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Sample records for joseph lounana tnis

  1. Joseph Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1920-01-01

    Dr. Joseph Sweetman Ames at his desk at the NACA headquarters. Dr. Ames was a founding member of NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics), appointed by President Woodrow Wilson in 1915. Ames took on NACA's most challenging assignments but mostly represented physics. He chaired the Foreign Service Committee of the newly-founded National Research Council, oversaw the NACA's patent cross-licensing plan that allowed manufacturers to share technologies. Ames expected the NACA to encourage engineering education. He pressed universities to train more aerodynamicists, then structured NACA to give young engineers on-the-job training. Ames gave the NACA a focused vision that was research-based and decided that aerodynamics was the most important field of endeavor. He championed the work of theorists like Max Munk. The world class wind tunnels at Langley Aeronautical laboratory reflected his vision as well as the faith Congress put in him. Ames became chairman of the NACA main committee in 1927. Two years later he accepted the Collier Trophy on behalf on the NACA. He kept the NACA alive when Herbert Hoover tried to eliminate it and transfer its duties to industry. Ames accepted a nomination by Air Minister Hermann Goring to the Deutsche Akademie der Luftfartforschung. Ames then considered it an honor, many Americans did, and was surprised to learn about the massive Nazi investment in aeronautical infrastructure, then six times larger than the NACA. Ames urged the funding for a second laboratory and expansion of the NACA facilities to prepare for war. A stroke in May 1936 paralyzed the right side of his body. He immediately resigned as chairman of the NACA executive committee and in October 1937 he resigned from the NACA main committee. On June 8, 1944 the NACA officially dedicated its new laboratory in Sunnyvale California to Joseph S. Ames. Ames died in 1943, having never stepped foot in the new laboratory that bears his name; the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory

  2. Instructor Interviews Joseph Featherstone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1987

    1987-01-01

    An interview with Joseph Featherstone, a teacher at Michigan State University, reveals his attitudes regarding good teaching. Good teaching is a victory over meaninglessness, giving children the chance to hope and to have faith in their future. (CB)

  3. Joseph Conrad: International Narrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, George

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the contribution made by Joseph Conrad's fictional writing to our understanding of cultural awareness. Never comfortable with his adopted English culture, Conrad used his experiences in different parts of the world during his career in the merchant navy to explore in his writing aspects of cultural dissonance and cultural…

  4. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2003-03-01

    This paper gives a short account of some key elements in the life of Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768-1830), specifically his relation to Napoleon Bonaparte. The mathematical approach to Fourier series and the original scepticism by French mathematicians are briefly illustrated.

  5. Joseph Conrad: International Narrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, George

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the contribution made by Joseph Conrad's fictional writing to our understanding of cultural awareness. Never comfortable with his adopted English culture, Conrad used his experiences in different parts of the world during his career in the merchant navy to explore in his writing aspects of cultural dissonance and cultural…

  6. Joseph Lister's first operation

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Ruth; Rhodes, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Joseph Lister was still a medical student in 1851 when he served as house surgeon at University College Hospital, London, under John Erichsen. Here we report the first major operation that Lister accomplished, hitherto apparently missed by biographers. We chart his exemplary dealings with an emergency case of eviscerating stab wound in a woman brought to casualty at night, when he had been in post for less than a month. The case demonstrates Lister's fundamental competence at an early stage in his training. We outline the context of debate and controversy over the repair of lacerated gut at the time, and argue that Lister's period at University College London was profoundly formative.

  7. Joseph Priestley's Legacy in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMeekin, Dorothy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the life and work of Joseph Priestley, a scientist of the late eighteenth century who was famous for his work in both Europe and America. Includes a description of the Joseph Priestley house, a museum containing some of his scientific equipment and exhibitions relating to his work. (MM)

  8. Joseph Conrad's "Lord Jim": Reconsiderations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Haj, Ali Albashir Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims at reconsidering critically Joseph Conrad's "Lord Jim." Joseph Conrad is a great master of English prose who writes normally of the sea, of the Eastern islands, of the English character as seen against a background of the exotic or faced with difficulties. The power of Conrad's feelings for Jim, as well as the…

  9. Joseph Priestley's Legacy in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMeekin, Dorothy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the life and work of Joseph Priestley, a scientist of the late eighteenth century who was famous for his work in both Europe and America. Includes a description of the Joseph Priestley house, a museum containing some of his scientific equipment and exhibitions relating to his work. (MM)

  10. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE FIRST BANK OF JOSEPH, LOCATED BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE FIRST BANK OF JOSEPH, LOCATED BETWEEN JOSEPH AND SECOND AVENUE ON MAIN STREET. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Joseph Main Street, Between Joseph & Second Avenues, Joseph, Wallowa County, OR

  11. Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Sudarsky, L; Coutinho, P

    1995-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is a form of dominantly-inherited ataxia originally described in people of Azorean and Portuguese descent. The disorder has subsequently been identified in Japan, Brazil, Australia, and China. Average age of onset is 35 to 40. Core features include progressive ataxia, dysarthria, postural instability, nystagmus, eyelid retraction, and facial fasciculations. Dystonia is often prominent in younger patients. Three distinct phenotypes appear to reflect the clinical spectrum of a single mutant gene. Neuropathology involves afferent and efferent cerebellar systems, with preservation of cerebellar cortex and inferior olive. Spinocerebellar pathways, substantia nigra, and cranial nerve motor nuclei are involved. The disorder is due to an unstable CAG repeat on chromosome 14q32.1. A dominantly inherited ataxia (SCA-3) in families of French and German descent has also been linked to this segment of chromosome 14. The relationship between MJD and the other dominant inherited ataxias is discussed.

  12. Joseph Henry and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenberg, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Joseph Henry (1797-1878) is best known for his work in electromagnetism and as the first secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. But he was also a pioneer solar physicist, an early advocate of US participation in astrophysics, and a facilitator of international cooperation in astronomy. This paper will briefly trace his role in the development of the US astronomical community from the time he taught astronomy at Princeton in the 1830s through his death, focusing on failed efforts to persuade US astronomers and patrons of astronomy that the best path for US astronomy should be astrophysics. He thought that the US could make a more significant contribution to astronomy science by striking out on a less travelled path rather than competing with the established European observatories.

  13. Joseph (Joe) A. Walker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    In March 1945 Joseph A. Walker joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory, Cleveland, Ohio, (later NASA's Lewis Research Center, now the Glenn Research Center) as a physicist. He transferred to the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California in 1951, as a research pilot. For the next fifteen years Walker served as a pilot at the Edwards flight research facility (today known as NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center) on such projects as the Bell X-1#2 (2 flights, first on August 27, 1951), Bell X-1A (1 flight on July 20, 1955), X-1E (21 flights, first on December 12, 1955), Douglas D-558-I #3 Skystreak (14 flights, first on June 29, 1951), Douglas D-558-II #2 Skyrocket (3 flights, first on April 29, 1955), Douglas D-558-II #3 Skyrocket (2 flights, first on May 7, 1954). On the Douglas X-3, Joe was project pilot and made all 20 flights, the first on August 1, 1954. Joe considered this aircraft the 'worst' plane he ever flew. He flew the Northrup X-4 (2 flights, first on October 18, 1951), Bell X-5 (78 flights, first on January 9, 1952). He also flew programs involving the F-100, F-101, F-102, F-104 and the B-47. Walker made the first NASA flight on the North American X-15 on March 25, 1960. His 25th and final X-15 flight on August 22, 1963, reached 354,200 feet, an unofficial record altitude of almost 67 miles. On October 30, 1964, Walker took the first Bell Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) on its maiden flight, reaching a peak altitude of 10 feet and a free flight time of just under one minute. Two LLRV's and three Lunar Landing Training Vehicles developed from them were used to develop piloting and operational techniques for lunar landings. In November, he left the program after 35 flights on the first LLRV. Walker flew chase flights as well as research flights. On June 8, 1966 he was flying chase in NASA's F-104N for the Air Force's experimental bomber, North American XB-70A, when he was fatally

  14. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE FIRST BANK OF JOSEPH, LOCATED AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE FIRST BANK OF JOSEPH, LOCATED AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECOND AND MAIN, VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Joseph Main Street, Between Joseph & Second Avenues, Joseph, Wallowa County, OR

  15. ASK Talks With Joseph Rothenberg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenberg, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Recently retired NASA administrator Joseph Rothenberg reflects on project management during the Apollo era at the start of his career, as well as the history of, and changes in, project management over his years at NASA. He concludes by describing what he sees as NASA's most important needs in the near future.

  16. Where was Joseph Babinski born?

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio A G; Munhoz, Renato P; de Souza, Leonardo Cruz

    2011-01-01

    There is controversy in the neurological literature about where Joseph Babinski was born, including a myth propounded by various important authors that he was born in Lima, Peru. However, according to the most consistent biographical data, he was in fact born in Paris, France, and became a medical celebrity there and in Poland as well as around the world.

  17. A conversation with Joseph Lau.

    PubMed

    Lau, Joseph; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Ingerick, Meghan

    2015-03-01

    Dr. Joseph Lau is a world-leading expert in meta-analysis and systematic reviews. Currently a professor in the Department of Health Services, Policy and Practice and co-director of the Center for Evidence-based Medicine at Brown University, Professor Lau has applied evidence-based methods to a variety of clinical, biomedical and healthcare topics; has developed reliable and efficient methods and tools to conduct systematic reviews and meta-analyses; and has advanced an understanding on the impact of factors that may contribute to differences of results in scientific studies. His past research includes cumulative meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, comparison of results from large trials and meta-analyses of small trials, effect of baseline risk in the interpretation of clinical trial results, and empirical evaluation of existing methods of combining data. His current focus is on a Web-based repository of systematic review data, reviews of diagnostic tests, nutrition, clinical practice guidelines, and dissemination of evidence-based methods to varied health-care disciplines. This report is a conversation from an adapted version of an interview, more or less chronologically arranged, between Joseph C. Cappelleri as interviewer and Joseph Lau as interviewee, with Meghan Ingerick recording and transcribing the interview.

  18. Joseph Priestley and the Psychology of Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Michael G.

    Joseph Priestley, in his "A Course of Lectures on Oratory and Criticism," developed a psychological theory of style. The "Course" covers three main topics: traditional rhetorical arts of invention, arrangement, and style. Borrowing from the ideas of David Hartley, the association psychologist; Joseph Addison, the aesthetician;…

  19. Joseph Maxwell on mediumistic personifications.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Carlos S

    2016-09-01

    The study of mediumship received much impetus from the work of psychical researchers. This included ideas about the phenomena of personation, or changes in attitudes, dispositions and behaviours shown by some mediums that supposedly indicated discarnate action. The aim of this Classic Text is to reprint passages about this topic from the writings of French psychical researcher Joseph Maxwell (1858-1938), which were part of the contributions of some psychical researchers to reconceptualize the manifestations in psychological terms. Maxwell suggested these changes in mediums were a production of their subconscious mind. His ideas are a reflection of previous theorization about secondary personalities and a particular example of the contributions of psychical researchers to understand the psychology of mediumship.

  20. Joseph Priestley: Docter Phlogiston or Reverend Oxygen?

    PubMed

    Fara, Patricia

    2010-09-01

    In propaganda material, people are often presented in black-and-white terms as either a villain or a hero. Although Joseph Priestley is denigrated for believing in the discredited substance phlogiston, he is also celebrated for discovering oxygen.

  1. Joseph Mayer and Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    In the January 1937 issue of the Journal of Chemical Physics (Volume 5) there appeared a paper by Joseph Mayer which was the first of a series of articles. It produced great and immediate impact. The title was "The Statistical Mechanics of Condensing Systems. I," the abstract of this paper is given below: It is shown that for a system composed of N identical molecules with mutual potential energy, the assumption that the total potential energy can be expressed as the sum of that between pairs of molecules allows the derivation of simple, accurate formal equations for the thermodynamic properties of the system. Under certain conditions, generally fulfilled at low temperatures, the equations predict a region where the pressure and Gibb's free energy are independent of volume, the characteristic of condensing sytems. The equations permit calculation of the Gibb's free energy of the liquid in equilibrium with the vapor and all the properties of the saturated vapor, but not the volume or volume dependence of the condensed phase...

  2. Joseph Henry and the Telegraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochfelder, David

    1997-04-01

    Morse's telegraph rested upon three scientific advances which occured between 1800 and 1830: the development of battery technology, the formulation of laws governing the behavior of electrical components in circuits, and the discovery of electromagnetic phenomena. Joseph Henry was crucial to the development of the early telegraph. His work on electromagnetism made it possible for the electric current to manifest itself as useful mechanical work. Henry developed electromagnets of sufficient lifting power, but which drew relatively small currents; these magnets were the heart of Morse's telegraph receiver. Morse also used electromagnets as relays, which allowed him to transmit signals over great distances. Morse often acknowledged his debt to Henry, and the two enjoyed a cordial working relationship until the mid-1840s. But during the bitter and protracted litigation over Morse's patent, Henry testified (unwillingly, he claimed) against the inventor. This began a lifelong quarrel between the two men, the specifics of which were tedious and petty. In general terms, however, their conflict arose over different notions regarding scientific discovery and technological innovation.

  3. Rethinking Joseph Janangelo's "Joseph Cornell and the Artistry of Composing Persuasive Hypertexts"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Composition and Communication, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several excerpts from an article written by Joseph Janangelo titled "Joseph Cornell and the Artistry of Composing Persuasive Hypertexts." In his article, Janangelo suggested that Cornell's work and ideas about composing model intelligent ways to composing persuasive nonsequential text. Janangelo also wondered if the use of…

  4. Rethinking Joseph Janangelo's "Joseph Cornell and the Artistry of Composing Persuasive Hypertexts"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Composition and Communication, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several excerpts from an article written by Joseph Janangelo titled "Joseph Cornell and the Artistry of Composing Persuasive Hypertexts." In his article, Janangelo suggested that Cornell's work and ideas about composing model intelligent ways to composing persuasive nonsequential text. Janangelo also wondered if the use of…

  5. Joseph Conrad's tormented Rescue (fantasy).

    PubMed

    Freedman, William

    2014-02-01

    Joseph Conrad was a notoriously tormented writer for whom the creative act was often a punishment severe enough to drive him into paralyzing depressions that delayed the completion of his novels, sometimes for years. By far the most agonizing of these projects was The Rescue, a novel he began in 1898, abandoned a year later, tried unsuccessfully to continue several times over the next two decades, but was only able to resume in 1918 and to complete, after another tortured two-year struggle, in 1920. An explanation for this incapacity, that is powerfully suggested by the novel's evocative title and perhaps unintentionally ironic subtitle (A Romance of the Shallows) has not yet been explored. Using Freud's 1910 essay on the rescue fantasy, "Contributions to the Psychology of Love: A Special Type of Choice of Object Made by Men," and Emanuel Berman's instructive revision and expansion of the concept in his 2003 American Imago essay, "Ferenczi, Rescue, and Utopia," I argue that a substantial explanation for Conrad's tormented history with The Rescue is ascribable to its quite remarkably faithful treatment of a rescue fantasy with deep and disabling resonance for its author. More specifically, the difficulty was compounded by the novel's dramatization of the soul-crushing conflict between two such fantasies: one in the service of the masculine ideal of unflinching dedication to a heroic purpose, the other promising satisfaction to the equally potent demands of emotional and sexual desire. Features of Conrad's narrative fit so tightly and consistently with the theory as Freud (and Abraham) proposed and as Berman elaborated it that The Rescue offers itself as one of those rare and reinforcing instances wherein the literary text seems to validate the psychoanalytic theory at least as persuasively as the theory "understands" the text.

  6. 6. View northeast of Ten Acre Lot with Joseph Fry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View northeast of Ten Acre Lot with Joseph Fry Farm complex (center) and Beehive House (right)in the background - Joseph Fry Farm Landscape, 2153 South County Trail Road (U.S. Route 2), East Greenwich, Kent County, RI

  7. 75 FR 15430 - Chief Joseph Hatchery Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... Chinook salmon and will help mitigate for the effects of the Federal Columbia River Power System on fish... Bonneville Power Administration Chief Joseph Hatchery Program AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA....gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT: Mickey Carter, Bonneville Power Administration--KEC-4, P.O...

  8. Joseph Rotblat: Influences, Scientific Achievements and Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Joseph Rotblat was one of the most distinguished nuclear physicists and peace campaigners of the post Second World War period. His peace activities rank alongside those of Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell; he won the Nobel Peace Prize, jointly with the Pugwash movement, that he helped found. However, he made significant contributions to…

  9. Joseph Rotblat: Influences, Scientific Achievements and Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Joseph Rotblat was one of the most distinguished nuclear physicists and peace campaigners of the post Second World War period. His peace activities rank alongside those of Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell; he won the Nobel Peace Prize, jointly with the Pugwash movement, that he helped found. However, he made significant contributions to…

  10. Content, Joseph Schwab and German "Didaktik"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Zongyi

    2015-01-01

    This article attempts to extend and deepen the conversation concerning the knowledge-based approach to curriculum espoused by Michael Young in his 2013 "JCS" paper through revisiting the structure of the disciplines thinking of Joseph Schwab and German "Didaktik." It argues that curriculum making requires a theory of knowledge…

  11. Content, Joseph Schwab and German "Didaktik"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Zongyi

    2015-01-01

    This article attempts to extend and deepen the conversation concerning the knowledge-based approach to curriculum espoused by Michael Young in his 2013 "JCS" paper through revisiting the structure of the disciplines thinking of Joseph Schwab and German "Didaktik." It argues that curriculum making requires a theory of knowledge…

  12. An Interview with Joseph Chilton Pearce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercogliano, Chris

    1995-01-01

    Joseph Chilton Pearce, a writer who lectures internationally on child development, discusses the importance of the birth environment on infant development, the negative effects resulting from doctor-assisted births, his experiences in the births of his children, the importance of bonding, and the relationship between childbirth and childhood…

  13. An Interview with Joseph Chilton Pearce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luvmour, Josette; Luvmour, Ba; Dupler-King, Kathy; Pearce, Joseph Chilton

    1999-01-01

    Author Joseph Chilton discusses parents' roles in child rearing, the importance of nurturing, and how negative and positive childhood experiences affect one's emotional and physical health throughout life. Describes neurocardiology, which is documenting the biological connections between the brain and heart and lifting the wisdom and intelligence…

  14. An Interview with Joseph Chilton Pearce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luvmour, Josette; Luvmour, Ba; Dupler-King, Kathy; Pearce, Joseph Chilton

    1999-01-01

    Author Joseph Chilton discusses parents' roles in child rearing, the importance of nurturing, and how negative and positive childhood experiences affect one's emotional and physical health throughout life. Describes neurocardiology, which is documenting the biological connections between the brain and heart and lifting the wisdom and intelligence…

  15. An Interview with Joseph Chilton Pearce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercogliano, Chris

    1995-01-01

    Joseph Chilton Pearce, a writer who lectures internationally on child development, discusses the importance of the birth environment on infant development, the negative effects resulting from doctor-assisted births, his experiences in the births of his children, the importance of bonding, and the relationship between childbirth and childhood…

  16. Sleep disorders in Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, José Luiz; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Martinez, Alberto R M; Martins, Carlos R; Rezende Filho, Flávio M; Sobreira-Neto, Manoel A; Prado, Lucila B F; do Prado, Gilmar F; França, Marcondes C; Barsottini, Orlando G P

    2016-11-01

    This article provides a description on clinical features and pathophysiology of the main sleep disorders observed in Machado-Joseph disease (MJD). Pathological studies have clearly demonstrated that degenerative process in MJD is widespread in the nervous system, and not restricted to the cerebellum. Nonmotor manifestations are frequent and may include pain, cramps, dysautonomia, cognitive deficits, psychiatric manifestations, olfactory deficits, fatigue, nutritional issues, and sleep disorders. Sleep disorders are frequent in MJD, and include restless legs syndrome, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, excessive daytime sleepiness, insomnia, sleep apnea, periodic limb movements during sleep, parasomnia, and others. Pathophysiological mechanisms related to sleep disorders in Machado-Joseph are complex and poorly understood. Considering that sleep complaints are a treatable condition, recognizing sleep disorders in MJD is relevant.

  17. [Chemistry dictionary of Pierre-Joseph Macquer].

    PubMed

    Viel, Claude

    2004-01-01

    In 1976, Pierre-Joseph Macquer publishes the first edition of his Chemistry dictionary, the first concerning this science. A second edition with many additions has been printed in 1778, bearing in mind the new concepts borned with the chemistry evolution. All chemists are unanimous to salute this monumental and precious work. These different aspects are presented in this Note, near the examination of the exemplary of this dictionary annotated by Jean Hermann, alsatian doctor and naturalist contemporary of Macquer.

  18. 1. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY JOSEPH T. GOLABOWSKI PHOTOGRAPHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY JOSEPH T. GOLABOWSKI - PHOTOGRAPHER - APRIL 10, 1934. VIEW FROM SOUTH-EAST - Presbyterian Church, West Cherry & North Mechanic Streets, Winchester, Scott County, IL

  19. 2. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY JOSEPH T. GOLABOWSKI PHOTOGRAPHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY JOSEPH T. GOLABOWSKI - PHOTOGRAPHER - APRIL 10, 1934. VIEW FROM NORTH-WEST - Presbyterian Church, West Cherry & North Mechanic Streets, Winchester, Scott County, IL

  20. 3. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY JOSEPH T. GOLABOWSKI PHOTOGRAPHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY JOSEPH T. GOLABOWSKI - PHOTOGRAPHER - APRIL 10, 1934. SOUTH ELEVATION (FRONT) - Presbyterian Church, West Cherry & North Mechanic Streets, Winchester, Scott County, IL

  1. [Joseph Babinski's contribution to neurological symptomatology].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Tetsuo

    2014-11-01

    Joseph Babinski (1857-1932) was an excellent clinician. André Breton, a French poet, described Babinski's way of clinical examination in his Manifeste du surréalisme (1924), which vividly revealed Babinski's meticulous character. Babinski is well known by his eponymous Babinski reflex. Although some predecessors had described this phenomenon briefly, its meaning was interpreted by Babinski. His contribution to neurological symptomatology was not restricted to his plantar skin reflex, but also to other wide area. In this article, symptoms described by Babinski, i.e. plantar skin reflex, cerebellar symptoms including cerebellar asynergy, adiadochokinesis, dysmetria, cerebellar catalepsy, and rising sign, platysma sign, anosognosia are explained and are critically discussed.

  2. [Joseph Rollet & the shadow of Ricord].

    PubMed

    Chevallier, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    There are three distinguished names in French venereology during the first half of XIXth century: Ricord, Bassereau and Rollet. Ricord is above all a colourful practitioner of fashionable circles and he takes care of a lot of VIP: political people, actors, writers ... With his influence he takes strong opinions but in fact he has only linked gonorrhoea with veneral ulcers. Joseph Rollet head surgeon in the Antiquaille hospital of Lyon, continuing the studies of Bassereau, proves many basic points about venereal diseases often opposed to the theories of Ricord. So theses two scientists too discret or provincial will remain in the shadow of Ricord.

  3. Jacques Joseph: Father of modern aesthetic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit

    2008-01-01

    When we review the history of modern aesthetic surgery, a name that stands out as bright as a beacon and precious as gold is undoubtedly that of Jacques Joseph. A surgeon, par excellence, far ahead of his time, who chose to think out of the box, Joseph, despite all odds set out to give respectability to Aesthetic Surgery without depriving it of any scientific core values. By his words and deeds proved beyond doubt that only the very best in the field of reconstructive surgery, can visualize the hidden perfection in imperfection and formulate a treatment plan and a surgical strategy to achieve that elusive perfection. The rich surgical literature that he has left behind, the wealth of surgical instruments that he had designed and above all a way of thinking that he propagated, that aesthetic surgery is not frivolous but very serious endeavor, and treating the psychology of the patient is as important as treating his disease, undoubtedly makes him the revered ‘Father of Modern Aesthetic Surgery’. PMID:20174541

  4. Interview--Cliff Joseph: Art Therapist, Pioneer, Artist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley-Hiscox, Anna

    1997-01-01

    Interview of Cliff Joseph, one of the first African Americans to participate in the American Art Therapy Association and to become a registered art therapist and teacher. Details Joseph's impact on art therapy and cultural and social issues, as well as his relationships with other prominent art therapists. (MKA)

  5. Tribes of Men: John Joseph Mathews and Indian Internationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutenski, Emily

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses John Joseph Mathews and Indian internationalism. As an old man, Osage intellectual, writer, and historian, John Joseph Mathews recalled his expatriation from the United States during the 1920s. After growing up in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, seat of the Osage Nation, where he had been born in 1894 to a white mother…

  6. Tribes of Men: John Joseph Mathews and Indian Internationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutenski, Emily

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses John Joseph Mathews and Indian internationalism. As an old man, Osage intellectual, writer, and historian, John Joseph Mathews recalled his expatriation from the United States during the 1920s. After growing up in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, seat of the Osage Nation, where he had been born in 1894 to a white mother…

  7. Joseph F. Poland (1908-1991)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. Ivan

    On June 4, 1991, AGU Fellow Joseph Fairfield Poland died in a Sacramento, Calif., hospital at the age of 83 after a long fight with Parkinson's Disease. A recognized expert on land subsidence and a retiree from the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division, his death occurred only 2 weeks after the end of the 4th International Symposium on Land Subsidence, held in Houston, Tex. Frequently known as “Mr. Land Subsidence,” it was appropriate that the proceedings of that symposium had been dedicated to him.Born in Boston, Poland earned a bachelor's degree in geology from Harvard University in 1929. He was resident geologist for Tropical Oil Company in Colombia from 1929 to 1931. After returning to the United States, Poland earned his master's degree in geology from Stanford University in 1935, taught groundwater hydrology, and consulted on groundwater and geophysical problems in the West and Southwest.

  8. Joseph Boussinesq's legacy in fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrigol, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    Joseph Boussinesq was the most prolific of all French contributors to nineteenth-century fluid mechanics. His scientific production included a novel theory of solitary waves, the KdV equation for finite deformations of the water surface in an open channel, a systematic study of open channel and pipe flow based on the concept of effective viscosity, pioneering derivations of boundary layers and entrance effects, new exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation under geometrically simple boundary conditions, and the 'Boussinesq approximation' for heat convection in a moving fluid under gravity. Although his extraordinary skills were quickly recognized and rewarded, other experts in the field were often unaware even of his most important results and they ended up rediscovering some of them. Boussinesq's unusual background and the resulting peculiarities of his style explain this problematic diffusion. They also account for the richness of his legacy.

  9. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 1936 STAIR RAILING, 66 WEST OAK STREET - Chicago Ironwork, 66 West Oak Street (Cast Iron Stair Railing), 66 West Oak Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  10. 20. Photocopy of photograph (from Joseph R. Knowland Collection, Oakland, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of photograph (from Joseph R. Knowland Collection, Oakland, California, c. 1902) EXTERIOR, DETAIL OF BELFRY & CONVENTO, OVERGROWN CONDITIONS, C. 1902 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

  11. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 COPY OF OLD PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY THE COMMANDANT, EARLY PHOTO OF HOUSE DATE UNKNOWN. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 346, Davenport Drive, Arsenal Grounds, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  12. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 1936 COPIED FROM AN OLD PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY MRS. NELLY MUNRO - Old Baptist Parsonage, Snyder & Virginia Streets, Sublette, Lee County, IL

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Copied by Joseph Hill from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Copied by Joseph Hill from an old photograph loaned by Alice Snyder, Galena, Illinois. SOUTH EAST ELEVATION - Grace Episcopal Church, South Prospect Street, Galena, Jo Daviess County, IL

  14. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Copied by Joseph Hill from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Copied by Joseph Hill from photograph loaned by the Illinois Bell Telephone Co. SOUTH EAST ELEVATION - Grace Episcopal Church, South Prospect Street, Galena, Jo Daviess County, IL

  15. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 COPY OF AN OLD PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY THE COMMANDANT, ARSENAL ISLAND 1870 - Rock Island Arsenal, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  16. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 COPY OF PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY THE COMMANDANT, FORT ARMSTRONG 1819 FROM A MODEL IN ARSENAL MUSEUM - Fort Armstrong, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  17. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer COL. DAVENPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer COL. DAVENPORT Copy of an old photograph loaned by the commandant. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 346, Davenport Drive, Arsenal Grounds, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  18. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 COPY OF OLD PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY THE COMMANDANT, FORT ARMSTRONG ARSENAL ISLAND 1819 - Fort Armstrong, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  19. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 COPY OF OLD PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY THE COMMANDANT. DATE UNKNOWN - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 346, Davenport Drive, Arsenal Grounds, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  20. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 COPY OF AN OLD PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY THE COMMANDANT, EARLY BRIDGE ACROSS MISSISSIPPI RIVER, DATE UNKNOWN. - Bridge Spanning Mississippi River, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  1. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer October 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer October 1936 #12 EARLY RED BRICK HOUSE, Elk and Prospect Sts., Galena, Illinois - Galena Doorways, Red Brick House, Elk & Prospect Streets, Galena, Jo Daviess County, IL

  2. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 1936 BALCONY RAILING, 945 NO. DEARBORN ST. JUDGE CARPENTER'S HOME - Chicago Ironwork, Judge Carpenter House (Cast Iron Balcony Railing), 945 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  3. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer June, 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer June, 1936 DETAIL OF BALCONY RAILING, 945 NO. DEARBORN ST. JUDGE CARPENTER'S HOME - Chicago Ironwork, Judge Carpenter House (Cast Iron Balcony Railing), 945 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  4. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 10, 1936 SOUTH ELEVATION (Copied from student's drawing, Dept. of Architecture, Armour Institute of Technology. Chicago) - Keating House, U.S. Highway 430, Fayville, Alexander County, IL

  5. 18. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 26, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 26, 1936 FIREPLACE IN DINING ROOM, The Davenport House, Rock Island Arsenal - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 346, Davenport Drive, Arsenal Grounds, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  6. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer August 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer August 1936 BRONZE TABLET HISTORICAL MARKER - Hobson Grist Mill (Monument & Millstones), DuPage County Pioneer Park, Naperville, Du Page County, IL

  7. 7. Detail of balcony rail. August 1936. Joseph Hill, photographer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail of balcony rail. August 1936. Joseph Hill, photographer, copied from small photo taken by survey member. - Jansonist Colony, Steeple Building, Main & Bishop Hill Streets, Bishop Hill, Henry County, IL

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer August 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer August 1936 FIRST ORIGINAL STORE AND POSTOFFICE, COPY OF AN EARLY PHOTOGRAPH. LENT BY EVELYN S. CRAIG - Jansonist Colony, Colony Store & Post Office, Main & Bishop Hill Streets, Bishop Hill, Henry County, IL

  9. 6. Detail of pilaster cap. Aug. 10, 1936. Joseph Hill, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail of pilaster cap. Aug. 10, 1936. Joseph Hill, photographer, copied from small photo taken by survey member. - Jansonist Colony, Steeple Building, Main & Bishop Hill Streets, Bishop Hill, Henry County, IL

  10. 3. West and south elevations. Joseph Hill, photographer, copied from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. West and south elevations. Joseph Hill, photographer, copied from photo lent by Evelyn S. Craig. August 1936. - Jansonist Colony, Steeple Building, Main & Bishop Hill Streets, Bishop Hill, Henry County, IL

  11. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer Spring 1937 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer Spring 1937 DETAIL OF CORNICE AND SECOND FLOOR WINDOW TRIM. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 346, Davenport Drive, Arsenal Grounds, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  12. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 10, 1936 CAST IRON GATE AT 1352 W. Washington Blvd., Chicago - Chicago Ironwork, William M. Strong Estate (Cast Iron House & Gate), 1352 West Washington Boulevard, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 1936 FENCE RAILING 1133 WEST WASHINGTON BLVD. - Chicago Ironwork, 1133 West Washington Boulevard (Cast Iron Fence & Railing), 1133 West Washington Boulevard, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  14. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July, 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July, 1936 PORCH RAILING, 1149 W. WASHINGTON Blvd. - Chicago Ironwork, 1149 West Washington Boulevard (Cast Iron Stair Railing), 1149 West Washington Boulevard, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  15. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer April 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer April 1, 1936 MANTEL 1352 W. Washington Blvd., Chicago - Chicago Ironwork, William M. Strong Estate (Cast Iron House & Gate), 1352 West Washington Boulevard, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  16. 4. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY JOSEPH T. GOLABOWSKI PHOTOGRAPHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY JOSEPH T. GOLABOWSKI - PHOTOGRAPHER - APRIL 10, 1934. COLUMN AND PIER DETAIL - LOOKING UP - Presbyterian Church, West Cherry & North Mechanic Streets, Winchester, Scott County, IL

  17. Proposed Consent Agreement and Final Order: Joseph O’Meara, Joseph O’Meara Living Trust, and Killarney West Golf Course, Inc.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's proposed Consent Agreement and Final Order in the matter of Joseph O’Meara, Joseph O’Meara Living Trust, and Killarney West Golf Course, Inc. for violations of the Clean Water Act in Hillsboro, Oregon.

  18. Proposed Penalty Against Joseph O’Meara, Joseph O’Meara Living Trust, and Killarney West Golf Course, Inc. for Clean Water Act Violations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Public notice of EPA's proposed penalty against Joseph O’Meara, Joseph O’Meara Living Trust, and Killarney West Golf Course, Inc. for violations of the Clean Water Act at their facility in Hillsboro, Oregon.

  19. Association between Machado-Joseph disease and oxidative stress biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Laura Segabinazzi; da Silveira, Aron Ferreira; Trott, Alexis; Houenou, Lucien J; Algarve, Thaís Doeler; Belló, Caroline; Lenz, Adriano Flesch; Mânica-Cattani, Maria Fernanda; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica

    2013-10-09

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, also called Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), is an hereditary autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease that affects the cerebellum and its afferent and efferent connections. Since the mechanism by which mutant ataxin-3 eventually leads to neuronal death is poorly understood, additional investigations to clarify the biological alterations related to Machado-Joseph disease are necessary. Recent investigations suggest that oxidative stress may contribute significantly to Machado-Joseph disease. We compared markers of oxidative stress between Machado-Joseph disease and healthy control subjects. The results showed that Machado-Joseph patients have higher catalase levels and lower thiol protein levels compared to control subjects. The peripheral blood lymphocyes of MJD patients also showed higher levels of DNA damage by the comet assay than control subjects. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that the oxidative stress is associated with MJD patients. However, whether strategies to increase cellular antioxidative capacity may be effective therapies for the treatment of Machado-Joseph disease is an open question. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Joseph Rotblat: influences, scientific achievements and legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Martin

    2008-11-01

    Joseph Rotblat was one of the most distinguished nuclear physicists and peace campaigners of the post Second World War period. His peace activities rank alongside those of Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell; he won the Nobel Peace Prize, jointly with the Pugwash movement, that he helped found. However, he made significant contributions to science, and in particular to the medical applications of accelerators, radiation and radio-nuclides. In this article his early work and influences in Poland are described. He then joined James Chadwick at Liverpool University and began work on the cyclotron recently constructed there. Rotblat then, together with Chadwick, joined the Manhattan Project. This experience was to shape his life. He stayed at Los Alamos for less than a year before walking out. He was suspected of being a spy. Rotblat then became Professor of Physics at St Bartholomew's Medical College and pioneered the use of a 15 MeV linear accelerator in treatment and research. He made fundamental contributions to understanding the effects of the fallout from nuclear bomb tests. He also, together with Patricia Lindop, made important contributions to understanding the biological effects of radiation.

  1. Joseph Priestley, oxygen, and the enlightenment.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-01-01

    Joseph Priestley (1733–1804) was the first person to report the discovery of oxygen and describe some of its extraordinary properties. As such he merits a special place in the history of respiratory physiology. In addition his descriptions in elegant 18th-century English were particularly arresting, and rereading them never fails to give a special pleasure. The gas was actually first prepared by Scheele (1742–1786) but his report was delayed. Lavoisier (1743–1794) repeated Priestley's initial experiment and went on to describe the true nature of oxygen that had eluded Priestley, who never abandoned the erroneous phlogiston theory. In addition to oxygen, Priestley isolated and characterized seven other gases. However, most of his writings were in theology because he was a conscientious clergyman all his life. Priestley was a product of the Enlightenment and argued that all beliefs should be able to stand the scientific scrutiny of experimental investigations. As a result his extreme liberal views were severely criticized by the established Church of England. In addition he was a supporter of both the French and American Revolutions. Ultimately his political and religious attitudes provoked a riot during which his home and his scientific equipment were destroyed. He therefore emigrated to America in 1794 where his friends included Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin. He settled in Northumberland, Pennsylvania although his scientific work never recovered from his forced departure. But the descriptions of his experiments with oxygen will always remain a high point in the history of respiratory physiology.

  2. [Bioethical arguments in Joseph Ratzinger's thinking].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Carbonell López, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    In the dense theological thought of Joseph Ratzinger before his election as pope, we find fundamental contributions to contemporary bioethics. Starting from the assumption of the close relationship between faith and science he incorporates a necessary theological dimension in the bioethical dialogue that illuminates and clarifies the answers to the real questions raised in bioethical actions. On the one hand, there is the question of the origin of man that is understood as God's creation as opposed to a purely biological origin to which a modern pseudoscientific stance wants to confine it. On the other hand, there is the question about man's identity, which is understood as the image of God, from which stems the inviolable dignity and sacredness of human life, overcoming scientistic materialism. Finally, we find the question of how to treat the ″other″, even the embryo, as a result of its lofty dignity, analyzing the ethical and legal consequences that exude from their nature and are summarized in the duty to protect and respect the other which the law should protect against the abuse of those who are stronger.

  3. Joseph Henry's Conception of Scientific Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theerman, Paul

    1997-04-01

    Joseph Henry, America's premier physicist and physics teacher in the mid-nineteenth century, had decided views of scientific knowledge. These were expressed in two ways. First of all, scientific knowledge led to moral betterment. Thus the study of science was a morally good thing. This was not only because it led to the contemplation of God's creation, which was a standard reason justifying the study of science dating from the Scientific Revolution and even earlier. More importantly, the study of science itself was a moral discipline, imparting to scientists the habits and virtues of truthfulness, respect for others, care and diligence, and the discernment of meaningful patterns from experience. The moral ideals of science were expressed most strongly in Henry's upholding the international "Republic of Science"; conversely, cheapening science was a sign of moral failure. Second, for Henry and his generation, science provided a path to sure truth, separate from falsehood of both the politics and the quackery that characterized mid-century public life. Henry promoted this in his championing of the Smithsonian Institution a scientific establishment, against the ideas of others who wanted to make it a literary establishment or a training school for teachers. For Henry, the Smithsonian's scientific reputation would be established by relying on careful peer review in its publications, and supporting established scientists to write authoritative popular works. The purpose of both these activities was to raise the profile of science in the United States and further establish science and the scientific method as a guide to public life.

  4. Obituary: Richard Joseph Elston, 1960-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannuzi, Buell Tomasson; Bechtold, Jill

    2004-12-01

    Richard Joseph Elston, known for his development of innovative astronomical instrumentation, died on 26 January 2004 in Gainesville, Florida, after a four-year battle with Hodgkin's lymphoma. A professor of astronomy at the University of Florida, Richard had an unusually broad range of interests and skills, and a willingness to share his passion for astronomy with others, which made him a highly valued member of the astronomical community. Born 1 July 1960, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Richard was the son of a geologist father and journalist mother. His childhood interest in astronomy and instrumentation matured as he majored in physics and astronomy at the University of New Mexico (BS, 1983) under the mentorship of Michael Zeilik. Richard pursued his PhD in astronomy at the University of Arizona and earned his degree in 1988. He pioneered the use of IR arrays for deep imaging surveys of the sky to study galaxy formation, and completed his thesis Search for Rapidly Forming Galaxies at High Redshift under the direction of George Rieke. Richard's graduate work included the first detection of galaxies at intermediate redshifts with evolved populations too red to have been identifiable from optical imaging surveys alone. In the Astrophysical Journal Letters in 1988, he, George Rieke, and Marcia Rieke reported the discovery of this new class of galaxies, now known as EROs (Extremely Red Objects), important as the possible progenitors of present day elliptical galaxies. Following post-doctoral positions at Kitt Peak National Observatory from 1988 to 1991 and at the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington from 1991 to 1992, Richard joined the scientific staff of Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, part of the NSF's National Optical Astronomy Observatory. By 1994, he had become head of CTIO's IR instrumentation program and was leading the development of new instruments for the US astronomical community. In 1996, Richard married astronomer

  5. Clinical evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Sabrina Mello Alves; Felix, Valter Nilton; Gurgel, Jonas Lírio; Sallum, Rubens A A; Cecconello, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    In Machado-Joseph disease, poor posture, dystonia and peripheral neuropathy are extremely predisposing to oropharyngeal dysphagia, which is more commonly associated with muscular dystrophy. To evaluate the clinical characteristics of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Machado-Joseph disease patients. Forty individuals participated in this study, including 20 with no clinical complaints and 20 dysphagic patients with Machado-Joseph disease of clinical type 1, who were all similar in terms of gender distribution, average age, and cognitive function. The medical history of each patient was reviewed and each subject underwent a clinical evaluation of deglutition. At the end, the profile of dysphagia in patients with Machado-Joseph disease was classified according to the Severity Scale of Dysphagia, as described by O'Neil and collaborators. Comparison between dysphagic patients and controls did not reveal many significant differences with respect to the clinical evaluation of the oral phase of deglutition, since afflicted patients only demonstrated deficits related to the protrusion, retraction and tonus of the tongue. However, several significant differences were observed with respect to the pharyngeal phase. Dysphagic patients presented pharyngeal stasis during deglutition of liquids and solids, accompanied by coughing and/or choking as well as penetration and/or aspiration; these signs were absent in the controls. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is part of the Machado-Joseph disease since the first neurological manifestations. There is greater involvement of the pharyngeal phase, in relation to oral phase of the deglutition. The dysphagia of these patients is classified between mild and moderate.

  6. [Joseph Toynbee--otologist, scientist, philanthropist].

    PubMed

    Betlejewski, Stanisław; Betlejewski, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Joseph Tonbee's life's work may be summarized in the words of William Wilde: "The labours and investigations of Mr. Toynbee have affected more for aural pathology than those of all his predecessors either in England or on the continent". Some idea of the extent of his researches is given by the fact that he dissected some 2.000 ears. These preparations formed the Toynbee Collection in the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. He wrote the results of his researches in a catalogue that includes the description of 1,659 human ears. This catalogue forms the basis of modern otology for all time. This purely pathological catalogue was completed in 1860 with the publication of a more clinical book, "The Diseases of the Ear: their Nature, Diagnosis and Treatment". Toynbee appears to have been the first to describe the pathological changes in otosclerosis. In his book "Diseases of the Ear" he described the condition clearly, recognizing "anchylosis of the stapes to the fenestra ovalis" in 136 temporal bones. He also aligned the subjective, visual and ausculatory tests for Eustacchian tubal patency which we use today. Adam Politzer wrote: "Toynbee was the first who realized in otology that therapeutic progress depends on the knowledge of anatomy". But Toynbee was also active on other fields. Politzer, in his lecture in Vienna in 1914 said: "Toynbee was as outstanding a savant as he was a philanthropist. In addition to his scientific activity, he considered it a sacred task to dedicate his spare time to the improvement of living and health conditions of the poorer classes." Tragic enough, Toynbee's zeal for clinical experimentation went too far. Seeking to help his patients by devising a treatment to allay their tinnitus, he conceived the idea of introducing a mixture of chloroform and prussic acid into the tympanic cavity by means of Valsalva maneuver. When he made the first trial on July 7, 1866, with himself as a subject, he was found dead on the couch in his

  7. Saint Joseph's University Institute for Environmental Stewardship

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, Micahel P.; Springer, Clint J.

    2014-06-03

    future climate scenarios is local adaptation and not necessarily genome size as has been hypothesized in the literature. Task B: Installation of an extensive green roof system on the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University for research, research-training and educational outreach activities. An experimental green roof system was designed and installed by an outside contractor (Roofmeadows) on the roof of the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University. The roof system includes four test plots, each with a different drainage system, instrumentation to monitor storm water retention, roof deck temperature, heat flux into and out of the building, rain fall, wind speed and direction, relative humidity and heat emission from the roof system. The vegetative roof was planted with 26 species of plants, distributed throughout the roof area, to assess species/variety growth and coverage characteristics, both in terms of the different drain layer systems, and in terms of the different exposures along the north to south axis of the building. Analysis of the drain layer performance, in terms of storm water retention, shows that the aggregate (stone) drainage layer system performed the best, with the moisture management mat system second, and the geotextile drain layer and reservoir sheet layer systems coming in last. This information is of value in the planning and design of vegetative roof systems since the different types of drainage layer systems have different installation costs and different weights. The different drainage layer systems also seem to be having an impact on plant growth and spread with the test plot with the reservoir sheet layer actually having the poorest plant coverage and plant spread of all areas of the roof studied. Plant growth performance analysis is ongoing, but significant differences have been observed in the third growing season ('13) along the north to south axis, with most species doing better towards the northern end of the roof (in terms of

  8. [Joseph Carey Merrick the man in the flannel mask].

    PubMed

    Rimar, Yossi

    2007-02-01

    Joseph Carey Merrick was born like all other children in his time, yet his life story was unlike those of other people due to an odd disfiguring disease that devastated his appearance. Despite his personal and social handicap caused by his deformity, Joseph Merrick did his best to survive the challenges of every-day living in a hostile and unsympathetic world. This is the story of a man who had to cover his face from the crows behind a mask, a man whose bones have yet to find eternal peace. This is the story of the "elephant man".

  9. Joseph Ames's "Typographical Antiquities" and the Antiquarian Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiner, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    One of the most famous historical documents of English printing is Joseph Ames's "Typographical Antiquities," published in London in 1749. Although Ames referred to his work as a history of printing, the bulk of it is a list of the first printers in England and their works through 1600, with very full bibliographical descriptions for…

  10. Science and Worldviews in the Classroom: Joseph Priestley and Photosynthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper elaborates on the life and publications of Joseph Priestley, the eighteenth-century polymath. The paper outlines his particular place in the European Enlightenment; it stresses the importance of philosophy and worldview in his scientific work on pneumatic chemistry, the composition of air, and his discovery of the process of…

  11. Video from Panel Discussion with Joseph Fraumeni and David Schottenfeld

    Cancer.gov

    Video footage from Panel Discussion with Joseph Fraumeni and David Schottenfeld on Cancer Epidemiology over the Last Half-Century and Thoughts on the Future. The discussion took place on May 11, 2012, when DCEG hosted Dr. Schottenfeld as a Visiting Scholar.

  12. Using Joseph Campbell to Improve Students' Response to Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnum, Carol M.

    1992-01-01

    Shows how teachers can use the videotapes and writings of Joseph Campbell to help students see patterns in literature and respond personally to it. Presents Campbell's explanation of the monomyth of the hero's journey, and discusses three works in which the pattern is present. (SR)

  13. Perils of Accommodation: The Case of Joseph W. Holley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Thomas V.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines accommodationism, a tactic of racial uplift used by black school founders and teachers in the Jim Crow South. For founders, accommodationism was a dangerous process of collaboration, resistance, and compromise. The subject under study is Joseph Winthrop Holley. Born in South Carolina, Holley studied in the North at Phillips…

  14. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer March 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer March 10, 1936 CAST IRON BALCONY RAIL AND WROUGHT IRON WINDOW RAILING 945 NORTH DEARBORN STREET, CHICAGO - Chicago Ironwork, Judge Carpenter House (Cast Iron Balcony Railing), 945 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  15. Wesley Joseph McJulien: Leader, Teacher, and Media Pioneer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wennberg, Hans-Erik

    2000-01-01

    Provides a profile of Wesley Joseph McJulien, an instructional technologist who provided leadership to the field throughout his professional career. Highlights include his educational background, teaching career in higher education, presidency of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT), and his role as spokesperson for…

  16. Interview with Dr Joseph Murray (by Francis L Delmonico).

    PubMed

    Murray, Joseph

    2002-10-01

    The Editors asked Dr Delmonico to interview Dr Joseph Murray, winner of the Nobel prize in Medicine 1990 for performing the first successful renal transplant, to record recollections of the issues of the 1950s, when clinical transplantation was born, on Dr Murray's medical career in transplantation, and on some contemporary issues.

  17. BRASS MILL #72 SLITTER, OPERATED BY JOSEPH WAGNER, FORMERLY AN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRASS MILL #72 SLITTER, OPERATED BY JOSEPH WAGNER, FORMERLY AN EMPLOYEE OF REPUBLIC STEEL IN BUFFALO. BRASS STRIP FROM THE SLITTE IS USED ON THE BUFFALO PLANT'S CONTINUOUS SEAMLESS TUBE LINE. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  18. Pioneer in Behavioral Pharmacology: A Tribute to Joseph V. Brady

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The contributions of Joseph V. Brady to behavioral pharmacology span more than 50 years and range from early studies using the Estes-Skinner ("conditioned emotional response") procedure to examine drug effects and various physiological processes in experimental animals to the implementation of mobile methadone treatment services and to small group…

  19. Inside and outside: Boxes Inspired by Joseph Cornell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Laurel

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project inspired by the work of Joseph Cornell. The project called for designing both the outside and the inside of a cigar box according to the student's theme. Thus, students needed to consider the viewer's vantage point with the box both closed and open, general design elements, two-dimensional and…

  20. Perils of Accommodation: The Case of Joseph W. Holley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Thomas V.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines accommodationism, a tactic of racial uplift used by black school founders and teachers in the Jim Crow South. For founders, accommodationism was a dangerous process of collaboration, resistance, and compromise. The subject under study is Joseph Winthrop Holley. Born in South Carolina, Holley studied in the North at Phillips…

  1. Visions and Re-Visions of Charles Joseph Minard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friendly, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Describes the contributions of Charles Joseph Minard to statistical graphics, noting the time course of his work and providing background on his famous effort, the flow-map depiction of Napoleon's march on Moscow. Explores some modern re-visions of this famous graphic from an information visualization perspective. (SLD)

  2. Visions and Re-Visions of Charles Joseph Minard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friendly, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Describes the contributions of Charles Joseph Minard to statistical graphics, noting the time course of his work and providing background on his famous effort, the flow-map depiction of Napoleon's march on Moscow. Explores some modern re-visions of this famous graphic from an information visualization perspective. (SLD)

  3. Joseph Lancaster and the History of Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Examining the origin and accomplishments of the Lancastrian monitorial system of instruction, this paper discusses the influence of that system on American education. It gives a brief history of how Joseph Lancaster became involved in reading instruction and how he was a pioneer in emphasizing a reading curriculum that was written down. It then…

  4. Pioneer in Behavioral Pharmacology: A Tribute to Joseph V. Brady

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The contributions of Joseph V. Brady to behavioral pharmacology span more than 50 years and range from early studies using the Estes-Skinner ("conditioned emotional response") procedure to examine drug effects and various physiological processes in experimental animals to the implementation of mobile methadone treatment services and to small group…

  5. Using Joseph Campbell to Improve Students' Response to Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnum, Carol M.

    1992-01-01

    Shows how teachers can use the videotapes and writings of Joseph Campbell to help students see patterns in literature and respond personally to it. Presents Campbell's explanation of the monomyth of the hero's journey, and discusses three works in which the pattern is present. (SR)

  6. Joseph v. Brady: Synthesis Reunites What Analysis Has Divided

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Travis

    2012-01-01

    Joseph V. Brady (1922-2011) created behavior-analytic neuroscience and the analytic framework for understanding how the external and internal neurobiological environments and mechanisms interact. Brady's approach offered synthesis as well as analysis. He embraced Findley's approach to constructing multioperant behavioral repertoires that found…

  7. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill's Photograph Copy of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill's Photograph Copy of Original Photograph May5, 1936 SOUTH ELEVATION 1352 W.WASHINGTON BLVD. -1362 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. - Chicago Ironwork, William M. Strong Estate (Cast Iron House & Gate), 1352 West Washington Boulevard, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  8. [The umbilical metastasis. Sister Mary Joseph and her time].

    PubMed

    Trebing, D; Göring, H-D

    2004-02-01

    Although Baluff in 1854 and Nelaton in 1860 had already described umbilical metastases, the best known description of the metastasis of carcinomas to this site as "trouser button navel" was published in 1928 by William James Mayo (1861-1939), son of William Worrall Mayo (1815-1911), the founder of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, This phenomenon is supposed to have been pointed out to Mayo by his long-serving head surgical nurse Sister Mary Joseph (1856-1939). The English surgeon Hamilton Bailey, in his famous textbook "Physical Signs in Clinical Surgery" in 1949, coined the term "Sister Joseph's nodule" for an umbilical metastasis. The expression has become widely accepted and used. Sister Mary Joseph, daughter of Irish immigrants, belonged to the 3rd order of the Holy Francis, was distinguished for her skills, intelligence and devotion to nursing which was also her calling. She worked for many decades at the world-famous Mayo Clinic and taught generations of young nurses. In recent years, the original surgical building at Saint Mary's Hospital has been named "Joseph Building" in her memory. Among the numerous eponyms occurring in the dermatology and the medicine, the association with the name of a nurse represents beyond doubt a special feature.

  9. Science and Worldviews in the Classroom: Joseph Priestley and Photosynthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper elaborates on the life and publications of Joseph Priestley, the eighteenth-century polymath. The paper outlines his particular place in the European Enlightenment; it stresses the importance of philosophy and worldview in his scientific work on pneumatic chemistry, the composition of air, and his discovery of the process of…

  10. Sister Mary Joseph's nodule that originated from lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Hiroshige; Kubouchi, Yasuaki; Taniguchi, Yuji; Miwa, Ken; Adachi, Yoshin; Fujioka, Shinji; Ito, Hisao

    2011-03-01

    Umbilical metastasis of cancer, known as Sister Mary Joseph's nodule (SMJN), is a rare phenomenon. It is usually due to intraabdominal malignancies and is quite rare from lung cancer. Here we describe a case of SMJN that originated from advanced lung adenocarcinoma. SMJN should be noted as an important sign of some hidden malignancy including lung cancer.

  11. Joseph v. Brady: Synthesis Reunites What Analysis Has Divided

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Travis

    2012-01-01

    Joseph V. Brady (1922-2011) created behavior-analytic neuroscience and the analytic framework for understanding how the external and internal neurobiological environments and mechanisms interact. Brady's approach offered synthesis as well as analysis. He embraced Findley's approach to constructing multioperant behavioral repertoires that found…

  12. Astronaut Joseph Kerwin forms perfect sphere with water droplet

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-01

    SL2-X9-730 (1 June 1973) --- Scientist-astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot, forms a perfect sphere by blowing water droplets from a straw in zero-gravity. He is in the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop. Photo credit: NASA

  13. Obituary: Joseph Wyan Chamberlain, 1928-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunten, Donald M.

    2004-12-01

    Joseph W. Chamberlain died at home with his family on April 14 2004 after a long illness. He was born August 24, 1928 and raised in Boonville, Missouri, where his father was the doctor. There was no doubt that both Joe and his elder brother Gilbert would also become doctors, but Joe's first class in comparative anatomy at the University of Missouri convinced him that this was not his destiny and he immediately switched to physics and astronomy. He obtained a Masters degree in physics and moved on to the University of Michigan; his advisor was Lawrence Aller and he was also strongly influenced by Leo Goldberg. Early in 1952 he was awarded a PhD and began work at the Air Force Cambridge Research Center where he changed his interests to the upper atmosphere. Among his duties was liaison with research groups at several universities, and I met him when he visited us at the University of Saskatchewan one very cold winter day. He was soon posted to work with Aden Meinel at Yerkes Observatory, where he was added to the faculty and became the leader of the group when Meinel departed to organize the Kitt Peak National Observatory. He himself moved there in 1962 as Associate Director for Space Science; the name of the division was later changed to Planetary Science. He recruited a strong group to work on planetary atmospheres and several group members played important roles in the Mariner 10, Pioneer Venus, Viking, Voyager and Galileo missions. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1965. As leader of the group he recruited at Kitt Peak, Joe earned the admiration and loyalty of us all. He strongly preferred doing science to his administrative tasks, but he was still effective at the latter. He was considerably bothered that his superiors, especially the managing boards with which he had to deal, did not always meet his high standards. Joe's friends and colleagues felt, and still feel, that he would have been much happier as a member of a teaching faculty, and

  14. Remembering Joseph Mayo and His Contributions to Animal Science | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Guest Writer In the 1990s, when Joseph Mayo, D.V.M, ran out of gas leading coworkers home from a meeting in Bethesda, he pulled over to the side of the road on I-270 and waited for help. He didn’t have to wait long; within a few minutes a passing motorist took pity on the group of scientists and offered them a lift back to Fort Detrick.

  15. Joseph Rotblat, the bomb and anomalies from his archive.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Martin C

    2013-06-01

    Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat made significant contributions to nuclear physics and worked on the development of the atomic bomb. He walked out of the Manhattan Project after working there for less than a year, the only scientist to do so. Rotblat gave a comprehensive account of his time at Los Alamos. His Archive is now becoming available and papers contained therein are inconsistent with some aspects of his account. The reasons as to how such anomalies and contradictions could occur are considered.

  16. Chief Joseph Dam, Columbia River, Washington, Community Impact Reports,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    Corps of Engineers. . e . .. . UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (Wh.n Data Entered) REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE READ INSTRUCTIONS R PEFORE... CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (WIhwnt ata Ent .rd) CHIEF JOSEPH DAM COMMUNITY IMPACT REPORTS TABLE OF CONTENTS PRE-CONSTRUCTION ANALYSIS PUBLISHED...pool 10 feet to elevation 956 feet. Planned construction will temporarily occur in three stages : (1) phasing- in of construction activities in late 1974

  17. Science, alchemy and light: paintings by Joseph Wright of Derby.

    PubMed

    Dominiczak, Marek H

    2002-01-01

    This article considers two paintings by the English painter, Joseph Wright of Derby (1734-97), 'An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump' and 'The Alchemist in Search of the Philosopher's Stone' as painterly reflections on the early industrial culture. Particularly interesting in the "Experiment on a Bird" is the broad spectrum of spectator's reactions to the experiment; this can be related to the contemporary debate on the contextualization of science.

  18. Astronaut Joseph Kerwin takes blood sample from Astronaut Charles Conrad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin (right), Skylab 2 science pilot and a doctor of medicine, takes a blood sample from Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Sylab 2 commander, as seen in this reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the Skylab 1 and 2 space station cluster in Earth orbit. The blood sampling was part of the Skylab Hematology and Immunology Experiment M110 series.

  19. Photocopy of photograph (from NBPPNSY, CSF 4036766) Joseph P. Garfinkel, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (from NBP-PNSY, CSF 4036-7-66) Joseph P. Garfinkel, photographer, July 20, 1966 oblique aerial photo taken from an altitude of approximately 6,000 feet; view north of Philadelphia Naval Base and Shipyard. Reserve basin (Haer no. Pa-387-W) is at left center of photograph. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  20. Astronaut Joseph Kerwin takes blood sample from Astronaut Charles Conrad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin (right), Skylab 2 science pilot and a doctor of medicine, takes a blood sample from Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Sylab 2 commander, as seen in this reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the Skylab 1 and 2 space station cluster in Earth orbit. The blood sampling was part of the Skylab Hematology and Immunology Experiment M110 series.

  1. Astronaut Paul Weitz gets physical examination from Astronaut Joseph Kerwin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, Skylab 2 pilot, gets a physical examination by a fellow crewman during the 28-day Skylab 2 mission. Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot and a doctor of medicine, uses a stethoscope to check the Weitz's heartbeat. They are in the Orbital Workshop crew quarters of the Skylab 1 and 2 space station in Earth orbit. This photograph was taken by Charles Conrad Jr., Skylab 2 commander.

  2. Remembering Joseph Mayo and His Contributions to Animal Science | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Guest Writer In the 1990s, when Joseph Mayo, D.V.M, ran out of gas leading coworkers home from a meeting in Bethesda, he pulled over to the side of the road on I-270 and waited for help. He didn’t have to wait long; within a few minutes a passing motorist took pity on the group of scientists and offered them a lift back to Fort Detrick.

  3. Astronaut Joseph Kerwin strapped into sleep restraint in crew quarters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot, is photographed strapped into the sleep restraint in the crew quarters of the Orbital Workshop of the Skylab 1 and 2 space station cluster in Earth orbit. Kerwin is wearing the special cap which contains biomedical instrumentation for the M133 Sleep Monitoring Experiment. The purpose of the M133 experiment is to evaluate quantity and quality of sleep during prolonged space flight by the analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) and electrooculographic (EOG) activity.

  4. Astronaut Joseph Kerwin strapped into sleep restraint in crew quarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot, is photographed strapped into the sleep restraint in the crew quarters of the Orbital Workshop of the Skylab 1 and 2 space station cluster in Earth orbit. Kerwin is wearing the special cap which contains biomedical instrumentation for the M133 Sleep Monitoring Experiment. The purpose of the M133 experiment is to evaluate quantity and quality of sleep during prolonged space flight by the analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) and electrooculographic (EOG) activity.

  5. Umbilical metastasis (Sister Joseph's nodule) from carcinoma of the vagina.

    PubMed

    Bakri, Y N; Subhi, J; Hashim, E; Senoussi, M

    1991-01-01

    A case is reported of a squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina with metastasis to the umbilicus (Sister Mary Joseph's nodule). Systemic cisplatinum chemotherapy resulted in partial response, however, the "nodule" was a sign of poor prognosis and indicative of short-term survival. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of umbilical metastasis from a primary carcinoma of the vagina.

  6. In praise of Joseph Priestley - the particle physicist!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. T.

    1991-05-01

    Joseph Priestley (1733 - 1804), known more as a chemist, made important contributions to the evolution of our view of the structure of matter. To commemorate the notorious Birmingham riots of July 1791, during which his house was burnt and his work destroyed, and following which he left England for the United States after three years in London, this article highlights his major contribution to what we now call particle physics

  7. STS-97 Crew Interview: Joseph Tanner, MS1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The STS-97 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his training. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, its payload, the rendez-vous with the International Space Station (ISS), and what it will be like to work knowing there is already a crew on board the ISS.

  8. Professor Joseph Warren Horton (1889-1967): biological engineer.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Gerald L

    2005-02-01

    Joseph Warren Horton graduated with a degree in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1914. He became involved in the early development of electrical measurement devices, televised image transmission, and the detection of underwater sound transmission. In the mid-1930s he was appointed the first leader of the newly created Department of Biological Engineering at MIT and in this position he made major contributions to the application of physics to human physiology, in particular by increasing the safety of explosive inhalational anaesthetic agents.

  9. DCEG Symposium to Honor Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr. | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer On May 6, the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) will sponsor a symposium to honor 50 years of leadership from its founding director, Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr., M.D., who stepped down from the position in July 2012. The conference, entitled “Cancer Epidemiology: From Pedigrees to Populations,” will highlight critical findings in cancer epidemiology from the last 50 years, as well as opportunities for future research directions. Long History of Leadership and Discovery

  10. Joseph Harris of Trevecka: Scientist, Artisan, Servant of the Crown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, M.

    2012-01-01

    A major goal of natural philosophy in the early eighteenth century was the search for accurate positional longitude. This quest demanded the most precise instruments and the most meticulous observations in astronomy and geophysics. Joseph Harris strode across these disciplines making a valuable contribution to the studies of astronomy, navigation, horology and magnetic variation. He later served his country by standardising weights and measures of coinage as Assay Master at the Royal Mint. Yet his prowess is little known or acknowledged. This paper describes and examines his life and roles.

  11. DCEG Symposium to Honor Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr. | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer On May 6, the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) will sponsor a symposium to honor 50 years of leadership from its founding director, Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr., M.D., who stepped down from the position in July 2012. The conference, entitled “Cancer Epidemiology: From Pedigrees to Populations,” will highlight critical findings in cancer epidemiology from the last 50 years, as well as opportunities for future research directions. Long History of Leadership and Discovery

  12. ASTRONAUT KERWIN, JOSEPH P. - EXTRAVEHICULAR ACTIVITY (EVA) - SKYLAB (SL)-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-01

    S73-27562 (June 1973) --- Scientist-astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot, performs extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Skylab 1 and 2 space station cluster in Earth orbit, as seen in this reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the station. Kerwin is just outside the Airlock Module. Kerwin assisted astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Skylab 2 commander, during the successful EVA attempt to free the stuck solar array system wing on the Orbital Workshop. Photo credit: NASA

  13. Astronaut Joseph R. Tanner works with PCG experiment on middeck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-11-14

    On the Space Shuttle Atlantis' mid-deck, astronaut Joseph R. Tanner, mission specialist, works at area amidst several lockers onboard the Shuttle which support the Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiment. This particular section is called the Crystal Observation System, housed in the Thermal Enclosure System (COS/TES). Together with the Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDA), housed in a Single Locker Thermal Enclosure (SLTES) which is out of frame, the Cos/TES represents the continuing research into the structures of proteins and other macromolecules such as viruses.

  14. Joseph V. Brady: Synthesis Reunites What Analysis Has Divided

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Travis

    2012-01-01

    Joseph V. Brady (1922–2011) created behavior-analytic neuroscience and the analytic framework for understanding how the external and internal neurobiological environments and mechanisms interact. Brady's approach offered synthesis as well as analysis. He embraced Findley's approach to constructing multioperant behavioral repertoires that found their way into designing environments for astronauts as well as studying drug effects on human social behavior in microenvironments. Brady created translational neurobehavioral science before such a concept existed. One of his most lasting contributions was developing a framework for ethical decision making to protect the rights of the people who participate in scientific research. PMID:23450040

  15. Carl Sagan and Joseph Shklovsky: Intelligent Life in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Vladimir

    J. S. Shklovsky and Carl Sagan played an outstanding role in modern astronomy. Their names are well known not only to professional astronomers, but also to millions of educated people in many countries, which are interested in modern state of science research. Among these trends of modern science, which are difficult to define, are such problems, as the creation of Solar system, the origin of life on Earth, the evolution of living organisms on Earth from the simplest viruses to Homo Sapiens, the evolution of intelligence and technology. Finally, both outstanding scientists were deeply interested in the problem of SETI (Search Extraterrestrial Intelligence), i.e. search of extraterrestrial civilizations and methods of making contacts with them. And both scientists were high professionals in their fields. Joseph Shklovsky was a theoretical astronomer in all fields of modern astronomy (geophysics and physics of the upper atmosphere of the Earth, Sun and Solar Corona, Interplanetary Medium and Solar Wind, Interstellar Medium, Supernova and their remnants, the Galaxy and galaxies, Quasars and Cosmology). There is hardly a field in modern astrophysics (except perhaps the theory of the interior structure of stars), where Joseph Shklovsky has not l a bright stamp of his talent…

  16. Leader and Spokesman for a People in Exile: Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Samvit

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses Chief Joseph's surrender that marked the beginning of his diplomatic stand for justice in Indian Territory, where his tribe was forcibly exiled in accordance with American Indian policy of the time. Joseph battled for the repatriation of the Nez Perce through protests and other legal means, winning the support of the growing…

  17. Leader and Spokesman for a People in Exile: Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Samvit

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses Chief Joseph's surrender that marked the beginning of his diplomatic stand for justice in Indian Territory, where his tribe was forcibly exiled in accordance with American Indian policy of the time. Joseph battled for the repatriation of the Nez Perce through protests and other legal means, winning the support of the growing…

  18. NATURAL BIOATTENUATION OF TRICHLOROETHENE AT THE ST. JOSEPH, MICHIGAN SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from the St. Joseph, Michigan, Superfund Site were used in a peer-reviewed video entitled "Natural Bioattenuation of Trichloroethene at the St. Joseph, Michigan Superfund Site." Computer visualizations of the data set show how trichloroethene, or TCE, can degrade under natu...

  19. Joseph Campbell, Jung, Anne Tyler, and "The Cards": The Spiritual Journey in "Searching for Caleb."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Karen M.

    Joseph Campbell, Carl Jung, and Anne Tyler have all dealt with spiritual journeys and card reading in their writings. In his book "Tarot Revelations," Joseph Campbell discusses his first association with tarot cards, dating from 1943, when he was introduced to the symoblism of playing cards by his friend and mentor, Heinrich Zimmer. Carl…

  20. Joseph Campbell, Jung, Anne Tyler, and "The Cards": The Spiritual Journey in "Searching for Caleb."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Karen M.

    Joseph Campbell, Carl Jung, and Anne Tyler have all dealt with spiritual journeys and card reading in their writings. In his book "Tarot Revelations," Joseph Campbell discusses his first association with tarot cards, dating from 1943, when he was introduced to the symoblism of playing cards by his friend and mentor, Heinrich Zimmer. Carl…

  1. 78 FR 50098 - Notice of Inventory Completion: St. Joseph County Sheriff's Department, Centreville, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ..., MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The St. Joseph County Sheriff's..., Centreville, MI 49032, telephone (269) 467-9045. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance.... The human remains were removed from Section 27, Leonidas Township, St. Joseph County, MI. This...

  2. 78 FR 6173 - Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen... Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and Richard Kosiba (Petitioners...

  3. The Chief Joseph Hatchery Program 2014 Annual Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearl, Andrea; Laramie, Matthew; Baldwin, Casey; Rohrback, John; Phillips, Pat

    2017-01-01

    The Chief Joseph Hatchery Program is comprised of both operations and maintenance of the Chief Joseph Hatchery, located near Bridgeport, Washington and the monitoring and evaluation of natural- and hatchery-origin Chinook salmon in the Okanogan Subbasin. In 2014, the Chief Joseph Hatchery released 44,267 yearling and 186,050 subyearling integrated Chinook from the Omak acclimation pond, and 265,656 subyearling segregated Chinook from the hatchery. Full production potential was not met at the hatchery for brood year 2014 because of higher than anticipated pre-spawn mortality in the broodstock. The total Chinook spawn in 2014 included, 132 hatcheryorigin Spring Chinook (66 male, 66 female)(21% of full program), 498 natural-origin summer/fall Chinook (250 male, 248 female)(83% of full program), and 453 hatcheryorigin Summer/Fall Chinook (223 male, 230 female)(92%). Two hundred thousand Spring Chinook parr were received in late October at the Riverside Acclimation Pond from the Winthrop National Fish Hatchery (100% of full production). These fish will be released in the spring of 2015 and mark the beginning of implementation of the non-essential experimental population under section 10(j) of the Endangered Species Act. Monitoring and evaluation consist primarily of operating rotary screw traps on the Okanogan River to monitor juvenile production and outmigration, beach seining and PIT tagging operations at the confluence of the Okanogan and Columbia Rivers, the operation of an adult pilot weir on the Okanogan River, and redd and carcass surveys on the Okanogan and Similkameen rivers. In 2014, the rotary screw traps captured 22,073 natural-origin Chinook, and estimated total juvenile outmigration was 3,265,309 (95% C. I. = 1,809,367- 4,721,251). Via the beach seine, 9,133 juvenile Chinook were captured, and 8,226 were released with an implanted PIT tag. 2,324 adult Chinook were encountered in the weir trap, of which 318 were hatchery-origin and 2,006 were natural

  4. Joseph Gurney Barclay and the 1860 10-inch Cooke refractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, C. E.

    2006-12-01

    Joseph Gurney Barclay (1816-1898) was a partner in the banking firm of Barclay, Bevan & Co. He was, like his grandfather, Robert Barclay of Clapham, a keen Astronomer who observed regularly at his home Knotts Green House in Leyton, Essex, England, and he was a frequent contributor to the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Employing professional astronomers, he made many original observations, especially following the acquisition of a 10-inch Cooke refractor in 1860. Gifted to the Radcliffe Observatory, Oxford in 1885, the 'Barclay Equatorial' continued in professional use until 1935 when it was removed to Marlborough College in Wiltshire, England, where it is now in full computerized use following complete restoration.

  5. Neurology and surrealism: André Breton and Joseph Babinski.

    PubMed

    Haan, Joost; Koehler, Peter J; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-12-01

    Before he became the initiator of the surrealist movement, André Breton (1896-1966) studied medicine and worked as a student in several hospitals and as a stretcher bearer at the front during World War I. There he became interested in psychiatric diseases such as hysteria and psychosis, which later served as a source of inspiration for his surrealist writings and thoughts, in particular on automatic writing. Breton worked under Joseph Babinski at La Pitié, nearby La Salpêtrière, and became impressed by the 'sacred fever' of the famous neurologist. In this article, we describe the relationship between Breton and Babinski and try to trace back whether not only Breton's psychiatric, but also his neurological experiences, have influenced surrealism. We hypothesize that Breton left medicine in 1920 partly as a consequence of his stay with Babinski.

  6. Opportunity View of Private Joseph Field on Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-07

    This image of a target called "Private Joseph Field" combines four images from the microscopic imager on the robotic arm of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, with enhanced color information added from the rover's panoramic camera. This target is within the "Marathon Valley" area of the western rim of Endeavour Crater. The component images were taken on May 29, 2016, during the 4,389th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars. The mosaic shows an area spanning about 2 inches (5 centimeters). Geochemical data indicate the presence of magnesium and iron sulfates at this location, most likely corresponding to the white pebble visible near the center of the image. These sulfates may have formed by the interaction of acidic fluids with the rocks along the rim of Endeavour crater. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21142

  7. Joseph Rotblat: Moral Dilemmas and the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veys, Lucy

    2013-12-01

    John Fitzgerald Kennedy famously said, "One man can make a difference and every man should try."1 Joseph Rotblat (1908-2005) was the quintessence of Kennedy's conviction. He was the only scientist who left Los Alamos after it transpired that the atomic bomb being developed there was intended for use against adversaries other than Nazi Germany. I explore Rotblat's early research in Warsaw and Liverpool, which established his reputation as a highly capable experimental physicist, and which led him to join the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos in 1944. I examine his motivation for resigning from the project in 1945, and the unwillingness of his fellow scientists to follow suit, which draws attention to the continuing discourse on the responsibility of scientists for the consequences of their research.

  8. [François Joseph Double and auscultation].

    PubMed

    Suspène, Michel

    2007-01-01

    François-Joseph Double, co-founder of the Académie de Médecine, was one of those doctors who, right at the beginning of the nineteenth century, developped the accurate observation of the clinical signs of illness, which called earlier practice into question. This led him to study the unaided auscultation of respiratory and cardiac ailments. Shortly before Laennec's fundamental discovery of aided auscultation, Double was describing different sorts of sounds such as those which would later be called tubal breathing, and pulmonary rales or crackles; listening to the heart, he concentrated on problems of the beat, on unusual sounds but did not know how to link them to any specific ailment. The fact that his findings precede those of Laennec have not allowed him the recognition that his pioneering work deserves.

  9. Photographic copy of photograph, Joseph Yolo, photographer, 1936 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, Joseph Yolo, photographer, 1936 (original print located at U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Upper Columbia Area Office, Yakima, Washington). "WAHT A GOVERNMENT CANAL AND AN ASSURED WATER SUPPLY WILL DO IN A DESERT AREA IS SHOWN IN THIS AIR VIEW OF A SECTION OF THE YAKIMA FEDERAL RECLAMATION PROJECT IN CENTRAL WASHINGTON. THE MAIN CANAL IS SEEN RUNNING DOWN THE MIDDLE OF THE VALLEY WITH PATCHES OF ORCHARDS AND FIELDS ON EITHER SIDE, BUT ABOVE THE CANAL LINE THE SAGE BRUSH DESERT REMAINS, AS CAN BE SEEN ON THE LEFT. THE YAKIMA PROJECT SUPPORTS MORE THAN 110,000 PEOPLE IN A TERRITORY WHICH WAS DESERT 35 YEARS AGO. MANY OF THE ORIGINAL SETTLERS WHO CAME, LIKE THOSE WHO ARE NOW SETTLING ON THE VALE PROJECT, TO BREAK THE RAW DESERT LAND, ARE STILL LIVING ON THESE NEATLY CHECKERBOARDED FARMS" - Kachess Dam, Kachess River, 1.5 miles north of Interstate 90, Easton, Kittitas County, WA

  10. Astronaut Joseph Tanner is assisted into his EMU during training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-08-01

    S94-40048 (1 August 1994) --- Astronaut Joseph R. Tanner, mission specialist, is assisted by Boeing suit expert Steve Voyles as he prepares to be submerged in a 25-feet deep pool at the Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F). Though no extravehicular activity (EVA) is planned for the mission, at least two astronauts are trained to perform tasks that would require a space walk in the event of failure of remote systems. In November, Tanner will join four other NASA astronauts and a European mission specialist for a week and a half in space aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. The flight will support the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS-3) mission.

  11. Joseph Rotblat and the moral responsibilities of the scientist.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Martin Clifford

    2009-06-01

    Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat was one of the most distinguished scientists and peace campaigners of the post second world war period. He made significant contributions to nuclear physics and worked on the development of the atomic bomb. He then became one of the world's leading researchers into the biological effects of radiation. His life from the early 1950s until his death in August 2005 was devoted to the abolition of nuclear weapons and peace. For this he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, together with Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs (that he helped found) in 1995. His work in this area ranked with that of Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell and this article is an attempt to summarise his life, achievements, but in particular outline his views on the moral responsibilities of the scientist. He is a towering intellectual figure and his contributions to mankind should be better known and more widely understood.

  12. Science Advisor and Applied Physicist: Joseph Henry Serves His Country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenberg, Marc

    1997-04-01

    When Joseph Henry accepted the postion of secretary of the Smithsonian in 1846, his career changed radically. Although he never ceased thinking of himself as a research scientist and educator, thereafter his chief roles were those of science administrator and advisor to both the executive and legislative branches of the federal government for both science and technology. His effectiveness as an advocate became more important than his skill as an experimental physicist. Even when he entered the laboratory, his role had changed. No longer was he concerned with basic research. As a member of various government boards and committees, Henry spent the last three decades of his life concerned with the application of fundamental knowledge for the improvement of the human condition. This paper will discuss Henry's service on behalf of his country.

  13. Pierre-Joseph Macquer: Chemistry in the French Enlightenment.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent studies of chemistry courses and of academic research at the beginning of the eighteenth century, the perception of chemistry in the French Enlightenment has often been overshadowed by Lavoisier's works. This article proposes three specific case studies selected from Pierre Joseph Macquer's (1718-84) rich career to show the continuous evolution of chemistry throughout the century: medicinal chemistry through the application of the Comte de La Garaye's metallic salt solutions, the emergence of industrial chemistry through a few of Macquer's evaluations at the Bureau du Commerce, and finally communal academic research through the experiments on diamonds using Tschirnhaus's lens. These examples attempt to illustrate the innovative, creative, dynamic, multicultural, and multifaceted chemistry of the Enlightenment.

  14. Joseph Lister: his contributions to early experimental physiology

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Edward R.

    2013-01-01

    Joseph Lister (1827–1912) acquired a lifelong interest in histology and experimental physiology while a student at University College London between 1848 and 1852. His first two publications in 1853 were histological studies of the contractile tissue of the iris and the skin. Studies of inflammation in 1855 progressed to experiments on the nervous control of arteries, using techniques of peripheral nerve division, spinal cord section and needle stimulation of the brain. This interest in nervous mechanisms led to innovative experiments on gut motility and the autonomic nervous system, from which he inferred that sympathetic nerve control was mediated via intrinsic neuronal plexuses in the gut wall, a mode of action confirmed 100 years later, in 1964–65. It is not generally known that Lister was elected FRS for this early experimental work and that his early commitment to experimental science and microscopy was the background to his later work on the development of surgical antisepsis.

  15. Joseph Lister and the performance of antiseptic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Worboys, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights a neglected feature of Joseph Lister's work, namely how, in addition to promoting germ theories and the principles of the antiseptic system, he also devoted much time and effort to communicating the performative aspects of antisepsis and of the many other surgical innovations that he developed. Attention to ‘detail’ and striving for ‘improvement’ were crucial to Listerian practice, and he sought to convey his credo in three main ways: first, his publications aimed at ‘bringing the subject out in the same sort of way as it had been worked out by himself’; second, he set out strict protocols and information on materials and methods, yet also encouraged surgeons to improvise; and third, he made himself an exemplar of a new form of professionalism, which made constancy and vigilance in practice a moral duty for surgeons. PMID:24686323

  16. Astronaut Joseph Kerwin test subject Lower Body Negative Pressure experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot, serves as test subject for the Lower Body Negative Pressure Experiment. Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, Skylab 2 pilot, assists Kerwin with the blood pressure cuff. They are in the experiment and work area of the Orbital Workshop crew quarters of the Skylab 1 and 2 space station cluster in Earth orbit. Kerwin is lying in the lower body negative pressure device. The purpose of the M092 experiment is to provide information concerning the time course of cardiovascular adaptation during flight, and to provide inflight data for predicting the degree of orthostatic intolerance and impairment of physical capacity to be expected upon return to Earth environment. The data collected in support of M092 are blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, vectorcardiogram, LBNPD pressure, leg volume changes, and body weight.

  17. Science and Worldviews in the Classroom: Joseph Priestley and Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    This paper elaborates on the life and publications of Joseph Priestley, the eighteenth-century polymath. The paper outlines his particular place in the European Enlightenment; it stresses the importance of philosophy and worldview in his scientific work on pneumatic chemistry, the composition of air, and his discovery of the process of photosynthesis (or the ‘restoration of air’ as it was called at the time); finally the paper indicates ways in which Priestley’s work on photosynthesis can be utilised in the school classroom to advance the understanding of scientific subject matter, to promote an understanding of the nature of scientific procedure and methodology, and finally to evaluate some basic tenets of the European Enlightenment that Priestley so passionately advocated.

  18. Sister Mary Joseph's nodule as initial pancreatic cancer manifestation.

    PubMed

    Vallejo Bernad, Cristina; Casamayor Franco, María Carmen; Hakim Alonso, Sofía

    2017-02-01

    We report the case of an 85-year-old female patient who presented with umbilical pain associated with an indurated growth, the whole being apparently consistent with incarcerated umbilical hernia, which prompted an urgent surgical procedure for its removal. The pathology study revealed dermal infiltration by a malignancy. Gland tumor cells expressed an immunohistochemical profile initially consistent with a pancreatic origin. In view of these findings a CT scan was performed, which revealed a pancreatic tail tumor as well as multiple hepatic metastasis. Skin metastasis is a rare sign usually reflecting a carcinoma of unknown origin. Umbilical skin metastasis, called Sister Mary Joseph´s nodule, reflect an intra-abdominal tumor, being pancreatic cancer strange.

  19. Highlighting High Performance: Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    2002-11-01

    Oberlin College’s Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies is a high-performance building featuring an expansive photovoltaic system and a closed-loop groundwater heat pump system. Designers incorporated energy-efficient components and materials

  20. STS-51A mission specialist Joseph P. Allen during WETF training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Portrait view of STS-51A mission specialist Joseph P. Allen during training in the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). He is wearing the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) minus the helmet.

  1. Mission Specialst Joseph P. Allen ready for launch of STS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Mission Specialst Joseph P. Allen, fully suited in his Shuttle constant wear garment and 'wired' for monitoring (note sensors on face and head), seems ready for launch in his seat in the middeck area of the Space Shuttle Columbia.

  2. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer August 10th, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer August 10th, 1936 (Copied from small photo taken by survey members) OLD APARTMENT HOUSE - Jansonist Colony, Old Apartment House, Main Street, Bishop Hill, Henry County, IL

  3. Flattened facial colliculus on magnetic resonance imaging in Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yoshitsugu; Ito, Shoichi; Makino, Takahiro; Kanai, Kazuaki; Arai, Kimihito; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2012-07-01

    Atrophy of the pontine tegmentum and facial colliculus is a characteristic pathological feature of Machado-Joseph disease. We assessed whether this finding can be detected by conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 17 patients with genetically confirmed Machado-Joseph disease, 15 disease controls (spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy), and 17 normal subjects were examined using a 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. The widths of the facial colliculus, pontine tegmentum, and pontine base and the area of the fourth ventricle were measured on axial T2-weighted imaging. Pathological examination was performed in 9 Machado-Joseph disease patients. In addition, visual inspection of the facial colliculus was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic analysis. The width of the facial colliculus was significantly smaller in Machado-Joseph disease patients (0.37 ± 0.16 mm; mean ± standard deviation) than in normal subjects (0.73 ± 0.30 mm; P < .01), whereas the width of the pontine tegmentum was smaller in both Machado-Joseph disease (4.85 ± 0.58 mm) and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (4.72 ± 0.59) patients than in normal subjects (6.35 ± 0.74 mm; P < .01). Visual evaluation of the facial colliculus showed sufficient area under the receiver operating characteristic curves to differentiate Machado-Joseph disease from dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (0.78) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (0.87). Pathological evaluation showed significant atrophy of the facial colliculus in all Machado-Joseph disease patients. Atrophy of the facial colliculus is a feasible magnetic resonance imaging finding for diagnosing Machado-Joseph disease, and it is easily found as a flattening of the fourth ventricular floor. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Muscle cramp in Machado-Joseph disease: altered motor axonal excitability properties and mexiletine treatment.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Kazuaki; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Arai, Kimihito; Sung, Jia-Ying; Ogawara, Kazue; Hattori, Takamichi

    2003-04-01

    Machado-Joseph disease is one of the most common hereditary spinocerebellar degenerative disorders with a wide range of clinical manifestations. Pathology studies have shown mild to moderate loss of anterior horn cells and, in terms of spinal pathology, Machado-Joseph disease is regarded as a type of lower motoneuron disease. Muscle cramps are often associated with lower motoneuron disorders, but features of cramps in Machado-Joseph disease patients have never been studied. We investigated the incidence and nature of muscle cramps in Machado-Joseph disease patients, the excitability properties of motor axons [strength-duration time constant (tau(SD)), threshold electrotonus, refractoriness and supernormality] using threshold tracking and the effects of mexiletine hydrochloride on those cramps. Of 20 consecutive patients, 16 (80%) had frequent, severe muscle cramps in the legs, trunk or arms that disturbed their daily activities. The frequency of pathological muscle cramps was similar to that for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (68%) and higher than those for patients with spinal muscular atrophy (33%) or peripheral axonal neuropathy (24%). Threshold-tracking studies showed that tau(SD), which in part reflects Na(+) conductance at the resting membrane potential, was significantly greater in the Machado-Joseph disease patients than in normal subjects; severe muscle cramps were associated with a longer tau(SD). Threshold electrotonus, refractoriness and supernormality were not significantly different between Machado-Joseph disease patients and normal subjects. Eight Machado-Joseph disease patients with severe cramps, who received mexiletine treatment, experienced nearly complete relief with a partial normalization of tau(SD) (P = 0.08). Muscle cramps are a very frequent and disabling factor in Machado-Joseph disease. Pathological muscle cramps responded well to mexiletine treatment, and this is consistent with the hypothesis that they are caused by an

  5. Strabismus and Micro-Opsoclonus in Machado-Joseph Disease.

    PubMed

    Ghasia, Fatema F; Wilmot, George; Ahmed, Anwar; Shaikh, Aasef G

    2016-08-01

    We describe novel deficits of gaze holding and ocular alignment in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, also known as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD). Twelve MJD patients were studied. Clinical assessments and quantitative ocular alignment measures were performed. Eye movements were quantitatively assessed with corneal curvature tracker and video-oculography. Strabismus was seen in ten MJD patients. Four patients had mild to moderate intermittent exotropia, three had esotropia, one had skew deviation, one had hypotropia, and one patient had moderate exophoria. Three strabismic patients had V-pattern. Near point of convergence was normal in two out of three patients with exotropia. Gaze holding deficits were also common. Eight patients had gaze-evoked nystagmus, and five had micro-opsoclonus. Other ocular motor deficits included saccadic dysmetria in eight patients, whereas all had saccadic interruption of smooth pursuit. Strabismus and micro-opsoclonus are common in MJD. Coexisting ophthalmoplegia or vergence abnormalities in our patients with exotropia that comprised 50 % of the cohort could not explain the type of strabismus in our patients. Therefore, it is possible that involvement of the brainstem, the deep cerebellar nuclei, and the superior cerebellar peduncle are the physiological basis for exotropia in these patients. Micro-opsoclonus was also common in MJD. Brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei lesion also explains micro-opsoclonus, whereas brainstem deficits can describe slow saccades seen in our patients with MJD.

  6. Executive and emotional dysfunction in Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Zawacki, Tricia M; Grace, Janet; Friedman, Joseph H; Sudarsky, Lewis

    2002-09-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia. Few studies have examined the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profiles of patients with MJD. In this study, six individuals with MJD were given a battery of neuropsychological tests. Relative impairments on timed verbal attention tasks and verbal fluency (Stroop, Oral Symbol Digit Modalities, and Controlled Oral Word Association Test) were found. Other executive impairments also were seen on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, independent of motor dysfunction severity. Moderate- to severe levels of depressive symptoms were endorsed by four of the six patients, and caregivers observed increased apathy in the patients. Impaired executive and emotional functioning in MJD does not appear to be related to ataxia severity. These patients did not meet the criteria for dementia. General cognitive abilities, language, list learning, story recall, and untimed tasks of attention were within normal limits. Impaired executive abilities and emotional functioning in MJD patients is consistent with disruption of frontal-subcortical systems. Copyright 2002 Movement Disorder Society.

  7. Joseph Carpue's file drawer experiment - A murder mystery from 1801.

    PubMed

    Freshwater, M Felix

    2015-12-01

    Today unpublished or "file drawer" experiments are the impetus for trial registration and reporting of all results. In 1801, Joseph Carpue, the father of modern plastic surgery, did a file drawer experiment for Benjamin West, who was President of the Royal Academy of Arts. George III had commissioned West to create the largest stained glass window ever created whose theme, the Crucifixion, was based upon Michelangelo's drawing. Subsequently, West suffered a series of political, professional and economic setbacks. In the summer of 1801, West's project was delayed. By the fall, West hoped that independent scientific confirmation of his design could salvage the project. West approached Carpue who obtained a murderer's fresh corpse that he crucified and documented the results with plaster casts created by sculptor Thomas Banks. Carpue's experiment showed that West's window design wrongly depicted the Crucifixion because West had posed the hands and shoulders incorrectly. West died in 1820 without ever being associated with Carpue's experiment. Carpue's obituary in The Lancet in 1846 contained Carpue's handwritten note that described the experiment but not West's Royal commission. As no records or publications associate the cast with West project, this can be considered to be a file drawer experiment. After 1801, West made further drawings of the Crucifixion that showed the figures in the same position as the cast. Nineteenth century auction catalogues suggest that West made a corrected Crucifixion painting, but its current location remains a mystery.

  8. Profile: Joseph Marek: 2016-17 ASCP President.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Marlene Z

    It was four months in Alaska, in the middle of winter, that changed Joseph Marek's view of what it means to be a pharmacist. Marek was on his last rotation in pharmacy school when he experienced the kind of practice that he wanted for himself. He found that kind of practice as a consultant pharmacist, and next month, Marek, 49, will become the 2016-2017 president of the American Society of Consulting Pharmacists. Working at the Public Health Service (PHS) in the Arctic Circle in 1990, he dispensed and carried out clinical duties with the chief pharmacist and provided care to the native Inuit population through the Indian Health Service. "PHS had a walk-in clinic where the physicians worked closely with the pharmacist to do medication management for the patients," he said. The pharmacists also provided medications to the surrounding villages (50,000 square miles) and had to coordinate the dispensing/delivery of these medications when the physicians visited them. "The doctors highly valued the pharmacists' clinical knowledge, and it was a great environment to learn how to collaborate with the medical/health care team to benefit the Inuits," he said. "Everyone worked together and you could see the outcomes quickly."

  9. Electrical Enlightenment: Joseph Priestley's Historical and Experimental Studies of Electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boantza, Victor

    Joseph Priestley (1733-1804) was one of the most controversial public figures of the eighteenth century. A true Enlightenment polymath, he wrote more than two hundred books, pamphlets, sermons, and essays on subjects ranging from science to politics and from metaphysics to theology. He was a religious dissenter, political radical, vocal supporter of the French Revolution, and lifelong defender of the losing side in the Chemical Revolution. Priestley is best known for having ``discovered'' oxygen in the 1770s and for his lasting contributions to pneumatic chemistry. Yet his first scientific fascination, while teaching at Warrington Academy, was electricity--one of the greatest scientific fads of the Enlightenment. Priestley's work on electricity, both historical and experimental, culminated in his History and Present State of Electricity (1767), which became a standard textbook on the subject for nearly a century, and went through numerous editions and translations. Situating Priestley's electrical investigations against the background of eighteenth-century ideals of scientific theory and practice, especially concerning physics, experimental philosophy, and natural history, illuminates the relations between science, society, and epistemology in the Enlightenment.

  10. Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer

    PubMed Central

    Buchmann, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale. PMID:26467835

  11. The way of sex: Joseph Needham and Jolan Chang.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Leon Antonio

    2012-09-01

    This paper analyses the understandings of Daoist alchemy and Chinese sexuality of Joseph Needham and his friend and correspondent, the Chinese-Swedish writer Jolan Chang (Chang Chung-lan, 1917-2002). Using the extensive correspondence between the two men, as well as Needham's files on "inner alchemy" deposited at the Needham Research Institute, the paper begins with a partial reconstruction of a 1977 symposium, chaired by Needham, to promote Chang's new book, The Tao of Love and Sex: The Ancient Chinese Way to Ecstasy. Needham and Chang's visions of Chinese sex are then read against excerpts from Science and Civilisation in China, specifically Volume V: Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Part 5: Spagyrical Discovery and Invention: Physiological Alchemy (1983). Three inter-related aspects are explored. First, reading Science and Civilisation in China against materials in the Needham archives offers crucial hints to Needham's historiography and historical practice. Second, the way that Daoist regimens came to be actively reconstructed and repackaged as practices concerned with the enhancement of sexual pleasure and intensity. Third, the investigation of the networks and circulations of assumptions, visions, fantasies about "China". Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fibroblasts of Machado Joseph Disease patients reveal autophagy impairment

    PubMed Central

    Onofre, Isabel; Mendonça, Nuno; Lopes, Sara; Nobre, Rui; de Melo, Joana Barbosa; Carreira, Isabel Marques; Januário, Cristina; Gonçalves, António Freire; de Almeida, Luis Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Machado Joseph Disease (MJD) is the most frequent autosomal dominantly inherited cerebellar ataxia caused by the over-repetition of a CAG trinucleotide in the ATXN3 gene. This expansion translates into a polyglutamine tract within the ataxin-3 protein that confers a toxic gain-of-function to the mutant protein ataxin-3, contributing to protein misfolding and intracellular accumulation of aggregates and neuronal degeneration. Autophagy impairment has been shown to be one of the mechanisms that contribute for the MJD phenotype. Here we investigated whether this phenotype was present in patient-derived fibroblasts, a common somatic cell type used in the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells and subsequent differentiation into neurons, for in vitro disease modeling. We generated and studied adult dermal fibroblasts from 5 MJD patients and 4 healthy individuals and we found that early passage MJD fibroblasts exhibited autophagy impairment with an underlying mechanism of decreased autophagosome production. The overexpression of beclin-1 on MJD fibroblasts reverted partially autophagy impairment by increasing the autophagic flux but failed to increase the levels of autophagosome production. Overall, our results provide a well-characterized MJD fibroblast resource for neurodegenerative disease research and contribute for the understanding of mutant ataxin-3 biology and its molecular consequences. PMID:27328712

  13. Franz Joseph Gall and music: the faculty and the bump.

    PubMed

    Eling, Paul; Finger, Stanley; Whitaker, Harry

    2015-01-01

    The traditional story maintains that Franz Joseph Gall's (1758-1828) scientific program began with his observations of schoolmates with bulging eyes and good verbal memories. But his search to understand human nature, in particular individual differences in capacities, passions, and tendencies, can also be traced to other important observations, one being of a young girl with an exceptional talent for music. Rejecting contemporary notions of cognition, Gall concluded that behavior results from the interaction of a limited set of basic faculties, each with its own processes for perception and memory, each with its own territory in both cerebral or cerebellar cortices. Gall identified 27 faculties, one being the sense of tone relations or music. The description of the latter is identical in both his Anatomie et Physiologie and Sur les Fonctions du Cerveau et sur Celles de Chacune de ses Parties, where he provided positive and negative evidences and discussed findings from humans and lower animals, for the faculty. The localization of the cortical faculty for talented musicians, he explained, is demonstrated by a "bump" on each side of the skull just above the angle of the eye; hence, the lower forehead of musicians is broader or squarer than in other individuals. Additionally, differences between singing and nonsinging birds also correlate with cranial features. Gall even brought age, racial, and national differences into the picture. What he wrote about music reveals much about his science and creative thinking.

  14. Oral Histories in Meteoritics and Planetary Science - XVII: Joseph Goldstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Derek W. G.

    2012-05-01

    In this interview, Joseph Goldstein (Fig. 1) recounts how he became interested in meteorites during his graduate studies working with Robert Ogilvie at MIT. By matching the Ni profiles observed across taenite fields in the Widmanstätten structure of iron meteorites with profiles he computed numerically he was able to determine cooling rates as the meteorites cooled through 650-400 °C. Upon graduating, he worked with a team of meteorite researchers led by Lou Walter at Goddard Space Flight Center where for 4 years he attempted to understand metallographic structures by reproducing them in the laboratory. Preferring an academic environment, Joe accepted a faculty position in the rapidly expanding metallurgy department at Lehigh University where he was responsible for their new electron microprobe. He soon became involved in studying the metal from lunar soils and identifying the metallic component from its characteristic iron and nickel compositions. Over the next two decades he refined these studies of Ni diffusion in iron meteorites, particularly the effect of phosphorus in the process, which resulted in superior Fe-Ni-P phase diagrams and improved cooling rates for the iron meteorites. After a period as vice president for research at Lehigh, in 1993 he moved to the University of Massachusetts to serve as dean of engineering, but during these administrative appointments Joe produced a steady stream of scientific results. Joe has served as Councilor, Treasurer, Vice President, and President of the Meteoritical Society. He received the Leonard Medal in 2005, the Sorby Award in 1999, and the Dumcumb Award for in 2008.

  15. Machado-Joseph disease in Brazil: from the first descriptions to the emergence as the most common spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, José Luiz; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Radvany, João; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2012-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of Azorean ancestry firstly described in 1972. Since then, several Brazilian researchers have studied clinical and genetic issues related to the disease. Nowadays, Machado-Joseph disease is considered the most common spinocerebellar ataxia worldwide. Machado-Joseph disease still has no specific therapy to arrest progression, but the unclear pathophysiological mechanism, features related to genetic characteristics, phenotype variability, apparently global involvement of the nervous system in the disease and the therapeutic challenges continue to attract investigators in the field of spinocerebellar ataxias. Brazilian researchers have distinguished themselves in the ongoing investigation seeking new knowledge about Machado-Joseph disease.

  16. Nonmotor and extracerebellar features in Machado-Joseph disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, José Luiz; França, Marcondes C; Braga-Neto, Pedro; D'Abreu, Anelyssa; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Saute, Jonas A; Teive, Hélio A; Caramelli, Paulo; Jardim, Laura Bannach; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani P

    2013-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 or Machado-Joseph disease is the most common spinocerebellar ataxia worldwide, and the high frequency of nonmotor manifestations in Machado-Joseph disease demonstrates how variable is the clinical expression of this single genetic entity. Anatomical, physiological, clinical, and functional neuroimaging data reinforce the idea of a degenerative process involving extracerebellar regions of the nervous system in Machado-Joseph disease. Brain imaging and neuropathologic studies have revealed atrophy of the pons, basal ganglia, midbrain, medulla oblongata, multiple cranial nerve nuclei, and thalamus and of the frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital, and limbic lobes. This review provides relevant information about nonmotor manifestations and extracerebellar symptoms in Machado-Joseph disease. The main nonmotor manifestations of Machado-Joseph disease described in previous data and discussed in this article are: sleep disorders, cognitive and affective disturbances, psychiatric symptoms, olfactory dysfunction, peripheral neuropathy, pain, cramps, fatigue, nutritional problems, and dysautonomia. In addition, we conducted a brief discussion of noncerebellar motor manifestations, highlighting movement disorders. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Machado-Joseph Disease: from first descriptions to new perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Machado-Joseph Disease (MJD), also known as spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), represents the most common form of SCA worldwide. MJD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder of late onset, involving predominantly the cerebellar, pyramidal, extrapyramidal, motor neuron and oculomotor systems; although sharing features with other SCAs, the identification of minor, but more specific signs, facilitates its differential diagnosis. MJD presents strong phenotypic heterogeneity, which has justified the classification of patients into three main clinical types. Main pathological lesions are observed in the spinocerebellar system, as well as in the cerebellar dentate nucleus. MJD's causative mutation consists in an expansion of an unstable CAG tract in exon 10 of the ATXN3 gene, located at 14q32.1. Haplotype-based studies have suggested that two main founder mutations may explain the present global distribution of the disease; the ancestral haplotype is of Asian origin, and has an estimated age of around 5,800 years, while the second mutational event has occurred about 1,400 years ago. The ATXN3 gene encodes for ataxin-3, which is ubiquitously expressed in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and, among other functions, is thought to participate in cellular protein quality control pathways. Mutated ATXN3 alleles consensually present about 61 to 87 CAG repeats, resulting in an expanded polyglutamine tract in ataxin-3. This altered protein gains a neurotoxic function, through yet unclear mechanisms. Clinical variability of MJD is only partially explained by the size of the CAG tract, which leaves a residual variance that should be explained by still unknown additional factors. Several genetic tests are available for MJD, and Genetic Counseling Programs have been created to better assist the affected families, namely on what concerns the possibility of pre-symptomatic testing. The main goal of this review was to bring together updated knowledge on MJD, covering

  18. Cytokines in Machado Joseph Disease/Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3.

    PubMed

    da Silva Carvalho, Gerson; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Haas, Clarissa Branco; Torrez, Vitor Rocco; Brochier, Andressa Wigner; Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Gheno, Tailise; Russo, Aline; Monte, Thais Lampert; Schumacher-Schuh, Artur; D'Avila, Rui; Donis, Karina Carvalho; Castilhos, Raphael Machado; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Torman, Vanessa Leotti; Camey, Suzi; Portela, Luis Valmor; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe the serum concentrations of a broad spectrum of cytokines in symptomatic and asymptomatic carriers of Machado Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) CAG expansions. Molecularly confirmed carriers and controls were studied. Age at onset, disease duration, and clinical scales Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), Neurological Examination Score for Spinocerebellar Ataxias (NESSCA), SCA Functional Index (SCAFI), and Composite Cerebellar Functional Score (CCFS) were obtained from the symptomatic carriers. Serum was obtained from all individuals and a cytokine panel "consisted of" eotaxin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2, IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, interferon gamma-induced protein (IP)-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-a, MIP-b, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was analyzed. In a subgroup of symptomatic carriers, the cytokine panel was repeated after 360 days. Cytokine distribution among groups was studied by discriminant analysis; changes in serum levels after 360 days were studied by generalized estimation equation. Sixty-six symptomatic carriers, 13 asymptomatic carriers, and 43 controls were studied. No differences in cytokine patterns were found between controls and carriers of the CAG expansions or between controls and symptomatic carriers only. In contrast, eotaxin concentrations were significantly higher in asymptomatic than in symptomatic carriers or in controls (p = 0.001, ANCOVA). Eotaxin did not correlate with age, disease duration, CAG expansion, NESSCA score, and SARA score. Among symptomatic carriers, eotaxin dropped after 360 days (p = 0.039, GEE). SCA3/MJD patients presented a benign pattern of

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Joseph Henry: The Rise of an American Scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Elspeth

    1998-09-01

    Albert Moyer has clearly done his research into the events of Joseph Henry's life. The personal, professional, sociological and scientific aspects have been meticulously detailed throughout and the ordering, as in the chapter headings, is chronological, so that there is some element of each of these aspects in each chapter. This is unfortunately both the strength and the weakness of the biography, as the detail seemed to me to be the most remarkable characteristic of the writing. But, the bigger stories, or the themes, which might have been possible, seemed to get lost. Hence, I found this a book for those who are seriously interested in Joseph Henry; but for those whose interest might be more general, say having an interest in nineteenth century growth of scientific institutions, or wanting to understand the conceptual development of electromagnetism, there seemed to be too much which came from the Henry point of view, rather than locating Henry within his time and context. This is a remark about style, rather than omission of content, as the myriad of details in each paragraph certainly inform the reader about the context. For instance, some sociology of the USA in the nineteenth century could be inferred, say showing how a young man from a modest background might make his way into a professional life, but the information is so particularly a description of Henry's experience that one has to rely on prior knowledge or make assumptions in order to create a sociological perspective. That is, I now know, what happened to Henry, but I do not know if his case was in any sense typical or atypical. Similarly there is information about education in general at that time, and scientific education, research and its publication, as it applied to Henry. The relationships between science in the USA and in Europe have a place, and there is quite a bit of information about the institutions in which Henry worked, particularly Albany Academy, Princeton and the Smithsonian. Henry

  20. 77 FR 61657 - Indiana Northeastern Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-In Branch and St. Joseph Counties, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... St. Joseph Counties, MI Indiana Northeastern Railroad Company (IN) has filed a verified notice of.... Joseph County, Mich. (the Line). The Line traverses United States Postal Service Zip Codes 49036, 49028... .'' Decided: October 2, 2012. By the Board, Rachel D. Campbell, Director, Office of Proceedings. Derrick A...

  1. Sister Mary Joseph Nodules on 99mTc HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy in patients with neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hongli; Zhang, Yingqiang; Li, Fang

    2015-02-01

    A Sister Mary Joseph nodule represents an umbilical metastasis, which is more commonly caused by a primary malignancy in gastrointestinal tract or from reproductive system. We report Sister Mary Joseph nodules caused by neuroendocrine tumor and revealed on Tc HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy.

  2. [The vitalism of Paul-Joseph Barthez (1734-1806)].

    PubMed

    Han, Hee Jin

    2010-06-30

    In The Logic of Life (1970), Francois Jacob (1920- ), Nobel Prize laureate in Physiology or Medicine (1965), proclaimed the end of vitalism based on the concept of life. More than two decades before this capital sentence condemning vitalism was pronounced, Georges Canguilhem (1904-1995), a French philosopher of medicine, already acknowledged that eighteenth-century vitalism was scientifically retrograde and politically reactionary or counter-revolutionary insofar as it was rooted in the animism of Georg Ernst Stahl (1660-1734). The negative preconception of the term 'vitalism' came to be established as an orthodox view, since Claude Bernard (1813-1878) unfairly criticized contemporary vitalism in order to propagate his idea of experimental medicine. An eminent evolutionary biologist like Ernst Mayr (1904-2005) still defended similar views in This is Biology (1997), arguing that if vitalists were decisive and convincing in their rejection of the Cartesian model (negative heuristics), however they were equally indecisive and unconvincing in their own explanatory endeavors (positive heuristics). Historically speaking, vitalists came to the forefront for their outstanding criticism of Cartesian mechanism and physicochemical reductionism, while their innovative concepts and theories were underestimated and received much less attention. Is it true that vitalism was merely a pseudo-science, representing a kind of romanticism or mysticism in biomedical science? Did vitalists lack any positive heuristics in their biomedical research? Above all, what was actually the so.called 'vitalism'? This paper aims to reveal the positive heuristics of vitalism defined by Paul.Joseph Barthez (1734-1806) who was the founder of the vitalist school of Montpellier. To this end, his work and idea are introduced with regard to the vying doctrines in physiology and medicine. At the moment when he taught at the medical school of Montpellier, his colleagues advocated the mechanism of Rene

  3. Highlighting High Performance Buildings: Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    2002-11-01

    Oberlin College's Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies is a high-performance building featuring an expansive photovoltaic system and a closed-loop groundwater heat pump system. Designers incorporated energy-efficient components and materials that are local, non-toxic, and durable.

  4. General Education Assessment and Fulfilling the Mercy Mission at the University of Saint Joseph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the processes and procedures the University of Saint Joseph used to conduct a systematic assessment of mission-related student-learning outcomes found in the General Education curriculum, and thus assess how well the institution was fulfilling its Mercy mission. The assessment showed student learning strengths and gaps and…

  5. 75 FR 73135 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc. Joseph M. Farley Nuclear Plant, Environmental Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... effect radiation exposures to plant workers and members of the public. The proposed action does not... are needed. No effects on the aquatic or terrestrial habitat in the vicinity of the plant, or to... COMMISSION Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc. Joseph M. Farley Nuclear Plant, Environmental Assessment...

  6. Archaeological Investigations at Site 45-DO-326, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    idetmlifil by blak niaber) Cultural Resources, Washington Microblades Columbia River rrehistory Cascade Phase Chief Joseph Dam Project Archaeology Frenchman ...Stone tool manufacture, primarily as part of a generalized flake tool Industry utilizing imported cryptocrystalline stones, was relatively consistent...unifacial or bifacial edge on a cryptocrystalline tool likely evidences light cutting or scraping use on a soft, elastic material. However, smoothing

  7. The Joseph Bellamy House: Great Awakening in Puritan New England. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pape, Barbara Bradbury

    The small rural town of Bethlehem, Connecticut, contains pristine examples of modest 18th-century houses that surround a charming village green. Opposite the village green, the Reverend Joseph Bellamy's immense white clapboard house rises from a hilltop, an imposing presence that makes the village appear diminutive. The house stands today as a…

  8. Joseph Walker, a Black Playwright, Exhorts Counselors and Black People to Deal With Themselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Joseph

    1976-01-01

    This is an interview with Joseph Walker, black playwright. He attempts to reflect back to the black community their experience in a white controlled world. In this interview, he discusses his views of the black experience, the pressures on man-woman relationships, and the role of black psychiatry. (NG)

  9. Cervical and ocular vestibular evoked potentials in Machado-Joseph disease: Functional involvement of otolith pathways.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rodrigo Souza; Pereira, Melissa Marques; Pedroso, José Luiz; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas; Manzano, Gilberto Mastrocola

    2015-11-15

    Machado-Joseph disease is defined as an autosomal dominant ataxic disorder caused by degeneration of the cerebellum and its connections and is associated with a broad range of clinical symptoms. The involvement of the vestibular system is responsible for several symptoms and signs observed in the individuals affected by the disease. We measured cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in a sample of Machado-Joseph disease patients in order to assess functional pathways involved. Bilateral measures of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP) were obtained from 14 symptomatic patients with genetically proven Machado-Joseph disease and compared with those from a control group of 20 healthy subjects. Thirteen (93%) patients showed at least one abnormal test result; oVEMP and cVEMP responses were absent in 17/28 (61%) and 11/28 (39%) measures, respectively; and prolonged latency of cVEMP was found in 3/28 (11%) measures. Of the 13 patients with abnormal responses, 9/13 (69%) patients showed discordant abnormal responses: four with absent oVEMP and present cVEMP, two with absent cVEMP and present oVEMP, and three showed unilateral prolonged cVEMP latencies. Both otolith-related vestibulocollic and vestibulo-ocular pathways are severely affected in Machado-Joseph disease patients evaluated by VEMPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Plight of the American Writer and Joseph Brodsky in Exile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updike, John; Jacoby, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Two articles originally published in the 1970s are reprinted. The first argues that the American writer no longer knows what is expected of him and has difficulty engaging in conversation with the reader. The second examines the work and teaching of Joseph Brodsky, a Russian poet, while in the United States. (MSE)

  11. Ethnographic Research and Globalization: A Discussion of Joseph Tobin's Model of Video-Cued Multivocal Ethnography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watras, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Joseph Tobin made an impact on the field of comparative education in 2009 when he used a unique form of ethnography to illuminate the effects of world-wide forces, such as modernization, on schools in specific countries. Earlier, in 1989, he published "Preschool in Three Cultures" with co-authors David Wu and Dana Davidson. The…

  12. Assessing conservation effects on water quality in the St. Joseph River Watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agriculture is a major contributor to non-point source pollution of streams, rivers and lakes. The St. Joseph River is a major drinking water source in northeastern Indiana that has been contaminated by chemicals in runoff. A Source Water Protection Initiative project began in 2002, with the focus ...

  13. Astronaut Joseph P. Allen on flight deck taking photographs of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Astronaut Joseph P. Allen, STS-5 mission specialist, lets a spot-meter float free during a period devoted to out the window photographs of the Earth from the orbiting Columbia. Allen is on the flight deck positioned behind the pilot's station.

  14. Conceiving of Concept Maps to Foster Meaningful Learning: An Interview with Joseph D. Novak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardellini, Liberato

    2004-01-01

    Joseph Novak discusses the concept of mapping to capture and archive expert knowledge. He worked in various corporations where he used the concept of mapping for research and development efforts and to create and transfer knowledge and information in corporate environments.

  15. Exceptional Scholarship and Democratic Agendas: Interviews with John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2006-01-01

    This portraiture study of four exceptional scholars in education--John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni--provides insight into their scholarly work and life habits, direction and aspirations, assessment and analysis of major trends in the profession, and advice for aspiring leaders and academics. Telephone interviews with…

  16. Exceptional Scholarship and Democratic Agendas: Interviews with John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    This portraiture study of four exceptional scholars in education--John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni--provides insight into their scholarly work and life habits, direction and aspirations, assessment and analysis of major trends in the profession, and advice for aspiring leaders and academics. Telephone interviews with…

  17. Joseph Schwab, Self-Study of Teaching and Teacher Education Practices Proponent? A Personal Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Cheryl J.

    2008-01-01

    The field of self-study of teaching and teacher education practices, like a number of other areas of inquiry, appears negligent in paying intellectual debt to Joseph Schwab who revolutionalized the fields of curriculum and teaching in the 1970s with his ideas about the practical. In this article, I trace my personal journey of coming to know…

  18. Joseph Pulitzer II and Advertising Censorship, 1929-1939. Journalism Monographs Number Seventy-seven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Daniel W.

    In an age of little or no consumer protection, the St. Louis "Post-Dispatch," under the guidance of Joseph Pulitzer II, was the first and most successful practitioner of self-imposed censorship of advertising, a practice that continues to this day. Beginning on May 1, 1929, the "Post-Dispatch" announced an aggressive program of…

  19. Riotous Images: Representations of Joseph Priestley in British Prints during the French Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on printed images that were published in Britain during the 1790s, depicting the educationist, theologian, chemist, physicist, historian and philosopher Joseph Priestley (1733-1804). It is argued that such etchings and engravings are indicative of, and contributed to, the lifelong political and historical education of late…

  20. Riotous Images: Representations of Joseph Priestley in British Prints during the French Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on printed images that were published in Britain during the 1790s, depicting the educationist, theologian, chemist, physicist, historian and philosopher Joseph Priestley (1733-1804). It is argued that such etchings and engravings are indicative of, and contributed to, the lifelong political and historical education of late…

  1. From Chemical Analysis to Analyzing Chemical Education: An Interview with Joseph J. Lagowski

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardellini, Liberato

    2010-01-01

    This interview provides glimpses of Joseph J. Lagowski and his life from the time he played with a Gilbert chemistry set, to his tenure at The University of Texas at Austin. His initial interest in chemistry was further nurtured and developed thanks to an excellent high school teacher. In the interview, Lagowski discusses his research in…

  2. Ethnographic Research and Globalization: A Discussion of Joseph Tobin's Model of Video-Cued Multivocal Ethnography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watras, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Joseph Tobin made an impact on the field of comparative education in 2009 when he used a unique form of ethnography to illuminate the effects of world-wide forces, such as modernization, on schools in specific countries. Earlier, in 1989, he published "Preschool in Three Cultures" with co-authors David Wu and Dana Davidson. The…

  3. Recent theoretical chemical dynamics at Rochester in the paths of Joseph O. Hirschfelder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. F.; Lam, K.-S.; Bhattacharyya, D. K.; Hutchinson, M.; Zimmerman, I. H.; Devries, P. L.; Yuan, J.-M.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent theoretical studies of gas-phase molecular rate processes, including various effects of laser radiation, is presented in the context of the extensive and influential work of Joseph O. Hirschfelder during the past half-century. The topics addressed are energy transfer, chemical reactions, unimolecular dissociation, transition states, and bound-continuum interactions.

  4. What's in a Coauthor?: (Re)Locating Joseph Denney in Composition History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This article reassesses the Fred Newton Scott and Joseph Villiers Denney collaborative textbook authorship by emphasizing Denney's generally overlooked contributions to that coauthorship and to the field of composition generally. Through an examination of Denney's scholarly work and his personal correspondence with Scott during the period marking…

  5. Reflections on Preparing Educators to Evaluate the Efficacy of Educational Technology: An Interview with Joseph South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen; Spector, J. Michael; Persichitte, Kay; Meiers, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Joseph South, an educational researcher, technology consultant, and former director of the U.S. Office of Educational Technology participated in a research initiative on Educational Technology Efficacy Research organized by the Jefferson Education Accelerator, Digital Promise, and the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia. The…

  6. What's in a Coauthor?: (Re)Locating Joseph Denney in Composition History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This article reassesses the Fred Newton Scott and Joseph Villiers Denney collaborative textbook authorship by emphasizing Denney's generally overlooked contributions to that coauthorship and to the field of composition generally. Through an examination of Denney's scholarly work and his personal correspondence with Scott during the period marking…

  7. A Curriculum for Character Education: Joseph Schwab and the Ramah Camps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Burton; Pereira, Peter; Roby, Thomas; Block, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Joseph Schwab (1909-1988) is known for his scathing critique of curriculum theory and its over reliance on quantitative models derived from social science theories. From the late 1950's through the middle 1960's, Schwab was instrumental to efforts to create a new and more educationally sound curriculum for weekday religious schools in synagogues…

  8. A Short Biography of Joseph Fourier and Historical Development of Fourier Series and Fourier Transforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with a brief biographical sketch of Joseph Fourier, his first celebrated work on analytical theory of heat, his first great discovery of Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Included is a historical development of Fourier series and Fourier transforms with their properties, importance and applications. Special emphasis is made…

  9. Joseph McCabe: A Forgotten Early Populariser of Science and Defender of Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Joseph McCabe (1867-1955) was one of the most prolific and gifted polymaths of the twentieth century. Long before such a thing was thought respectable, and almost a century before any university established a chair in the public understanding of science, McCabe made a living as a populariser of science and a critic of philosophical and religious…

  10. A Short Biography of Joseph Fourier and Historical Development of Fourier Series and Fourier Transforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with a brief biographical sketch of Joseph Fourier, his first celebrated work on analytical theory of heat, his first great discovery of Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Included is a historical development of Fourier series and Fourier transforms with their properties, importance and applications. Special emphasis is made…

  11. 99mTc-DMSA Uptake in a Sister Mary Joseph's Nodule From Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Naddaf, Sleiman; Azzumeea, Fahad; Fahad Alzayed, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    A 50-year-old woman with ovarian cancer underwent Tc-DMSA scan to evaluate the functional status of the right hydronephrotic kidney. The images incidentally revealed a well-defined focus of mild radiotracer uptake at the midanterior abdominal wall, which correlated with a metastatic Sister Mary Joseph's nodule seen on CT performed a week earlier.

  12. Joseph Pulitzer II and Advertising Censorship, 1929-1939. Journalism Monographs Number Seventy-seven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Daniel W.

    In an age of little or no consumer protection, the St. Louis "Post-Dispatch," under the guidance of Joseph Pulitzer II, was the first and most successful practitioner of self-imposed censorship of advertising, a practice that continues to this day. Beginning on May 1, 1929, the "Post-Dispatch" announced an aggressive program of…

  13. Joseph Priestley Is the Focus as Modern Chemistry Celebrates Its Second Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernheim, Robert A.; Olofson, Roy A.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a meeting in 1874, seen to be the origin of the American Chemical Society, which commemorated the 100th anniversary of Joseph Priestley's discovery of oxygen. The remainder of the article is concerned with Priestley's scientific contributions and their implications. (DT)

  14. The Oral History of Evaluation: The Professional Development of Joseph Wholey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Robin Lin; Caracelli, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Joseph S. Wholey is Professor Emeritus in the University of Southern California's (USC) School of Public Policy, Planning, and Development. He received his BA from Catholic University, Phi Beta Kappa and his MA in mathematics and PhD in philosophy from Harvard University. His work focuses on the use of strategic planning, performance measurement,…

  15. Astronauts Joseph Allen rides cherry picker over stowage area/work station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Joseph P. Allen rides a cherry picker over to a stowage area/work station to wrap up extravehicular activity (EVA) duties above Earth. The cherry picker is a union of the mobile foot restraint and the remote manipulator system (RMS), controlled from inside Discovery's cabin. The Westar VI/PAM-D satellite is pictured secured in Discovery's cargo bay.

  16. An Assessment of the Importance of Joseph Mayer Rice in American Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerji, Madhabi

    Historical accounts of the American public school system vary on whether Joseph Mayer Rice, the 19th century physician-turned-journalist who wrote numerous studies aimed at educational reform, is important in the history of educational research and on the nature of his influence in the field. An examination of the treatment of Rice by educational…

  17. From Chemical Analysis to Analyzing Chemical Education: An Interview with Joseph J. Lagowski

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardellini, Liberato

    2010-01-01

    This interview provides glimpses of Joseph J. Lagowski and his life from the time he played with a Gilbert chemistry set, to his tenure at The University of Texas at Austin. His initial interest in chemistry was further nurtured and developed thanks to an excellent high school teacher. In the interview, Lagowski discusses his research in…

  18. Painting as Rhetorical Performance: Joseph Wright's "An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helmers, Marguerite

    2001-01-01

    Explores three broad areas of inquiry: what significance visual images have for rhetorical analysis; how a study of nonverbal material might be conducted; and whether visual explanations depend on the image or the viewer. Argues that viewers understand Joseph Wright's painting "The Air Pump" in terms of its subject, its exhibition space, the…

  19. Distribution and relative abundance of fishes in littoral areas of Chief Joseph Reservoir, Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gadomski, Dena M.; Venditti, David A.; Robinson, T. Craig; Beeman, John W.; Maule, Alec G.

    2004-01-01

    We surveyed fish assemblages in littoral areas of Chief Joseph Reservoir of the upper Columbia River to aid in understanding this ecosystem. Fish distributions and abundances were examined during April-July 1999 in relation to environmental conditions in the reservoir. We also compared the fish assemblages in Chief Joseph reservoir in 1999 to a past study conducted during 1974-1975, and to assemblages in other areas of the Columbia River. During 67 hr of electrofishing and 78 beach seine hauls in Chief Joseph Reservoir, 7460 fishes representing 8 families were collected. The majority of the catch was native – northern pikeminnow; redside shiners; longnose, bridgelip, and largescale suckers; and sculpins. The most abundant introduced species was walleye, and one species, rainbow trout, was mostly of net-pen origin. Larger sizes of suckers and northern pikeminnow were most abundant in the upper reservoir, likely due to upstream spawning migrations. The lower reservoir contained greater abundances of smaller fishes, and this area had lower flows, smaller substrates, and more complex shorelines that offered these fishes refugia. Only adult suckers displayed significant differences in abundances related to substrate. The relative abundances of species appeared to have changed since the 1970s, when the dominant fishes were northern pikeminnow, peamouth, largescale suckers, and walleye. Fish assemblage differences between Chief Joseph Reservoir and lower Columbia River reservoirs were also evident due to the morphology of the reservoir, its more northerly location, and the lack of fish passage facilities at Chief Joseph Dam. Our study is one of the few descriptions of fishes in the upper Columbia Rivers.

  20. Transplantation of cerebellar neural stem cells improves motor coordination and neuropathology in Machado-Joseph disease mice.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Liliana S; Nóbrega, Clévio; Hirai, Hirokazu; Kaspar, Brian K; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2015-02-01

    Machado-Joseph disease is a neurodegenerative disease without effective treatment. Patients with Machado-Joseph disease exhibit significant motor impairments such as gait ataxia, associated with multiple neuropathological changes including mutant ATXN3 inclusions, marked neuronal loss and atrophy of the cerebellum. Thus, an effective treatment of symptomatic patients with Machado-Joseph disease may require cell replacement, which we investigated in this study. For this purpose, we injected cerebellar neural stem cells into the cerebellum of adult Machado-Joseph disease transgenic mice and assessed the effect on the neuropathology, neuroinflammation mediators and neurotrophic factor levels and motor coordination. We found that upon transplantation into the cerebellum of adult Machado-Joseph disease mice, cerebellar neural stem cells differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Importantly, cerebellar neural stem cell transplantation mediated a significant and robust alleviation of the motor behaviour impairments, which correlated with preservation from Machado-Joseph disease-associated neuropathology, namely reduction of Purkinje cell loss, reduction of cellular layer shrinkage and mutant ATXN3 aggregates. Additionally, a significant reduction of neuroinflammation and an increase of neurotrophic factors levels was observed, indicating that transplantation of cerebellar neural stem cells also triggers important neuroprotective effects. Thus, cerebellar neural stem cells have the potential to be used as a cell replacement and neuroprotective approach for Machado-Joseph disease therapy.

  1. Transcranial sonography findings in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (Machado-Joseph disease): a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, José Luiz; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Felício, Andre Carvalho; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani

    2011-10-24

    Few studies on transcranial brain sonography have been performed in hereditary and non-hereditary ataxias. The objective of the present study was to report transcranial brain sonography findings in a sample of clinically and molecularly proven Machado-Joseph disease patients and to compare these data against those of an age- and gender-matched control group. A cross-sectional study on transcranial brain sonography was conducted in 30 Machado-Joseph disease patients. Transcranial brain sonography was performed by an experienced sonographer blinded to the clinical, genetic, and neuroimaging data. The results were compared with those of a control group of 44 healthy subjects matched for age and gender. The sonographic findings were also correlated with clinical features and genetic data in Machado-Joseph disease group. A significantly higher frequency of substantia nigra and lenticular nucleus hyperechogenicity was found in the Machado-Joseph disease group compared to an age- and gender-matched healthy control group (p<0.001). The substantia nigra echogenic area proved to be the best predictor for differentiating cases from controls. Third and lateral ventricles were significantly larger in the Machado-Joseph disease patients than in the control subjects. No significant correlations were found between transcranial brain sonography findings and Machado-Joseph disease demographic/clinical data. Transcranial brain sonography findings in Machado-Joseph disease patients differed significantly to those in age- and gender-matched controls. Substantia nigra hyperechogenicity occurred frequently in Machado-Joseph disease patients and was found to be the best predictor for differentiating cases from controls. Additionally, this data describes the occurrence of brain atrophy in Machado-Joseph disease group. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Serotonergic signalling suppresses ataxin 3 aggregation and neurotoxicity in animal models of Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Jalles, Ana; Esteves, Sofia; Kang, Soosung; da Silva Santos, Liliana; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Neto, Mário F; Brielmann, Renée M; Bessa, Carlos; Duarte-Silva, Sara; Miranda, Adriana; Oliveira, Stéphanie; Neves-Carvalho, Andreia; Bessa, João; Summavielle, Teresa; Silverman, Richard B; Oliveira, Pedro; Morimoto, Richard I; Maciel, Patrícia

    2015-11-01

    Polyglutamine diseases are a class of dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorders for which there is no effective treatment. Here we provide evidence that activation of serotonergic signalling is beneficial in animal models of Machado-Joseph disease. We identified citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, in a small molecule screen of FDA-approved drugs that rescued neuronal dysfunction and reduced aggregation using a Caenorhabditis elegans model of mutant ataxin 3-induced neurotoxicity. MOD-5, the C. elegans orthologue of the serotonin transporter and cellular target of citalopram, and the serotonin receptors SER-1 and SER-4 were strong genetic modifiers of ataxin 3 neurotoxicity and necessary for therapeutic efficacy. Moreover, chronic treatment of CMVMJD135 mice with citalopram significantly reduced ataxin 3 neuronal inclusions and astrogliosis, rescued diminished body weight and strikingly ameliorated motor symptoms. These results suggest that small molecule modulation of serotonergic signalling represents a promising therapeutic target for Machado-Joseph disease.

  3. [Joseph Willot, pharmacist, and his fighter activities during the 1st war].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, Bruno

    2008-05-01

    Joseph Willot was pharmacist (PhD), professor of pharmaceutical chemistry at the Catholic University of Lille (France), but also pharmacist in town and industrial pharmacist. Born in 1876, he was invited by Firmin Dubar, business man from Roubaix, and Mr Pinte, priest and teacher of chemistry at the technical Institute in the same town, to joint them in 1914, under the German Occupation, in order to diffuse information from the free part of France. This diffusion is going very soon to be under the format of an underground journal which had several successive names (L'Oiseau de France, La Patience...) until the network was discovered in 1916. Joseph Willot and his two partners were then deported in Germany. The present article wants to remind the history of this pharmacist from the professional viewpoint as well as for his fighter activities and his influence later on.

  4. Joseph Hersey Pratt (1872-1956): An early proponent of cognitive-behavioural therapy in America.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Charles T

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of mild psychoneuroses in America began shifting in the 1950s from Freudian psychoanalysis to various forms of psychotherapy that do not delve into patient's subconscious. Some of the new approaches were termed cognitive, behavioural or cognitive behavioural therapy and in America were practised notably by Joseph Wolpe, Albert Ellis and Aaron T Beck. Modern psychiatric literature makes little mention of two prior innovators in this area - the French neurologist Jules Dejerine and his Boston disciple Joseph H Pratt. In the early 1900s, Dejerine treated patients at La Salpêtrière in Paris using techniques adopted subsequently by Pratt during the 1930s and employed by the trio some decades later. This paper revisits the early history of psychotherapy in America and includes a brief summary of Pratt's medical career.

  5. Serotonergic signalling suppresses ataxin 3 aggregation and neurotoxicity in animal models of Machado-Joseph disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Kang, Soosung; da Silva Santos, Liliana; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Neto, Mário F.; Brielmann, Renée M.; Bessa, Carlos; Duarte-Silva, Sara; Miranda, Adriana; Oliveira, Stéphanie; Neves-Carvalho, Andreia; Bessa, João; Summavielle, Teresa; Silverman, Richard B.; Oliveira, Pedro; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2015-01-01

    Polyglutamine diseases are a class of dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorders for which there is no effective treatment. Here we provide evidence that activation of serotonergic signalling is beneficial in animal models of Machado-Joseph disease. We identified citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, in a small molecule screen of FDA-approved drugs that rescued neuronal dysfunction and reduced aggregation using a Caenorhabditis elegans model of mutant ataxin 3-induced neurotoxicity. MOD-5, the C. elegans orthologue of the serotonin transporter and cellular target of citalopram, and the serotonin receptors SER-1 and SER-4 were strong genetic modifiers of ataxin 3 neurotoxicity and necessary for therapeutic efficacy. Moreover, chronic treatment of CMVMJD135 mice with citalopram significantly reduced ataxin 3 neuronal inclusions and astrogliosis, rescued diminished body weight and strikingly ameliorated motor symptoms. These results suggest that small molecule modulation of serotonergic signalling represents a promising therapeutic target for Machado-Joseph disease. PMID:26373603

  6. Wildlife Habitat Impact Assessment, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington : Project Report 1992.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, Douglas; Berger, Matthew

    1992-01-01

    Under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, a wildlife habitat impact assessment and identification of mitigation objectives have been developed for the US Army Corps of Engineer`s Chief Joseph Dam Project in north-central Washington. This study will form the basis for future mitigation planning and implementation.

  7. Asian origin for the worldwide-spread mutational event in Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Martins, Sandra; Calafell, Francesc; Gaspar, Claudia; Wong, Virginia C N; Silveira, Isabel; Nicholson, Garth A; Brunt, Ewout R; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth; Stevanin, Giovanni; Hsieh, Mingli; Soong, Bing-Wen; Loureiro, Leal; Dürr, Alexandra; Tsuji, Shoji; Watanabe, Mitsunori; Jardim, Laura B; Giunti, Paola; Riess, Olaf; Ranum, Laura P W; Brice, Alexis; Rouleau, Guy A; Coutinho, Paula; Amorim, António; Sequeiros, Jorge

    2007-10-01

    Machado-Joseph disease is the most frequent dominant ataxia worldwide. Despite its frequency and presence in many populations, only 2 founder mutations have been suggested to explain its current geographic distribution. To trace back in history the main mutational events in Machado-Joseph disease, we aimed to assess ancestral haplotypes and population backgrounds, to date the mutations, and to trace the routes and time of introduction of the founder haplotypes in different populations. We studied 264 families with Machado-Joseph disease from 20 different populations. Six intragenic single-nucleotide polymorphisms were used to determine ancestral mutational events; 4 flanking short tandem repeats were used to construct extended haplotypes and measure accumulation of genetic diversity over time within each lineage. The worldwide-spread lineage, TTACAC, had its highest diversity in the Japanese population, where we identified the ancestral short tandem repeat-based haplotype. Accumulated variability suggested a postneolithic mutation, about 5774 +/- 1116 years old, with more recent introductions in North America, Germany, France, Portugal, and Brazil. As to the second mutational event, in the GTGGCA lineage, only 7 families (of 71 families) did not have Portuguese ancestry, although gene diversity was again smaller in Portuguese families (0.44) than in non-Portuguese families (0.93). The worldwide-spread mutation may have first occurred in Asia and later been diffused throughout Europe, with a founder effect accounting for its high prevalence in Portugal; the other Machado-Joseph disease lineage is more recent, about 1416 +/- 434 years old, and its dispersion may be explained mainly by recent Portuguese emigration.

  8. Archaeological Investigations at Site 45-OK-258, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    neceeeary and Identify by block number) Cultural Resources, Washington Frenchman Springs Phase Columbia River rrehistory Cayuse Phase Chief Joseph Dam... Cryptocrystalline (CCS) materials, including jasper, chalcedony, petrified wood, and opal, make up slightly over 80% of all artifacts, and quartzite objects...of them were of cryptocrystalline - - material, while roughly 50% of the debitage was coarse quartzite. This distinguishes this bone layer from that of

  9. Archaeological Investigations at Site 45-DO-282, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Columbia River rrehistory Cascade Phase Chief Joseph Dam Project Archaeology Frenchman Springs Phase Settlement and Subsistence Patterns Southern...majority of object types with cortex are cryptocrystalline concholdal flakes (73%) (Table 3-10). Cryptocrystaillne chunks comprise 5.7% and non...object types. Weight, length, thickness and weight measurements taken on concholdal flakes reflect the use of cryptocrystalline stones for most tool forms

  10. Archaeological Investigations at Sites 45-OK-250 and 45-OK-4, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    River rrehistory Frenchman Springs Phase Chief Jos.eph Dam Project Archaeology Archaeobotany Settlement and Subsistence Patterns Nespelem Indians... Cryptocrystalline artifacts by zone, 45-OK-250 and 45-OK-4 .. .... ......... ......... .... 55 Table 3-4. Quartz ite arti facts by zone, 45-OK-250 and... Cryptocrystalline artifacts by zone, 45-OK-250 and 45-OK-4. 274 Table B-4. Quartzite artifacts by zone, 45-OK-250 and 45-OK-4 .. .. ... 276 Table B-5. Basalt

  11. Arthur Conan Doyle, Joseph Bell, and Sherlock Holmes. A neurologic connection.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, B F; Key, J D

    1991-03-01

    Neurologists, like physicians in several other medical specialties, can lay claim to Sherlock Holmes as one of their own. This assertion is validated by the number of neurologic conditions, such as seizures, stroke, syncope, encephalopathies, and head trauma, that are mentioned in the stories and novels. In addition, the article reviews the powers of observation and the deductive approach utilized by Conan Doyle and Joseph Bell, the models for Sherlock Holmes, and how these skills can be applied to medical problems.

  12. Astronaut Joseph P. Allen, STS-5 crew member, in front of open hatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Astronaut Joseph P. Allen, right, STS-5 mission specialist, slips on jacket portion of his Shuttle constant-wear garment in the White room at Launch Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Astronaut William B. Lenoir, STS-5's other mission specialist, left, waits to enter the Columbia, whose open hatch is at center. Electrodes on Allen's face and head are for monitoring his reflexes during launch.

  13. Astronaut Joseph Kerwin during EVA at Skylab 1 and 2 space station cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot, performs extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Skylab 1 and 2 space station cluster in Earth orbit, as seen in this reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the station. Kerwin is just outside the Airlock Module. Kerwin assisted Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Skylab 2 commander, during the successful EVA attempt to free the stuck solar array system wing on the Orbital Workshop.

  14. Irish links of the multinational chemist Joseph Black (1728-1799).

    PubMed

    Breathnach, C S

    1999-10-01

    Joseph Black (1728-1799) is remembered for his discovery of carbon dioxide and his characterisation of latent heat and specific heat. He was a chemist by chance, a physicist by inclination, and a physician by necessity. His discovery of carbon dioxide was as important for biology as it was for chemistry, and his work on heat laid a sound foundation for the study of temperature regulation in man and animals.

  15. The Life and Work of Joseph Plateau: Father of Film and Discoverer of Surface Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wautier, Kristel; Jonckheere, Alexander; Segers, Danny

    2012-09-01

    In 1835 Joseph Plateau (1801-1883) was appointed Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Ghent University, Belgium. By then he was well known for his groundbreaking work on the aftereffect of light on the human retina, and he would go on to become the first person to produce moving images, for which he is considered to be the Father of Film. His greatest scientific achievement, however, was his discovery of surface tension.

  16. Machado–Joseph disease in a Nigerian family: mutational origin and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ogun, Shamsideen Abayomi; Martins, Sandra; Adebayo, Philip B; Dawodu, Clara O; Sequeiros, Jorge; Finkel, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Machado–Joseph disease (MJD) has been described in Africans, but no cases have been reported from Nigeria. Current MJD global distribution results from both the ancestral populations-of-origin and the founder effects of mutations, some as a consequence of the Portuguese sea travels in the 15th to 16th century. Two main ancestral haplotypes have been identified: the Machado lineage, which is more recent, predominant in families of Portuguese extraction, and the Joseph lineage, which is much older and worldwide spread, postulated to have an Asian origin. We report a Nigerian family with MJD from Calabar, once settled by Portuguese slave traders, and assessed its mutational origin. The proband was a 33-year-old man with progressive unsteady gait, weakness of all limbs, dysphagia, dysarthria, urinary frequency and diaphoresis. He had end-of-gaze nystagmus, spastic quadriparesis and atrophic small muscles of the hand. He showed fibrillation potentials on EMG, and nerve conduction studies suggested a central axonopathy without demyelination. This family bears the Joseph haplotype, which has a founder effect in the island of Flores, in the Azores (and their descendants in North-America), but is also the most common in non-Portuguese populations worldwide, with an estimated mutation age of around 7000 years. PMID:24781759

  17. Machado-Joseph disease in a Nigerian family: mutational origin and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ogun, Shamsideen Abayomi; Martins, Sandra; Adebayo, Philip B; Dawodu, Clara O; Sequeiros, Jorge; Finkel, Michael F

    2015-02-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) has been described in Africans, but no cases have been reported from Nigeria. Current MJD global distribution results from both the ancestral populations-of-origin and the founder effects of mutations, some as a consequence of the Portuguese sea travels in the 15th to 16th century. Two main ancestral haplotypes have been identified: the Machado lineage, which is more recent, predominant in families of Portuguese extraction, and the Joseph lineage, which is much older and worldwide spread, postulated to have an Asian origin. We report a Nigerian family with MJD from Calabar, once settled by Portuguese slave traders, and assessed its mutational origin. The proband was a 33-year-old man with progressive unsteady gait, weakness of all limbs, dysphagia, dysarthria, urinary frequency and diaphoresis. He had end-of-gaze nystagmus, spastic quadriparesis and atrophic small muscles of the hand. He showed fibrillation potentials on EMG, and nerve conduction studies suggested a central axonopathy without demyelination. This family bears the Joseph haplotype, which has a founder effect in the island of Flores, in the Azores (and their descendants in North-America), but is also the most common in non-Portuguese populations worldwide, with an estimated mutation age of around 7000 years.

  18. Water quality and discharge data for St. Joseph Bay, Florida, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berndt, M.P.; Franklin, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Historical data were compiled on water quality and water levels for the St. Joseph Bay area to assess quality of possible sources of land-derived water into the Bay. Ground-water quality data were compiled from Florida Department of Environmental Protection and surface-water quality data were compiled from U.S.Geological Survey files. Water-quality and water-level data were measured during two sample collection periods in October 1997 and March 1998 to determine water-quality and discharge rates in St. Joseph Bay under two sets of flow conditions. Measurements in the Bay included water level, temperature, pH, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity. Median pH in water from the surficial, intermediate and Floridan aquifer systems ranged from 4.8 to 7.8, and median specific conductance values were less than 500 microsiemens per centimeter. Median nutrient concentrations-- nitrate plus nitrite, ammonia and phosphorus--in the three aquifers were less than 0.5 milligrams per liter. The median pH was 7.0 and the median specific conductance was 81 microsiemens per centimeter for two samples from the Chipola River distribution canal. Water level data were obtained for several wells near St. Joseph Bay but only two wells yielded sufficient data to plot hydrographs. Measurements in St. Joseph Bay during the October and March collection periods were similar for pH and turbidity but differed for temperature, specific conductance and dissolved oxygen. The median temperature was 20.6 degrees Celsius in October and 15.4 degrees Celsius in March, median specific conductance was 39,500 microsiemens per centimeter in October and 43,300 microsiemens per centimeter in March, and median dissolved oxygen was 7.6 milligrams per liter in October and 8.3 milligrams per liter in March. The range in water levels over a tidal cycle in St. Joseph Bay on October 29, 1997 was about 1 foot. During a 24-hour tidal cycle on October 29, 1997, estimated hourly discharge varied from

  19. The Story of Joseph from the Koran. Lessons from ORIAS Institute on History through Literature in the 6th Grade/7th Grade Core Classrooms, 1998-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalak, Laurence

    This lesson about Islam and the Koran is intended for grade 6 or 7 core classrooms. The lesson plan uses the story of Joseph (not Joseph, the father of Jesus, but Joseph who was abandoned by his brothers in a pit) as told in the Koran. The lesson plan does not provide a translation of the story but indicates where one can be found on the Internet.…

  20. Overexpression of the autophagic beclin-1 protein clears mutant ataxin-3 and alleviates Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Nascimento-Ferreira, Isabel; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; Auregan, Gwennaëlle; Onofre, Isabel; Alves, Sandro; Dufour, Noëlle; Colomer Gould, Veronica F; Koeppen, Arnulf; Déglon, Nicole; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2011-05-01

    Machado-Joseph disease, also known as spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, is the most common of the dominantly inherited ataxias worldwide and is characterized by mutant ataxin-3 misfolding, intracellular accumulation of aggregates and neuronal degeneration. Here we investigated the implication of autophagy, the major pathway for organelle and protein turnover, in the accumulation of mutant ataxin-3 aggregates and neurodegeneration found in Machado-Joseph disease and we assessed whether specific stimulation of this pathway could mitigate the disease. Using tissue from patients with Machado-Joseph disease, transgenic mice and a lentiviral-based rat model, we found an abnormal expression of endogenous autophagic markers, accumulation of autophagosomes and decreased levels of beclin-1, a crucial protein in the early nucleation step of autophagy. Lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of beclin-1 led to stimulation of autophagic flux, mutant ataxin-3 clearance and overall neuroprotective effects in neuronal cultures and in a lentiviral-based rat model of Machado-Joseph disease. These data demonstrate that autophagy is a key degradation pathway, with beclin-1 playing a significant role in alleviating Machado-Joseph disease pathogenesis.

  1. Novel candidate blood-based transcriptional biomarkers of Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Mafalda; Bettencourt, Conceição; Maciel, Patrícia; Gao, Fuying; Ramos, Amanda; Kazachkova, Nadiya; Vasconcelos, João; Kay, Teresa; Rodrigues, Ana João; Bettencourt, Bruno; Bruges-Armas, Jácome; Geschwind, Daniel; Coppola, Giovanni; Lima, Manuela

    2015-06-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3) is a late-onset polyglutamine neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the ATXN3 gene, which encodes for the ubiquitously expressed protein ataxin-3. Previous studies on cell and animal models have suggested that mutated ataxin-3 is involved in transcriptional dysregulation. Starting with a whole-transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood samples from patients and controls, we aimed to confirm abnormal expression profiles in Machado-Joseph disease and to identify promising up-regulated genes as potential candidate biomarkers of disease status. The Illumina Human V4-HT12 array was used to measure transcriptome-wide gene expression in peripheral blood samples from 12 patients and 12 controls. Technical validation and validation in an independent set of samples were performed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Based on the results from the microarray, twenty six genes, found to be up-regulated in patients, were selected for technical validation by quantitative real-time PCR (validation rate of 81% for the up-regulation trend). Fourteen of these were further tested in an independent set of 42 patients and 35 controls; 10 genes maintained the up-regulation trend (FCGR3B, CSR2RA, CLC, TNFSF14, SLA, P2RY13, FPR2, SELPLG, YIPF6, and GPR96); FCGR3B, P2RY13, and SELPLG were significantly up-regulated in patients when compared with controls. Our findings support the hypothesis that mutated ataxin-3 is associated with transcription dysregulation, detectable in peripheral blood cells. Furthermore, this is the first report suggesting a pool of up-regulated genes in Machado-Joseph disease that may have the potential to be used for fine phenotyping of this disease. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  2. A 325-year reconstruction of St. Joseph River streamflow using tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Karly R.

    The use of tree ring widths as indicators of water resource availability affords annual-scale resolution in the reconstruction of streamflow prior to the limited instrumental record. While an abundance of streamflow reconstructions have been conducted in the western United States, few have been undertaken in the eastern half of the country. This study aims to enhance understanding of regional hydroclimate in the Great Lakes region by presenting a 325-year streamflow reconstruction for the St. Joseph River, as well as contributing two new tree ring-width chronologies in Indiana and Michigan. A variety of factors potentially influencing the chance of successful streamflow reconstruction are also posited and discussed. A total of 55 tree ring width chronologies from Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Ontario were examined using standard methods in dendrochronology and nested principal component analysis (PCA) to reconstruct St. Joseph River streamflow to 1675 with greater skill than climatology. The resulting overall reconstruction and periods identified as severe droughts and pluvials were in general agreement with other dendroclimatological studies in the eastern U.S. The findings suggest that the instrumental record (beginning in 1924) does not accurately depict long-term streamflow variability of the St. Joseph River. The reconstructed values tend to overestimate the intensity and duration of pluvial periods, but also show that droughts in the region were of similar intensity to those in the more recent past, but were of longer duration. This suggests that water resource managers may need to consider a wider range of variability than previously indicated by the instrumental record.

  3. The Forgotten Forefather: Joseph James Kinyoun and the Founding of the National Institutes of Health

    PubMed Central

    Morens, David M.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT In celebrating the 125th anniversary of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in August 2012, NIH has been examining its origins, its history, and the visionary men and women whose research have contributed to the saving and/or improving the quality of life of millions of people throughout the world. This minireview examines Joseph James Kinyoun (1860 to 1919), the 1887 founder of a federal Hygienic Laboratory that is considered the direct ancestor of the modern NIH, and explores the development of NIH as it was shaped by, and in turn shaped, the new field of microbiology. PMID:22736540

  4. Machado-Joseph disease in New England: clinical description and distinction from the olivopontocerebellar atrophies.

    PubMed

    Sudarsky, L; Corwin, L; Dawson, D M

    1992-01-01

    Experience is described in 25 patients from southern New England with Machado-Joseph Disease, examined serially at annual screening clinics. The disorder is dominantly inherited, with a wide range of phenotypic variation. Core clinical features described include ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria, facial fasciculations, and lid retraction, producing a characteristic staring expression. In addition, young onset patients have spasticity, extrapyramidal rigidity, and dystonic manifestations. Late onset patients often have distal atrophy and sensory loss. Postural instability is often an early feature. We discuss the distinction of this entity from the olivopontocerebellar atrophies.

  5. Excerpts from Joseph Stiglitz's speech to the World Bank, April 1999.

    PubMed

    Scher, A; Baxandall, P

    2000-01-01

    The Journal has published several articles critical of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. These articles have shown the damage caused by the neoliberal policies advocated by these agencies to the health and quality of life of the people in countries where such policies are carried out. Published here are excerpts of a speech given by Joseph Stiglitz, senior economist of the World Bank, in which he finally recognizes the damage these policies have caused in Russia, where life expectancy has fallen quite dramatically during the years of neoliberal reform. The question triggered by his speech is why the World Bank continues its neoliberal policies.

  6. Joseph Igersheimer (1879-1965): a visionary ophthalmologist and his contributions before and after exile.

    PubMed

    Namal, Arin; Reisman, Arnold

    2007-11-01

    While in forced exile from Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1939, Joseph Igersheimer was the architect of modern ophthalmology in Turkey. Earlier he was a pioneer in addressing the impact of syphilis on eyesight. He was the first to use arsphenamine in the treatment of syphilis of the eye and the first to operate on retinal detachment by closing the holes. In 1939 he joined Tufts University's Medical School and became a major contributor to America's ophthalmology. By the time of his retirement, over 2000 American ophthalmologists had listened to his lectures.

  7. Li-Fraumeni syndrome: Discovery and future challenges - Joseph Fraumeni Symposium

    Cancer.gov

    In May 2014, NCI’s Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) hosted Cancer Epidemiology: From Pedigrees to Populations, a scientific symposium honoring 50 years of visionary leadership by Dr. Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr., the founding Director of DCEG. In this video, Dr. Stephen Chanock of NCI provides opening remarks. Dr. David Schottenfeld of the University of Michigan moderates a session on the search for cancer susceptibility genes. Dr. Louise Strong of University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center speaks about the discovery and future challenges of Li-Fraumeni syndrome research. For more information on this symposium, visit http://dceg.cancer.gov/news-events/Fraumeni-symposium-speakers.

  8. Decoupling the Stationary Navier-Stokes-Darcy System with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman Interface Condition

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, Yong; Chu, Yuchuan; He, Xiaoming; ...

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a domain decomposition method for the coupled stationary Navier-Stokes and Darcy equations with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition in order to improve the efficiency of the finite element method. The physical interface conditions are directly utilized to construct the boundary conditions on the interface and then decouple the Navier-Stokes and Darcy equations. Newton iteration will be used to deal with the nonlinear systems. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the features of the proposed method.

  9. Johann Joseph Oppel (1855) on Geometrical–Optical Illusions: A Translation and Commentary

    PubMed Central

    Todorović, Dejan; Phillips, David; Lingelbach, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    The term geometrical–optical illusions was coined by Johann Joseph Oppel (1815–1894) in 1855 in order to distinguish spatial distortions of size and orientation from the broader illusions of the senses. We present a translation of Oppel’s article and a commentary on the material described in it. Oppel did much more than give a name to a class of visual spatial distortions. He examined a variety of figures and phenomena that were precursors of later, named illusions, and attempted to quantify and interpret them. PMID:28694957

  10. Joseph Lister (1827-1912): a pioneer of antiseptic surgery remembered a century after his death.

    PubMed

    Jessney, Benn

    2012-08-01

    Joseph Lister was a remarkable British surgeon who pioneered principles of antisepsis. He died 100 years ago after devoting his life to developing and promoting safe, antiseptic surgery. In the 1800 s as many as 80% of all operations resulted in infection but many people refused to accept the true nature of infection, believing instead that the deaths were coincidental. Lister became familiar with the work of Pasteur while working in Glasgow. He recognized the truth in Pasteur's work and in 1867 Lister published his landmark paper 'On the Antiseptic Principle in the Practice of Surgery' in the British Medical Journal. It proved to be a turning point in healthcare.

  11. Mutational origin of Machado-Joseph disease in the Australian Aboriginal communities of Groote Eylandt and Yirrkala.

    PubMed

    Martins, Sandra; Soong, Bing-Wen; Wong, Virginia C N; Giunti, Paola; Stevanin, Giovanni; Ranum, Laura P W; Sasaki, Hidenao; Riess, Olaf; Tsuji, Shoji; Coutinho, Paula; Amorim, António; Sequeiros, Jorge; Nicholson, Garth A

    2012-06-01

    To determine whether the presence of Machado-Joseph disease (MJD, also spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 [SCA3]) among Australian aborigines was caused by a new mutational event or by the introduction of expanded alleles from other populations. We sequenced a region of 4 kilobases (kb), encompassing the CAG repeat within the ATXN3 gene, in 2 affected Australian aboriginal families and compared them with the Joseph and Machado lineages described before. Full-extended haplotypes (including also more distant single-nucleotide polymorphisms and flanking short tandem repeats) were assessed by segregation and allele-specific amplification. A phylogenetic tree was inferred from genetic distances, and age of the Australasian Joseph-derived lineage was estimated. The aboriginal communities of Groote Eylandt and Yirrkala, in the Northern Territories, Australia (local ethics institutional permission was granted, and both community and individual informed consent was obtained). A convenience sample of 19 patients and unaffected relatives, from 2 Australian aboriginal families affected with MJD; 40 families with MJD of multiethnic origins and 50 unrelated Asian control subjects. The 2 aboriginal families shared the same full haplotype, including 20 single-nucleotide polymorphisms:TTGATCGAGC-(CAG)(Exp)-CACCCAGCGC, that is, the Joseph lineage with a G variant in rs56268847.Among 33 families with the Joseph lineage, this derived haplotype was found only in 5 of 16 Taiwanese, all 3 Indian,and 1 of 3 Japanese families analyzed. A related-extended MJD haplotype shared by Australian aborigines and some Asian families (a Joseph-derived lineage) suggests a common ancestor for all, dating back more than 7000 years.

  12. Re-establishing ataxin-2 downregulates translation of mutant ataxin-3 and alleviates Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Clévio; Carmo-Silva, Sara; Albuquerque, David; Vasconcelos-Ferreira, Ana; Vijayakumar, Udaya-Geetha; Mendonça, Liliana; Hirai, Hirokazu; de Almeida, Luís Pereira

    2015-12-01

    Machado-Joseph disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with the polyQ-expanded ataxin-3 (encoded by ATXN3), for which no therapy is available. With the aim of clarifying the mechanism of neurodegeneration, we hypothesized that the abnormally long polyQ tract would interact aberrantly with ataxin-2 (encoded by ATXN2), another polyQ protein whose function has recently been linked to translational regulation. Using patient's samples and cellular and animal's models we found that in Machado-Joseph disease: (i) ataxin-2 levels are reduced; and (ii) its subcellular localization is changed towards the nucleus. Restoring ataxin-2 levels by lentiviral-mediated overexpression: (i) reduced mutant ataxin-3 levels; and (ii) rescued behaviour defects and neuropathology in a transgenic mouse model of Machado-Joseph disease. Conversely (i) mutating the ataxin-2 motif that enables binding to its natural interactor and translation activator poly(A)-binding protein; or (ii) overexpressing poly(A)-binding protein, had opposite effects, increasing mutant ataxin-3 translation and aggregation. This work suggests that in Machado-Joseph disease, mutant ataxin-3 drives an abnormal reduction of ataxin-2 levels, which overactivates poly(A)-binding protein, increases translation of mutant ataxin-3 and other proteins and aggravates Machado-Joseph disease. Re-establishment of ataxin-2 levels reduces mutant ataxin-3 and alleviates Machado-Joseph disease pathogenesis opening a new avenue for therapeutic intervention in this and potentially other polyQ disorders. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Beclin 1 mitigates motor and neuropathological deficits in genetic mouse models of Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Nascimento-Ferreira, Isabel; Nóbrega, Clévio; Vasconcelos-Ferreira, Ana; Onofre, Isabel; Albuquerque, David; Aveleira, Célia; Hirai, Hirokazu; Déglon, Nicole; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2013-07-01

    Machado-Joseph disease or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, the most common dominantly-inherited spinocerebellar ataxia, results from translation of the polyglutamine-expanded and aggregation prone ataxin 3 protein. Clinical manifestations include cerebellar ataxia and pyramidal signs and there is no therapy to delay disease progression. Beclin 1, an autophagy-related protein and essential gene for cell survival, is decreased in several neurodegenerative disorders. This study aimed at evaluating if lentiviral-mediated beclin 1 overexpression would rescue motor and neuropathological impairments when administered to pre- and post-symptomatic lentiviral-based and transgenic mouse models of Machado-Joseph disease. Beclin 1-mediated significant improvements in motor coordination, balance and gait with beclin 1-treated mice equilibrating longer periods in the Rotarod and presenting longer and narrower footprints. Furthermore, in agreement with the improvements observed in motor function beclin 1 overexpression prevented neuronal dysfunction and neurodegeneration, decreasing formation of polyglutamine-expanded aggregates, preserving Purkinje cell arborization and immunoreactivity for neuronal markers. These data show that overexpression of beclin 1 in the mouse cerebellum is able to rescue and hinder the progression of motor deficits when administered to pre- and post-symptomatic stages of the disease.

  14. Iterative CT reconstruction with small pixel size: distance-driven forward projector versus Joseph's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K.; Rassner, U.; Davidson, H. C.; Schöndube, H.; Stierstorfer, K.; Hornegger, J.; Noo, F.

    2015-03-01

    Over the last few years, iterative reconstruction methods have become an important research topic in x-ray CT imaging. This effort is motivated by increasing evidence that such methods may enable significant savings in terms of dose imparted to the patient. Conceptually, iterative reconstruction methods involve two important ingredients: the statistical model, which includes the forward projector, and a priori information in the image domain, which is expressed using a regularizer. Most often, the image pixel size is chosen to be equal (or close) to the detector pixel size (at field-of-view center). However, there are applications for which a smaller pixel size is desired. In this investigation, we focus on reconstruction with a pixel size that is twice smaller than the detector pixel size. Using such a small pixel size implies a large increase in computational effort when using the distance-driven method for forward projection, which models the detector size. On the other hand, the more efficient method of Joseph will create imbalances in the reconstruction of each pixel, in the sense that there will be large differences in the way each projection contributes to the pixels. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the impact of these imbalances on image quality in comparison with utilization of the distance-driven method. The evaluation involves computational effort, bias and noise metrics, and LROC analysis using human observers. The results show that Joseph's method largely remains attractive.

  15. [A missing name in the history of chagasic megaesophagus: Joseph Cooper Reinhardt (1809/10-1873)].

    PubMed

    Meneghelli, U G; de Rezende, J M; Troncon, L E; Madrid, N; de Moura, M L

    1998-01-01

    The book entitled "Brazil and the Brasilians", written by the Reverends Kidder and Fletcher and firstly published in the United States in 1857, reports the travels of these two missionaries throughout Brazil and includes a section entitled "A new disease". This section contains data regarding the clinical picture, the natural history and the epidemiology of a commom disease in Brazilian hinterland, which was known as "mal de engasgo". These informations were collected in 1855 by Rev. Fletcher from an anonymous North American physician, who worked in Limeira, State of São Paulo, and is called in the book merely as "Dr.-". The present work reports the results of an investigation carried out aiming at the identification of "Dr.-" and discloses documental evidence that "Dr.-" was actually Dr. Joseph Cooper Reinhardt (1809/10-1883). Dr. Reinhardt worked for many years in the citites of Limeira and Campinas, State of São Paulo, and probably had an extensive knowledge regarding the main features of this particular disease, which would be known, nearly 100 years later, as chagasic megaesophagus. The authors point out that, from now on, any account of the history of chagasic megaesophagus must include the name of Dr. Joseph Cooper Reinhardt.

  16. The Dark Side of Addiction: The Horsley Gantt to Joseph Brady Connection.

    PubMed

    Koob, George F

    2017-04-01

    W. Horsley Gantt and Joseph V. Brady laid a rich foundation for understanding the concept of emotion, derived from 2 prominent traditions of physiology and psychology: classic conditioning and operant conditioning, respectively. This framework guided my fierce interest in motivation in general and the interaction between reward and stress, which began at John Hopkins with my thesis work under the guidance of Drs. Zoltan Annau, Solomon Synder, and Joseph Brady, among many others. Using the study of the neurobiology of addiction as a framework, I argue that drug addiction not only involves positive reinforcement associated with the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse but also involves another major source of reinforcement, specifically negative reinforcement driven by negative emotional states (termed the "dark side" of addiction). Excessive activation of the brain reward systems leads to antireward or a decrease in the function of normal reward-related neurocircuitry and persistent recruitment of the brain stress systems, both of which may be neurobiologically linked. Understanding the neuroplasticity of the neurocircuitry that comprises the negative reinforcement associated with addiction is a key to understanding negative emotional states in general and their pathophysiology.

  17. IN MEMORIAM Joseph M Marshall (6 September 1943-15 December 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    Joseph M Marshall Joseph M Marshall graduated as BSc Hons. Physics, Sheffield, UK in 1965 and got a PhD degree in Edinburgh in 1970. In the same year he became Research Fellow in the University of Edinburgh, UK, then Lecturer (1974), Senior Lecturer (1981) and Reader (1984) in the University of Abertay Dundee. In 1987 he took the position of Professor of Electronic Materials in the University of Wales Swansea, UK and in 2002 became Emeritus Professor in the same University. His scientific papers (over 180) span three areas: Experimental and theoretical studies of the conductive, photoconductive and other properties of crystalline, polycrystalline, amorphous and organic semiconductors; Computer based numerical modelling of carrier transport and other properties of semiconducting materials and electronic devices; Design, fabrication and characterisation of thin-film sensor devices and systems, for applications in information technology, medicine, automotive industry, etc. He was Member of the Organising Committee of the annual Chelsea Conferences on Amorphous and Liquid Semiconductors (London, UK), Scientific Chairman of the Organising Committee of the 1990-2008 Biennial International Schools on Condensed Matter Physics (Varna, Bulgaria), Finance Chairman of the 1993 International Conference on Amorphous Semiconductors (Cambridge, UK), Co-Director of the 2001 NATO Advanced Study Institute 'Photovoltaic and Photoactive Materials - Properties, Technology and Applications' (Sozopol, Bulgaria) and co-editor of their Proceedings. He was a recipient of the Marin Drinov Medal of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (1998) and the Georgi Nadjakov Sign of Honour of the Institute of Solid State Physics (2005).

  18. Agricultural land use and water quality in the upper St. Joseph River basin, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cummings, T. Ray

    1978-01-01

    Land use in the upper St. Joseph River basin of south-central Michigan is primarily agricultural. In the 144-square-mile area, the chemical and physical characteristics of water are determined by the climate and soils, as well as by land conservation practices. Municipal waste discharges affect water quality at some locations, as do the larger lakes and ponds. Data indicate that mean discharge from the basin is 135 cubic feet per second. About half this flow is contributed to the St. Joseph River by three major tributaries: Beebe Creek (36 cubic feet per second); Sand Creek (24 cubic feet per second); and Soap Creek (13 cubic feet per second). Runoff from 21 drainage areas delineated for the investigation ranged from 0.22 to 4.07 cubic feet per second per square mile; both the higher and lower values are largely the result of naturally occurring inter- and intrabasin transfers of water.Suspended-sediment concentrations are low throughout the basin, rarely exceeding 100 milligrams per liter. Mean concentrations at four daily sampling stations on the major tributaries and on the St. Joseph River ranged from 9.7 milligrams per liter to 38 milligrams per liter. The maximum sediment yield was 182 pounds per acre per year. Deposition of sediment in five of the 21 areas resulted in a net loss of sediment transported, and thus “negative” yields.Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations do not vary greatly from site to site. Mean concentrations of total nitrogen at downstream sites on Beebe, Sand, and Soap Creeks, and on the St. Joseph River ranged from 1.5 to 1.8 milligrams per liter. About 90 percent of all nitrogen, and 66 percent of all phosphorus, is transported in solution. Land used principally for agriculture has a mean total nitrogen yield of 4.9 pounds per acre per year and a mean total phosphorus yield of 0.13 pounds per year. A comparison of total nitrogen and total phosphorus yields with type of agricultural use showed few relationships; nitrogen yield

  19. Sustainable Planning Practices in St. Joseph Watershed as a Mixed Land-Use Watershed to Reduce the Risk of Chemical Impairment of Surface Water Supplies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increased population growth in St. Joseph Watershed and the mix of land-use with urban and agricultural production brings about chemical impairment of metropolitan drinking water supplies. Furthermore, the St. Joseph Watershed is not only a drinking water supply, but also it provides water for recre...

  20. 33 CFR 334.670 - Gulf of Mexico south and west of Apalachicola, San Blas, and St. Joseph bays; air-to-air firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Apalachicola, San Blas, and St. Joseph bays; air-to-air firing practice range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334... Apalachicola, San Blas, and St. Joseph bays; air-to-air firing practice range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. (a... the Commanding Officer, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he may designate.......

  1. 75 FR 50010 - Atchison Casting Corp. (n/k/a Bradken-Atchison/St. Joseph, Inc.), CityFed Financial Corp., Divine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... COMMISSION Atchison Casting Corp. (n/k/a Bradken-Atchison/St. Joseph, Inc.), CityFed Financial Corp., Divine, Inc. (n/k/a Enivid, Inc.), Genesis Worldwide, Inc., Hampton Consulting Corp., and Jake's Pizza... Casting Corp. (n/k/a Bradken-Atchison/St. Joseph, Inc.) because it has not filed any periodic...

  2. Using 3D acoustic telemetry to assess the response of resident salmonids to strobe lights in Lake Roosevelt, Washington: Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Feasibility Study, 2001-2002 annual report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, R.W.; Farley, M.J.; Hansen, G.S.; Shurtleff, D.J.; Rondorf, D.W.; LeCaire, R.

    2003-01-01

    In 1995, the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was established to mitigate the loss of anadromous fish due to the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams. The objectives of the Chief Joseph Enhancement Project are to determine the status of resident kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams and to enhance kokanee and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations. Studies conducted at Grand Coulee Dam documented substantial entrainment of kokanee through turbines at the third powerhouse.

  3. Flood-inundation maps for the St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Zachary W.

    2017-02-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.6-mile reach of the St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at https://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 04101000, St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Ind. Real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NWS site EKMI3).Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional, step-backwater hydraulic modeling software developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the current stage-discharge rating at the USGS streamgage 04101000, St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Ind., and the documented high-water marks from the flood of March 1982. The hydraulic model was then used to compute six water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 23.0 ft (the NWS “action stage”) to 28.0 ft, which is the highest stage interval of the current USGS stage-discharge rating curve and 1 ft higher than the NWS “major flood stage.” The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar] data having a 0.49-ft root mean squared error and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution, resampled to a 10-ft grid) to delineate the area flooded at each stage.The availability of these maps, along with Internet information

  4. A Special Needs Post-High School Program at St. Joseph College: "If They Could See Me Now..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Alex; McGrath, Glenn

    This collection of materials describes a collaborative program between the West Hartford (Connecticut) Public Schools and St. Joseph College (Connecticut) to prepare special needs students who have completed high school for transition to employment and community living. The program is intended to provide meaningful integration of special needs…

  5. RNA interference mitigates motor and neuropathological deficits in a cerebellar mouse model of Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Clévio; Nascimento-Ferreira, Isabel; Onofre, Isabel; Albuquerque, David; Déglon, Nicole; de Almeida, Luís Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease or Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 is a progressive fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by the polyglutamine-expanded protein ataxin-3. Recent studies demonstrate that RNA interference is a promising approach for the treatment of Machado-Joseph disease. However, whether gene silencing at an early time-point is able to prevent the appearance of motor behavior deficits typical of the disease when initiated before onset of the disease had not been explored. Here, using a lentiviral-mediated allele-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-3 in an early pre-symptomatic cerebellar mouse model of Machado-Joseph disease we show that this strategy hampers the development of the motor and neuropathological phenotypic characteristics of the disease. At the histological level, the RNA-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-3 decreased formation of mutant ataxin-3 aggregates, preserved Purkinje cell morphology and expression of neuronal markers while reducing cell death. Importantly, gene silencing prevented the development of impairments in balance, motor coordination, gait and hyperactivity observed in control mice. These data support the therapeutic potential of RNA interference for Machado-Joseph disease and constitute a proof of principle of the beneficial effects of early allele-specific silencing for therapy of this disease.

  6. Effects of Agricultural and Conservation Practices on Nutrients Losses from the St. Joseph River Watershed, Northeast Indiana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agriculture has been identified as a primary contributor to nutrients that cause algal blooms in the Gulf of Mexico and Lake Erie. Since 2002, we have been monitoring water quality from agricultural drainage ditches in the St. Joseph River watershed to assess the impacts of agricultural and conserva...

  7. The Integration of Listening Skills as a Complement to Speaking Skills in the St. Joseph's College Core I Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappuccilli, Ralph M.

    James Kinneavy's "Theory of Discourse," already being used as the model for the writing assignments in the curriculum at St. Joseph's College, can also be used as the model for listening and speaking assignments. This proposed project would incorporate the following four-step procedure: (1) determining what is necessary in preparing…

  8. Howard Joseph McKee, Jr., Winnebago Traditionalist. With Teacher's Guide. Native Americans of the Twentieth Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Public Schools, MN.

    A biography for elementary school students describes Howard Joseph McKee, Jr, an American Indian elder who teaches the Winnebago language and is developing a system for translating it into English. Mr. McKee's photograph and a map of Nebraska reservations are included. A teaching guide following the bibliography contains learning objectives and…

  9. Use of surface and borehole geophysics to delineate the glacial-drift stratigraphy of northeastern St. Joseph County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bayless, E. Randall; Westjohn, David B.; Watson, Lee R.

    1995-01-01

    Inverse models of direct current electrical- resistivity sounding data and normal-resistivity and natural-gamma logs were used to assist delineation of the glacial-drift stratigraphy in a 580-square- kilometer area of northeastern St. Joseph County, Indiana. Unconsolidated deposits in the study area are composed of glacial-drift, including outwash, till, and lacustrine sediments; thicknesses range from about 15 to more than 70 meters. The glacial outwash deposits are mostly composed of sand and gravel and are the primary source of drinking water to northeastern St. Joseph County. The glacial till and glacio-lacustrine deposits contain a larger fraction of clay than the outwash deposits and may retard ground-water flow between shallow and deeper sand and gravel aquifers. Results of the geophysical measurements collected during this study indicate that glacial-drift deposits in the area north and east of the St. Joseph River are mostly composed of sand and gravel with inter-layered clay-rich deposits that are laterally discontinuous. In the area south of the St. Joseph River, the thickness of sand and gravel deposits diminishes, and clay-rich deposits dominate the stratigraphy. The presence of an electrically conductive bedrock, the Ellsworth Shale, beneath the glacial-drift deposits is identified in inverse models of direct current electrical-resistivity sounding data.

  10. [Joseph Crofts, et al., Plaintiffs, vs. Board of Governors of California Community Colleges, et al., Defendants. Consent Decree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District Court, San Francisco, CA. Northern District of California.

    A consent decree between Joseph Crofts, et al., and the Board of Governors of California Community Colleges terminating litigation regarding alleged patterns and practices of discrimination in employment and education against persons of Spanish heritage at Contra Costa College is presented. The decree outlines provisions to be followed under the…

  11. RNA Interference Mitigates Motor and Neuropathological Deficits in a Cerebellar Mouse Model of Machado-Joseph Disease

    PubMed Central

    Onofre, Isabel; Albuquerque, David; Déglon, Nicole; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease or Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 is a progressive fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by the polyglutamine-expanded protein ataxin-3. Recent studies demonstrate that RNA interference is a promising approach for the treatment of Machado-Joseph disease. However, whether gene silencing at an early time-point is able to prevent the appearance of motor behavior deficits typical of the disease when initiated before onset of the disease had not been explored. Here, using a lentiviral-mediated allele-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-3 in an early pre-symptomatic cerebellar mouse model of Machado-Joseph disease we show that this strategy hampers the development of the motor and neuropathological phenotypic characteristics of the disease. At the histological level, the RNA-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-3 decreased formation of mutant ataxin-3 aggregates, preserved Purkinje cell morphology and expression of neuronal markers while reducing cell death. Importantly, gene silencing prevented the development of impairments in balance, motor coordination, gait and hyperactivity observed in control mice. These data support the therapeutic potential of RNA interference for Machado-Joseph disease and constitute a proof of principle of the beneficial effects of early allele-specific silencing for therapy of this disease. PMID:25144231

  12. Research Administration in History: The Development of OMB Circular A-110 through Joseph Warner's COGR Subcommittee, 1976-1979

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Phillip E.; Smith, Marie F.

    2008-01-01

    Research administrators can be assisted in resolving issues with awareness of the critical period of policy formation divulged in the Joseph Warner Papers. He and his colleagues on the Subcommittee on Grants and Contracts Provisions of COGR adopted the philosophy that research administrators needed flexibility and reduced paperwork and costs.…

  13. Defining American Heroes: Analyzing the Metamorphosis of the War Hero in Twentieth Century War Films Using Joseph Campbell's, "Hero's Journey."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frith, Luci A.

    In "The Hero's Journey" Joseph Campbell identifies the patterns that inform the myths of the "hero" throughout recorded history. By using Campbell's template, this paper examines how the American war hero is portrayed and has been portrayed in film. The paper states that Americans not only define their war heroes in films but…

  14. Howard Joseph McKee, Jr., Winnebago Traditionalist. With Teacher's Guide. Native Americans of the Twentieth Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Public Schools, MN.

    A biography for elementary school students describes Howard Joseph McKee, Jr, an American Indian elder who teaches the Winnebago language and is developing a system for translating it into English. Mr. McKee's photograph and a map of Nebraska reservations are included. A teaching guide following the bibliography contains learning objectives and…

  15. St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Indiana, flood-inundation HEC-RAS Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Zachary W.

    2017-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.6-mile reach of the St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Indiana were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 04101000, St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Ind. Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NWS site EKMI3). Flood profiles were computed for the USGS streamgage 04101000, St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Ind., reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater hydraulic modeling software developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the current stage-discharge rating at the USGS streamgage 04101000, St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 6 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 23.0 ft (the NWS “action stage”) to 28.0 ft, which is the highest stage interval of the current USGS stage-discharge rating curve and 1 ft higher than the NWS “major flood stage.” The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar]) data having a 0.49-ft root mean squared error and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each stage. The availability of these maps, along with Internet information regarding current stage from the USGS streamgage

  16. On the origins of organology: Franz Joseph Gall and a girl named Bianchi.

    PubMed

    Eling, Paul; Finger, Stanley; Whitaker, Harry

    2017-01-01

    Franz Joseph Gall (1758-1828) introduced a new theory of mind and brain at the end of the eighteenth century, which he referred to as organology, dealing with mental functions and their cortical localizations. Gall wrote that observations regarding the verbal learning capacities of his schoolmates brought about his new way of thinking. This widely accepted view, however, requires qualification. Although Gall's experiences and observations as a schoolboy were relevant, especially for his craniology, these childhood memories might have been recalled and reinterpreted after he had started to think about the faculties of mind-specifically after he had met Bianchi, a 5-year-old girl with a special talent for music.

  17. A kind of Mozart of medicine: Joseph Plenck (1735-1807).

    PubMed

    Holubar, Karl

    2003-12-01

    This is a tribute to one of the fathers of modern European dermatology and venereology, Dr Joseph Plenck, the Viennese protodermatologist of two hundred years ago, 1735-1807, who was professor and secretary of the Imperial Medical Josephine Academy, where today is the Institute for the history of medicine. Plenck introduced the systematization of dermatovenereological diseases based on their paradigmatic differences, which is deemed as "the only (system) with pretensions to accuracy". A man of diversified interests and a fruitful author, he wrote many treatises covering various fields from dermatology, venereology, and dentistry to surgery, obstetrics, anatomy, pediatrics, pharmacology, and botany. This remarkable physician definitely left a deep trace in the history of dermatology and venereology, and marked the transition from text-based to visually dependent culture in the field of dermatovenereology.

  18. The Wichita Valley irrigation project: Joseph Kemp, boosterism, and conservation in northwest Texas, 1886-1939.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jahue

    2011-01-01

    This is the story of failure: in this case, an irrigation project that never met its boosters' expectations. Between 1880 and 1930, Wichita Falls entrepreneur Joseph Kemp dreamed of an agrarian Eden on the Texas rolling plains. Kemp promoted reclamation and conservation and envisioned the Big Wichita River Valley as the "Irrigated Valley." But the process of bringing dams and irrigation ditches to the Big Wichita River ignored knowledge of the river and local environment, which ultimately was key to making these complex systems work. The boosters faced serious ecological limitations and political obstacles in their efforts to conquer water, accomplishing only parts of the grandiose vision. Ultimately, salty waters and poor drainage doomed the project. While the livestock industry survived and the oil business thrived in the subsequent decades, the dream of idyllic irrigated farmsteads slowly disappeared.

  19. Chinese homozygous Machado-Joseph disease (MJD)/SCA3: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Sheng; Zeng, Junsheng; He, Miao; Zeng, Xianfeng; Zhou, Yao; Liu, Zhen; Jiang, Hong; Tang, Beisha; Wang, Junling

    2015-03-01

    A young Chinese male patient was identified as homozygous for Machado-Joseph disease (MJD)/spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. This patient had a 4-year medical history mainly presenting severe ataxia, abnormal eye movement and pyramidal signs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and cervical spinal cord revealed no obvious abnormality despite the severe symptoms and the findings of an electromyogram. However, brainstem auditory evoked potential indicated peripheral impairment and visual evoked potential indicated central impairment of his visual pathways. Molecular diagnosis revealed the pattern of CAG repeat units of this patient was 71/71. This case demonstrates that homozygosity for MJD enhances the clinical severity of the disease, which suggests that genetic education is of great importance.

  20. Conceiving of Concept Maps To Foster Meaningful Learning: An Interview with Joseph D. Novak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, Liberato

    2004-09-01

    Joseph Novak, the inventor of concept maps, explains in this interview how that idea was born thirty years ago. As a student he developed a passion for education, trying to find better ways to educate people and help them "learn how to learn". Concept maps can profitably be used to represent knowledge in every field of study: they help students to construct new learning and are also useful for teachers to discover possible misconceptions in the students' own construction. Novak discusses the advantages of meaningful learning and the foundations of his theory of education based on "human constructivism" and he summarizes it in a concept map. He also explains why concept maps are a useful tool for corporations, too.

  1. Sister Joseph's nodule in a liver transplant recipient: Case report and mini-review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Panaro, Fabrizio; Andorno, Enzo; Di Domenico, Stefano; Morelli, Nicola; Bottino, Giuliano; Mondello, Rosalia; Miggino, Marco; Jarzembowski, Tomasz M; Ravazzoni, Ferruccio; Casaccia, Marco; Valente, Umberto

    2005-01-01

    Background Umbilical metastasis is one of the main characteristic signs of extensive neoplastic disease and is universally referred to as Sister Mary Joseph's nodule. Case presentation A 59-years-old Caucasian female underwent liver transplant for end stage liver disease due to hepatitis C with whole graft from cadaveric donor in 2003. After transplantation the patient developed multiple subcutaneous nodules in the umbilical region and bilateral inguinal lymphadenopathy. The excision biopsy of the umbilical mass showed the features of a poorly differentiated papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma. Computed tomographic scan and transvaginal ultrasonography were unable to demonstrate any primary lesion. Chemotherapy was start and the dosage of the immunosuppressive drugs was reduced. To date the patient is doing well and liver function is normal. Conclusions The umbilical metastasis can arise from many sites. In some cases, primary tumor may be not identified; nonetheless chemotherapy must be administrated based on patient's history, anatomical and histological findings. PMID:15651984

  2. Joseph Swan (1791-1874): pioneer of research on peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Barton, N J; Smith, B D

    2008-06-01

    Joseph Swan was born in 1791 and appointed surgeon to Lincoln County Hospital in 1814. In addition to his clinical work, he carried out what were probably the first animal experiments on nerve injuries. These were mostly on rabbits, in which the sciatic nerves were partly or wholly divided, had a section excised, or were ligated. He found that regeneration could occur, even after neurectomy. He reported these results, together with his experience in human patients and the effects of neurectomy in a horse, in an essay of 1819, which won the Jacksonian Prize of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and is still preserved there. In 1827 he moved to London, where he devoted himself mainly to dissections of the nervous system and was active in the College. He retired to Filey in Yorkshire, where he died in 1874.

  3. Thirteen days: Joseph Delboeuf versus Pierre Janet on the nature of hypnotic suggestion.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, André

    2004-01-01

    The problem of post-hypnotic suggestion was introduced in 1884. Give a hypnotic subject the post-hypnotic command to return in 13 days. Awake, the subject remembers nothing yet nonetheless fulfills the command to return. How then does the subject count 13 days without knowing it? In 1886, Pierre Janet proposed the concept of dissociation as a solution, arguing that a second consciousness kept track of time outside of the subject's main consciousness. Joseph Delboeuf, in 1885, and Hippolyte Bernheim, in 1886, proposed an alternative solution, arguing that subjects occasionally drifted into a hypnotic state in which they were reminded of the suggestion. This article traces the development of these competing solutions and describes some of Delboeuf's final reflections on the problem of simulation and the nature of hypnosis.

  4. [Advances in Neurological Therapeutics for Friedreich Ataxia and Machado-Joseph Disease].

    PubMed

    Yabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2017-08-01

    We reviewed advances in therapeutics for both Friedreich ataxia and Machado-Joseph disease. Various clinical trials have been carried out, mainly for Friedreich ataxia; however, the therapeutic reports from these trials have not provided much evidence for success. Some interesting clinical trials have been reported, and further developments are expected. Regenerative therapy using umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and a therapeutic study investigating a new pathomechanism in animal and/or cell culture studies were reported. We expect that these results will translate to therapeutic strategies for patients with these disorders. In addition, biomarkers play an important role when novel treatments are discovered and clinical trials are performed: hence at present, a number of biomarkers such as gait analysis by triaxial accelerometers and prism adaptation of hand-reaching movements, are being examined.

  5. [The life of Joseph Haydn from a medical point of view (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Franken, F H

    1976-06-25

    Joseph Haydn (1732 to 1809) had hardly been troubled by any illness of note, apart from a chronic nasal polyp until 1799. During the composition of the oratoria "The Seasons" (1799 to 1801), the signs of cerebral arteriosclerosis with cardiac insufficiency made their appearance. Haydn's creative strength subsequently declined rapidly and he was virtually unable to compose any more after he had finished "The Seasons" until his death in 1809. The plan to compose a third oratoria "The Last Judgement" ended abortively. Haydn himself suffered acutely from the inactivity imposed on him by the illness, as documented by various sources. Hadyn remained fully conscious right up to the time of his death, which presumably resulted from cardiac failure. Haydn's grave was ransacked only a few days after the funeral and his skull was snatched. It has been finally restored to his resting place in Eisenstadt only as recently as 1954 after a protracted and devious journey.

  6. [The three lifes of Doctor Joseph-Ignace Guillotin (1738-1814)].

    PubMed

    Noterman, J

    2011-01-01

    The life of Joseph-Ignace Guillotin can be divided into three periods. The first part of his life consists of his training and his settling as a medical consultant and influential freemason from 1738 to 1788. The second part primarily consists of his political role for a short period during the Revolution (from 1788 to 1791). It was during that time that he proposed a change in the functioning of the General States, a penal Code reform, and the reorganization of the teaching and medical exercice. Finally, during the third period of his life, he focused on promoting vaccination against smallpox and founded with others the present-day Academy of Medicine of Paris.

  7. [Savants and cultutal boundaries. Thermalism in Savoy and the work of Joseph Daquin (1732-1815)].

    PubMed

    Carpanetto, Dino

    2008-01-01

    The essay sets out to explain the general orientation of the studies, the problems, the perspectives and the research that were done by Joseph Daquin (1732-1815), a physician born in Chambéry (Savoy, Kingdom of Sardinia). He had a secular education at the Faculty of Medicine of Turin, where he earned his degree under Ignazio Somis and Vitaliano Donati. The aim of this essay is to give a critical contribution to cultural history and examine the origins of thermalism with particular emphasis on therapy, physics experiments, and its relation to political and social structure. Daquin was a witness of the advancement of science beyond the boundaries of scientific Enlightenment. His overriding intellectual concern was with the meaning and impact of chemistry theories on medical practices. The author has published an interesting Analyse des eaux thermales d'Aix en Savoie (1773), a natural experimental history of mineral waters in Aix-les-Bains.

  8. Joseph Lovell, MD (1788-1836): First US army surgeon general.

    PubMed

    Craig, Stephen C

    2016-08-01

    Joseph Lovell, trained in medicine at Harvard and in military medicine/surgery by the War of 1812, became the first Surgeon General to sit on the reorganised army staff at the tender age of 29 in 1818. With a keen intellect, medical acumen, and wartime experiences for his tools and a close supporting relationship with Commanding General Jacob Jennings Brown and Secretary of War John C Calhoun (1728-1850), Lovell constructed an efficient and effective organisational and administrative framework for the new Medical Department of the US Army. Moreover, he not only redefined the role of the American military physician but also established the professional dignity, respectability and value of the medical officer among line officers and staff. Lovell's 18-year tenure came to an abrupt end, but the operational framework he created became both foundation and legacy for his successors.

  9. Sir Joseph Barcroft: one victorian physiologist's contributions to a half century of discovery.

    PubMed

    Longo, Lawrence D

    2016-03-01

    During the first half of the 20th Century, Joseph Barcroft, KBE, FRS of Cambridge University became a world leader in respiratory physiology. He determined the role of neural stimulation in the oxygen consumption of several organs, established many of the factors that regulate the binding of oxygen to haemoglobin, explored the determinants of a human's acclimatization to high altitude and developed the field of fetal cardiovascular physiology. Chair of the Cambridge Department of Physiology from 1925 to 1937, he served as a consultant and member of many UK governmental committees. During World War I, he led a British research unit exploring the effects of poisonous gases on pulmonary function and related problems. In addition to his almost 300 publications, several of his monographs are considered as classics.

  10. Joseph Henry’s role in the discovery of electromagnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Glenn S.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of electromagnetic induction in the early part of the 19th century is one of the greatest scientific achievements of all time, and it has had tremendous technological consequences. The credit for this discovery rightfully goes to the great English experimental physicist Michael Faraday. However, the American physicist Joseph Henry made some observations comparable to Faraday’s at nearly the same time, and for that reason, Faraday and Henry are often considered to be co-discoverers of some aspects of electromagnetic induction. We examine Henry’s early research on electromagnetism, starting from his efforts to improve the electromagnet, which led directly to his investigations of induction. We describe his earliest experiments on both mutual and self-induction, and pay particular attention to the relationship of Henry’s research to that of Faraday. The approach is one in which the experiments are described and then analysed using modern theory and terminology.

  11. Anthropological neurology: symptoms and their meanings according to Joseph Prick (1909-1978).

    PubMed

    ter Meulen, B C; Dekkers, W J M; Keyser, A; van Woerkom, T C A M

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the life and work of the Dutch neurologist Joseph Prick (1909-1978) and his idea of an anthropological neurology. According to Prick, neurological symptoms should not only be explained from an underlying physico-chemical substrate but also be regarded as meaningful. We present an outline of the historical and philosophical context of his ideas with a focus on the theory of the human body by the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1908-1961) and the concept of anthropology-based medicine developed by Frederik Buytendijk (1887-1974). We give an overview of anthropological neurology as a clinical practice and finally we discuss the value of Prick's approach for clinical neurology today.

  12. Acquisition of wood fuel at the Joseph C. McNeil Generating Station

    SciTech Connect

    Kropelin, W.

    1993-12-31

    The Joseph C. McNeil Generating Station is the world`s largest single boiler, municipally-owned, wood-fired electrical generating plant. The 50 megawatt McNeil Station is located in Burlington, Vermont and is owned by several Vermont public and private electric utilities. The operator and majority owner is the City of Burlington Electric Department (BED). Wood fuel procurement for the McNeil Station has been conducted in an environmentally sensitive way. Harvesting is carried out in conformance with a comprehensive wood chip harvesting policy and monitored by professional foresters. Unpredictable levels of Station operation require rigid adherence to a wood storage plan that minimizes the risk of over heating and spontaneous combustion of stockpiled fuel.

  13. Sister Mary Joseph nodule as the presenting sign of disseminated prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Deb, Prabal; Rai, Radhey Shyam; Rai, Rahul; Gupta, Ekawali; Chander, Yogesh

    2009-01-01

    Sister Mary Joseph's nodule is referred to as metastasis of visceral malignancy to the umbilicus. Most common primaries are in the gastrointestinal or genital tract, while other locations are rare. We recently encountered a 76-year-old male who was referred to the surgery clinic with an erythematous nodule in the umbilicus measuring 6 cm in diameter with complaints of painless profuse hematuria. History revealed severe obstructive voiding symptoms of 2-year duration, along with significant loss of weight and difficulty in walking. A detailed examination showed hard nodular hepatomegaly, along with grade IV prostatomegaly. Serum prostate-specific antigen was 3069 ng/ml. A pelvic radiograph displayed multiple osteolytic lesions, while ultrasonography showed multiple iso- and hypoechoic lesions in both lobes of the liver, suggestive of metastasis. Histopathology of a Tru-cut biopsy of the prostate confirmed an adenocarcinoma (Gleason score 9) with umbilical metastasis. The patient was on regular follow-up and died 3 months later.

  14. Sympathetic science: Charles Darwin, Joseph Hooker, and the passions of Victorian naturalists.

    PubMed

    Endersby, Jim

    2009-01-01

    This essay examines the complex tangle of emotional and scientific attachments that linked Darwin and botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker. Analyzing their roles as husbands, fathers, and novel readers demonstrates that possessing and expressing sympathy was as important for Victorian naturalists as it was for Victorian husbands. Sympathy was a scientific skill that Victorian naturalists regarded as necessary to fully understand the living world; although sympathy became increasingly gendered as feminine over the course of the century, its importance to male naturalists requires us to rethink the ways gender roles were negotiated in Victorian Britain. Botany was, for men like Darwin and Hooker, an acceptably masculine pursuit that nevertheless allowed--and even required--them to be sensitive and sympathetic.

  15. Sir Edward Appleton and Joseph Priestley: two giants of electrical science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Excell, P. S.

    The life of Sir Edward Appleton is reviewed, in commemoration of the recent centenary of his birth. Appleton discovered the ionosphere and devoted much of his life to investigations of its properties, receiving the Nobel Prize for physics as a result. He became a senior government scientist in World War II and afterwards was appointed Vice-Chancellor of Edinburgh University. The influence of his roots in the city of Bradford is emphasized and compared with the case of Joseph Priestley, also born near Bradford some 160 yr earlier. Priestley was a major early investigator of electrical phenomena and compiled a comprehensive treatise on the electrical knowledge of his day. He was the first person to present an experimental proof of the inverse-square law of electrostatic force, although he is usually better remembered as the discoverer of oxygen.

  16. Joseph McCabe: A Forgotten Early Populariser of Science and Defender of Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Bill

    2010-05-01

    Joseph McCabe (1867-1955) was one of the most prolific and gifted polymaths of the twentieth century. Long before such a thing was thought respectable, and almost a century before any university established a chair in the public understanding of science, McCabe made a living as a populariser of science and a critic of philosophical and religious obscurantism. Through the first half of the twentieth century he wrote countless cheap and widely distributed books and pamphlets for those whose thirst for knowledge exceeded the money or time they could devote to such pursuits. This article will detail, and give some assessment of, McCabe’s career as a populariser of science and expositor of evolutionary theory and its philosophical, religious and cultural ramifications.

  17. Mountford Joseph Bramley: A pioneering thyroidologist and the first principal of Asia's oldest medical college.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Subhankar; Datta, Adrija; Chatterjee, Pranab

    2015-01-01

    Mountford Joseph Bramley was one of the educationists whose sincere efforts are undeniable in the making of modern India. After achieving the Member of the Royal College of Surgeons diploma, he joined the Malta Garrison as a Hospital Assistant and was soon promoted to the rank of Assistant Surgeon of the Rifle Brigade. Following his arrival in India in 1826, he held several important medical posts in the British service. He was one of the early researchers to investigate the role of iodine in the causation of goitre. He was appointed as the first Principal of the Medical College of Bengal, the oldest medical college in Asia, in 1835. Bramley was an educationist from the very core of his heart, and he always wished for the betterment of his students. He died early at the age of 34 years. His legacy as a pioneer in the fields of medical education and endocrinology, specifically thyroidology, has largely been shrouded in a miasma of time.

  18. A Science Superior to Music: Joseph Sauveur and the Estrangement between Music and Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The scientific revolution saw a shift from the natural philosophy of music to the science of acoustics. Joseph Sauveur (1653-1716), an early pioneer in acoustics, determined that science as understood in the eighteenth century could not address the fundamental problems of music, particularly the problem of consonance. Building on Descartes, Mersenne, and Huygens especially, Sauveur drew a sharp divide between sound and music, recognizing the former as a physical phenomenon obeying mechanical and mathematical principles and the latter as an inescapably subjective and unquantifiable perception. While acoustics grew prominent in the Académie des sciences, music largely fell out of the scientific discourse, becoming primarily practiced art rather than natural philosophy. This study illuminates what was considered proper science at the dawn of the Enlightenment and why one particular branch of natural philosophy—music—did not make the cut.

  19. [Dr. Joseph Chazanowicz (1844-1919) and the National Library in Jerusalem].

    PubMed

    Ohry, Avi

    2014-01-01

    Dr. Joseph Chazanowicz (1844-1919), was a Russian physician, and founder of the Jewish National Library in JerusaLem. After completing his studies at the Jewish school and at the gymnasium of Grodno, Chazanowicz went to Königsberg, Germany to study medicine and finished his studies in 1872. Returning to Russia, he began to practice at Byelostok's Jewish hospital. Chazanowicz founded the Hovevei Ziyyon ["Lovers of Zion"] society and also the Linat Ha-Zedek ("Hospice for the Poor")--caring for the poor. In 1890 he visited Palestine and conceived the idea of founding a library in Jerusalem, together with the B'nai B'rith organization. In 1896 he sent his large collection of books, amounting to nearly 10,000 volumes, to Jerusalem as the beginning of the Abarbanel library. The enlargement of this library and the collection of funds to erect a special building for it became the life-work of Chazanowicz.

  20. Hydrogeology and simulated ground-water flow through the unconsolidated aquifers of northeastern St. Joseph County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bayless, E. Randall; Arihood, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey investigated ground-water resources of northeastern St. Joseph County, Indiana, during 1990-93. The investigation included field measurements of water levels and numerical models of ground-water flow. This report documents results of that work and includes descriptions of (1) hydrogeologic framework, (2) water levels, (3) model sensitivity to variations in hydrogeologic parameters, (4) simulated aquifer response to increased ground-water withdrawals, (5) recharge areas for significant water- withdrawal facilities, (6) flow paths and discharge points for ground-water solutes originating beneath known contamination sites. Water-level data indicated (1) regional ground- water flow towards the St. Joseph River, (2) depth to water is small in the St. Joseph aquifer system compared to that in the Hilltop and Nappanee aquifer systems, (3) water levels in deep and shallow parts of the aquifer system are not equal where a confining unit is present. Model results indicate increasing withdrawals by 50 percent at significant water-withdrawal facilities would cause drawdowns less than 6 feet in the 1/4-square-mile area surrounding pumping sites. The response of Juday Creek and the St. Joseph River to increased ground-water pumpage is reductions of ground-water contribution to streamflow of 23 percent and 6 percent, respectively. Particle-tracking analyses indicate flow paths for solutes originating beneath known contamination sites may pass near to, or be intercepted by, significant water-withdrawal facilities. Most particles are discharged to the St. Joseph River but some may be discharged to Juday Creek.

  1. Dystonia in Machado-Joseph disease: Clinical profile, therapy and anatomical basis.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Marcelo B; Martinez, Alberto Rolim M; Rezende, Thiago Junqueira R; Friedman, Joseph H; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; D'Abreu, Anelyssa; França, Marcondes C

    2015-12-01

    Dystonia is frequent in Machado-Joseph disease, but several important aspects are not yet defined, such as the detailed clinical profile, response to treatment and anatomical substrate. We screened 75 consecutive patients and identified those with dystonia. The Burke-Marsden-Fahn Dystonia Rating Scale was employed to quantify dystonia severity. Patients with dystonia received levodopa 600 mg/day for 2 months and were videotaped before and after treatment. A blinded evaluator rated dystonia in the videos. Patients with disabling dystonia who failed to respond to levodopa treatment received botulinum toxin. Finally, volumetric T1 and diffusion tensor imaging sequences were obtained in the dystonic group using a 3T-MRI scanner to identify areas of gray and white matter that were selectively damaged. There were 21 patients with dystonia (28%): 9 classified as generalized and 12 as focal/segmental. Patients with dystonia had earlier onset and larger (CAG) expansions (28.9 ± 11.7 vs 40.6 ± 11.4; p < 0.001 and 75 vs 70; p < 0.001, respectively). Although group analyses failed to show benefit on levodopa (p = 0.07), some patients had objective improvement. In addition, ten patients received botulinum toxin resulting in a significant change in dystonia scores after 4 weeks (p = 0.03). Patients with dystonia had atrophy at pre- and paracentral cortices; whereas, non-dystonic patients had occipital atrophy. Basal ganglia volume was reduced in both groups, but atrophy at the thalami, cerebellar white matter and ventral diencephali was disproportionately higher in the dystonic group. Dystonia in Machado-Joseph disease is frequent and often disabling, but may respond to levodopa. It is associated predominantly with structural abnormalities around the motor cortices and in the thalami. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Review of the hydrologic data-collection network in the St Joseph River basin, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crompton, E.J.; Peters, J.G.; Miller, R.L.; Stewart, J.A.; Banaszak, K.J.; Shedlock, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The St. Joseph River Basin data-collection network in the St. Joseph River for streamflow, lake, ground water, and climatic stations was reviewed. The network review included only the 1700 sq mi part of the basin in Indiana. The streamflow network includes 11 continuous-record gaging stations and one partial-record station. Based on areal distribution, lake effect , contributing drainage area, and flow-record ratio, six of these stations can be used to describe regional hydrology. Gaging stations on lakes are used to collect long-term lake-level data on which to base legal lake levels, and to monitor lake-level fluctuations after legal levels are established. More hydrogeologic data are needed for determining the degree to which grouhd water affects lake levels. The current groundwater network comprises 15 observation wells and has four purposes: (1) to determine the interaction between groundwater and lakes; (2) to measure changes in groundwater levels near irrigation wells; (3) to measure water levels in wells at special purpose sites; and (4) to measure long-term changes in water levels in areas not affected by pumping. Seven wells near three lakes have provided sufficient information for correlating water levels in wells and lakes but are not adequate to quantify the effect of groundwater on lake levels. Water levels in five observation wells located in the vicinity of intensive irrigation are not noticeably affected by seasonal withdrawals. The National Weather Sevice operates eight climatic stations in the basin primarily to characterize regional climatic conditions and to aid in flood forecasting. The network meets network-density guidelines established by the World Meterological Organization for collection of precipitation and evaporation data but not guidelines suggested by the National Weather Service for density of precipitation gages in areas of significant convective rainfalls. (Author 's abstract)

  3. A short biography of Joseph Fourier and historical development of Fourier series and Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2012-07-01

    The profound study of nature is the most fertile source of mathematical discoveries. Not only does this study, by offering a definite goal to research, have the advantage of excluding vague questions and futile calculations, but it is also a sure means of moulding analysis itself, and discerning those elements in it which it is still essential to know and which science ought to conserve. These fundamental elements are those which recur in all natural phenomena. Joseph Fourier pure mathematics enables us to discover the concepts and laws connecting them, which gives us the key to the understanding of the phenomena of nature. Albert Einstein This article deals with a brief biographical sketch of Joseph Fourier, his first celebrated work on analytical theory of heat, his first great discovery of Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Included is a historical development of Fourier series and Fourier transforms with their properties, importance and applications. Special emphasis is made to his splendid research contributions to mathematical physics, pure and applied mathematics and his unprecedented public service accomplishments in the history of France. This is followed by historical comments about the significant and major impact of Fourier analysis on mathematical physics, probability and mathematical statistics, mathematical economics and many areas of pure and applied mathematics including geometry, harmonic analysis, signal analysis, wave propagation and wavelet analysis. Special attention is also given to the Fourier integral formula, Brownian motion and stochastic processes and many examples of applications including isoparametric inequality, everywhere continuous but nowhere differentiable functions, Heisenberg uncertainty principle, Dirichlets' theorem on primes in

  4. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, Brian; Lockwood, Jr., Neil W.; McLellan, Jason G.

    2001-01-01

    The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, commonly known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (blocked area). The three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the blocked area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information housed in a central location will allow managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP (NWPPC program measure 10.8B.26) is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the blocked area and the Columbia Basin blocked area management plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of blocked area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the blocked area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. The use of common collection and analytical tools is essential to the process of streamlining joint management decisions. In 1999 and 2000 the project

  5. Archaeological Investigations at Sites 45-OK-2 and 45-OK-2A, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Indians Columbia River rrehistory Cascade Phase Chief Joseph Dam Project Archaeology Frenchman Springs Phase * Settlement and Subsistence Patterns Cayuse...82 Table 3-9. Material frequencies by zone, 45-OK-2 and 45-OK-2A. ...... 91 Table 3-10. Cryptocrystalline object...types by zone, 45-OK-2 and 45-OK-2A. ......................... 93 xvi" 7..... Table 3-11. Dorsal cortex on cryptocrystalline flakes and chunks by zone

  6. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Joseph Forest Products, Wallowa County, OR. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The 18-acre Joseph Forest Products (JFP) site is a wood-processing facility in the City of Joseph, Wallowa County, Oregon. Land use in the area is predominantly industrial and agricultural. The City of Enterprise uses two springs located 4,000 feet from JFP to serve as its municipal water supply. In 1974, and again from 1977 to 1985, Joseph Forest Products, Inc., used the site as a lumber mill, processing wood into lumber products. The selected remedial action for the site includes demolishing contaminated onsite structures, including the process, storage, and mixing tanks, and the wooden structures and concrete slabs, followed by offsite disposal; decontaminating the concrete drip pad and tanks, followed by recycling or offsite disposal of debris; excavating surface and subsurface soil, with screening and segregation of hazardous waste for offsite disposal, with stabilization, if necessary, prior to disposal at appropriate facilities; backfilling any excavated areas; removing asbestos from the facility, with offsite disposal; removing underground storage tanks and any associated contaminated soil, with scrapping or offsite disposal; monitoring ground water; and implementing institutional controls, including deed and land use restrictions or environmental notices. The estimated capital cost for this remedial action is $550,000, with an annual O M cost of $24,000 for 3 years.

  7. Limited Effect of Chronic Valproic Acid Treatment in a Mouse Model of Machado-Joseph Disease.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Sofia; Duarte-Silva, Sara; Naia, Luana; Neves-Carvalho, Andreia; Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Maciel, Patrícia

    2015-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease, caused by a CAG repeat expansion within the coding region of ATXN3 gene, and which currently lacks effective treatment. In this work we tested the therapeutic efficacy of chronic treatment with valproic acid (VPA) (200mg/kg), a compound with known neuroprotection activity, and previously shown to be effective in cell, fly and nematode models of MJD. We show that chronic VPA treatment in the CMVMJD135 mouse model had limited effects in the motor deficits of these mice, seen mostly at late stages in the motor swimming, beam walk, rotarod and spontaneous locomotor activity tests, and did not modify the ATXN3 inclusion load and astrogliosis in affected brain regions. However, VPA chronic treatment was able to increase GRP78 protein levels at 30 weeks of age, one of its known neuroprotective effects, confirming target engagement. In spite of limited results, the use of another dosage of VPA or of VPA in a combined therapy with molecules targeting other pathways, cannot be excluded as potential strategies for MJD therapeutics.

  8. Toward RNAi therapy for the polyglutamine disease Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Costa, Maria do Carmo; Luna-Cancalon, Katiuska; Fischer, Svetlana; Ashraf, Naila S; Ouyang, Michelle; Dharia, Rahil M; Martin-Fishman, Lucas; Yang, Yemen; Shakkottai, Vikram G; Davidson, Beverly L; Rodríguez-Lebrón, Edgardo; Paulson, Henry L

    2013-10-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is a dominantly inherited ataxia caused by a polyglutamine-coding expansion in the ATXN3 gene. Suppressing expression of the toxic gene product represents a promising approach to therapy for MJD and other polyglutamine diseases. We performed an extended therapeutic trial of RNA interference (RNAi) targeting ATXN3 in a mouse model expressing the full human disease gene and recapitulating key disease features. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) encoding a microRNA (miRNA)-like molecule, miRATXN3, was delivered bilaterally into the cerebellum of 6- to 8-week-old MJD mice, which were then followed up to end-stage disease to assess the safety and efficacy of anti-ATXN3 RNAi. Despite effective, lifelong suppression of ATXN3 in the cerebellum and the apparent safety of miRATXN3, motor impairment was not ameliorated in treated MJD mice and survival was not prolonged. These results with an otherwise effective RNAi agent suggest that targeting a large extent of the cerebellum alone may not be sufficient for effective human therapy. Artificial miRNAs or other nucleotide-based suppression strategies targeting ATXN3 more widely in the brain should be considered in future preclinical tests.

  9. [Joseph O'Dwyer--a pioneer in endotracheal intubation and pressure respiration].

    PubMed

    Goerig, M; Filos, K; Renz, D

    1988-10-01

    The oro- and nasotracheal intubation has been developed into one of the most important techniques in anaesthesiology. Originally, intubations were carried out for overcoming acute diphteric airway obstruction in children. As late as the end of the 19 century, the only life saving chance was to perform tracheotomy. Although the technique for this operation at that time was well developed, it was very often impossible to save the life of those moribund patients. The famous American paediatrician Joseph O'Dwyer re-initiated the technique of intubation and his excellent results became great success and promoted world-wide use, although it was a well-known procedure at that time. His intubation method - also called the O'Dwyer-Method-was first published in the N. Y. Medical Journal as "Intubation of the Larynx" 100 years ago. Working together with the surgeon George Fell, O'Dwyer designed an apparatus, for artificial respiration. As Fell-O'Dwyer Apparatus it was widely used in cases of asphyxia, - even in those caused by overdosage of anaesthetics. Further developments of the apparatus permitted positive pressure ventilation and the combination with a funnel for narcotics increased the repertory of anaesthesiological possibilities.

  10. Correlation between CAG Repeat Length and Clinical Features in Machado-Joseph Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Patrícia; Gaspar, Claudia; DeStefano, Anita L.; Silveira, Isabel; Coutinho, Paula; Radvany, João; Dawson, David M.; Sudarsky, Lewis; Guimarães, João; Loureiro, Jose E. L.; Nezarati, Marjan M.; Corwin, Lee I.; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Rooke, Karen; Rosenberg, Roger; MacLeod, Patrick; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Sequeiros, Jorge; Rouleau, Guy A.

    1995-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is associated with the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in a novel gene on 14q32.1. We confirmed the presence of this expansion in 156 MJD patients from 33 families of different geographic origins: 15 Portuguese Azorean, 2 Brazilian, and 16 North American of Portuguese Azorean descent. Normal chromosomes contain between 12 and 37 CAG repeats in the MJD gene, whereas MJD gene carriers have alleles within the expanded range of 62–84 CAG units. The distribution of expanded alleles and the gap between normal and expanded allele sizes is either inconsistent with a premutation hypothesis or most (if not all) of the alleles we studied descend from a common ancestor. There is a strong correlation between the expanded repeat size and the age at onset of the disease as well as the clinical presentation. There is mild instability of the CAG tract length with transmission of the expanded alleles; both increase and decrease in size between parents and progeny occur, with larger variations in male than in female transmissions. Together, these effects can partly explain the variability of age at onset and of phenotypic features in MJD; however, other modifying factors must exist. ImagesFigure 3 PMID:7611296

  11. Neural correlates of ataxia severity in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R; Diaz, Rosalinda; Campos-Romo, Aurelio; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disorder. Several post-mortem and imaging studies have shown cerebellar and brainstem atrophy. A number of studies have used volumetric regional information to investigate the relationship between neurodegeneration and the ataxia severity. However, regional analysis can obscure the specific location in which the degenerative process is affecting the brain tissue, which can be crucial for the development of new target treatments for this disease. Here we explored the relationship between the gray matter degeneration and the ataxia severity on a cohort of SCA3 patients using a voxel-wise approach. Seventeen patients with molecular diagnose of SCA3 and 17 matched healthy controls participated in this study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain images were acquired and voxel-based morphometry was used to obtain the grey matter volume of each participant. Ataxia severity in the patient group was evaluated using the scale for the assessment and rating of ataxia (SARA). Group comparison revealed significant atrophy in SCA3 including bilateral cerebellum, vermis, brainstem, and occipital cortex. Significant negative correlations between gray matter volume and SARA scores were found in the cerebellum and the cingulate gyrus. These findings highlight the specific contribution of the cerebellum and the cingulate cortex to the ataxia deficits among the other regions showing neurodegeneration in SCA3 patients.

  12. Michael S. Brown, MD and Joseph L. Goldstein, MD. 1985 Nobel laureates in medicine.

    PubMed

    Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1996-02-01

    When Michael S. Brown, MD and Joseph L. Goldstein, MD first met as interns at the Massachusetts General Hospital in 1966, they could hardly have imagined that their careers would continue to be intertwined some 30 years later. It was shortly following their arrival as clinical associates at the National Institutes of Health in 1968 that the pair developed an interest in abnormalities of cholesterol metabolism. Bolstered by epidemiologic data that showed elevated cholesterol levels in many patients with myocardial infarction, Brown and Goldstein, who relocated to the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in 1972, began a search for receptors important in cholesterol homeostasis. These studies, performed in their early stages while juggling clinical duties at Parkland Hospital, culminated in a series of scientific achievements which merited among other honors the Hazen Award in 1982, the Lasker Award in 1985, and the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1985. Today, as Regental Professors of the University of Texas, Brown and Goldstein head a laboratory group which continues to test the cutting edge of medical research. Although impressed with the pace of technological advances in biology, the declining role of clinically oriented physicians in biomedical research troubles the pair. Interviewed in their library in Dallas, Brown and Goldstein spoke about the complicated balance of science, medicine, and education necessary to produce another generation of successful investigators.

  13. Strong linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analysis in Japanese pedigrees with Machado-Joseph disease

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Kotaro; Tanaka, Hajime; Saito, Masaaki

    1996-09-20

    To identify the markers tightly linked to Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) and to investigate whether a limited number of ancestral chromosomes are shared by Japanese MJD pedigrees, a detailed linkage analysis employing D14S55, D14S48, D14S67, D14S291, D14S280, AFM343vf1, D14S81, D14S265, D14S62, and D14S65 was performed. The results of multipoint linkage analysis as well as detection of critical recombination events indicate that the gene for MJD is localized in a 4-cM region between D14S280-D14S81. We found strong linkage disequilibria at AFM343vf1 and D14S81, and association of a few common haplotypes with MJD. These results indicate that there is an obvious founder effect in Japanese MJD and suggest the possibility of the existence of predisposing haplotypes which are prone to expansions of CAG repeats. 47 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Limited Effect of Chronic Valproic Acid Treatment in a Mouse Model of Machado-Joseph Disease

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sofia; Duarte-Silva, Sara; Naia, Luana; Neves-Carvalho, Andreia; Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Maciel, Patrícia

    2015-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease, caused by a CAG repeat expansion within the coding region of ATXN3 gene, and which currently lacks effective treatment. In this work we tested the therapeutic efficacy of chronic treatment with valproic acid (VPA) (200mg/kg), a compound with known neuroprotection activity, and previously shown to be effective in cell, fly and nematode models of MJD. We show that chronic VPA treatment in the CMVMJD135 mouse model had limited effects in the motor deficits of these mice, seen mostly at late stages in the motor swimming, beam walk, rotarod and spontaneous locomotor activity tests, and did not modify the ATXN3 inclusion load and astrogliosis in affected brain regions. However, VPA chronic treatment was able to increase GRP78 protein levels at 30 weeks of age, one of its known neuroprotective effects, confirming target engagement. In spite of limited results, the use of another dosage of VPA or of VPA in a combined therapy with molecules targeting other pathways, cannot be excluded as potential strategies for MJD therapeutics. PMID:26505994

  15. Joseph John Thomson's models of matter and radiation in the early 1890s.

    PubMed

    Bordoni, Stefano

    In the late nineteenth century, Joseph John Thomson moved away from Maxwell's specific theoretical models of matter and energy, even though he continued to rely on the general framework of Maxwell's electromagnetic theory. In his 1893 book, he accomplished the conceptual drift towards a discrete model for matter, electricity, and fields. In Thomson's model, energy was linked to tubes of force, in particular to the aether contained in them and surrounding them: the energy was the kinetic energy of aether, of both a rotational and translational kind. Starting from Maxwell's electromagnetic fields, namely stresses propagating through a continuous solid medium, Thomson arrived at a representation of fields as a sea of discrete units carrying energy and momentum. He tried to transform Maxwell's theory into a unified picture in which atomic models of matter stood beside atomic models of fields. In 1904 his interpretation of X-rays was based on the integration between two complementary features of electromagnetic radiation, the continuity and the discreteness, and on some kind of fibrous aether. In recent secondary literature, the problematic conceptual link between J. J. Thomson's theory and contemporary theories on electromagnetic radiation has been underestimated. On the contrary, in the first half of the twentieth century, some physicists inquired into that link, and a widespread debate emerged, misunderstandings included.

  16. Joseph Black, carbon dioxide, latent heat, and the beginnings of the discovery of the respiratory gases.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-06-15

    The discovery of carbon dioxide by Joseph Black (1728-1799) marked a new era of research on the respiratory gases. His initial interest was in alkalis such as limewater that were thought to be useful in the treatment of renal stone. When he studied magnesium carbonate, he found that when this was heated or exposed to acid, a gas was evolved that he called "fixed air" because it had been combined with a solid material. He showed that the new gas extinguished a flame, that it could not support life, and that it was present in gas exhaled from the lung. Within a few years of his discovery, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen were also isolated. Thus arguably Black's work started the avalanche of research on the respiratory gases carried out by Priestley, Scheele, Lavoisier, and Cavendish. Black then turned his attention to heat and he was the first person to describe latent heat, that is the heat added or lost when a liquid changes its state, for example when water changes to ice or steam. Latent heat is a key concept in thermal physiology because of the heat lost when sweat evaporates. Black was a friend of the young James Watt (1736-1819) who was responsible for the development of early steam engines. Watt was puzzled why so much cooling was necessary to condense steam into water, and Black realized that the answer was the latent heat. The resulting improvements in steam engines ushered in the Industrial Revolution.

  17. Pierre-Joseph Macquer an eighteenth-century artisanal-scientific expert.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Christine

    2012-07-01

    Pierre-Joseph Macquer (1718-1784) is well known as one of the major chemists in the eighteenth century as a theoretician and a teacher. He is also known for his works on dyeing. This paper presents a new face of Macquer. He proposed a theory on mordants in dyeing as early as 1775. Besides his activity at the Académie des sciences, he played an important role in Government as the commissioner of dyeing from 1766 where he established close links with artisan inventors. Académicien chimiste at the royal Manufactory of Sèvres from 1757, he was also the inventor of French porcelain. His notebooks show his organization, method, courage, passion and obstinacy in the search for the paste for hard porcelain. He also proposed an interpretation of its formation. Macquer was both a theoretician and a practical expert in dyeing as well as in porcelain making. He managed to bridge the gap between science and art.

  18. Traces of the Past: Unraveling the Secrets of Archaeology through Chemistry (by Joseph B. Lambert)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orna, Mary Virginia

    1998-07-01

    Addison-Wesley: Reading, MA, 1997. 319 pp. 9.5 x 6.4 in. ISBN 0201409283. $30.00. One of the most fascinating ideas in science is the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. How can science, which is so highly regarded for its ability to present irrefutable evidence, be based at its core on uncertainty? The answer, of course, lies in the notion that any probe that is inserted into a system in order to perform a measurement will necessarily change that system, however slightly. So it is with analytical chemistry as it turns its observer's eye on the problems of the past: archaeological chemists, in the very act of analyzing and examining the mysteries of our cultural origins and artifacts, have indeed, by becoming part of the system being observed, changed and even created major sectors of our culture. And no author has been more successful than Joseph B. Lambert in documenting and demonstrating with many fascinating examples how this cultural examination and creation has evolved.

  19. Ancestral Origins of the Machado-Joseph Disease Mutation: A Worldwide Haplotype Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, C.; Lopes-Cendes, I.; Hayes, S.; Goto, J.; Arvidsson, K.; Dias, A.; Silveira, I.; Maciel, P.; Coutinho, P.; Lima, M.; Zhou, Y.-X.; Soong, B.-W.; Watanabe, M.; Giunti, P.; Stevanin, G.; Riess, O.; Sasaki, H.; Hsieh, M.; Nicholson, G. A.; Brunt, E.; Higgins, J. J.; Lauritzen, M.; Tranebjaerg, L.; Volpini, V.; Wood, N.; Ranum, L.; Tsuji, S.; Brice, A.; Sequeiros, J.; Rouleau, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder originally described in families of Portuguese-Azorean ancestry. The cloning of the MJD1 gene allowed identification of the disease in many other populations, and MJD is now known to be the most common cause of dominant spinocerebellar ataxia. The hypothesis that its present world distribution could result from the spread of an original founder mutation has been raised, both at historical and molecular levels. In the present study, we tested this hypothesis by linkage-disequilibrium analysis of tightly linked polymorphisms and by haplotype comparison, in 249 families from different countries. We typed five microsatellite markers surrounding the MJD1 locus (D14S1015, D14S995, D14S973, D14S1016, and D14S977), and three intragenic single–base-pair polymorphisms (A669TG/G669TG, C987GG/G987GG, and TAA1118/TAC1118). The results show two different haplotypes, specific to the island of origin, in families of Azorean extraction. In families from mainland Portugal, both Azorean haplotypes can be found. The majority of the non-Portuguese families also share the same intragenic haplotype seen in the families coming from the island of Flores, but at least three other haplotypes were seen. These findings suggest two introductions of the mutation into the Portuguese population. Worldwide, the sharing of one intragenic haplotype by the majority of the families studied implies a founder mutation in MJD. PMID:11133357

  20. Sister Mary Joseph Nodule as a First Manifestation of a Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Mai; Kinuta, Takatoshi; Hori, Masateru; Mori, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old female presented to our hospital with a 2 cm firm, nontender, protuberant umbilical nodule. She received treatment with antibiotics for suspected granuloma, with no improvement after two months. High levels of CA125 as well as an ovarian cyst and intrathoracic and intra-abdominal lesions on imaging studies made us suspect an ovarian cancer with a Sister Mary Joseph nodule (SMJN) and other metastases. A bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and umbilical and omentum tumor resections were performed and a metastatic ovarian serous adenocarcinoma was diagnosed by histopathology. After surgery, the patient received chemotherapy with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and bevacizumab; however paclitaxel allergy was observed. As a result, chemotherapy continued with carboplatin and bevacizumab every three weeks for a total of 6 courses. Currently, she is still undergoing treatment with bevacizumab and CA125 levels have been progressively decreasing. SMJN is a rare umbilical metastasis which needs to be considered as a differential diagnosis in the presence of an umbilical tumor for prompt treatment initiation. PMID:27635270

  1. War, sanity, and the Nazi mind: the last passion of Joseph Jastrow.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Peter J

    2009-11-01

    The career of Joseph Jastrow (1863-1944) spanned more than 50 years in service to psychology. For 40 years he represented academic psychology at the University of Wisconsin as chair of the psychology department (1886 to 1927), but also was never far from popularizing psychology through books, articles, public lectures, newspaper columns, and finally radio lectures (e.g., Jastrow, 1900, 1935b). Providing a scientific and progressive psychology for the general public was always a strong penchant for Jastrow on several subjects, such as spiritualism (Jastrow, 1911) and effective living (Jastrow, 1935b). About 1939, while he was well into his 70s, his efforts focused on exposing the menace that Adolf Hitler and Nazism posed, so he undertook to enlist prominent editors to publish his work, Hitler: Mask and Myth, as articles or a book. He was not successful in gaining support for the project. His failing can be understood from the perspectives of the American market for Hitler material, the shortcomings of the manuscript, and how he represented psychology to the American public.

  2. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2003-09-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  3. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; O'Connor, Dick

    2003-01-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan (1998

  4. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2005-11-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  5. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2006-02-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  6. Parkinsonian phenotype in Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3): a two-case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder of late onset, which is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the coding region of the ATXN3 gene. This disease presents clinical heterogeneity, which cannot be completely explained by the size of the repeat tract. MJD presents extrapyramidal motor signs, namely Parkinsonism, more frequently than the other subtypes of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias. Although Parkinsonism seems to segregate within MJD families, only a few MJD patients develop parkinsonian features and, therefore, the clinical and genetic aspects of these rare presentations remain poorly investigated. The main goal of this work was to describe two MJD patients displaying the parkinsonian triad (tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity), namely on what concerns genetic variation in Parkinson's disease (PD) associated loci (PARK2, LRRK2, PINK1, DJ-1, SNCA, MAPT, APOE, and mtDNA tRNAGln T4336C). Case presentation Patient 1 is a 40 year-old female (onset at 30 years of age), initially with a pure parkinsonian phenotype (similar to the phenotype previously reported for her mother). Patient 2 is a 38 year-old male (onset at 33 years of age), presenting an ataxic phenotype with parkinsonian features (not seen either in other affected siblings or in his father). Both patients presented an expanded ATXN3 allele with 72 CAG repeats. No PD mutations were found in the analyzed loci. However, allelic variants previously associated with PD were observed in DJ-1 and APOE genes, for both patients. Conclusions The present report adds clinical and genetic information on this particular and rare MJD presentation, and raises the hypothesis that DJ-1 and APOE polymorphisms may confer susceptibility to the parkinsonian phenotype in MJD. PMID:22023810

  7. NREM-related parasomnias in Machado-Joseph disease: clinical and polysomnographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Giselle Melo Fontes; Pedroso, José Luiz; Dos Santos, Diogo Fernandes; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Do Prado, Lucila Bizari Fernandes; De Carvalho, Luciane Bizari Coin; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Do Prado, Gilmar Fernandes

    2016-02-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorders that affect the cerebellum and its connections, and have a marked clinical and genetic variability. Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3)--MJD/SCA3--is the most common SCA worldwide. MJD/SCA3 is characterized classically by progressive ataxia and variable other motor and non-motor symptoms. Sleep disorders are common, and include rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD), restless legs syndrome (RLS), insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, excessive fragmentary myoclonus and sleep apnea. This study aims to focus upon determining the presence or not of non-REM (NREM)-related parasomnias in MJD/SCA 3, using data from polysomnography (PSG) and clinical evaluation. Forty-seven patients with clinical and genetic diagnosis of MJD/SCA3 and 47 control subjects were evaluated clinically and by polysomnography. MJD/SCA3 patients had a higher frequency of arousals from slow wave sleep (P < 0.001), parasomnia complaints (confusional arousal/sleep terrors, P = 0.001; RBD, P < 0.001; and nightmares, P < 0.001), REM sleep without atonia (P < 0.001), periodic limb movements of sleep index (PLMSi) (P < 0.001), percentage of N3 sleep (P < 0.001) and percentage of N1 sleep (P < 0.001). These data show that NREM-related parasomnias must be included in the spectrum of sleep disorders in MJD/SCA3 patients. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Sleep Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Sleep Research Society.

  8. Neuropeptide Y mitigates neuropathology and motor deficits in mouse models of Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Neves, Joana; Gonçalves, Nélio; Cunha-Santos, Janete; Simões, Ana Teresa; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Hirai, Hirokazu; Kügler, Sebastian; Cavadas, Cláudia; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2015-10-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is a fatal, dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder associated with an expanded polyglutamine tract within the ataxin-3 protein, and characterized by progressive impairment of motor coordination, associated with neurodegeneration of specific brain regions, including cerebellum and striatum. The currently available therapies do not allow modification of disease progression. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been shown to exert potent neuroprotective effects by multiple pathways associated with the MJD mechanisms of disease. Thus, we evaluated NPY levels in MJD and investigated whether raising NPY by gene transfer would alleviate neuropathological and behavioural deficits in cerebellar and striatal mouse models of the disease. For that, a cerebellar transgenic and a striatal lentiviral-based models of MJD were used. NPY overexpression in the affected brain regions in these two mouse models was obtained by stereotaxic injection of adeno-associated viral vectors encoding NPY. Up to 8 weeks after viral injection, balance and motor coordination behaviour and neuropathology were analysed. We observed that NPY levels were decreased in two MJD patients' cerebella and in striata and cerebella of disease mouse models. Furthermore, overexpression of NPY alleviated the motor coordination impairments and attenuated the related neuropathological parameters, preserving cerebellar volume and granular layer thickness, reducing striatal lesion and decreasing mutant ataxin-3 aggregation. Additionally, NPY mediated increase of brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and decreased neuroinflammation markers. Our data suggest that NPY is a potential therapeutic strategy for MJD. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservaton 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    LeCaire, Richard

    1998-01-01

    In the early 1980's the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, the Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife developed a management plan for Lake Roosevelt on the restoration and enhancement of kokanee salmon populations using hatchery out plants and the restoration of natural spawning runs. The plan was incorporated into the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) in their 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife program as partial mitigation for hydropower caused fish losses resulting from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project, as part of a basin wide effort, is evaluating the status of the natural production kokanee in streams tributary to Lakes Roosevelt and Rufus Woods and is examining entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam. The goal of this project is the protection and enhancement of the natural production kokanee in these two lakes. The project is currently collecting data under four phases or parts. Since 1991, Lake Whatcom Washington origin kokanee have been planted in considerable numbers into the waters of Lake Roosevelt. A natural production kokanee fishery has persisted in the lake since the early 1970's(Cash, 1995), (Scholz, 1991). Historical information alludes to wild Kokanee production in the San Poil River, Nespelem River, Big Sheep Creek, Ora-Pa-Ken Creek, Deep Creek and Onion Creeks. The genetic makeup of the fish within the fishery is unknown, as is their contribution to the fishery. The level of influence by the hatchery out planted stock on wild fish stocks is unknown as well. Project outcomes will indicate the genetic fitness for inclusion of natural production kokanee stocks into current Bonneville Power Administration funded hatchery programs. Other findings may determine contribution/interaction of/between wild/hatchery kokanee stocks found in the waters of Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt.

  10. A randomized, phase 2 clinical trial of lithium carbonate in Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; de Castilhos, Raphael Machado; Monte, Thais Lampert; Schumacher-Schuh, Artur Francisco; Donis, Karina Carvalho; D'Ávila, Rui; Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Russo, Aline Dutra; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Gheno, Tailise Conte; de Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; Portela, Luis Valmor Cruz; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria-Luiza; Camey, Suzi Alvez; Torman, Vanessa Bielefeld Leotti; de Mello Rieder, Carlos Roberto; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2014-04-01

    Because lithium exerts neuroprotective effects in preclinical models of polyglutamine disorders, our objective was to assess the safety and efficacy of lithium carbonate (0.5-0.8 milliequivalents per liter) in patients with Machado-Joseph disease (spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 [MJD/SCA3]). For this phase 2, single-center, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01096082), 62 patients who had MJD/SCA3 with a disease duration ≤10 years and an independent gait were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either lithium or placebo. After 24 weeks, 169 adverse events were reported, including 50.3% in the lithium group (P = 1.00; primary safety outcome). Sixty patients (31 in the placebo group and 29 in the lithium group) were analyzed for efficacy (intention-to-treat analysis). Mean progression between groups did not differ according to scores on the Neurological Examination Score for the Assessment of Spinocerebellar Ataxia (NESSCA) after 48 weeks (-0.35; 95% confidence interval, -1.7 to 1.0; primary efficacy outcome). The lithium group exhibited minor progression on the PATA speech-rate (P = 0.002), the nondominant Click Test (P = 0.023), the Spinocerebellar Ataxia Functional Index (P = 0.003), and the Composite Cerebellar Functional Score (P = 0.029). Lithium was safe and well tolerated, but it had no effect on progression when measured using the NESSCA in patients with MJD/SCA3. This slowdown in secondary outcomes deserves further clarification. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  11. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease starting before adolescence.

    PubMed

    Donis, Karina Carvalho; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Krum-Santos, Ana Carolina; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Mattos, Eduardo Preusser; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Torman, Vanessa Leotti; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2016-04-01

    Onset of Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) before adolescence has been rarely reported. This study aims to describe a cohort of SCA3/MJD with onset before 12 years of age, comparing their disease progression with the progression observed in patients with usual disease onset. We identified all cases from our cohort whose onset was before adolescence. After consent, patients were examined with clinical scales Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) and Neurological Examination Score for Spinocerebellar Ataxia (NESSCA). Gender, age, age at onset, disease duration, CAG expanded repeats, transmitting parent, and anticipation of cases with infantile and adult onset were studied. Progression of NESSCA and SARA scores was estimated through a mixed model, and was compared with a historical group with onset after adolescence. Between 2000 and 2014, 461 symptomatic individuals from our region were diagnosed as SCA3/MJD. Onset of eight cases (2.2%), all heterozygotes, was before adolescence: seven were females (p = 0.054). CAG expanded repeats--75 ± 3 versus 84 ± 4--and anticipations--7 ± 9.7 versus 14.4 ± 7.2 years--were different between early childhood and adult onset groups (p < 0.03). The median survival of early childhood onset group was 23 years of age. The annual progression of SARA--2.3 and 0.6 points/year (p = 0.001)--and NESSCA--2.04 and 0.88 points/year (p = 0.043)--was faster in childhood than in adult onset group. Onset of SCA3/MJD before adolescence was related to larger expanded CAG repeats in heterozygosis; females seemed to be at higher risk. Disease progression was faster than in SCA3/MJD starting after 12 years.

  12. Sir Joseph Barcroft, Cambridge placental and fetal research (1933-1966) and inter-generational Science.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Robert; Boyd, C A Richard

    2010-01-01

    The nature of Cambridge (UK) placental and fetal research in the middle third of the twentieth century is reviewed on the basis of published literature and personal recollection. Joseph Barcroft is a central figure who came to fetal research late in an extremely productive career which is briefly sketched. Contemporaneous Cambridge academics in the field included J.D. Boyd (the authors father), J. Hammond, F.H.A. Marshall, R.A. McCance, J. Needham, A.S. Parkes and Elsie Widdowson. The then current Cambridge academic geography is explained and features of its scientific life such as funding, institutional structure and ethos, teaching and clinical duties, domestic and gender roles, and political context, including war and empire, are briefly considered. The testing of research findings against general principles and use of quantitative thinking are identified as important features. Intergenerational connections, often within individual families, are identified as a striking feature. The long-term impact of Cambridge work of this period; locally, in current trophoblast and feto-placental genetic research, in Oxford in probably influencing G.S. Dawes research leadership, and internationally, especially through D.H. Barron, and through him to the Denver School, is considered. That human placental and embryological specimens collected by J.D. Boyd have received a new lease of life as the "Boyd Collection", including use by Allen Enders is noted. Mechanisms for the maintenance of scientific quality and productivity during the period, mainly through the scientist himself relying on an internalised sense of "obligation", are contrasted with those current in the UK and more widely; formal peer-review at frequent intervals, with subsequent allocation of short-term funding. The strengths and weaknesses of each are considered.

  13. Hydrologic and water-quality characteristics of a Wetland receiving wastewater effluent in St. Joseph, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Rob G.; Stark, James R.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrologic and water-quality characteristics were determined for a wetland being used for tertiary treatment of wastewater in St. Joseph, Minnesota. The wetland consists of spruce-tamarack fen and a cattail marsh, with the wastewater being discharged into the fen, and the fen draining into the marsh. The wetland is underlain by flat-lying glacial outwash that ranges from 0 to greater than 20 m in thickness. Horizontal ground-water movement in the outwash aquifer is toward the wetland from the south, east, and west. There is a strong upward vertical hydraulic gradient (about 0.1) in the ground-water flow system beneath and around the wetland. Regionally, the glacial-outwash aquifer is unconfined, but it is confined or partly confined locally by peat deposits under the wetland. Analysis of the hydrologic balance of the fen from October 1985 through September 1986 indicates that the inflow was 44 percent ground water, 38 percent wastewater, 11 percent runoff (storm sewer), and 7 percent precipitation. The fen outflow was 93 percent surface water and 7 percent evapotranspiration. Inflow to the marsh was 74 percent surface water, 21 percent ground water, and 5 percent precipitation. Outflow from the marsh was 94 percent surface water and 6 percent evapotranspiration. Wastewater contributed 74,996, and 81 percent of the total suspended solids, total phosphorus, and total ammonia plus organic nitrogen in the fen, respectively. Other chemical inputs were from the storm sewer, ground water, and atmospheric deposition. The fen was found to retain 34, 14, and 14 percent of the suspended solids, total phosphorus, and total ammonia plus organic nitrogen, respectively. The marsh retained 44, 18, and 22 percent of these three constituents, respectively.

  14. Further refinement of the locus for Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, K.; Tanaka, H.; Takiyama, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant, multi-system, neurodegenerative disorder involving predominantly cerebellar, pyramidal, extrapyramidal, motor neuron and oculomotor systems. We have discovered that the gene for MJD is mapped to chromosome 14q24.3-32.1 in a region of 29 cM between D14S53 and D14S45 using 7 microsatellite DNA markers. To further characterize the candidate region for MJD gene, we analyzed 80 individuals including 35 affected members from 5 Japanese MJD families (3 families are pathologically proven and 2 families are diagnosed based on the clinical manifestations), using 10 new microsatellite DNA markers (D14S76, D14S61, D14S59, D14S67, D14S291, D14S280, D14S81, D14S265, D14S62, and D14S65) in the region defined by previous linkage analysis. High lod scores of 9.227, 3.5207, 9.0320, and 6.7032 were obtained at D14S48, D14S291, D14S280, and D14S81 at recombination fractions of 0.00, 0.05, 0.01, and 0.05, respectively. We have observed recombination events at D14S291 and D14S81 in affected individuals while no recombination events were observed at D14S280. The results indicate that the gene for MJD is likely to be located in the region of 4CM between D14S291 and D14S81. The identification of multiple informative flanking markers should facilitate positional cloning of the gene for MJD.

  15. Cancer in Machado-Joseph disease patients-low frequency as a cause of death.

    PubMed

    Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Kersting, Nathália; Gonçalves, Thomaz Abramsson; Pacheco, Daphne Louise Oliveira; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria-Luiza; Camey, Suzi Alves; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2017-04-01

    Since polyglutamine diseases have been related to a reduced risk of cancer, we aimed to study the 15 years cumulative incidence of cancer (CIC) (arm 1) and the proportion of cancer as a cause of death (arm 2) in symptomatic carriers of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD). SCA3/MJD and control individuals from our state were invited to participate. A structured interview was performed. CIC as published by the Brazilian National Institute of Cancer, was used as populational control. Causes of death were obtained from the Public Information System on Mortality. We interviewed 154 SCA3/MJD patients and 80 unrelated controls: CIC was 7/154 (4.5%) and 5/80 (6.3%), respectively. The interim analysis for futility showed that the number of individuals required to detect a significant difference between groups (1938) would be three times larger than the existing local SCA3/MJD population (625), for an absolute risk reduction of 1.8%. Then this study arm was discontinued due to lack of power. In the same period, cancer was a cause of death in 9/101 (8.9%) SCA3/MJD and in 52/202 (26.2%) controls, with an absolute reduction risk of 17.3% (OR 0.27, 95%CI 0.13 to 0.58, p = 0.01). A significant reduction of cancer as cause of death was observed in SCA3/MJD, suggesting a common effect to all polyglutamine diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Genetic counseling and presymptomatic testing programs for Machado-Joseph Disease: lessons from Brazil and Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Osorio, Claudio Maria; Romariz, Flavia; Paneque, Milena; Sequeiros, Jorge; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2014-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant, late-onset neurological disorder and the most common form of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) worldwide. Diagnostic genetic testing is available to detect the disease-causing mutation by direct sizing of the CAG repeat tract in the ataxin 3 gene. Presymptomatic testing (PST) can be used to identify persons at risk of developing the disease. Genetic counseling provides patients with information about the disease, genetic risks, PST, and the decision-making process. In this study, we present the protocol used in PST for MJD and the relevant observations from two centers: Brazil (Porto Alegre) and Portugal (Porto). We provide a case report that illustrates the significant ethical and psychological issues related to PST in late-onset neurological disorders. In both centers, counseling and PST are performed by a multidisciplinary team, and genetic testing is conducted at the same institutions. From 1999 to 2012, 343 individuals sought PST in Porto Alegre; 263 (77%) of these individuals were from families with MJD. In Porto, 1,530 individuals sought PST between 1996 and 2013, but only 66 (4%) individuals were from families with MJD. In Brazil, approximately 50% of the people seeking PST eventually took the test and received their results, whereas 77% took the test in Portugal. In this case report, we highlight several issues that might be raised by the consultand and how the team can extract significant information. Literature about PST testing for MJD and other SCAs is scarce, and we hope this report will encourage similar studies and enable the implementation of PST protocols in other populations, mainly in Latin America. PMID:24764760

  17. Cognitive deficits in Machado-Joseph disease correlate with hypoperfusion of visual system areas.

    PubMed

    Braga-Neto, Pedro; Dutra, Lívia Almeida; Pedroso, José Luiz; Felício, André C; Alessi, Helena; Santos-Galduroz, Ruth F; Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique F; Castiglioni, Mário Luiz V; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca; de Garrido, Griselda Esther Jara; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas; Jackowski, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Cognitive and olfactory impairments have previously been demonstrated in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD)-SCA3/MJD. We investigated changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in a cohort of Brazilian patients with SCA3/MJD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation among rCBF, cognitive deficits, and olfactory dysfunction in SCA3/MJD. Twenty-nine genetically confirmed SCA3/MJD patients and 25 control subjects were enrolled in the study. The severity of cerebellar symptoms was measured using the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale and the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia. Psychiatric symptoms were evaluated by the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and Beck Depression Inventory. The neuropsychological assessment consisted of Spatial Span, Symbol Search, Picture Completion, the Stroop Color Word Test, Trail Making Test (TMT), and Phonemic Verbal Fluency. Subjects were also submitted to odor identification evaluation using the 16-item Sniffin' Sticks. SPECT was performed using ethyl cysteine dimer labeled with technetium-99m. SCA3/MJD patients showed reduced brain perfusion in the cerebellum, temporal, limbic, and occipital lobes compared to control subjects (pFDR <0.001). A significant positive correlation was found between the Picture Completion test and perfusion of the left parahippocampal gyrus and basal ganglia in the patient group as well as a negative correlation between the TMT part A and bilateral thalamus perfusion. The visuospatial system is affected in patients with SCA3/MJD and may be responsible for the cognitive deficits seen in this disease.

  18. Planning future clinical trials in Machado Joseph disease: Lessons from a phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Rieder, Carlos R M; Castilhos, Raphael Machado; Monte, Thais Lampert; Schumacher-Schuh, Artur Francisco; Donis, Karina Carvalho; D'Ávila, Rui; Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Russo, Aline Dutra; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Gheno, Tailise Conte; Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Portela, Luis Valmor Cruz; Camey, Suzi; Torman, Vanessa Bielefeld Leotti; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2015-11-15

    In a recent phase 2 clinical trial in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD), a neurogenetic disorder without specific therapy, benefits of lithium carbonate were found only on secondary efficacy outcomes, all related to ataxic features. In order to help designing future studies, we further analyzed the trial data searching for treatment response modifiers and metric properties of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) scales. Efficacy analysis was performed with the Neurological Examination Score for the Assessment of Spinocerebellar Ataxia (NESSCA) and the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) subscores and with the subgroup of patients with independent gait according to the 8-meter walking-time (8MW). Interactions of clinical/molecular findings with treatment response, minimally important differences (MIDs), and sample size estimations for NESSCA, SARA, Spinocerebellar Ataxia Functional Index (SCAFI) and Composite Cerebellar Functional Score (CCFS) were evaluated. 62 SCA3/MJD patients had been randomly assigned (1:1) for the double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. While cerebellar NESSCA (range: 0-7 points) differed between groups 0.64 points (95% CI 0.23 to 1.05, p<0.001) over the whole 48weeks of study, favoring lithium, no effect was found on non-ataxia subscores. Among patients able to perform the 8MW on baseline, NESSCA (p=0.010) and SCAFI (p=0.015) differed between groups favoring lithium. Finally, estimated sample sizes for the scales were provided. Lithium efficacy on cerebellar NESSCA, and on SCAFI and CCFS in the primary analysis, together with the lack of effect on non-ataxia features suggests that lithium should be tested in phase 3 trials in SCA3/MJD and that ataxia scales should be preferred to multisystem neurological instruments as the primary outcome. The inclusion of early stage patients is advisable in future clinical trials in SCA3/MJD. clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01096082. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  19. From Dodge City to Emerald City: The Importance of Joseph E. Zins' Work in Teacher Education Programs--A Commentary on "The Scientific Base Linking Social and Emotional Learning to School Success," a Chapter by Joseph E. Zins, Michelle R. Bloodworth, Roger P. Weissberg, and Herbert J. Walberg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, David Lee

    2007-01-01

    This commentary argues that Joseph Zins' work can contribute and enhance university-based teacher preparation programs. Focusing on secondary English Education, it examines how SEL competencies can improve the curricula and field experiences to support pre-service teachers.

  20. From Dodge City to Emerald City: The Importance of Joseph E. Zins' Work in Teacher Education Programs--A Commentary on "The Scientific Base Linking Social and Emotional Learning to School Success," a Chapter by Joseph E. Zins, Michelle R. Bloodworth, Roger P. Weissberg, and Herbert J. Walberg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, David Lee

    2007-01-01

    This commentary argues that Joseph Zins' work can contribute and enhance university-based teacher preparation programs. Focusing on secondary English Education, it examines how SEL competencies can improve the curricula and field experiences to support pre-service teachers.

  1. Calpastatin-mediated inhibition of calpains in the mouse brain prevents mutant ataxin 3 proteolysis, nuclear localization and aggregation, relieving Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Simões, Ana T; Gonçalves, Nélio; Koeppen, Arnulf; Déglon, Nicole; Kügler, Sebastian; Duarte, Carlos Bandeira; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2012-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease is the most frequently found dominantly-inherited cerebellar ataxia. Over-repetition of a CAG trinucleotide in the MJD1 gene translates into a polyglutamine tract within the ataxin 3 protein, which upon proteolysis may trigger Machado-Joseph disease. We investigated the role of calpains in the generation of toxic ataxin 3 fragments and pathogenesis of Machado-Joseph disease. For this purpose, we inhibited calpain activity in mouse models of Machado-Joseph disease by overexpressing the endogenous calpain-inhibitor calpastatin. Calpain blockage reduced the size and number of mutant ataxin 3 inclusions, neuronal dysfunction and neurodegeneration. By reducing fragmentation of ataxin 3, calpastatin overexpression modified the subcellular localization of mutant ataxin 3 restraining the protein in the cytoplasm, reducing aggregation and nuclear toxicity and overcoming calpastatin depletion observed upon mutant ataxin 3 expression. Our findings are the first in vivo proof that mutant ataxin 3 proteolysis by calpains mediates its translocation to the nucleus, aggregation and toxicity and that inhibition of calpains may provide an effective therapy for Machado-Joseph disease.

  2. On the immediacy of unconscious truth: understanding Betty Joseph's 'here and now' through comparison with alternative views of it outside of and within Kleinian thinking.

    PubMed

    Blass, Rachel B

    2011-10-01

    Psychoanalysis emphasizes that in discovering psychic truth what is needed is not abstract or distant knowledge of this truth but rather an immediate encounter with it. In this paper the author examines the meaning of this immediacy through the study of Betty Joseph's notion of 'here and now,' which in recent years has been most directly associated with it. The author shows how Joseph's notion of 'here and now' continues a legacy beginning in Freud and taken up by Klein regarding the immediacy of unconscious truth that differs from other available analytic formulations of the term. To highlight the uniqueness of Joseph's contribution the author goes on to examine what distinguishes it within the kleinian framework. She does this in part through comparison with the clinical approach of Hanna Segal, whose focus on unconscious phantasy adheres to the same foundational legacy. The author points to the differences between Joseph and Segal and their significance, which have not been sufficiently elaborated in the analytic literature. She argues that viewing these differences within the context of a shared perspective on the role of unconscious truth in the analytic process and task enriches our understanding of the complexity of kleinian thinking and the meaning of truth in psychoanalysis. This understanding is also furthered by the recognition that many uses of the term 'here and now' in the analytic literature refer to something very different from what Joseph refers to and are based on a perspective that is fundamentally opposed to hers.

  3. A combinatorial approach to identify calpain cleavage sites in the Machado-Joseph disease protein ataxin-3.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jonasz J; Golla, Matthias; Guaitoli, Giambattista; Wanichawan, Pimthanya; Hayer, Stefanie N; Hauser, Stefan; Krahl, Ann-Christin; Nagel, Maike; Samer, Sebastian; Aronica, Eleonora; Carlson, Cathrine R; Schöls, Ludger; Riess, Olaf; Gloeckner, Christian J; Nguyen, Huu P; Hübener-Schmid, Jeannette

    2017-03-08

    Ataxin-3, the disease protein in Machado-Joseph disease, is known to be proteolytically modified by various enzymes including two major families of proteases, caspases and calpains. This processing results in the generation of toxic fragments of the polyglutamine-expanded protein. Although various approaches were undertaken to identify cleavage sites within ataxin-3 and to evaluate the impact of fragments on the molecular pathogenesis of Machado-Joseph disease, calpain-mediated cleavage of the disease protein and the localization of cleavage sites remained unclear. Here, we report on the first precise localization of calpain cleavage sites in ataxin-3 and on the characterization of the resulting breakdown products. After confirming the occurrence of calpain-derived fragmentation of ataxin-3 in patient-derived cell lines and post-mortem brain tissue, we combined in silico prediction tools, western blot analysis, mass spectrometry, and peptide overlay assays to identify calpain cleavage sites. We found that ataxin-3 is primarily cleaved at two sites, namely at amino acid positions D208 and S256 and mutating amino acids at both cleavage sites to tryptophan nearly abolished ataxin-3 fragmentation. Furthermore, analysis of calpain cleavage-derived fragments showed distinct aggregation propensities and toxicities of C-terminal polyglutamine-containing breakdown products. Our data elucidate the important role of ataxin-3 proteolysis in the pathogenesis of Machado-Joseph disease and further emphasize the relevance of targeting this disease pathway as a treatment strategy in neurodegenerative disorders. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Surgical pathology in the era of the Civil War: the remarkable life and accomplishments of Joseph Janvier Woodward, MD.

    PubMed

    Rapkiewicz, Amy V; Hawk, Alan; Noe, Adrienne; Berman, David M

    2005-10-01

    Joseph Janvier Woodward was an assistant surgeon in the US Army during the Civil War, coauthored the definitive works on the mortality and morbidity of that war, attended at the autopsy of President Lincoln, and attended President Garfield after he was shot. He revolutionized the field of photomicroscopy and was one of the first pathologists to use aniline dyes as tissue stains. Yet despite the occasional biographical sketch every few decades, he is largely unknown today. Herein, we review his contributions to surgical pathology and medicine and present modern-day photomicrographs of 140-year-old slides from Woodward's original collection.

  5. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of gastrointestinal stromal tumor presenting as an umbilical mass (Sister Mary Joseph's Nodule).

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Donizete; Wakely, Paul E

    2006-04-01

    The Sister Mary Joseph (SMJ) nodule is a clinical sign of metastatic cancer involving the umbilicus. The vast majority of these instances represent adenocarcinomas arising from ovarian or colorectal primaries. We present a patient who presented with ascites and the SMJ lesion that turned out to be a metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor after fine needle aspiration biopsy was performed. The lesion was subsequently histologically confirmed. Gastrointestinal stroma tumor involving the umbilicus is exceedingly uncommon and only rarely presents in this fashion. The cytomorphological features, differential diagnosis, and comparison with the tissue specimen are made.

  6. Redescription of the fig wasp genus Sycophilodes Joseph (Chalcidoidea: Pteromalidae: Epichrysomallinae) with description of a new species from India.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Achintya; Dey, Debjani

    2014-07-18

    Sycophilodes Joseph is a non-pollinating fig wasp genus so far reported only from Ficus benghalensis L. The genus Sycophilodes is revised with redescription of the male and the first description of the female of its only currently included species, S. moniliformis. A second species, Sycophilodes uluberiaensis Pramanik & Dey sp. nov. is described. Available keys are modified and supplemented to facilitate identification of Sycophilodes and a key for distinguishing both sexes of the two included species is presented. All type specimens are deposited in the National Pusa Collection, IARI, New Delhi.

  7. Medicine and music: a note on John Hunter (1728-93) and Joseph Haydn (1732-1809).

    PubMed

    Fu, Louis

    2010-05-01

    Joseph Haydn was a central figure in the development and growth of the European classical musical tradition in its transition from the Baroque period. John Hunter as the Founder of Scientific Surgery was a dominant figure in 18th-century British medical science. Anne Hunter née Home (1742-1821) was in her own right a figure of some eminence in the literary circles of 18th-century London. Attracted to the burgeoning medical and musical scenes of London, John Hunter married Anne Home and became a famous surgeon; Haydn became acquainted with the Hunters. The people, the opportunities and the circumstances had coincided.

  8. [Creation of the St Joseph University Faculty of Medicine in Beirut: 125 years of Franco-Lebanese healthcare cooperation].

    PubMed

    Farah, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The Mediterranean--mare nostrum--has always been a cradle of exchanges for the different inhabitants of its shores, as highlighted by myths and legends dating back to antiquity. Cooperation between France and Lebanon expanded markedly in the 17th century and has continually expanded since, in fields such as education, through initiatives launched by the French government and by religious institutions. The Faculty of Medicine is an excellent example. The instigator was the Society of Jesus, which had created St Joseph University in 1875, eventually being supported by the French government. Following an agreement signed on 7 May 1883 between the Society of Jesus and the French authorities, the medical school opened on November 30th of the same year. The school soon became a faculty, and was managed until 1976 by a chancellor who answered to a French academic institution and delivered French state medical degrees. In 1976, however, following changes to the statutes of St Joseph University and the Faculty, the latter became a fully fledged Lebanese Faculty of Medicine delivering its diplomas through St Joseph University. The faculty soon needed a hospital complex to meet its students' medical needs. After some trials with local hospitals, it was decided to build the facility from scratch, and to name it Hotel Dieu de France. Construction was financed by the French government, and by a subscription launched by the French Press Syndicate, at the initiative of the newspaper Le Temps and at the request of the French Asia Committee (Comité de l'Asie Française). The Hospital was inaugurated on May 27, 1923. It soon encompassed a French maternity unit and cancer center, thus constituting the French Hospital Association (Association Hospitalière Française). In 1984, following an agreement between the French government and St Joseph University, Hotel Dieu became the property of the university, and the vice-chancellor became chairman of the board. The transfer of the faculty

  9. Calpain Inhibition Is Protective in Machado-Joseph Disease Zebrafish Due to Induction of Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Watchon, Maxinne; Yuan, Kristy C; Mackovski, Nick; Svahn, Adam J; Cole, Nicholas J; Goldsbury, Claire; Rinkwitz, Silke; Becker, Thomas S; Nicholson, Garth A; Laird, Angela S

    2017-08-09

    The neurodegenerative disease Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), also known as spinocerebellar ataxin-3, affects neurons of the brain and spinal cord, disrupting control of the movement of muscles. We have successfully established the first transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) model of MJD by expressing human ataxin-3 protein containing either 23 glutamines (23Q, wild-type) or 84Q (MJD-causing) within neurons. Phenotypic characterization of the zebrafish (male and female) revealed that the ataxin-3-84Q zebrafish have decreased survival compared with ataxin-3-23Q and develop ataxin-3 neuropathology, ataxin-3 cleavage fragments and motor impairment. Ataxin-3-84Q zebrafish swim shorter distances than ataxin-3-23Q zebrafish as early as 6 days old, even if expression of the human ataxin-3 protein is limited to motor neurons. This swimming phenotype provides a valuable readout for drug treatment studies. Treating the EGFP-ataxin-3-84Q zebrafish with the calpain inhibitor compound calpeptin decreased levels of ataxin-3 cleavage fragments, but also removed all human ataxin-3 protein (confirmed by ELISA) and prevented the early MJD zebrafish motor phenotype. We identified that this clearance of ataxin-3 protein by calpeptin treatment resulted from an increase in autophagic flux (indicated by decreased p62 levels and increased LC3II). Cotreatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine blocked the decrease in human ataxin-3 levels and the improved movement produced by calpeptin treatment. This study demonstrates that this first transgenic zebrafish model of MJD is a valuable tool for testing potential treatments for MJD. Calpeptin treatment is protective in this model of MJD and removal of human ataxin-3 through macro-autophagy plays an important role in this beneficial effect.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We have established the first transgenic zebrafish model of the neurodegenerative disease MJD, and identified relevant disease phenotypes, including impaired movement from an early age

  10. Joseph A. Walker after X-15 flight #2-14-28

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-03-30

    Joseph A. Walker was a Chief Research Pilot at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center during the mid-1960s. He joined the NACA in March 1945, and served as project pilot at the Edwards flight research facility on such pioneering research projects as the D-558-1, D-558-2, X-1, X-3, X-4, X-5, and the X-15. He also flew programs involving the F-100, F-101, F-102, F-104, and the B-47. Walker made the first NASA X-15 flight on March 25, 1960. He flew the research aircraft 24 times and achieved its fastest speed and highest altitude. He attained a speed of 4,104 mph (Mach 5.92) during a flight on June 27, 1962, and reached an altitude of 354,300 feet on August 22, 1963 (his last X-15 flight). He was the first man to pilot the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) that was used to develop piloting and operational techniques for lunar landings. Walker was born February 20, 1921, in Washington, Pa. He lived there until graduating from Washington and Jefferson College in 1942, with a B.A. degree in Physics. During World War II he flew P-38 fighters for the Air Force, earning the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal with Seven Oak Clusters. Walker was the recipient of many awards during his 21 years as a research pilot. These include the 1961 Robert J. Collier Trophy, 1961 Harmon International Trophy for Aviators, the 1961 Kincheloe Award and 1961 Octave Chanute Award. He received an honorary Doctor of Aeronautical Sciences degree from his alma mater in June of 1962. Walker was named Pilot of the Year in 1963 by the National Pilots Association. He was a charter member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, and one of the first to be designated a Fellow. He was fatally injured on June 8, 1966, in a mid-air collision between an F-104 he was piloting and the XB-70.

  11. Peripheral Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3/Machado-Joseph Disease.

    PubMed

    de Assis, Adriano M; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Longoni, Aline; Haas, Clarissa Branco; Torrez, Vitor Rocco; Brochier, Andressa Wigner; Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Gheno, Tailise Conte; Russo, Aline; Monte, Thais Lampert; Castilhos, Raphael Machado; Schumacher-Schuh, Artur; D'Avila, Rui; Donis, Karina Carvalho; de Mello Rieder, Carlos Roberto; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Camey, Suzi; Leotti, Vanessa Bielefeldt; Jardim, Laura Bannach; Portela, Luis Valmor

    2017-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) is a polyglutamine disorder with no current disease-modifying treatment. Conformational changes in mutant ataxin-3 trigger different pathogenic cascades, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation; however, the clinical relevance of oxidative stress elements as peripheral biomarkers of SCA3/MJD remains unknown. We aimed to evaluate ROS production and antioxidant defense capacity in symptomatic and presymptomatic SCA3/MJD individuals and correlate these markers with clinical and molecular data with the goal of assessing their properties as disease biomarkers. Molecularly confirmed SCA3/MJD carriers and controls were included in an exploratory case-control study. Serum ROS, measured by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) antioxidant enzyme activities, levels were assessed. Fifty-eight early/moderate stage symptomatic SCA3/MJD, 12 presymptomatic SCA3/MJD, and 47 control individuals were assessed. The DCFH-DA levels in the symptomatic group were 152.82 nmol/mg of protein [95% confidence interval (CI), 82.57-223.08, p < 0.001] higher than in the control and 243.80 nmol/mg of protein (95% CI, 130.64-356.96, p < 0.001) higher than in the presymptomatic group. The SOD activity in the symptomatic group was 3 U/mg of protein (95% CI, 0.015-6.00, p = 0.048) lower than in the presymptomatic group. The GSH-Px activity in the symptomatic group was 13.96 U/mg of protein (95% CI, 5.90-22.03, p < 0.001) lower than in the control group and 20.52 U/mg of protein (95% CI, 6.79-34.24, p < 0.001) lower than in the presymptomatic group and was inversely correlated with the neurological examination score for spinocerebellar ataxias (R = -0.309, p = 0.049). Early/moderate stage SCA3/MJD patients presented a decreased antioxidant capacity and increased ROS generation. GSH-Px activity was the most

  12. Joseph Clover and the cobra: a tale of snake envenomation and attempted resuscitation with bellows in London, 1852.

    PubMed

    Ball, C

    2010-07-01

    The Industrial Revolution saw the creation of many new jobs, but probably none more curious than that of zookeeper. The London Zoological Gardens, established for members in 1828, was opened to the general public in 1847. In 1852 the "Head Keeper in the Serpent Room", Edward Horatio Girling, spent a night farewelling a friend departing for Australia. He arrived at work in an inebriated state and was bitten on the face by a cobra that he was handling in a less than sensible manner. He was taken by cab to University College Hospital where he was resuscitated by a number of doctors, including Joseph Clover then the resident medical officer to the hospital and later to become the leading anaesthetist in London. Clover recorded this event in his diary along with the resuscitation method used. The patient eventually died but his treatment created a flurry of correspondence in the medical and lay press. Interestingly, the attempted resuscitation was with bellows, which had been abandoned by the Royal Humane Society twenty years earlier Clover records other cases of resuscitation with bellows at University College Hospital during his time as a resident medical officer there (1848 to 1853). There is a casebook belonging to Joseph Clover in the Geoffrey Kaye Museum, in Melbourne. This story is one of the many interesting stories uncovered during a study of this book and Clover's other personal papers.

  13. Calpain inhibition reduces ataxin-3 cleavage alleviating neuropathology and motor impairments in mouse models of Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Simões, Ana Teresa; Gonçalves, Nélio; Nobre, Rui Jorge; Duarte, Carlos Bandeira; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2014-09-15

    Machado-Joseph Disease (MJD) is the most prevalent autosomal dominantly inherited cerebellar ataxia. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the ATXN3 gene, which translates into a polyglutamine tract within the ataxin-3 protein. Present treatments are symptomatic and do not prevent disease progression. As calpain overactivation has been shown to contribute to mutant ataxin-3 proteolysis, translocation to the nucleus, inclusions formation and neurodegeneration, we investigated the potential role of calpain inhibition as a therapeutic strategy to alleviate MJD pathology. For this purpose, we administered orally the calpain inhibitor BDA-410 to a lentiviral mouse model of MJD. Western-blot and immunohistochemical analysis revealed the presence of N- and C-terminal mutant ataxin-3 fragments and the colocalization of large inclusions with cleaved caspase-3 in the mice brain. Oral administration of the calpain inhibitor BDA-410 decreased both fragments formation and full-length ataxin-3 levels, reduced aggregation of mutant ataxin-3 and prevented cell injury and striatal and cerebellar degeneration. Importantly, in correlation with the preserved cerebellar morphology, BDA-410 prevented motor behavioural deficits. In conclusion, BDA-410 alleviates Machado-Joseph neuropathology and may therefore be an effective therapeutic option for MJD. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Franz Joseph Gall on greatness in the fine arts: A collaboration of multiple cortical faculties of mind.

    PubMed

    Eling, Paul; Finger, Stanley

    2015-10-01

    Although Franz Joseph Gall (1758-1828) is well known for his organology, i.e., his theory of cortical localization of function largely derived from skull features, little has been written about his ideas pertaining to specific faculties other than speech, and even less attention has been drawn to how the individual faculties might work together in specific situations. Our focus shall be on how Franz Joseph Gall viewed the fine arts, with special emphasis on what one must possess to be outstanding in this field, which he associated with perceiving and understanding relationships, and several higher faculties of mind, including color, "constructiveness," locality, and recognizing people. How these faculties are utilized, he tells us, will vary with whether an artist does portraits, landscapes, historical scenes, still life compositions, etc., as well as with the selected medium (e.g., oil paints, sketching on paper, stones to be carved). To put Gall's thoughts about the fine arts in context, brief mention will be made of his scientific career, his guiding philosophy, the questions he most wanted to answer, what he construed as "evidence," how he eliminated the soul or "controller" from his system, and how he presented his work to the public. Some comparisons will be made to what he wrote about having a talent for music.

  15. The lower Tuscaloosa Formation (upper cretaceous) in the Greensburg and Joseph Branch Field Areas, St. Helena Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Corcoran, M.K. ); Cameron, C.P.; Meylan, M.A. )

    1993-09-01

    Detailed examination of five conventional cores and geophysical well logs in the Greensburg and Joseph Branch field areas of St. Helena Parish, Louisiana, were used to determine the geology of the First Tuscaloosa sand (an informal term for the objective sandstone in this part of the Lower Tuscaloosa production trend). Greensburg and Joseph Branch fields occur in the intermediate-depth part of the productive trend at an average depth of about 13,000 ft in an area of limited low-relief structural nosing. Neither anticlinal closures greater than 20 ft nor faults were recognized by structure contour mapping. Based on the updip and lateral shaling-out of the First Tuscaloosa Sand in the field areas, and the absence of structure, these fields are deemed stratigraphic traps. The First Tuscaloosa Sand probably was deposited as a distributary channel that flowed in the subaerial lowland part of a delta. Intense bioturbation of sand tops, unidirectional trough cross-bedding, and flaser structures were recognized in the core, indicating that this part of the overall deltaic environment was influenced or reworked by primarily sublitharenite, with scattered quartzarenite intervals. The reservoir facies was extensively modified by diagenesis. Initial (primary) porosity was reduced by compaction and later by formation of quartz overgrowths. Secondary porosity, developed as a result of the dissolution of unstable grains and late-stage carbonate cements, can range up to 25%.

  16. Baron von Zach's business relations with the Munich entrepreneur Joseph von Utzschneider (German Title: Geschäftsbeziehungen des Barons von Zach zu dem Münchner Unternehmer Joseph von Utzschneider)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Ivo

    The relationship between the astronomer von Zach on the one side and the entrepreneur Joseph von Utzschneider and his partner Georg von Reichenbach on the other dates presumably from the year 1807 when Zach spent two months in Munich. Already in the same year Zach had ordered an instrument for himself and began to solicit business for the institute of Reichenbach, Utzschneider, and Liebherr, which was founded in 1804. One of the clients canvassed by Zach was the director of the observatory in Naples Zuccari. Zuccari had ordered the whole equipment for the new observatory from this institute in 1813. The instruments for Naples, which were completed in 1814, were sent accompanied by Reichenbach by land and sea to their destination where Reichenbach supervised their setup. At that time Reichenbach had separated from Utzschneider who kept the optical institute in Benediktbeuern with his new partner Joseph von Fraunhofer whereas Reichenbach became owner of the mathematical-mechanical institute in Munich. For personal and economical reasons Utzschneider began soon after to produce not only optical glass but also optical devices similar to those offered by Reichenbach. As soon as two institutes in Munich competed against each other on the market for sophisticated geodetical and astronomical instruments Zach sided with Utzschneider. Zach's main professional argument for this decision was that both competitors got the optical glass for their instruments from Utzschneider's optical institute in Benediktbeuern. This meant that Utzschneider had first choice and so the optical part of his instruments could be considered as better than that of Reichenbach`s instruments. Zach's role as an agent in Italy and France for the sale of products coming from Utzschneider's manufactories is highlighted by three of Zach's letters to Utzschneider from 1817 and 1818, two of which are reproduced here for the first time.

  17. The Most Significant Rhetorical Work in French Is: L'Abbe Joseph Cyprien Nadal's "Dictionnaire d'Eloquence Sacree" (Paris: Migne, 1851).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert W.

    Joseph Cyprien Nadal's "Dictionnaire d'Eloquence Sacree" is an outstanding work because of Nadal's thorough treatment of all the elements young speakers should know as they embark on a platform career. The most important of these elements are invention, disposition, style, memory, and delivery. In addition, the book discusses five duties…

  18. 33 CFR 334.670 - Gulf of Mexico south and west of Apalachicola, San Blas, and St. Joseph bays; air-to-air firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico south and west of Apalachicola, San Blas, and St. Joseph bays; air-to-air firing practice range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.670 Gulf of Mexico south and west of...

  19. 33 CFR 334.670 - Gulf of Mexico south and west of Apalachicola, San Blas, and St. Joseph bays; air-to-air firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico south and west of Apalachicola, San Blas, and St. Joseph bays; air-to-air firing practice range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.670 Gulf of Mexico south and west of...

  20. 33 CFR 334.670 - Gulf of Mexico south and west of Apalachicola, San Blas, and St. Joseph bays; air-to-air firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico south and west of Apalachicola, San Blas, and St. Joseph bays; air-to-air firing practice range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.670 Gulf of Mexico south and west of...

  1. 33 CFR 334.670 - Gulf of Mexico south and west of Apalachicola, San Blas, and St. Joseph bays; air-to-air firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico south and west of Apalachicola, San Blas, and St. Joseph bays; air-to-air firing practice range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.670 Gulf of Mexico south and west of...

  2. The Chicago Board of Education Desegregation Policies and Practices [1975-1985]: A Historical Examination of the Administrations of Superintendents Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study will be to examine the policies and practices of two distinguished superintendents of the Chicago Public Schools: Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and the first African American female Superintendent Dr. Ruth Love. Hannon's four year administration extended from 1975 through 1979. Love's administration encompassed the years 1980…

  3. Being a Stranger and the Strangeness of Being: Joseph Conrad's "The Secret Sharer" as an Allegory of Being in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwieler, Elias

    2013-01-01

    Joseph Conrad's "The Secret Sharer" has often been associated with what can be called initiation stories. However, in this article I argue that Conrad's text is more than that. It can, I suggest, be read as an allegory of the inaccessibility to reveal the essence of being in command, being in education, and also the…

  4. Being a Stranger and the Strangeness of Being: Joseph Conrad's "The Secret Sharer" as an Allegory of Being in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwieler, Elias

    2013-01-01

    Joseph Conrad's "The Secret Sharer" has often been associated with what can be called initiation stories. However, in this article I argue that Conrad's text is more than that. It can, I suggest, be read as an allegory of the inaccessibility to reveal the essence of being in command, being in education, and also the…

  5. The Chicago Board of Education Desegregation Policies and Practices [1975-1985]: A Historical Examination of the Administrations of Superintendents Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study will be to examine the policies and practices of two distinguished superintendents of the Chicago Public Schools: Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and the first African American female Superintendent Dr. Ruth Love. Hannon's four year administration extended from 1975 through 1979. Love's administration encompassed the years 1980…

  6. Telegram from Senator Joseph McCarthy to President Harry S. Truman. The Constitution Community: Postwar United States (1945 to Early 1970s).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Tom

    As soon as World War II ended, the United States and the Soviet Union began a struggle for supremacy. It was against the backdrop of the Cold War that the threat of internal subversion and external attack began to preoccupy Congress. On February 9, 1950, Senator Joseph McCarthy gave a speech in Wheeling, West Virginia, where he claimed to have in…

  7. Joseph Priestley across Theology, Education, and Chemistry: An Interdisciplinary Case Study in Epistemology with a Focus on the Science Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Berg, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of a search for the intellectual tools used by Joseph Priestley (1733-1804) in his chemistry, education, and theology documents. Priestley's enquiring democratic view of knowledge was applicable in all three areas and constitutes a significant part of his lifework. Current epistemological issues in science…

  8. 'God grant it may do good two all': the madhouse practice of Joseph Mason, 1738-79.

    PubMed

    Smith, Leonard

    2016-06-01

    Private madhouses made a significant contribution to the development of psychiatric practices in eighteenth-century England. Joseph Mason of Bristol, proprietor of a madhouse at Stapleton and then at nearby Fishponds, was part of a dynasty of successful and respected mad-doctors. A deeply religious man, his Christian ethics constituted the guiding force in his work with patients and interactions with their relatives. He was also an astute man of business, who recognized that comfortable domestic surroundings and the achievement of recoveries would enhance his reputation and attract lucrative middle-class custom. His treatment approaches, illustrated in a 1763 diary, were eclectic and pragmatic, comprising various medicines, dietary regulation, graded social interactions, and the cultivation of individualized therapeutic relationships with his patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Three pioneers of comparative psychology in America, 1843-1890: Lewis H. Morgan, John Bascom, and Joseph LeConte.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Timothy D

    2003-02-01

    Scientific comparative psychology in America dates from the mid-1890s, but there is a body of earlier literature on the topic, written during a period of theistic debates over Darwinian evolution. The anthropologist Lewis H. Morgan rejected instinct as an explanation of animal behavior in 1843 and defended the mental similarities between animals and humans, although he was not an evolutionist. John Bascom's textbook Comparative Psychology (1878) is the earliest American work to use that title, and its theistic approach anticipates some arguments found in much later evolutionary works. Beginning in 1860, the geologist Joseph LeConte, who is well known for defending the compatibility of evolution and religion, wrote several articles in which he outlined a comparative evolutionary approach to psychological problems. However, these writers did not establish a coherent research tradition and were ignored by the "New Psychologists" of the 1880s.

  10. Joseph Needham, CH, FRS, FBA., b. 9 December 1900; d. 24 April 1995. A Sailor's Tribute and a Memoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, D. W.

    Sailors, indeed anyone interested in the development of sailing craft, will be for ever indebted to Joseph Needham. Today they will find with ease literature that describes the origins, characteristics, and development of sailing craft in the various regions of the world; the inter-relationships between natural products, and native hull stuctures and forms, sails' fabrics, shapes, and performance. They can learn, too, that the closestowing anchor, the water-tight bulkhead, the balanced rudder (and other features of the modern efficiency-conscious ship constructor) have all been adapted from the millenniaold, so-long-despised by Westerners, Chinese junk, just as has, late in this twentieth century, the stiffened sail of the modern high-performance yacht.

  11. A question of merit: John Hutton Balfour, Joseph Hooker and the 'concussion' over the Edinburgh chair of botany.

    PubMed

    Bellon, Richard

    2005-03-01

    In 1845, Robert Graham's death created a vacancy for the traditionally dual appointment to the University of Edinburgh's chair of botany and the Regius Keepership of the Edinburgh Royal Botanic Garden. John Hutton Balfour and Joseph Hooker emerged as the leading candidates. The contest quickly became embroiled in long running controversies over the nature and control of Scottish university education at a time of particular social and political tension after a recent schism in Church of Scotland. The politics of the appointment were complicated by the fact that the Edinburgh Town Council (which preferred Balfour) chose the chair while the keepership was under the patronage of the Westminster government (which preferred Hooker). Balfour eventually emerged triumphant after a bitter campaign marked on all sides by intense politicking. The struggle to replace Graham provides a case study in how Victorian men of science adapted their aspirations to the practical realities of life in industrial, reforming, imperial, multinational Britain.

  12. Caloric restriction blocks neuropathology and motor deficits in Machado–Joseph disease mouse models through SIRT1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Santos, Janete; Duarte-Neves, Joana; Carmona, Vitor; Guarente, Leonard; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Machado–Joseph disease (MJD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by an abnormal expansion of the CAG triplet in the ATXN3 gene, translating into a polyglutamine tract within the ataxin-3 protein. The available treatments only ameliorate symptomatology and do not block disease progression. In this study we find that caloric restriction dramatically rescues the motor incoordination, imbalance and the associated neuropathology in transgenic MJD mice. We further show that caloric restriction rescues SIRT1 levels in transgenic MJD mice, whereas silencing SIRT1 is sufficient to prevent the beneficial effects on MJD pathology. In addition, the re-establishment of SIRT1 levels in MJD mouse model, through the gene delivery approach, significantly ameliorates neuropathology, reducing neuroinflammation and activating autophagy. Furthermore, the pharmacological activation of SIRT1 with resveratrol significantly reduces motor incoordination of MJD mice. The pharmacological SIRT1 activation could provide important benefits to treat MJD patients. PMID:27165717

  13. Beyond antisepsis: Examining the relevance of the works of Joseph Baron Lister to the contemporary surgeon-scientist

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Graeme E.

    2014-01-01

    As the father of antispesis, the legacy of Joseph Baron Lister is assured and his influence on the development of contemporary surgical practice is recognised in the context of his achievement of predictable, infection-free surgery. However, looking beyond Lister's finest achievement and examining this work in the context of his whole career as a surgeon-scientist reveals important lessons pertinent to aspiring peers in how, by replacing surgical dogma with observation, deductive reasoning and scientific verification, by pursuing good ideas in the face of resistance and by making research directly relevant and patient-focused, lasting changes can be accomplished. This short paper aims to put Lister's developments in antisepsis in the context of his whole career, to evaluate his legacy and to commend his approach to contemporary surgeon-scientists. PMID:25593429

  14. The role of the patient's remembered history and unconscious past in the evolution of Betty Joseph's 'Here and now' clinical technique (1959-1989).

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    The author historicizes one aspect of Betty Joseph's ongoing technical contributions in terms of its originating London kleinian context. Early on she drew upon both the patient's remembered history and unconscious past, linking these experiences in past-to-present transference interpretations in order to effect psychic change. In evolving the technique of 'here and now' analysis, Joseph came to emphasize a communicative definition of projective and introjective identification as well as the significance of enactments while marginalizing the use of part-object anatomical interpretative language. She gradually set aside directly linking the patient's past with the present, compelled now by making direct contact with her patients. She now tracked how difficult patients acted in and responded to interpretations from moment to moment. The author maintains that the explicit and implicit conceptual work of Wilfred Bion as well as Joseph's continuous group workshop for analysts led to an increased understanding of the patient's projective impact on the analyst's countertransference responses, and thereby increased the analyst's capacity with 'difficult to treat' narcissistic spectrum patients described by her colleague, Herbert Rosenfeld. In recent work, while Joseph continues to elucidate what patients recall about their early past, she formats her understanding in terms of a direct analysis of the structure of the patient's projected internal object relations in the transference. The analyst works with the patient's communications and enactments, with a greater emphasis on a more 'inside-to-outside' understanding of transference in contrast to the earlier 'past-to-present' work associated with both Freud and Klein. This investigation concludes with one example of Betty Joseph's significant impact on contemporary kleinian technique by taking up some of Michael Feldman's work. Now the analyst listens to the 'past presented,' the patient's projected internal world, as well

  15. Response of the St. Joseph River to lake level changes during the last 12,000 years in the Lake Michigan basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kincare, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    The water level of the Lake Michigan basin is currently 177 m above sea level. Around 9,800 14C years B.P., the lake level in the Lake Michigan basin had dropped to its lowest level in prehistory, about 70 m above sea level. This low level (Lake Chippewa) had profound effects on the rivers flowing directly into the basin. Recent studies of the St. Joseph River indicate that the extreme low lake level rejuvenated the river, causing massive incision of up to 43 m in a valley no more than 1.6 km wide. The incision is seen 25 km upstream of the present shoreline. As lake level rose from the Chippewa low, the St. Joseph River lost competence and its estuary migrated back upstream. Floodplain and channel sediments partially refilled the recently excavated valley leaving a distinctly non-classical morphology of steep sides with a broad, flat bottom. The valley walls of the lower St. Joseph River are 12-18 m tall and borings reveal up to 30 m of infill sediment below the modern floodplain. About 3 ?? 108 m3 of sediment was removed from the St. Joseph River valley during the Chippewa phase lowstand, a massive volume, some of which likely resides in a lowstand delta approximately 30 km off-shore in Lake Michigan. The active floodplain below Niles, Michigan, is inset into an upper terrace and delta graded to the Calumet level (189 m) of Lake Chicago. In the lower portion of the terrace stratigraphy a 1.5-2.0 m thick section of clast-supported gravel marks the entry of the main St. Joseph River drainage above South Bend, Indiana, into the Lake Michigan basin. This gravel layer represents the consolidation of drainage that probably occurred during final melting out of ice-marginal kettle chains allowing stream piracy to proceed between Niles and South Bend. It is unlikely that the St. Joseph River is palimpsest upon a bedrock valley. The landform it cuts across is a glaciofluvial-deltaic feature rather than a classic unsorted moraine that would drape over pre-glacial topography

  16. "If I only touch her cloak": the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph in New Orleans hospital, 1834-1860.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hyejung Grace; Kim, Ock-Joo

    2015-04-01

    This study is about the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph in New Orleans' Charity Hospital during the years between 1834 and 1860. The Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph was founded in 1809 by Saint Elizabeth Ann Bailey Seton (first native-born North American canonized in 1975) in Emmitsburg, Maryland. Seton's Sisters of Charity was the first community for religious women to be established in the United States and was later incorporated with the French Daughters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul in 1850. A call to work in New Orleans' Charity Hospital in the 1830s meant a significant achievement for the Sisters of Charity, since it was the second oldest continuously operating public hospitals in the United States until 2005, bearing the same name over the decades. In 1834, Sister Regina Smith and other sisters were officially called to Charity Hospital, in order to supersede the existing "nurses, attendants, and servants," and take a complete charge of the internal management of Charity Hospital. The existing scholarship on the history of hospitals and Catholic nursing has not integrated the concrete stories of the Sisters of Charity into the broader histories of institutionalized medicine, gender, and religion. Along with a variety of primary sources, this study primarily relies on the Charity Hospital History Folder stored at the Daughters of Charity West Center Province Archives. Located in the "Queen city of the South," Charity Hospital was the center of the southern medical profession and the world's fair of people and diseases. Charity Hospital provided the sisters with a unique situation that religion and medicine became intertwined. The Sisters, as nurses, constructed a new atmosphere of caring for patients and even their families inside and outside the hospital, and built their own separate space within the hospital walls. As hospital managers, the Sisters of Charity were put in complete charge of the hospital, which was never seen in other hospitals. By

  17. Public health assessment for petitioned public health assessment, Union Carbide (Byers Warehouse), St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Missouri, Region 7. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-04

    In response to a petition from a St. Joseph, Missouri resident, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) conducted a public health assessment of the Union Carbide (Byers Warehouse) site in St. Joseph, Missouri. The basement of Byers Warehouse was used by Vulcan Chemicals to store ethylene dibromide (EDB), chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride (CCI4). The first and second floors were used by Union Carbide to store 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyproprionic acid (2,4,5-TP). The Byers Warehouse (Union Carbide) Petition site is not a current public health hazard. That conclusion is based on the complete removal of the toxic substances stored in the warehouse, and the lack of any current or future completed exposure pathways. Past storage of herbicides and other chemical products represented a public health hazard.

  18. The perceived advantages and disadvantages of presymptomatic testing for Machado-Joseph disease: development of a new self-response inventory.

    PubMed

    Rolim, Luísa; Zagalo-Cardoso, José A; Paúl, Constança; Sequeiros, Jorge; Fleming, Manuela

    2006-10-01

    This study describes the construction of a self-response inventory to evaluate the perception of advantages and disadvantages of the Machado-Joseph disease presymptomatic testing, in 44 individuals at-risk for this disease. The results showed that the reliability of this inventory was satisfactory. Factor analysis revealed a bidimensional structure: perceived advantages (pros) and perceived disadvantages (cons) of presymptomatic testing. Social desirability was found unrelated to the total scores of our inventory. Additional correlation studies, with other scales, confirmed the convergent validity of the instrument. These results suggest adequate construct validity. This inventory thus seems to be a proper instrument to assess expectations involved in the decision-making process of Machado-Joseph disease presymptomatic testing.

  19. Constraints on the Chief Joseph Dike Swarm of the Columbia River Flood Basalts from the legacy dataset of William H. Taubeneck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasholds, M. W.; Karlstrom, L.; Morriss, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Chief Joseph dike swarm, spanning northeastern OR, southeastern WA, and parts of western ID, is one of the primary dike swarms feeding the mid-Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) (e.g. Reidel et al. 2013). William H. Taubeneck (1923-2016) mapped these and other CRBG feeder dikes over 40 years, generating an expansive dataset with locations and characteristics of dike segments, primarily centered within the Wallowa Mountains, extending as far north as Lewiston, ID, and as far south as Farewell Bend, OR. Taubeneck is credited with originally defining the Chief Joseph swarm, but his data was not made available until his death. Using ArcMap, we are in the process of digitizing, field checking, and making available relevant data from Taubeneck's annotated maps and notebooks. We extract dike locations, orientations, thicknesses, and host rock characteristics. We present an overview of the Taubeneck data, relating to Chief Joseph dikes in WA, ID, and newer field measurements in the Wallowas, OR. Strikes of the 4410 dike segments range from NNW to NNE, with outliers that define smaller clusters with distinct orientations. The dikes have primarily near-vertical dips, paleo-depths ranging from 2 km to 0.3 km, and limited observations indicate widths from <5 m to 40 m. A majority of dikes are exposed in uplifted granites of the Wallowa batholith and metamorphosed host: 1606 dikes occur in quartz diorite, 60 occur in the Hurwal Formation, 139 occur in metavolcanics, while 401 occur in CRBG basalt. The other 2204 dikes are not in the Chief Joseph area. There does not seem to be a significant relation between host rock composition and dike orientation, although wall rock interactions are more dramatic in non-granitic Tertiary rocks. This dataset may provide further insight into both dike emplacement dynamics and the plumbing system of the CRBG.

  20. Neurophysiological studies and non-motor symptoms prior to ataxia in a patient with machado-joseph disease: trying to understand the natural history of brain degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, José Luiz; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Ribeiro, Rodrigo Souza; Bezerra, Márcio Luiz Escorcio; do Prado, Lucila B F; Batista, Ilza Rosa; Alessi, Helena; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Manzano, Gilberto Mastrocola; do Prado, Gilmar Fernandes; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2014-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 or Machado-Joseph disease is the most common spinocerebellar ataxia. In this neurological disease, anatomical, physiological, clinical, and functional neuroimaging demonstrate a degenerative process besides the cerebellum. We performed neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies-polysomnography, transcranial sonography, vestibular-evoked myogenic potential, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1, and a formal neuropsychological evaluation in a patient with sleep complaints and positive testing for Machado-Joseph disease, without cerebellar atrophy, ataxia, or cognitive complaints. Polysomnography disclosed paradoxical high amplitude of submental muscle, characterizing REM sleep without atonia phenomenon. Transcranial sonography showed hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra. There was an absence of vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials on both sides in the patient under study, in opposite to 20 healthy subjects. Brain imaging SPECT with (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 demonstrated a significant lower DAT density than the average observed in six healthy controls. Electroneuromyography was normal. Neuropsychological evaluation demonstrated visuospatial and memory deficits. Impairment of midbrain cholinergic and pontine noradrenergic systems, dysfunction of the pre-synaptic nigrostriatal system, changes in echogenicity of the substantia nigra, and damage to vestibulo-cervical pathways are supposed to occur previous to cerebellar involvement in Machado-Joseph disease.

  1. Atrazine concentrations in stream water and streambed sediment pore water in the St. Joseph and Galien River basins, Michigan and Indiana, May 2001-September 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duris, Joseph W.; Reeves, Howard W.; Kiesler, James L.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) sampled multiple stream sites across the St. Joseph and Galien River Basins to detect and quantify the herbicide atrazine using a field enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) triazine test. In May 2001, July 2001, April 2002, August 2002, August 2003 and September 2003, composite samples were collected across streams at USGS streamflow-gaging stations. Concentrations and instantaneous loading for atrazine sampled in stream water throughout the St. Joseph River and Galien River Basins in Michigan and Indiana ranged from nondetection (< 0.05 part per billion (ppb)) with an associated load less than 0.001 kilogram per day (kg/d) to 6 ppb and a maximum load of 10 kg/d. Atrazine concentrations were highest in May 2001 just after the planting season. The lowest concentration was found in April 2002 just before planting. Atrazine concentrations in streambed-sediment pore water were not spatially connected with atrazine concentrations in stream-water samples. This study showed that atrazine concentrations were elevated from May to July in the St. Joseph and Galien River Basins. At many sites, concentrations exceeded the level that has been shown to feminize frog populations (0.2 ppb). There were 8 sites where concentrations exceeded 0.2 ppb atrazine in May 2001 and July 2001.

  2. A 1842 skull from Dupuytren's museum of Paris: an original artifact of Joseph Gensoul first maxillectomy technique.

    PubMed

    Benmoussa, Nadia; Kerner, Jennifer; Josset, Patrice; Conan, Patrick; Charlier, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Joseph Gensoul was a pioneer of ENT surgery. In 1827, he performed the first total maxillectomy on 17-year-old boy. His work inspired many surgeons, who were previously unwilling to remove maxillary tumours. A paleopathological study performed in the Dupuytren museum allowed us to identify a skull from the early 19th century, with a large maxillar tumour. There were indications that this skull was operated according to Gensoul's technique. The aim of this study is to confirm that this patient had, in fact, received this surgical treatment. This is a historical and descriptive paleopathological study of a skull of the early 19th century of Dupuytren Museum in Paris. The historical research was conducted in collaboration with the French Academy of Medicine and the Museum of Medicine History (Paris). Bones mark cut studies allowed us to confirm that the patient was operated according to the method described by Gensoul in his "Surgical letter" in 1833. Our historical research has allowed us to understand the perspectives of surgeons in the 19th century and the intellectual processes that led to this discovery. At a time when the robotization and industrialization dominate our art, it is interesting to look to our past, our origins, and our history. The study of ancient humans remains and allows us to understand the origin of our specialty and pay tribute to these pioneering surgeons. Their intellectual approach and boldness should be acknowledged and applauded, especially as it is also the key to our success.

  3. A Familial Factor Independent of CAG Repeat Length Influences Age at Onset of Machado-Joseph Disease

    PubMed Central

    DeStefano, Anita L.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Maciel, Patricia; Gaspar, Claudia; Radvany, Joao; Dawson, David M.; Sudarsky, Lewis; Corwin, Lee; Coutinho, Paula; MacLeod, Patrick; Sequeiros, Jorge; Rouleau, Guy A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.

    1996-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is a late-onset, progressive, neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of an unstable trinucleotide (CAG) repeat sequence in a novel gene (MJD1) on chromosome 14. Previous studies showed that age at onset is negatively correlated with the number of CAG repeat units, but only part of the variation in onset age is explained by CAG repeat length. Ages at onset and CAG repeat lengths of 136 MJD patients from 23 kindreds of Portuguese descent were analyzed, to determine whether familial factors independent of CAG repeat length modulate age at onset of MJD. Correlation among sibs for onset age adjusted for CAG repeat length was .43, which indicates that an environmental or genetic factor common to sibs influences onset age. Positive correlations were also observed for avuncular (r = .22) and first-cousin pairs (r = .28), which supports the hypothesis that a genetic factor is influencing age at onset. Commingling analysis of onset ages adjusted for CAG repeat length identified three distributions in this population of affected individuals. Further studies of a much larger sample are needed to determine whether these distributions represent the influence of a genetic or environmental factor. PMID:8659514

  4. Joseph A. Burton Forum Award Talk: Remembering our Humanity: the deep impact of the Russell-Einstein Manifesto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Patricia M.

    2009-05-01

    ``There lies before us, if we choose, continual progress in happiness, knowledge, and wisdom. Shall we, instead, choose death, because we cannot forget our quarrels? We appeal as human beings to human beings: Remember your humanity, and forget the rest.'' Days before his death, Albert Einstein joined Bertrand Russell and other notable scientists and philosophers in issuing a statement calling for the abolition of war and for governments to ``find peaceful means for the settlement of all matters of dispute between them." As a first step, they called for the renunciation of nuclear weapons. The initiative led to the establishment of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, which bring together influential scholars and public figures concerned with reducing the danger of armed conflict and seeking cooperative solutions for global problems. The Russell-Einstein Manifesto has had a major impact on the way in which people discuss the issues of peace and war. The paper traces the growing awareness of the meaning of war, ways in which violent conflict can be prevented, particularly in the nuclear age, and the humanitarian imperative for so doing. From the Russell-Einstein Manifesto, London, 9 July 1955, signed also by Max Born, Percy W. Bridgman, Leopold Infeld, Frederic Joliot-Curie, Herman J. Muller, Linus Pauling, Cecil F. Powell, Joseph Rotblat and Hideki Yukawa

  5. Evidence supporting the primacy of Joseph Petzval in the discovery of aberration coefficients and their application to lens design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakich, Andrew; Wilson, Raymond

    2007-09-01

    In 1839 Louis Daguerre published his process for permanently fixing optical images, and created an instant need for a high-aperture, relatively wide-field and well-corrected lens. Within a year, an optical design meeting all of these requirements was provided by Professor Joseph Petzval, a mathematician with no previous background in optics. This optical design was revolutionary in that it was well corrected for aberration over a wide-field at the unprecedented speed of f/3.5. As Petzval never published explicit details of his method for designing lenses, the credit for the invention of an aberration theory applicable to lens design has gone in the first place to Seidel, and later to those who developed high-order coefficients such as Schwarzschild, T Smith and Buchdahl. It is the contention of this paper that this has been an historical injustice, and that sufficient evidence exists, and indeed has existed in part since well before Seidel published his derivation of third-order aberration coefficients, to establish Petzval as the original pioneer of third-and-higher-order aberration theory as a tool for lens design.

  6. Effects of agricultural irrigation on water resources in the St. Joseph River basin, Indiana, and implications for aquifer yield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, J.G.; Renn, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    During the past decade, the acreage of irrigated agricultural land in Indiana has tripled, causing public concern about competition for water and resulting in several State laws for regulating water withdrawals. The St. Joseph River basin represents less than one-tenth of the area of the State, but it contains one-third of the State 's irrigated land. Irrigated land in the basin is composed of permeable soils that are underlain by productive glacial aquifers. A computer model was used to analyze the effects of maximum irrigation withdrawals on aquifer drawdown and streamflow in a 16.5 sq mi area of intensive irrigation. Simulation of maximum pumping resulted in predicted aquifer drawdowns of one-fourth of the total available drawdown. Flow in a nearby stream was decreased by 40%. Areas of most intensive irrigation in the basin also are areas that have productive aquifers and well-sustained streamflows. Aquifer yield is based on the concept of capture - the volume of increased recharge to the aquifer or decreased discharge from the aquifer that results from pumping. The high rates of capture for aquifers in the basin supply ample water for present (1982) irrigation and for substantial future development. (USGS)

  7. Integrating Strategic and Operational Decision Making Using Data-Driven Dashboards: The Case of St. Joseph Mercy Oakland Hospital.

    PubMed

    Jack Weiner; Balijepally, Venugopal; Tanniru, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Hospitals have invested and continue to invest heavily in building information systems to support operations at various levels of administration. These systems generate a lot of data but fail to effectively convert these data into actionable information for decision makers. Such ineffectiveness often is attributed to a lack of alignment between strategic planning and information technology (IT) initiatives supporting operational goals. We present a case study that illustrates how the use of digital dashboards at St. Joseph Mercy Oakland (SJMO) Hospital in Pontiac, Michigan, was instrumental in supporting such an alignment. Driven by a focus on key performance indicators (KPIs), dashboard applications also led to other tangible and intangible benefits. An ability to track KPIs over time and against established targets, with drill-down capabilities, allowed leadership to hold staff members accountable for achieving their performance targets. By displaying the dashboards in prominent locations (such as operational unit floors, the physicians' cafeteria, and nursing stations), SJMO ushered in transparency in the planning and monitoring processes. The need to develop KPI metrics and drive data collection efforts became ingrained in the work ethos of people at every level of the organization. Although IT-enabled dashboards have been instrumental in supporting this cultural transformation, the focus of investment was the ability of technology to make collective vision and action the responsibility of all stakeholders.

  8. Lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 reduce cell death in a cell model of Machado-Joseph disease

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Ramos, C.M.; Pereira, T.C.; Dogini, D.B.; Gilioli, R.; Lopes-Cendes, I.

    2016-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of the polyglutamine domain of the ataxin-3 (ATX3) protein. MJD/SCA3 is the most frequent autosomal dominant ataxia in many countries. The mechanism underlying MJD/SCA3 is thought to be mainly related to protein misfolding and aggregation leading to neuronal dysfunction followed by cell death. Currently, there are no effective treatments for patients with MJD/SCA3. Here, we report on the potential use of lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 to reduce cell death caused by the expanded ATX3 in cell culture. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by MTT assay and by flow cytometry after staining with annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide. Treatment with lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 led to a significant increase in viability of cells expressing expanded ATX3 (Q84). In addition, we found that the increase in cell viability resulted from a significant reduction in the proportion of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, there was a significant change in the expanded ATX3 monomer/aggregate ratio after lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 treatment, with an increase in the monomer fraction and decrease in aggregates. The safety and tolerance of both drugs are well established; thus, our results indicate that lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 are good candidates for further in vivo therapeutic trials. PMID:27878228

  9. 'Items for criticism (not in sequence)': Joseph DeLee, Pare Lorentz and The Fight for Life (1940).

    PubMed

    Gainty, Caitjan

    2017-09-01

    In the late 1920s, the American obstetrician Joseph DeLee brought the motion-picture camera into the birth room. Following that era's trend of adapting industrial efficiency practices for medical environments, DeLee's films give spectacular and unexpected expression to the engineering concept of 'streamlining'. Accomplishing what more tangible obstetric streamlining practices had failed to, DeLee's cameras, and his post-production manipulation, shifted birth from messy and dangerous to rationalized, efficient, death-defying. This was film as an active and effective medical tool. Years later, the documentarian Pare Lorentz produced and wrote his own birth film, The Fight for Life (1940). The documentary subject of the film was DeLee himself, and the film was set in his hospitals, on the same maternity 'sets' that had once showcased film's remarkable streamlining capacity to give and keep life. Yet relatively little of DeLee was retained in the film's content, resulting in a showdown that, by way of contrast, further articulated DeLee's understanding of film's medical powers and, in so doing, hinted at a more dynamic moment in the history of medicine while speaking also to the process by which that understanding ceased to be historically legible.

  10. Jules and Augusta Dejerine, Pierre Marie, Joseph Babiński, Georges Guillain and their students during World War I.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, O

    2017-03-01

    World War I (1914-1918), however tragic, was nonetheless an "edifying school of nervous system experimental pathology" not only because of the various types of injuries, but also because their numbers were greater than any physician could have foreseen. The peripheral nervous system, the spine and the brain were all to benefit from the subsequent advances in clinical and anatomo-functional knowledge. Neurosurgeons took on nerve sutures, spinal injury exploration, and the localization and extraction of intracranial foreign bodies. Little by little, physical medicine and rehabilitation were established. A few of the most famous Parisian neurologists at the time-Jules and Augusta Dejerine, Pierre Marie, Joseph Babiński and Georges Guillain, who directed the military neurology centers-took up the physically and emotionally exhausting challenge of treating thousands of wounded soldiers. They not only cared for them, but also studied them scientifically, with the help of a small but devoted band of colleagues. The examples presented here reveal their courage and their efforts to make discoveries for which we remain grateful today.

  11. Joseph S. Weiner and the foundation of post-WW II human biology in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Little, Michael A; Collins, Kenneth J

    2012-01-01

    Both the United States and the United Kingdom experienced a transformation in the science of physical anthropology from the period before World War II until the post-war period. In the United States, Sherwood L. Washburn is credited with being a leading figure in this transformation. In the United Kingdom, two individuals were instrumental in bringing about a similar change in the profession. These were Joseph S. Weiner at the University of Oxford and Nigel Barnicot at the University of London, with Weiner playing the principal role as leader in what Washburn called the "New Physical Anthropology," that is, the application of evolutionary theory, the de-emphasis on race classification, and the application of the scientific method and experimental approaches to problem solving. Weiner's contributions to physical anthropology were broad-based--climatic and work physiology, paleoanthropology, and human variation--in what became known as human biology in the U.K. and human adaptability internationally. This biographical essay provides evidence for the significant influence of J.S. Weiner on the post-war development of human biology (biological or physical anthropology) inthe U.K.

  12. Lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 reduce cell death in a cell model of Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Ramos, C M; Pereira, T C; Dogini, D B; Gilioli, R; Lopes-Cendes, I

    2016-11-21

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of the polyglutamine domain of the ataxin-3 (ATX3) protein. MJD/SCA3 is the most frequent autosomal dominant ataxia in many countries. The mechanism underlying MJD/SCA3 is thought to be mainly related to protein misfolding and aggregation leading to neuronal dysfunction followed by cell death. Currently, there are no effective treatments for patients with MJD/SCA3. Here, we report on the potential use of lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 to reduce cell death caused by the expanded ATX3 in cell culture. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by MTT assay and by flow cytometry after staining with annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide. Treatment with lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 led to a significant increase in viability of cells expressing expanded ATX3 (Q84). In addition, we found that the increase in cell viability resulted from a significant reduction in the proportion of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, there was a significant change in the expanded ATX3 monomer/aggregate ratio after lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 treatment, with an increase in the monomer fraction and decrease in aggregates. The safety and tolerance of both drugs are well established; thus, our results indicate that lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 are good candidates for further in vivo therapeutic trials.

  13. Risk assessment for the reintroduction of anadromous salmonids upstream of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams, Northeastern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardiman, Jill M.; Breyta, Rachel B.; Haskell, Craig A.; Ostberg, Carl O.; Hatten, James R.; Connolly, Patrick J.

    2017-09-12

    The Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT; Spokane, Colville, Kootenai, Coeur d’Alene, and Kalispel Tribes) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife want to reintroduce anadromous salmonids to their historical range to restore ecosystem function and lost cultural and spiritual relationships in the upper Columbia River, northeastern Washington. The UCUT contracted with the U.S. Geological Survey to assess risks to resident taxa (existing fish populations in the reintroduction area upstream of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams) and reintroduced salmon associated with reintroduction. We developed a risk assessment framework for reintroduction of anadromous salmonids upstream of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. To accomplish this goal, we applied strategies identified in previous risk assessment frameworks for reintroduction. The risk assessment is an initial step towards an anadromous reintroduction strategy. An initial list of potential donor sources for reintroduction species was developed from previous published sources for Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) donors in the Transboundary Reach of the Columbia River, British Columbia; an ecological risk assessment of upper Columbia River hatchery programs on non-target taxa of concern; and a review of existing hatchery programsDuring two workshops, we further identified and ranked potential donor sources of anadromous Redband Trout (steelhead; O. mykiss), Chinook Salmon, Sockeye Salmon (O. nerka), and Coho Salmon (O. kisutch). We also identified resident fish populations of interest and their primary habitat, location, status, and pathogen concerns to determine the potential risks of reintroduction. Species were deemed of interest based on resource management and potential interactions (that is, genetics, competition, and predation) with introduced species. We developed tables of potential donors by species and characterized potential sources (hatchery and natural origins), populations (individual runs

  14. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease: segregation patterns and factors influencing instability of expanded CAG transmissions.

    PubMed

    Souza, G N; Kersting, N; Krum-Santos, A C; Santos, A S P; Furtado, G V; Pacheco, D; Gonçalves, T A; Saute, J A; Schuler-Faccini, L; Mattos, E P; Saraiva-Pereira, M L; Jardim, L B

    2016-08-01

    Controversies about Mendelian segregation and CAG expansion (CAGexp) instabilities during meiosis in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) need clarification. Additional evidence about these issues was obtained from the cohort of all SCA3/MJD individuals living in South Brazil. A survey was carried out to update information registered since 2001. Deaths were checked with the Public Information System, and data was made anonymous. Anticipation and delta-CAGexp from parent-offspring pairs, and delta-CAGexp between siblings were obtained. One hundred and fifty-nine families (94% of the entire registry) were retrieved, comprising 3725 living individuals as of 2015, 625 of these being symptomatic. Minimal prevalence was 6:100,000. Carriers of a CAGexp represented 65.6% of sibs in the genotyped offspring (p < 0.001). Median instability was larger among paternal than maternal transmissions, and instabilities correlated with anticipation (r = 0.38; p = 0.001). Age of the parent correlated to delta-CAGexp among 115 direct parent-offspring CAGexp transmissions (ρ = 0.23, p = 0.014). In 98 additional kindreds, the delta-CAGexp between 269 siblings correlated with their delta-of-age (ρ = 0.27, p < 0.0001). SCA3/MJD was associated with a segregation distortion favoring the expanded allele in our cohort. Instability of expansion during meiosis was weakly influenced by the age of the transmitting parent at the time of conception. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles alleviates Machado-Joseph disease neurological phenotype.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Mariana; Mendonça, Liliana; Nóbrega, Clévio; Gomes, Célia; Costa, Pedro; Hirai, Hirokazu; Moreira, João Nuno; Lima, Maria C; Manjunath, N; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2016-03-01

    Others and we showed that RNA interference holds great promise for the treatment of dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorders such as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), for which there is no available treatment. However, successful experiments involved intracranial administration of viral vectors and there is a need for a safer and less invasive procedure. In this work, we successfully generated stable nucleic acid lipid particles (SNALPs), incorporating a short peptide derived from rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG-9r) and encapsulating small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can target mutant ataxin-3. The developed formulation exhibited important features that make it adequate for systemic administration: high encapsulation efficiency of siRNAs, ability to protect the encapsulated siRNAs, appropriate and homogeneous particle size distribution. Following optimization of the formulation and in vitro validation of its efficacy to silence the MJD-causing protein - mutant ataxin-3 - in neuronal cells, in vivo experiments showed that intravenous administration of RVG-9r-targeted SNALPs efficiently silenced mutant ataxin-3 reducing neuropathology and motor behavior deficits in two mouse models of MJD. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing beneficial impact of a non-viral gene silencing strategy in MJD and the first time that a non-invasive systemic administration proved to be beneficial on a polyglutamine disorder. Our study opens new avenues towards MJD therapy that can also be applied to other neurodegenerative diseases linked to the production of pathogenic proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychosis in Machado-Joseph Disease: Clinical Correlates, Pathophysiological Discussion, and Functional Brain Imaging. Expanding the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Braga-Neto, Pedro; Pedroso, José Luiz; Gadelha, Ary; Laureano, Maura Regina; de Souza Noto, Cristiano; Garrido, Griselda Jara; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2016-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is the most common spinocerebellar ataxia worldwide with a broad range of clinical manifestations, but psychotic symptoms were not previously characterized. We investigated the psychiatric manifestations of a large cohort of Brazilian patients with MJD in an attempt to characterize the presence of psychotic symptoms. We evaluated 112 patients with clinical and molecular diagnosis of MJD from February 2008 to November 2013. Patients with psychotic symptoms were referred to psychiatric evaluation and brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) analysis. A specific scale-Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS)-was used to characterize psychotic symptoms in MJD patients. We also performed an autopsy from one of the patients with MJD and psychotic symptoms. Five patients presented psychotic symptoms. Patients with psychotic symptoms were older and had a late onset of the disease (p < 0.05). SPECT results showed that MJD patients had significant regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) decrease in the cerebellum bilaterally and vermis compared with healthy subjects. No significant rCBF differences were found in patients without psychotic symptoms compared to patients with psychotic symptoms. The pathological description of a patient with MJD and psychotic symptoms revealed severe loss of neuron bodies in the dentate nucleus and substantia nigra. MJD patients with a late onset of the disease and older ones are at risk to develop psychotic symptoms during the disease progression. These clinical findings may be markers for an underlying cortical-cerebellar disconnection or degeneration of specific cortical and subcortical regions that may characterize the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome.

  17. Promoter Variant Alters Expression of the Autophagic BECN1 Gene: Implications for Clinical Manifestations of Machado-Joseph Disease.

    PubMed

    Kazachkova, Nadiya; Raposo, Mafalda; Ramos, Amanda; Montiel, Rafael; Lima, Manuela

    2017-07-11

    Autophagy is especially important in disorders where accumulation of the mutant protein is a hallmark, such as the Machado-Joseph disease/spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (MJD/SCA3). We analyzed the promoter of the BECN1 gene, whose overexpression has been reported to exert neuroprotective effects in MJD, with the aim of finding variants that could be associated with expression levels of beclin-1 and could be tested as modifiers of onset and disease severity. A fragment encompassing the BECN1 promoter was sequenced in 95 MJD subjects and 120 controls. The impact of the variation detected on transcription factors (TFs) binding affinity was evaluated in silico and inferences concerning levels of expression were confirmed by fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR in a subset of 28 MJD subjects and 26 controls. Four previously described (rs60221525, rs116943570, rs34882610, and rs34037822) and one novel (c.-933delG) variants were identified. In silico analysis performed for the most frequent variants-rs60221525 C allele and rs116943570 T allele-predicted an impact of the presence of these alleles on TF binding affinity. BECN1 expression levels were in agreement with the in silico predictions, showing a tendency for decreased levels in samples with the rs60221525 C allele and for increased levels in samples with the rs116943570 T allele. MJD patients carrying the rs60221525 C allele presented a tendency for earlier estimated age at onset. Moreover, patients with the rs60221525 C allele presented a more severe clinical picture, compared to patients without this allele. The analysis of a larger number of patients from different cohorts, currently unavailable, would be required to confirm these results.

  18. Unravelling Endogenous MicroRNA System Dysfunction as a New Pathophysiological Mechanism in Machado-Joseph Disease.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Vitor; Cunha-Santos, Janete; Onofre, Isabel; Simões, Ana Teresa; Vijayakumar, Udaya; Davidson, Beverly L; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2017-04-05

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded polyglutamine tract within the protein ataxin-3 (ATXN3). Despite current efforts, MJD's mechanism of pathogenesis remains unclear and no disease-modifying treatment is available. Therefore, in this study, we investigated (1) the role of the 3' UTR of ATXN3, a putative microRNA (miRNA) target, (2) whether miRNA biogenesis and machinery are dysfunctional in MJD, and (3) which specific miRNAs target ATXN3-3' UTR and whether they can alleviate MJD neuropathology in vivo. Our results demonstrate that endogenous miRNAs, by targeting sequences in the 3' UTR, robustly reduce ATXN3 expression and aggregation in vitro and neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation in vivo. Importantly, we found an abnormal MJD-associated downregulation of genes involved in miRNA biogenesis and silencing activity. Finally, we identified three miRNAs-mir-9, mir-181a, and mir-494-that interact with the ATXN3-3' UTR and whose expression is dysregulated in human MJD neurons and in other MJD cell and animal models. Furthermore, overexpression of these miRNAs in mice resulted in reduction of mutATXN3 levels, aggregate counts, and neuronal dysfunction. Altogether, these findings indicate that endogenous miRNAs and the 3' UTR of ATXN3 play a crucial role in MJD pathogenesis and provide a promising opportunity for MJD treatment. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. All rights reserved.

  19. [Pierre-Joseph Duhem (1758-1807), doctor regicide, and other National Convention physician-deputies vis-a-vis the lawsuit of Louis XVI].

    PubMed

    Dupont, Geneviève; Lellouch, Alain; Olry, Régis

    2006-01-01

    On January 16, 1793, seven hundred aud forty nine deputies of the National Convention are called on to express their opinion by word of mouth about this question: "What penalty Louis, former king of the French, brought upon himself ?" Among these deputies, 47 are or were physicians : 22 vote for death without delay, 3 for suspended death sentence, 20 for indulgence (imprisonment till the peace and banishment thereafter), and 2 refuse to vote. This paper aims at summarizing the attitude of the physicians-deputies, and more specifically those of Pierre-Joseph Duhem, at the time of one of the most famous trials of the history of France.

  20. The cosmic child: The artwork of Joseph Cornell and a type of unusual sensibility, or thinking inside the box: the mind that channels infinity.

    PubMed

    Scheftel, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the unique mind of the twentieth- century American artist Joseph Cornell, known for his boxes and collages made with "found" materials. The author interpolates reflections upon Cornell with vignettes from the treatment of a young child, speculating that certain individuals may possess a constellation of vulnerabilities/sensitivities that constitute what is referred to as a "cosmic" sensibility. It is suggested that such an orientation can lead variously to anxieties and separation problems, as well as (or in addition to) intellectual and/or artistic giftedness. The outcome of such dynamics would depend on a complex interplay of temperament, circumstance, and relational attunement.

  1. Machado-Joseph Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Strategy Current Research Research Funded by NINDS Basic Neuroscience Clinical Research Translational Research Research at NINDS Focus ... Resources Current Research Research Funded by NINDS Basic Neuroscience Clinical Research Translational Research Research at NINDS Focus ...

  2. Machado-Joseph Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms that underlie inherited neurodegenerative diseases such as MJD. Other research areas include the ... genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms that underlie inherited neurodegenerative diseases such as MJD. Other research areas include the ...

  3. Joseph Murray as mentor.

    PubMed

    Harken, Alden Hood

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to scan Dr Murray's Nobel Laureate lecture for strategies of creating a productive, creative, cohesive, and indeed even cost-effective academic department of surgery and medical center. I will detail the elements of Dr Murray's lecture that highlight "ideas" as ultimately more valuable tools in recruiting and retaining franchise surgeons than a big salary and a prominent parking space.

  4. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2005-02-01

    This report documents a four-year study(a) to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) at the entrance to the forebay of the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). In this report, emphasis is placed on the methodology and results associated with the fourth project year and compared with findings from the previous years to provide an overall project summary. Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River (Figure S.1). A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish, including kokanee and rainbow trout, were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. Because these entrainment rates represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam, they have been judged unacceptable to fishery managers responsible for perpetuating the fishery in Lake Roosevelt. In an effort to reduce fish entrainment rates, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was modified in 2001 to include a multiyear study of the efficacy of using strobe lights to deter fish from entering the third powerplant forebay. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated the four-year study in collaboration with Colville Tribal

  5. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam

  6. Integrating the Study of the Politics of Egypt and Israel into the Curriculum of Saint Joseph's College, New York. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2000 (Egypt and Israel).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauzon, Kenneth E.

    The comparative study of the dynamics of the politics of Egypt and Israel is one subject that suggests itself for consideration for inclusion in the curriculum of Saint Joseph's College, New York. This study of a prospective Egyptian/Israeli politics course is divided into the following sections: (1) "Introduction"; (2)…

  7. Romantic Joseph Lenné Landscape Park in Zatonie Near Zielona Góra as a Relic of Garden Art - Modern-Day Transformations and Threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochańska, Agnieszka

    2016-09-01

    The romantic landscape park was established in 1824 by order of one of the best-known aristocrats at the time, Princess Dorothea Talleyrand Perigold, Dutchess of Dino. The park is an example of amenity horticulture of artistic value that has survived to this day. The creator of the park was the talented landscape architect Peter Joseph Lenné. In its current state, the park differs significantly from the image on lithographs of the past. Upon carrying out field investigations and comparative studies, it was established that the maintained stand of tress holds high compositional value. The conclusions of the article define the current threats to the longevity of the park as well as highlighting the plan of revalorization works.

  8. The Thompson-McFadden Commission and Joseph Goldberger: Contrasting 2 Historical Investigations of Pellagra in Cotton Mill Villages in South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Stephen J.; Knox, Justin; Morabia, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    As pellagra reached epidemic proportions in the United States in the early 20th century, 2 teams of investigators assessed its incidence in cotton mill villages in South Carolina. The first, the Thompson-McFadden Commission, concluded that pellagra was likely infectious. The second, a Public Health Service investigation led by Joseph Goldberger, concluded that pellagra was caused by a dietary deficiency. In this paper, we recount the history of the 2 investigations and consider how the differences between the 2 studies' designs, measurements, analyses, and interpretations led to different conclusions. Because the novel dietary assessment strategy was a key feature of the Public Health Service's study design, we incorporated simulated measurement error in a reanalysis of the Public Health Service's data to assess whether this specific difference affected the divergent conclusions. PMID:24966221

  9. Brigham to the Bush: carrying the inspiration of Dr. Joseph E. Murray for humanitarian surgical care to the world's "bottom billion".

    PubMed

    Geelhoed, Glenn W

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Joseph Murray has inspired me, among many others, to develop medical and surgical care through thoughtful research and to see that the benefits achieved are applied to human needs in a greater global perspective. In active encouragement of his protégées, he has stimulated innovation not only in academic centers and in specialty fields such as transplantation and craniofacial reconstruction, but also in wide-scale benefit to all peoples in need, passing hope along through transformational learning and indigenizing health care skills. In an example from one such protégée, a career in academic surgical pursuit of learning beyond boundaries is illustrated in going from the Brigham to the bush, learning from those who may never have been in a schoolroom, and from our "mission to heal" carrying back "Gifts From the Poor."

  10. Chemical and biological conditions in Bald Eagle Creek and prognosis of trophic characteristics of Foster Joseph Sayers Reservoir, Centre County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flippo, Herbert N.

    1970-01-01

    Foster Joseph Sayers. Reservoir will b.e impounded on moderately fertile soils; however, its water source, Bald Eagle Creek, is a bicarbonate-water stream that is over~y-enriched with nutrients. About 650 of the 1,730 acres to be inundated in summer are subject to infestation with aquatic weeds. Nuisance algal "blooms" are expected to occur in summer. The reservoir will stratify in early summer and water · releas·ed for conservation purposes and acid neutralization will consist mostly of hypolimnetic water. This water will be nearly depleted in. dissolved oxygen and will, at times, contain relatively high concentrations of heavy metallic ions and hydrogen:!sulfide.

  11. The first demonstration of lactic acid in human blood in shock by Johann Joseph Scherer (1814–1869) in January 1843

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, T. C.; van der Hoven, B.; Bakker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid was first found and described in sour milk by Karl Wilhelm Scheele (1742–1786) in 1780. The German physician–chemist Johann Joseph Scherer (1841–1869) demonstrated the occurrence of lactic acid in human blood under pathological conditions in 1843 and 1851. In this article we honour the forgotten observations by Scherer and describe the influence of Scherer's finding on further research on lactic acid at the end of the 19th century. We conclude that Scherer's 1843 case reports should be cited as the first description of lactic acid in human blood after death and also as the first demonstration of lactic acid as a pathological finding in septic and haemorrhagic shock. Carl Folwarczny was, in 1858, the first to demonstrate lactic acid in blood in a living patient. PMID:17661014

  12. The Thompson-McFadden Commission and Joseph Goldberger: contrasting 2 historical investigations of pellagra in cotton mill villages in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Stephen J; Knox, Justin; Morabia, Alfredo

    2014-08-01

    As pellagra reached epidemic proportions in the United States in the early 20th century, 2 teams of investigators assessed its incidence in cotton mill villages in South Carolina. The first, the Thompson-McFadden Commission, concluded that pellagra was likely infectious. The second, a Public Health Service investigation led by Joseph Goldberger, concluded that pellagra was caused by a dietary deficiency. In this paper, we recount the history of the 2 investigations and consider how the differences between the 2 studies' designs, measurements, analyses, and interpretations led to different conclusions. Because the novel dietary assessment strategy was a key feature of the Public Health Service's study design, we incorporated simulated measurement error in a reanalysis of the Public Health Service's data to assess whether this specific difference affected the divergent conclusions.

  13. Joseph Priestley Across Theology, Education, and Chemistry: An Interdisciplinary Case Study in Epistemology with a Focus on the Science Education Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Berg, Kevin C.

    2011-07-01

    This paper discusses the findings of a search for the intellectual tools used by Joseph Priestley (1733-1804) in his chemistry, education, and theology documents. Priestley's enquiring democratic view of knowledge was applicable in all three areas and constitutes a significant part of his lifework. Current epistemological issues in science education are examined from the point of view of the nature of theory and experiment as observed in Priestley's writings and as espoused in modern philosophy of science. Science and religious faith issues in the context of science education are examined from the point of view of one's understanding of sacred texts, and the suggestion is made that a Priestleyan model of "the liberty to think for oneself" and "to hold knowledge with humility and virtue" could prove helpful in dealing with the known divergent opinions in relation to science, education, and religion.

  14. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a

  15. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or

  16. Treating Palliative Care Patients with Pain with the Body Tambura: A Prospective Case Study at St. Joseph's Hospice for Dying destitute in Dindigul South India.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Cordula; Teut, M; Samwel, Kakuko Lopoyetum; Narayanasamy, S; Rathapillil, T; Thathews, G

    2015-01-01

    The Body Tambura is a recently invented stringed instrument that is used for receptive music therapy designed to be placed and attached on the human body. The aim of this study was to record perceived effects of a treatment with the Body Tambura on palliative care patients with special reference to pain. A prospective case study was carried out with patients of St. Joseph's Hospice for Dying Destitute in Dindigul/South India. Patients were treated with a treatment after baseline assessment and also on the next day. Outcomes were measured quantitatively by using a numeric rating scale (0-10, 10 maximum intensity of pain felt) at baseline, directly after treatment, and the day after the treatment to determine the intensity of the pain. Ten patients (five women and five men) participated in the study. The majority described the therapy as a pleasant experience. The pain intensity at baseline was reduced from 8.3 ± standard deviation (SD) 1.16 to 4.6 ± 1.52 at day 1 and from 4.6 ± 2.07 to 2.4 ± 1.58 at day 2. A clinically relevant pain reduction was described as short time outcome; the therapy was received and perceived well. Forthcoming research should include a control group, randomization, a larger number of participants, and a longer period of treatment.

  17. Ectoine alters subcellular localization of inclusions and reduces apoptotic cell death induced by the truncated Machado-Joseph disease gene product with an expanded polyglutamine stretch.

    PubMed

    Furusho, Kentaro; Yoshizawa, Toshihiro; Shoji, Shinichi

    2005-10-01

    Protein misfolding is considered a key event in the pathogenesis of polyglutamine disease such as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD). Overexpression of chaperone proteins and the application of chemical chaperones are reported to suppress polyglutamine induced cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. The effects of compatible solutes, which are osmoprotectants in bacteria and possess the action in stabilizing proteins under stress, have not, to our knowledge, been studied. We explored the protective effects of the compatible solutes ectoine, hydroxyectoine, and betaine on apoptotic cell death produced by the truncated MJD gene product with an expanded polyglutamine tract in cultured neuro2a cells. Ectoine, but not hydroxyectoine or betaine, decreased large cytoplasmic inclusions and increased the frequency of nuclear inclusions. Immunoblot analysis showed that ectoine reduced the total amount of aggregates. Despite the presence of nuclear inclusions, apoptotic features were less frequently observed after ectoine application. Our findings suggest that ectoine, a natural osmoprotectant in bacteria, may function as a novel molecule protecting cells from polyglutamine-induced toxicity.

  18. Monsters and the case of L. Joseph: André Feil's thesis on the origin of the Klippel-Feil syndrome and a social transformation of medicine.

    PubMed

    Belykh, Evgenii; Malik, Kashif; Simoneau, Isabelle; Yagmurlu, Kaan; Lei, Ting; Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Byvaltsev, Vadim A; Theodore, Nicholas; Preul, Mark C

    2016-07-01

    André Feil (1884-1955) was a French physician best recognized for his description, coauthored with Maurice Klippel, of patients with congenital fusion of cervical vertebrae, a condition currently known as Klippel-Feil syndrome. However, little is known about his background aside from the fact that he was a student of Klippel and a physician who took a keen interest in describing congenital anomalies. Despite the relative lack of information on Feil, his contributions to the fields of spinal disease and teratology extended far beyond science to play an integral role in changing the misguided perception shrouding patients with disfigurements, defects, deformities, and so-called monstrous births. In particular, Feil's 1919 medical school thesis on cervical abnormalities was a critical publication in defying long-held theory and opinion that human "monstrosities," anomalies, developmental abnormalities, and altered congenital physicality were a consequence of sinful behavior or a reversion to a primitive state. Indeed, his thesis on a spinal deformity centering on his patient, L. Joseph, was at the vanguard for a new view of a patient as nothing less than fully human, no matter his or her physicality or appearance.

  19. Joseph-Nicolas Delisle's relations with German astronomers and scientists when travelling to and from Russia (1725-26 and 1747)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Simone

    Upon request by Peter-the-Great, the French astronomer Joseph-Nicolas Delisle (1688-1768) left Paris in November 1725. During his voyage, he wanted to visit German colleagues and to have the opportunity to examine their instruments. His objective since several years was to collect original data of observations. When being in Nuremberg and Berlin, he made a search concerning the observations performed by Eimmart and G. Kirch, later in Danzig, he succeeded to buy Hevelius's manuscripts. After staying in Russia for 22 years, where he was the founder of the Petersburg Observatory, Delisle came back to France in the year 1747. During his return trip (two and a half months) he visited libraries in Prussia showing interest to their manuscripts and to some curiosities. Then in the surroundings of Wittenberg, he visited count von Löser's collection of instruments. In Berlin, he met the Feldmarschall von Schmettau and Grischow; but the previously seen colleagues were dead. During all these years, Delisle had enlarged the circle of his acquaintances, which has been very useful to launch the ``avertissements'' to recommend observations of some peculiar astronomical phenomena. The expeditions in 1761 for the transit of Venus owe a lot to him.

  20. Mid- and long-term anxiety levels associated with presymptomatic testing of Huntington's disease, Machado-Joseph disease, and familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lêdo, Susana; Leite, Ângela; Souto, Teresa; Dinis, Maria A; Sequeiros, Jorge

    2016-02-05

    To study anxiety as a variable of the mid- and long-term psychological impact of pre-symptomatic testing for three autosomal dominant late-onset disorders - Huntington's disease (HD), Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) and familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) TTR V30M - in a Portuguese sample. This cross-sectional study included 203 participants: 170 (83.7%) underwent pre-symptomatic testing for FAP, 29 (14.3%) for HD, and 4 (2%) for MJD. Of the 203 participants, 73 (36.0%) were asymptomatic carriers, 29 (14.5%) were symptomatic carriers, 9 (4.5%) were diagnosed with FAP and had a liver transplant, and 89 (44.5%) were non-carriers. Most were women (58.1%) and married (66.5%). The anxiety variable was assessed using the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS). The anxiety scores were higher for symptomatic carriers and for those who underwent psychological support consultations over the years. For symptomatic carriers, the mean scores were superior to 40 points, which reflects clinical anxiety. Although it was not possible to differentiate between the mid- and long-term psychological impacts, this study supports the conclusion that the proximity to the age of symptoms onset might be a trigger for anxiety.

  1. Marked phenotypic heterogeneity associated with expansion of a CAG repeat sequence at the spinocerebellar ataxia 3/Machado-Joseph disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Cancel, G.; Abbas, N.; Stevanin, G.

    1995-10-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia 3 locus (SCA3) for type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders, has been mapped to chromosome 14q32.1. ADCA type I patients from families segregating SCA3 share clinical features in common with those with Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), the gene of which maps to the same region. We show here that the disease gene segregating in each of three French ADCA type I kindreds and in a French family with neuropathological findings suggesting the ataxochoreic form of dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy carries an expanded CAG repeat sequence located at the same locus as that for MJD. Analysis of the mutation in these families shows a strong negative correlation between size of the expanded CAG repeat and age at onset of clinical disease. Instability of the expanded triplet repeat was not found to be affected by sex of the parent transmitting the mutation. Evidence was found for somatic and gonadal mosaicism for alleles carrying expanded trinucleotide repeats. 36 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Medical doctors as the captain of a ship: an analysis of medical students’ book reports on Joseph Conrad’s “Lord Jim”

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In South Korean ferry disaster in 2014, the captain abandoned the ship with passengers including high school students still aboard. We noticed the resemblance of abandoning the ship with passengers still aboard the ferry (named the Sewol) and the ship Patna, which was full of pilgrims, in Joseph Conrad’s novel “Lord Jim.” The aim of this study is to see how medical students think about the role of a medical doctor as a captain of a ship by analyzing book reports on Conrad’s “Lord Jim.” Methods: Participants included 49 third-year medical students. Their book reports were analyzed. Results: If placed in the same situation as the character of Jim, 24 students of the 49 respondents answered that they would stay with the passengers, while 18 students indicated they would escape from the ship with the crew. Most of the students thought the role of a doctor in the medical field was like that of a ‘captain.’ The medical students reported that they wanted to be a doctor who is responsible for his or her patients, highly moral, warm-hearted, honest, and with high self-esteem. Conclusion: In conclusion, we found that “Lord Jim” induced the virtue of ‘responsibility’ from the medical students. Consequently, “Lord Jim” could be good teaching material for medical humanities. PMID:25417908

  3. Treating Palliative Care Patients with Pain with the Body Tambura: A Prospective Case Study at St. Joseph's Hospice for Dying destitute in Dindigul South India

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Cordula; Teut, M; Samwel, Kakuko Lopoyetum; Narayanasamy, S; Rathapillil, T; Thathews, G

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Body Tambura is a recently invented stringed instrument that is used for receptive music therapy designed to be placed and attached on the human body. The aim of this study was to record perceived effects of a treatment with the Body Tambura on palliative care patients with special reference to pain. Materials and Methods: A prospective case study was carried out with patients of St. Joseph's Hospice for Dying Destitute in Dindigul/South India. Patients were treated with a treatment after baseline assessment and also on the next day. Outcomes were measured quantitatively by using a numeric rating scale (0–10, 10 maximum intensity of pain felt) at baseline, directly after treatment, and the day after the treatment to determine the intensity of the pain. Results: Ten patients (five women and five men) participated in the study. The majority described the therapy as a pleasant experience. The pain intensity at baseline was reduced from 8.3 ± standard deviation (SD) 1.16 to 4.6 ± 1.52 at day 1 and from 4.6 ± 2.07 to 2.4 ± 1.58 at day 2. Conclusion: A clinically relevant pain reduction was described as short time outcome; the therapy was received and perceived well. Forthcoming research should include a control group, randomization, a larger number of participants, and a longer period of treatment. PMID:26009680

  4. Toward therapeutic targets for SCA3: Insight into the role of Machado-Joseph disease protein ataxin-3 in misfolded proteins clearance.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoling; Liu, Hongmei; Fischhaber, Paula L; Tang, Tie-Shan

    2015-09-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD, also known as spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, SCA3), an autosomal dominant neurological disorder, is caused by an abnormal expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat in the ataxin-3 protein. The length of the expanded polyQ stretch correlates positively with the severity of the disease and inversely with the age at onset. To date, we cannot fully explain the mechanism underlying neurobiological abnormalities of this disease. Yet, accumulating reports have demonstrated the functions of ataxin-3 protein in the chaperone system, ubiquitin-proteasome system, and aggregation-autophagy, all of which suggest a role of ataxin-3 in the clearance of misfolded proteins. Notably, the SCA3 pathogenic form of ataxin-3 (ataxin-3(exp)) impairs the misfolded protein clearance via mechanisms that are either dependent or independent of its deubiquitinase (DUB) activity, resulting in the accumulation of misfolded proteins and the progressive loss of neurons in SCA3. Some drugs, which have been used as activators/inducers in the chaperone system, ubiquitin-proteasome system, and aggregation-autophagy, have been demonstrated to be efficacious in the relief of neurodegeneration diseases like Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's (PD), Alzheimer's (AD) as well as SCA3 in animal models and clinical trials, putting misfolded protein clearance on the list of potential therapeutic targets. Here, we undertake a comprehensive review of the progress in understanding the physiological functions of ataxin-3 in misfolded protein clearance and how the polyQ expansion impairs misfolded protein clearance. We then detail the preclinical studies targeting the elimination of misfolded proteins for SCA3 treatment. We close with future considerations for translating these pre-clinical results into therapies for SCA3 patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Combined therapy with m-TOR-dependent and -independent autophagy inducers causes neurotoxicity in a mouse model of Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Silva, S; Silva-Fernandes, A; Neves-Carvalho, A; Soares-Cunha, C; Teixeira-Castro, A; Maciel, P

    2016-01-28

    A major pathological hallmark in several neurodegenerative disorders, like polyglutamine disorders (polyQ), including Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), is the formation of protein aggregates. MJD is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the ATXN3 gene, resulting in an abnormal protein, which is prone to misfolding and forms cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates within neurons, ultimately inducing neurodegeneration. Treatment of proteinopathies with drugs that up-regulate autophagy has shown promising results in models of polyQ diseases. Temsirolimus (CCI-779) inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR), while lithium chloride (LiCl) acts by inhibiting inositol monophosphatase, both being able to induce autophagy. We have previously shown that chronic treatment with LiCl (10.4 mg/kg) had limited effects in a transgenic MJD mouse model. Also, others have shown that CCI-779 had mild positive effects in a different mouse model of the disease. It has been suggested that the combination of mTOR-dependent and -independent autophagy inducers could be a more effective therapeutic approach. To further explore this avenue toward therapy, we treated CMVMJD135 transgenic mice with a conjugation of CCI-779 and LiCl, both at concentrations known to induce autophagy and not to be toxic. Surprisingly, this combined treatment proved to be deleterious to both wild-type (wt) and transgenic animals, failing to rescue their neurological symptoms and actually exerting neurotoxic effects. These results highlight the possible dangers of manipulating autophagy in the nervous system and suggest that a better understanding of the potential disruption in the autophagy pathway in MJD is required before successful long-term autophagy modulating therapies can be developed. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of the FluEgg model to predict transport of Asian carp eggs in the Saint Joseph River (Great Lakes tributary)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, Tatiana; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, P. Ryan; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2015-01-01

    The Fluvial Egg Drift Simulator (FluEgg) is a three-dimensional Lagrangian model that simulates the movement and development of Asian carp eggs until hatching based on the physical characteristics of the flow field and the physical and biological characteristics of the eggs. This tool provides information concerning egg development and spawning habitat suitability including: egg plume location, egg vertical and travel time distribution, and egg-hatching risk. A case study of the simulation of Asian carp eggs in the Lower Saint Joseph River, a tributary of Lake Michigan, is presented. The river hydrodynamic input for FluEgg was generated in two ways — using hydroacoustic data and using HEC-RAS model data. The HEC-RAS model hydrodynamic input data were used to simulate 52 scenarios covering a broad range of flows and water temperatures with the eggs at risk of hatching ranging from 0 to 93% depending on river conditions. FluEgg simulations depict the highest percentage of eggs at risk of hatching occurs at the lowest discharge and at peak water temperatures. Analysis of these scenarios illustrates how the interactive relation among river length, hydrodynamics, and water temperature influence egg transport and hatching risk. An improved version of FluEgg, which more realistically simulates dispersion and egg development, is presented. Also presented is a graphical user interface that facilitates the use of FluEgg and provides a set of post-processing analysis tools to support management decision-making regarding the prevention and control of Asian carp reproduction in rivers with or without Asian carp populations.

  7. Non-Mendelian transmission in dentatorubral-pallidolysian atrophy and Machado-Joseph disease: The mutant allele is preferentially transmitted in male meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Igarashi, Shuichi; Takiyama, Yoshihisa; Onodera, Osamu

    1996-04-01

    Autosomal dominant dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) and Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) are neurodegenerative disorders caused by CAG trinucleotide repeat expansions. An inverse correlation of age at onset with the length of the expanded CAG trinucleotide repeats has been demonstrated, and the intergenerational instability of the length of the CAG trinucleotide repeats, which is more prominent in paternal than in maternal transmissions, has been shown to underlie the basic mechanisms of anticipation in DRPLA and MJD. Our previous observations on DRPLA and MJD pedigrees, as well as a review of the literature, have suggested that the numbers of affected offspring exceed those of unaffected offspring, which is difficult to explain by the Mendelian principle of random segregation of alleles. In the present study, we analyzed the segregation patterns in 211 transmissions in 24 DRPLA pedigrees and 80 transmissions in 7 MJD pedigrees, with the diagnoses confirmed by molecular testing. Significant distortions in favor of transmission of the mutant alleles were found in male meiosis, where the mutant alleles were transmitted to 62% of all offspring in DRPLA ({chi}{sup 2} = 7.69; P < .01) and 73% in MJD ({chi}{sup 2} = 6.82; P < .01). The results were consistent with meiotic drive in DRPLA and MJD. Since more prominent meiotic instability of the length of the CAG trinucleotide repeats is observed in male meiosis than in female meiosis and meiotic drive is observed only in male meiosis, these results raise the possibility that a common molecular mechanism underlies the meiotic drive and the meiotic instability in male meiosis. 23 refs., 1 tab.

  8. [Is oral rehydration with nasogastric tube more efficient than rehydration with spoon? Preliminary study in children with non-severe dehydration in Joseph-Raseta-Befelatanana Hospital, Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Ravelomanana, T; Rabeatoandro, S; Randrianaivo, N; Ratsimbazafy, A; Raobijaona, H; Barennes, H

    2010-05-01

    Since its recommendation by WHO, Oral Rehydration Solutions (ORS) contributed in reducing the rate of mortality due to acute gastroenteritis. In Madagascar, the rate of lethality imputed to gastroenteritis is about 3%. Rehydration can be performed either by using spoons which reliability is unsure because of parents' potential inobservance and child's refusal, or by nasogastric tube. The nasogastric tube may resolve these obstacles at the hospital. We realized a preliminary study to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of nasogastric tube and spoon administration of the ORS in rehydration of child with moderate post-gastroenteritis dehydration. This is an open comparative study realized in the Pediatric Unit at the Joseph-Raseta-Befelatanana Hospital from the 21 January to 21 May 2008. Main outcomes was the proportion of rehydrated children at 4 hours, other were: failure at 8 hours, duration and volume of SRO, side effects. Fifty-three children from 4-month to 4-year old among 1306 patients were recruited and forty-seven patients were included. Nine patients failed (4 children received ORS by spoon and 5 children by nasogastric tube). The use of spoon was more effective: 62.5% of the patients were rehydrated at the fourth hour versus 39.3% in nasogastric tube group (P = 0.04). Making debit constant presents difficulties in rehydration with nasogastric tube (44.4 %). Tolerance of nasogastric tube is generally good but 16.7% children get out their tube during this study. No ORS' inhalation was observed with both routes. No false passage or tube or ORS rejection was recorded in both techniques. This study shows that using spoon to rehydrate is more effective for the rehydration of moderate dehydration. The use of nasogastric tube needs more surveillance.

  9. [Resistant phenotypes of Escherichia coli strains responsible for urinary tract infection in the laboratory of the University Hospital Joseph Raseta Befelatanana, Antananarivo].

    PubMed

    Rakotovao-Ravahatra, Zafindrasoa Domoina; Randriatsarafara, Fidiniaina Mamy; Rasoanandrasana, Saïda; Raverohanta, Léa; Rakotovao, Andriamiadana Luc

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infection caused by Escherichia coli frequently occurs in the hospital environment. This study aims to describe resistant phenotypes of Escherichia coli strains to monitor their occurrence. We conducted a descriptive retrospective study of 102 Escherchia coli strains responsible for urinary tract infection in the laboratory of the University Hospital Joseph Raseta Befelatanana, Antananarivo from January 2014 to October 2016. Beta-lactam antibiotic resistance screening identified high-level penicillinases 50% (n=51), Escherichia coli producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) 22.5% (n=23), high-level cephalosporinases 14.7% (n=15), penicillinases low level 5.9% (n=6), wild type strains 5.9% (n=6) and a strain ofEscherichia coli emerging strain high-level resistance. Aminoglycosides resistance was identified in 58 (56.9%) wild type phenotype, 29 (28.4%) strains sensitive to amikacin and 15 (14.7%) resistant to all aminoglycosides. Fluoroquinolones resistance was identified in 52 (51%) wild type strains, 9 (8.8%) strains sensitive to ciprofloxacin and 41 (40.2%) resistant to all fluoroquinolones. Women (25, 7%) (p= 0.25, NS), patients more than 60 years (38.7%) (p=0.02), patients hospitalized in the Department of Nephrology (53.8%) (p=0.04), with urinary disorder and kidney disease (29, 7%) (p= 0.2, NS) were the most affected by E-ESBL. Based on high multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli strains guidelines for the empirical treatment of urinary tract infections need to be revised.

  10. Psychological Well-Being and Family Satisfaction Levels Five Years After Being Confirmed as a Carrier of the Machado-Joseph Disease Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Carlos; Gomes, Elisabete; Kazachkova, Nadiya; Bettencourt, Conceição; Raposo, Mafalda; Kay, Teresa Taylor; MacLeod, Patrick; Vasconcelos, João

    2012-01-01

    The present study on long-term outcome of presymptomatic testing for Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) aimed to evaluate the psychological well-being and the familial satisfaction of subjects that 5 years prior received an unfavorable result in the predictive testing (PT). The study included 47 testees of Azorean origin (23 from the island of Flores and 24 from S. Miguel) that completed the fourth evaluation session of the MJD protocol, and undertook a neurological examination at the moment of participation in the study. Nearly 50% of testees were symptomatic at the time of the study. Psychological well-being of the 47 participants was evaluated using the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB). The family satisfaction scale by adjectives was applied to obtain information on family dynamics. The average PGWB score of the total participants was of 73.3, a value indicative of psychological well-being. Nearly half of the testees presented scores indicating psychological well-being, whereas scores indicating moderate (28.9%) or severe (23.7%) stress were found in the remaining. The average score in the PGWB scale was lower in symptomatic than in asymptomatic subjects; moreover, the distinct distribution of the well-being categories seen in the two groups shows an impact of the appearance of first symptoms on the psychological state. Motives for undertaking the test, provided 5 years prior, failed to show an impact in well-being. The average score for familial satisfaction was of 134, a value compatible with high familial satisfaction, which represented the most frequent category (59.6%). Results demonstrate that well-being and family satisfaction need to be monitored in confirmed carriers of the MJD mutation. The inclusion of acceptance studies, after PT, as well as the development of acceptance training actions, should be of major importance to anticipate the possibility of psychological damage. PMID:23153003

  11. Scaliger, Joseph (1540-1609)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    French mathematician who, in 1582, founded the system of the Julian day, a continuous reckoning of time which starts at midday GMT on 1 January 4713 BC. The system has the advantage that it is able to set aside issues of leap years, the different lengths of months, `lost' days at changes of calendars etc. The label `Julian' commemorates Scaliger's father Julius....

  12. Needham, Joseph (1900-95)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historian of science, he was educated at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, where he eventually became Master. A friendship with three young Chinese researchers in Cambridge inspired him to learn Chinese, and during the Second World War he was posted to Chongqing, where he became acquainted with Chinese achievements in science and technology, and was astonished. This inspired him to devot...

  13. Joseph Priestley and His Contemporaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, George

    1975-01-01

    Author recalled simultaneously the scientific lives of Priestley, Franklin, Rumford, Davy, Faraday, and other investigators of "experimental philosophy" (what we now call chemistry), and the life of the Royal Institution, founded in 1797 to promote both research and its practical applications. (Editor/RK)

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly works with the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Reilly and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner are at KSC for equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly works with the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Reilly and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner are at KSC for equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (center) and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner (right) talk with a worker about the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (center) and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner (right) talk with a worker about the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner and STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly get a close look at the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Reilly and Tanner are at KSC for equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner and STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly get a close look at the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Reilly and Tanner are at KSC for equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (left) and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner (right) look over the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (left) and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner (right) look over the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers (in protective clothing) brief STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (center) and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner (right) about the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers (in protective clothing) brief STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (center) and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner (right) about the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly stands in front of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Reilly and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner are at KSC for equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly stands in front of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Reilly and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner are at KSC for equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (center) works with the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Reilly and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner are at KSC for equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (center) works with the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Reilly and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner are at KSC for equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner (left) and STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (right) look over the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) behind them. Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner (left) and STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (right) look over the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) behind them. Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (left) and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner (right) look over components in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (left) and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner (right) look over components in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner (left) and STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (right) are donning protective clothing to interface with the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), in the background. Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner (left) and STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (right) are donning protective clothing to interface with the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), in the background. Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner looks at the Exposed Facility Berthing Mechanism (EFBM) on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), after removing its cover. Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner looks at the Exposed Facility Berthing Mechanism (EFBM) on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), after removing its cover. Equipment familiarization is a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

  5. Cultivating Fertile Grounds: Enhancing and Extending the Scientific Base of Social and Emotional Learning--A Commentary on "The Scientific Base Linking Social and Emotional Learning to School Success," a Chapter by Joseph E. Zins, Michelle R. Bloodworth, Roger P. Weissberg, and Herbert J. Walberg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manz, Patricia H.

    2007-01-01

    Joseph Zins was a forerunner in empirically demonstrating the interrelationship of SEL interventions and school success. This commentary highlights his perspectives on the accumulating body of evidence for the academic gains that have been associated with various SEL interventions and aims to show how new research methodologies can further extend…

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner gets hands-on experience with the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Tanner and STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly are at KSC for equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner gets hands-on experience with the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Tanner and STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly are at KSC for equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (left) and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner get hands-on experience with the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Reilly and Tanner are at KSC for equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly (left) and STS-115 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner get hands-on experience with the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Reilly and Tanner are at KSC for equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations.

  8. Talking the Higgs Boson with Dr. Joseph Incandela: Third Lecture in the DOE Science Speaker Series (includes opening remarks from Dr. Bill Brinkman and introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Incandela, Joseph

    2012-09-14

    In July of 2012, scientists leading two different research teams, working independently of each other, announced that they had almost certain proof of the long-sought Higgs boson. Though Cern did not call the discovery "official", many physicists conceded the evidence was now so compelling they had surely found the missing particle. The formal confirmation will come over the next few months of further investigation. The experiments are taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and this third lecture in the DOE Science Speaker Series is given by one of those announcing scientists in July. He is Dr. Joseph Incandela, the current spokesperson for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment at CERN. He was heavily involved in the search for the top quark at Fermi and is from the University of California, Santa Barbara. The title he gives his presentation is "Searching for the genetic code of our universe: Discovery at the LHC."

  9. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C.

    2006-03-01

    The construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River resulted in the complete extirpation of the anadromous fishery upstream of these structures. Today, this area is totally dependent upon resident fish resources to support local fisheries. The resident fishing is enhanced by an extensive stocking program for target species in the existing fishery, including kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). The kokanee fishery in Lake Roosevelt has not been meeting the return goals set by fisheries managers despite the stocking program. Investigations of physical and biological factors that could affect the kokanee population found predation and entrainment had a significant impact on the fish population. In 1999 and 2000, walleye (Sander vitreum) consumed between 15% and 9%, respectively, of the hatchery kokanee within 41 days of their release, while results from a study in the late 1990s estimated that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam could account for up to 30% of the total mortality of the stocked fish. To address the entrainment loss, the Bonneville Power Administration commissioned a study to determine if fish would avoid areas illuminated by strobe lights in the forebay of the third powerplant. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). From 2002 through 2004, six strobe lights were suspended in the center of the opening to the third powerplant forebay during summer months. Results from those studies indicated that fish appeared to be attracted to the illuminated area but only at night and when flow conditions within the third powerplant forebay were minimal. However, small but consistent results from these studies indicated that under high flow conditions, fish might be avoiding the lights. The 2005 study was designed to examine whether, under high flow conditions near the penstock

  10. Using 3D Acoustic Telemetry to Assess the Response of Resident Salmonids to Strobe Lights in Lake Roosevelt, Washington; Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Feasibility Study, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Russlee; Farley, M.; Hansen, Gabriel

    2003-01-01

    In 1995, the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was established to mitigate the loss of anadromous fish due to the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams. The objectives of the Chief Joseph Enhancement Project are to determine the status of resident kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams and to enhance kokanee and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations. Studies conducted at Grand Coulee Dam documented substantial entrainment of kokanee through turbines at the third powerhouse. In response to finding high entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam, the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) recommended investigating the use of strobe lights to repel fish from the forebay of the third powerhouse. Therefore, our study focused on the third powerhouse and how strobe lights affected fish behavior in this area. The primary objective of our study was to assess the behavioral response of kokanee and rainbow trout to strobe lights using 3D acoustic telemetry, which yields explicit spatial locations of fish in three dimensions. Our secondary objectives were to (1) use a 3D acoustic system to mobile track tagged fish in the forebay and upriver of Grand Coulee Dam and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting fish using a hydrophone mounted in the tailrace of the third powerhouse. Within the fixed hydrophone array located in the third powerhouse cul-de-sac, we detected 50 kokanee and 30 rainbow trout, accounting for 47% and 45% respectively, of the fish released. Kokanee had a median residence time of 0.20 h and rainbow trout had a median residence time of 1.07 h. We detected more kokanee in the array at night compared to the day, and we detected more rainbow trout during the day compared to the night. In general, kokanee and rainbow trout approached along the eastern shore and the relative frequency of kokanee and rainbow trout detections was highest along the eastern shoreline of the 3D array. However, because we

  11. The status of three little known names proposed by Miranda-Ribeiro (1926) and the synonymization of Pyrrhura snethlageae Joseph & Bates, 2002 (Psittaciformes: Psittacidae: Arinae).

    PubMed

    Gaban-Lima, Renato; Raposo, Marcos A

    2016-11-27

    The presence of complex geographic variation among species allied to the absence of clear morphological breaks among populations has led to many poorly defined taxa in the genus Pyrrhura (Psittacidae: Arinae: Arini). This article addresses nomenclature of the Pyrrhura picta species complex, particularly the identity of three little-known names introduced by Miranda-Ribeiro (1926): Pyrrhura luciani ochrotis, P. l. pallescens and P. l. melanoides. We show that these names represent subjective synonyms of Pyrrhura snethlageae Joseph & Bates, 2002. Furthermore, we argue that Pyrrhura pallescens (Miranda-Ribeiro, 1926) n. comb. should be considered as the valid senior name because: (1) there is no doubt about the type locality (near the type locality of P. snethlageae) and, as a consequence, it "will best serve stability and universality of nomenclature" as recommended by the International Code of Zoological Nomenclatural, and; (2) it corresponds to the most common phenotype usually referred to as P. snethlageae, the species name that has been used for bird specimens from this region. Those considering P. snethlageae lucida Arndt, 2008 as a valid taxon should refer to this population as Pyrrhura pallescens lucida (Arndt, 2008) n. comb. In a near future P. pallescens melanoides (Miranda-Ribeiro, 1926) n. comb. is likely to be considered the best senior synonym of P. p. lucida given its type locality (Teles Pires River, MT).

  12. Linkage disequilibrium at the Machado-Joseph disease spinal cerebellar ataxia 3 locus: Evidence for a common founder effect in French and Portuguese-Brazilian families as well as a second ancestral Portuguese-Azorean mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanin, G.; Cancel, G.; Didierjean, O.

    1995-11-01

    Spinal cerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3) is a genetic subtype of the type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. SCA3 was mapped in French families to chromosome 14q24.3-qter in the same region as the gene for Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), which was classified as a form of ADCA type I on the basis of similarities in the clinical presentation of individual patients. The MJD gene was recently identified in Japanese kindreds, and the mutation was characterized as an unstable CAG repeat that is expanded in affected individuals. The same mutation is observed in families of Portuguese-Azorean ancestry, as well as in French SCA3 kindreds. In other disorders caused by unstable and expanded triplet repeats, such as fragile X syndrome (FRA-X), myotonic dystrophy (MD), Huntington disease (HD), and SCA1, linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the mutation and closely linked polymorphic markers was detected, suggesting that there were only one or a few founders or predisposing haplotypes. In the present study, 29 families of different geographical origins were tested for LD between the MJD/SCA3 mutation and four flanking microsatellite markers. 27 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. [Paskal Joseph Ritter von Ferro, the Reformer of the Austrian Public Health. On the occasion of the 200th anniversary of his death in consequence of the battle of Wagram against Napoleon].

    PubMed

    Flamm, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Paskal Joseph Ferro, born on June 5th, 1753 in Bonn, Germany, in the course of his military service as a surgeon graduated medicine in 1777 in Strasbourg and Vienna. Here initially he worked as a private physician in a hospital. In 1785 he became an assistant to the leading municipal physician, in 1793 he was appointed director of the district hospitals and in 1793 medical official in charge of Lower Austria. In 1795 Ferro was the first on the now created position of "Protomedicus" (director of the health administration) of an Austrian country. His most important acts were the creation of the first medical cold water bath in Austria, the foundation of institutions for the salvation of casualties, the introduction of rooms to lay out the dead in the communities, the organization of dispersed health regulations and their publications for common knowledge and especially the introduction of the smallpox vaccination in 1799 first time outside the UK. After the battle of Wagram (north to Vienna) in the Napoleonic war (July 6th, 1809) he had to care for the wounded and 56,000 dead soldiers on the battle field. In this action he contracted typhoid fever and consequently died on August 21st, 1809.

  14. Joseph-Frédéric-Benoît Charrière - How to Explain His Success as One of the Most Famous Surgical Instrument Makers Regarding His Life from Childhood to Death.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Jasmin Katrin

    2017-01-01

    We use the name 'Charrière' every day as a unit of measurement. This article explains his success as one of the most famous instrument makers who ever lived. A review of the literature was completed using PubMed. Additionally, material of historical sources like the museum of Bulle was used. Joseph-Frédéric-Benoît Charrière was born in Switzerland in 1803. At the age of 13, he moved to Paris and learned the profession of a cutler. In 1820, he took over the workshop of his teacher Vincent. Dupuytren was one of the most important people in Charrière's professional life. Charrière specialized in the fabrication of surgical instruments of such high quality that he was very sought after by famous surgeons. In 1837, Charrière went to Sheffield, England, to learn more about working with metals and alloys. In 1851, he was inducted into the Legion of Honour. Charrière died in 1876 in Paris. The patronage of Dupuytren was a very important supporting factor in Charrière's professional life, but mainly his great courage, the willingness to learn from others, his creativity and technical fantasy and his curiosity and broad interest in a lot of different fields explain his unmatched professional success. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. OMICS and 21st century brain surgery from education to practice: James Rutka of the University of Toronto interviewed by Joseph B. Martin (Boston) and Türker Kılıç (İstanbul).

    PubMed

    Rutka, James; Martin, Joseph; Kılıç, Türker

    2014-12-01

    The Science-in-Backstage interviews aim to share experiences by global medical and life sciences thought leaders on emergent technologies and novel scientific, medical, and educational practices, situating them in both a historical and contemporary science context so as to "look into the biotechnology and innovation futures" reflexively and intelligently. OMICS systems diagnostics and personalized medicine are greatly impacting brain surgery, not to forget the training of the next generation of neurosurgeons. What do the futures hold for the practice of, and education in 21(st) century brain surgery in the age of OMICS systems science, personalized medicine, and the use of simulation in surgeon training? James Rutka is a clinician scientist and a world leader in diagnosis and treatment of brain tumors. He is Professor and Chair of the Department of Surgery at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, a President Emeritus of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Neurosurgery. Professor Rutka was interviewed for the global medical, biotechnology, and life sciences readership of the OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology to speak on these pressing questions in his personal capacity as an independent senior scholar. The issues debated in the present interview are of broad relevance for 21(st) century surgery and postgenomics medicine. The interviewers were Professor Joseph B. Martin, Harvard Medical School Dean Emeritus in Boston and Joint Dean of Medicine at Bahçeşehir University in İstanbul, and the author of "Alfalfa to Ivy: Memoir of a Harvard Medical School Dean," and Professor Türker Kılıç, Dean of Medicine at Bahçeşehir University in İstanbul, and an elected member of the Turkish Academy of Sciences.

  16. Using the Joseph F. Smith Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, Russell T.; And Others

    Designed to support a 2-credit course required of Brigham Young University-Hawaii students prior to graduation, this syllabus provides a consolidated library instruction package for students in English 111W--Library Skills and Research Writing--which is taught jointly by librarians and English faculty. The syllabus is written to be easily…

  17. Using the Joseph F. Smith Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, Russell T.; And Others

    Designed to support a 2-credit course required of Brigham Young University-Hawaii students prior to graduation, this syllabus provides a consolidated library instruction package for students in English 111W--Library Skills and Research Writing--which is taught jointly by librarians and English faculty. The syllabus is written to be easily…

  18. Joseph Tofte Bruns: Wrestling with Big Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosier, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Joe Bruns is currently a student in the Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Certification Program at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. The series of work featured in this interview centers on the idea of relationships. Joe explores collective and implicated relationship to the work of Felix Gonzalez-Torres through the reuse of paper taken from…

  19. Delisle, Joseph-Nicolas (fl. eighteenth century)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    French astronomer, member of the Académie, hired CHARLES MESSIER as a draftsman, and as a recorder of astronomical observations. Visited ISAAC NEWTON in London in 1724. Calculated the return path for HALLEY's Comet in 1758-9 and published a map which guided the recovery search, showing the predicted path of return calculated at 10 day intervals. Messier, as his observing assistant, was set to obs...

  20. Joseph Tofte Bruns: Wrestling with Big Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosier, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Joe Bruns is currently a student in the Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Certification Program at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. The series of work featured in this interview centers on the idea of relationships. Joe explores collective and implicated relationship to the work of Felix Gonzalez-Torres through the reuse of paper taken from…

  1. Lagrange, Joseph-Louis (1736-13)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Mathematician, born in Giuseppe Lodovico Lagrangia in Turin, Sardinia-Piedmont (now Italy), in a family of modest means. As he said: `If I had been rich, I probably would not have devoted myself to mathematics'. Contrast with GERHARD HERZBERG. As a young man, he published work on the calculus of variations, developed a theory of dynamics based on the principle of least action, fluid mechanics (wh...

  2. Joseph Henry and the American Philosophical Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Walter E.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the extent to which Henry was affiliated with the Society and its influence on his work including his evolving relationship with the Society in the scope of the changing nature of American scientific institutions. (DF)

  3. Pawsey, Joseph Lade (1908-62)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Radiophysicist and astronomer, born Ararat, Victoria, Australia, pioneered the use of a Lloyd's mirror arrangement for radio interferometry at Dover Heights in Australia, and located the source of solar radio noise within the disc of the Sun. As John Hey had suggested, the radio noise came from sunspots....

  4. Joseph Burton Award Recipient: Voodoo Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Robert L.

    1998-04-01

    Unexpected scientific results that appear to violate conventional understanding of how the universe works can portend revolutionary advances in human knowledge, advances that will change the way we think about the universe. Alas, more often, such *discoveries* are simply wrong. Error is a normal part of science, and uncovering flaws in scientific observations or reasoning is the everyday work of scientists. There are, however, certain scientific claims that seem to take on a life of their own out of all proportion to the evidence. This is voodoo science -- and we pay a heavy price for it. The various forces that conspire to keep voodoo science alive will be explored.

  5. Inflammation, suppuration, putrefaction, fermentation: Joseph Lister's microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on Lister's inaugural lecture at King's College, London, in October 1877. As the new Professor of Clinical Surgery, Lister had much to report, including impressively high survival rates from complex operations previously regarded as foolhardy. Instead, he chose to address the processes of fermentation in wine, blood and milk. His reasons are not obvious to a modern audience, just as they probably were not to those who heard him in the Great Hall at King's. Having brought microbiological apparatus from his laboratory to the lecture theatre and presented proof of bacterial variety and specificity, Lister publicly demonstrated the creation of the first pure bacterial culture in the history of microbiology. It was an ingenious and well-thought-out strategy designed to generate a frame of mind among his new colleagues and future students, receptive to the causative role of bacteria in septic diseases. His timing was impeccable.

  6. An Interview with Sir Keith Joseph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Education: Forward Trends, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The interview with Britain's Secretary of State for Education focuses on special education policies, includng such topics as the role of microelectronics, parent participation, services for integrated students, and curriculum development for children with moderate learning difficultties. (CL)

  7. Summary of Results, Chief Joseph Dam Cultural Resources Project, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    124 CONCLUSIONS AN) COWARISONS ...... .................... .... 125 4. A POSTGLACIAL POLLEN RECOR) FROM GOOSE LANE, OKANOGAN COUNTY...dates with broader regional Interpretations of glacial and postglacial events. Like the majority of geomorphological studies in the Plateau, Hibbert...Plsidlum cf. P. contortum Prime, Gyraullis cf Gi . vermicularls, and S± JiQoa oalustrIs Muller (Identified by Dr. V. S. Mallory, University of

  8. Research Design for the Chief Joseph Dam Cultural Resources Project.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    lower terraces eroded by river action or built up by overbank deposits during postglacial times. In general, the pre-dam floodplain zone was dominated...8217, --,’’- ....’.’. ’- .- -’ -;- . - ’ •--’ :. - . • , , ’ . % . ’ . . ’G,3" ’.’,", .’,",;. .’’.’ Gi ’:’ . .".’ :"----. -.".-’- , ,’: * 12 DOGA CO

  9. Historical figure: dr joseph babinski(1857 to 1932).

    PubMed

    Dechy, H

    2010-01-01

    Each time a patient is examined somewhere, one looks for Babinskis sign. It is recorded in medical files all over the world, but because the history of medicine is only minimally taught, Babinski remains virtually unknown. At times he is thought to be Russian, some write his name with a Y; the reflex he discovered is sometimes abbreviated as Bab or, less frequently, as BBK. The essence of Babinskis success was in creating an original approach to the evaluation of the patient, based on a meticulous clinical exam, looking for those abnormal reflexes or signs which he described, often in the face of considerable criticism.

  10. Response to a Serious Flood: The St Joseph's Healthcare Experience.

    PubMed

    Dhanoa, Tina; Fuller, Hugh; Herechuk, Bryan; Trowbridge, Stephanie; Raab, Victoria; MacDonald, Anne Marie; Coffin-Simpson, Tara; Gosse, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Water spread like liquid fire damaging more than 60,000 sq. ft. of clinical and support space, bringing the emergency department (ED) and operating rooms at St Joe's to an abrupt halt. Staff mobilized immediately, calling a hospital-wide Code Aqua (flood) and Code Green (evacuation) for the ED, and launching into action to save equipment and supplies worth millions of dollars. Our path to recovery has been difficult, but we have emerged stronger as an organization. The urgent necessity of rethinking care led to radical innovation, particularly in the flow and care of patients admitted through the ED.

  11. 75 FR 32742 - Action Affecting Export Privileges; Joseph Piquet

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... involved in this conspiracy were high power amplifiers designed for use by the U.S. military in early warning radar and missile target acquisition systems, and low noise amplifiers that have both...

  12. Joseph Godwin Greenfield: The father of neuropathology (1884-1958).

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B; Rai, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    The systematic study of neuropathology was initiated by Godwin Greenfield in the early part of the 20(th) century. He worked at the National Hospital, Queen Square, London for the major period of his life and worked on various subjects like cerebrospinal fluid, intracranial tumours, cerebellar ataxias, dystrophia myotonica, disseminated sclerosis, subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord, and the like. After his retirement he visited the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness in Bethesda, Maryland, USA, from time to time and there he died suddenly from myocardial infarction.

  13. Macmillan Encyclopedia of Chemistry (edited by Joseph J. Lagowski)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, George B.

    1998-11-01

    Macmillan: New York, 1997. Four volumes. Figs., tables. lxxi + 1696 pp. 22.0 x 28.5 cm. $400. ISBN 0-02-897225-2. This latest addition to Macmillan's series of comprehensive core science encyclopedias (previous sets dealt with physics and earth sciences) will be of particular interest to readers of this Journal, for it is edited by longtime Journal of Chemical Education editor Joe Lagowski, assisted by a board of five distinguished associate editors. The attractively priced set offers clear explanations of the phenomena and concepts of chemistry and its materials, whether found in industry, the laboratory, or the natural world. It is intended for a broad spectrum of readers-professionals whose work draws on chemical concepts and knowledge (e.g., material scientists, engineers, health workers, biotechnologists, mathematicians, and computer programmers), science teachers at all levels from kindergarten to high school, high school and college students interested in medicine or the sciences, college and university professors, and laypersons desiring information on practical aspects of chemistry (e.g., household cleaning products, food and food additives, manufactured materials, herbicides, the human body, sweeteners, and animal communication).

  14. The Life and Work of Joseph Fraunhofer (1787-1826)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Alfred

    1975-01-01

    Describes Fraunhofer's scientific career as a glass and lens maker, a discoverer of dark lines in the solar spectrum, a corrector of lens aberration, and investigator of diffraction. Gives biographical data and anecdotes. Includes a bibliography, mainly of German sources. (GH)

  15. Ground-water quality in northeastern St. Joseph County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, J.M.; Bayless, E. Randall; Watson, Lee R.

    1995-01-01

    No industrial organic compounds were detected in the water samples. Four pesticides - alachlor, carbofuran, metolachlor, and triazines - were detected in water samples; the highest pesticide concentration in a water sample was 1.0 microgram per liter of alachlor.

  16. Joseph A. Burton Forum Award: Some Nuclear Weapons Dilemmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear weapons pose a combination of political and ethical dilemmas the solution to which has not been found. On one hand, in the view of both US government leaders and US allies, nuclear deterrence continues to play an essential part in the US role as the ultimate source of military strength for the alliances among the major democratic countries. It also continues to be in demand by countries that believe themselves to be isolated and threatened. On the other hand, nuclear weapons, besides being effective deterrents, can cause unprecedented loss of life and risk the demise of civilizations. No ban or technical precaution could prevent the rebuilding of nuclear weapons in a crisis. No diplomatic arrangement to date has erased the threat of invasion and war in the world. Only the abandonment of war and the threat of war as instruments of policy can make nuclear weapons obsolete. The slow, halting, risky road to that end remains the only hope for a world in which lasting solutions to the nuclear dilemmas are possible.

  17. The alleged poisoning of Joseph Stalin: proof beyond reasonable doubt?

    PubMed

    Quigley, James; Keating, Áine

    2013-12-01

    The name "Ioseb Besarionis dze Dzhugashvili" is as unassuming as it is unknown. It is the birth name of the brutal dictator who changed the face of Europe and whose actions still influence our lives today. Stalin, the man responsible for the slaughter of over twenty million of his own Soviet citizens and yet, the man who transformed the USSR from the feudalistic society of the Tsar's to a twentieth century military powerhouse that was instrumental in the defeat of Nazi Germany. Known as "Koba" to his friends, he cultivated a cult of personality where he was, and to a certain extent still is, admired in Russia and the former Soviet states. This paper will look at the following questions: why when he fell gravely ill did his comrades wait so long before seeking medical assistance? why were there omissions in the final post mortem report?, and why did one his closest lieutenants boast so openly about having murdered him.

  18. No Easy Answers: Joseph Schwab's Contributions to Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Elliot

    1984-01-01

    Schwab's work in curriculum planning emphasizes the need for eclecticism and the legitimacy of an uncertain, practical orientation. This essay analyzes the effects of Schwab's theory and calls for a new language for education, to be formulated through practical contact with the processes of schooling. (MJL)

  19. Igneous carbonates in dolerites of Franz Joseph land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklyarov, E. V.; Karyakin, Yu. V.; Kanakin, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    Carbonates showing the signs of crystallization from a melt were found in dolerites and basalts of lava covers and dikes of Alexandra Land, Heiss, and Newcomb islands. These carbonates may fill interstitials between silicate minerals, as well as constitute wormlike or amebiform separations in dolerites. In other cases, the "bulbs" are formed within acidic glass in the centers of globules consisting of pyroxene and rimmed with ilmenite crystals in cryptocrystalline basalts. Most of the carbonate separations are constituted of siderite (80-95% of siderite minal); calcites (up to 20% of siderite minal) and carbonates of calcite-dolomite isomorphic series are found less frequently. In view of the plume nature of volcanic rocks at the archipelago, the capture of carbonatite melt by silicate magma seems to be the most likely. However, the possibility of the magma capture and melting of residual siderite fragments from the underlying terrigenous formation of Mesozoic age cannot be excluded.

  20. A King over Egypt, Which Knew Not Joseph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, William E.

    1993-01-01

    Although it is true that today's education needs improvement, schools today are not all bad. The opinions of the following five experts, whose views are worth hearing are introduced: (1) Thomas Hopkins; (2) Ralph Tyler; (3) E. F. Lindquist; (4) Walter Cook; and (5) Harold Benjamin. (SLD)

  1. A King over Egypt, Which Knew Not Joseph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, William E.

    1993-01-01

    Although it is true that today's education needs improvement, schools today are not all bad. The opinions of the following five experts, whose views are worth hearing are introduced: (1) Thomas Hopkins; (2) Ralph Tyler; (3) E. F. Lindquist; (4) Walter Cook; and (5) Harold Benjamin. (SLD)

  2. More than a Metaphor: The Education of Joseph Knecht

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Education is a key theme in Hermann Hesse's final novel, "The Glass Bead Game". The book begins with a narrator's introduction, in which the Glass Bead Game is described as a way of playing with the total contents of culture--of drawing connections between disciplines, knowledge and values. The main part of the novel is devoted to the life of…

  3. The elusive Johann Joseph Oppel (1815-1894).

    PubMed

    Phillips, David; Wade, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Oppel is frequently cited for coining the term 'geometrical optical illusions' in 1855, but portrayals of him have rarely been sighted. We present a portrait of him and a brief description of his contributions to the study of illusions as well as other areas of sound and vision, particularly stereoscopy, colour, and motion. Despite the citations in the context of illusions, Oppel remains an elusive figure in the history of science.

  4. Leverrier [Le Verrier], Urbain Jean Joseph (1811-77)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Celestial mechanician, born in Saint-Lô, France. Worked at the Paris Observatory, under ARAGO. Later became director where his drive for efficiency and for total control over the staff made him unpopular, particularly his diktat that `One should not read in the papers the names of assistant astronomers who made discoveries, when the credit belongs exclusively to the director under whose orders th...

  5. Joseph Schwab, Curriculum, Curriculum Studies and Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, F. Michael

    2013-01-01

    The "Practical 1" paper combines Schwab's abiding concern, for the nature and quality of educational experience with another abiding concern, for how we think about what we do. The Practical 1 is the first of a set of four "practical" essays. These in turn are the product of his thinking about college education and his…

  6. More than a Metaphor: The Education of Joseph Knecht

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Education is a key theme in Hermann Hesse's final novel, "The Glass Bead Game". The book begins with a narrator's introduction, in which the Glass Bead Game is described as a way of playing with the total contents of culture--of drawing connections between disciplines, knowledge and values. The main part of the novel is devoted to the life of…

  7. The use of neutrons for the detection of explosives in Civil Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pesente, S.; Fabris, D.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Viesti, G.

    2007-02-12

    The search for hidden explosives has been simulated in laboratory conditions by using our Tagged Neutron Inspection System (TNIS). Applications of the TNIS concept to Civil Security problems are discussed in the light of our projects for cargo container inspections. Moreover, neutron attenuation and scattering can be used to search in real time for large quantity of explosive hidden in vehicles.

  8. Joseph eleve des poissons au Gabon. Guide pour l'elevage des poissons (Joseph Raises Fish in Gabon. Guide for Raising Fish).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, Scott

    A guide, in French, to raising fish for food and profit is designed to instruct and encourage Gabonese natives to establish family fisheries. It describes and illustrates in story form the process used to plan the fishery, clear the land, seek help from an agricultural agent, create a dam, make compost, plan and build the pond, feed the fish,…

  9. Archaeological Investigations at Sites 45-DO-242 and 45-DO-243, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    base of a shallow draw upstream from River Mile 579. The terrace system created by postglacial downcutting through glaciolacustrine sediments Is...EF h H AA A d f EF Gf 𔃼 A gI BA.Aa 0 a 2 F A A. LINE SEGMENTS DIGITIZED LANDMARKS a -- 1a-A = blade A-I - shoulder 1 = neck 1 -3 stem i.;’.~ €3-a...London. Nickmann, R.J., and E. Leopold 1981 A postglacial pollen record from Goose Lake, Okanogan County, Washington: evidence for an early Holocene

  10. A bill for the relief of Joseph Gabra and Sharon Kamel.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2009-01-06

    01/06/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S85) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. 77 FR 14441 - Facility Operating License Amendment From Southern Nuclear Operating, Inc., Joseph M. Farley...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... Licensing Branch 2-1, Division of Operating Reactor Licensing, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S... Operating Reactor Licensing, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR...

  12. [The reception of Franz Joseph Gall's doctrine on phrenology in Holland shortly after 1800].

    PubMed

    Heiningen, T

    1997-01-01

    Between 1800 and 1810 Gall's 'Hersen-Schedelleer' [= doctrine on phrenology] received increasing attention in Holland, just as it did in Germany and France. Gall had tried to connect visible human skull marks with brain anatomy, brain functioning and behaviour, a relationship in which he also compared man and animal. Scientists as well as people in non-scientific circles tried to find an answer to the question to what extent Gall's ideas on human brain anatomy and the development of the skull in relation to behaviour were acceptable. Besides there was a growing interest in the possible consequences of Gall's theory for moral life. However, Gall's doctrine was largely based on unproved and unprovable assumptions. Gall's visit to Holland, in the early spring of 1806, had a polarizing effect on supporters and adversaries, as it had had in Germany. In Holland Gerard Vrolik, professor at the Amsterdam Athenaeum Illustre, published the first treatise on this subject, in which he revealed himself to be a hesitant and prudent supporter of Gall's theories. From early 1804 Jacob Eliza Doornik, physician and scientist, and Martinus Stuart, theologist and historian, played a leading part in the discussion on this subject. The former opposed all aspects of Gall's theory. The latter - contrary to what one would expect - supported Gall in every way, with both regard to his explanation of brain anatomy and physiology and to his views on the relationship between the shape of the brain and the development of the skull. Remarkably he accepted Gall's materialism and rejected his fatalism. We can only explain Stuart's defence of Gall's moral views supposing he considered these in a religious framework. In Stuart's conviction God had given man a certain tendency to evil which man has to accept as a necessity in the fight against evil and the search for good. ...

  13. 76 FR 71374 - Joseph Giacchino, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... whether his licenses should be suspended or revoked, DEA lacks authority to revoke his registration... requires, as a condition of obtaining a registration, that a practitioner be ``authorized to dispense... 21 U.S.C. 824(a)(3), Congress expressly authorized the revocation of a DEA registration issued to...

  14. 78 FR 66801 - Norfolk Southern Railway Company-Abandonment Exemption-in St. Joseph County, Ind.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ...'s Office of Environmental Analysis (OEA) in its independent investigation) cannot be made before the... environment and historic resources. OEA will issue an environmental assessment (EA) by November 8, 2013. Interested persons may obtain a copy of the EA by writing to OEA (Room 1100, Surface Transportation Board...

  15. Archaeological Investigations at Site 45-OK-18, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on revere* aide if necesary and identify by block number) Cultural Resources, Washington Frenchman Springs Phase P...38 Table 3-5. Metric attributes of cryptocrystalline conchoidal flakes by zone. ..... ............ .......... 39 Table 3-6...Primary and secondary cryptocrystalline debitage by zone .. ..... ........... ............ 39 Table 3-7. Quartzite Industry. .. .......... .......... 40

  16. Archaeological Investigations at Site 45-DO-273, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    33 Table 3-3. Grouped material type frequencies by zone .... ......... 34 Table 3-4. Cryptocrystalline industry: formal types by zone...35 Table 3-5. Cryptocrystalline Industry: metric attributes of concholdal flakes by zone .... ................. .... 36 Table 3-6. Cryptocrystalline ...discussion, several of the I IthIc types are combined into groups. Jasper, chalcedony, petrified wood, and opal are discussed jointly as " cryptocrystalline

  17. Archaeological Investigations at Site 45-DO-214, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    26 Table 3-4. Cryptocrystalline artifact types by zone ... ......... 30 Table 3-5. Quartzlte and basalt...with Hudnut Phase points similar to Frenchman Springs Phase styles on the Middle Columbia (Nelson 1969). The succeeding river deposit, DU II, contains...frequencies of lithic material from 45-O- 214. Jasper, chalcedony and petrified wood are cryptocrystalline silicas formed by similar processes and

  18. Archaeological Inventory and Testing of Prehistoric Habitation Sites, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    forest products, tulee (?), deer. Way camp Plateau Family groups Long foraging/quarrying (?) trips: tules, fall , roots, cryptocrystalline rocks...area. Assemblages contain Wells Hydroelectric Project relatively high frequencies of cryptocrystalline artifacts, a few cobble cutting tools, and...Dan phase, large basal-notched (7- 4,500 B.P.), Cold Springs (4,500 - 3,700 and stemmed projectile points appear in the B.P.), Frenchman Springs

  19. Archaeological Investigations at Sites 45-OK-287 and 45-OK-288, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Percentage of condition by zone ............. 61 Figure 3-8. Relative frequencies of cryptocrystalline silicas by zone ......................... 63 Figure... Cryptocrystalline artifacts sorted by zone ......... . 57 Table 3-4. Argillite artifacts sorted by zone ... ............... 58 Table 3-5. Quartzite artifacts...Technological dimensions ........ ................. 222 Table B-2. Size attributes of cryptocrystalline concholdal flakes 223 Table B-3. Size

  20. Archaeological Investigations at Site 45-DO-285, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    lithic material type by analytic zone . . . . 22 Table 3-3. Zone frequencies of cryptocrystalline silica artifacts sorted by formal category...attributes of cryptocrystalline concholdal flakes . 114 * Table B-3. SIze attrIbutes of arg II Ite concholdal flakes ... ...... 114 Table B-4. Size... cryptocrystalline silicas formed by similar processes and sharing similar strength, flexibility and flaking characteristics (Crabtree 1967). They are available