl Marx bring to their analyses of social life, exploring the contributions and limits of their respective approaches. I then propose what I call a "multilectical" theoretical lens that encompasses the strengths of all three and leans on the insights of post-Marxist…

  3. Reversing the Trend of Engineering Enrollment Declines with Innovative Outreach, Recruiting, and Retention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, C. E.; Yeary, M. B.; Sluss, J. J., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses an all-encompassing approach to increase the number of students in engineering through innovative outreach, recruiting, and retention programs. Prior to adopting these programs, the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of Oklahoma (OU), Norman, experienced a reduction in engineering enrollment…

  4. 111. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building elevations of north, south, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building elevations of north, south, east, and west sides. Includes details of personnel decontamination area, dark room, and other features. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-A-3. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-00-613-102723. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Rediscovering the Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, John W.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a curriculum development project in which the Science Education Center of the University of Oklahoma and the science department of Norman (Oklahoma) High School prepared and classroom tested complete courses in biology, chemistry, and physics using the learning cycle principles of exploration, conceptual invention, and discovery. (JN)

  6. TRANSGENERATIONAL EFFECTS OF DEHP IN THE MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    TITLE: Transgenerational Effects of Di(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate in the Male Rat. AUTHORS (ALL): Gray, Leon Earl1; Barlow, Norman J2; Furr, Johnathan R1; Brock, John 3; Silva, Manori J3; Barr, Dana B3; Ostby, Joseph S1

    SPONSOR NAME:

    INSTITUTIONS (AL...

  7. 76 FR 67401 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List All...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ..., 2011, notice (76 FR 54423) for more details. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Janine Van Norman, Chief...-8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On September 1, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR.... Hannibal Bolton, (Acting) Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. BILLING CODE 4310-55-P...

  8. Why Teacher Must Go Mobile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascopella, Angela

    2009-01-01

    This article profiles Cathleen Norris, a Regents Professor in the department of Learning Technologies at the University of North Texas and co-creator of GoKnow Learning who encourages teachers to use cell phones in lessons. As a middle and high school math teacher for 14 years in the Norman (Oklahoma) School District and Dallas (Texas) Independent…

  9. Code-Switching and Vernacular Support: An Early Middle English Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaffari, Janne

    2016-01-01

    In the multilingual history of England, the period following the Norman Conquest in 1066 is a particularly intriguing phase, but its code-switching patterns have so far received little attention. The present article describes and analyses the multilingual practices evinced in London, British Library, MS Stowe 34, containing one instructional prose…

  10. Using "Children of a Lesser God" To Teach Intercultural Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Russell F., II; Rock, Roseanna

    One film widely recommended as an instructional resource for communication courses is "Children of a Lesser God," the 1986 movie starring Marlee Matlin and William Hurt. In this film, which can serve as a case study, James Leeds, a talented young teacher in a school for the deaf, falls in love with Sarah Norman, a graduate of the school who, in…

  11. Hearings on Reauthorization of the Vocational Education Act of 1963. Part 7: Vocational Guidance and Counseling and H.R. 4974, Vocational Guidance Act of 1981. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session on H.R. 66.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This document is a transcript of hearings on the reauthorization of the Vocational Education Act of 1963. The specific focus of the hearings was vocational guidance and counseling, as specified in H.R. 4974, the Vocational Guidance Act of 1981. Testimony was given by Jeffrey Drake, coordinator of career development in Flint, Michigan; Norman C.…

  12. 75 FR 79084 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers. DATES: This decision is effective January 14, 2011. Comments must be... Act ] Statement for the FDMS published in the Federal Register on January 17, 2008 (73 FR 3316), or... Larry J. Folkerts Francis M. McMullin Lester W. Carter Paul W. Hunter Norman Mullins Christopher L....

  13. Texturing Space-Times in the Australian Curriculum: Cross-Curriculum Priorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, David; Lingard, Robert; Sellar, Sam

    2015-01-01

    The Australian curriculum, as a policy imagining what learning should take place in schools, and what that learning should achieve, involves the imagining and rescaling of social relations amongst students, their schools, the nation-state and the globe. Following David Harvey's theorisations of space-time and Norman Fairclough's operationalisation…

  14. A Note on the Measurement of Primary Memory Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raaijmakers, Jeroen G. W.

    1982-01-01

    The buffer model proposed by Atkinson and Shiffrin gives a valid measure of primary-memory capacity (i.e., the estimate is close to the true value), a property lacking in both the original Waugh and Norman method and Watkins' modifications of that method. (Author/PN)

  15. Affirmative Communication as Health: The New Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Thomas W.

    A wide range of interesting observations of the past decade, which may now cast their shadow as the health communication paradigm of the forthcoming decade, can be clarified and correlated. One example of effective communication therapy was Norman Cousins's hospitalization with the crippling disease, "ankylosing spondylitis." Using large doses of…

  16. 116. ARAI Details of hot cell section of building ARA626. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    116. ARA-I Details of hot cell section of building ARA-626. Shows manipulator openings in operating face of hot cell, start/stop buttons, and other details. Norman Engineering Company 961/area/SF-626-E-6. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-10-613-102731. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. What Can Be Done to Enhance the Status of the Associate Degree?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Michael E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Essays by four community college chief executive officers (i.e., Michael E. Crawford, Donald L. Newport, Mary M. Norman, and Donald G. Phelps) suggest ways in which community colleges can implement programs and practices that will improve the position of the associate degree and the community college in American higher education. (DMM)

  18. Back to Basics for Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1991-01-01

    Some members of Congress retain a Norman Rockwell image of the two-parent household. To make headway with these leaders, educators must get them into schools and neighborhoods to let them see firsthand the crying needs of children and the schools providing safe harbor for a few hours. Administrators should also share their visions of education's…

  19. 76 FR 33401 - Environmental Impact Statement: Will and Kankakee Counties, Illinois and Lake County, IN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... impacts at a planning level of detail using a Geographic Information System (GIS) supplemented as needed... County, Indiana. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Norman R. Stoner, P.E., Division Administrator, Federal..., N758, Indianapolis, IN 46204, Phone: (317) 232-0694. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FHWA,...

  20. The Ecological Impact of a Dictionary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the impact of the development of a dictionary of Jersey Norman French. The dictionary has created a perception among speakers of Jersey French that they did not know the language. This perception appears to be the result of the ecological change that the dictionary produced by repositioning the language from an oral habitat to a written…

  1. 63. VIEW NORTH UP OWENS VALLEY, SOUTH OF HAIWEE COMPLEX, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW NORTH UP OWENS VALLEY, SOUTH OF HAIWEE COMPLEX, 395 AND AQUEDUCT GOING UP MIDDLE OF PICTURE SPACE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 64. VIEW NORTH UP OWENS VALLEY, SOUTH OF HAIWEE COMPLEX, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. VIEW NORTH UP OWENS VALLEY, SOUTH OF HAIWEE COMPLEX, 935 AND AQUEDUCT GOING UP MIDDLE OF PICTURE SPACE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. Comparing a Cognitive Model and Phototherapy in the Treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantz, Sandra

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is characterized by recurrent major depression or bipolar disorder that occurs annually, usually later in fall as the daylight hours decrease, and that alternates with euthymic or hypomanic moods in the spring and summer. Pioneering research by Dr. Norman Rosenthal and associates has found phototherapy to be…

  4. Beneath the Surface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    Discusses wood-flooring components for athletic facilities, what materials make up these floors, and how they affect a floor's performance once installed. The pros and cons of anchored versus floating systems are examined, including the issue of moisture resistance. Also discussed is the influence of Deutsches Institut fur Normans (DIN) standards…

  5. Practicing Politics: Female Political Scientists as Candidates for Elective Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, University of Oklahoma political science professor Cindy Simon Rosenthal was elected mayor of Norman, Oklahoma, after having served as a member of its city council. Was her activity unique within the political science profession among female political scientists? Her election stimulated the curiosity of some of us in the…

  6. O*NET Final Technical Report. Volume I [and] Volume II [and] Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Norman G.; Mumford, Michael D.; Borman, Walter C.; Jeanneret, P. Richard; Fleishman, Edwin A.; Levin, Kerry Y.

    This document contains the three volumes of the technical report for development of the prototype of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET), which is intended to replace the "Dictionary of Occupational Titles.""General Introduction" (Norman G. Peterson) presents an overview of O*NET's purpose, content, and structure. "Research Method:…

  7. Campbell's Rule for Estimating Entropy Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2004-01-01

    Campbell's rule for estimating entropy changes is discussed in relation to an earlier article by Norman Craig, where it was proposed that the approximate value of the entropy of reaction was related to net moles of gas consumed or generated. It was seen that the average for Campbell's data set was lower than that for Craig's data set and…

  8. Behavior, Expectations and Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Jr, Murray; Rashotte, Lisa Slattery

    2010-01-01

    We predict effects of behavior patterns and status on performance expectations and group inequality using an integrated theory developed by Fisek, Berger and Norman (1991). We next test those predictions using new experimental techniques we developed to control behavior patterns as independent variables. In a 10-condition experiment, predictions…

  9. USING DNA MICROARRAYS TO CHARACTERIZE GENE EXPRESSION IN TESTES OF FERTILE AND INFERTILE HUMANS AND MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    USING DNA MICROARRAYS TO CHARACTERIZE GENE EXPRESSION
    IN TESTES OF FERTILE AND INFERTILE HUMANS AND MICE

    John C. Rockett1, J. Christopher Luft1, J. Brian Garges1, M. Stacey Ricci2, Pasquale Patrizio2, Norman B. Hecht2 and David J. Dix1
    Reproductive Toxicology Divisio...

  10. "Miss, Did This Really Happen Here?" Exploring Big Overviews through Local Depth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Rachel; Goudie, Kath

    2015-01-01

    Rachel Foster and Kath Goudie's search for a more rigorous and interesting way of teaching Year 7 the Norman Conquest was initially driven by a desire to incorporate local history in a more meaningful way in their Key Stage 3 schemes of work. This search culminated in a collaboration with an academic historian, Stephen Baxter. In this article they…

  11. Evaluation of radiation partitioning models at Bushland, Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop growth and soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum energy transfer models often require estimates of net radiation components, such as photosynthetic, solar, and longwave radiation to both the canopy and soil. We evaluated the 1998 radiation partitioning model of Campbell and Norman, herein referr...

  12. Plan of the principal (second) floor of James H. Windrim ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Plan of the principal (second) floor of James H. Windrim and George Summers’s competition design for the New Masonic Temple, Philadelphia, 1867. The exterior wall outline of the architects’ Early Norman alternative design is shown overlaid across the left third of the drawing. - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. 78 FR 67452 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... (OK) Eldon Miles (IN) Norman V. Myers (WA) Jack E. Potts, Jr. (PA) Neal A. Richard (LA) Benny R... January 17, 2008 (73 FR 3316). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Elaine M. Papp, Chief, Medical Programs... applicants has satisfied the entry conditions for obtaining an exemption from the vision requirements (64...

  14. A vertical Y-tube is a valuable tool for assessing whitefly preference, yielding well-defined results among attractive versus poor host plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Almost 90 years ago, an USDA entomologist (Norman McIndoo) reported on his invention of a horizontal Y-tube apparatus which he called an insect olfactometer. In several species of plants, McIndoo used the olfactometer to provide the first experimental proof of insect response to plant odors. The ol...

  15. User Centered System Design. Part II: Collected Papers from the UCSD HMI Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla. Inst. for Cognitive Science.

    This report is a collection of 11 recent papers by the Human-Machine Interaction Group at the University of California, San Diego. The following papers are included: (1) "Stages and Levels in Human-Machine Interaction," Donald A. Norman; (2) "The Nature of Expertise in UNIX," Stephen W. Draper; (3) "Users in the Real World," David Owen; (4)…

  16. 75 FR 17708 - Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization March 30, 2010. Take notice that on March 25, 2010, Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline LLC (KMLP... directed to Norman Watson, Director, Business Development, Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline LLC, 500...

  17. New Horizons in Adult Education. Volumes 3-7. 1989-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Horizons in Adult Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Volume 3 includes the following: "Comparison of Computer and Audio Teleconferencing" (Norman Coombs); "Intellectual Suppression" [book review] (Roger Boshier). Contents of volume 4 are as follows: "Straight Time and Standard Brand Adult Education" (John Ohliger); "Comparison of Folk High Schools in Denmark, and East and West Germany" (Robert…

  18. The "Hamburger Connection" as Ecologically Unequal Exchange: A Cross-National Investigation of Beef Exports and Deforestation in Less-Developed Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    This study explores Norman Myers's concept of the "hamburger connection" as a form of ecologically unequal exchange, where more-developed nations are able to transfer the environmental costs of beef consumption to less-developed nations. I used ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to test whether deforestation in less-developed nations is…

  19. Carnivals, the Carnivalesque, "The Magic Puddin'," and David Almond's "Wild Girl, Wild Boy": Toward a Theorizing of Children's Plays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Rosemary Ross

    2003-01-01

    Seeks to extend current children's literature criticism into children's plays and children's theatre. Uses Norman Lindsay's "The Magic Pudding" as a prose introduction to an idea of a theatrical carnivalesque. Develops a theory of plays-as-the-performance-of-texts, relating this to the current debate on performance and performativity. Applies some…

  20. STS-42 Mission Specialist Thagard during egress exercises in JSC's WETF pool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist Norman E. Thagard, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES), prepares to don the communications carrier assembly (CCA) prior to launch emergency egress (bailout) exercises in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool.

  1. How Can ICT Contribute to the Learning of Foreign Languages by Pupils with SEN?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiring, Lynne; Norman, Nigel

    2005-01-01

    In this article Lynne Meiring and Nigel Norman focus on the notion of entitlement and the demands this has made on schools and teachers to cater for the needs of a wide range of pupils previously denied an experience of foreign languages. In order to enable all pupils to realise their potential, facilities and strategies have to be reviewed and…

  2. New medium licensed for campylobacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A medium, “Campy-Cefex”, has been licensed by the ARS Office of Technology Transfer with Becton Dickinson (No. 1412-002) and Neogen (No. 1412-001) based on patent No. 5,891,709, “Campy-Cefex Selective and Differential Medium for Campylobacter” by Dr. Norman Stern of the Poultry Microbiological Safet...

  3. Memorial I.Rabi

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Le DG H.Schopper ainsi que Norman Ramsey et le DG de l'Unesco rendent hommage à Isidor Rabi, grand scientifique et humaniste (1929-1988).Cette rencontre est organisée ensemble avec le Cern et l'Unesco.

  4. A Celebration of Richard Feynman

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In honor of the 2005 World Year of Physics, on the birthday of Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman, BSA sponsored this celebration. Actor Norman Parker reads from Feynman's bestselling books, and Ralph Leighton and Tom Rutishauser, who played bongos with Feynman, reminisce on what it was like to drum with him.

  5. "MIGRANT CHILDREN--THE CHALLENGE AND OUR RESPONSE"--REPORT OF THE MIGRANT CHILDREN'S FUND CONFERENCE (JULY 1961).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GORDON, CYRUS; AND OTHERS

    THE ROLE OF FEDERAL, STATE, AND PRIVATE AGENCIES IN HELPING MIGRANT CHILDREN WAS DISCUSSED. BACKGROUND INFORMATION GIVEN BY NORMAN THOMAS AND FAY BENNETT EMPHASIZED SURVEY RESULTS. IN 1961 THERE WERE BETWEEN 350,000 AND 450,000 CHILDREN OF DOMESTIC MIGRANT WORKERS IN AMERICA. IN 1959 75,000 OF THE 500,000 MIGRANT WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES WERE…

  6. Low Energy Building for High Energy People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The Huston Huffman Center at the University of Oklahoma's Norman campus has a jogging track as well as facilities for exercise and court games that are fully accessible to the handicapped. The building is set eight feet in the ground both to reduce its bulk and to conserve energy. (Author/MLF)

  7. Managing Resources in Agricultural Colleges. Information Bank Working Paper Number 2326.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, L.; And Others

    Three papers from a study conference are provided. "Is There a Future for Agricultural Education?" (L. Norman) attempts to answer this question. Part I puts forward suggestions as to why there may be no future for agricultural education. Part II suggests some ways of counteracting the problems enumerated in Part I. Part III offers suggestions on…

  8. Proceedings of the First Conference on Computerized Adaptive Testing (Washington, D.C., June 12-13, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Cynthia L., Ed.

    The principal objectives of this conference were to exchange information, discuss theoretical and empirical developments, and to coordinate research efforts. The papers and their authors are: "The Graded Response Model of Latent Trait Theory and Tailored Testing" by Fumiko Samejima; (Incomplete Orders and Computerized Testing" by Norman Cliff;…

  9. 114. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building details of fuel storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building details of fuel storage pit in plan and section. Spaces shown for 20 elements. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-S-4. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-60-613-102752. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Adult Literacy. A Compendium of Articles from the Journal of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radencich, Marguerite C., Ed.

    The following articles are included: "Reconceptualizing the Language of Adult Literacy" (Ilsley, Stahl); "Expanding the Definition of Literacy for Adult Remedial Readers" (Heathington); "Adult Literacy Programs" (Davis); "Stages in the Reading Development of Adults" (Norman, Malicky); "Reading Concepts and Strategies of Adult Nonreaders" (Malicky,…

  11. Effects of Laughter on Discomfort Thresholds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogan, Rosemary; Waltz, William

    Pain is affected by a variety of motivational and affective variables, such as relaxation, social modeling, and social support. Norman Cousins has proposed that laughter is a particularly effective pain antagonist. To compare the effects of laughter on pain sensitivity with the effects of relaxation (a variable known to reduce pain sensitivty),…

  12. Opening Our Doors: Taking Public Library Service to Preschool and Day-Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Sally

    The Opening Our Doors Project of the Pioneer Library System of Norman, Oklahoma takes public library service to preschool and day care facilities by means of learning kits housed in tote bags. The sturdy, zippered tote bags are full of books, games, toys, learning folders, and so forth. There is a tote bag for each of 75 different topics. Topics…

  13. Solving the "Gypsy Problem": "D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New, William S.; Merry, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines how the "discourse moment" constituted by "D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic" might affect the future of schooling for Roma youth. In this article, the authors follow the scheme proposed by Lilie Chouliaraki and Norman Fairclough, who suggest a five-part framework for critical discourse analysis: statement of the problem,…

  14. Why Helium Ends in "-Ium"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.; Holme, Thomas; Cooper, Melanie; White, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Edward Frankland and Norman Lockyer researched upon a gaseous spectra in relation to the physical constitution of the sun and named it as "helium" (from Greek "helios" meaning "sun"). Since Lockyer apparently never formally proposed the name in print, it is not known why he chose to use a metallic end "ium".

  15. Language Status Decisions and the Law in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Shirley Brice; Mandabach, Frederick

    The status of pluralistic languages in the United States may be traced back to attitudes and policies developed in medieval England, where Norman French, Old English, and Latin were each associated with certain contexts and certain populations. English finally achieved dominant status in all domains, but this achievement came about through…

  16. Economics and Equity in Employment of People with Disabilities: International Policies and Practices. Proceedings from the Symposium (East Lansing, Michigan, April 28-May 2, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habeck, Rochelle V., Ed.; And Others

    This volume contains the following presentations: "An Overview of Policy Issues," by Donald Galvin; "Policies for the Employment of Disabled People,' by Norman Acton; "A Corporate Perspective," by Jane Belau; "The Future of Work for People with Disabilities--A View from Great Britain," by Paul Cornes; "A Sociopolitical Perspective," by Harlan…

  17. 117. ARAI Shop and maintenance (ARA627) building roof and floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    117. ARA-I Shop and maintenance (ARA-627) building roof and floor plan. Includes room finish and equipment schedule. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-627-A-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0627-00-613-102759. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. 118. ARAI Shop and maintenance (ARA627) building elevations of north, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    118. ARA-I Shop and maintenance (ARA-627) building elevations of north, south, east, and west sides and other details of door and window types. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-627-A-2. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0627-00-613-102760. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. 119. ARAI Shop and maintenance (ARA627) building sections and details ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    119. ARA-I Shop and maintenance (ARA-627) building sections and details of interior mesh partitions. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-627-A-3. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0627-00-613-102761. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. 110. ARAI support facilities. Index of drawings related to initial ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    110. ARA-I support facilities. Index of drawings related to initial construction of hot cell building ARA-626, shop and maintenance building ARA-627, and other buildings at ARA-I. Date: Circa January 1959. Norman Engineering Company. Ineel index code no. 068-9999-80-613-102703. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Language and Reading Comprehension. Linguistics and Reading Series: 2. Papers in Applied Linguistics. CAL-ERIC/CLL Series on Languages and Linguistics, No. 52.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanat, Stanley F., Ed.

    This collection provides a number of perspectives on the central role that language plays in reading comprehension. Following an introduction by the editor, entitled "Attention and Individual Differences in Comprehension," the following papers are presented: (1) "The Line of Sight Approach," by Norman H. Mackworth; (2) "The Information Processing…

  2. Why Man Explores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena.

    This document presents a transcript of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration panel discussion held on July 2, 1976, in conjunction with the Viking Mission to Mars. The panel consisted of Norman Cousins, Ray Bradbury, Jacques Cousteau, James Michener, and Philip Morrison, and the principal topic was a philosophical discussion of the…

  3. Growing Vegetables. People on the Farm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Office of Governmental and Public Affairs.

    This booklet, one in a series about life on modern farms, describes farm operations and some activities in the lives of six vegetable farmers throughout the United States. The booklet visits the tomato growing of Carl Schneider and his partners and the lettuce growing farm of Norman Martella, both in California. It then includes brief accounts of…

  4. Graduate School and the Self: A Theoretical View of Some Negative Effects of Professional Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Janet Malenchek

    1989-01-01

    Proposes a conceptualization of the professionalization that is inherent in graduate school training as resocialization rather than developmental socialization. Discusses the possible negative effects of this process on students' self-concept. Responses by Jane Allyn Piliavin, Norman Goodman, and Joan Aldous follow. (LS)

  5. Cognitive, Social, and Contextual Determinants of Strategy Production: Comments on Bray et al. (1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferretti, Ralph P.

    1994-01-01

    This response to Norman Bray (EC 609 160) analyzes the methodology and findings of the original study and concludes that studies of strategy production must look at not only the mentally retarded child's cognitive capacities in problem solving but also the social and contextual conditions that affect the child's representation and use of…

  6. Planning for Proficiency. Dimension: Language '86. Report of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching (1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryer, T. Bruce; Medley, Frank W., Jr.

    Selected papers from the 1986 Southern Conference on Language Teaching on instruction for language proficiency are presented: "The Foreign Language Teacher: Confronting an Ever-Changing Profession" (Robert Di Donato); "Restructuring a Traditional Foreign Language Program for Oral Proficiency" (Filisha Camara-Norman, James Davis, Karen Smyley…

  7. Lie algebras and linear differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, R. W.; Rahimi, A.

    1972-01-01

    Certain symmetry properties possessed by the solutions of linear differential equations are examined. For this purpose, some basic ideas from the theory of finite dimensional linear systems are used together with the work of Wei and Norman on the use of Lie algebraic methods in differential equation theory.

  8. Environmental Deprivation and Enrichment: Proceedings of the Annual Invitational Conference on Urban Education (4th, April 26, 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY. Graduate School of Education.

    The Proceedings begin with Dean Joshua Fishman's welcoming remarks. Dr. Norman Gordon introduces environmental deprivation and enrichment. Individual differences in the effects of early experience on later behavior are Dr. Donald Forgays' subject, whose paper is discussed by Dr. Lawrence Plotkin. Dr. Kenneth Clark analyzes the "cult of cultural…

  9. New Assessments, New Rigor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joan Herman; Robert Linn

    2014-01-01

    Researching. Synthesizing. Reasoning with evidence. The PARCC and Smarter Balanced assessments are clearly setting their sights on complex thinking skills. Researchers Joan Herman and Robert Linn look at the new assessments to see how they stack up against Norman Webb's depth of knowledge framework as well as against current state tests. The…

  10. Preparing Youth for the 21st Century: The Transition from Education to the Labour Market. Conference Proceedings (Washington, D.C., February 23-24, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This document contains 15 papers from a conference on preparing youth for the 21st century that was organized by the U.S. Department of Education and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The following papers are included: "Giving Young People a Good Start: The Experience of OECD Countries" (Norman Bowers, Anne Sonnet,…

  11. Engineers, Development, and Engineering Education: From National to Sustainable Community Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucena, J.; Schneider, J.

    2008-01-01

    In October 2007, Norman Borlaug wrote in "Science" magazine that "more than 200 science journals throughout the world will simultaneously publish papers on global poverty and human development--a collaborative effort to increase awareness, interest, and research about these important issues of our time". Borlaug, Nobel Peace Prize laureate and…

  12. Information Processing, Specificity of Practice, and the Transfer of Learning: Considerations for Reconsidering Fidelity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grierson, Lawrence E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Much has been made in the recent medical education literature of the incorrect characterization of simulation along a continuum of low to high fidelity (Cook et al. "JAMA" 306(9): 978-988, 2011; Norman et al. "Med Educ" 46(7): 636-647, 2012; Teteris et al. "Adv Health Sci Educ" 17(1): 137-144, 2012). For the most…

  13. Alignment of Idaho State Standards With The Idaho Direct Mathematics Assessment In Grades 4, 6, and 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leffler, James

    2004-01-01

    The process used for this alignment was an abbreviated version of the alignment work and models developed by Norman L. Webb (1997, 1999, 2001, and 2002), and used in alignment studies of the Idaho state assessment system. While the full Webb alignment includes four dimensions, this study only considers two of the dimensions -- Depth of Knowledge…

  14. Aiming Higher. 25 Stories of How Companies Prosper by Combining Sound Management and Social Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollier, David

    This collection of real-life stories profiles chief executive officers, managers, and employees who view social challenges as opportunities to create new markets, build motivated work forces, and attract loyal customers. The companies profiled have been honored by The Business Enterprise Trust, founded by Norman Lear. The following profiles are…

  15. TIFS/FL5 - 2nd Asheville deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    TIFS/FL5 - 2nd Asheville deployment. People in photograph include: Charlie Peacock, Randy Bailey, Paul Deppe, Mike Reagan, Mike Norman, Rob Rivera, Paul Schifferle, Russ Parrish, Trey Auther, Lou Glaab, Dave McLuer, Mike Parrag, and Lynda Kramer.

  16. Danny Weber, a student experimenter, discusses experiment hardware for STS-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Danny Weber, a student from Cornell University, discusses the hardware for an experiment he devised, with Astronaut Norman E. Thagard, STS-7 mission specialist. The experiment is entitled 'Effect of weightlessness on arthritis'. The cage and monitoring equipment shown are designed to use rats as the subjects for the study. Weber was attending Hunter College High School when he submitted the experiment.

  17. Using Authentic Resources in Teaching French. Teaching Languages, 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Barry, Ed.

    A collection of papers gives ideas for exploitation of resources easily available to the language teacher. Although the papers apply specifically to French instruction, the ideas may be of interest to all language teachers. "Realia in the Classroom" (Norman Hill) concerns the contribution to language instruction of such materials as containers,…

  18. A Cognitive Processing Account of Individual Differences in Novice Logo Programmers' Conceptualisation and Use of Recursion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Pamela

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated individual differences in the construction of mental models of recursion in LOGO programming. The learning process was investigated from the perspective of Norman's mental models theory and employed diSessa's ontology regarding distributed, functional, and surrogate mental models, and the Luria model of brain…

  19. SURFACTANT FLUSH: HOW WELL DID IT WORK?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Oklahoma Corporation Commission through a contract with Surbec-Art, Inc. of Norman Oklahoma has remediated TPH contamination at a gasoline spill at Golden, Oklahoma. Residual gasoline was removed from the subsurface using a flush of surfactant, followed by in situ bioremedia...

  20. Astronauts and cosmonauts sign Gagarin's diary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In keeping with Russian tradition, astronaut Norman E. Thagard (seated, left), guest researcher, watches as Vladimir N. Dezhurov (seated, center), signs the diary of the late Yuriy A. Gagarin, the first Russian cosmonaut, as his Mir 18 crew mates and the

  1. The Future in Education: Problems, Possibilities and Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kierstead, Fred D., Ed.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The nine articles in this special issue discuss topics on the future of education, including educational priorities for the 1990's, teacher education, educational technology, and culture and synergy as tools for educational and social reconstruction. Journal available from University of Oklahoma, College of Education, 434 Hawthorn Street, Norman,…

  2. 121. ARAI Guard house (ARA628). Drawing shows north, south, east, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    121. ARA-I Guard house (ARA-628). Drawing shows north, south, east, and west elevations, floor plan, counter details, and roof plan. Norman Engineering Corporation 961-area/SF-628-A-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 063-0628-00-613-102772. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. 125. ARAI Contaminated waste storage tank (ARA729). Shows location of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    125. ARA-I Contaminated waste storage tank (ARA-729). Shows location of tank on the ARA-I site, section views, connecting pipeline, and other details. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-301-3. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0301-00-613-102711. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. 123. ARAI Substation (ARA726) plan, elevation, security fence details, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. ARA-I Substation (ARA-726) plan, elevation, security fence details, and sections. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-726-E-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0726-10-613-102778. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. 112. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building roof plan and details ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building roof plan and details of roof ventilating equipment and parapet. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-A-2. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-00-613-102722. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Supporting Universal Prevention Programs: A Two-Phased Coaching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students' emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter et al. in "Early Child Res Q" 26:96-109, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter and Van Norman in "Early…

  7. Memorial I.Rabi

    SciTech Connect

    2006-11-01

    Le DG H.Schopper ainsi que Norman Ramsey et le DG de l'Unesco rendent hommage à Isidor Rabi, grand scientifique et humaniste (1929-1988).Cette rencontre est organisée ensemble avec le Cern et l'Unesco.

  8. Reclaiming the Vision: Past, Present, and Future Native Voices for the Eighth Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Lee, Ed.; Bruchac, James, Ed.

    This book describes the "Returning the Gift" project, designed to create new opportunities for North American Native writers to share their work with Native youth, the overall Native community, and the general public. The project included a festival that brought together over 200 current and emerging Native American writers (Norman, Oklahoma, July…

  9. The Mark of a Leader: Longevity, Strategic Planning and Vision Bring Academic and Financial Success to Xavier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    This article profiles Dr. Norman Francis and describes how his longevity, strategic planning and vision as president of Xavier University bring academic and financial success. Higher education leaders say his 43 years at the Catholic HBCU in New Orleans is an increasingly rare example of the benefits possible from a lengthy presidency. It takes…

  10. 115. ARAI Details of hot cell section of building ARA626. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    115. ARA-I Details of hot cell section of building ARA-626. Shows location of high density concrete, viewing windows, filters, monorail crane, bridge crane, and other details. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-626-MS-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-40-613-102737. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Testing the Waters. Duke Power State Park: An Environmental Education Learning Experience Designed for Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhinehart, William C.; Beazley, Lea J.

    This learning packet, one in a group of eight, was developed by the Duke Power State Park in North Carolina for Grades 4-6 to learn to identify macroinvertebrates found in Lake Norman. Loose-leaf pages are presented in nine sections that contain: (1) introductions to the North Carolina State Park System, the Duke Power State Park, the park's…

  12. Using radiometric surface temperature for surface energy flux estimation in Mediterranean drylands from a two-source perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent paper by Morillas et al. [Morillas, L. et al. Using radiometric surface temperature for surface energy flux estimation in Mediterranean drylands from a two-source perspective, Remote Sens. Environ. 136, 234-246, 2013] evaluates the two-source model (TSM) of Norman et al. (1995) with revi...

  13. Doing Institutional Research: A Focus on Professional Development. Papers from the Annual Meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research (9th, Durham, New Hampshire, October 17-19, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Diana M., Ed.

    Institutional research that focuses on professional development is addressed in 35 papers from the 1982 meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Titles and authors include the following: "Modeling College Student Adjustment and Retention for the Individual Institution" (Norman D. Aitken); "The Development Saga of an…

  14. STS-30 crewmembers Thagard and Lee during onboard cabin depressurization test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    On Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, middeck, STS-30 mission specialists Norman E. Thagard (left) and Mark C. Lee participate in cabin depressuriza- tion test. Thagard and Lee wear launch and entry helmets (LEHs) during the test. They also display a Florida State insignia and a 'Maggot on Board' sign. Open airlock hatch and a third crewmember's hand appear in the foreground.

  15. CSSEDC Quarterly. 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, James, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    These four issues of the CSSEDC Quarterly (Conference for Secondary School English Department Chairpersons) represent the quarterly for 1989. Articles in number 1 deal with professional development, and include: "Sharing Expertise within a Department" (Martha R. Dolly); "Empowerment Develops a Computer Writing Center" (Norman L. Frey); "Videotapes…

  16. Readability: Computer Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenthal, Helen

    Textual Analysis of Language Samples (TEXAN) is a computer program which can count a number of variables needed for use in readability formulas. Three studies which utilize TEXAN are reported in this paper: (1) In 1972, Norman and Helen Felsenthal randomly selected 20 books from the 1306 in Eakin's "Good Books for Children" and calculated their…

  17. Ideas from Ten North American Curriculum Thinkers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Edmund C.

    The views and attitudes of ten North American educational policy-makers concerning curriculum development and design are presented. The theories and research of Herbert M. Kliebard, Fenwick W. English, Walter Werner, John I. Goodlad, Decker F. Walker, William A. Reid, Norman E. Gleadow, Neil Postman, Elliot W. Eisner, and Michael W. Apple are…

  18. Action Implications in Adult Basic Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    Eight articles on adult basic education are presented. The articles adapted from 1971 workshop presentations are: Action Implications for ABE Directors by Alan Knox; ABE Budget Development, by Donald G. Butcher; Competent ABE Instructors, by William D. Dowling; Interview Techniques and Training, by Norman Kagan; Reading: The Basic in Adult Basic…

  19. Testing a Neurocomputational Model of Recollection, Familiarity, and Source Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elfman, Kane W.; Parks, Colleen M.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    The authors assess whether the complementary learning systems model of the medial temporal lobes (Norman & O'Reilly, 2003) is able to account for source recognition receiver operating characteristics (ROCs). The model assumes that recognition reflects the contribution of a hippocampally mediated recollection process and a cortically mediated…

  20. 75 FR 65940 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... Intl, VOR RWY 3, Amdt 13 On September 15, 2010 (75 FR 178) the FAA published an Amendment in Docket No... (GPS) RWY 22L, Amdt 1 San Jose, CA, Norman Y. Mineta San Jose Intl, RNAV (RNP) Z RWY 30R, Orig-A...

  1. Arctic warming: nonlinear impacts of sea-ice and glacier melt on seabird foraging.

    PubMed

    Grémillet, David; Fort, Jérôme; Amélineau, Françoise; Zakharova, Elena; Le Bot, Tangi; Sala, Enric; Gavrilo, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Arctic climate change has profound impacts on the cryosphere, notably via shrinking sea-ice cover and retreating glaciers, and it is essential to evaluate and forecast the ecological consequences of such changes. We studied zooplankton-feeding little auks (Alle alle), a key sentinel species of the Arctic, at their northernmost breeding site in Franz-Josef Land (80°N), Russian Arctic. We tested the hypothesis that little auks still benefit from pristine arctic environmental conditions in this remote area. To this end, we analysed remote sensing data on sea-ice and coastal glacier dynamics collected in our study area across 1979-2013. Further, we recorded little auk foraging behaviour using miniature electronic tags attached to the birds in the summer of 2013, and compared it with similar data collected at three localities across the Atlantic Arctic. We also compared current and historical data on Franz-Josef Land little auk diet, morphometrics and chick growth curves. Our analyses reveal that summer sea-ice retreated markedly during the last decade, leaving the Franz-Josef Land archipelago virtually sea-ice free each summer since 2005. This had a profound impact on little auk foraging, which lost their sea-ice-associated prey. Concomitantly, large coastal glaciers retreated rapidly, releasing large volumes of melt water. Zooplankton is stunned by cold and osmotic shock at the boundary between glacier melt and coastal waters, creating new foraging hotspots for little auks. Birds therefore switched from foraging at distant ice-edge localities, to highly profitable feeding at glacier melt-water fronts within <5 km of their breeding site. Through this behavioural plasticity, little auks maintained their chick growth rates, but showed a 4% decrease in adult body mass. Our study demonstrates that arctic cryosphere changes may have antagonistic ecological consequences on coastal trophic flow. Such nonlinear responses complicate modelling exercises of current and future

  2. Arctic warming: nonlinear impacts of sea-ice and glacier melt on seabird foraging.

    PubMed

    Grémillet, David; Fort, Jérôme; Amélineau, Françoise; Zakharova, Elena; Le Bot, Tangi; Sala, Enric; Gavrilo, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Arctic climate change has profound impacts on the cryosphere, notably via shrinking sea-ice cover and retreating glaciers, and it is essential to evaluate and forecast the ecological consequences of such changes. We studied zooplankton-feeding little auks (Alle alle), a key sentinel species of the Arctic, at their northernmost breeding site in Franz-Josef Land (80°N), Russian Arctic. We tested the hypothesis that little auks still benefit from pristine arctic environmental conditions in this remote area. To this end, we analysed remote sensing data on sea-ice and coastal glacier dynamics collected in our study area across 1979-2013. Further, we recorded little auk foraging behaviour using miniature electronic tags attached to the birds in the summer of 2013, and compared it with similar data collected at three localities across the Atlantic Arctic. We also compared current and historical data on Franz-Josef Land little auk diet, morphometrics and chick growth curves. Our analyses reveal that summer sea-ice retreated markedly during the last decade, leaving the Franz-Josef Land archipelago virtually sea-ice free each summer since 2005. This had a profound impact on little auk foraging, which lost their sea-ice-associated prey. Concomitantly, large coastal glaciers retreated rapidly, releasing large volumes of melt water. Zooplankton is stunned by cold and osmotic shock at the boundary between glacier melt and coastal waters, creating new foraging hotspots for little auks. Birds therefore switched from foraging at distant ice-edge localities, to highly profitable feeding at glacier melt-water fronts within <5 km of their breeding site. Through this behavioural plasticity, little auks maintained their chick growth rates, but showed a 4% decrease in adult body mass. Our study demonstrates that arctic cryosphere changes may have antagonistic ecological consequences on coastal trophic flow. Such nonlinear responses complicate modelling exercises of current and future

  3. ["Dr Breuer will care for him with utmost attention." A plan for Nietzsche's neuropathological treatment in Vienna].

    PubMed

    Müller-Buck, Renate

    2007-01-01

    This essay is about a plan for the treatment of Friedrich Nietzsche by Josef Breuer in the spring of 1878. The plan was developed by Siegfried Lipiner, a philosphy student from Galicia and an admirer of Nietzsche, who was acquainted with Breuer as well as with Freud. Lipiner was convinced that Nietzsche could be treated by the Viennese specialists and tried his best to arrange this. However all his endeavors were frustrated by the opposition of Nietzsche's advisors in Basel, as well as his docters, and ultimately of Nietzsche himself who preferred the cold-water therapy in Baden-Baden.

  4. The barents sea magmatic province: Geological-geophysical evidence and new 40Ar/39Ar dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipilov, E. V.; Karyakin, Yu. V.

    2011-07-01

    Resulting from study of the geological structure of the Franz Josef Land and Svalbard archipelagoes, this work presents new 17 40Ar/39Ar age datings for basalts taken during coastal expeditions in 2006-2010. Radiological age determination for intrusive units (sills) located in the western part of Nordensciold Land (Spitzbergen Island) has been made for the first time. In relation to use of the interpretation results of marine geological-geophysical data, the distribution peculiarities and time ranges for Jurassic-Cretaceous basic magmatism within the studied regions of the Barents Sea continental margin and within the Arctic as a whole are discussed.

  5. COMMITTEES: SQM2004 Organising and International Advisory Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    Organising Committee Jean Cleymans (Chairman) Zeblon Vilakazi Roger Fearick Peter Steinberg Rory Adams Bruce Becker Sarah Blyth Gareth de Vaux Heather Gray Mark Horner Nawahl Razak Artur Szostak Spencer Wheaton International Advisory Committee Federico Antinori Tim Hallman John Harris Tetsuo Hatsuda Ulrich Heinz Huan Z Huang Sonja Kabana Volker Koch Rob Lacey Jes Madsen Yasuo Miake Maurizio Morando Berndt Mueller Grazyna Odyniec Helmut Oeschler Apostolos Panagiotou Josef Pochodzalla Johann Rafelski Karel Safarik Jack Sandweiss Jürgen Schaffner-Bielich Georges Stephans Horst Stoecker Herbert Stroebele Thomas Ullrich Orlando Villalobos-Baillie Bill Zajc Joseph Zimanyi

  6. Arctic geodynamics: Arctic science and ERS-1 satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel; Sandwell, David T.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed gravity field map of the mid Arctic Ocean, spreading ridge system was produced on the basis of ERS-1 satellite altimetry data. Areas of special concern, the Barents and Kara Seas, and areas surrounding the islands of Svalbard, Frans Josef Land and Novoya Zemlya are reviewed. ERS-1 altimetry covers unique Arctic and Antarctic latitudes above 72 degrees. Before ERS-1 it was not possible to study these areas with satellite altimetry. Gravity field solutions for the Barents Sea, portions of the Arctic Ocean and the Norwegian sea are shown. The largest gravity anomalies occur along the Greenland fracture zone as well as along transform faults near Svalbard.

  7. Investigation into the effects of antioxidant-rich extract of Tamarindus indica leaf on antioxidant enzyme activities, oxidative stress and gene expression profiles in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Razali, Nurhanani; Abdul Aziz, Azlina; Lim, Chor Yin; Mat Junit, Sarni

    2015-01-01

    The leaf extract of Tamarindus indica L. (T. indica) had been reported to possess high phenolic content and showed high antioxidant activities. In this study, the effects of the antioxidant-rich leaf extract of the T. indica on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities, H2O2-induced ROS production and gene expression patterns were investigated in liver HepG2 cells. Lipid peroxidation and ROS production were inhibited and the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase was enhanced when the cells were treated with the antioxidant-rich leaf extract. cDNA microarray analysis revealed that 207 genes were significantly regulated by at least 1.5-fold (p < 0.05) in cells treated with the antioxidant-rich leaf extract. The expression of KNG1, SERPINC1, SERPIND1, SERPINE1, FGG, FGA, MVK, DHCR24, CYP24A1, ALDH6A1, EPHX1 and LEAP2 were amongst the highly regulated. When the significantly regulated genes were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software, "Lipid Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry, Hematological Disease" was the top biological network affected by the leaf extract, with a score of 36. The top predicted canonical pathway affected by the leaf extract was the coagulation system (P < 2.80 × 10(-6)) followed by the superpathway of cholesterol biosynthesis (P < 2.17 × 10(-4)), intrinsic prothrombin pathway (P < 2.92 × 10(-4)), Immune Protection/Antimicrobial Response (P < 2.28 × 10(-3)) and xenobiotic metabolism signaling (P < 2.41 × 10(-3)). The antioxidant-rich leaf extract of T. indica also altered the expression of proteins that are involved in the Coagulation System and the Intrinsic Prothrombin Activation Pathway (KNG1, SERPINE1, FGG), Superpathway of Cholesterol Biosynthesis (MVK), Immune protection/antimicrobial response (IFNGR1, LEAP2, ANXA3 and MX1) and Xenobiotic Metabolism Signaling (ALDH6A1, ADH6). In conclusion, the antioxidant-rich leaf extract of T. indica inhibited lipid peroxidation

  8. Investigation into the effects of antioxidant-rich extract of Tamarindus indica leaf on antioxidant enzyme activities, oxidative stress and gene expression profiles in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Razali, Nurhanani; Abdul Aziz, Azlina; Lim, Chor Yin

    2015-01-01

    The leaf extract of Tamarindus indica L. (T. indica) had been reported to possess high phenolic content and showed high antioxidant activities. In this study, the effects of the antioxidant-rich leaf extract of the T. indica on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities, H2O2-induced ROS production and gene expression patterns were investigated in liver HepG2 cells. Lipid peroxidation and ROS production were inhibited and the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase was enhanced when the cells were treated with the antioxidant-rich leaf extract. cDNA microarray analysis revealed that 207 genes were significantly regulated by at least 1.5-fold (p < 0.05) in cells treated with the antioxidant-rich leaf extract. The expression of KNG1, SERPINC1, SERPIND1, SERPINE1, FGG, FGA, MVK, DHCR24, CYP24A1, ALDH6A1, EPHX1 and LEAP2 were amongst the highly regulated. When the significantly regulated genes were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software, “Lipid Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry, Hematological Disease” was the top biological network affected by the leaf extract, with a score of 36. The top predicted canonical pathway affected by the leaf extract was the coagulation system (P < 2.80 × 10−6) followed by the superpathway of cholesterol biosynthesis (P < 2.17 × 10−4), intrinsic prothrombin pathway (P < 2.92 × 10−4), Immune Protection/Antimicrobial Response (P < 2.28 × 10−3) and xenobiotic metabolism signaling (P < 2.41 × 10−3). The antioxidant-rich leaf extract of T. indica also altered the expression of proteins that are involved in the Coagulation System and the Intrinsic Prothrombin Activation Pathway (KNG1, SERPINE1, FGG), Superpathway of Cholesterol Biosynthesis (MVK), Immune protection/antimicrobial response (IFNGR1, LEAP2, ANXA3 and MX1) and Xenobiotic Metabolism Signaling (ALDH6A1, ADH6). In conclusion, the antioxidant-rich leaf extract of T. indica inhibited lipid

  9. Investigation into the effects of antioxidant-rich extract of Tamarindus indica leaf on antioxidant enzyme activities, oxidative stress and gene expression profiles in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Razali, Nurhanani; Abdul Aziz, Azlina; Lim, Chor Yin; Mat Junit, Sarni

    2015-01-01

    The leaf extract of Tamarindus indica L. (T. indica) had been reported to possess high phenolic content and showed high antioxidant activities. In this study, the effects of the antioxidant-rich leaf extract of the T. indica on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities, H2O2-induced ROS production and gene expression patterns were investigated in liver HepG2 cells. Lipid peroxidation and ROS production were inhibited and the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase was enhanced when the cells were treated with the antioxidant-rich leaf extract. cDNA microarray analysis revealed that 207 genes were significantly regulated by at least 1.5-fold (p < 0.05) in cells treated with the antioxidant-rich leaf extract. The expression of KNG1, SERPINC1, SERPIND1, SERPINE1, FGG, FGA, MVK, DHCR24, CYP24A1, ALDH6A1, EPHX1 and LEAP2 were amongst the highly regulated. When the significantly regulated genes were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software, "Lipid Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry, Hematological Disease" was the top biological network affected by the leaf extract, with a score of 36. The top predicted canonical pathway affected by the leaf extract was the coagulation system (P < 2.80 × 10(-6)) followed by the superpathway of cholesterol biosynthesis (P < 2.17 × 10(-4)), intrinsic prothrombin pathway (P < 2.92 × 10(-4)), Immune Protection/Antimicrobial Response (P < 2.28 × 10(-3)) and xenobiotic metabolism signaling (P < 2.41 × 10(-3)). The antioxidant-rich leaf extract of T. indica also altered the expression of proteins that are involved in the Coagulation System and the Intrinsic Prothrombin Activation Pathway (KNG1, SERPINE1, FGG), Superpathway of Cholesterol Biosynthesis (MVK), Immune protection/antimicrobial response (IFNGR1, LEAP2, ANXA3 and MX1) and Xenobiotic Metabolism Signaling (ALDH6A1, ADH6). In conclusion, the antioxidant-rich leaf extract of T. indica inhibited lipid peroxidation

  10. Geographical distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in the Norwegian and Russian Arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lie, E.; Bernhoft, A.; Riget, F.; Belikov, Stanislav; Boltunov, Andrei N.; Derocher, A.E.; Garner, G.W.; Wiig, O.; Skaare, J.U.

    2003-01-01

    Geographical variation of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) was studied in blood samples from 90 adult female polar bear (Ursus maritimus) from Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Kara Sea, East-Siberian Sea and Chukchi Sea. In all regions, oxychlordane was the dominant OCP. Regional differences in mean levels of HCB, oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor, ??-HCH, ??-HCH and p,p???-DDE were found. The highest levels of oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor and DDE were found in polar bears from Franz Josef Land and Kara Sea. HCB level was lowest in polar bears from Svalbard. Polar bears from Chukchi Sea had the highest level of ??- and ??-HCH. The lowest ??-HCH concentration was found in bears from Kara Sea. In all the bears, ???HCHs was dominated by ??-HCH. The geographical variation in OCP levels and pattern may suggest regional differences in pollution sources and different feeding habits in the different regions. Polar bears from the Western Russian Arctic were exposed to higher levels of chlordanes and p,p???-DDE than polar bears from locations westwards and eastwards from this region. This may imply the presence of a significant pollution source in the Russian Arctic area. The study suggests that the western Russian Arctic is the most contaminated region of the Arctic and warrants further research. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. New weather radar coming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    What would you call the next generation of radar for severe weather prediction? NEXRAD, of course. A prototype for the new system was recently completed in Norman, Okla., and by the early 1990s up to 195 stations around the United States will be tracking dangerous weather and sending faster, more accurate, and more detailed warnings to the public.NEXRAD is being built for the Departments of Commerce, Transportation, and Defense by the Unisys Corporation under a $450 million contract signed in December 1987. Th e system will be used by the National Weather Service, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the U.S. Air Force and Navy. The NEXRAD radar tower in Norman is expected to be operational in October.

  12. Evaluation of the Sho-Vel-Tum Alkali-Surfactant-Polymer (ASP) Oil Recovery Project - Stephens County, OK

    SciTech Connect

    French, Troy

    1999-08-16

    Le Norman Energy Company conducted research on field application of alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) flooding as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's plan to maximize the production of our domestic oil resources. In addition to having substantial technical merit, the process uses chemicals that are environmentally acceptable. Le Norman's field project is located in the Sho-Vel-Tum (OK) oil field, which was a major producer of crude oil in past years, but has since been extensively waterflooded. This reservoir in this portion of the field is typical of many shallow reservoirs in the Oklahoma-Kansas area and is a good demonstration site for that area. The pay zones are located approximately 700 ft. deep, and this project is the shallowest field test for ASP flooding.

  13. Mind the gap - Deriving a compatible user mental model of the home heating system to encourage sustainable behaviour.

    PubMed

    Revell, Kirsten M A; Stanton, Neville A

    2016-11-01

    Householders' behaviour with their home heating systems is a considerable contributor to domestic energy consumption. To create a design specification for the 'scaffolding' needed for sustainable behaviour with home heating controls, Norman's (1986) Gulf of Execution and Evaluation was applied to the home heating system. A Home Heating Design Model (DM) was produced with a home heating expert. Norman's (1986) 7 Stages of Activity were considered to derive a Compatible User Mental Model (CUMM) of a typical Heating System. Considerable variation in the concepts needed at each stage was found. Elements that could be derived from the DM supported stages relating to action specification, execution, perception and interpretation, but many are not communicated in the design of typical heating controls. Stages relating to goals, intentions and evaluation required concepts beyond the DM. A systems view that tackles design for sustainable behaviour from a variety of levels is needed. PMID:27062135

  14. Mind the gap - Deriving a compatible user mental model of the home heating system to encourage sustainable behaviour.

    PubMed

    Revell, Kirsten M A; Stanton, Neville A

    2016-11-01

    Householders' behaviour with their home heating systems is a considerable contributor to domestic energy consumption. To create a design specification for the 'scaffolding' needed for sustainable behaviour with home heating controls, Norman's (1986) Gulf of Execution and Evaluation was applied to the home heating system. A Home Heating Design Model (DM) was produced with a home heating expert. Norman's (1986) 7 Stages of Activity were considered to derive a Compatible User Mental Model (CUMM) of a typical Heating System. Considerable variation in the concepts needed at each stage was found. Elements that could be derived from the DM supported stages relating to action specification, execution, perception and interpretation, but many are not communicated in the design of typical heating controls. Stages relating to goals, intentions and evaluation required concepts beyond the DM. A systems view that tackles design for sustainable behaviour from a variety of levels is needed.

  15. Historical overview of Ramsey spectroscopy and its relevance on Time and Frequency Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, M. M.; Tarelho, L. V. G.; de Souza, M. A.; Baratto, A. C.; Garcia, G. A.; Muller, S. T.; De Martin, J., Jr.; Rodriguez, A. S.; Bebeachibuli, A.; Magalhães, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    A brief overview of the historical evolution of the method of successive oscillatory fields developed by Norman Ramsey, and some different implementations of the decurrent methodology are presented. We use time and frequency standards, from Cs atomic beams to optical standards, as examples. The scientific progress and the technological implementation achieved through a partnership between USP-SC and INMETRO are shown on the characterization of each time and frequency standard.

  16. Early Results from the VENGA Integral Field Spectroscopy Survey: Current and Past Spatially-Resolved Star Formation in NGC2903

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mimi; Gebhardt, K.; Jogee, S.; VENGA

    2012-01-01

    We present spatially-resolved integral field spectroscopy of the nearby isolated spiral galaxy NGC 2903 from the VIRUS-P Exploration of Nearby Spiral Galaxies (VENGA) survey. Among science goals that the survey aims at, here we focus on its star formation activity, stellar population modeling and constraining its star formation history. We acknowledge support from the Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program (NHARP) ARP-03658-0234-2009.

  17. Nature's ups and downs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Peter

    2015-12-01

    When Norman Lockyer, an astronomer and science writer with a day job as a clerk at the War Office in London, approached the publishing house Macmillan and Company in 1869 with a proposal for a new weekly journal about science, few could have predicted the outcome. The journal in question was Nature, and given its influence over the past 146 years, it is hard to believe that Melinda Baldwin's Making Nature is the first full-length book to be written about it.

  18. Inflight views of the crew of STS-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Inflight view of the crew of STS-7. This view is a group portrait of the crew on the flight deck displaying some jelly beans discovered among their food supplies. The label on the candy reads 'Compliments of the White House.' In the rear from left to right are Astronauts Robert L. Crippen, crew commander; Frederick H. Hauck, pilot; and John M. Fabian, mission specialist. In front are Drs. Sally K. Ride and Norman E. Thagard, mission specialists.

  19. Enzyme Amplified Detection of Microbial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wainwright, Norman R.

    2004-01-01

    This proposal is MBL's portion of NASA's Johnson Space Center's Astrobiology Center led by Principal Investigator, Dr. David McKay, entitled: 'Institute for the Study of Biomarkers in Astromaterials.' Dr. Norman Wainwright is the principal investigator at MBL and is responsible for developing methods to detect trace quantities of microbial cell wall chemicals using the enzyme amplification system of Limulus polyphemus and other related methods.

  20. Frederick National Laboratory Celebrates 40 Years | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Forty years ago, what we now call the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research was born. Here are some highlights in the facility’s history. October 19, 1971 – President Richard Nixon announced that Fort Detrick would be converted from a biological warfare facility to a cancer research center (Covert, Norman M., Cutting Edge: A History of Fort Detrick, Maryland, 1943–1993, pp. 85–87).

  1. Are they worth it? Executive compensation, company performance don't always relate at top hospital, post-acute and insurance companies.

    PubMed

    Galloro, Vince; Benko, Laura B

    2003-08-01

    Modern Healthcare's first comprehensive report on CEO pay at the top for-profit healthcare providers and insurers shows pay and stock performance aren't always linked. One exception is Norman Payson, left, who was tapped in 1998 to help turn around then-faltering Oxford Health Plans. He pulled in total direct compensation of $76 million last year, including $73 million in exercised stock options. PMID:12931471

  2. A comparison of models to estimate in-canopy photosynthetically active radiation and their influence on canopy stomatal resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leiming; Moran, Michael D.; Brook, Jeffrey R.

    The models for photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) used in a multi-layer canopy stomatal resistance (CSR) model developed by Baldocchi et al. (Atmospheric Environment 21 (1987) 91-101) and in a two-big-leaf CSR model developed by Hicks et al. (Water, Air and Soil Pollution 36 (1987) 311) are investigated in this study. The PAR received by shaded leaves in Baldocchi et al. (1987) is found to be larger than that predicted by a canopy radiative-transfer model developed by Norman (in: Barfield, Gerber, (Eds.), Modification of the Aerial Environment of Crops. ASAE Monograph No. 2. American Society for Agricultural. Engineering, St. Joseph, MI, 1979, p. 249) by as much as 50% even though the Baldocchi et al. (1987) model is indirectly based on Norman's model. This larger value of PAR results in turn in a smaller CSR by as much as 30% for canopies with larger leaf area indexes. A new formula to predict vertical profiles for PAR received by shaded leaves inside a canopy is suggested in the present study based on Norman (1979) and agrees well with the original model of Norman (1979). The simple treatment used in Hicks et al. (1987) for canopy-average PAR received by shaded leaves is found to diverge for canopies with leaf area indexes not close to two A new empirical formula for canopy-average PAR is then suggested for use in a two-big-leaf model, and it is shown that under most conditions the modified two-big-leaf CSR model can predict reasonable values when compared with the more complex multi-layer CSR model. Both the modified multi-layer CSR model and the modified two-big-leaf CSR model are also shown to predict reasonable dry deposition velocities for O 3 when compared to several sets of measurements.

  3. Cayley-Klein parameters and evolution of two- and three-level systems and squeezed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattoli, G.; Torre, A.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the time behavior of quantum states ruled by Hamiltonians linear in the SU(2), SU(1,1), and SU(3) generators in terms of the Cayley-Klein parameters, originally introduced in classical mechanics is analyzed. Also pointed out is the link between the Cayley-Klein parameters and the Wei-Norman ordering functions, exploited in the context of the Schrödinger representation.

  4. 122. ARAI Pump House (ARA629). Drawing shows north, south, east, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    122. ARA-I Pump House (ARA-629). Drawing shows north, south, east, and west elevations, floor plan, foundation plan, and other details. Note small enclosure at southwest corner of building to contain chlorination equipment. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-629-A-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0629-00-613-102774. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. 124. ARAI Reservoir (ARA727), later named water storage tank. Shows ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    124. ARA-I Reservoir (ARA-727), later named water storage tank. Shows plan of 100,000-gallon tank, elevation, image of "danger radiation hazard" sign, and other details. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-727-S-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0727-60-613-102779. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Bibliography of astronomers. Books and pamphlets in English by and about astronomers. Volume I: The spirit of the nineteenth century.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, P.

    In this bibliography a concise biographical chronology of the following astronomers is given: George Biddell Airy (1801 - 1892), Robert Stawell Ball (1840 - 1913), George Phillips Bond (1825 - 1865), William Cranch Bond (1789 - 1859), Agnes Mary Clerke (1842 - 1907), John Frederick William Herschel (1792 - 1871), Edward Singleton Holden (1846 - 1914), Joseph Norman Lockyer (1836 - 1920), Percival Lowell (1855 - 1916), Ormsby MacKnight Mitchel (1809 - 1862), Simon Newcomb (1835 - 1909), Richard Anthony Proctor (1837 - 1888), Mary Fairfax Greig Somerville (1780 - 1872).

  7. Statistical Connections between the Properties of Type IA Supernovae and the B-V Colors of Their Parent Galaxies, and the Value of H 0: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branch, David; Romanishin, W.; Baron, E.

    1996-08-01

    In the 1996 July 1 issue, this paper was printed without it's title as a result of an error at the final stage of typesetting. The title, and authors, of the paper are as follows: See Journal for Abstract. STATISTICAL CONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE PROPERTIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AND THE B - V COLORS OF THEIR PARENT GALAXIES, AND THE VALUE OF H_0_ DAVID BRANCH, W. ROMANISHIN, AND E. BARON Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019

  8. STS-30 Atlantis, OV-104, crew eats preflight breakfast at KSC O and C Bldg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 crewmembers eat preflight breakfast at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Operations and Checkout (O and C) Building before boarding Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Sitting around table (left to right) are Mission Specialist (MS) Norman E. Thagard, Pilot Ronald J. Grabe, Commander David M. Walker, MS Mary L. Cleave, and MS Mark C. Lee. A cake decorated with the STS-30 mission insignia is in the center of the table.

  9. 113. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building wall sections and details ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building wall sections and details of radio chemistry lab. Shows high-bay roof over hot cells and isolation rooms below grade storage pit for fuel elements. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-A-4. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-00-613-102724. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. STS-30 crewmembers pose for informal portrait on JSC FB-SMS middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-30 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, crewmembers pause briefly from their training schedule to pose for informal portrait in JSC fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). On FB-SMS middeck are (left to right) Commander David M. Walker, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark C. Lee, MS Mary L. Cleave, Pilot Ronald J. Grabe, and MS Norman E. Thagard. FB-SMS is located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  11. Dr. John Stack and other NASA Langley Research Center Visitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Front Row, left to right: Mrs. Elsa Hoare and Major Philip L. Teed - staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England: Dr. Barnes Wallis - Chief of Aeronautical Research, Vicers-Armstrong, Ltd., Weybridge, England. Back Row, left to right: Norman W. Boorer and Cecil W. Hayes - Staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England; John R. Christie - Ministry of Supply, London, England; Philip A. Hufton - Chief Supt., Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedford, England; Lindsey I. Turner, Jr. - Langley Research Center. Photographed November 13, 1958.

  12. Crew portrait during 51-B mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Crew portrait during 51-B mission. Note the gold T-shirts of 'gold' team members Robert F. Overmyer (bottom left), Don L. Lind (behind Overmyer), William E. Thornton (bottom right) and Taylor G. Wang (behind Thornton). Posing 'upside down' are 'silver team members (l.-r.) Frederick D. Gregory, Norman E. Thagard and Lodewijk van den Berg. The seven are in the long science module for Spacelab 3 in the cargo bay of the Shuttle Challenger.

  13. STS-51B Crew Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The crew assigned to the STS-51B mission included (seated left to right) Robert F. Overmyer, commander; and Frederick D. Gregory, pilot. Standing, left to right, are Don L. Lind, mission specialist; Taylor G. Wang, payload specialist; Norman E. Thagard, mission specialist; William E. Thornton, mission specialist; and Lodewijk van den Berg, payload specialist. Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger on April 29, 1985 at 12:02:18 pm (EDT), the STS-51A mission's primary payload was the Spacelab-3.

  14. Peptidomic Identification of Serum Peptides Diagnosing Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuaibin; Stevenson, David K.; Sheng, Guojun; Butte, Atul J.; Ling, Xuefeng B.

    2013-01-01

    We sought to identify serological markers capable of diagnosing preeclampsia (PE). We performed serum peptide analysis (liquid chromatography mass spectrometry) of 62 unique samples from 31 PE patients and 31 healthy pregnant controls, with two-thirds used as a training set and the other third as a testing set. Differential serum peptide profiling identified 52 significant serum peptides, and a 19-peptide panel collectively discriminating PE in training sets (n = 21 PE, n = 21 control; specificity = 85.7% and sensitivity = 100%) and testing sets (n = 10 PE, n = 10 control; specificity = 80% and sensitivity = 100%). The panel peptides were derived from 6 different protein precursors: 13 from fibrinogen alpha (FGA), 1 from alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT), 1 from apolipoprotein L1 (APO-L1), 1 from inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4), 2 from kininogen-1 (KNG1), and 1 from thymosin beta-4 (TMSB4). We concluded that serum peptides can accurately discriminate active PE. Measurement of a 19-peptide panel could be performed quickly and in a quantitative mass spectrometric platform available in clinical laboratories. This serum peptide panel quantification could provide clinical utility in predicting PE or differential diagnosis of PE from confounding chronic hypertension. PMID:23840341

  15. Identification of biomarkers for periodontal disease using the immunoproteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Kerishnan, Jesinda P.; Mohammad, Sani; Alias, Muhamad Shaifunizam; Mu, Alan Kang-Wai; Vaithilingam, Rathna Devi; Baharuddin, Nor Adinar; Safii, Syarida H.; Abdul Rahman, Zainal Ariff; Chen, Yu Nieng

    2016-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is one of the most common oral diseases associated with the host’s immune response against periodontopathogenic infection. Failure to accurately diagnose the stage of periodontitis has limited the ability to predict disease status. Therefore, we aimed to look for reliable diagnostic markers for detection or differentiation of early stage periodontitis using the immunoprotemic approach. Method In the present study, patient serum samples from four distinct stages of periodontitis (i.e., mild chronic, moderate chronic, severe chronic, and aggressive) and healthy controls were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), followed by silver staining. Notably, we consistently identified 14 protein clusters in the sera of patients and normal controls. Results Overall, we found that protein levels were comparable between patients and controls, with the exception of the clusters corresponding to A1AT, HP, IGKC and KNG1 (p < 0.05). In addition, the immunogenicity of these proteins was analysed via immunoblotting, which revealed differential profiles for periodontal disease and controls. For this reason, IgM obtained from severe chronic periodontitis (CP) sera could be employed as a suitable autoantibody for the detection of periodontitis. Discussion Taken together, the present study suggests that differentially expressed host immune response proteins could be used as potential biomarkers for screening periodontitis. Future studies exploring the diagnostic potential of such factors are warranted. PMID:27635317

  16. Renal Transcriptome Analysis of Programmed Hypertension Induced by Maternal Nutritional Insults.

    PubMed

    Tain, You-Lin; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Chan, Julie Y H; Huang, Li-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Maternal nutrition can affect development, leading to long-term effects on the health of offspring. The most common outcome is programmed hypertension. We examined whether alterations in renal transcriptome are responsible for generating programmed hypertension among four different models using next-generation RNA sequencing (NGS) technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received 50% caloric restriction (CR), intraperitoneal injection of 45 mg/kg streptozotocin, 60% high-fructose (HF) diet, or 1% NaCl in drinking water to conduct CR, diabetes, HF, or high-salt models, respectively. All four models induced programmed hypertension in adult male offspring. We observed 16 shared genes in a two-week-old kidney among four different models. The identified differential expressed genes (DEGs) that are related to the regulation of blood pressure included Adrb3, Alb, Apoe, Calca, Kng1, Adm2, Guca2b, Hba2, Hba-a2, and Ppara. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathway and glutathione metabolism pathway were shared by the CR, diabetes, and HF models. Conclusively, a variety of maternal nutritional insults induced the same phenotype-programmed hypertension with differential alterations of renal transcriptome in adult male offspring. The roles of DEGs identified by the NGS in this study deserve further clarification to develop ideal maternal dietary interventions and thus spare the next generations from the burden of hypertension. PMID:26247937

  17. The performance of a two-stage SBR system in treating dye containing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Won, X H; Fu, L Y; Oian, Y

    2003-01-01

    A two-stage SBR system treating the wastewater containing copper-phthalocyanin dye-Reactive Turquoise Blue KN-G (C. I. Reactive Blue 21, denoted by RTB) was investigated during a 200-cycle operation. The performance of the system, including pollutant removal rates, operating stability and sludge characteristics, may be a concern in the long-term run. The results shows that the system removed RTB efficiently despite the step-up RTB concentration from 13.1 to 107 mg/L in the influent. The average total removal rates of RTB were 81% to 92.5% due to the contribution of both anaerobic and aerobic stages, while stable effluent was produced with the help of the aerobic stage. The sludge in each reactor was in the steady state and of good activity on RTB removal. Moreover, the anaerobic sludge with the SVI value of 109.1 and the aerobic sludge with the SVI value of 103.2 had good settling properties, which was verified by hardly any presence of suspended solids in the effluent and an observation under an electron-scanning microscope. The adsorption and biodegradation were considered as the mechanism for the stability of the SBR system during the long-term run.

  18. Use of high-boiling point organic solvents for pulping oil palm empty fruit bunches.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; Serrano, Luis; Moral, Ana; Pérez, Antonio; Jiménez, Luis

    2008-04-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunches were used as an alternative raw material to obtain cellulosic pulp. Pulping was done by using high-boiling point organic solvents of decreased polluting power relative to classical (Kraft, sulphite) solvents but affording operation at similar pressure levels. The holocellulose, alpha-cellulose and lignin contents of oil palm empty fruit bunches (viz. 66.97%, 47.91% and 24.45%, respectively) are similar to those of some woody raw materials such as pine and eucalyptus, and various non-wood materials including olive tree prunings, wheat straw and sunflower stalks. Pulping tests were conducted by using ethyleneglycol, diethyleneglycol, ethanolamine and diethanolamine under two different sets of operating conditions, namely: (a) a 70% solvent concentration, 170 degrees C and 90 min; and (b) 80% solvent, 180 degrees C and 150 min. The solid/liquid ratio was six in both cases. The amine solvents were found to provide pulp with better properties than did the glycol solvents. Ethanolamine pulp exhibited the best viscosity and drainage index (viz. 636 mL/g and 17 degrees SR, respectively), and paper made from it the best breaking length (1709 m), stretch (1.95%), burst index (0.98 kN/g) and tear index (0.33 mNm(2)/g). Operating costs can be reduced by using milder conditions, which provide similar results. In any case, the amines are to be preferred to the glycols as solvents for this purpose.

  19. The Extreme Anterior Domain Is an Essential Craniofacial Organizer Acting through Kinin-Kallikrein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jacox, Laura; Sindelka, Radek; Chen, Justin; Rothman, Alyssa; Dickinson, Amanda; Sive, Hazel

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The extreme anterior domain (EAD) is a conserved embryonic region that includes the presumptive mouth. We show that the Kinin-Kallikrein pathway is active in the EAD and necessary for craniofacial development in Xenopus and zebrafish. The mouth failed to form and neural crest (NC) development and migration was abnormal after loss of function (LOF) in the pathway genes kng, encoding Bradykinin (xBdk), carboxypeptidase-N (cpn) that cleaves Bradykinin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Consistent with a role for nitric oxide (NO) in face formation, endogenous NO levels declined after LOF in pathway genes but these were restored and a normal face formed after medial implantation of xBdk-beads into LOF embryos. Facial transplants demonstrated that Cpn function from within the EAD is necessary for migration of first arch cranial NC into the face and to promote mouth opening. The study identifies the EAD as an essential craniofacial organizer acting through Kinin-Kallikrein signaling. PMID:25043181

  20. Identification of biomarkers for periodontal disease using the immunoproteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Kerishnan, Jesinda P.; Mohammad, Sani; Alias, Muhamad Shaifunizam; Mu, Alan Kang-Wai; Vaithilingam, Rathna Devi; Baharuddin, Nor Adinar; Safii, Syarida H.; Abdul Rahman, Zainal Ariff; Chen, Yu Nieng

    2016-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is one of the most common oral diseases associated with the host’s immune response against periodontopathogenic infection. Failure to accurately diagnose the stage of periodontitis has limited the ability to predict disease status. Therefore, we aimed to look for reliable diagnostic markers for detection or differentiation of early stage periodontitis using the immunoprotemic approach. Method In the present study, patient serum samples from four distinct stages of periodontitis (i.e., mild chronic, moderate chronic, severe chronic, and aggressive) and healthy controls were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), followed by silver staining. Notably, we consistently identified 14 protein clusters in the sera of patients and normal controls. Results Overall, we found that protein levels were comparable between patients and controls, with the exception of the clusters corresponding to A1AT, HP, IGKC and KNG1 (p < 0.05). In addition, the immunogenicity of these proteins was analysed via immunoblotting, which revealed differential profiles for periodontal disease and controls. For this reason, IgM obtained from severe chronic periodontitis (CP) sera could be employed as a suitable autoantibody for the detection of periodontitis. Discussion Taken together, the present study suggests that differentially expressed host immune response proteins could be used as potential biomarkers for screening periodontitis. Future studies exploring the diagnostic potential of such factors are warranted.

  1. Temperature sensitivity (Q10), and dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition in permafrost soils with different carbon quality and under experimental warming. R. Bracho1, E.A.G Schuur1, E. Pegoraro1, K.G. Crummer1, S. Natali2, J. Zhou, Y Luo3, J. L. Wu3, M. Tiedje4, K. Konstantinidis5 1Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. 2Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, MA. 3Institute for Environmental Genomics and Department of Botany and Microbiology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 4Center for Microbial Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; 5Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Genomics and School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracho, R. G.; Schuur, E. A.; Pegoraro, E.; Crummer, K. G.; Natali, S.; Zhou, J.; Wu, L.; Luo, Y.; Tiedje, J. M.; Konstantinidis, K.

    2013-12-01

    Permafrost soils contain approximately1700 Pg of carbon (C), twice the amount of C in the atmosphere. Temperatures in higher latitudes are increasing, inducing permafrost thaw and subsequent microbial decomposition of previously frozen C. This process is one of the most likely positive feedbacks to climate change. Understanding the temperature sensitivity (Q10) and dynamics of SOM decomposition under warming is essential to predict the future state of the earth - climate system. Alaskan tundra soils were exposed to two winter warming (WW) seasons in the field, which warmed the soils by 4°C to 40 cm depth. Soils were obtained from three depths (0 - 15, 15 - 25 and 45 - 55 cm) and differed in initial amounts of labile and recalcitrant C. Soils were incubated in the lab under aerobic conditions, at 15 and 25°C over 365 days. Q10 was estimated at 14, 100 & 280 days of incubation (DOI); C fluxes were measured periodically and dynamics of SOM decomposition (C pool sizes and decay rates) were estimated by fitting a two pool C model to cumulative respired C (Ccum, mgC/ginitialC). After two WW seasons, initial C content tended to decrease through the soil profile and C:N ratio was significantly decreased in the top 15 cm. After one year of incubation, Ccum was twice as high at 25°C as at 15°C and significantly decreased with depth. No significant WW field treatment was detected, although Ccum tended to be lower in warmed soils. Labile C accounted for up to 5% of initial soil C content in the top 15 cm and decreased with depth. Soils exposed to WW had smaller labile C pools, and higher labile C decay rates in the top 25 cm. Q10 significantly decreased with time and depth as labile pool decreased, especially for WW. This decrease with time indicates a lower temperature sensitivity of the most recalcitrant C pool. The deepest WW soil layer, where warming was more pronounced, had significantly lower Q10 compared to control soils at the same depth. After two seasons, the warming treatment affected decomposition by reducing labile C pools and increasing its decay rates. Warming also reduced temperature sensitivity, showing acclimation of the most recalcitrant C pool in the tundra ecosystem.

  2. Terpenoids as major precursors of dissolved organic matter in landfill leachates, surface water, and groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Nanny, M.A.; McIntyre, C.

    2003-01-01

    13C NMR analyses of hydrophobic dissolved organic matter (DOM) fractions isolated from a landfill leachate contaminated groundwater near Norman, OK; the Colorado River aqueduct near Los Angeles, CA; Anaheim Lake, an infiltration basin for the Santa Ana River in Orange County, CA; and groundwater from the Tomago Sand Beds, near Sydney, Australia, found branched methyl groups and quaternary aliphatic carbon structures that are indicative of terpenoid hydrocarbon precursors. Significant amounts of lignin precursors, commonly postulated to be the major source of DOM, were found only in trace quantities by thermochemolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the Norman Landfill and Tomago Sand Bed hydrophobic DOM fractions. Electrospray/tandem mass spectrometry of the Tomago Sand Bed hydrophobic acid DOM found an ion series differing by 14 daltons, which is indicative of aliphatic and aryl-aliphatic polycarboxylic acids. The product obtained from ozonation of the resin acid, abietic acid, gave a similar ion series. Terpenoid precursors of DOM are postulated to be derived from resin acid paper sizing agents in the Norman Landfill, algal and bacterial terpenoids in the Colorado River and Anaheim Lake, and terrestrial plant terpenoids in the Tomago Sand Beds.

  3. Bedrock cores from 89° North: Implications for the geologic framework and Neogene paleoceanography of Lomonosov Ridge and a tie to the Barents shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grantz, Arthur; Pease, Victoria L.; Willard, Debra A.; Phillips, R.L.; Clark, David L.

    2001-01-01

    Two piston cores from the Eurasian flank of Lomonosov Ridge near lat 88.9°N, long 140°E provide the first samples of bedrock from this high-standing trans-Arctic ridge. Core 94-PC27 sampled nonmarine siltstone similar in facies and age to uppermost Triassic to lower Lower Jurassic and mid– Lower Cretaceous beds in the 4 to > 5 km Mesozoic section on Franz Josef Land, on the outer Barents shelf. A ca. 250 Ma peak in the cumulative frequency curve of detrital zircons from the siltstone, dated by U- Th-Pb analysis, suggests a source in the post-tectonic syenites of northern Taymyr and nearby islands in the Kara Sea. Textural trends reported in the literature indicate that the Lower Jurassic nonmarine strata of Franz Josef Land coarsen to the southeast; this suggests the existence of a sedimentary system in which detrital zircons could be transported from the northern Taymyr Peninsula to the outer Barents shelf near the position of core 94-PC27 prior to opening of the Eurasia Basin. Correlation of the coaly siltstone in core 94-PC27 with part of the Mesozoic section on Franz Josef Land is compatible with the strong evidence from seafloor magnetic anomalies and bathymetry that Lomonosov Ridge is a continental fragment rifted from the Barents shelf during the Cenozoic. It also suggests that Lomonosov Ridge near the North Pole is underlain by a substantial section of unmetamorphosed Mesozoic marine and nonmarine sedimentary strata. Core 94-PC29 sampled cyclical deposits containing ice-rafted debris (IRD) overlying weakly consolidated laminated olive-black anoxic Neogene siltstone and mudstone with an average total organic carbon (TOC) of 4.1 wt%. The high TOC content of the mudstone indicates that during the Neogene, prior to the introduction of IRD into the Arctic seas about 3.3 Ma (early late Pliocene), the shallow waters of the central Arctic Ocean supported significant primary photosynthetic organic production near the North Pole. These deposits also contain fine

  4. Replication and Pedagogy in the History of Psychology II: Fowler & Wells's Phrenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevino, Kelly M.; Konrad, Krista K.

    2008-05-01

    Phrenologists believed that specific brain regions corresponded to certain character traits. In addition, the size of each brain region was believed to determine the strength of the respective trait. Phrenology originated in Austria with Franz Josef Gall and was popularized and commercialized in America at the end of the 19th century by Orson Squire Fowler. In this project, we conducted a replication of Fowler’s phrenology in order to better understand the specificity of the manualized methodology, the extent to which the methodology allowed for positive versus negative analyses, and the implications for the scientific rejection and public acceptance of phrenology. The results of our replication revealed that the subjective judgments and biases of the examiner strongly influence the results of phrenological analyses.

  5. Experimental power density distribution benchmark in the TRIGA Mark II reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Snoj, L.; Stancar, Z.; Radulovic, V.; Podvratnik, M.; Zerovnik, G.; Trkov, A.; Barbot, L.; Domergue, C.; Destouches, C.

    2012-07-01

    In order to improve the power calibration process and to benchmark the existing computational model of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Josef Stefan Inst. (JSI), a bilateral project was started as part of the agreement between the French Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives (CEA) and the Ministry of higher education, science and technology of Slovenia. One of the objectives of the project was to analyze and improve the power calibration process of the JSI TRIGA reactor (procedural improvement and uncertainty reduction) by using absolutely calibrated CEA fission chambers (FCs). This is one of the few available power density distribution benchmarks for testing not only the fission rate distribution but also the absolute values of the fission rates. Our preliminary calculations indicate that the total experimental uncertainty of the measured reaction rate is sufficiently low that the experiments could be considered as benchmark experiments. (authors)

  6. Ganzheitliche Produktionssysteme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korge, Axel; Lentes, Hans-Peter; Wengler, Michael; Hartmann, Thorsten; Röhrle, Josef; Kammüller, Mathias

    Erfolgreiche Unternehmer machen es vor: Mit einem Ganzheitlichen Produktionssystem (GPS) haben sie ihre Produktivität mehr als verdoppelt, die Durchlaufzeit bei verbesserter Termintreue halbiert und die Fehlerquote in den Promille-Bereich gedrückt [1]. Der Ansatz ist: Innovative Organisationsmethoden, die sich als Best-practice-Lösungen bewährt haben, werden zu einem in sich abgestimmten Gesamtsystem konfiguriert. Durch eine geeignete Auswahl und die gezielte Abstimmung geeigneter Methoden aufeinander können die drei Erfolgsfaktoren Qualität, Zeit und Kosten gleichzeitig erfüllt werden. Ein Ganzheitliches Produktionssystem versetzt die Produktionsmitarbeiter und Führungskräfte in die Lage, bessere Leistungsergebnisse mit weniger Stress zu erbringen. "Das ist nicht wirklich schwierig“, betont Josef Röhrle, der Werkleiter von Siemens Erlangen, Preisträger der Besten Fabrik 2004 und 2006, "denn alle Methoden sind bekannt und beschrieben.“

  7. Surface Spreading and Immunostaining of Yeast Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grubb, Jennifer; Brown, M Scott; Bishop, Douglas K

    2015-01-01

    The small size of nuclei of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae limits the utility of light microscopy for analysis of the subnuclear distribution of chromatin-bound proteins. Surface spreading of yeast nuclei results in expansion of chromatin without loss of bound proteins. A method for surface spreading balances fixation of DNA bound proteins with detergent treatment. The method demonstrated is slightly modified from that described by Josef Loidl and Franz Klein. The method has been used to characterize the localization of many chromatin-bound proteins at various stages of the mitotic cell cycle, but is especially useful for the study of meiotic chromosome structures such as meiotic recombinosomes and the synaptonemal complex. We also describe a modification that does not require use of Lipsol, a proprietary detergent, which was called for in the original procedure, but no longer commercially available. An immunostaining protocol that is compatible with the chromosome spreading method is also described. PMID:26325523

  8. The blood from Auschwitz and the silence of the scholars.

    PubMed

    Müller-Hill, B

    1999-01-01

    The Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Genetics and Eugenics in Berlin-Dahlem was the centre of scientific racism in Nazi Germany. Its bad history culminated in a research project to analyse the molecular basis of racial differences in the susceptibility to various infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. Josef Mengele, a former postdoc of the director of the institute, Otmar von Verschuer, collected blood samples and other material in Auschwitz from families and twins of Jews and Gypsies. The blood samples were analysed by Günther Hillmann in the Berlin laboratory of Nobel Prize winner Adolf Butenandt. Butenandt had just moved to Tübingen. The project was paid for by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. Butenandt, Hillmann and von Verschuer made scientific careers in the Federal Republic. To the present day this past has not been acknowledged by the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft as part of its history.

  9. High levels of contaminants in ivory gull Pagophila eburnea eggs from the Russian and Norwegian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Miljeteig, Cecilie; Strøm, Hallvard; Gavrilo, Maria V; Volkov, Andrey; Jenssen, Bjørn M; Gabrielsen, Geir W

    2009-07-15

    We found high levels of contaminants, in particular organochlorines, in eggs of the ivory gull Pagophila eburnea, a high Arctic seabird species threatened by climate change and contaminants. An 80% decline in the ivory gull breeding population in the Canadian Arctic the last two decades has been documented. Because of the dependence of the ivory gull on sea ice and its high trophic position, suggested environmental threats are climate change and contaminants. The present study investigated contaminant levels (organochlorines, brominated flame retardants, perfluorinated alkyl substances, and mercury) in ivory gull eggs from four colonies in the Norwegian (Svalbard) and Russian Arctic (Franz Josef Land and Severnaya Zemlya). The contaminant levels presented here are among the highest reported in Arctic seabird species, and we identify this as an important stressor in a species already at risk due to environmental change.

  10. New zonal and infrazonal scales for the Kimmeridgian in Westarn Siberia based on cardioceratid ammonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogov, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    It is proposed to use a Boreal scale based on the succession of cardioceratids (with the Bauhini, Kitchini, Sokolovi, and Decipiens zones) for the subdivision of the Kimmeridgian of Western Siberia instead of the aulacospephanid-based Subpolar Urals scale which was traditionally used in this region. It is shown that the use of the Boreal scale allows a finer subdivision and correlation of the Kimmeridgian of Western Siberia. A complete succession of zones and subzones based on cardioceratids and several biohorizons previously established in western Arctic are confirmed. The infrazonal Kimmeridgian scale of Western Siberia is correlated with the scales of Franz Josef Land, Spitsbergen, and northern Central Siberia. The diagnosis and ranges of Plasmatites zieteni (Rouill.), characteristic of the basal part of the Kimmeridgian (zieteni biohorizon), are given. The new species Amoeboceras (?) klimovae Rogov, sp. nov. and Amoebites peregrinator Rogov, sp. nov. (index species of the biohorizons recognized by the present author) are described.

  11. Parent-child incest that extends into adulthood: a survey of international press reports, 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Although the subject of ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood has never been addressed in a systematic way in the professional literature, accounts of such cases have been appearing for many years. The Josef Fritzl case added a new impetus to reporting such abuses in the popular press. The current study presents 44 such cases from 24 countries that appeared in English-language press accounts over 5 years commencing January 2007. These cases are discussed in light of the minimal coverage of such issues in the professional literature. The results of this study suggest that cases of enduring incest are not rare and typically incorporate decades of sexual abuse, frequently result in pregnancies, and commonly incorporate ongoing violence and death threats. PMID:23406223

  12. Parent-child incest that extends into adulthood: a survey of international press reports, 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Although the subject of ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood has never been addressed in a systematic way in the professional literature, accounts of such cases have been appearing for many years. The Josef Fritzl case added a new impetus to reporting such abuses in the popular press. The current study presents 44 such cases from 24 countries that appeared in English-language press accounts over 5 years commencing January 2007. These cases are discussed in light of the minimal coverage of such issues in the professional literature. The results of this study suggest that cases of enduring incest are not rare and typically incorporate decades of sexual abuse, frequently result in pregnancies, and commonly incorporate ongoing violence and death threats.

  13. Plyler Prize and APS Fellow Introductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathanson, Gilbert

    2014-03-01

    The Division of Chemical Physics is delighted to announce the 2013 APS Fellows sponsored by DCP and to honor the 2014 Earl K. Plyler Prize Award winner. The new APS Fellows are: Ilan Benjamin, Hua Guo, Manos Mavrikakis, Josef Paldus, Joern Siepmann, Hans-Peter Steinrueck, Douglas Tobias, Angela Wilson, and Yijing Yan. The citations for each awardee will be read out loud. I will also introduce Prof. Lai-Sheng Wang of the Department of Chemistry at Brown University, who was awarded the 2014 Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics. Please come learn about these extraordinary scientists during this prize session. Prof. Wang's Plyler Prize talk will follow immediately after this introduction. For more information, see http://www.aps.org/units/dcp/.

  14. Glacial erosion processes need improved understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Saettem, J. )

    1992-06-22

    This paper reports that more than 10 years of oil and gas exploration in the Norwegian and Russian Barents Sea has resulted in few and moderate finds, mainly restricted to the Hammerfest basin. Major gas discoveries are reported off Russia. The Barents Sea off the two countries covers about 1.2 million sq km. Including the arctic Svalbard and Franz Josef archipelagoes, this area is comparable in size to the entire Gulf of Mexico or the U.S. east of the Mississippi River. Snohvit gas field is estimated by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate to contain 76 billion cu m of gas plus a thin oil zone. Many wells have revealed that Barents Sea structures have earlier been filled to a greater extent but the oil has leaked out.

  15. [Franz Coelestin Ritter von Schneider-Vienna's first medical chemist and teacher of the first Austrian hygienists. The 200th anniversary of his birthday].

    PubMed

    Flamm, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Franz Schneider (13.09.1812-29.11.1897) in 1850 was appointed the first lecturer on "Chemistry for physicians" by the Viennese university. Two years later he accepted the professorship in the military medical schools in the "Josephinum" from where he shifted to the philosophical faculty as professor of "Common and medical chemistry". Soon after this start in 1870 he became unable to continue his work because of an explosion during experiments. Thus in 1876 the emperor called Schneider to the Austrian public health administration as director. In the following twelve years he achieved great successes in his duties. As a scientist he had worked on various topics of organic and inorganic chemistry. But beyond that Schneider succeeded in imparting to his assistants the modality of scientific work and the way of hygienic thinking. Thus his scholars Josef Nowak, Florian Kratschmer and Max Gruber were well prepared to become Austria's first university hygienists. PMID:23188463

  16. The tripartite origins of the tonic neck reflex: Gesell, Gerstmann, and Magnus.

    PubMed

    Shevell, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The standard neurologic examination of the newborn and infant includes the elicitation of the tonic neck reflex. Normally present, its persistence is suggestive of neurologic dysfunction and a prognostic marker highly suggestive of an adverse outcome. Working in different fields, with different approaches and largely independently, three leaders of early 20th century neurosciences (Rudolf Magnus, Josef Gerstmann, and Arnold Gesell) elaborated different aspects of this primitive reflex. Magnus provided the first description in an animal model utilizing a meticulously prepared decerebrate cat correctly identifying the reflex's reliance on proprioceptors in the neck and processing in the upper cervical segment. Gerstmann first described its occurrence in the setting of neurologic disease, providing a meticulous written description in an early description of the index case of what would later be eponymously designated Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome. Gesell initially described the reflex's fundamental occurrence in normal young infants, highlighting its adaptive role in early development and its persistence as a hallmark of neurologic pathology.

  17. Ilya Mark Scheinker: Controversial Neuroscientist and Refugee From National Socialist Europe.

    PubMed

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Ziller, Matthias Georg; Shevell, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Russian-born, Vienna-trained neurologist and neuropathologist Ilya Mark Scheinker collaborated with Josef Gerstmann and Ernst Sträussler in 1936 to describe the familial prion disorder now known as Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease. Because of Nazi persecution following the annexation of Austria by Nazi Germany, Scheinker fled from Vienna to Paris, then after the German invasion of France, to New York. With the help of neurologist Tracy Putnam, Scheinker ended up at the University of Cincinnati, although his position was never guaranteed. He more than doubled his prior publications in America, and authored three landmark neuropathology textbooks. Despite his publications, he was denied tenure and had difficulty professionally in the Midwest because of prejudice against his European mannerisms. He moved back to New York for personal reasons in 1952, dying prematurely just 2 years later. Scheinker was twice uprooted, but persevered and eventually found some success as a refugee. PMID:26891202

  18. [Czech eponyms in pathology].

    PubMed

    Steiner, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    The 24th European Congress of Pathology taking place in Prague is an opportunity to remind our society of the Czech names appearing as eponyms in pathological terminology: Karel Rokitanský - R. protuberance in dermoid cyst; R. thrombogenic theory of atherosclerosis; Mayer - R. - Küster - Hauser - Winckel syndrome (congenital malformation of the vagina and uterus); Václav Treitz - T. duodenal ligament; T. retroperitoneal hernia; T. uremic colitis; Vilém Dušan Lambl - L. excrescences of heart valves; Lamblia (Giardia) intestinalis, and also the foundation of urological cytology; Stanislav Provázek - Prowazek - Halberstädter bodies (trachoma), Rickettsia Prowazeki (typhus fever); Josef Vaněk - V. tumor (gastric inflammatory fibroid polyp), and also discovery of the etiology of pneumocystic pneumonia; Otto Jírovec - Pneumocystis Jiroveci; Blahoslav Bednář - B. tumor (pigmented dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans).

  19. Shostakovich versus the Central Committee: the power of music.

    PubMed

    White, Richard H R

    2008-08-01

    The centenary of Shostakovich's birth, celebrated in 2006, generated considerable interest in his life and music. During the Cold War his music was rarely played in the West, and it was not until after his death in 1975 that it re-emerged. The publication of his memoirs in the UK, in 1979, gave new insights into his life in Soviet Russia. Music, like art and literature, has the power to shock and can reflect anger and frustration at contemporary social issues. Much debate has focused on whether Shostakovich was a victim or mouthpiece of Communism. In order to fully appreciate his music, it is essential to understand his personal and professional life under Josef Stalin--in particular his public humiliation by the Central Committee, and by professional musicians who were Communist Party members. PMID:18724608

  20. Surface Spreading and Immunostaining of Yeast Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Jennifer; Brown, M. Scott; Bishop, Douglas K.

    2015-01-01

    The small size of nuclei of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae limits the utility of light microscopy for analysis of the subnuclear distribution of chromatin-bound proteins. Surface spreading of yeast nuclei results in expansion of chromatin without loss of bound proteins. A method for surface spreading balances fixation of DNA bound proteins with detergent treatment. The method demonstrated is slightly modified from that described by Josef Loidl and Franz Klein1,2. The method has been used to characterize the localization of many chromatin-bound proteins at various stages of the mitotic cell cycle, but is especially useful for the study of meiotic chromosome structures such as meiotic recombinosomes and the synaptonemal complex. We also describe a modification that does not require use of Lipsol, a proprietary detergent, which was called for in the original procedure, but no longer commercially available. An immunostaining protocol that is compatible with the chromosome spreading method is also described. PMID:26325523

  1. [A comparative analysis of the helminth fauna of kittiwake Rissa tridactyla (Linnaeus, 1758) and glaucous gull Larus hyperboreus Gunnerus, 1767 from different parts of the Barents Sea].

    PubMed

    Kuklin, V V; Galaktionov, K V; Galkin, A K; Marasaev, S F

    2005-01-01

    The article is based on the results of helminthological observations made on kittiwake Rissa tridactyla and glaucous gull Larus hyperboreus in 1991-2001 in different areas of the Barents Sea (Eastern Murman coast, Franz Josef Land, Novaya Zemlya, Spitzbergen). 18 helminth species (2 trematodes, 11 cestodes, 4 nematodes, and 2 acanthocephalans) were recorded in the kittiwakes and 19 (3 trematodes, 9 cestodes, 5 nematodes and 2 acanthocephalans) species were recorded in the glaucous gulls. Trematodes were absent in the birds collected at the Franz Josef Land and the northern island of Novaya Zemlya. 3 trematode species, namely Gymnophallus sp. (somateria?), Microphallus sp. 1 (M. pseudopygmaeus), and Cryptocotyle lingua were found in the glaucous gulls of western Spitzbergen. It was supposed that the life cycles of these parasites can be completed there. On the other hand, coastal ecosystems of Arctic archipelagoes turn out to be favourable for the transmission of some cestodes. This is closely connected with the regional traits in the marine bird diet, namely the increase of the amphipod (intermediate hosts of hymenolepidids and some dilepidids) and polar cod (supposed second intermediate host for some tetrabothriids) portion in Arctic. As a result, cestodes are the base of the helminth fauna of kittiwakes and glaucous gulls of the Barents Sea, by their species richness, prevalence and abundance. Nematodes and acanthocephalans were represented by a few species with low infection intensity. The main ecological factors affected the regional difference in the species richness and abundance of the helminths parasitising kittiwakes and glaucous gulls in the Barents Sea are proposed. Those are regional climatic features and regional traits in the behaviour and food priorities of birds, and also the distribution of the helminths intermediate hosts, invertebrates and fishes. The phenomenon of host specificity lowering with respect to the definitive host was recorded in some

  2. Continental Flood Basalts of Bennett Island, East Siberian Sea: High Arctic Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegner, Christian; Pease, Victoria

    2014-05-01

    Volcanism provides a means of tracing mantle melting events and crustal evolution. The High Arctic includes a rich portfolio of volcanic rocks outcropping in the Circum-Arctic borderlands and imaged geophysically beneath the Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge that have been lumped together as a High-Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). However, the ages (c. 440-60 Ma) and compositions (tholeiitic-alkaline-calc-alkaline) reported varies considerably and geological correlations remain elusive. One of the possible correlative events is the formation of continental flood basalts and sills in the Canadian Arctic Islands, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land and Bennett Island. These flood basalts have previously been linked to mantle plume melting and may represent a short-lived LIP event at c. 124-122 Ma. We present new data for a 350 m thick continental flood basalt succession at Bennett Island examined during fieldwork in Septemer 2013 on a joint Russian (VSEGEI) - Swedish (SWEDARCTIC) expedition to the De Long Archipelago. This volcanic succession is composed of 20 near-horisontal, undeformed flow units overlying a thin sedimentary succession of Cretaceous age (?) including coal seams and possibly volcaniclastic material that, in turn, unconformably overlies a more steeply dipping succession of Cambrian and Ordovician sediments. The flows are thinnest (c. 2-10 m) and aphyric to very-sparsely olivine-phyric in the lower portion. In contrast, the flows in the upper portion are thicker (>20 m) and aphyric to sparsely plagioclase-phyric. We will discuss new petrographic and compositional data for the Bennett Island flood basalts, possibly including new U-Pb age data. The aim is to evaluate their petrogenesis, to discuss their possible correlation to the flood basalt and sill successions of the Canadian Arctic Islands, Svalbard and Franz Josef Land and evaluate the geodynamic evolution of the High Arctic.

  3. [A comparative analysis of the helminth fauna of kittiwake Rissa tridactyla (Linnaeus, 1758) and glaucous gull Larus hyperboreus Gunnerus, 1767 from different parts of the Barents Sea].

    PubMed

    Kuklin, V V; Galaktionov, K V; Galkin, A K; Marasaev, S F

    2005-01-01

    The article is based on the results of helminthological observations made on kittiwake Rissa tridactyla and glaucous gull Larus hyperboreus in 1991-2001 in different areas of the Barents Sea (Eastern Murman coast, Franz Josef Land, Novaya Zemlya, Spitzbergen). 18 helminth species (2 trematodes, 11 cestodes, 4 nematodes, and 2 acanthocephalans) were recorded in the kittiwakes and 19 (3 trematodes, 9 cestodes, 5 nematodes and 2 acanthocephalans) species were recorded in the glaucous gulls. Trematodes were absent in the birds collected at the Franz Josef Land and the northern island of Novaya Zemlya. 3 trematode species, namely Gymnophallus sp. (somateria?), Microphallus sp. 1 (M. pseudopygmaeus), and Cryptocotyle lingua were found in the glaucous gulls of western Spitzbergen. It was supposed that the life cycles of these parasites can be completed there. On the other hand, coastal ecosystems of Arctic archipelagoes turn out to be favourable for the transmission of some cestodes. This is closely connected with the regional traits in the marine bird diet, namely the increase of the amphipod (intermediate hosts of hymenolepidids and some dilepidids) and polar cod (supposed second intermediate host for some tetrabothriids) portion in Arctic. As a result, cestodes are the base of the helminth fauna of kittiwakes and glaucous gulls of the Barents Sea, by their species richness, prevalence and abundance. Nematodes and acanthocephalans were represented by a few species with low infection intensity. The main ecological factors affected the regional difference in the species richness and abundance of the helminths parasitising kittiwakes and glaucous gulls in the Barents Sea are proposed. Those are regional climatic features and regional traits in the behaviour and food priorities of birds, and also the distribution of the helminths intermediate hosts, invertebrates and fishes. The phenomenon of host specificity lowering with respect to the definitive host was recorded in some

  4. Implying Analytic Measures for Unravelling Rheumatoid Arthritis Significant Proteins Through Drug-Target Interaction.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sachidanand; Vennila, J Jannet; Snijesh, V P; George, Gincy; Sunny, Chinnu

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune and inflammatory disease that mainly alters the synovial joints and ultimately leads to their destruction. The involvement of the immune system and its related cells is a basic trademark of autoimmune-associated diseases. The present work focuses on network analysis and its functional characterization to predict novel targets for RA. The interactive model called as rheumatoid arthritis drug-target-protein (RA-DTP) is built of 1727 nodes and 7954 edges followed the power-law distribution. RA-DTP comprised of 20 islands, 55 modules and 123 submodules. Good interactome coverage of target-protein was detected in island 2 (Q-Score 0.875) which includes 673 molecules with 20 modules and 68 submodules. The biological landscape of these modules was examined based on the participation molecules in specific cellular localization, molecular function and biological pathway with favourable p value. Functional characterization and pathway analysis through KEGG, Biocarta and Reactome also showed their involvement in relation to the immune system and inflammatory processes and biological processes such as cell signalling and communication, glucosamine metabolic process, renin-angiotensin system, BCR signals, galactose metabolism, MAPK signalling, complement and coagulation system and NGF signalling pathways. Traffic values and centrality parameters were applied as the selection criteria for identifying potential targets from the important hubs which resulted into FOS, KNG1, PTGDS, HSP90AA1, REN, POMC, FCER1G, IL6, ICAM1, SGK1, NOS3 and PLA2G4A. This approach provides an insight into experimental validation of these associations of potential targets for clinical value to find their effect on animal studies. PMID:26286007

  5. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of the antitumor effect of TM208 and EGFR-TKI resistance in human breast cancer xenograft mice

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xi-wei; Ji, Shuang-min; Li, Run-tao; Wu, Ke-hua; Zhu, Xiao; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-yan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The novel anticancer compound TM208 is an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI). Since the development of resistance to EGFR-TKIs is a major challenge in their clinical usage, we investigated the profiles of resistance following continuous treatment with TM208 in human breast cancer xenograft mice, and identified the relationship between the tumor pEGFR levels and tumor growth inhibition. Methods: Female BALB/c nude mice were implanted with human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and the xenograft mice received TM208 (50 or 150 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or vehicle for 18 d. The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of TM208 were evaluated. Results: The PK properties of TM208 were described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption kinetics. Our study showed the inhibitory effects of TM208 on tumor pEGFR levels gradually reached a maximum effect, after which it became weaker over time, which was characterized by a combined tolerance/indirect response PD model with an estimated EC50 (55.9 μg/L), as well as three parameters ('a' of 27.2%, 'b' of 2730%, 'c' of 0.58 h−1) denoting the maximum, extent and rate of resistance, respectively. The relationship between the tumor pEGFR levels and tumor growth inhibition was characterized by a combined logistic tumor growth/transit compartment model with estimated parameters associated with tumor growth characteristics kng (0.282 day−1), drug potency kTM208 (0.0499 cm3/day) and the kinetics of tumor cell death k1 (0.141 day−1), which provided insight into drug mechanisms and behaviors. Conclusion: The proposed PK/PD model provides a better understanding of the pharmacological properties of TM208 in the treatment of breast cancer. Furthermore, simulation based on a tolerance model allows prediction of the occurrence of resistance. PMID:27133303

  6. Gene-centric approach identifies new and known loci for FVIII activity and VWF antigen levels in European Americans and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weihong; Cushman, Mary; Green, David; Rich, Stephen S; Lange, Leslie A; Yang, Qiong; Tracy, Russell P; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Basu, Saonli; Wilson, James G; Keating, Brendan J; Weng, Lu-Chen; Taylor, Herman A; Jacobs, David R; Delaney, Joseph A; Palmer, Cameron D; Young, Taylor; Pankow, James S; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Smith, Nicholas L; Reiner, Alexander P; Folsom, Aaron R

    2015-06-01

    Coagulation factor VIII and von Willebrand factor (VWF) are key proteins in procoagulant activation. Higher FVIII coagulant activity (FVIII :C) and VWF antigen (VWF :Ag) are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and venous thromboembolism. Beyond associations with ABO blood group, genetic determinants of FVIII and VWF are not well understood, especially in non European-American populations. We performed a genetic association study of FVIII :C and VWF:Ag that assessed 50,000 gene-centric single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18,556 European Americans (EAs) and 5,047 African Americans (AAs) from five population-based cohorts. Previously unreported associations for FVIII :C were identified in both AAs and EAs with KNG1 (most significantly associated SNP rs710446, Ile581Thr, Ile581Thr, P = 5.10 × 10(-7) in EAs and P = 3.88 × 10(-3) in AAs) and VWF rs7962217 (Gly2705Arg,P = 6.30 × 10(-9) in EAs and P = 2.98 × 10(-2) in AAs. Significant associations for FVIII :C were also observed with F8/TMLHE region SNP rs12557310 in EAs (P = 8.02 × 10(-10) ), with VWF rs1800380 in AAs (P = 5.62 × 10(-11) ), and with MAT1A rs2236568 in AAs (P51.69 × 10(-6) ). We replicated previously reported associations of FVIII :C and VWF :Ag with the ABO blood group, VWF rs1063856(Thr789Ala), rs216321 (Ala852Gln), and VWF rs2229446 (Arg2185Gln). Findings from this study expand our understanding of genetic influences for FVIII :C and VWF :Ag in both EAs and AAs.

  7. Cloning and Characterization of an Endoglucanase Gene from Actinomyces sp. Korean Native Goat 40.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Chan; Kang, Seung Ha; Choi, Eun Young; Hong, Yeon Hee; Bok, Jin Duck; Kim, Jae Yeong; Lee, Sang Suk; Choi, Yun Jaie; Choi, In Soon; Cho, Kwang Keun

    2016-01-01

    A gene from Actinomyces sp. Korean native goat (KNG) 40 that encodes an endo-β-1,4-glucanase, EG1, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) DH5α. Recombinant plasmid DNA from a positive clone with a 3.2 kb insert hydrolyzing carboxyl methyl-cellulose (CMC) was designated as pDS3. The entire nucleotide sequence was determined, and an open-reading frame (ORF) was deduced. The ORF encodes a polypeptide of 684 amino acids. The recombinant EG1 produced in E. coli DH5α harboring pDS3 was purified in one step using affinity chromatography on crystalline cellulose and characterized. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/zymogram analysis of the purified enzyme revealed two protein bands of 57.1 and 54.1 kDa. The amino terminal sequences of these two bands matched those of the deduced ones, starting from residue 166 and 208, respectively. Putative signal sequences, a Shine-Dalgarno-type ribosomal binding site, and promoter sequences related to the consensus sequences were deduced. EG1 has a typical tripartite structure of cellulase, a catalytic domain, a serine-rich linker region, and a cellulose-binding domain. The optimal temperature for the activity of the purified enzyme was 55°C, but it retained over 90% of maximum activity in a broad temperature range (40°C to 60°C). The optimal pH for the enzyme activity was 6.0. Kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax of rEG1 were 0.39% CMC and 143 U/mg, respectively. PMID:26732336

  8. Genome-Wide Meta-Analyses of Plasma Renin Activity and Concentration Reveal Association with the Kininogen 1 and Prekallikrein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, Wolfgang; Chen, Ming-Huei; Teumer, Alexander; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Lin, Honghuang; Fox, Ervin R.; Musani, Solomon K.; Wilson, James G.; Wang, Thomas J.; Völzke, Henry; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Meisinger, Christine; Nauck, Matthias; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Li, Yong; Menard, Jöel; Hercberg, Serge; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Völker, Uwe; Rawal, Rajesh; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Hannemann, Anke; Dörr, Marcus; Rettig, Rainer; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Bakker, Stephan J.L.; Navis, Gerjan; Wallaschofski, Henri; Meneton, Pierre; van der Harst, Pim; Reincke, Martin; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Consortium, CKDGen

    2015-01-01

    Background The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS) is critical for regulation of blood pressure and fluid balance and influences cardiovascular remodeling. Dysregulation of the RAAS contributes to cardiovascular and renal morbidity. The genetic architecture of circulating RAAS components is incompletely understood. Methods and Results We meta-analyzed genome-wide association data for plasma renin activity (n=5,275), plasma renin concentrations (n=8,014) and circulating aldosterone (n=13,289) from up to four population-based cohorts of European and European-American ancestry, and assessed replication of the top results in an independent sample (n=6,487). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two independent loci displayed associations with plasma renin activity atgenome-wide significance (p<5×10-8). A third locus was close to this threshold (rs4253311 in kallikrein B [KLKB1], p=5.5×10-8). Two of these loci replicated in an independent sample for both plasma renin and aldosterone concentrations (SNP rs5030062 in kininogen 1 [KNG1]: p=0.001 for plasma renin, p=0.024 for plasma aldosterone concentration; rs4253311 with p<0.001 for both plasma renin and aldosterone concentration). SNPs in the NEBL gene reached genome-wide significance for plasma renin concentration in the discovery sample (top SNP rs3915911, p= 8.81×10-9), but did not replicate (p=0.81). No locus reached genome-wide significance for aldosterone. SNPs rs5030062 and rs4253311 were not related to blood pressure or renal traits; in a companion study, variants in the kallikrein B locus were associated with B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations in African-Americans. Conclusions We identified two genetic loci (kininogen 1 and kallikrein B) influencing key components of the RAAS, consistent with the close interrelation between the kallikrein-kinin system and the RAAS. PMID:25477429

  9. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Regulates Seed Dormancy in Barley.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shingo; Pourkheirandish, Mohammad; Morishige, Hiromi; Kubo, Yuta; Nakamura, Masako; Ichimura, Kazuya; Seo, Shigemi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Ando, Tsuyu; Hensel, Goetz; Sameri, Mohammad; Stein, Nils; Sato, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yano, Masahiro; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-03-21

    Seed dormancy has fundamental importance in plant survival and crop production; however, the mechanisms regulating dormancy remain unclear [1-3]. Seed dormancy levels generally decrease during domestication to ensure that crops successfully germinate in the field. However, reduction of seed dormancy can cause devastating losses in cereals like wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) due to pre-harvest sprouting, the germination of mature seed (grain) on the mother plant when rain occurs before harvest. Understanding the mechanisms of dormancy can facilitate breeding of crop varieties with the appropriate levels of seed dormancy [4-8]. Barley is a model crop [9, 10] and has two major seed dormancy quantitative trait loci (QTLs), SD1 and SD2, on chromosome 5H [11-19]. We detected a QTL designated Qsd2-AK at SD2 as the single major determinant explaining the difference in seed dormancy between the dormant cultivar "Azumamugi" (Az) and the non-dormant cultivar "Kanto Nakate Gold" (KNG). Using map-based cloning, we identified the causal gene for Qsd2-AK as Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 (MKK3). The dormant Az allele of MKK3 is recessive; the N260T substitution in this allele decreases MKK3 kinase activity and appears to be causal for Qsd2-AK. The N260T substitution occurred in the immediate ancestor allele of the dormant allele, and the established dormant allele became prevalent in barley cultivars grown in East Asia, where the rainy season and harvest season often overlap. Our findings show fine-tuning of seed dormancy during domestication and provide key information for improving pre-harvest sprouting tolerance in barley and wheat. PMID:26948880

  10. Genome-wide pathway-based association study implicates complement system in the development of Kashin-Beck disease in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Wen, Yan; Guo, Xiong; Zhang, Yingang; Wang, Sen; Yang, Tielin; Shen, Hui; Chen, Xiangding; Tan, Lijun; Tian, Qing; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2015-02-01

    Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) is a chronic osteochondropathy. The pathogenesis of KBD remains unknown. To identify relevant biological pathways for KBD, we conducted a genome-wide pathway-based association study (GWPAS) following by replication analysis, totally using 2743 Chinese Han adults. A modified gene set enrichment algorithm was used to detect association between KBD and 963 biological pathways. Cartilage gene expression analysis and serum complement measurement were performed to evaluate the functional relevance of identified pathway with KBD. We found that the Complement and Coagulation Cascades (CACC) pathway was significantly associated with KBD (P value=3.09×10(-5), false-discovery rate=0.042). Within the CACC pathway, the most significant association was observed at rs1656966 (P value=1.97×10(-4)) of KNG1 gene. Further replication study observed that rs1656966 (P value=0.037) was significantly associated with KBD in an independent validation sample of 1026 subjects. Gene expression analysis observed that CFD (ratio=3.39±2.68), A2M (ratio=3.67±5.63), C5 (ratio=2.65±2.52) and CD46 (ratio=2.29±137) genes of the CACC pathway were up-regulated in KBD articular cartilage compared to healthy articular cartilage. The serum level of complement C5 in KBD patients were significantly higher than that in healthy controls (P value=0.038). Our study is the first to suggest that complement system-related CACC pathway contributed to the development of KBD.

  11. Exploitation of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin from Hesperaloe funifera.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, R; Rodríguez, A; García, J C; Rosal, A; Jiménez, L

    2011-01-01

    This work seeks the integral use of all major components of Hesperaloe funifera, separating hemicelluose by hydrothermal treatments; cellulose by pulping processes; and exploitation of lignin of pulping liquor by pyrolysis and gasification processes. By using sulfuric acid in the hydrothermal treatment (150-190 °C, 0-20 min after reaching operating temperature, 6-10 liquid/solid ratio, 0.1-0.5% sulfuric acid), the glucose and xylose of liquid fraction increase from 1.5% to 5.9%, and 4.0% to 12.4%, respectively; the yields of solid fraction decrease from 91.6% to 79.5%, and the lignin content increase from 23% to 32%. Pulps and paper sheets obtained from solid fractions hydrothermal treatments and from raw material pulped with diethanolamine, are worse than those obtained with soda-anthraquinone (Yield 57.8%; kappa number 24.9; Viscosity 711 mL/g; Brightness 54.8%; Tensile index 73.6 Nm/g; Stretch 2.84%; Burst index 6.13 kN/g and Tear index 1.69 mNm2/g). By acidification (pH 6) of soda pulping liquor it separate lignin-rich solids, which by pyrolysis gave a gas containing 1.13% H2, 31.79% CO and 1.86% CH4 by weight. Gasification of the same sample provided a gas containing 0.18% H2, 24.50% CO and 17.75% CH4.

  12. Spontaneous Immunity Against the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ROR1 in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Daneshmanesh, Amir Hossein; Mozaffari, Fariba; Moshfegh, Ali; Hansson, Lotta; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Sharifian, Ramazan Ali; Rabbani, Hodjattallah; Österborg, Anders; Mellstedt, Håkan; Shokri, Fazel

    2015-01-01

    Background ROR1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and several other malignancies but absent in most adult normal tissues. ROR1 is considered an onco-fetal antigen. In the present study we analysed spontaneous humoral and cellular immunity against ROR1 in CLL patients. Materials and Methods Antibodies against ROR1 were analysed in 23 patients and 20 healthy donors by ELISA and Western blot. Purified serum IgG from patients was tested for cytotoxicity against CLL cells using the MTT viability assay. A cellular immune response against ROR1 derived HLA-A2 restricted 9 aa and 16 aa long peptides were analysed using peptide loaded dendritic cells co-cultured with autologous T cells from CLL patients (n = 9) and healthy donors (n = 6). IFN-γ, IL-5 and IL-17A-secreting T cells were assessed by ELISPOT and a proliferative response using a H3-thymidine incorporation assay. Results The majority of CLL patients had antibodies against ROR1. Significantly higher titers of anti-ROR1 antibodies were noted in patients with non-progressive as compared to progressive disease. The extracellular membrane-close ROR1 KNG domain seemed to be an immunodominant epitope. Ten patients with high titers of anti-ROR1 binding antibodies were tested for cytotoxicity. Five of those had cytotoxic anti-ROR1 antibodies against CLL cells. ROR1-specific IFN-γ and IL-17A producing T cells could be detected in CLL patients, preferentially in non-progressive as compared to patients with progressive disease (p<0.05). Conclusion ROR1 seemed to spontaneously induce a humoral as well as a T cell response in CLL patients. The data support the notion that ROR1 might be a specific neo-antigen and may serve as a target for immunotherapy. PMID:26562161

  13. Lie symmetry and integrability of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, R. Z.

    1998-12-01

    Combining a Lie algebraic approach that is due to Wei and Norman [J. Math. Phys. 4, 475 (1963)] and the ideas suggested by Drach [Compt. Rend. 168, 337 (1919)], we have constructed several classes of systems of linear ordinary differential equations that are integrable by quadratures. Their integrability is ensured by integrability of the corresponding stationary cubic Schrödinger, KdV, and Harry-Dym equations. Next, we obtain a hierarchy of integrable reductions of the Dirac equation of an electron moving in the external field. Their integrability is shown to be in correspondence with integrability of the stationary mKdV hierarchy.

  14. STS-42 MS/PLC Thagard and Payload Specialist Bondar work in IML-1 spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Norman E. Thagard and Payload Specialist Roberta L. Bondar are busily engaged with experiments in the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) spacelab (SL) module. Bondar reads a checklist near the Rack 5 Biorack and glovebox while Thagard performs a VCR tape change-out. The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) (foreground) and shuttle middeck lockers are secured in IML-1's center aisle. In the background the open hatch and SL tunnel interior are visible. Crewmembers enter and exit the IML-1 module via the SL tunnel which connects to Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, airlock.

  15. Radar aeroecology: exploring the movements of aerial fauna through radio-wave remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Chilson, Phillip B; Bridge, Eli; Frick, Winifred F; Chapman, Jason W; Kelly, Jeffrey F

    2012-10-23

    An international and interdisciplinary Radar Aeroecology Workshop was held at the National Weather Center on 5-6 March 2012 on the University of Oklahoma campus in Norman, OK, USA. The workshop brought together biologists, meteorologists, radar engineers and computer scientists from 22 institutions and four countries. A central motivation behind the Radar Aeroecology Workshop was to foster better communication and cross-disciplinary collaboration among a diverse spectrum of researchers, and promote a better understanding of the ecology of animals that move within and use the Earth's lower atmosphere (aerosphere).

  16. The right to a decent minimum of health care.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Allen E

    1984-01-01

    Buchanan examines, and finds inadequate, several philosophical approaches to justifying and specifying the content of a universal right to a decent minimum of health care: utilitarian arguments, Rawlsian ideal contract arguments, and Norman Daniels' equality of opportunity argument. Also rejecting the libertarian hypothesis that there is no right to a decent minimum of care, he contends that the claim that society should guarantee certain health care services can be supported by a pluralistic approach encompassing special right-claims, harm prevention, prudential arguments emphasizing public health benefits, and beneficence.

  17. User-centered design to develop clinical applications. Literature review.

    PubMed

    Luna, Daniel; Quispe, María; Gonzalez, Zulma; Alemrares, Alfredo; Risk, Marcelo; Garcia Aurelio, Mauro; Otero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    User-centered design is mentioned by Norman as "the need for a design that uses the natural properties of the individuals, exploiting the relationships and constraints and focusing on the needs and interests of the user, in order to make the final products usable and understandable". This is also important in health developments. The objective of this paper is to search and analyze articles in the healthcare field where user-centered design principles have been applied. We describe findings in this topic from articles published between January 1995 and September 2014.

  18. It’s cool to be part of the energy solution

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2012-08-04

    I think many of us grasp that our nation is facing a huge energy challenge, but I had yet to hear it articulated in such a compelling way as in some recently published testimony before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. The messenger was Norman Augustine, retired chairman and CEO of the Lockheed Martin Corporation. He testified in his capacity as a member of the American Energy Innovation Council, an independent and informal group of seven of industry’s elite who have come together to lend a voice to the national discussion about a problem that affects us all; as he put it, the provision of energy.

  19. Novel Application of Cyclolipopeptide Amphisin: Feasibility Study as Additive to Remediate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contaminated Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Groboillot, Anne; Portet-Koltalo, Florence; Le Derf, Franck; Feuilloley, Marc J. G.; Orange, Nicole; Poc, Cécile Duclairoir

    2011-01-01

    To decontaminate dredged harbor sediments by bioremediation or electromigration processes, adding biosurfactants could enhance the bioavailability or mobility of contaminants in an aqueous phase. Pure amphisin from Pseudomonas fluorescens DSS73 displays increased effectiveness in releasing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) strongly adsorbed to sediments when compared to a synthetic anionic surfactant. Amphisin production by the bacteria in the natural environment was also considered. DSS73’s growth is weakened by three model PAHs above saturation, but amphisin is still produced. Estuarine water feeding the dredged material disposal site of a Norman harbor (France) allows both P. fluorescens DSS73 growth and amphisin production. PMID:21673923

  20. Visualization of gust gradients and aircraft response as measured by the NASA B-57B aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, D.; Campbell, W.; Dow, C.; Phillips, M.; Gregory, R.; Frost, W.

    1984-01-01

    A program to obtain gust gradient measurements over the span of an airfoil is being conducted by NASA. Data have been collected from four areas of the United States (Denver, Colorado; Edwards, California; Huntsville, Alabama; and Norman, Oklahoma). The background program development data collection, and some data analysis efforts of the gust gradient effort have previously been presented (Houbolt, 1979; Camp, et al., 1983; Campbell, 1983; Campbell, et al., 1983; Frost, et al., 1983; and Painter and Camp, 1983). The purpose of this paper is to discuss briefly the animation of a gust gradient data set that was collected during the summer of 1982 at Denver, Colorado.

  1. Distributed representation as a principle for the analysis of cockpit information displays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J

    1997-01-01

    This article examines the representational properties of cockpit information displays from the perspective of distributed representations (Zhang & Norman, 1994). The basic idea is that the information needed for many tasks in a cockpit is distributed across the external information displays in the cockpit and the internal minds of the pilots. It is proposed that the relative distribution of internal and external information is the major factor of a display's representational efficiency. Several functionally equivalent but representationally different navigation displays are selected to illustrate how the principle of distributed representations is applied to the analysis of the representational efficiencies of cockpit information displays.

  2. Estimation of agronomic variables using spectral signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, N. S.; Thompson, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for the determination of leaf area index or leaf angle distribution from remote-sensing canopy-reflectance (CR) measurements are developed on the basis of empirical models relating CR to parameters such as soil and vegetation spectral properties, solar flux, and viewing angle. A general procedure for inverting CR models is presented and applied to the models of Suits (1972), Verhoef and Bunnik (1981), and Norman (1979) in the IR range. Numerical results for a soybean canopy are compared in a table, and the error sensitivity of the inverted models is shown to be relatively high, requiring the use of ancillary data such as soil reflectance, leaf reflectance, and leaf transmittance.

  3. Searching for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in Intergalactic Absorption: The Expanding Universe

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Credits: Science: Michael L. Norman, Robert Harkness, Pascal Paschos, Rick Wagner, San Diego Supercomputer Center/University of California, San Diego Visualization: Mark Hereld, Joseph A. Insley, Michael E. Papka, Argonne National Laboratory; Eric C. Olson, University of Chicago This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The computation was performed at the National Institute for Computational Sciences (NICS).

  4. Comment on ‘Special-case closed form of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. F.

    2016-05-01

    Recently Van-Brunt and Visser (2015 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 48 225207) succeeded in explicitly evaluating the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff (BCH) expansion series for the noncommuting operators X and Y, provided that the two operators satisfy the commutation relation: [X,Y]={uX}+{vY}+{cI}, and the operator I commutes with both of them. In this comment we show that the closed-form BCH formula of this special case can be straightforwardly derived by the means of the Wei-Norman theorem and no summation of the infinite series is needed.

  5. Oklahoma City, Canadian River, OK, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view of Oklahoma City, OK (35.5N, 97.5W) surrounded by the grasslands of the central plains, is detailed enough to use as a map of the major highways and throughfares within the city and surrounding area. Tinker Air Force Base and Will Rogers International Airport as well as Lakes Hefner, Stanley Draper and nearby recreation areas. The smaller community of Norman, on the banks of the Canadian River to the south, is home to the University of Oklahoma.

  6. The 12th International Conference on Atomic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Robert R.; Rich, Arthur

    1991-02-01

    The conference began with a session devoted to the Nobel Laureates in Physics for 1989, all of whom were from the Atomic Physics community; Norman Ramsey and Hans Dehmelt spoke but Wolfgang Paul was unable to attend. Some sessions were titled as follows: Fundamental Laws and Constants; Atom and Ion Manipulation; Nonlinear Physics and Chaos; Quantum Optics and Other Laser Techniques; Photoionization Processes; Plasma Physics; Atomic Spectroscopy and Structure - Theory; Atomic Spectroscopy and Structure - Experimental; Molecular Spectroscopy and Structure, Surfaces, and Clusters; Atomic, Ionic, and Molecular Collisions; Electron and Positron Collisions; and Exotic Atomic and Special Topics.

  7. Evidence for high-efficiency laser-heated hohlraum performance at 527 nm.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R M; Oades, K; Thomas, B R; Schneider, M; Slark, G E; Suter, L J; Kauffman, R; Hinkel, D; Miller, M C

    2005-02-11

    A series of experiments conducted on the HELEN laser system [M. J. Norman, Appl. Opt.4120023497], into thermal x-ray generation from hohlraum targets using 527 nm (2omega) wavelength laser light, has shown that it is possible to exceed radiation temperatures previously thought limited by high levels of superthermal or hot electron production or stimulated backscatter. This Letter questions whether the assumptions traditionally applied to hohlraum design with respect to hot plasma filling and the use of 2omega light are too conservative.

  8. Engineering genetic injustice.

    PubMed

    Wenz, Peter

    2005-02-01

    In their jointly written book, From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice, Allen Buchanan, Dan Brock, Norman Daniels and Daniel Wikler defend 'the development and deployment of genetic intervention technologies..', including genetic enhancements, against charges that they exacerbate injustice. The present paper examines some of their arguments. The first section shows that the authors confuse real societies with just societies. The second shows that without this confusion, their arguments reveal the enormous justice-impairing potential of deploying genetic enhancements in such societies as the United States.

  9. 2012 Annual report of the American Psychological Association.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Provides the 2012 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association. In 2012, APA celebrated its 120th anniversary. It has grown from its original 31 members to the largest association of psychologists in the United States and a worldwide leader within the discipline. This edition of the report introduces each directorate and office within APA and talks about their goals and objectives. the president of APA, Dr. Norman Anderson, also gives a brief report which updates you on the activities of the association during its 120th anniversary as the professional home for psychologists and an advocate for the discipline.

  10. STS-71 Mission Highlights Resources Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The flight crew of the STS-71 Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis Commander Robert L. Gibson, Pilot Charles J. Precourt, Mission Specialists, Ellen S. Baker, Bonnie J. Dunbar, Gregory J. Harbaugh, and Payload Specialists, Norman E. Thagard, Vladimir Dezhurov, and Gennadiy Strekalov present an overview of their mission. It's primary objective is the first Mir docking with a space shuttle and crew transfer. Video footage includes the following: prelaunch and launch activities; the crew eating breakfast; shuttle launch; on orbit activities; rendezvous with Mir; Shuttle/Mir joint activities; undocking; and the shuttle landing.

  11. Real and alleged problems for Daniels's account of health justice.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, J Paul

    2013-08-01

    Norman Daniels's theory of health justice is the most comprehensive and systematic such theory we have. In one of the few articles published so far on Daniels's new book, Just Health, Benjamin Sachs argues that Daniels's core "principle of equality of opportunity does not do the work Daniels needs it to do." Yet Sachs's objections to Daniels's framework are deeply flawed. Where these arguments do not rely on significant misreadings of Daniels, they ignore sensible strands in Just Health that considerably dull their force. After disarming Sachs's arguments against Daniels's theory, I explain why I agree with Sachs's conclusion: Daniels's equality of opportunity-based account of health justice rests on shaky foundations.

  12. Angels and Demons: The Science Behind the Scenes

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman

    2009-05-12

    Does antimatter really exist? How and why do scientists produce and use it? Does CERN exist and is there an underground complex deep beneath the Swiss/French border? Is truth stranger than fiction? Find out at the coming public lecture. On Tuesday, May 12, SLAC physicist Norman Graf will discuss the real science behind Angels & Demons, Dan Brown's blockbuster novel and the basis of an upcoming Tom Hanks movie. Graf's' talk is one in a series of public lectures across the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico to share the science of antimatter and the Large Hadron Collider, and the excitement of particle physics research.

  13. Painless dental laser - Keith Murry in lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA inventor Keith Murray checks out laser technology that promises to make painless dental lasers affordable for dentists and their patients. Developed at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va., the dual-wavelength laser can be electronically switched between the two laser frequencies important to dentists. Co-inventors of the technology are Murray, Norman Barnes, also of Langley, and Ralph Hutcheson of Scientific Materials Corp., Bozeman, Montana. The technology was originally developed for studies of atmospheric wind change. Photographed in building 1202, laser lab.

  14. Evidence for high-efficiency laser-heated hohlraum performance at 527 nm.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R M; Oades, K; Thomas, B R; Schneider, M; Slark, G E; Suter, L J; Kauffman, R; Hinkel, D; Miller, M C

    2005-02-11

    A series of experiments conducted on the HELEN laser system [M. J. Norman, Appl. Opt.4120023497], into thermal x-ray generation from hohlraum targets using 527 nm (2omega) wavelength laser light, has shown that it is possible to exceed radiation temperatures previously thought limited by high levels of superthermal or hot electron production or stimulated backscatter. This Letter questions whether the assumptions traditionally applied to hohlraum design with respect to hot plasma filling and the use of 2omega light are too conservative. PMID:15783658

  15. STS-30 crewmembers train on JSC shuttle mission simulator (SMS) flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Wearing headsets, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark C. Lee (left), MS Mary L. Cleave (center), and MS Norman E. Thagard pose on aft flight deck in JSC's fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). In background, Commander David M. Walker and Pilot Ronald J. Grabe check data on forward flight deck CRT monitors. FB-SMS is located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Crewmembers are scheduled to fly aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, in April 1989 for NASA mission STS-30.

  16. Mineral resources of the Trinity River tributary area in Texas and Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weissenborn, A. E.

    1946-01-01

    In March 1945 Colonel George R. Goethels, Chief of the Civil Works Division of the Corps of Engineers, requested the Director of the Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior, to prepare a report on the mineral resource of the area that, according to economic studies made by the Corps of Engineers, would be affected by the canalization of the Trinity River to Fort Worth. As a consequence, the staff of the Geological Survey's Regional Office in Rolla, Mo., was assigned the task of preparing the desired information. A. E. Weissenborn, acting Regional Geologist, called on Major H. R. Norman, Division Engineer of the Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, and discussed with him the purpose, scope, and form of the proposed report. Following this discussion, Dr. John T. Lonsdale, Director of the Bureau of Economic Geology of the University of Texas, at Mr. Weissenborn's request, agreed that the Bureau of Economic Geology should participate in the preparation of the report. My. Weissenborn also called on Robert H. Dott, Director of the Oklahoma State Geological Survey at Norman, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Geological Survey was unable to participate in writing the report, but was very helpful in supplying published and unpublished or out-of-print information on the mineral resources of Oklahoma.

  17. Spatial analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic DNA diversity in wild sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima) populations: do marine currents shape the genetic structure?

    PubMed

    Fievet, Virgil; Touzet, Pascal; Arnaud, Jean-François; Cuguen, Joël

    2007-05-01

    Patterns of seed dispersal in the wild sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima) are predicted to be influenced by marine currents because populations are widely distributed along the European Atlantic coast. We investigated the potential influence of marine currents on the pattern of spatial genetic structuring in natural populations of sea beet. Populations were located along the French coasts of the Anglo-Norman gulf that features peculiar marine currents in the Channel. Thirty-three populations were sampled, among which 23 were continental and 10 were insular populations located in Jersey, Guernsey and Chausey, for a total of 1224 plants genotyped. To validate the coastal topography influence and the possibility of marine current orientated gene flow on the genetic features of sea beet populations, we assessed patterns of genetic structuring of cytoplasmic and nuclear diversity by: (i) searching for an isolation-by-distance (IBD) pattern using spatial autocorrelation tools; (ii) using the Monmonier algorithm to identify genetic boundaries in the area studied; and (iii) performing assignment tests that are based on multilocus genotype information to ascertain population membership of individuals. Our results showed a highly contrasted cytoplasmic and nuclear genetic differentiation and highlighted the peculiar situation of island populations. Beyond a classical isolation-by-distance due to short-range dispersal, genetic barriers fitting the orientation of marine currents were clearly identified. This suggests the occurrence of long-distance seed dispersal events and an asymmetrical gene flow separating the eastern and western part of the Anglo-Norman gulf.

  18. Merizocotyle euzeti sp. n. (Monogenea: Monocotylidae) from the nasal tissue of three deep sea skates (Rajidae) in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Irigoitia, Manuel M; Cantatore, Delfina M P; Delpiani, Gabriela E; Incorvaia, Inés S; Lanfranchi, Ana L; Timi, Juan T

    2014-06-01

    A new species of Merizocotyle Cerfontaine, 1894 (Monogenea: Monocotylidae) is described from the nasal tissues of three deep sea rajid skates: the southern thorny skate, Amblyraja doellojuradoi (Pozzi), broadnose skate, Bathyraja brachyurops (Fowler), and yellownose skate, Zearaja chilensis (Guichenot), collected off Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, southwest Atlantic Ocean. Two additional species of sympatric rajid, the white-dotted skate, Bathyraja albomaculata (Norman), and the Patagonian skate, Bathyraja macloviana (Norman), were also examined but no merizocotylines were found. The taxonomy of the Merizocotylinae is not widely accepted and, as a result, the status of Thaumatocotyle and Mycteronastes, and their proposed synonymy with Merizocotyle are currently under discussion. The new species differs from its congeners by having a unique haptoral structure, 6 peripheral loculi that are asymmetrically arranged (one much smaller, indistinctly located in the left or right side of the haptor). The presence of the new species in three sympatric species of Rajidae belonging to distinct genera and subfamilies, as well as its absence in sympatric congenerics indicates the lack of phylogenetic host specificity. Host ecology and geographical distribution appear to be more important than host phylogeny in determining the distribution of this parasite across potential hosts in the region. This constitutes the first record of Merizocotyle in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean.

  19. Differences in evaporation between a floating pan and class a pan on land

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masoner, J.R.; Stannard, D.I.; Christenson, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Research was conducted to develop a method for obtaining floating pan evaporation rates in a small (less than 10,000 m2) wetland, lagoon, or pond. Floating pan and land pan evaporation data were collected from March 1 to August 31, 2005, at a small natural wetland located in the alluvium of the Canadian River near Norman, Oklahoma, at the U.S. Geological Survey Norman Landfill Toxic Substances Hydrology Research Site. Floating pan evaporation rates were compared with evaporation rates from a nearby standard Class A evaporation pan on land. Floating pan evaporation rates were significantly less than land pan evaporation rates for the entire period and on a monthly basis. Results indicated that the use of a floating evaporation pan in a small free-water surface better simulates actual physical conditions on the water surface that control evaporation. Floating pan to land pan ratios were 0.82 for March, 0.87 for April, 0.85 for May, 0.85 for June, 0.79 for July, and 0.69 for August. ?? 2008 American Water Resources Association.

  20. In Situ Rates of Sulfate Reduction in Response to Geochemical Perturbations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kneeshaw, T.A.; McGuire, J.T.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Smith, E.W.

    2011-01-01

    Rates of in situ microbial sulfate reduction in response to geochemical perturbations were determined using Native Organism Geochemical Experimentation Enclosures (NOGEEs), a new in situ technique developed to facilitate evaluation of controls on microbial reaction rates. NOGEEs function by first trapping a native microbial community in situ and then subjecting it to geochemical perturbations through the introduction of various test solutions. On three occasions, NOGEEs were used at the Norman Landfill research site in Norman, Oklahoma, to evaluate sulfate-reduction rates in wetland sediments impacted by landfill leachate. The initial experiment, in May 2007, consisted of five introductions of a sulfate test solution over 11 d. Each test stimulated sulfate reduction with rates increasing until an apparent maximum was achieved. Two subsequent experiments, conducted in October 2007 and February 2008, evaluated the effects of concentration on sulfate-reduction rates. Results from these experiments showed that faster sulfate-reduction rates were associated with increased sulfate concentrations. Understanding variability in sulfate-reduction rates in response to perturbations may be an important factor in predicting rates of natural attenuation and bioremediation of contaminants in systems not at biogeochemical equilibrium. Copyright ?? 2011 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2011 National Ground Water Association.

  1. Priority setting in health care: a complementary approach.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Rui; Rego, Guilhermina

    2014-09-01

    Explicit forms of rationing have already been implemented in some countries, and many of these prioritization systems resort to Norman Daniels' "accountability for reasonableness" methodology. However, a question still remains: is "accountability for reasonableness" not only legitimate but also fair? The objective of this paper is to try to adjust "accountability for reasonableness" to the World Health Organization's holistic view of health and propose an evolutionary perspective in relation to the "normal" functioning standard proposed by Norman Daniels. To accomplish this purpose the authors depart from the "normal" functioning standard to a model that promotes effective opportunity for everyone in health care access, because even within the "normal" functioning criteria some treatments and medical interventions should have priority upon others. Equal opportunity function is a mathematical function that helps to hierarchize moral relevant necessities in health care according to this point of view. It is concluded, first, that accountability for reasonableness is an extremely valuable tool to address the issue of setting limits in health care; second, that what is called in this paper "equal opportunity function" might reflect how accountability for reasonableness results in fair limit-setting decisions; and third, that this methodology must be further specified to best achieve fair limit-setting decisions. Indeed, when resources are especially scarce the methodology suggested in this paper might allow not only prioritizing in an "all or nothing" basis but can contribute to a hierarchy system of priorities in health care.

  2. Spatio-temporal evolution of biogeochemical processes at a landfill site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B.; Mohanty, B. P.; McGuire, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Predictions of fate and transport of contaminants are strongly dependent on spatio-temporal variability of soil hydraulic and geochemical properties. This study focuses on time-series signatures of hydrological and geochemical properties at different locations within the Norman landfill site. Norman Landfill is a closed municipal landfill site with prevalent organic contamination. Monthly data at the site include specific conductance, δ18O, δ2H, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and anions (chloride, sulfate, nitrate) from 1998-2006. Column scale data on chemical concentrations, redox gradients, and flow parameters are also available on daily and hydrological event (infiltration, drainage, etc.) scales. Since high-resolution datasets of contaminant concentrations are usually unavailable, Wavelet and Fourier analyses were used to infer the dominance of different biogeochemical processes at different spatio-temporal scales and to extract linkages between transport and reaction processes. Results indicate that time variability controls the progression of reactions affecting biodegradation of contaminants. Wavelet analysis suggests that iron-sulfide reduction reactions had high seasonal variability at the site, while fermentation processes dominated at the annual time scale. Findings also suggest the dominance of small spatial features such as layered interfaces and clay lenses in driving biogeochemical reactions at both column and landfill scales. A conceptual model that caters to increased understanding and remediating structurally heterogeneous variably-saturated media is developed from the study.

  3. FDTD calculations of SAR for child voxel models in different postures between 10 MHz and 3 GHz.

    PubMed

    Findlay, R P; Lee, A-K; Dimbylow, P J

    2009-08-01

    Calculations of specific energy absorption rate (SAR) have been performed on the rescaled NORMAN 7-y-old voxel model and the Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) child 7-y-old voxel model in the standing arms down, arms up and sitting postures. These calculations were for plane-wave exposure under isolated and grounded conditions between 10 MHz and 3 GHz. It was found that there was little difference at each resonant frequency between the whole-body averaged SAR values calculated for the NORMAN and ETRI 7-y-old models for each of the postures studied. However, when compared with the arms down posture, raising the arms increased the SAR by up to 25%. Electric field values required to produce the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers public basic restriction were calculated, and compared with reference levels for the different child models and postures. These showed that, under certain worst-case exposure conditions, the reference levels may not be conservative.

  4. The response of tropical Australian estuaries to a sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanski, E.; Chappell, J.

    1996-02-01

    Estuaries in tropical Australia have a low sediment yield (about 5-20 tonnes km -2 yr -1). The estuaries formed when rising post-glacial sea level invaded coastal valleys 7 to 9000 years ago. Geomorphological and stratigraphic data show that mangrove swamps developed on the flooded plains and in some cases their substrate kept pace with the rising sea level. The bulk of the sediment originated from the sea. When sea level stabilised, 6000 years ago, the flood plains prograded seaward. The channels now are generally stable and in some cases are inherited from the progradation phase. The response of these estuaries to a sea level rise may be inferred both from their evolution during post glacial sea level rise and from hydrodynamics-sedimentological models calibrated against measurements of tidal processes. This was undertaken for Coral Creek, the South Alligator River and the Norman River in north Australia. Modelling indicates that a future sea level rise will generate changes in the dynamics and channel dimensions which mimic post glacial changes. In the macrotidal South Alligator the floodplain will revert to mangrove, the mouth region will widen and sediment will move upstream and onto the floodplain. In the mesotidal, diurnal Norman the channel will widen throughout and sediment will be transported seawards. In Coral Creek the mangrove will retreat landwards.

  5. A new species of Asterocheres (Copepoda, Siphonostomatoida) with a redescription of A. complexus Stock, 1960 and A. sarsi Bandera & Conradi, 2009.

    PubMed

    Bandera, Eugenia; Conradi, Mercedes

    2014-07-07

    The present paper reviews the material of three species of Asterocheres Boeck 1859 deposited in four different Zoological European museums as part of the ongoing taxonomical revision of this genus. Asterocheres sarsi Bandera & Conradi 2009, the species described by Sars in 1915 as Ascomyzon latum (Brady 1880) and lately recognized as a distinct species by Bandera and Conradi in 2009 is fully described in this paper from material collected by Sars in Norway in 1915 and deposited in The Natural History Museum of the University of Oslo. Asterocheres complexus Stock, 1960 which has been sometimes confused with A. sarsi is redescribed from material collected by Stock in France in 1959 and deposited in the Zoological Museum of the University of Amsterdam. Furthermore, a new species, previously misidentified as A. suberitis Gieisbrecht 1897, from the Norman`s collection of The Natural History Museum of London, is described as A. eugenioi, new species. These three species, A. complexus, A. eugenioi, and A. sarsi share the general appearance of body thanks to the pointed posterolateral angle of the epimeral area of somite bearing leg 3, sometimes slightly produced into backwardly directed processes, and somite bearing leg 4 largely concealed under somite bearing leg 3.

  6. Impact of a fixed Siberian Traps mantle plume on the tectonics of the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawver, L. A.; Norton, I. O.; Gahagan, L.

    2012-12-01

    Eruption of the Siberian Traps at the Permo-Triassic boundary [~250 Ma] produced more than 3 x 106 km3 of rapidly emplaced magma throughout a region ~2.5 x 106 km2 in extent. Dates from the New Siberian Islands of 252 ± 2 Ma (Kuzmichev & Pease, 2007) indicate that Siberian Trap-related magmas are found ~500 km to the east of where they are generally shown to terminate to the west of the Lena River. Cenozoic opening of the Eurasian Basin would account for some of this discrepancy. A Siberian Trap mantle plume in an absolute reference frame fixed to the present day location of the Iceland hot spot, tracks through time across the Taimyr Peninsula region during the Late Triassic period and then to north of the Severnaya Zemlya archipelago by the end of the Middle Jurassic. With the exception of some Middle Triassic dates from the Taimyr Peninsula there is no apparent expression of a hot spot track during the this period. Motion of Laurasia in a paleomagnetically controlled reference frame has the Franz Josef Land archipelago over the fixed hotspot from about 155 Ma to 147 Ma prior to the early phase of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province [HALIP], generally taken to be 130 Ma to 120 Ma. Campsie et al (1988) have one date of 145 Ma from samples collected by Fridthof Nansen in 1895-1896 on Solsberi Island. Dibner et al (1988) have a dozen ages from dolerite samples from various islands spanning the period 175 ±12 Ma to 138 ±10 Ma with five of them between 158 Ma to 144 Ma. During the Late Jurassic into the earliest Cretaceous the track of the fixed hotspot follows the future margin of the Barents Shelf just inboard of a reconstructed Lomonosov Ridge. By the end of the Valanginian, the hotspot tracks curves slightly, mimicking the southern curve of the Lomonosov Ridge off North America. The early phase of the HALIP moves the region of the northern Ellesmere Island over the hotspot while forming the Mendeleev and Alpha ridges. By middle Albian time, the Siberian Traps

  7. Modern processes controlling the sea bed sediment formation in Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanyuk, I.; Dmitrievsky, A.; Shapovalov, S.; Chaikina, O.; Akivis, T.

    2009-04-01

    The Barents Sea is one of the key regions for understanding of the postglacial history of the climate and circulation of the World Ocean. There are the limits of warm North Atlantic waters penetration to the Arctic and a zone of interaction between Atlantic and Arctic waters. The Barents Se's limits are the deep Norwegian Sea in the West, the Spitsbergen Island and the Franz Josef Land and the deep Nansen trough in the North, the Novaya Zemlya archipelago in the East and the North shore of Europe in the South. An analysis of Eurasian-Arctic continental margin shows correspondence between the rift systems of the shelf with those of the ocean. This relation can be observed in the central Arctic region. All the rift systems underlying the sediment basin are expressed in the sea bed relief as spacious and extensive graben valleys burnished by lobes. Two transverse trenches cross both shelf and continental slope, namely the Medvezhinsky trench between Norway and Spitsbergen in the West and the Franz Victoria trench between Spitsbergen and the Franz Josef Land in the North. The Barents and the Kara Seas are connected by the Kara Gate Strait and wide transverse trough of Saint Anna in the North-West. The recent assessment of the eolian solid sediment supply to the Barents Sea is about 0.904 tons. The Barents Sea as a whole should be considered as "starving" in terms of its feeding with solid sediment matter. Observations show the considerable part of the sea bottom to be free of Holocene sediment cover. The more ancient Quaternary units or bedrock can be seen at the bottom surface. This phenomenon is the most typical for arches of relatively shallow elevations. Thick accumulations of new sediments are connected with fjords. The amount of sea ice delivered from the Barents Sea to the Arctic Ocean is 35 km3 a year. This value should be added by iceberg delivery from the North island of Novaya Zemlya, the Franz Josef Land, the Spitsbergen Island and North Norway but most of

  8. Music and the Nature: Input of the Czech Composers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav; Nemcova, Lidmila

    2014-05-01

    Extraordinary occasions for art of any kind - music, creative graphic and plastic arts, literature (classic, modern incl. science fiction), theatre, cinema, etc. - exist to harmonise individual personal interests with those of the humanity well-being and of the Nature and also to cultivate individual spirituality and the appropriate values. Arts can be applied as irreplaceable means for making any human being better, for improving his sense for solidarity and for increasing his ethical sensibility. An interest for the art should be cultivated already since the childhood. - How much of inspiration for numerous composers all over the world has been given by the Nature, how much of inspiration for people who by listening to such a music are increasing nobility of their behaviour as well as their friendly approach to the Nature. - Many classical music works have been written with a strong inspiration by the Nature itself from the past until today. The actual Year of the Czech Music gives the possibility to present the most famous Czech composers inspired by the Nature (selected examples only): Bedřich Smetana (1824 - 1884): At the sea shore - a concert etude for piano inspired by his stay in Göteborg (Sweden); Vltava (Moldau) - a symphonic poem from the cycle "My country" inspired by the river crossing Bohemia from the South to Prague; From the Bohemian woods and meadows - another symphonic poem from the same cycle. Antonín Dvořák (1841 - 1904): V přírodě (In the Nature) - a work for orchestra Leoš Janáček (1854 - 1928): Příhody li\\vsky Bystrou\\vsky (The Cunning Little Vixen) - an opera situated mostly in a forest. Josef Bohuslav Foerster (1859-1951): Velké širé rodné lány (Big large native fields) - a choir for men singers inspired by the nature in the region where the composer as a boy from Prague was visiting his grand-father. Vítězslav Novák (1870 - 1949): In Tatra mountains - a symphonic poem expressing the author's passion for the famous

  9. Constraints on the glacial erosion rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    It is thought that glaciers erode their underlying bedrock mainly through abrasion and quarrying. Theories predict erosion to be proportional to ice-sliding velocity raised to some power: ˙e = Kguls (1) where ė is the erosion rate, and Kg a proportionality constant and l an exponent. By implementing such a rule in numerical models, it has been possible to reproduce typical glacial landscape features, such as U-shape valleys, hanging valleys, glacial cirques or fjords. Although there have been great advances in the level of sophistication of these models, for example through the inclusion of high-order ice dynamics and subglacial hydrology, the proportionality constant, and the exponent have remained poorly constrained parameters. Recently, two independent studies in the Antarctic Peninsula and Patagonian Andes (Koppes et al., 2015) and the Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand (Herman et al., 2015) simultaneously collected erosion rate and ice velocity data to find that erosion depends non-linearly on sliding velocity, and that the exponent on velocity is about 2. Such a nonlinear rule is appealing because it may, in part, explain the observed variations in erosion rates globally. Furthermore, an exponent about 2 closely matches theoretical predictions for abrasion. Although it is tempting to argue that abrasion is the dominant process for fast flowing glaciers like the Franz Josef Glacier, there is a clear need for more data and better quantification for the role of quarrying. Both studies also led to very similar values for the proportionality constant Kg. These new results therefore imply that glacial erosion processes might be better constrained than previously thought. Given that glacial velocity can nowadays be measured and modeled at an unprecedented resolution, it may potentially become possible to use glacial erosion models in a predictive manner. Herman, F. et al. "Erosion by an Alpine glacier." Science 350.6257 (2015): 193-195. Koppes, M. et al. "Observed

  10. Glacier surface melt characterization and trend analysis (1992-2011) in the Russian High Arctic from combined resolution-enhanced scatterometer and passive microwave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; Ramage, J. M.; Semmens, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Global warming has been pronounced in the remote glacierized archipelagoes (Severnaya Zemlya, Novaya Zemlya and Franz Josef Land) of the Russian High Arctic (RHA) and its effect on the low altitude, high latitude small ice caps needs examination. The timing and spatial variability of snow melt onset, duration and intensity are key factors influencing mass balance and the ice marginal hydrological system as well as important indicators of glacial response to anthropogenic and natural forcings. Characterization and trend analysis of RHA glacier melt behaviors provide insight about assessing the mass loss rate under recent Arctic climate change. However, due to the harsh environment, long term records of glaciological data for RHA are limited, necessitating the application of remotely sensed data to accomplish the research. The high sensitivity to liquid water and the ability to penetrate non-precipitating clouds enables microwave remote sensing to detect glacier surface melt. The appearance of melt water in snow dramatically decreases the returned scatterometer radar signal from active microwave sensors and sharply augments passive microwave emission. Based on this feature, we combined resolution-enhanced ERS-1/2 C-band (1992-2000), QuickSCAT Ku-band (2000-2009), ASCAT C-band (2009-2011) scatterometer data and SSMI 37 GHz (1995-2007) vertically polarized passive microwave products from Brigham Young University and analyzed glacier surface melt trends from 1992 to 2011 with a spatial resolution downscaled to 4.45km. We concatenated scatterometer derived melt behaviors by overlapping years and refined the results based on passive microwave data. Cross-validation shows that melt timing to be consistent between the active and passive sensors. Trend analysis (α < 0.005) reveals that the average glacier surface melt onset date occurs earlier by approximately 0.85 days/year in Severnaya Zemlya which outpaced the mean advancing rate in the pan-Arctic. Surrounded by ocean

  11. Fundamentals, accuracy and input parameters of frost heave prediction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellekens, Fons Jozef

    In this thesis, the frost heave knowledge of physical geographers and soil physicists, a detailed description of the frost heave process, methods to determine soil parameters, and analysis of the spatial variability of these soil parameters are connected to the expertise of civil engineers and mathematicians in the (computer) modelling of the process. A description is given of observations of frost heave in laboratory experiments and in the field. Frost heave modelling is made accessible by a detailed description of the main principles of frost heave modelling in a language which can be understood by persons who do not have a thorough mathematical background. Two examples of practical one-dimensional frost heave prediction models are described: a model developed by Wang (1994) and a model developed by Nixon (1991). Advantages, limitations and some improvements of these models are described. It is suggested that conventional frost heave prediction using estimated extreme input parameters may be improved by using locally measured input parameters. The importance of accurate input parameters in frost heave prediction models is demonstrated in a case study using the frost heave models developed by Wang and Nixon. Methods to determine the input parameters are discussed, concluding with a suite of methods, some of which are new, to determine the input parameters of frost heave prediction models from very basic grain size parameters. The spatial variability of the required input parameters is analysed using data obtained along the Norman Wells-Zama oil pipeline at Norman Wells, NWT, located in the transition between discontinuous and continuous permafrost regions at the northern end of Canada's northernmost oil pipeline. A method based on spatial variability analysis of the input parameters in frost heave models is suggested to optimize the improvement that arises from adequate sampling, while minimizing the costs of obtaining field data. A series of frost heave

  12. Correlation of Hydraulic Fracturing Induced Seismicity with Operation Parameters of Shale Gas Extraction: Two Case Studies in Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahbod, A. M.; Kao, H.; Cassidy, J. F.; Snyder, D. B.; Cairns, S.; Walker, D.

    2015-12-01

    Northeast British Columbia, specifically the Horn River Basin (HRB) and Montney Trend, are among the largest shale gas production regions in western Canada. In contrast, there has been no large-scale hydraulic fracturing (HF) operation in the Northwest Territories in the Norman Wells region of the central Mackenzie valley. In this study, we investigate the effect of injection pressure, operation duration and injected volume on the observed seismicity in the HRB and Norman Wells regions and compare our observations with the pre-HF records. In the HRB, we apply the single-station location and waveform correlation methods to establish a homogenous earthquake catalog (2006/12-2011/12). In the Northwest Territories, we combine data from a local seismograph network of 4 stations plus a dense array of 7 stations located from 1 km to 50 km from the operation wells to locate earthquakes (2013/09-2014/07). In the HRB, the initial effect of an increased injected volume is an increase in earthquake frequency but not magnitude. Local earthquakes gradually become larger in magnitude as the scale of HF in the region expands. While the injection pressure during HF operations has been regulated at a relatively constant level, the massive increase of injection volume in 2010 and 2011 coincides with a series of ML>3 events. Relatively large seismic moment release (>1014 N m) occurred only when the monthly injected volume exceeded ~150,000 m3. In addition, we observe variable time lags, from days to up to 4 months between intense HF and the occurrence of a significant local earthquake. On the other hand, in the Norman Wells region, two small-scale HF were performed in 2014 with a total injected volume of ~ 14000 m3. We observed an increase in the number of micro-earthquakes (M < 2.0) during the HF period without a clear change in the overall seismic pattern. From these two observations, we conclude that HF operations do not necessarily result in an increase in the occurrence rate of

  13. Two endocrinological anniversaries.

    PubMed

    Svacina, S; Sucharda, P

    2004-01-01

    In 2004, the First Faculty of Medicine will commemorate two significant anniversaries related to the small, yet important field of endocrinology. On January 31, 2004 it has been twenty years since the death of the founder of the discipline in this country, professor Josef Charvát (6.8.1897 - 31.1.1984). The occasion was marked by the Dean of the First Faculty of Medicine, by the Prorector of Charles University and by the President of the Czech Academy of Science who jointly unveiled a memorial plaque dedicated to the founder-of Czech endocrinology placed on at the house in Ostrovní Street, where professor Charvát lived and died. During the brief ceremony, short quotes were read from the works of professor Charvát by the famous Czech actor Radovan Lukavský and a speech was delivered by professor Vratislav Schreiber, the most notable of professor Charvat's students. On June 29, 2004, professor Schreiber himself, still full of vigour celebrated his 80th birthday. That day, too, is a significant anniversary in the history of Czech endocrinology.

  14. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka

    2013-02-01

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  15. The Third Man: Robert Dunn's (1799-1877) Contribution to Aphasia Research in Mid-Nineteenth-Century England.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Marjorie Perlman

    2016-01-01

    Throughout his medical career, Robert Dunn (1799-1877) published a number of clinical cases with postmortem reports involving acquired language disorders, with the first noted in 1842. He developed a physiologically informed approach to psychological function during the 1850s along with a group of notable colleagues Benjamin Collins Brodie, Henry Holland, Thomas Laycock, John Daniel Morell, and Daniel Noble. He was also active in ethnographic research on human origins and racial diversity. As such, Dunn represents an interesting player in the developing fields of neurology, psychology, and anthropology in England in the latter part of the nineteenth century. These various strands converged at the meeting of the British Association of the Advancement of Science in 1868, where Dunn shared the program of lectures on the cutting-edge topic of aphasia with Paul Broca (1824-1880) and John Hughlings Jackson (1835-1911). Dunn's ideas developed over a longer time frame than his younger colleagues and as such represent a unique blending of concepts from the earlier work of Franz Josef Gall (1758-1828) and Jean-Baptiste Bouillaud (1798-1881) to the perspectives on language organization in the brain developed after 1861. PMID:26452588

  16. The cryptomnesic origins of Jung's dream of the multi-storeyed house.

    PubMed

    Myers, Steve

    2009-09-01

    Jung first recounted his dream of the multi-storeyed house in the 1925 seminars to illustrate the concept of the collective unconscious and explain the influence of phylogeny on his split with Freud. However, his telling the story of the dream belies a cryptomnesic influence of the early writings of psychoanalysis because Josef Breuer used a similar image to illustrate the structure of the psyche which Edouard Claparède associated with a phylogenetic inheritance. When telling the story of the dream, Jung misrepresented Freud's position, creating the impression of there being a bigger difference between their theories than was actually the case, and giving the dream a fictional significance for the breakdown of their relationship. In fact, Jung followed Freud into the fields of mythology and phylogenetics, and their split was due primarily to their different attitudes towards sexuality rather than phylogeny. The dream image has therefore led to a misunderstanding of Freudian theory when viewed from within a Jungian perspective. Freud believed there was a phylogenetic layer in the psyche, though he held a different view to Jung on its nature and importance. PMID:19765139

  17. The Contribution of Ernst Mach to Embodied Cognition and Mathematics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zudini, Verena; Zuccheri, Luciana

    2016-08-01

    A study of the interactions between mathematics and cognitive science, carried out within a historical perspective, is important for a better understanding of mathematics education in the present. This is evident when analysing the contribution made by the epistemological theories of Ernst Mach. On the basis of such theories, a didactic method was developed, which was used in the teaching of mathematics in Austria at the beginning of the twentieth century and applied to different subjects ranging from simple operations in arithmetic to calculus. Besides the relevance of this method—also named the "Jacob method" after Josef Jacob who proposed it—to teaching practice, it could also be considered interesting in a wider context with reference to the mind-body problem. In particular, the importance that Jacob gives to "muscular activity" in the process of forming and elaborating mathematical concepts, derived from Mach, resounds in the current debate on embodied cognition, where cognitive processes are understood not as expressions of an abstract and merely computational mind but as based on our physicality as human beings, equipped not just with a brain but also a (whole) body. This model has been applied to mathematics in the "theory of embodied mathematics", the objective of which is to study, with the methods and apparatus of embodied cognitive science, the cognitive mechanisms used in the human creation and conceptualisation of mathematics. The present article shows that the "Jacob method" may be considered a historical example of didactical application of analogous ideas.

  18. The life and work of Geoffrey Tyndale Young.

    PubMed

    Jones, John

    2015-03-01

    Geoffrey Tyndale Young was born in England's Peak District in 1915: his father and both grandfathers were pharmaceutical chemists. He graduated from the Universities of Birmingham and Bristol and was a transatlantic scientific liaison officer in the Second World War, shortly after which he was elected to a Fellowship at Jesus College Oxford. He combined peptide synthesis research, undergraduate teaching, and College administration with leadership in European peptide science and was universally respected for his integrity, wisdom, and unflappable diplomacy. A close friend of Josef Rudinger, he attended almost all of the first two dozen European Peptide Symposia 1958-1996. When he retired in 1982, he was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire and was elected an Emeritus Fellow of Jesus College, of which he had been Acting Principal 1973-1977. In retirement, he was instrumental in setting up this journal and steered the formation of the European Peptide Society, of which he was the first chairman. In 1950, he married Janet Mary Baker, later Baroness Young of Farnworth, Leader of the British House of Lords 1982-1983, who died in 2002: they had three daughters who survive him. He died at home in Oxford on 24 May 2014 aged 98. PMID:25449167

  19. Persistence despite perturbations for interacting populations.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Sebastian J

    2006-10-21

    Two definitions of persistence despite perturbations in deterministic models are presented. The first definition, persistence despite frequent small perturbations, is shown to be equivalent to the existence of a positive attractor i.e. an attractor bounded away from extinction. The second definition, persistence despite rare large perturbations, is shown to be equivalent to permanence i.e. a positive attractor whose basin of attraction includes all positive states. Both definitions set up a natural dichotomy for classifying models of interacting populations. Namely, a model is either persistent despite perturbations or not. When it is not persistent, it follows that all initial conditions are prone to extinction due to perturbations of the appropriate type. For frequent small perturbations, this method of classification is shown to be generically robust: there is a dense set of models for which persistent (respectively, extinction prone) models lies within an open set of persistent (resp. extinction prone) models. For rare large perturbations, this method of classification is shown not to be generically robust. Namely, work of Josef Hofbauer and the author have shown there are open sets of ecological models containing a dense sets of permanent models and a dense set of extinction prone models. The merits and drawbacks of these different definitions are discussed.

  20. Glacial isostatic adjustment associated with the Barents Sea ice sheet: A modelling inter-comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auriac, A.; Whitehouse, P. L.; Bentley, M. J.; Patton, H.; Lloyd, J. M.; Hubbard, A.

    2016-09-01

    The 3D geometrical evolution of the Barents Sea Ice Sheet (BSIS), particularly during its late-glacial retreat phase, remains largely ambiguous due to the paucity of direct marine- and terrestrial-based evidence constraining its horizontal and vertical extent and chronology. One way of validating the numerous BSIS reconstructions previously proposed is to collate and apply them under a wide range of Earth models and to compare prognostic (isostatic) output through time with known relative sea-level (RSL) data. Here we compare six contrasting BSIS load scenarios via a spherical Earth system model and derive a best-fit, χ2 parameter using RSL data from the four main terrestrial regions within the domain: Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Novaya Zemlya and northern Norway. Poor χ2 values allow two load scenarios to be dismissed, leaving four that agree well with RSL observations. The remaining four scenarios optimally fit the RSL data when combined with Earth models that have an upper mantle viscosity of 0.2-2 × 1021 Pa s, while there is less sensitivity to the lithosphere thickness (ranging from 71 to 120 km) and lower mantle viscosity (spanning 1-50 × 1021 Pa s). GPS observations are also compared with predictions of present-day uplift across the Barents Sea. Key locations where relative sea-level and GPS data would prove critical in constraining future ice-sheet modelling efforts are also identified.

  1. IJS procedure for RELAP5 to TRACE input model conversion using SNAP

    SciTech Connect

    Prosek, A.; Berar, O. A.

    2012-07-01

    The TRAC/RELAP Advanced Computational Engine (TRACE) advanced, best-estimate reactor systems code developed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission comes with a graphical user interface called Symbolic Nuclear Analysis Package (SNAP). Much of efforts have been done in the past to develop the RELAP5 input decks. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the Institut 'Josef Stefan' (IJS) conversion procedure from RELAP5 to TRACE input model of BETHSY facility. The IJS conversion procedure consists of eleven steps and is based on the use of SNAP. For calculations of the selected BETHSY 6.2TC test the RELAP5/MOD3.3 Patch 4 and TRACE V5.0 Patch 1 were used. The selected BETHSY 6.2TC test was 15.24 cm equivalent diameter horizontal cold leg break in the reference pressurized water reactor without high pressure and low pressure safety injection. The application of the IJS procedure for conversion of BETHSY input model showed that it is important to perform the steps in proper sequence. The overall calculated results obtained with TRACE using the converted RELAP5 model were close to experimental data and comparable to RELAP5/MOD3.3 calculations. Therefore it can be concluded, that proposed IJS conversion procedure was successfully demonstrated on the BETHSY integral test facility input model. (authors)

  2. On large outflows of Arctic sea ice into the Barents Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Ron; Maslowski, Wieslaw; Laxon, Seymour W.

    2005-01-01

    Winter outflows of Arctic sea ice into the Barents Sea are estimated using a 10-year record of satellite ice motion and thickness. The mean winter volume export through the Svalbard/Franz Josef Land passage is 40 km3, and ranges from -280 km3 to 340 km3. A large outflow in 2003 is preconditioned by an unusually high concentration of thick perennial ice over the Nansen Basin at the end of the 2002 summer. With a deep atmospheric low situated over the eastern Barents Sea in winter, the result is an increased export of Arctic ice. The Oct-Mar ice area flux, at 110 x 10 to the third power km3, is not only unusual in magnitude but also remarkable in that >70% of the area is multiyear ice; the ice volume flux at340 km3 is almost one-fifth of the ice flux through the Fram Strait. Another large outflow of Arctic sea ice through this passage, comparable to that in 2003, is found in 1996. This southward flux of sea ice represents one of two major sources of freshwater in the Barents Sea; the other is the eastward flux of water via the Norwegian Coastal Current. The possible consequences of variable freshwater input on the Barents Sea hydrography and its impact on transformation of Atlantic Water en route to the Arctic Ocean are examined with a 25-year coupled ice-ocean model.

  3. Gerstmann, Sträussler, and Scheinker: the persecution of the men behind the syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Ziller, Matthias Georg; Shevell, Michael

    2014-07-15

    In 1936, Austrian neuroscientists Josef Gerstmann and Ernst Sträussler, along with expatriate Russian neuroscientist Ilya Mark Scheinker, described the familial prion disorder later named for them from a case they mutually treated at a Viennese neurologic hospital. In 1938, Austria was annexed to Nazi Germany in the Anschluss, effectively ending any collaboration between the 3 men. Gerstmann and Scheinker eventually immigrated to America, and Sträussler, although dismissed from his faculty position, remained protected from persecution in Vienna throughout the war likely because of his marriage to an "Aryan woman." Although he attained some degree of success in exile, Gerstmann was never again director of a hospital and primarily maintained a private practice after some brief consulting positions in New York in the 1940s. His medical degree was retroactively stripped by the Nazis without his knowledge, and was not reinstated until 1955. Gerstmann also became embroiled in a bitter struggle to regain his confiscated property in Vienna. Scheinker, aided by the refugee resettlement committee, settled in Cincinnati where he had several successful years and published 3 textbooks, but was denied university tenure and entered private practice until his untimely death. All 3 neurologists lost significant career momentum, and had to pick up the pieces of their fractured lives after the war or their forced exile. Their stories reflect many of the tragic realities of Nazi persecution of Jewish physicians.

  4. The Third Man: Robert Dunn's (1799-1877) Contribution to Aphasia Research in Mid-Nineteenth-Century England.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Marjorie Perlman

    2016-01-01

    Throughout his medical career, Robert Dunn (1799-1877) published a number of clinical cases with postmortem reports involving acquired language disorders, with the first noted in 1842. He developed a physiologically informed approach to psychological function during the 1850s along with a group of notable colleagues Benjamin Collins Brodie, Henry Holland, Thomas Laycock, John Daniel Morell, and Daniel Noble. He was also active in ethnographic research on human origins and racial diversity. As such, Dunn represents an interesting player in the developing fields of neurology, psychology, and anthropology in England in the latter part of the nineteenth century. These various strands converged at the meeting of the British Association of the Advancement of Science in 1868, where Dunn shared the program of lectures on the cutting-edge topic of aphasia with Paul Broca (1824-1880) and John Hughlings Jackson (1835-1911). Dunn's ideas developed over a longer time frame than his younger colleagues and as such represent a unique blending of concepts from the earlier work of Franz Josef Gall (1758-1828) and Jean-Baptiste Bouillaud (1798-1881) to the perspectives on language organization in the brain developed after 1861.

  5. SED Alumni---breeding ground for scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bederson, Benjamin

    2006-04-01

    In 1943 the US Army established the Special Engineering Detachment (SED), in which mostly drafted young soldiers possessing some scientific credentials (though usually quite minimal) were reassigned from other duties to the Manhattan Project to assist in various research and development aspects of nuclear weapons. The Los Alamos contingent, never more than a few hundred GIs, worked with more senior scientists and engineers, often assuming positions of real responsibility. An unintended consequence of this circumstance was the fact that being in the SEDs turned out to be a fortuitous breeding ground for future physicists, chemists, and engineers. SEDs benefited from their close contacts with established scientists, working with them side by side, attended lectures by luminaries, and gained invaluable experience that would help them establish academic and industrial careers later in life. I will discuss some of these individuals (I list only those of whom I am personally aware). These include Henry ``Heinz'' Barschall*, Richard Bellman*-RAND Corporation, Murray Peshkin-ANL, Peter Lax-Courant Institute, NYU, William Spindel*-NRC,NAS, Bernard Waldman- Notre Dame, Richard Davisson*-U of Washington, Arnold Kramish- RAND, UNESCO, Josef Hofmann- Acoustic Research Corp, Val Fitch- Princeton U. *deceased

  6. Adam Politzer-Father of Modern Otology.

    PubMed

    Dhungat, J V Pai; Gore, Geeta

    2015-09-01

    Adam Politzer (1835-1920) was born in Alberti near the city of Budapest in Hungary. He studied medicine at the University of Vienna and obtained his Doctorate degree in 1859. Some of his teachers belonged to the famous second "Vienna School" such as Joseph Skoda, Karl Rokitansky, Von Hebra, Josef Hyrtil, Johann Von Oppolzer and famous physiologist Carl Ludwig -who took special interest in him and was influential in his subsequent career. Politzer showed unusual interest in diseases of the ear and started to work in Carl Ludwig's laboratory. His interest at that time was mainly the physics of the auditory system. He studied the innervations of the intrinsic muscles of the ear There he was the first to demonstrate that the innervations of the tensor tympani muscle was by trigeminal nerve and that of the stapedial muscle was by facial nerve. He studied the air movement in the Eustachian tube and variation of air pressure in the tympanic cavity by connecting two manometers- one placed in the external auditory canal meatus, and another in the pharynx. He showed valve near the opening into the middle ear which controls the process. It is usually closed to keep the bacteria and other things away from the mouth and nose. PMID:27608882

  7. Recent mass changes of glaciers in the Russian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moholdt, Geir; Wouters, Bert; Gardner, Alex S.

    2012-05-01

    Glaciers and ice caps are known to contribute significantly to present-day sea level rise, but there are still glaciated regions where little is known about modern changes in glacier mass. One of these regions is the Russian High Arctic archipelagos which has a total glaciated area of 51,500 km2. We have assessed the glacier mass budget of this region for a 6-year period between October 2003 and October 2009 using independent ICESat laser altimetry and GRACE gravimetry. Over this period we found that the archipelagos have lost ice at a rate of -9.1 ± 2.0 Gt a-1, which corresponds to a sea level contribution of 0.025 mm a-1. Approximately 80% of the ice loss came from Novaya Zemlya with the remaining 20% coming from Franz Josef Land and Severnaya Zemlya. Meteorological records of temperature and precipitation for the period 1980-2009 suggest that the recent climatic mass budget is not substantially different from the longer-term trend.

  8. Ice Mass Changes in the Russian High Arctic from Repeat High Resolution Topography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Michael; Zheng, Whyjay; Pritchard, Matthew; Melkonian, Andrew; Morin, Paul; Porter, Claire; Howat, Ian; Noh, Myoung-Jong; Jeong, Seongsu

    2016-04-01

    We use a combination of ASTER and cartographically derived Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) supplemented with WorldView DEMs, the ArcticDEM and ICESat lidar returns to produce a time-series of ice changes occurring in the Russian High Arctic between the mid-20th century and the present. Glaciers on the western, Barents Sea coast of Novaya Zemlya are in a state of general retreat and thinning, while those on the eastern, Kara Sea coast are retreating at a slower rate. Franz Josef Land has a complicated pattern of thinning and thickening, although almost all the thinning is associated with rapid outlet glaciers feeding ice shelves. Severnaya Zemlya is also thinning in a complicated manner. A very rapid surging glacier is transferring mass into the ocean from the western periphery of the Vavilov Ice Cap on October Revolution Island, while glaciers feeding the former Matusevich Ice Shelf continue to thin at rates that are faster than those observed during the operational period of ICESat, between 2003 and 2009. Passive microwave studies indicate the total number of melt days is increasing in the Russian Arctic, although much of the melt may refreeze within the firn. It is likely that ice dynamic changes will drive mass loss for the immediate future. The sub-marine basins beneath several of the ice caps in the region suggest the possibility that mass loss rates may accelerate in the future.

  9. New data about seismicity and crustal velocity structure of the "continent-ocean" transition zone of the Barents-Kara region in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Alexey N.; Vaganova, Natalya V.; Konechnaya, Yana V.; Asming, Vladimir E.

    2015-01-01

    The recent (2011) installation of seismic station Zemlya Franca-Iocifa (ZFI) on Alexander Island in the Franz Josef Land Archipelago allows new seismic monitoring of the "continent-ocean" transition zone of the Barents-Kara Sea region. The region is seismically active, and we hypothesize that the prevailing geodynamic factor responsible for the occurrence of weak earthquakes is isostatic compensation of avalanche sedimentation in the "continent-ocean" transition zone. The crustal velocity structure beneath ZFI was determined using receiver functions. Crustal thickness is 30 km, based on an observed Moho discontinuity with underlying mantle velocities being Vp = 8.15 km/s and Vs = 4.5 km/s The model indicates a mid-crustal boundary at a depth of about 17 km with a velocity contrast between the upper ( Vp = 6.1 km/s, Vs = 3.6 km/s) and lower ( Vp = 6.8 km/s, Vs = 3.9 km/s) layers. In addition, the upper crustal sedimentary layer is about 4 km thick with Vp = 4.3 km/s and Vs = 2.36 km/s.

  10. The life and work of Geoffrey Tyndale Young.

    PubMed

    Jones, John

    2015-03-01

    Geoffrey Tyndale Young was born in England's Peak District in 1915: his father and both grandfathers were pharmaceutical chemists. He graduated from the Universities of Birmingham and Bristol and was a transatlantic scientific liaison officer in the Second World War, shortly after which he was elected to a Fellowship at Jesus College Oxford. He combined peptide synthesis research, undergraduate teaching, and College administration with leadership in European peptide science and was universally respected for his integrity, wisdom, and unflappable diplomacy. A close friend of Josef Rudinger, he attended almost all of the first two dozen European Peptide Symposia 1958-1996. When he retired in 1982, he was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire and was elected an Emeritus Fellow of Jesus College, of which he had been Acting Principal 1973-1977. In retirement, he was instrumental in setting up this journal and steered the formation of the European Peptide Society, of which he was the first chairman. In 1950, he married Janet Mary Baker, later Baroness Young of Farnworth, Leader of the British House of Lords 1982-1983, who died in 2002: they had three daughters who survive him. He died at home in Oxford on 24 May 2014 aged 98.

  11. Tectonics and hydrocarbon potential of the Barents Megatrough

    SciTech Connect

    Baturin, D.; Vinogradov, A.; Yunov, A. )

    1991-08-01

    Interpretation of geophysical data shows that the geological structure of the Eastern Barents Shelf, named Barents Megatrough (BM), extends sublongitudinally almost from the Baltic shield to the Franz Josef Land archipelago. The earth crust within the axis part of the BM is attenuated up to 28-30 km, whereas in adjacent areas its thickness exceeds 35 km. The depression is filled with of more than 15 km of Upper Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic sediments overlying a folded basement of probable Caledonian age. Paleozoic sediments, with exception of the Upper Permian, are composed mainly of carbonates and evaporites. Mesozoic-Cenozoic sediments are mostly terrigenous. The major force in the development of the BM was due to extensional tectonics. Three rifting phases are recognizable: Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous, Early Triassic, and Jurassic-Early Cretaceous. The principal features of the geologic structure and evolution of the BM during the late Paleozoic-Mesozoic correlate well with those of the Sverdup basin, Canadian Arctic. Significant quantity of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous basaltic dikes and sills were intruded within Triassic sequence during the third rifting phase. This was probably the main reason for trap disruption and hydrocarbon loss from Triassic structures. Lower Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous reservoir sandstones are most probably the main future objects for oil and gas discoveries within the BM. Upper Jurassic black shales are probably the main source rocks of the BM basin, as well as excellent structural traps for hydrocarbon fluids from the underlying sediments.

  12. Rock cooling history using thermoluminescence of natural radiation dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Rabiul; Herman, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    Recently, optical luminescences from quartz and feldspar have been proposed to have great potential in low temperature thermochronology (<100°C). The present study aims to explore thermoluminescence (TL) of feldspar to determine cooling history of rock. The advantage of thermoluminescence over optical luminesce is single TL glow curve has different thermal and athermal stability at different temperature of the glow curve, which can be determined by computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) method and estimation of rate of anomalous fading in the laboratory. The rock samples were collected from Alex Knob of Franz Josef glacier, New Zealand, which is expected to be one of the rapidly exhuming settings in Southern Alps. The natural luminescence levels, which are in the dynamic equilibrium because of competition between growth due to ambient radioactivity and decay due thermal and athermal loss, are determined using multiple aliquot regeneration (MAR) protocol. Multiple thermal signals with wide range of thermal stability, extracted from composite glow curve, particularly low temperature part which is more sensitive to ambient temperature, is promising for better constraint on late stage cooling history.

  13. The tripartite origins of the tonic neck reflex: Gesell, Gerstmann, and Magnus.

    PubMed

    Shevell, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The standard neurologic examination of the newborn and infant includes the elicitation of the tonic neck reflex. Normally present, its persistence is suggestive of neurologic dysfunction and a prognostic marker highly suggestive of an adverse outcome. Working in different fields, with different approaches and largely independently, three leaders of early 20th century neurosciences (Rudolf Magnus, Josef Gerstmann, and Arnold Gesell) elaborated different aspects of this primitive reflex. Magnus provided the first description in an animal model utilizing a meticulously prepared decerebrate cat correctly identifying the reflex's reliance on proprioceptors in the neck and processing in the upper cervical segment. Gerstmann first described its occurrence in the setting of neurologic disease, providing a meticulous written description in an early description of the index case of what would later be eponymously designated Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome. Gesell initially described the reflex's fundamental occurrence in normal young infants, highlighting its adaptive role in early development and its persistence as a hallmark of neurologic pathology. PMID:19255413

  14. The cryptomnesic origins of Jung's dream of the multi-storeyed house.

    PubMed

    Myers, Steve

    2009-09-01

    Jung first recounted his dream of the multi-storeyed house in the 1925 seminars to illustrate the concept of the collective unconscious and explain the influence of phylogeny on his split with Freud. However, his telling the story of the dream belies a cryptomnesic influence of the early writings of psychoanalysis because Josef Breuer used a similar image to illustrate the structure of the psyche which Edouard Claparède associated with a phylogenetic inheritance. When telling the story of the dream, Jung misrepresented Freud's position, creating the impression of there being a bigger difference between their theories than was actually the case, and giving the dream a fictional significance for the breakdown of their relationship. In fact, Jung followed Freud into the fields of mythology and phylogenetics, and their split was due primarily to their different attitudes towards sexuality rather than phylogeny. The dream image has therefore led to a misunderstanding of Freudian theory when viewed from within a Jungian perspective. Freud believed there was a phylogenetic layer in the psyche, though he held a different view to Jung on its nature and importance.

  15. The first aeromagnetic survey in the Arctic: results of the Graf Zeppelin airship flight of 1931

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raspopov, O. M.; Sokolov, S. N.; Demina, I. M.; Pellinen, R.; Petrova, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    In July of 1931, on the eve of International Polar Year II, an Arctic flight of the Graf Zeppelin rigid airship was organized. This flight was a realization of the idea of F. Nansen, who advocated the use of airships for the scientific exploration of the Arctic territories, which were poorly studied and hardly accessible at that time. The route of the airship flight was Berlin - Leningrad - Arkhangelsk - Franz Josef Land - Severnaya Zemlya - the Taimyr Peninsula - Novaya Zemlya - Arkhangelsk - Berlin. One of scientific goals of the expedition was to measure the H and D geomagnetic field components. Actually, the first aeromagnetic survey was carried out in the Arctic during the flight. After the expedition, only preliminary results of the geomagnetic measurements, in which an anomalous behavior of magnetic declination in the high-latitude part of the route was noted, were published. Our paper is concerned with the first aeromagnetic measurements in the Arctic and their analysis based on archival and modern data on the magnetic field in the Barents and Kara sea regions. It is shown that the magnetic field along the flight route had a complicated structure, which was not reflected in the magnetic charts of those times. The flight was very important for future development of aero- and ground-based magnetic surveys in the Arctic, showing new methods in such surveys.

  16. Polymorphic enzymes, urinary bladder cancer risk, and structural change in the local industry.

    PubMed

    Ovsiannikov, Daniel; Selinski, Silvia; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Moormann, Oliver; Haenel, Matthias W; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In the 1990s, an uncommonly high percentage of glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) negative bladder cancer cases (70%) was reported in the greater Dortmund area. The question arose as to whether this uncommonly high percentage of GSTM1 negative bladder cancer cases was due to environmental and/or occupational exposure decades ago. Thus, 15 years later, another study on bladder cancer was performed in the same area after the coal, iron, and steel industries had finally closed in the 1990s. In total 196 bladder cancer patients from the St.-Josefs-Hospital Dortmund-Hörde and 235 controls with benign urological diseases were assessed by questionnaire and genotyped for GSTM1, glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1), and the N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) tag SNP rs1495741. The frequency of the GSTM1 negative genotype was 52% in bladder cancer cases and thus lower compared to a previous study performed from 1992 to 1995 in the same area (70%). NAT2 genotypes were distributed equally among cases and controls (63% slow acetylators). Fewer GSTT1 negative genotypes were present in cases (17%) than in controls (20%).

  17. A neutron track etch detector for electron linear accelerators in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vukovic, Branko; Faj, Dario; Poje, Marina; Varga, Maja; Radolic, Vanja; Miklavcic, Igor; Ivkovic, Ana; Planinic, Josip

    2010-01-01

    Background Electron linear accelerators in medical radiotherapy have replaced cobalt and caesium sources of radiation. However, medical accelerators with photon energies over 10 MeV generate undesired fast neutron contamination in a therapeutic X-ray photon beam. Photons with energies above 10 MeV can interact with the atomic nucleus of a high-Z material, of which the target and the head of an accelerator consist, and lead to the neutron ejection. Results and conclusions. Our neutron dosimeter, composed of the LR-115 track etch detector and boron foil BN-1 converter, was calibrated on thermal neutrons generated in the nuclear reactor of the Josef Stefan Institute (Slovenia), and applied to dosimetry of undesirable neutrons in photon radiotherapy by the linear accelerator 15 MV Siemens Mevatron. Having considered a high dependence of a cross-section between neutron and boron on neutron energy, and broad neutron spectrum in a photon beam, as well as outside the entrance door to maze of the Mevatron, we developed a method for determining the effective neutron detector response. A neutron dose rate in the photon beam was measured to be 1.96 Sv/h. Outside the Mevatron room the neutron dose rate was 0.62 μSv/h. PACS: 87.52. Ga; 87.53.St; 29.40.Wk. PMID:22933893

  18. Magnitude systems in old star catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Tomoko; Yamaoka, Hitoshi

    2005-06-01

    The current system of stellar magnitudes originally introduced by Hipparchus was strictly defined by Norman Pogson in 1856. He based his system on Ptolemy's star catalogue, the Almagest, recorded in about AD137, and defined the magnitude-intensity relationship on a logarithmic scale. Stellar magnitudes observed with the naked eye recorded in seven old star catalogues were analyzed in order to examine the visual magnitude systems. Although psychophysicists have proposed that human visual sensitivity follows a power-law scale, it is shown here that the degree of agreement is far better for a logarithmic scale than for a power-law scale. It is also found that light ratios in each star catalogue are nearly equal to 2.512, if the brightest (1st magnitude) and the faintest (6th magnitude and dimmer) stars are excluded from the study. This means that the visual magnitudes in the old star catalogues agree fully with Pogson's logarithmic scale.

  19. Juvenile onset depression alters cardiac autonomic balance in response to psychological and physical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bylsma, Lauren M.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Rottenberg, Jonathan; Jennings, J. Richard; George, Charles J.; Kiss, Enikő; Kapornai, Krisztina; Halas, Kitti; Dochnal, Roberta; Lefkovics, Eszter; Benák, István; Baji, Ildikó; Vetró, Ágnes; Kovacs, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic balance (CAB) indexes the ratio of parasympathetic to sympathetic activation (Berntson, Norman, Hawkley, & Cacioppo, 2008), and is believed to reflect overall autonomic flexibility in the face of environmental challenges. However, CAB has not been examined in depression. We examined changes in CAB and other physiological variables in 179 youth with a history of juvenile onset depression (JOD) and 161 healthy controls, in response to two psychological (unsolvable puzzle, sad film) and two physical (handgrip, and forehead cold pressor) challenges. In repeated measures analyses, controls showed expected reductions in CAB for both the handgrip and unsolvable puzzle, reflecting a shift to sympathetic relative to parasympathetic activation. By contrast, JOD youth showed increased CAB from baseline for both tasks (ps<.05). No effects were found for the forehead cold pressor or sad film tasks, suggesting that CAB differences may arise under conditions requiring greater attentional control or sustained effort. PMID:26225465

  20. A double-blind placebo controlled trial with oral ambroxol and N-acetylcysteine for mucolytic treatment in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ratjen, F; Wönne, R; Posselt, H G; Stöver, B; Hofmann, D; Bender, S W

    1985-11-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and ambroxol as compared with the effect of placebos was studied in 36 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with mild to moderate pulmonary disease. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three regimens, matched on the basis of age and Chrispin-Norman scores. The trial was conducted over a period of 12 weeks. Patients were assessed clinically and by extensive pulmonary function techniques (body-plethysmography, maximal expiratory flow-volume curves, trapped air determination). Although no clinical differences could be observed between the three groups, significant impairment in the placebo group was found for trapped air and FEV1 when compared to the active groups, suggesting a therapeutic effect of ambroxol and NAC in CF. PMID:3908111

  1. Ambulatory electrocardiology.

    PubMed

    Romero, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    About 50 years ago, Norman Jefferis Holter invented a device that opened the possibility of recording heart activity over long periods of time. This invention, together with the rapid developments in electronics, has enabled a revolutionary change in the diagnosis and management of cardiac diseases. Ambulatory cardiac monitors have decreased in size to the point of becoming wearable or implantable and are able to monitor heart activity for months or even years. In addition, new telecommunication systems allow clinicians to remotely access cardiac events and to respond within a short period of time. Novel advances in computing and algorithm development are expanding the clinical applications of ambulatory devices with more complex automatic interpretation of the electrocardiographic signal. This article reviews the state of the art of these techniques from both clinical and technical approaches, covering a historic perspective up to today, and discusses current applications, challenges, and future directions. PMID:23422020

  2. "I have seen the future": selling the unsustainable city.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Seventy years ago, General Motors’ Highways and Horizons exhibit at the World’s Fair, designed by Norman Bel Geddes and Eero Saarinen, promoted demand for cars and federal highways without any concern for environmental sustainability, the theme of our 2010 conference. The main exhibit included a sequence of four parts (entrance ramps, map lobby, Futurama ride, and “intersection of 1960”) where the viewer’s perception of spatial scale was manipulated. Setha M. Low’s theory of “embodied space” helps decode why movement through these diverse spaces influenced millions of Americans’ views of transportation and urban form, a promotional success yet to be equaled by advocates of environmental sustainability. PMID:22329067

  3. Intercomparison of whole-body averaged SAR in European and Japanese voxel phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter J.; Hirata, Akimasa; Nagaoka, Tomoaki

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides an intercomparison of the HPA male and female models, NORMAN and NAOMI with the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) male and female models, TARO and HANAKO. The calculations of the whole-body SAR in these four phantoms were performed at the HPA, at NICT and at the Nagoya Institute of Technology (NIT). These were for a plane wave with a vertically aligned electric field incident upon the front of the body from 30 MHz to 3 GHz for isolated conditions. As well as investigating the general differences through this frequency range, particular emphasis was placed on the assumptions of how dielectric properties are assigned to tissues (particularly skin and fat) and the consequence of using different algorithms for calculating SAR at the higher frequencies.

  4. STS-42 Pilot Oswald and MS Thagard work with Biorack samples in IML-1 module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 Pilot Stephen S. Oswald (left) and Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commmander (PLC) Norman E. Thagard, positioned in center aisle, handle Biorack samples while working inside the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) module. Oswald is wearing a Los Angeles Dodger baseball cap. Each crewmember wore the cap for a day during the flight to pay tribute to the late astronaut Manley L. (Sonny) Carter, originally assigned to this crew. Carter, an avid Dodger fan and versatile athlete, died in a commuter airline crash in 1991. In the background is the IML-1 spacelab (SL) module forward hatch and SL tunnel. The IML-1 SL module is located in Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB).

  5. Combustion of pulverized coal in vortex structures. Quarterly progress report No. 6, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gollahalli, S.R.

    1995-03-01

    This sixth quarterly report describes the activities and accomplishments of the research team at the University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, related to the project entitled ``Combustion of Pulverized Coal in Vortex Structures`` during the period January 1, 1995 to March 31, 1995. The work performed in this quarter consisted of the following four tasks: (1) design and fabrication of a computer-driven traversing mechanism for traversing LDV transmitter and receiving optics, (2) color schlieren photography, (3) presenting a report in the panel-review meeting in Pittsburgh, (4) installation of additional safety devices in response to the letter of Dr. Sean Plasynski, and (5) streamwise velocity measurement in the isothermal heterogeneous shear layer with nonreacting particles using LDV. In the next quarter, we plan to continue this work with heated shear layers in which particles undergo pyrolysis. Flow visualization and mean velocity field measurement instrumentation will continue as the major experimental techniques.

  6. A search For Artic ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Four atmospheric scientists took off with their instruments for Greenland last week, where they will try to see if depletion of stratospheric ozone in the Arctic can be detected as it has been in Antarctica since 1985.Members of the scientific team include Susan Solomon and George Mount of the Aeronomy Laboratory at the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration (NOAA) in Boulder, Colo., and Ryan Sanders and Roger Jakoubec of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science in Norman, Okla. These four participated in previous National Ozone Expedition (NOZE) investigations at McMurdo Station in Antarctica that helped document the ozone “hole,” decreases of up to 50% in ozone during the early austral spring in September and October of the last 2 years (1986-1987).

  7. Engaging and Supporting Culturally Diverse Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupla, C.; Buxner, S.; Peticolas, L. M.; Mendez, B.; Acevedo, S.; Begay, D.; Higgins, M. L.; Norman, D.

    2013-04-01

    This two hour special workshop was held during the 2012 ASP conference in Tucson. There are a variety of reasons that science education needs to reach out to culturally diverse audiences. Each culture, and each individual community, has its own challenges; each brings special insight to science. What does the research say about engaging these different audiences? How can science educators attract and sustain programs with various cultures? How do the needs of our audiences vary with culture and within communities? Moderators Shupla, Sanlyn, and Peticolas invited a variety of presenters with expertise to share their experiences: Salvador Acevado, David Begay, Michelle Higgins, Bryan Mendez, and Dara Norman. During the first hour, presenters shared a variety of best practices for engaging and supporting culturally diverse audiences; in the second hour, participants and presenters discussed specific programmatic challenges and possible directions.

  8. Particle rings and astrophysical accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Romanova, M. M.

    2016-03-01

    Norman Rostoker had a wide range of interests and significant impact on the plasma physics research at Cornell during the time he was a Cornell professor. His interests ranged from the theory of energetic electron and ion beams and strong particle rings to the related topics of astrophysical accretion discs. We outline some of the topics related to rings and discs including the Rossby wave instability which leads to formation of anticyclonic vortices in astrophysical discs. These vorticies are regions of high pressure and act to trap dust particles which in turn may facilitate planetesimals growth in proto-planetary disks and could be important for planet formation. Analytical methods and global 3D magneto-hydrodynamic simulations have led to rapid advances in our understanding of discs in recent years.

  9. A new species of Cephalodasys (Gastrotricha, Macrodasyida) from the Caribbean Sea with a determination key to species of the genus.

    PubMed

    Kieneke, Alexander; Schmidt-Rhaesa, Andreas; Hochberg, Rick

    2015-01-01

    A new marine gastrotrich species of the genus Cephalodasys is described from shallow sublittoral coralline sand sampled between Lee Stocking Island and Norman's Pond Cay (Exuma Cays), Bahamas. Cephalodasys interinsularis n. sp. reaches a body length of 471 µm and is characterized by a new combination of characters including six total anterior adhesive tubes and five pairs of ventrolateral adhesive tubes. The new species is morphologically similar to C. swedmarki but can be distinguished by the different number of anterior adhesive tubes, the spatial arrangement of the ventrolateral adhesive tubes, and a shorter pharynx. We provide an updated diagnosis of the genus and a determination key to all known species of Cephalodasys. C. interinsularis n. sp. is the third known species of Cephalodasys from the Caribbean marine province. PMID:25947742

  10. Water resources of the Wild Rice River watershed, northwestern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, Thomas C.; Bidwell, L.E.; Maclay, Robert W.

    1970-01-01

    The area of the watershed is about 2,600 square miles and includes most of Mahnomen and Norman Counties and parts of Becker, Clay, Clearwater, and Polk Counties. The population of the area is about 37,000 people of which about 70 percent live on farms. The economy is based principally on farming. The area of lake clay and silt is used mostly for raising sugar beets and wheat; and potatoes are grown largely on the sandy soils. In the western part of the morainal area small grain, dairy, and cattle farming is the most common. The eastern part of the morainal area is important for forest products and recreation. Industries in the area are small and are based on agricultural processing and service.

  11. Misconceptions about astronomical magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Eric; Cox, Caroline V.

    1997-10-01

    The present system of astronomical magnitudes was created as an inverse scale by Claudius Ptolemy in about 140 A.D. and was defined to be logarithmic in 1856 by Norman Pogson, who believed that human eyes respond logarithmically to the intensity of light. Although scientists have known for some time that the response is instead a power law, astronomers continue to use the Pogson magnitude scale. The peculiarities of this system make it easy for students to develop numerous misconceptions about how and why to use magnitudes. We present a useful exercise in the use of magnitudes to derive a cosmologically interesting quantity (the mass-to-light ratio for spiral galaxies), with potential pitfalls pointed out and explained.

  12. NASA B-57B severe storms flight program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, W. D.; Camp, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    The B-57B Severe Storms Flight Program gathers data to characterize atmosphere anomalies such as wind shear, turbulence, and microbursts at altitudes up to 1000 feet (300 meters). These data are used to enhance the knowledge of atmospheric processes, to improve aviation safety, to develop systems technology and piloting technique for avoiding hazards and to increase the understanding of the causes of related aircraft accidents. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility B-57B aircraft has participated in several severe storms data collection programs such as the Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) located in Denver, Colorado area, Operation Rough Rider located in the Norman, Oklahoma area with the National Severe Storms Laboratory, and Mountain and desert turbulence in the Edwards Air Force Base, California area. Flight data are presented from flights which encountered the wind shear, turbulence and microburst anomalies. These flight results are discussed and some conclusions are made relating to these atmospheric anomalies.

  13. Thunderstorm Overflight Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, O. H., Jr.; Vonnegut, B.; Orville, R.; Brook, M.; Tennis, R.; Rhodes, C.; Rust, D.

    1980-01-01

    The Thunderstorm Overflight Program is being conducted by NASA, NOAA, and universities to evaluate the feasibility of making meaningful measurements of lightning parameters from an orbiting platform above thunderstorms. A NASA instrumented U-2 high-altitude research aircraft was used during the summer of 1979 and spring of 1980 to collect data over the tops of the thunderstorms while ground-based measurements were being made simultaneously. Test sites at Langmuir Laboratory, Socorro, N. Mex., and the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Okla. were used for this program. Additional flights are planned for the spring and summer of 1981. Data from the NASA U-2 flights will also be used to interpret measurements made during the Nighttime/Daytime Optical Survey Lightning Experiment to be flown on the Space Shuttle in late 1981.

  14. A double-blind placebo controlled trial with oral ambroxol and N-acetylcysteine for mucolytic treatment in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ratjen, F; Wönne, R; Posselt, H G; Stöver, B; Hofmann, D; Bender, S W

    1985-11-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and ambroxol as compared with the effect of placebos was studied in 36 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with mild to moderate pulmonary disease. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three regimens, matched on the basis of age and Chrispin-Norman scores. The trial was conducted over a period of 12 weeks. Patients were assessed clinically and by extensive pulmonary function techniques (body-plethysmography, maximal expiratory flow-volume curves, trapped air determination). Although no clinical differences could be observed between the three groups, significant impairment in the placebo group was found for trapped air and FEV1 when compared to the active groups, suggesting a therapeutic effect of ambroxol and NAC in CF.

  15. Gold Medal Award for life achievement in the science of psychology.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2012 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology is Philip G. Zimbardo. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 120th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 3, 2012, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2012 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; Charles L. Brewer, vice president/secretary; Gerald Koocher, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; Brian N. Baird; David H. Barlow; Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Connie Chan; William Howell; Anthony Jackson; Ronald F. Levant; Aurelio Prifitera; Sandra Shullman; Archie L. Turner; and Kurt Geisinger, APA Board of Directors liaison.

  16. Kosmische Katastrophen und der Ursprung der Religion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, F.

    This book is a German translation, by V. Delavre, from the English original "The origin of the Universe and the origin of religion", published in 1993. Contents: E. Sens: Die unterbrochene Musikstunde. Einleitung zur deutschen Ausgabe. C. Ryskamp: Einführung. R. N. Anshen: Vorwort. F. Hoyle: Kosmische Katastrophen und der Ursprung der Religion - Die Folgen der Respektabilität; Eiszeiten und Kometen; Die allgemeine Situation in den Nacheiszeiten; Kometen und der Ursprung der Religionen; Der Übergang zu Mittelalter und Neuzeit. Diskussionsbeiträge: Ruth Nanda Anshen, Freeman Dyson, Paul Oscar Kristeller, John Archibald Wheeler, James Schwartz, Roger Shinn, Milton Gatch, Philip Solomon, Norman Newell. F. Hoyle: Schlußwort. A. Tollmann: Nachwort zur deutschen Ausgabe.

  17. When the going gets tough the beautiful get going: aesthetic appeal facilitates task performance.

    PubMed

    Reppa, Irene; McDougall, Siné

    2015-10-01

    The current studies examined the effect of aesthetic appeal on performance. According to one hypothesis, appeal would lead to overall decrements or enhancements in performance [e.g. Sonderegger & Sauer, (Applied Ergonomics, 41, 403-410, 2010)]. Alternatively, appeal might influence performance only in problem situations, such as when the task is difficult [e.g. Norman, (2004)]. The predictions of these hypotheses were examined in the context of an icon search-and-localisation task. Icons were used because they are well-defined stimuli and pervasive to modern everyday life. When search was made difficult using visually complex stimuli (Experiment 1), or abstract and unfamiliar stimuli (Experiment 2), icons that were appealing were found more quickly than their unappealing counterparts. These findings show that in a low-level visual processing task, with demand characteristics related to appeal eliminated, appeal can influence performance, especially under duress.

  18. STS-30 Mission Insignia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The STS-30 patch depicts the joining of NASA's manned and unmanned space programs. The sun and inner planets of our solar system are shown with the curve connecting Earth and Venus symbolizing the shuttle orbit, the spacecraft trajectory toward Venus, and its subsequent orbit around our sister planet. A Spanish caravel similar to the ship on the official Magellan program logo commemorates the 16th century explorer's journey and his legacy of adventure and discovery. Seven stars on the patch honor the crew of Challenger. The five-star cluster in the shape of the constellation Cassiopeia represent the five STS-30 crewmembers - Astronauts David Walker, Ronald Grabe, Norman Thagard, Mary Cleave and Mark Lee - who collectively designed the patch.

  19. Resource allocation in health care and the role of personal autonomy.

    PubMed

    Gandjour, A

    2015-03-01

    Resource allocation decisions in health care require the consideration of ethical values. Major ethical theories include Amartya Sen's capability approach, Norman Daniels's theory of justice for health, and preference utilitarian theory. This paper argues that while only preference utilitarian theory explicitly considers the impact of an individual's actions on others, all 3 theories agree in terms of providing individual autonomy. Furthermore, it shows that all 3 theories emphasise the role of informed preferences in securing individual autonomy. Still, stressing personal autonomy has limited direct implications for priority setting. 2 priority rules for resource allocation could be identified: 1) to give priority to patients with mental disability (over those with pure physical disability); and 2) to give priority to patients with a large expected loss of autonomy without treatment. PMID:25321862

  20. Aerial optimization and canopy penetration study of Dibrom 14 Concentrate.

    PubMed

    Brown, James R; Reynolds, W H; Palmisano, C; Taylor, V

    2005-03-01

    This document describes the results of collaborative trials between St. Tammany Parish Mosquito Control, ADAPCO, Inc., and the Navy Disease Vector Ecology and Control Center, Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, FL. These tests provide data on the aerial optimization testing of Dibrom 14 Concentrate adulticide. During the week of June 17, 2002, 1 canopy penetration and 3 optimization studies were conducted in St. Tammany Parish, LA, using a Britton Norman twin turbine Islander equipped with 10-800067 flat fan nozzles. Dibrom 14 Concentrate (AMVAC Chemical Corp., Los Angeles, CA) was applied at 3.12 liter per min from a release height of 60.96 m above ground level (agl) at 140 kts indicated airspeed. This resulted in an application rate of 0.65 oz/acre. PMID:15825773

  1. Travelling Scientist, Circulating Images and the Making of the Modern Scientific Journal.

    PubMed

    Bigg, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    The early astrophysicist Norman Lockyer was both editor of the journal Nature from its creation in 1869 and for the following five decades, and an early practioner of the new astronomy. He frequently used the journal to expound his scientific theories, report on his work and send news home while on expeditions. I look into the particular visual culture of astrophysics developed by Lockyer in Nature, its evolution at a time of rapid development both of the techniques of astrophysical observation and visualization and of the techniques of image reproduction in print. A study of the use and reuse of visual materials in different settings also makes it possible to sketch the circulating economy of Lockyer's images and the ways in which he put himself forward as a scientist, at a time when he was advocating the State support of research and scientists and helping create the modern scientific journal.

  2. High energy photon emission from wakefields and its signatures in astrophysical Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinella, Deano; Zhang, Xiaomei; Lau, Calvin; Taimourzadeh, Sam; Hwang, Yoonwoo; Koga, James; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Tajima, Toshiki

    2015-11-01

    Episodic eruptions of accretion disks of AGNs (and Blazars) due to the Magneto-Rotational-Instability are related to the excitation of intense Alfven waves and their subsequently mode converted EM pulses. These intense pulses are related to the emission of bursts of gamma rays and extreme high energy cosmic ray (EHECR) genesis in AGN and Blazars. Wakefield acceleration and pondermotive acceleration of electrons give rise to gamma ray emissions of the above through synchrotron radiation which can undergo inverse-compton scattering to attain high x-ray energies. We study additional emissions of gamma rays by the betatron oscillations and QED radiative processes in the intense accelerating fields. Supported by the Norman Rostoker Fund.

  3. Modern Methods for Interrogating the Human Connectome

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Mark J.; Sakaie, Ken E.; Beall, Erik B.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Bridwell, David A.; Rubinov, Mikail; Rao, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Connectionist theories of brain function took hold with the seminal contributions of Norman Geschwind a half century ago. Modern neuroimaging techniques have expanded the scientific interest in the study of brain connectivity to include the intact as well as disordered brain. Method In this review, we describe the most common techniques used to measure functional and structural connectivity, including resting state functional MRI, diffusion MRI, and electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography coherence. We also review the most common analytical approaches used for examining brain interconnectivity associated with these various imaging methods. Results This review presents a critical analysis of the assumptions, as well as methodological limitations, of each imaging and analysis approach. Conclusions The overall goal of this review is to provide the reader with an introduction to evaluating the scientific methods underlying investigations that probe the human connectome. PMID:26888611

  4. [The necessary frugality of the elderly].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carlos Dimas Martins; Schramm, Fermin Roland

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to reflect on the pertinence and moral legitimacy of basing the allocation of public resources for health on the age variable, considered from the perspective of the theory of "justice as equity" as formulated by John Rawls. After characterizing the problem of public resource allocation for health -- confronted with the challenge posed by population aging -- and briefly presenting the concept of equity adopted in this study, as well as discussing the approach by Norman Daniels and Daniel Callahan to resource allocation among different age groups, we conclude that basing resource allocation on the age variable may be considered ethically adequate if we conceive the individual's life as a limited cycle of existence formed by different stages (childhood, adolescence, maturity, old age, and death), during which the needs vary, such that the distribution of resources among different age groups should be based on an ethics of protection.

  5. Private virtues, public detriment: allocating scarce medical resources to the elderly.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Larry R

    1989-10-01

    Churchill reviews Norman Daniels' Am I My Parents' Keeper (Oxford University Press; 1988) and Daniel Callahan's Setting Limits (Simon & Schuster; 1987). Both books present their authors' reflections on one of the most pressing problems of social ethics, how to allocate health care resources to the elderly in a climate of scarcity. Churchill first analyzes Daniels' response to the problem, the "prudential lifespan account," by which health care rights might give persons legitimate claims to services at one stage of their lives but not at another. This approach is contrasted with Callahan's "return to virtue" argument, which rests upon two major claims, one about the appropriate ends of medicine and the other about the meaning of old age. Churchill discusses both works within the context of the problematic relation in the United States between private and public goods, and between individual and social well-being. PMID:11659151

  6. Sedimentary basin geochemistry and fluid/rock interactions workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    Fundamental research related to organic geochemistry, fluid-rock interactions, and the processes by which fluids migrate through basins has long been a part of the U.S. Department of Energy Geosciences program. Objectives of this program were to emphasize those principles and processes which would be applicable to a wide range of problems associated with petroleum discovery, occurrence and extraction, waste disposal of all kinds, and environmental management. To gain a better understanding of the progress being made in understanding basinal fluids, their geochemistry and movement, and related research, and to enhance communication and interaction between principal investigators and DOE and other Federal program managers interested in this topic, this workshop was organized by the School of Geology and Geophysics and held in Norman, Oklahoma in November, 1991.

  7. Duke Power Company's development of a biofouling monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Derwort, J.E.; Gnilka, A. )

    1991-11-01

    Biofouling programs at Duke Power Company (DPC) can be traced to the invasion of the Catawba River system by Corbicula in 1968. Raw water systems at Plant Allen, a coal-fired station on Lake Wylie, became heavily infested by clams during the 1970s. Development of programs was accelerated as a result of the shutdown of Catawba nuclear station (CNS) on lake Wylie in 1986 due to clam infestations in safety-related systems, increased biofouling problems at McGuire nuclear station (MNS) on lake Norman, and by the issuance of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Generic Letter (GL) 89-13 (issued in 1989). Historical data were reviewed to identify pertinent questions, and a refined, multifaceted Corbicula monitoring plan was developed. This plan was implemented at CNS and MNS in 1989.

  8. The Foundations of a Human Right to Health: Human Rights and Bioethics in Dialogue.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Audrey

    2015-06-11

    Human rights, including the right to health, are grounded in protecting and promoting human dignity. Although commitment to human dignity is a widely shared value, the precise meaning and requirements behind the term are elusive. It is also unclear as to how a commitment to human dignity translates into specific human rights, such as the right to the highest attainable standard of health, and delineates their scope and obligations. The resulting lack of clarity about the foundations of and justification for the right to health has been problematic in a number of ways. This article identifies the strengths of and some of the issues with the grounding of the right to health in human dignity. It then examines ethical and philosophical expositions of human dignity and several alternative foundations proposed for the right to health, including capability theory and the work of Norman Daniels, to assess whether any offer a richer and more adequate conceptual grounding for the right to health.

  9. NOSS science working group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The members of the NOSS Science Working Group are John Apel, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratories/NOAA; Tim Barnett, Scripps Institution of Oceanography; Francis Bretherton (chairman), National Center for Atmospheric Research; Otis Brown, University of Miami; Joost Businger, University of Washington; Garrett Campbell, NCAR; Mark Cane, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Robert Edwards, National Marine Fisheries Service/NOAA; James Mueller, Naval Postgraduate School; Peter Niiler, Oregon State University; James J. O'Brien, Florida State University; Norman Phillips, National Meteorological Center/NOAA; Owen Phillips, The Johns Hopkins University; Stephen Piacsek, NSTL Station, NORDA; Trevor Platt, Bedford Institute of Oceanography; Stephen Pond, University of British Columbia; Stanley Ruttenberg (executive secretary), NCAR; William Schmitz, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Jerry Schubel, State University of New York; Robert Stewart, Scripps; Norbert Untersteiner, NOAA; and Alan Weinstein, Naval Environmental Prediction Research Facility.

  10. Rawlsian Justice and Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Knight, Carl; Albertsen, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Palliative care serves both as an integrated part of treatment and as a last effort to care for those we cannot cure. The extent to which palliative care should be provided and our reasons for doing so have been curiously overlooked in the debate about distributive justice in health and healthcare. We argue that one prominent approach, the Rawlsian approach developed by Norman Daniels, is unable to provide such reasons and such care. This is because of a central feature in Daniels' account, namely that care should be provided to restore people's opportunities. Daniels' view is both unable to provide pain relief to those who need it as a supplement to treatment and, without justice-based reasons to provide palliative care to those whose opportunities cannot be restored. We conclude that this makes Daniels' framework much less attractive.

  11. Landsat 6 images to provide more remote sensing muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Koger, D.G.

    1993-02-01

    This paper reports that with the launch planned for third quarter 1993 of Landsat 6, the newest civilian use imaging satellite, oil and gas explorationists will have been using satellite images for 20 years. The economic benefits of remote sensing photogeology will get yet another boost as data from the enhanced thematic mapper become available almost immediately from a new ground station in Norman, Okla. Photogeology is the practice of examining photography of the earth to identify surface expressions of geologic features at depth. Scanners (fax machines and video cameras are common scanners) aboard satellites collect high-tech surface mapping data. Scanners capture more light and do so with greater discrimination than film.

  12. OBSERVING TODDLERS' INDIVIDUAL EXPERIENCES IN CLASSROOMS: INITIAL USE OF THE PARENTING INTERACTIONS WITH CHILDREN: CHECKLIST OF OBSERVATIONS LINKED TO OUTCOMES.

    PubMed

    Lippard, Christine N; Riley, Katie L; Hughes-Belding, Kere

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated using the Parenting Interactions with Children: Checklist of Observations Linked to Outcomes (PICCOLO; Roggman, Cook, Innocenti, Norman, & Christiansen, 2013a) measure to assess teacher-child interactions experienced by individual toddlers within their childcare classrooms. Forty toddlers were observed, each during three 10-min cycles, and all their interactions with adults in the classroom were coded using the PICCOLO. Results, in terms of psychometric properties, indicate promise for using this measure to observe toddlers' individual experiences of teacher-child interactions in group settings. Furthermore, certain individual teacher-toddler interactions were associated with toddlers' problem behavior. Implications for use of the PICCOLO in early childhood classroom research and particular findings related to toddlers' behavior are discussed.

  13. OBSERVING TODDLERS' INDIVIDUAL EXPERIENCES IN CLASSROOMS: INITIAL USE OF THE PARENTING INTERACTIONS WITH CHILDREN: CHECKLIST OF OBSERVATIONS LINKED TO OUTCOMES.

    PubMed

    Lippard, Christine N; Riley, Katie L; Hughes-Belding, Kere

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated using the Parenting Interactions with Children: Checklist of Observations Linked to Outcomes (PICCOLO; Roggman, Cook, Innocenti, Norman, & Christiansen, 2013a) measure to assess teacher-child interactions experienced by individual toddlers within their childcare classrooms. Forty toddlers were observed, each during three 10-min cycles, and all their interactions with adults in the classroom were coded using the PICCOLO. Results, in terms of psychometric properties, indicate promise for using this measure to observe toddlers' individual experiences of teacher-child interactions in group settings. Furthermore, certain individual teacher-toddler interactions were associated with toddlers' problem behavior. Implications for use of the PICCOLO in early childhood classroom research and particular findings related to toddlers' behavior are discussed. PMID:27554914

  14. Gold Medal Award for life achievement in the application of psychology.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2012 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology is Marsha Linehan. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 120th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 3, 2012, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2012 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; Charles L. Brewer, vice president/secretary; Gerald Koocher, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; Brian N. Baird; David H. Barlow; Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Connie Chan; William Howell; Anthony Jackson; Ronald F. Levant; Aurelio Prifitera; Sandra Shullman; Archie L. Turner; and Kurt Geisinger, APA Board of Directors liaison.

  15. Gold Medal Award for life achievement in the practice of psychology.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2012 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology is Carol D. Goodheart. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 120th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 3, 2012, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2012 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; Charles L. Brewer, vice president/secretary; Gerald Koocher, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; Brian N. Baird; David H. Barlow; Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Connie Chan; William Howell; Anthony Jackson; Ronald F. Levant; Aurelio Prifitera; Sandra Shullman; Archie L. Turner; and Kurt Geisinger, APA Board of Directors' liaison.

  16. Gold medal award for life achievement in the application of psychology.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2009 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology is Stuart Oskamp. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 117th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 7, 2009, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2009 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; William Howell, vice president/secretary; Archie L. Turner, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; David H. Barlow; Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Charles L. Brewer; Anthony Jackson; Steven E. James; Ronald F. Levant; Gerald Koocher; Sandra Shullman; and Rosie Phillips Bingham, APA Board of Directors liaison.

  17. Gold medal award for life achievement in the science of psychology.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2009 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology is Mary K. Rothbart. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 117th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 7, 2009, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2009 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; William Howell, vice president/secretary; Archie L. Turner, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; David H. Barlow; Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Charles L. Brewer; Anthony Jackson; Steven E. James; Ronald F. Levant; Gerald Koocher; Sandra Shullman; and Rosie Phillips Bingham, APA Board of Directors liaison.

  18. Gold medal award for life achievement in psychology in the public interest: Bernice Lott.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest is Bernice Lott. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 119th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2011, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2011 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; William Howell, vice president/secretary; Gerald Koocher, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; David H. Barlow, Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Charles L. Brewer; Connie Chan; Anthony Jackson; Ronald F. Levant; Sandra Shullman; Archie L. Turner; and Kurt Geisinger, APA Board of Directors liaison.

  19. Charles L. Brewer award for distinguished teaching of psychology.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2009 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is William Buskist. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Teaching Award at the 117th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 7, 2009, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2009 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; William Howell, vice president/secretary; Archie L. Turner, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; David H. Barlow; Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Charles L. Brewer; Anthony Jackson; Steven E. James; Ronald F. Levant; Gerald Koocher; Sandra Shullman; and Rosie Phillips Bingham, APA Board of Directors liaison.

  20. Gold medal award for life achievement in the science of psychology: Marcia K. Johnson.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology is Marcia K. Johnson. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 119th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2011, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2011 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; William Howell, vice president/secretary; Gerald Koocher, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; David H. Barlow, Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Charles L. Brewer; Connie Chan; Anthony Jackson; Ronald F. Levant; Sandra Shullman; Archie L. Turner; and Kurt Geisinger, APA Board of Directors liaison.