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Sample records for jpl electronic nose

  1. JPL Electronic Nose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Margaret A.; Homer, Margie L.

    2009-01-01

    The JPL Electronic Nose (ENose) is a full-time, continuously operating event monitor designed to detect air contamination from spills and leaks in the crew habitat in the International Space Station. It fills the long-standing gap between onboard alarms and complex analytical instruments. ENose provides rapid, early identification and quantification of atmospheric changes caused by chemical species to which it has been trained. ENose can also be used to monitor cleanup processes after a leak or a spill.

  2. The process of developing an instrument: the JPL electronic nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, M. A.

    2012-06-01

    An electronic nose is a sensing array designed to monitor for targeted chemical species or mixtures. From 1995 to 2008, an electronic nose was developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to monitor the environment in human occupied spacecraft for the sudden release, such as leaks or spills, of targeted chemical species. The JPL ENose was taken through three generations of device, from basic exploratory research into polymer-carbon composite chemiresistive sensors to a fully operating instrument which was demonstrated on the International Space Station for several months. The Third Generation JPL ENose ran continuously in the U.S. Lab on the International Space Station to monitor for sudden releases of a targeted group of chemical species. It is capable of detecting, identifying and quantifying targeted species in the parts-per-million range in air, and of operating at a range of temperatures, humidities and pressures.

  3. Developing sensor activity relationships for the JPL electronic nose sensors using molecular modeling and QSAR techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Jewell, A. D.; Zhou, H.; Manatt, K.; Kisor, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    We report a Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) study using Genetic Function Approximations (GFA) to describe the polymer-carbon composite sensor activities in the JPL Electronic Nose, when exposed to chemical vapors at parts-per-million concentration levels.

  4. Operation of a Third Generation JPL Electronic Nose in the Regenerative ECLSS Module Simulator at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Shevade, A. V.; Manatt, K. S.; Haines, B. E.; Perry, J. L.; Roman, M. C.; Scott, J. P.; Frederick, K. R.

    2010-01-01

    An electronic nose has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to monitor spacecraft cabin air for anomalous events such as leaks and spills of solvents, coolants or other fluids with near-real-time analysis. It is designed to operate in the environment of the US Lab on ISS and was deployed on the International Space Station for a seven-month experiment in 2008-2009. In order improve understanding of ENose response to crew activities, an ENose was installed in the Regenerative ECLSS Module Simulator (REMS) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for several months. The REMS chamber is operated with continuous analysis of the air for presence and concentration of CO, CO2, ethane, ethanol and methane. ENose responses were analyzed and correlated with logged activities and air analyses in the REMS.

  5. The JPL Electronic Nose: Monitoring Air in the US Lab on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Manatt, K. S.; Gluck, S.; Shevade, A. V.; Kisor, A. K.; Zhou, H.; Lara, L. M.; Homer, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    An electronic nose with a sensor array of 32 conductometric sensors has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to monitor breathing air in spacecraft habitat. The Third Generation ENose is designed to operate in the environment of the US Lab on the International Space Station (ISS). It detects a selected group of analytes at target concentrations in the ppm regime at an environmental temperature range of 18 - 30 oC, relative humidity from 25 - 75% and pressure from 530 to 760 torr. The monitoring targets are anomalous events such as leaks and spills of solvents, coolants or other fluids. The JPL ENose operated as a technology demonstration for seven months in the U.S. Laboratory Destiny during 2008-2009. Analysis of ENose monitoring data shows that there was regular, periodic rise and fall of humidity and occasional releases of Freon 218 (perfluoropropane), formaldehyde, methanol and ethanol. There were also several events of unknown origin, half of them from the same source. Each event lasted from 20 to 100 minutes, consistent with the air replacement time in the US Lab.

  6. The JPL Electronic Nose: Monitoring Air in the US Lab on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Manatt, K. S.; Gluck, S.; Shevade, A. V.; Kisor, A. K.; Zhou, H.; Lara, L. M.; Homer, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    An electronic nose with a sensor array of 32 conductometric sensors has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to monitor breathing air in spacecraft habitat. The Third Generation ENose is designed to operate in the environment of the US Lab on the International Space Station (ISS). It detects a selected group of analytes at target concentrations in the ppm regime at an environmental temperature range of 18 - 30 oC, relative humidity from 25 - 75% and pressure from 530 to 760 torr. The monitoring targets are anomalous events such as leaks and spills of solvents, coolants or other fluids. The JPL ENose operated as a technology demonstration for seven months in the U.S. Laboratory Destiny during 2008-2009. Analysis of ENose monitoring data shows that there was regular, periodic rise and fall of humidity and occasional releases of Freon 218 (perfluoropropane), formaldehyde, methanol and ethanol. There were also several events of unknown origin, half of them from the same source. Each event lasted from 20 to 100 minutes, consistent with the air replacement time in the US Lab.

  7. JPL Electronic Nose: From Sniffing Brain Cancer to Trouble in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.

    2011-01-01

    What Is An Electronic Nose? An array of non-specific chemical sensors, controlled and analyzed electronically, which mimics the action of the mammalian nose by recognizing patterns of response. An Enose: (1.) ENose measures background resistance in each sensor and establishes a baseline. (2.) Contaminant comes in contact with sensors on the sensing head. (3.) The sensing films, change physical properties, such as thickness or color, as air composition changes. (4.) Sensor response is recorded by a computer, the change in resistance is computed, and the distributed response pattern of the sensor array is used to identify gases and mixtures of gases. (5. Responses of the sensor array are analyzed and quantified using software developed for the task.

  8. JPL Electronic Nose: From Sniffing Brain Cancer to Trouble in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.

    2011-01-01

    What Is An Electronic Nose? An array of non-specific chemical sensors, controlled and analyzed electronically, which mimics the action of the mammalian nose by recognizing patterns of response. An Enose: (1.) ENose measures background resistance in each sensor and establishes a baseline. (2.) Contaminant comes in contact with sensors on the sensing head. (3.) The sensing films, change physical properties, such as thickness or color, as air composition changes. (4.) Sensor response is recorded by a computer, the change in resistance is computed, and the distributed response pattern of the sensor array is used to identify gases and mixtures of gases. (5. Responses of the sensor array are analyzed and quantified using software developed for the task.

  9. Expanding the analyte set of the JPL Electronic Nose to include inorganic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Zhou, H.; Mannat, K.; Manfreda, A.; Kisor, A.; Shevade, A.; Yen, S. P. S.

    2005-01-01

    An array-based sensing system based on 32 polymer/carbon composite conductometric sensors is under development at JPL. Until the present phase of development, the analyte set has focuses on organic compounds and a few selected inorganic compounds, notably ammonia and hydrazine.

  10. Expanding the analyte set of the JPL Electronic Nose to include inorganic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Zhou, H.; Mannat, K.; Manfreda, A.; Kisor, A.; Shevade, A.; Yen, S. P. S.

    2005-01-01

    An array-based sensing system based on 32 polymer/carbon composite conductometric sensors is under development at JPL. Until the present phase of development, the analyte set has focuses on organic compounds and a few selected inorganic compounds, notably ammonia and hydrazine.

  11. Electronic Nose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Grace Industries, Inc.'s Electronic Nose is a vapor and gas detector, deriving from NASA's electronic circuitry, capable for sensing the presence of accelerants several days after a fire. The device is powered by rechargeable battery and no special training needed to operate. If an accelerant is present, device will emit a beeping sound and trigger a flashing light; the faster the beep rate, the more volatile the accelerant. Its sensitivity can also detect minute traces of accelerants. Unit saves investigators of fire causes time and expense by providing speedy detection of physical evidence for use in court. Device is also useful for detecting hazardous fumes, locating and detecting gas leaks in refineries and on oil drilling rigs.

  12. Electronic Nose System Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has designed and built an electronic nose system -- ENose -- to take on the duty of staying alert for smells that could indicate hazardous conditions in a closed spacecraft environment. Its sensors (shown here) are tailored so they conduct electricity differently when an air stream carries a particular chemical across them. JPL has designed and built a 3-pound flight version. The active parts are 32 sensors, each with a different mix of polymers saturated with carbon. When certain chemicals latch onto a sensor, they change how the sensor conducts electricity. This signal tells how much of a compound is in the air. The electronic nose flown aboard STS-95 in 1998 was capable of successfully detecting 10 toxic compounds.

  13. Electronic Nose System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has designed and built an electronic nose system -- ENose -- to take on the duty of staying alert for smells that could indicate hazardous conditions in a closed spacecraft environment. Its sensors are tailored so they conduct electricity differently when an air stream carries a particular chemical across them. JPL has designed and built a 3-pound flight version (shown with palm-size control and data computer). The active parts are 32 sensors, each with a different mix of polymers saturated with carbon. When certain chemicals latch onto a sensor, they change how the sensor conducts electricity. This signal tells how much of a compound is in the air. The electronic nose flown aboard STS-95 in 1998 was capable of successfully detecting 10 toxic compounds.

  14. Second-Generation Electronic Nose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Ryan, Margaret; Shevade, Abhijit; Zhou, Hanying; Kisor, Adam; Jan, Darrell; Jewell, April; Taylor, Charles; Manfreda, Allison; Manatt, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A report discusses the second generation of the JPL Electronic Nose (ENose), an array of 32 semi-specific chemical sensors used as an event monitor to identify and quantify contaminants released into breathing air by leaks or spills. It is designed to monitor the environment for changes in air quality, and is trained to identify and quantify selected chemical species at predetermined concentrations, ranging from sub-ppm to ppth. This system has improved reproducibility for making matched arrays, allowing use of data analysis software with minimal recalibration on sensor set replacement. The Second Generation (SG) ENose is a follow-up to the first JPL Electronic Nose that was tested on an earlier space shuttle mission (STS-95). Improvements have been made to the hardware, sensor materials, and data analysis software.

  15. JPL preferred parts list: Reliable electronic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covey, R. E.; Scott, W. R.; Hess, L. M.; Steffy, T. G.; Stott, F. R.

    1982-01-01

    The JPL Preferred Parts List was prepared to provide a basis for selection of electronic parts for JPL spacecraft programs. Supporting tests for the listed parts were designed to comply with specific spacecraft environmental requirements. The list tabulates the electronic, magnetic, and electromechanical parts applicable to all JPL electronic equipment wherein reliability is a major concern. The parts listed are revelant to equipment supplied by subcontractors as well as fabricated at the laboratory.

  16. Electronic Nose and Electronic Tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Bandhopadhyay, Rajib

    Human beings have five senses, namely, vision, hearing, touch, smell and taste. The sensors for vision, hearing and touch have been developed for several years. The need for sensors capable of mimicking the senses of smell and taste have been felt only recently in food industry, environmental monitoring and several industrial applications. In the ever-widening horizon of frontier research in the field of electronics and advanced computing, emergence of electronic nose (E-Nose) and electronic tongue (E-Tongue) have been drawing attention of scientists and technologists for more than a decade. By intelligent integration of multitudes of technologies like chemometrics, microelectronics and advanced soft computing, human olfaction has been successfully mimicked by such new techniques called machine olfaction (Pearce et al. 2002). But the very essence of such research and development efforts has centered on development of customized electronic nose and electronic tongue solutions specific to individual applications. In fact, research trends as of date clearly points to the fact that a machine olfaction system as versatile, universal and broadband as human nose and human tongue may not be feasible in the decades to come. But application specific solutions may definitely be demonstrated and commercialized by modulation in sensor design and fine-tuning the soft computing solutions. This chapter deals with theory, developments of E-Nose and E-Tongue technology and their applications. Also a succinct account of future trends of R&D efforts in this field with an objective of establishing co-relation between machine olfaction and human perception has been included.

  17. Micro-Electronic Nose System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zee, Frank C.

    2011-12-01

    The ability to "smell" various gas vapors and complex odors is important for many applications such as environmental monitoring for detecting toxic gases as well as quality control in the processing of food, cosmetics, and other chemical products for commercial industries. Mimicking the architecture of the biological nose, a miniature electronic nose system was designed and developed consisting of an array of sensor devices, signal-processing circuits, and software pattern-recognition algorithms. The array of sensors used polymer/carbon-black composite thin-films, which would swell or expand reversibly and reproducibly and cause a resistance change upon exposure to a wide variety of gases. Two types of sensor devices were fabricated using silicon micromachining techniques to form "wells" that confined the polymer/carbon-black to a small and specific area. The first type of sensor device formed the "well" by etching into the silicon substrate using bulk micromachining. The second type built a high-aspect-ratio "well" on the surface of a silicon wafer using SU-8 photoresist. Two sizes of "wells" were fabricated: 500 x 600 mum² and 250 x 250 mum². Custom signal-processing circuits were implemented on a printed circuit board and as an application-specific integrated-circuit (ASIC) chip. The circuits were not only able to measure and amplify the small resistance changes, which corresponded to small ppm (parts-per-million) changes in gas concentrations, but were also adaptable to accommodate the various characteristics of the different thin-films. Since the thin-films were not specific to any one particular gas vapor, an array of sensors each containing a different thin-film was used to produce a distributed response pattern when exposed to a gas vapor. Pattern recognition, including a clustering algorithm and two artificial neural network algorithms, was used to classify the response pattern and identify the gas vapor or odor. Two gas experiments were performed, one

  18. Detection of hydrazine and monomethyl hydrazine using electronic noses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, R.; Young, R. C.; Buttner, W. J.; Ryan, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    Two electronic noses, the Cyranose electronic nose and the electronic nose developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, have been tested to determine their utility for detecting hydrazine and monomethyl hydrazine (MMH).

  19. Embedded Electronic Nose for VOC Mixture Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botre, B.; Gharpure, D.; Shaligram, A.

    2009-05-23

    This paper details the work done towards a low cost, small size, portable embedded electronic nose (e-nose) and its application for analysis of different VOC mixtures. The sensor array is composed of commercially available metal oxide semiconductor sensors by Figaro. The embedded E-nose consists of an ADuC831 and has an RS 232 interface for Desktop PC for higher level data collection and NN training. The ESP tool with database facility and multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP NN) is employed to interface the embedded hardware and to process the electronic nose signals before being classified. The use of embedded e-nose for the quantification of VOCs in mixtures is investigated.

  20. Two Algorithms for Processing Electronic Nose Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca; Linnell, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Two algorithms for processing the digitized readings of electronic noses, and computer programs to implement the algorithms, have been devised in a continuing effort to increase the utility of electronic noses as means of identifying airborne compounds and measuring their concentrations. One algorithm identifies the two vapors in a two-vapor mixture and estimates the concentration of each vapor (in principle, this algorithm could be extended to more than two vapors). The other algorithm identifies a single vapor and estimates its concentration.

  1. Monitoring the Halitosis with an Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Pennazza, Giorgio; Santonico, Marco; Capuano, Rosamaria; Mummolo, Stefano; Marzo, Giuseppe; Di Natale, Corrado

    2011-09-01

    Halitosis disease results in a distinctive volatile fingerprint of the individual exhaled breath. Here a QMB based electronic nose has been used to study such fingerprints. This study aimed at following the time evolution of halitosis conditions in patients undergoing two different treatments. Professional operators assessed oral odor, and their evaluation was used for classifier training. Results show that the electronic nose can identify the presence of oral malodor and the attenuation of the condition achieved by the application of the treatment.

  2. Bio-Benchmarking of Electronic Nose Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Amalia Z.; Anderson, Alisha R.; Trowell, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Electronic noses, E-Noses, are instruments designed to reproduce the performance of animal noses or antennae but generally they cannot match the discriminating power of the biological original and have, therefore, been of limited utility. The manner in which odorant space is sampled is a critical factor in the performance of all noses but so far it has been described in detail only for the fly antenna. Methodology Here we describe how a set of metal oxide (MOx) E-Nose sensors, which is the most commonly used type, samples odorant space and compare it with what is known about fly odorant receptors (ORs). Principal Findings Compared with a fly's odorant receptors, MOx sensors from an electronic nose are on average more narrowly tuned but much more highly correlated with each other. A set of insect ORs can therefore sample broader regions of odorant space independently and redundantly than an equivalent number of MOx sensors. The comparison also highlights some important questions about the molecular nature of fly ORs. Conclusions The comparative approach generates practical learnings that may be taken up by solid-state physicists or engineers in designing new solid-state electronic nose sensors. It also potentially deepens our understanding of the performance of the biological system. PMID:19641604

  3. Electronic nose for space program applications.

    PubMed

    Young, Rebecca C; Buttner, William J; Linnell, Bruce R; Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2003-08-01

    The ability to monitor air contaminants in the shuttle and the International Space Station is important to ensure the health and safety of astronauts, and equipment integrity. Three specific space applications have been identified that would benefit from a chemical monitor: (a) organic contaminants in space cabin air; (b) hypergolic propellant contaminants in the shuttle airlock; (c) pre-combustion signature vapors from electrical fires. NASA at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is assessing several commercial and developing electronic noses (E-noses) for these applications. A short series of tests identified those E-noses that exhibited sufficient sensitivity to the vapors of interest. Only two E-noses exhibited sufficient sensitivity for hypergolic fuels at the required levels, while several commercial E-noses showed sufficient sensitivity of common organic vapors. These E-noses were subjected to further tests to assess their ability to identify vapors. Development and testing of E-nose models using vendor supplied software packages correctly identified vapors with an accuracy of 70-90%. In-house software improvements increased the identification rates between 90 and 100%. Further software enhancements are under development. Details on the experimental setup, test protocols, and results on E-nose performance are presented in this paper along with special emphasis on specific software enhancements. c2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Electronic nose for space program applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca C.; Buttner, William J.; Linnell, Bruce R.; Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2003-01-01

    The ability to monitor air contaminants in the shuttle and the International Space Station is important to ensure the health and safety of astronauts, and equipment integrity. Three specific space applications have been identified that would benefit from a chemical monitor: (a) organic contaminants in space cabin air; (b) hypergolic propellant contaminants in the shuttle airlock; (c) pre-combustion signature vapors from electrical fires. NASA at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is assessing several commercial and developing electronic noses (E-noses) for these applications. A short series of tests identified those E-noses that exhibited sufficient sensitivity to the vapors of interest. Only two E-noses exhibited sufficient sensitivity for hypergolic fuels at the required levels, while several commercial E-noses showed sufficient sensitivity of common organic vapors. These E-noses were subjected to further tests to assess their ability to identify vapors. Development and testing of E-nose models using vendor supplied software packages correctly identified vapors with an accuracy of 70-90%. In-house software improvements increased the identification rates between 90 and 100%. Further software enhancements are under development. Details on the experimental setup, test protocols, and results on E-nose performance are presented in this paper along with special emphasis on specific software enhancements. c2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Electronic nose for space program applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca C.; Buttner, William J.; Linnell, Bruce R.; Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2003-01-01

    The ability to monitor air contaminants in the shuttle and the International Space Station is important to ensure the health and safety of astronauts, and equipment integrity. Three specific space applications have been identified that would benefit from a chemical monitor: (a) organic contaminants in space cabin air; (b) hypergolic propellant contaminants in the shuttle airlock; (c) pre-combustion signature vapors from electrical fires. NASA at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is assessing several commercial and developing electronic noses (E-noses) for these applications. A short series of tests identified those E-noses that exhibited sufficient sensitivity to the vapors of interest. Only two E-noses exhibited sufficient sensitivity for hypergolic fuels at the required levels, while several commercial E-noses showed sufficient sensitivity of common organic vapors. These E-noses were subjected to further tests to assess their ability to identify vapors. Development and testing of E-nose models using vendor supplied software packages correctly identified vapors with an accuracy of 70-90%. In-house software improvements increased the identification rates between 90 and 100%. Further software enhancements are under development. Details on the experimental setup, test protocols, and results on E-nose performance are presented in this paper along with special emphasis on specific software enhancements. c2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Electronic Nose Feature Extraction Methods: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jia; Guo, Xiuzhen; Duan, Shukai; Jia, Pengfei; Wang, Lidan; Peng, Chao; Zhang, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    Many research groups in academia and industry are focusing on the performance improvement of electronic nose (E-nose) systems mainly involving three optimizations, which are sensitive material selection and sensor array optimization, enhanced feature extraction methods and pattern recognition method selection. For a specific application, the feature extraction method is a basic part of these three optimizations and a key point in E-nose system performance improvement. The aim of a feature extraction method is to extract robust information from the sensor response with less redundancy to ensure the effectiveness of the subsequent pattern recognition algorithm. Many kinds of feature extraction methods have been used in E-nose applications, such as extraction from the original response curves, curve fitting parameters, transform domains, phase space (PS) and dynamic moments (DM), parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), energy vector (EV), power density spectrum (PSD), window time slicing (WTS) and moving window time slicing (MWTS), moving window function capture (MWFC), etc. The object of this review is to provide a summary of the various feature extraction methods used in E-noses in recent years, as well as to give some suggestions and new inspiration to propose more effective feature extraction methods for the development of E-nose technology. PMID:26540056

  7. Electronic Noses and Tongues in Wine Industry

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Méndez, María L.; De Saja, José A.; González-Antón, Rocio; García-Hernández, Celia; Medina-Plaza, Cristina; García-Cabezón, Cristina; Martín-Pedrosa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The quality of wines is usually evaluated by a sensory panel formed of trained experts or traditional chemical analysis. Over the last few decades, electronic noses (e-noses) and electronic tongues have been developed to determine the quality of foods and beverages. They consist of arrays of sensors with cross-sensitivity, combined with pattern recognition software, which provide a fingerprint of the samples that can be used to discriminate or classify the samples. This holistic approach is inspired by the method used in mammals to recognize food through their senses. They have been widely applied to the analysis of wines, including quality control, aging control, or the detection of fraudulence, among others. In this paper, the current status of research and development in the field of e-noses and tongues applied to the analysis of wines is reviewed. Their potential applications in the wine industry are described. The review ends with a final comment about expected future developments. PMID:27826547

  8. Handbook of Machine Olfaction: Electronic Nose Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Tim C.; Schiffman, Susan S.; Nagle, H. Troy; Gardner, Julian W.

    2003-02-01

    "Electronic noses" are instruments which mimic the sense of smell. Consisting of olfactory sensors and a suitable signal processing unit, they are able to detect and distinguish odors precisely and at low cost. This makes them very useful for a remarkable variety of applications in the food and pharmaceutical industry, in environmental control or clinical diagnostics and more. The scope covers biological and technical fundamentals and up-to-date research. Contributions by renowned international scientists as well as application-oriented news from successful "e-nose" manufacturers give a well-rounded account of the topic, and this coverage from R&D to applications makes this book a must-have read for e-nose researchers, designers and users alike.

  9. Electronic noses sniff out danger

    SciTech Connect

    Kratch, K.

    1995-07-01

    Manufactured by Minneapolis-based Sensor Electronics Corp., SEC 2000 digital gas detectors for hazardous environments display gas concentrations and sound an alarm when combustible or toxic gases exceed preset limits by as little as one part per million. The detectors also are used to monitor indoor air quality inside a variety of manufacturing plants and other public buildings. Gases, such as carbon monoxide, methane, chlorine and ammonia are monitored.

  10. Electronic Noses for Environmental Monitoring Applications

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Rosso, Renato Del

    2014-01-01

    Electronic nose applications in environmental monitoring are nowadays of great interest, because of the instruments' proven capability of recognizing and discriminating between a variety of different gases and odors using just a small number of sensors. Such applications in the environmental field include analysis of parameters relating to environmental quality, process control, and verification of efficiency of odor control systems. This article reviews the findings of recent scientific studies in this field, with particular focus on the abovementioned applications. In general, these studies prove that electronic noses are mostly suitable for the different applications reported, especially if the instruments are specifically developed and fine-tuned. As a general rule, literature studies also discuss the critical aspects connected with the different possible uses, as well as research regarding the development of effective solutions. However, currently the main limit to the diffusion of electronic noses as environmental monitoring tools is their complexity and the lack of specific regulation for their standardization, as their use entails a large number of degrees of freedom, regarding for instance the training and the data processing procedures. PMID:25347583

  11. Breath alcohol, multisensor arrays, and electronic noses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsson, Nils; Winquist, Fredrik

    1997-01-01

    The concept behind a volatile compound mapper, or electronic nose, is to use the combination of multiple gas sensors and pattern recognition techniques to detect and quantify substances in gas mixtures. There are several different kinds of sensors which have been developed during recent years of which the base techniques are conducting polymers, piezo electrical crystals and solid state devices. In this work we have used a combination of gas sensitive field effect devices and semiconducting metal oxides. The most useful pattern recognition routine was found to be ANNs, which is a mathematical approximation of the human neural network. The aim of this work is to evaluate the possibility of using electronic noses in field instruments to detect drugs, arson residues, explosives etc. As a test application we have chosen breath alcohol measurements. There are several reasons for this. Breath samples are a quite complex mixture contains between 200 and 300 substances at trace levels. The alcohol level is low but still possible to handle. There are needs for replacing large and heavy mobile instruments with smaller devices. Current instrumentation is rather sensitive to interfering substances. The work so far has dealt with sampling, how to introduce ethanol and other substances in the breath, correlation measurements between the electronic nose and headspace GC, and how to evaluate the sensor signals.

  12. Fruit volatile analysis using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Simona; Lloyd, Nathan W; Ebeler, Susan E; Zakharov, Florence

    2012-03-30

    Numerous and diverse physiological changes occur during fruit ripening, including the development of a specific volatile blend that characterizes fruit aroma. Maturity at harvest is one of the key factors influencing the flavor quality of fruits and vegetables. The validation of robust methods that rapidly assess fruit maturity and aroma quality would allow improved management of advanced breeding programs, production practices and postharvest handling. Over the last three decades, much research has been conducted to develop so-called electronic noses, which are devices able to rapidly detect odors and flavors. Currently there are several commercially available electronic noses able to perform volatile analysis, based on different technologies. The electronic nose used in our work (zNose, EST, Newbury Park, CA, USA), consists of ultra-fast gas chromatography coupled with a surface acoustic wave sensor (UFGC-SAW). This technology has already been tested for its ability to monitor quality of various commodities, including detection of deterioration in apple; ripeness and rot evaluation in mango; aroma profiling of thymus species; C(6) volatile compounds in grape berries; characterization of vegetable oil and detection of adulterants in virgin coconut oil. This system can perform the three major steps of aroma analysis: headspace sampling, separation of volatile compounds, and detection. In about one minute, the output, a chromatogram, is produced and, after a purging cycle, the instrument is ready for further analysis. The results obtained with the zNose can be compared to those of other gas-chromatographic systems by calculation of Kovats Indices (KI). Once the instrument has been tuned with an alkane standard solution, the retention times are automatically converted into KIs. However, slight changes in temperature and flow rate are expected to occur over time, causing retention times to drift. Also, depending on the polarity of the column stationary phase, the

  13. Towards a Chemiresistive Sensor-Integrated Electronic Nose: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Shih-Wen; Tang, Kea-Tiong

    2013-01-01

    Electronic noses have potential applications in daily life, but are restricted by their bulky size and high price. This review focuses on the use of chemiresistive gas sensors, metal-oxide semiconductor gas sensors and conductive polymer gas sensors in an electronic nose for system integration to reduce size and cost. The review covers the system design considerations and the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated technology for a chemiresistive gas sensor electronic nose, including the integrated sensor array, its readout interface, and pattern recognition hardware. In addition, the state-of-the-art technology integrated in the electronic nose is also presented, such as the sensing front-end chip, electronic nose signal processing chip, and the electronic nose system-on-chip. PMID:24152879

  14. The Electronic Nose Training Automation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schattke, Nathan

    2002-01-01

    The electronic nose is a method of using several sensors in conjunction to identify an unknown gas. Statistical analysis has shown that a large number of training exposures need to be performed in order to get a model that can be depended on. The number of training exposures needed is on the order of 1000. Data acquisition from the noses are generally automatic and built in. The gas generation equipment consists of a Miller-Nelson (MN) flow/temperature/humidity controller and a Kin-Tek (KT) trace gas generator. This equipment has been controlled in the past by an old data acquisition and control system. The new system will use new control boards and an easy graphical user interface. The programming for this is in the LabVIEW G programming language. A language easy for the user to make modifications to. This paper details some of the issues in selecting the components and programming the connections. It is not a primer on LabVIEW programming, a separate CD is being delivered with website files to teach that.

  15. Electronic Nose: Evaluation of Kamina Prototype Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schattke, Nathan

    2001-01-01

    The Kamina, Sam and Cyranose electronic nose systems were evaluated and partially trained. Much work was performed on the Kamina as it has the ability to respond to low (less than 10 ppb) concentrations of hydrazine compounds. We were able to tell the difference between Hydrazine (Hz) and Monomethylhydrazine (MMH) in standard clean humid air. We were able to detect MMH in reduced pressure (1/3 atm) at about 250 ppb, however the training set was to far from the real situation to be useful now. Various engineering and usability aspects of both the noses was noted, especially the software. One serious physical engineering flaw was remedied in the Kamina system. A gas flow manifold was created for the Sam system. Different chips were evaluated for the Kamina system. It is still unclear if they can be exchanged without retraining the software.The Sam Detect commercial unit was evaluated for solvent detection and evaluation. It was able to successfully identify some solvents. The Cyranose, was observed and evaluated for two days. It has the ability to detect gasses in the 100 parts per million level but not the 10 parts per billion level. It is very sensitive to humidity changes; there is software to partially handle this.

  16. Biomedical application of an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Mantini, A; Di Natale, C; Macagnano, A; Paolesse, R; Finazzi-Agrò, A; D'Amico, A

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of volatiles secreted outside the human body to get information on the health status of the individuals has been proposed several times in the past. This kind of analysis is complex both from the point of view of sample collection and data interpretation when, for instance, gas chromatography is utilized. In the recent years the advent of chemical sensors and chemical sensors systems (the so-called electronic noses) opened the way to the possibility of fast and simple analysis of odors in many fields, and, recently, among them, in medicine. In this paper some examples of these applications are illustrated. The results, although preliminary, encourage in pursuing these researches that can give rise to a better comprehension of the role of smell and odor in humans and, possibly in the near future, in novel diagnostic tools.

  17. Miniature sensor suitable for electronic nose applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A.; Gehl, Anthony C.; Allman, Steve L.; Johansson, Alicia; Boisen, Anja

    2007-05-01

    A major research effort has been devoted over the years for the development of chemical sensors for the detection of chemical and explosive vapors. However, the deployment of such chemical sensors will require the use of multiple sensors (probably tens of sensors) in a sensor package to achieve selective detection. In order to keep the overall detector unit small, miniature sensors with sufficient sensitivity of detection will be needed. We report sensitive detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a stimulant for the nerve agents, using a miniature sensor unit based on piezoresistive microcantilevers. The sensor can detect parts-per-trillion concentrations of DMMP within 10s exposure times. The small size of the sensor makes it ideally suited for electronic nose applications.

  18. Applications and advances in electronic-nose technologies

    Treesearch

    A. D. Wilson; M. Baietto

    2009-01-01

    Electronic-nose devices have received considerable attention in the field of sensor technology during the past twenty years, largely due to the discovery of numerous applications derived from research in diverse fields of applied sciences. Recent applications of electronic nose technologies have come through advances in sensor design, material improvements, software...

  19. Advances in electronic-nose technologies developed for biomedical applications

    Treesearch

    Dan Wilson; Manuela. Baietto

    2011-01-01

    The research and development of new electronic-nose applications in the biomedical field has accelerated at a phenomenal rate over the past 25 years. Many innovative e-nose technologies have provided solutions and applications to a wide variety of complex biomedical and healthcare problems. The purposes of this review are to present a comprehensive analysis of past and...

  20. Electronic nose for detecting multiple targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Parthasarathi, Ganga; Poddar, Rakesh; Zhao, Weiqiang; Luo, Cheng

    2006-05-01

    The discovery of high conductivity in doped polyacetylene in 1977 (garnering the 2000 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the three discovering scientists) has attracted considerable interest in the application of polymers as the semiconducting and conducting materials due to their promising potential to replace silicon and metals in building devices. Previous and current efforts in developing conducting polymer microsystems mainly focus on generating a device of a single function. When multiple micropatterns made of different conducting polymers are produced on the same substrate, many microsystems of multiple functions can be envisioned. For example, analogous to the mammalian olfactory system which includes over 1,000 receptor genes in detecting various odors (e.g., beer, soda etc.), a sensor consisting of multiple distinct conducting polymer sensing elements will be capable of detecting a number of analytes simultaneously. However, existing techniques present significant technical challenges of degradation, low throughput, low resolution, depth of field, and/or residual layer in producing conducting polymer microstructures. To circumvent these challenges, an intermediate-layer lithography method developed in our group is used to generate multiple micropatterns made of different, commonly used conducting polymers, Polypyrrole (PPy), Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy)thiophene (PEDOT) and Polyaniline (PANI). The generated multiple micropatterns are further used in an "electronic nose" to detect water vapor, glucose, toluene and acetone.

  1. Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies Developed for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alphus D.; Baietto, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    The research and development of new electronic-nose applications in the biomedical field has accelerated at a phenomenal rate over the past 25 years. Many innovative e-nose technologies have provided solutions and applications to a wide variety of complex biomedical and healthcare problems. The purposes of this review are to present a comprehensive analysis of past and recent biomedical research findings and developments of electronic-nose sensor technologies, and to identify current and future potential e-nose applications that will continue to advance the effectiveness and efficiency of biomedical treatments and healthcare services for many years. An abundance of electronic-nose applications has been developed for a variety of healthcare sectors including diagnostics, immunology, pathology, patient recovery, pharmacology, physical therapy, physiology, preventative medicine, remote healthcare, and wound and graft healing. Specific biomedical e-nose applications range from uses in biochemical testing, blood-compatibility evaluations, disease diagnoses, and drug delivery to monitoring of metabolic levels, organ dysfunctions, and patient conditions through telemedicine. This paper summarizes the major electronic-nose technologies developed for healthcare and biomedical applications since the late 1980s when electronic aroma detection technologies were first recognized to be potentially useful in providing effective solutions to problems in the healthcare industry. PMID:22346620

  2. Monitoring space shuttle air quality using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory electronic nose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Margaret Amy; Zhou, Hanying; Buehler, Martin G.; Manatt, Kenneth S.; Mowrey, Victoria S.; Jackson, Shannon P.; Kisor, Adam K.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Homer, Margie L.

    2004-01-01

    A miniature electronic nose (ENose) has been designed and built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA, and was designed to detect, identify, and quantify ten common contaminants and relative humidity changes. The sensing array includes 32 sensing films made from polymer carbon-black composites. Event identification and quantification were done using the Levenberg-Marquart nonlinear least squares method. After successful ground training, this ENose was used in a demonstration experiment aboard STS-95 (October-November, 1998), in which the ENose was operated continuously for six days and recorded the sensors' response to the air in the mid-deck. Air samples were collected daily and analyzed independently after the flight. Changes in shuttle-cabin humidity were detected and quantified by the JPL ENose; neither the ENose nor the air samples detected any of the contaminants on the target list. The device is microgravity insensitive.

  3. Monitoring space shuttle air quality using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Margaret Amy; Zhou, Hanying; Buehler, Martin G; Manatt, Kenneth S; Mowrey, Victoria S; Jackson, Shannon P; Kisor, Adam K; Shevade, Abhijit V; Homer, Margie L

    2004-06-01

    A miniature electronic nose (ENose) has been designed and built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA, and was designed to detect, identify, and quantify ten common contaminants and relative humidity changes. The sensing array includes 32 sensing films made from polymer carbon-black composites. Event identification and quantification were done using the Levenberg-Marquart nonlinear least squares method. After successful ground training, this ENose was used in a demonstration experiment aboard STS-95 (October-November, 1998), in which the ENose was operated continuously for six days and recorded the sensors' response to the air in the mid-deck. Air samples were collected daily and analyzed independently after the flight. Changes in shuttle-cabin humidity were detected and quantified by the JPL ENose; neither the ENose nor the air samples detected any of the contaminants on the target list. The device is microgravity insensitive.

  4. Monitoring space shuttle air quality using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory electronic nose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Margaret Amy; Zhou, Hanying; Buehler, Martin G.; Manatt, Kenneth S.; Mowrey, Victoria S.; Jackson, Shannon P.; Kisor, Adam K.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Homer, Margie L.

    2004-01-01

    A miniature electronic nose (ENose) has been designed and built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA, and was designed to detect, identify, and quantify ten common contaminants and relative humidity changes. The sensing array includes 32 sensing films made from polymer carbon-black composites. Event identification and quantification were done using the Levenberg-Marquart nonlinear least squares method. After successful ground training, this ENose was used in a demonstration experiment aboard STS-95 (October-November, 1998), in which the ENose was operated continuously for six days and recorded the sensors' response to the air in the mid-deck. Air samples were collected daily and analyzed independently after the flight. Changes in shuttle-cabin humidity were detected and quantified by the JPL ENose; neither the ENose nor the air samples detected any of the contaminants on the target list. The device is microgravity insensitive.

  5. A Compact and Low Cost Electronic Nose for Aroma Detection

    PubMed Central

    Macías, Miguel Macías; Agudo, J. Enrique; Manso, Antonio García; Orellana, Carlos Javier García; Velasco, Horacio Manuel González; Caballero, Ramón Gallardo

    2013-01-01

    This article explains the development of a prototype of a portable and a very low-cost electronic nose based on an mbed microcontroller. Mbeds are a series of ARM microcontroller development boards designed for fast, flexible and rapid prototyping. The electronic nose is comprised of an mbed, an LCD display, two small pumps, two electro-valves and a sensor chamber with four TGS Figaro gas sensors. The performance of the electronic nose has been tested by measuring the ethanol content of wine synthetic matrices and special attention has been paid to the reproducibility and repeatability of the measurements taken on different days. Results show that the electronic nose with a neural network classifier is able to discriminate wine samples with 10, 12 and 14% V/V alcohol content with a classification error of less than 1%. PMID:23698265

  6. Predicting odor pleasantness with an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Rafi; Medhanie, Abebe; Roth, Yehudah; Harel, David; Sobel, Noam

    2010-04-15

    A primary goal for artificial nose (eNose) technology is to report perceptual qualities of novel odors. Currently, however, eNoses primarily detect and discriminate between odorants they previously "learned". We tuned an eNose to human odor pleasantness estimates. We then used the eNose to predict the pleasantness of novel odorants, and tested these predictions in naïve subjects who had not participated in the tuning procedure. We found that our apparatus generated odorant pleasantness ratings with above 80% similarity to average human ratings, and with above 90% accuracy at discriminating between categorically pleasant or unpleasant odorants. Similar results were obtained in two cultures, native Israeli and native Ethiopian, without retuning of the apparatus. These findings suggest that unlike in vision and audition, in olfaction there is a systematic predictable link between stimulus structure and stimulus pleasantness. This goes in contrast to the popular notion that odorant pleasantness is completely subjective, and may provide a new method for odor screening and environmental monitoring, as well as a critical building block for digital transmission of smell.

  7. Predicting Odor Pleasantness with an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Rafi; Medhanie, Abebe; Roth, Yehudah; Harel, David; Sobel, Noam

    2010-01-01

    A primary goal for artificial nose (eNose) technology is to report perceptual qualities of novel odors. Currently, however, eNoses primarily detect and discriminate between odorants they previously “learned”. We tuned an eNose to human odor pleasantness estimates. We then used the eNose to predict the pleasantness of novel odorants, and tested these predictions in naïve subjects who had not participated in the tuning procedure. We found that our apparatus generated odorant pleasantness ratings with above 80% similarity to average human ratings, and with above 90% accuracy at discriminating between categorically pleasant or unpleasant odorants. Similar results were obtained in two cultures, native Israeli and native Ethiopian, without retuning of the apparatus. These findings suggest that unlike in vision and audition, in olfaction there is a systematic predictable link between stimulus structure and stimulus pleasantness. This goes in contrast to the popular notion that odorant pleasantness is completely subjective, and may provide a new method for odor screening and environmental monitoring, as well as a critical building block for digital transmission of smell. PMID:20418961

  8. Electronic nose based tea quality standardization.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Ritaban; Kashwan, K R; Bhuyan, M; Hines, E L; Gardner, J W

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we have used a metal oxide sensor (MOS) based electronic nose (EN) to analyze five tea samples with different qualities, namely, drier month, drier month again over-fired, well fermented normal fired in oven, well fermented overfired in oven, and under fermented normal fired in oven. The flavour of tea is determined mainly by its taste and smell, which is generated by hundreds of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Non-Volatile Organic Compounds present in tea. These VOCs are present in different ratios and determine the quality of the tea. For example Assamica (Sri Lanka and Assam Tea) and Assamica Sinesis (Darjeeling and Japanese Tea) are two different species of tea giving different flavour notes. Tea flavour is traditionally measured through the use of a combination of conventional analytical instrumentation and human or ganoleptic profiling panels. These methods are expensive in terms of time and labour and also inaccurate because of a lack of either sensitivity or quantitative information. In this paper an investigation has been made to determine the flavours of different tea samples using an EN and to explore the possibility of replacing existing analytical and profiling panel methods. The technique uses an array of 4 MOSs, each of, which has an electrical resistance that has partial sensitivity to the headspace of tea. The signals from the sensor array are then conditioned by suitable interface circuitry. The data were processed using Principal Components Analysis (PCA), Fuzzy C Means algorithm (FCM). We also explored the use of a Self-Organizing Map (SOM) method along with a Radial Basis Function network (RBF) and a Probabilistic Neural Network classifier. Using FCM and SOM feature extraction techniques along with RBF neural network we achieved 100% correct classification for the five different tea samples with different qualities. These results prove that our EN is capable of discriminating between the flavours of teas manufactured under

  9. An Evaluation of Electronic Nose for Space Program Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca C.; Linnell, Bruce R.; Buttner, William J.; Mersqhelte, Barry

    2003-01-01

    The ability to monitor air contaminants in the Shuttle and the International Space Station is important to ensure the health and safety of astronauts. Three specific space applications have been identified that would benefit from a chemical monitor: organic contaminants in crew cabins, propellant contaminants in the airlock, and pre-combustion fire detection. NASA has assessed several commercial and developing electronic noses (e-noses) for these applications. A preliminary series of tests identified those e-noses that exhibited sufficient sensitivity to the vapors of interest. These e-noses were further tested to assess their ability to identify vapors, and in-house software has been developed to enhance identification. This paper describes the tests, the classification ability of selected e-noses, and the software improvements made to meet the requirements for these space program applications.

  10. An electronic nose for quantitative determination of gas concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, Grzegorz; Kalinowski, Paweł; Woźniak, Łukasz

    2016-11-01

    The practical application of human nose for fragrance recognition is severely limited by the fact that our sense of smell is subjective and gets tired easily. Consequently, there is considerable need for an instrument that can be a substitution of the human sense of smell. Electronic nose devices from the mid 1980s are used in growing number of applications. They comprise an array of several electrochemical gas sensors with partial specificity and a pattern recognition algorithms. Most of such systems, however, is only used for qualitative measurements. In this article usage of such system in quantitative determination of gas concentration is demonstrated. Electronic nose consist of a sensor array with eight commercially available Taguchi type gas sensor. Performance of three different pattern recognition algorithms is compared, namely artificial neural network, partial least squares regression and support vector machine regression. The electronic nose is used for ammonia and nitrogen dioxide concentration determination.

  11. Applications and Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alphus D.; Baietto, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Electronic-nose devices have received considerable attention in the field of sensor technology during the past twenty years, largely due to the discovery of numerous applications derived from research in diverse fields of applied sciences. Recent applications of electronic nose technologies have come through advances in sensor design, material improvements, software innovations and progress in microcircuitry design and systems integration. The invention of many new e-nose sensor types and arrays, based on different detection principles and mechanisms, is closely correlated with the expansion of new applications. Electronic noses have provided a plethora of benefits to a variety of commercial industries, including the agricultural, biomedical, cosmetics, environmental, food, manufacturing, military, pharmaceutical, regulatory, and various scientific research fields. Advances have improved product attributes, uniformity, and consistency as a result of increases in quality control capabilities afforded by electronic-nose monitoring of all phases of industrial manufacturing processes. This paper is a review of the major electronic-nose technologies, developed since this specialized field was born and became prominent in the mid 1980s, and a summarization of some of the more important and useful applications that have been of greatest benefit to man. PMID:22346690

  12. Classification of Agarwood Oil Using an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Hidayat, Wahyu; Shakaff, Ali Yeon Md.; Ahmad, Mohd Noor; Adom, Abdul Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Presently, the quality assurance of agarwood oil is performed by sensory panels which has significant drawbacks in terms of objectivity and repeatability. In this paper, it is shown how an electronic nose (e-nose) may be successfully utilised for the classification of agarwood oil. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA), were used to classify different types of oil. The HCA produced a dendrogram showing the separation of e-nose data into three different groups of oils. The PCA scatter plot revealed a distinct separation between the three groups. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was used for a better prediction of unknown samples. PMID:22399899

  13. Classification of agarwood oil using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Hidayat, Wahyu; Shakaff, Ali Yeon Md; Ahmad, Mohd Noor; Adom, Abdul Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Presently, the quality assurance of agarwood oil is performed by sensory panels which has significant drawbacks in terms of objectivity and repeatability. In this paper, it is shown how an electronic nose (e-nose) may be successfully utilised for the classification of agarwood oil. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA), were used to classify different types of oil. The HCA produced a dendrogram showing the separation of e-nose data into three different groups of oils. The PCA scatter plot revealed a distinct separation between the three groups. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was used for a better prediction of unknown samples.

  14. A new kernel discriminant analysis framework for electronic nose recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Tian, Feng-Chun

    2014-03-13

    Electronic nose (e-Nose) technology based on metal oxide semiconductor gas sensor array is widely studied for detection of gas components. This paper proposes a new discriminant analysis framework (NDA) for dimension reduction and e-Nose recognition. In a NDA, the between-class and the within-class Laplacian scatter matrix are designed from sample to sample, respectively, to characterize the between-class separability and the within-class compactness by seeking for discriminant matrix to simultaneously maximize the between-class Laplacian scatter and minimize the within-class Laplacian scatter. In terms of the linear separability in high dimensional kernel mapping space and the dimension reduction of principal component analysis (PCA), an effective kernel PCA plus NDA method (KNDA) is proposed for rapid detection of gas mixture components by an e-Nose. The NDA framework is derived in this paper as well as the specific implementations of the proposed KNDA method in training and recognition process. The KNDA is examined on the e-Nose datasets of six kinds of gas components, and compared with state of the art e-Nose classification methods. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed KNDA method shows the best performance with average recognition rate and total recognition rate as 94.14% and 95.06% which leads to a promising feature extraction and multi-class recognition in e-Nose. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of Three Electronic Noses for Detecting Incipient Wood Decay

    PubMed Central

    Baietto, Manuela; Wilson, Alphus D.; Bassi, Daniele; Ferrini, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Tree assessment methodologies, currently used to evaluate the structural stability of individual urban trees, usually involve a visual analysis followed by measurements of the internal soundness of wood using various instruments that are often invasive, expensive, or inadequate for use within the urban environment. Moreover, most conventional instruments do not provide an adequate evaluation of decay that occurs in the root system. The intent of this research was to evaluate the possibility of integrating conventional tools, currently used for assessments of decay in urban trees, with the electronic nose–a new innovative tool used in diverse fields and industries for various applications such as quality control in manufacturing, environmental monitoring, medical diagnoses, and perfumery. Electronic-nose (e-nose) technologies were tested for the capability of detecting differences in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by wood decay fungi and wood from healthy and decayed trees. Three e-noses, based on different types of operational technologies and analytical methods, were evaluated independently (not directly compared) to determine the feasibility of detecting incipient decays in artificially-inoculated wood. All three e-nose devices were capable of discriminating between healthy and artificially-inoculated, decayed wood with high levels of precision and confidence. The LibraNose quartz microbalance (QMB) e-nose generally provided higher levels of discrimination of sample unknowns, but not necessarily more accurate or effective detection than the AromaScan A32S conducting polymer and PEN3 metal-oxide (MOS) gas sensor e-noses for identifying and distinguishing woody samples containing different agents of wood decay. However, the conducting polymer e-nose had the greater advantage for identifying unknowns from diverse woody sample types due to the associated software capability of utilizing prior-developed, application-specific reference libraries with

  16. Electronic noses and their applications in environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hashem, S.; Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Kangas, L.J.

    1995-12-31

    Compact, portable systems capable of quickly identifying contaminants in the field are of great importance when monitoring the environment. In this paper, we examine the effectiveness of using artificial neural networks for real-time data analysis of a sensor array. Analyzing the sensor data in parallel may allow for rapid identification of contaminants in the field without requiring highly selective component sensors. A sensor array combined with a data analysis module is referred to as an electronic nose. In this paper, we investigate the trade off between sensor sensitivity and selectivity relating to the applications of neural network based-electronic noses in environmental monitoring. We use a prototype electronic nose which consists of nine tin-oxide Taguchi-type sensors, a temperature sensor, and a humidity sensor. We illustrate that by using neural network based analysis of a sensor data, the selectivity of a sensor array may be significantly improved, especially when some (or all) sensors are not highly selective.

  17. Determination of authenticity of brand perfume using electronic nose prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebicki, Jacek; Szulczynski, Bartosz; Kaminski, Marian

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the practical application of an electronic nose technique for fast and efficient discrimination between authentic and fake perfume samples. Two self-built electronic nose prototypes equipped with a set of semiconductor sensors were employed for that purpose. Additionally 10 volunteers took part in the sensory analysis. The following perfumes and their fake counterparts were analysed: Dior—Fahrenheit, Eisenberg—J’ose, YSL—La nuit de L’homme, 7 Loewe and Spice Bomb. The investigations were carried out using the headspace of the aqueous solutions. Data analysis utilized multidimensional techniques: principle component analysis (PCA), linear discrimination analysis (LDA), k-nearest neighbour (k-NN). The results obtained confirmed the legitimacy of the electronic nose technique as an alternative to the sensory analysis as far as the determination of authenticity of perfume is concerned.

  18. Future applications of electronic-nose technologies in healthcare and biomedicine

    Treesearch

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2011-01-01

    The development and utilization of many new electronic-nose (e-nose) applications in the healthcare and biomedical fields have continued to rapidly accelerate over the past 20 years. Innovative e-nose technologies are providing unique solutions to a diversity of complex problems in biomedicine that are now coming to fruition. A wide range of electronic-nose instrument...

  19. Increasing Electronic Nose Recognition Ability by Laser Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejandra, Massacane; Juan, Vorobioff; Karina, Pierpauli; Norberto, Boggio; Silvia, Reich; Carlos, Rinaldi; Alfredo, Boselli; Alberto, Lamagna; Laura, Azcárate M.; Jorge, Codnia; Francisco, Manzano

    2009-05-01

    We present a method to increase the capability of an electronic nose to discriminate between a priori similar odours. We analyze the case of olive oil because it is well known that the characteristics of its aroma impair in many cases the discrimination between different kinds of olive oils especially when they are from similar geographic regions. In the present work we study how to improve the electronic nose performance for the above mentioned discrimination by the use of two IR laser wavelengths for vaporization.

  20. Clinical evaluation of the electronic nose in the diagnosis of ear, nose and throat infection: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Shykhon, M E; Morgan, D W; Dutta, R; Hines, E L; Gardner, J W

    2004-09-01

    The term electronic nose describes an electronic system that is able to mimic the human sense of smell. Electronic noses have been developed over the last 10 or more years to perform a variety of identification tasks in various industries. More recently electronic noses have attracted new interest in their application in the field of medical diagnosis. The aim of this study is to explore the use of an electronic nose to identify and classify pathogens associated with ear, nose and throat (ENT) infections. In this study 90 bacterial swab samples were collected from 90 patients with ENT infections. Some of these samples were analysed immediately with a commercial electronic nose (Cyranose C320). Similar numbers of swabs were also taken from the same site of infection and were sent for microbiology culture and sensitivity. The electronic nose diagnosis was compared with the microbiology diagnosis and it was found that the electronic nose diagnosis was correct in 88.2 per cent of the cases, which is an encouraging result.

  1. High-Temperature Gas Sensor Array (Electronic Nose) Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to measure emissions from aeronautic engines and in commercial applications such as automotive emission control and chemical process monitoring is a necessary first step if one is going to actively control those emissions. One single sensor will not give all the information necessary to determine the chemical composition of a high-temperature, harsh environment. Rather, an array of gas sensor arrays--in effect, a high-temperature electronic "nose"--is necessary to characterize the chemical constituents of a diverse, high-temperature environment, such as an emissions stream. The signals produced by this nose could be analyzed to determine the constituents of the emission stream. Although commercial electronic noses for near-room temperature applications exist, they often depend significantly on lower temperature materials or only one sensor type. A separate development effort necessary for a high-temperature electronic nose is being undertaken by the NASA Glenn Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio State University, and Makel Engineering, Inc. The sensors are specially designed for hightemperature environments. A first-generation high-temperature electronic nose has been demonstrated on a modified automotive engine. This nose sensor array was composed of sensors designed for hightemperature environments fabricated using microelectromechanical-systems- (MEMS-) based technology. The array included a tin-oxide-based sensor doped for nitrogen oxide (NOx) sensitivity, a SiC-based hydrocarbon (CxHy) sensor, and an oxygen sensor (O2). These sensors operate on different principles--resistor, diode, and electrochemical cell, respectively--and each sensor has very different responses to the individual gases in the environment. A picture showing the sensor head for the array is shown in the photograph on the left and the sensors installed in the engine are shown in the photograph on the right. Electronics are interfaced with the sensors for

  2. A Portable Electronic Nose For Hydrazine and Monomethyl Hydrazine Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca C.; Linnell, Bruce R.; Peterson, Barbara V.; Brooks, Kathy B.; Griffin, Tim P.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Program and military use large quantities Hydrazine (Hz) and monomethyl hydrazine (MMI-I) as rocket propellant. These substances are very toxic and are suspected human carcinogens. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienist set the threshold limit value to be 10 parts per billion (ppb). Current off-the-shelf portable instruments require 10 to 20 minutes of exposure to detect 10 ppb concentration. This shortcofriing is not acceptable for many operations. A new prototype instrument using a gas sensor array and pattern recognition software technology (i.e., an electronic nose) has demonstrated the ability to identify either Hz or MM}{ and quantify their concentrations at 10 parts per billion in 90 seconds. This paper describes the design of the portable electronic nose (e-nose) instrument, test equipment setup, test protocol, pattern recognition algorithm, concentration estimation method, and laboratory test results.

  3. Assessment of compost maturity by using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    López, Rafael; Giráldez, Inmaculada; Palma, Alberto; Jesús Díaz, M

    2016-02-01

    The composting process produces and emits hundreds of different gases. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can provide information about progress of composting process. This paper is focused on the qualitative and quantitative relationships between compost age, as sign of compost maturity, electronic-nose (e-nose) patterns and composition of compost and composting gas at an industrial scale plant. Gas and compost samples were taken at different depths from composting windrows of different ages. Temperature, classical chemical parameters, O2, CO, combustible gases, VOCs and e-nose profiles were determined and related using principal component analysis (PCA). Factor analysis carried out to a data set including compost physical-chemical properties, pile pore gas composition and composting time led to few factors, each one grouping together standard composting parameters in an easy to understand way. PCA obtained from e-nose profiles allowed the classifying of piles, their aerobic-anaerobic condition, and a rough estimation of the composting time. That would allow for immediate and in-situ assessment of compost quality and maturity by using an on-line e-nose. The e-nose patterns required only 3-4 sensor signals to account for a great percentage (97-98%) of data variance. The achieved patterns both from compost (chemical analysis) and gas (e-nose analysis) samples are robust despite the high variability in feedstock characteristics (3 different materials), composting conditions and long composting time. GC-MS chromatograms supported the patterns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation of a Nanowire Electronic Nose by Computer Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-14

    for explosives, monitoring food quality and testing human breath for signs of disease are some of the applications of electronic noses. The ideal...19 3.3.1 InAs and InP Structures Used For DFT Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.3.2 The Choice ...22 3.3.4 The Choice of Basis Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 4 Results and

  5. Using Electronic Noses to Detect Tumors During Neurosurgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Lara, Liana M.; Kateb, Babak; Chen, Mike

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed to develop special-purpose electronic noses and algorithms for processing the digitized outputs of the electronic noses for determining whether tissue exposed during neurosurgery is cancerous. At present, visual inspection by a surgeon is the only available intraoperative technique for detecting cancerous tissue. Implementation of the proposal would help to satisfy a desire, expressed by some neurosurgeons, for an intraoperative technique for determining whether all of a brain tumor has been removed. The electronic-nose technique could complement multimodal imaging techniques, which have also been proposed as means of detecting cancerous tissue. There are also other potential applications of the electronic-nose technique in general diagnosis of abnormal tissue. In preliminary experiments performed to assess the viability of the proposal, the problem of distinguishing between different types of cultured cells was substituted for the problem of distinguishing between normal and abnormal specimens of the same type of tissue. The figure presents data from one experiment, illustrating differences between patterns that could be used to distinguish between two types of cultured cancer cells. Further development can be expected to include studies directed toward answering questions concerning not only the possibility of distinguishing among various types of normal and abnormal tissue but also distinguishing between tissues of interest and other odorous substances that may be present in medical settings.

  6. Electronic Nose Based on an Optimized Competition Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Men, Hong; Liu, Haiyan; Pan, Yunpeng; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Haiping

    2011-01-01

    In view of the fact that there are disadvantages in that the class number must be determined in advance, the value of learning rates are hard to fix, etc., when using traditional competitive neural networks (CNNs) in electronic noses (E-noses), an optimized CNN method was presented. The optimized CNN was established on the basis of the optimum class number of samples according to the changes of the Davies and Bouldin (DB) value and it could increase, divide, or delete neurons in order to adjust the number of neurons automatically. Moreover, the learning rate changes according to the variety of training times of each sample. The traditional CNN and the optimized CNN were applied to five kinds of sorted vinegars with an E-nose. The results showed that optimized network structures could adjust the number of clusters dynamically and resulted in good classifications. PMID:22163887

  7. Compensating for Effects of Humidity on Electronic Noses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie; Ryan, Margaret A.; Manatt, Kenneth; Zhou, Hanying; Manfreda, Allison

    2004-01-01

    A method of compensating for the effects of humidity on the readouts of electronic noses has been devised and tested. The method is especially appropriate for use in environments in which humidity is not or cannot be controlled for example, in the vicinity of a chemical spill, which can be accompanied by large local changes in humidity. Heretofore, it has been common practice to treat water vapor as merely another analyte, the concentration of which is determined, along with that of the other analytes, in a computational process based on deconvolution. This practice works well, but leaves room for improvement: changes in humidity can give rise to large changes in electronic-nose responses. If corrections for humidity are not made, the large humidity-induced responses may swamp smaller responses associated with low concentrations of analytes. The present method offers an improvement. The underlying concept is simple: One augments an electronic nose with a separate humidity and a separate temperature sensor. The outputs of the humidity and temperature sensors are used to generate values that are subtracted from the readings of the other sensors in an electronic nose to correct for the temperature-dependent contributions of humidity to those readings. Hence, in principle, what remains after corrections are the contributions of the analytes only. Laboratory experiments on a first-generation electronic nose have shown that this method is effective and improves the success rate of identification of analyte/ water mixtures. Work on a second-generation device was in progress at the time of reporting the information for this article.

  8. Novel materials and applications of electronic noses and tongues.

    PubMed

    Gouma, Perena; Sberveglieri, Giorgio

    2004-10-01

    This introductory article describes the content of the October 2004 issue of MRS Bulletin focusing on novel materials and applications of electronic noses and tongues. The articles in this issue review the state of the art in materials, devices, and data processing algorithms used in electronic olfaction and taste systems. The most common gas- and liquid-phase analyte detection tools are presented and compared with traditional chemical analysis instrumentation such as gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy systems. Metal oxides, polymer/polymer composites, and dyes are covered in these articles as key sensing materials. Resistive, optical, electrochemical, and other types of electronic nose and tongue systems are reviewed, and their use in diverse applications, including environmental and food-quality monitoring and medical diagnostics, is discussed.

  9. The Electronic Nose: A Protocol To Evaluate Fresh Meat Flavor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isoppo, S.; Cornale, P.; Barbera, S.

    2009-05-01

    An Electronic Nose, comprising 10 MOS, was used to carry out meat aroma measurements in order to define an analytical protocol. Every meat sample (Longissimus Dorsi) was tested before, during and after cooking in oven (at 165° C for 600 seconds). Analysis took place in these three steps because consumers perceive odor when they buy (raw aroma), cook (cooking aroma) and eat meat (cooked aroma). Therefore these tests permitted to obtain a protocol useful to measure aroma daily perceived by meat eater.

  10. Identification of sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma using an electronic nose

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xia; Wan, Jun; Chu, Liang; Liu, Wengang; Jing, Yafeng; Wu, Chunjie

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pinelliae Rhizoma is a commonly used Chinese herb which will change brown during the natural drying process. However, sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma will get a better appearance than naturally dried one. Sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma is potentially toxical due to sulfur dioxide and sulfites formed during the fuming procedures. The odor components in sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma is complex. At present, there is no analytical method available to determine sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma simply and rapidly. To ensure medication safety, it is highly desirable to have an effective and simple method to identify sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma. Materials and Methods: This paper presents a novel approach using an electronic nose based on metal oxide sensors to identify whether Pinelliae Rhizoma was fumed with sulfur, and to predict the fuming degree of Pinelliae Rhizoma. Multivariate statistical methods such as principal components analysis (PCA), discriminant factorial analysis (DFA) and partial least squares (PLS) were used for data analyzing and identification. The use of the electronic nose to discriminate between different fuming degrees Pinelliae Rhizoma and naturally dried Pinelliae Rhizoma was demonstrated. Results: The electronic nose was also successfully applied to identify unknown samples including sulfur fumed samples and naturally dried samples, high recognition value was obtained. Quantitative analysis of fuming degree of Pinelliae Rhizoma was also demonstrated. The method developed is simple and fast, which provides a new quality control method of Chinese herbs from the aspect of odor. Conclusion: It has shown that this electronic nose based metal oxide sensor is sensitive to sulfur and sulfides. We suggest that it can serve as a supportive method to detect residual sulfur and sulfides. PMID:24914293

  11. Classification of buildings mold threat using electronic nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łagód, Grzegorz; Suchorab, Zbigniew; Guz, Łukasz; Sobczuk, Henryk

    2017-07-01

    Mold is considered to be one of the most important features of Sick Building Syndrome and is an important problem in current building industry. In many cases it is caused by the rising moisture of building envelopes surface and exaggerated humidity of indoor air. Concerning historical buildings it is mostly caused by outdated raising techniques among that is absence of horizontal isolation against moisture and hygroscopic materials applied for construction. Recent buildings also suffer problem of mold risk which is caused in many cases by hermetization leading to improper performance of gravitational ventilation systems that make suitable conditions for mold development. Basing on our research there is proposed a method of buildings mold threat classification using electronic nose, based on a gas sensors array which consists of MOS sensors (metal oxide semiconductor). Used device is frequently applied for air quality assessment in environmental engineering branches. Presented results show the interpretation of e-nose readouts of indoor air sampled in rooms threatened with mold development in comparison with clean reference rooms and synthetic air. Obtained multivariate data were processed, visualized and classified using a PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and ANN (Artificial Neural Network) methods. Described investigation confirmed that electronic nose - gas sensors array supported with data processing enables to classify air samples taken from different rooms affected with mold.

  12. Diverse Applications of Electronic-Nose Technologies in Agriculture and Forestry

    Treesearch

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Electronic-nose (e-nose) instruments, derived from numerous types of aroma-sensor technologies, have been developed for a diversity of applications in the broad fields of agriculture and forestry. Recent advances in e-nose technologies within the plant sciences, including improvements in gas-sensor designs, innovations in data analysis and pattern-recognition...

  13. Review of electronic-nose technologies and algorithms to detect hazardous chemicals in the environment

    Treesearch

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Novel mobile electronic-nose (e-nose) devices and algorithms capable of real-time detection of industrial and municipal pollutants, released from point-sources, recently have been developed by scientists worldwide that are useful for monitoring specific environmental-pollutant levels for enforcement and implementation of effective pollution-abatement programs. E-nose...

  14. Classification of white wine aromas with an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Lozano, J; Santos, J P; Horrillo, M C

    2005-09-15

    This paper reports the use of a tin dioxide multisensor array based electronic nose for recognition of 29 typical aromas in white wine. Headspace technique has been used to extract aroma of the wine. Multivariate analysis, including principal component analysis (PCA) as well as probabilistic neural networks (PNNs), has been used to identify the main aroma added to the wine. The results showed that in spite of the strong influence of ethanol and other majority compounds of wine, the system could discriminate correctly the aromatic compounds added to the wine with a minimum accuracy of 97.2%.

  15. Graphene-Based Chemical Vapor Sensors for Electronic Nose Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallon, Eric C.

    An electronic nose (e-nose) is a biologically inspired device designed to mimic the operation of the olfactory system. The e-nose utilizes a chemical sensor array consisting of broadly responsive vapor sensors, whose combined response produces a unique pattern for a given compound or mixture. The sensor array is inspired by the biological function of the receptor neurons found in the human olfactory system, which are inherently cross-reactive and respond to many different compounds. The use of an e-nose is an attractive approach to predict unknown odors and is used in many fields for quantitative and qualitative analysis. If properly designed, an e-nose has the potential to adapt to new odors it was not originally designed for through laboratory training and algorithm updates. This would eliminate the lengthy and costly R&D costs associated with materiel and product development. Although e-nose technology has been around for over two decades, much research is still being undertaken in order to find new and more diverse types of sensors. Graphene is a single-layer, 2D material comprised of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, with extraordinary electrical, mechanical, thermal and optical properties due to its 2D, sp2-bonded structure. Graphene has much potential as a chemical sensing material due to its 2D structure, which provides a surface entirely exposed to its surrounding environment. In this configuration, every carbon atom in graphene is a surface atom, providing the greatest possible surface area per unit volume, so that electron transport is highly sensitive to adsorbed molecular species. Graphene has gained much attention since its discovery in 2004, but has not been realized in many commercial electronics. It has the potential to be a revolutionary material for use in chemical sensors due to its excellent conductivity, large surface area, low noise, and versatile surface for functionalization. In this work, graphene is incorporated into a

  16. Estimation of bacteriological spoilage of pork cutlets by electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Kinga M; Seregély, Zs; Dalmadi, I; Andrássy, Eva; Farkas, J

    2007-06-01

    The utility of chemosensor array (EN) signals of head-space volatiles of aerobically stored pork cutlets as a non-invasive technique for monitoring their microbiological load was studied during storage at 4, 8 and 12 degrees C, respectively. The bacteriological quality of the meat samples was determined by standard total aerobic plate counts (TAPC) and colony count of selectively estimated Pseudomonas (PS) spp., the predominant aerobic spoilage bacteria. Statistical analysis of the electronic nose measurements were principal component analysis (PCA), and canonical discriminant analysis (CDA). Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to model correlation between microbial loads and EN signal responses, the degree of bacteriological spoilage, independently of the temperature of the refrigerated storage. Sensor selection techniques were applied to reduce the dimensionality and more robust calibration models were computed by determining few individual sensors having the smallest cross correlations and highest correlations with the reference data. Correlations between the predicted and "real" values were given on cross-validated data from both data reduced models and for full calibrations using the 23 sensor elements. At the same time, sensorial quality of the raw cutlets was noted subjectively on faultiness of the odour and colour, and drip formation of the samples. These preliminary studies indicated that the electronic nose technique has a potential to detect bacteriological spoilage earlier or at the same time as olfactory quality deterioration.

  17. Software Compensates Electronic-Nose Readings for Humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Hanying

    2007-01-01

    A computer program corrects for the effects of humidity on the readouts of an array of chemical sensors (an "electronic nose"). To enable the use of this program, the array must incorporate an independent humidity sensor in addition to sensors designed to detect analytes other than water vapor. The basic principle of the program was described in "Compensating for Effects of Humidity on Electronic Noses" (NPO-30615), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 6 (June 2004), page 63. To recapitulate: The output of the humidity sensor is used to generate values that are subtracted from the outputs of the other sensors to correct for contributions of humidity to those readings. Hence, in principle, what remains after corrections are the contributions of the analytes only. The outputs of the non-humidity sensors are then deconvolved to obtain the concentrations of the analytes. In addition, the humidity reading is retained as an analyte reading in its own right. This subtraction of the humidity background increases the ability of the software to identify such events as spills in which contaminants may be present in small concentrations and accompanied by large changes in humidity.

  18. Chemiresistive Electronic Nose toward Detection of Biomarkers in Exhaled Breath.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hi Gyu; Jung, Youngmo; Han, Soo Deok; Shim, Young-Seok; Shin, Beomju; Lee, Taikjin; Kim, Jin-Sang; Lee, Seok; Jun, Seong Chan; Park, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Chulki; Kang, Chong-Yun

    2016-08-17

    Detection of gas-phase chemicals finds a wide variety of applications, including food and beverages, fragrances, environmental monitoring, chemical and biochemical processing, medical diagnostics, and transportation. One approach for these tasks is to use arrays of highly sensitive and selective sensors as an electronic nose. Here, we present a high performance chemiresistive electronic nose (CEN) based on an array of metal oxide thin films, metal-catalyzed thin films, and nanostructured thin films. The gas sensing properties of the CEN show enhanced sensitive detection of H2S, NH3, and NO in an 80% relative humidity (RH) atmosphere similar to the composition of exhaled breath. The detection limits of the sensor elements we fabricated are in the following ranges: 534 ppt to 2.87 ppb for H2S, 4.45 to 42.29 ppb for NH3, and 206 ppt to 2.06 ppb for NO. The enhanced sensitivity is attributed to the spillover effect by Au nanoparticles and the high porosity of villi-like nanostructures, providing a large surface-to-volume ratio. The remarkable selectivity based on the collection of sensor responses manifests itself in the principal component analysis (PCA). The excellent sensing performance indicates that the CEN can detect the biomarkers of H2S, NH3, and NO in exhaled breath and even distinguish them clearly in the PCA. Our results show high potential of the CEN as an inexpensive and noninvasive diagnostic tool for halitosis, kidney disorder, and asthma.

  19. Electronic noses and tongues: applications for the food and pharmaceutical industries.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Elizabeth A; Bai, Jinhe; Plotto, Anne; Dea, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The electronic nose (e-nose) is designed to crudely mimic the mammalian nose in that most contain sensors that non-selectively interact with odor molecules to produce some sort of signal that is then sent to a computer that uses multivariate statistics to determine patterns in the data. This pattern recognition is used to determine that one sample is similar or different from another based on headspace volatiles. There are different types of e-nose sensors including organic polymers, metal oxides, quartz crystal microbalance and even gas-chromatography (GC) or combined with mass spectroscopy (MS) can be used in a non-selective manner using chemical mass or patterns from a short GC column as an e-nose or "Z" nose. The electronic tongue reacts similarly to non-volatile compounds in a liquid. This review will concentrate on applications of e-nose and e-tongue technology for edible products and pharmaceutical uses.

  20. Electronic Noses for Composites Surface Contamination Detection in Aerospace Industry

    PubMed Central

    De Vito, Saverio; Miglietta, Maria Lucia; Massera, Ettore; Fattoruso, Grazia; Formisano, Fabrizio; Polichetti, Tiziana; Salvato, Maria; Alfano, Brigida; Esposito, Elena; Di Francia, Girolamo

    2017-01-01

    The full exploitation of Composite Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) in so-called green aircrafts design is still limited by the lack of adequate quality assurance procedures for checking the adhesive bonding assembly, especially in load-critical primary structures. In this respect, contamination of the CFRP panel surface is of significant concern since it may severely affect the bonding and the mechanical properties of the joint. During the last years, the authors have developed and tested an electronic nose as a non-destructive tool for pre-bonding surface inspection for contaminants detection, identification and quantification. Several sensors and sampling architectures have been screened in view of the high Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scenarios requirements. Ad-hoc pattern recognition systems have also been devised to ensure a fast and reliable assessment of the contamination status, by combining real time classifiers and the implementation of a suitable rejection option. Results show that e-noses could be used as first line low cost Non Destructive Test (NDT) tool in aerospace CFRP assembly and maintenance scenarios. PMID:28368338

  1. Electronic Noses for Composites Surface Contamination Detection in Aerospace Industry.

    PubMed

    Vito, Saverio De; Miglietta, Maria Lucia; Massera, Ettore; Fattoruso, Grazia; Formisano, Fabrizio; Polichetti, Tiziana; Salvato, Maria; Alfano, Brigida; Esposito, Elena; Francia, Girolamo Di

    2017-04-02

    The full exploitation of Composite Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) in so-called green aircrafts design is still limited by the lack of adequate quality assurance procedures for checking the adhesive bonding assembly, especially in load-critical primary structures. In this respect, contamination of the CFRP panel surface is of significant concern since it may severely affect the bonding and the mechanical properties of the joint. During the last years, the authors have developed and tested an electronic nose as a non-destructive tool for pre-bonding surface inspection for contaminants detection, identification and quantification. Several sensors and sampling architectures have been screened in view of the high Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scenarios requirements. Ad-hoc pattern recognition systems have also been devised to ensure a fast and reliable assessment of the contamination status, by combining real time classifiers and the implementation of a suitable rejection option. Results show that e-noses could be used as first line low cost Non Destructive Test (NDT) tool in aerospace CFRP assembly and maintenance scenarios.

  2. Signal processing inspired from the olfactory bulb for electronic noses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ya-Qi; Meng, Qing-Hao; Qi, Pei-Feng; Zeng, Ming; Liu, Ying-Jie

    2017-01-01

    A bio-inspired signal processing method is proposed for electronic noses (e-noses). The proposed method contains an olfactory bulb model and a feature generation step. The structure of the olfactory bulb model is similar to the anatomical structure of mammals’ olfactory bulb. It consists of olfactory receptor neurons, mitral cells, granule cells, periglomerular cells, and short axon cells. This model uses gas sensors’ original response curves and transforms them to neuron spiking series no matter what kind the response curve is. This largely simplifies the follow-up feature generation step. Recurrence quantification analysis is employed to perform feature generation and the five most important features are selected. Finally, in order to verify the performance of the proposed method, seven kinds of Chinese liquors are tested and three classification methods are used to classify them. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method has a higher classification rate (99.05%) and also a steadier performance with the change of sensor number and types than the classic one.

  3. Quantitative determination of Freon gas using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lijing; Zhang, Liangyi; Zhou, Feng; Lu, Yu; Yang, Pengyuan

    2002-06-01

    This paper reports a quantitative electronic nose (enose) for the quantitative determination of Freon gas within the concentration range 0-1000 ppm in the presence of interfering gases such as water, lubricant and petrol vapours. This quantitative enose is a new type of Freon detection system, composed of an array of four sensors. The artificial neural network (ANN) and fuzzy logic type of ANN (FNN), in combination with the relative error concept in analytical chemistry, are integrated for both quantification and discrimination. The predicted results are satisfied with a pass rate of > 80% within the permitted relative errors. The results show that the Freon enose developed in this study is reliable for both the qualitative and quantitative determination of Freon gas and exhibits the merits of high sensitivity, anti-interference and accuracy.

  4. Industrial Applications of Electronic Nose Technology in the Textiles Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Tim; Chandler, Rob; Hallam, Viv; Simpson, Claire; Bentham, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Electronic nose technology has been available commercially for over 12 years but uptake in actual industrial applications has yet to be fully realised. We report 2 specific test protocols being used in the textiles industry that allow the direct measurement of anti-odour and anti-microbial capabilities of fabrics. Results will be shown for the standard anti-odour test which was specifically commissioned by Courtaulds PLC and which is being used by a number of manufacturers. The second test, which measures the anti-microbial and the anti-odour capabilities of fabrics simultaneously was developed in 2008. Results will be shown that clearly indicate both parameters are detected and proofs of anti-microbial capabilities will be given. These 2 tests will for the first time, enable the fulfillment of legislation that states for textile product claims, anti-odour and anti-microbial capabilities of fabrics must be scientifically substantiated.

  5. Results from the Space Shuttle STS-95 Electronic Nose Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Buehler, M. G.; Homer, M. L.; Mannatt, K. S.; Lau, B.; Jackson, S.; Zhou, H.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature electronic nose in which the sensing media are insulating polymers loaded with carbon black as a conductive medium has been designed and built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The ENose has a volume of 1700 cc, weighs 1.4 kg including the operating computer, and uses 1.5 W average power (3 W peak power). This ENose was used in a demonstration experiment aboard STS-95 (October, 1998), in which the ENose was operated continuously for six days and recorded the sensors' response to the air in the middeck. The ENose was designed to detect ten common contaminants in space shuttle crew quarters air. The experiment was controlled by collecting air samples daily and analyzing them using standard analytical techniques after the flight. Changes in humidity were detected and quantified, neither the ENose nor the air samples detected any of the contaminants on the target list. The device is microgravity insensitive.

  6. Electronic Nose To Detect Patients with COPD From Exhaled Breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velásquez, Adriana; Durán, Cristhian M.; Gualdron, Oscar; Rodríguez, Juan C.; Manjarres, Leonardo

    2009-05-01

    To date, there is no effective tool analysis and detection of COPD syndrome, (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) which is linked to smoking and, less frequently to toxic substances such as, the wood smoke or other particles produced by noxious gases. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates of this disease show it affects more than 52 million people and kills more than 2.7 million human beings each year. In order to solve the problem, a low-cost Electronic Nose (EN) was developed at the University of Pamplona (N. S) Colombia, for this specific purpose and was applied to a sample group of patients with COPD as well as to others who were healthy. From the exhalation breath samples of these patients, the results were as expected; an appropriate classification of the patients with the disease, as well as from the healthy group was obtained.

  7. Electronic Nose For Measuring Wine Evolution In Wine Cellars

    SciTech Connect

    Lozano, J.

    2009-05-23

    An electronic nose installed in a wine cellar for measuring the wine evolution is presented in this paper. The system extract the aroma directly from the tanks where wine is stored and carry the volatile compounds to the sensors cell. A tin oxide multisensor, prepared with RF sputtering onto an alumina substrate and doped with chromium and indium, is used. The whole system is fully automated and controlled by computer and can be supervised by internet. Linear techniques like principal component analysis (PCA) and nonlinear ones like probabilistic neural networks (PNN) are used for pattern recognition. Results show that system can detect the evolution of two different wines along 9 months stored in tanks. This system could be trained to detect off-odours of wine and warn the wine expert to correct it as soon as possible, improving the final quality of wine.

  8. Electronic Nose For Measuring Wine Evolution In Wine Cellars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, J.; Santos, J. P.; Horrillo, M. C.; Cabellos, J. M.; Arroyo, T.

    2009-05-01

    An electronic nose installed in a wine cellar for measuring the wine evolution is presented in this paper. The system extract the aroma directly from the tanks where wine is stored and carry the volatile compounds to the sensors cell. A tin oxide multisensor, prepared with RF sputtering onto an alumina substrate and doped with chromium and indium, is used. The whole system is fully automated and controlled by computer and can be supervised by internet. Linear techniques like principal component analysis (PCA) and nonlinear ones like probabilistic neural networks (PNN) are used for pattern recognition. Results show that system can detect the evolution of two different wines along 9 months stored in tanks. This system could be trained to detect off-odours of wine and warn the wine expert to correct it as soon as possible, improving the final quality of wine.

  9. Portable Electronic Nose to Discriminate Artificial Aged Wine from Barrel-Aged Wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J. P.; Cabellos, J. M.; Arroyo, T.; Horrillo, M. C.

    2011-09-01

    A novel portable electronic nose is presented as a fast tool to differentiate traditional aged wines from artificial aged wines. The instrument we have developed for testing the wines is a general purpose wireless portable electronic nose base on micromechanical tin oxide sensors. This system may discriminate among the wine samples obtained with the different aging methods.

  10. Recent progress in the design and clinical development of electronic-nose technologies

    Treesearch

    Dan Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Electronic-nose (e-nose) devices are instruments designed to detect and discriminate between precise complex gaseous mixtures of volatile organic compounds derived from specific organic sources, such as clinical test samples from patients, based on electronic aroma signature patterns (distinct digital sensor responses) resulting from the combined outputs of a...

  11. Sensing a Changing Chemical Mixture Using an Electronic Nose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan; Ryan, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    A method of using an electronic nose to detect an airborne mixture of known chemical compounds and measure the temporally varying concentrations of the individual compounds is undergoing development. In a typical intended application, the method would be used to monitor the air in an inhabited space (e.g., the interior of a building) for the release of solvents, toxic fumes, and other compounds that are regarded as contaminants. At the present state of development, the method affords a capability for identifying and quantitating one or two compounds that are members of a set of some number (typically of the order of a dozen) known compounds. In principle, the method could be extended to enable monitoring of more than two compounds. An electronic nose consists of an array of sensors, typically made from polymer carbon composites, the electrical resistances of which change upon exposure to a variety of chemicals. By design, each sensor is unique in its responses to these chemicals: some or all of the sensitivities of a given sensor to the various vapors differ from the corresponding sensitivities of other sensors. In general, the responses of the sensors are nonlinear functions of the concentrations of the chemicals. Hence, mathematically, the monitoring problem is to solve the set of time-dependent nonlinear equations for the sensor responses to obtain the time dependent concentrations of individual compounds. In the present developmental method, successive approximations of the solution are generated by a learning algorithm based on independent-component analysis (ICA) an established information theoretic approach for transforming a vector of observed interdependent signals into a set of signals that are as nearly statistically independent as possible.

  12. Metal oxide sensors for electronic noses and their application to food analysis.

    PubMed

    Berna, Amalia

    2010-01-01

    Electronic noses (E-noses) use various types of electronic gas sensors that have partial specificity. This review focuses on commercial and experimental E-noses that use metal oxide semi-conductors. The review covers quality control applications to food and beverages, including determination of freshness and identification of contaminants or adulteration. Applications of E-noses to a wide range of foods and beverages are considered, including: meat, fish, grains, alcoholic drinks, non-alcoholic drinks, fruits, milk and dairy products, olive oils, nuts, fresh vegetables and eggs.

  13. Metal Oxide Sensors for Electronic Noses and Their Application to Food Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Amalia

    2010-01-01

    Electronic noses (E-noses) use various types of electronic gas sensors that have partial specificity. This review focuses on commercial and experimental E-noses that use metal oxide semi-conductors. The review covers quality control applications to food and beverages, including determination of freshness and identification of contaminants or adulteration. Applications of E-noses to a wide range of foods and beverages are considered, including: meat, fish, grains, alcoholic drinks, non-alcoholic drinks, fruits, milk and dairy products, olive oils, nuts, fresh vegetables and eggs. PMID:22319332

  14. Molecular modeling of polymer composite-analyte interactions in electronic nose sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Manfreda, A. M.; Zhou, H.; Manatt, K. S.

    2003-01-01

    We report a molecular modeling study to investigate the polymer-carbon black (CB) composite-analyte interactions in resistive sensors. These sensors comprise the JPL electronic nose (ENose) sensing array developed for monitoring breathing air in human habitats. The polymer in the composite is modeled based on its stereoisomerism and sequence isomerism, while the CB is modeled as uncharged naphthalene rings with no hydrogens. The Dreiding 2.21 force field is used for the polymer, solvent molecules and graphite parameters are assigned to the carbon black atoms. A combination of molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (NPT-MD and NVT-MD) techniques are used to obtain the equilibrium composite structure by inserting naphthalene rings in the polymer matrix. Polymers considered for this work include poly(4-vinylphenol), polyethylene oxide, and ethyl cellulose. Analytes studied are representative of both inorganic and organic compounds. The results are analyzed for the composite microstructure by calculating the radial distribution profiles as well as for the sensor response by predicting the interaction energies of the analytes with the composites. c2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular modeling of polymer composite-analyte interactions in electronic nose sensors.

    PubMed

    Shevade, A V; Ryan, M A; Homer, M L; Manfreda, A M; Zhou, H; Manatt, K S

    2003-08-01

    We report a molecular modeling study to investigate the polymer-carbon black (CB) composite-analyte interactions in resistive sensors. These sensors comprise the JPL electronic nose (ENose) sensing array developed for monitoring breathing air in human habitats. The polymer in the composite is modeled based on its stereoisomerism and sequence isomerism, while the CB is modeled as uncharged naphthalene rings with no hydrogens. The Dreiding 2.21 force field is used for the polymer, solvent molecules and graphite parameters are assigned to the carbon black atoms. A combination of molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (NPT-MD and NVT-MD) techniques are used to obtain the equilibrium composite structure by inserting naphthalene rings in the polymer matrix. Polymers considered for this work include poly(4-vinylphenol), polyethylene oxide, and ethyl cellulose. Analytes studied are representative of both inorganic and organic compounds. The results are analyzed for the composite microstructure by calculating the radial distribution profiles as well as for the sensor response by predicting the interaction energies of the analytes with the composites.

  16. Molecular modeling of polymer composite-analyte interactions in electronic nose sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Manfreda, A. M.; Zhou, H.; Manatt, K. S.

    2003-01-01

    We report a molecular modeling study to investigate the polymer-carbon black (CB) composite-analyte interactions in resistive sensors. These sensors comprise the JPL electronic nose (ENose) sensing array developed for monitoring breathing air in human habitats. The polymer in the composite is modeled based on its stereoisomerism and sequence isomerism, while the CB is modeled as uncharged naphthalene rings with no hydrogens. The Dreiding 2.21 force field is used for the polymer, solvent molecules and graphite parameters are assigned to the carbon black atoms. A combination of molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (NPT-MD and NVT-MD) techniques are used to obtain the equilibrium composite structure by inserting naphthalene rings in the polymer matrix. Polymers considered for this work include poly(4-vinylphenol), polyethylene oxide, and ethyl cellulose. Analytes studied are representative of both inorganic and organic compounds. The results are analyzed for the composite microstructure by calculating the radial distribution profiles as well as for the sensor response by predicting the interaction energies of the analytes with the composites. c2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of electronic nose for industrial odors and gaseous emissions measurement and monitoring--An overview.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sharvari; Bandyopadhyay, Rajib; Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Pandey, R A; Jana, Arun

    2015-11-01

    The present review evaluates the key modules of the electronic nose, a biomimetic system, with specific examples of applications to industrial emissions monitoring and measurement. Regulations concerning the odor control are becoming very strict, due to ever mounting environmental pollution and its subsequent consequences and it is advantageous to employ real time measurement system. In this perspective, systems like the electronic nose are an improved substitute for assessing the complex industrial emissions over other analytical techniques (odorant concentration measurement) and olfactometry (odor concentration measurement). Compared to tools like gas chromatography, electronic nose systems are easy to develop, are non-destructive and useful for both laboratory and on field purposes. Although there has been immense development of more sensitive and selective sensor arrays and advanced data mining techniques, there have been limited reports on the application of electronic nose for the measurement of industrial emissions. The current study sheds light on the practical applicability of electronic nose for the effective industrial odor and gaseous emissions measurement. The applications categorization is based on gaseous pollutants released from the industries. Calibration and calibration transfer methodologies have been discussed to enhance the applicability of electronic nose system. Further, industrial gas grab sampling technique is reviewed. Lastly, the electronic mucosa system, which has the ability to overcome the flaws of electronic nose system, has been examined. The review ends with the concluding remarks describing the pros and cons of artificial olfaction technique for the industrial applications.

  18. Identification of insecticide residues with a conducting-polymer electronic nose

    Treesearch

    A.D. Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The identification of insecticide residues on crop foliage is needed to make periodic pest management decisions. Electronic-nose (e-nose) methods were developed and tested as a means of acquiring rapid identifications of insecticide residue types at relatively low cost by detection of headspace volatiles released from inert surfaces in vitro. Detection methods were...

  19. Identification and discrimination of herbicide residues using a conducting polymer electronic nose

    Treesearch

    Alphus Dan Wilson

    2016-01-01

    The identification of herbicide residues on crop foliage is necessary to make crop-management decisions for weed pest control and to monitor pesticide residue levels on food crops. Electronic-nose (e-nose) methods were tested as a cheaper, alternative means of discriminating between herbicide residue types (compared with conventional chromatography methods), by...

  20. Design and Implementation of an Electronic Nose System for the Determination of Fish Freshness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masot, Rafael; Alcañiz, Miguel; Pérez-Esteve, Edgar; Barat, José M.; Gil, Luis; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Garcia-Breijo, Eduardo

    2009-05-01

    An electronic nose has been designed to evaluate fish freshness. The e-nose consists of 15 commercial sensors, a home-made data acquisition system and a PC application that communicates with the data acquisition system. The equipment has been conceived so that the sensors can be configured in non-standard operation modes in order to improve the sensors discrimination capabilities.

  1. Can odors of TCM be captured by electronic nose? The novel quality control method for musk by electronic nose coupled with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tao; Jin, Cheng; Zhou, Jian; Li, Xingfeng; Wang, Haitao; Deng, Pingye; Yang, Ying; Wu, Yanwen; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2011-07-15

    Musk is a precious and wide applied material in traditional Chinese medicine, also, an important material for the perfume industry all over the world. To establish a rapid, cost-effective and relatively objective assessment for the quality of musk, different musk samples, including authentic, fake and adulterate, were collected. A oxide sensor based electronic nose (E-nose) was employed to measure the musk samples, the E-nose generated data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA), the responses of 18 sensors of E-nose were evaluated by loading analysis. Results showed that a rapid evaluation of complex response of the samples could be obtained, in combination with PCA and the perception level of the E-nose was given better results in the recognition values of the musk aroma. The authentic, fake and adulterate musk could be distinguished by E-nose coupled with PCA, sensor 2, 3, 5, 12, 15 and 17 were found to be able to better discriminate between musk samples, confirming the potential application of an electronic instrument coupled with chemometrics for a rapid and on-line quality control for the traditional medicines.

  2. Electronic Nose Aided Verification of an Odour Dispersion Model for Composting Plants' Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artoni, Riccardo; Palmeri, Luca; Pittarello, Alberto; Benzo, Maurizio

    2009-05-01

    The dispersion of odour from a composting plant was calculated with the CALPUFF modeling system, where site specific meteorology and geophysical informations were taken into account. The odour emissions, both from forced and free-convection sources, were measured by means of dynamic olfactometry and implemented in the model. The results obtained from the model were verified with a MOS sensor based Electronic Nose equipped with a preconcentrator, placed in two target sites 50 m and 250 m far from the plant. Odour episodes, detected by electronic nose, were compared with model's forecast; a procedure for tuning the model parameters is needed, in order to reproduce Electronic Nose measurements.

  3. Differentiation of red wines using an electronic nose based on surface acoustic wave devices.

    PubMed

    García, M; Fernández, M J; Fontecha, J L; Lozano, J; Santos, J P; Aleixandre, M; Sayago, I; Gutiérrez, J; Horrillo, M C

    2006-02-15

    An electronic nose, utilizing the principle of surface acoustic waves (SAW), was used to differentiate among different wines of the same variety of grapes which come from the same cellar. The electronic nose is based on eight surface acoustic wave sensors, one is a reference sensor and the others are coated by different polymers by spray coating technique. Data analysis was performed by two pattern recognition methods; principal component analysis (PCA) and probabilistic neuronal network (PNN). The results showed that electronic nose was able to identify the tested wines.

  4. Calibration of an electronic nose for poultry farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. H.; Shukor, S. A.; Kamis, M. S.; Shakaff, A. Y. M.; Zakaria, A.; Rahim, N. A.; Mamduh, S. M.; Kamarudin, K.; Saad, F. S. A.; Masnan, M. J.; Mustafa, H.

    2017-03-01

    Malodour from the poultry farms could cause air pollution and therefore potentially dangerous to humans' and animals' health. This issue also poses sustainability risk to the poultry industries due to objections from local community. The aim of this paper is to develop and calibrate a cost effective and efficient electronic nose for poultry farm air monitoring. The instrument main components include sensor chamber, array of specific sensors, microcontroller, signal conditioning circuits and wireless sensor networks. The instrument was calibrated to allow classification of different concentrations of main volatile compounds in the poultry farm malodour. The outcome of the process will also confirm the device's reliability prior to being used for poultry farm malodour assessment. The Multivariate Analysis (HCA and KNN) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) pattern recognition technique was used to process the acquired data. The results show that the instrument is able to calibrate the samples using ANN classification model with high accuracy. The finding verifies the instrument's performance to be used as an effective poultry farm malodour monitoring.

  5. Predicting sporulation events in a bioreactor using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Clemente, J J; Monteiro, S M S; Carrondo, M J T; Cunha, A E

    2008-10-15

    An electronic nose (EN) based on a non- specific multi-sensor array was used to accurately estimate sporulation events and the spore concentration of Bacillus subtilis cultures. The array included 6 metal oxide sensors (MOS), 10 metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET), one CO(2) infrared sensor and one humidity sensor. The EN was used to monitor the gas emissions from B. subtilis bioreactions during both batch and fed-batch operation. The signal pattern produced by the sensors was evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA) and training cultivations were used to build a model. The arc length of the PCA trajectories was successfully correlated to the off-line spore count; a strong linear correlation (R(2) = 0.992) between the numerical integration of the curves and the measured spore concentration was established. The fast responses of the sensors in combination with the robust correlation with the off-line determination of spore concentration establish this EN device as a convenient tool for monitoring sporulation events in bioprocesses. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Improved Classification of Orthosiphon stamineus by Data Fusion of Electronic Nose and Tongue Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Ammar; Shakaff, Ali Yeon Md.; Adom, Abdul Hamid; Ahmad, Mohd Noor; Masnan, Maz Jamilah; Aziz, Abdul Hallis Abdul; Fikri, Nazifah Ahmad; Abdullah, Abu Hassan; Kamarudin, Latifah Munirah

    2010-01-01

    An improved classification of Orthosiphon stamineus using a data fusion technique is presented. Five different commercial sources along with freshly prepared samples were discriminated using an electronic nose (e-nose) and an electronic tongue (e-tongue). Samples from the different commercial brands were evaluated by the e-tongue and then followed by the e-nose. Applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA) separately on the respective e-tongue and e-nose data, only five distinct groups were projected. However, by employing a low level data fusion technique, six distinct groupings were achieved. Hence, this technique can enhance the ability of PCA to analyze the complex samples of Orthosiphon stamineus. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) was then used to further validate and classify the samples. It was found that the LDA performance was also improved when the responses from the e-nose and e-tongue were fused together. PMID:22163381

  7. Electronic nose system combined with membrane interface probe for detection of VOCs in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Junghwan; Howard, Zachary; Kurup, Pradeep

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a novel electronic nose system combined with a membrane interface probe (MIP) for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water. The MIP is an in situ tool that allows the detection of certain VOCs in the soil via a pushed or driven probe. The MIP was combined with a sensor array consisting of four different tin-oxide gas sensors known as an electronic nose (e-nose). The designed e-nose system was calibrated in aqueous media spiked with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-xylene (BTEX) at concentrations of 100, 250, and 500 ppm. Since the experiment was conducted utilizing five repetitions for each analyte, a data set of 60 measurements was prepared for principal components analysis (PCA). The results of the PCA showed that two principal components contain more than 99% variance information and each VOC is separable and detectable by the e-nose.

  8. A Novel Semi-Supervised Electronic Nose Learning Technique: M-Training.

    PubMed

    Jia, Pengfei; Huang, Tailai; Duan, Shukai; Ge, Lingpu; Yan, Jia; Wang, Lidan

    2016-03-14

    When an electronic nose (E-nose) is used to distinguish different kinds of gases, the label information of the target gas could be lost due to some fault of the operators or some other reason, although this is not expected. Another fact is that the cost of getting the labeled samples is usually higher than for unlabeled ones. In most cases, the classification accuracy of an E-nose trained using labeled samples is higher than that of the E-nose trained by unlabeled ones, so gases without label information should not be used to train an E-nose, however, this wastes resources and can even delay the progress of research. In this work a novel multi-class semi-supervised learning technique called M-training is proposed to train E-noses with both labeled and unlabeled samples. We employ M-training to train the E-nose which is used to distinguish three indoor pollutant gases (benzene, toluene and formaldehyde). Data processing results prove that the classification accuracy of E-nose trained by semi-supervised techniques (tri-training and M-training) is higher than that of an E-nose trained only with labeled samples, and the performance of M-training is better than that of tri-training because more base classifiers can be employed by M-training.

  9. A Novel Semi-Supervised Electronic Nose Learning Technique: M-Training

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Pengfei; Huang, Tailai; Duan, Shukai; Ge, Lingpu; Yan, Jia; Wang, Lidan

    2016-01-01

    When an electronic nose (E-nose) is used to distinguish different kinds of gases, the label information of the target gas could be lost due to some fault of the operators or some other reason, although this is not expected. Another fact is that the cost of getting the labeled samples is usually higher than for unlabeled ones. In most cases, the classification accuracy of an E-nose trained using labeled samples is higher than that of the E-nose trained by unlabeled ones, so gases without label information should not be used to train an E-nose, however, this wastes resources and can even delay the progress of research. In this work a novel multi-class semi-supervised learning technique called M-training is proposed to train E-noses with both labeled and unlabeled samples. We employ M-training to train the E-nose which is used to distinguish three indoor pollutant gases (benzene, toluene and formaldehyde). Data processing results prove that the classification accuracy of E-nose trained by semi-supervised techniques (tri-training and M-training) is higher than that of an E-nose trained only with labeled samples, and the performance of M-training is better than that of tri-training because more base classifiers can be employed by M-training. PMID:26985898

  10. Use of electronic noses for detection of odour from animal production facilities: a review.

    PubMed

    Nimmermark, S

    2001-01-01

    In the field of controlling livestock and poultry odours in the internal and external environment and in derived food products, one main obstacle is how to measure the odour in a suitable way. Olfactometry and a human panel have been used in most studies of farm odour until now. Alternatives like electronic noses are interesting considering disadvantages for olfactometry regarding cost and labour requirement. An electronic device can produce an almost instant response which is useful in many applications. Studies have shown detection of farm odour for some electronic noses and also response to odour concentrations. Other studies have shown very high odour threshold values compared to human noses. Electronic noses with a large number of sensors have been developed since a base was formed in the 1950s. The fast progress in data processing and sensor development in the latest years have made the electronic noses interesting for a large number of industrial applications in the food processing industry, as well as in other areas. Materials like manure produce a complex mixture of odorous compounds and the interaction between these creates a unique odour where no specific dominating and characterising compound seems to exist. Related to swine farms almost 200 different odorous compounds have been reported. The electronic noses can, depending on the sensitivity of its sensors, detect some compounds at lower levels than the human nose, while other compounds offensive to a human nose cannot be detected. Proper function of the electronic noses with sensitivity for the odorous gases in the application must be followed by satisfying properties regarding ageing, temperature stability, humidity and other environmental factors.

  11. Rapid discrimination of slimming capsules based on illegal additives by electronic nose and flash gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhenzhen; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2015-02-01

    The discrimination of counterfeit and/or illegally manufactured medicines is an important task in the pharmaceutical industry for pharmaceutical safety. In this study, 22 slimming capsule samples with illegally added sibutramine and phenolphthalein were analyzed by electronic nose and flash gas chromatography. To reveal the difference among the different classes of samples, principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis were employed to analyze the data acquired from electronic nose and flash gas chromatography, respectively. The samples without illegal additives can be discriminated from the ones with illegal additives by using electronic nose or flash gas chromatography data individually. To improve the performance of classification, a data fusion strategy was applied to integrate the data from electronic nose and flash gas chromatography data into a single model. The results show that the samples with phenolphthalein, sibutramine and both can be classified well by using fused data. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. The Application of AN Electronic Nose as a Predictive Technique against Human Diabetic Nephropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, E. I.; Festuccia, A. M.; Martinelli, E.; Andreoli, A.; Martini, A.; di Natale, C.; de Lorenzo, A.

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study is to apply electronic nose (EN) technology as an alternative method for fast monitoring of metabolic clearances and nephropathy insurgence in diabetics. This will be performed through urine analyses of diabetic patients and healthy subjects.

  13. Environmental odours assessment from waste treatment plants: dynamic olfactometry in combination with sensorial analysers "electronic noses".

    PubMed

    Littarru, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    After an overview about the criteria of odour nuisance in different technical laws, about electronic noses analysers and about dynamic olfactometry, in the present paper the authors describe an application of dynamic olfactometry in combination with the determinations of electronic noses. The coordination of the two approaches permits optimisation of the advantages offered by both methods to the measurable and objective evaluation of the odour nuisance from waste treatment plants and chemical plants.

  14. Threshold detection of aromatic compounds in wine with an electronic nose and a human sensory panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, José Pedro; Lozano, Jesús; Aleixandre, Manuel; Arroyo, Teresa; Cabellos, Juan Mariano; Gil, Mar; del Carmen Horrillo, Maria

    2009-05-01

    An electronic nose (e-nose) based on thin film semiconductor sensors has been developed in order to compare the performance with a trained human sensory panel. The panel had 25 members and was trained to detect concentration thresholds of some compounds of interest present in wine. Typical red wine compounds such as whiskylactone and white wine compounds such as 3-methyl butanol were measured at different concentrations starting from the detection threshold found in literature (in the micrograms to milligrams per liter range). Pattern recognition methods (principal component analisys and neural networks) were used to process the data. The results showed that the performance of the e-nose for threshold detection was much better than the human panel. The compounds were detected by the e-nose at concentrations up to ten times lower than the panel. Moreover the e-nose was able to identify correctly each concentration level therefore quantitative applications are devised for this system.

  15. Discrimination of chicken seasonings and beef seasonings using electronic nose and sensory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Huaixiang; Li, Fenghua; Qin, Lan; Yu, Haiyan; Ma, Xia

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the feasibility of electronic nose as a method to discriminate chicken and beef seasonings and to predict sensory attributes. Sensory evaluation showed that 8 chicken seasonings and 4 beef seasonings could be well discriminated and classified based on 8 sensory attributes. The sensory attributes including chicken/beef, gamey, garlic, spicy, onion, soy sauce, retention, and overall aroma intensity were generated by a trained evaluation panel. Principal component analysis (PCA), discriminant factor analysis (DFA), and cluster analysis (CA) combined with electronic nose were used to discriminate seasoning samples based on the difference of the sensor response signals of chicken and beef seasonings. The correlation between sensory attributes and electronic nose sensors signal was established using partial least squares regression (PLSR) method. The results showed that the seasoning samples were all correctly classified by the electronic nose combined with PCA, DFA, and CA. The electronic nose gave good prediction results for all the sensory attributes with correlation coefficient (r) higher than 0.8. The work indicated that electronic nose is an effective method for discriminating different seasonings and predicting sensory attributes.

  16. Electronic Noses and Tongues: Applications for the Food and Pharmaceutical Industries

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Elizabeth A.; Bai, Jinhe; Plotto, Anne; Dea, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The electronic nose (e-nose) is designed to crudely mimic the mammalian nose in that most contain sensors that non-selectively interact with odor molecules to produce some sort of signal that is then sent to a computer that uses multivariate statistics to determine patterns in the data. This pattern recognition is used to determine that one sample is similar or different from another based on headspace volatiles. There are different types of e-nose sensors including organic polymers, metal oxides, quartz crystal microbalance and even gas-chromatography (GC) or combined with mass spectroscopy (MS) can be used in a non-selective manner using chemical mass or patterns from a short GC column as an e-nose or “Z” nose. The electronic tongue reacts similarly to non-volatile compounds in a liquid. This review will concentrate on applications of e-nose and e-tongue technology for edible products and pharmaceutical uses. PMID:22163873

  17. Electronic Nose for Quality Control of Colombian Coffee Through the Detection of Defects in ``Cup Tests''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Juan C.; Duran, Cristhian M.; Reyes, Adriana X.

    2009-05-01

    This article presents a preliminary study on the analysis of samples of Colombian coffee for the detection and classification of defects (i.e. using "Cup Tests"), which was conducted in Almacafé quality control laboratory Almacafé in Cúcuta, Colombia). The results obtained show the application of an Electronic Nose (EN), called "A-NOSE," used in the coffee sector for the cupping tests. The results show that e-nose technology can be a useful tool as quality control of coffee grain.

  18. A Portable Electronic Nose For Toxic Vapor Detection, Identification, and Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linnell, B. R.; Young, R. C.; Griffin, T. P.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Peterson, B. V.; Brooks, K. B.

    2005-01-01

    A new prototype instrument based on electronic nose (e-nose) technology has demonstrated the ability to identify and quantify many vapors of interest to the Space Program at their minimum required concentrations for both single vapors and two-component vapor mixtures, and may easily be adapted to detect many other toxic vapors. To do this, it was necessary to develop algorithms to classify unknown vapors, recognize when a vapor is not any of the vapors of interest, and estimate the concentrations of the contaminants. This paper describes the design of the portable e-nose instrument, test equipment setup, test protocols, pattern recognition algorithms, concentration estimation methods, and laboratory test results.

  19. Use of a MS-electronic nose for prediction of early fungal spoilage of bakery products.

    PubMed

    Marín, S; Vinaixa, M; Brezmes, J; Llobet, E; Vilanova, X; Correig, X; Ramos, A J; Sanchis, V

    2007-02-28

    A MS-based electronic nose was used to detect fungal spoilage (measured as ergosterol concentration) in samples of bakery products. Bakery products were inoculated with different Eurotium, Aspergillus and Penicillium species, incubated in sealed vials and their headspace sampled after 2, 4 and 7 days. Once the headspace was sampled, ergosterol content was determined in each sample. Different electronic nose signals were recorded depending on incubation time. Both the e-nose signals and ergosterol levels were used to build models for prediction of ergosterol content using e-nose measurements. Accuracy on prediction of those models was between 87 and 96%, except for samples inoculated with Penicillium corylophilum where the best predictions only reached 46%.

  20. Electronic nose for quality control of Colombian coffee through the detection of defects in "Cup Tests".

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Juan; Durán, Cristhian; Reyes, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Electronic noses (ENs), are used for many applications, but we must emphasize the importance of their application to foodstuffs like coffee. This paper presents a research study about the analysis of Colombian coffee samples for the detection and classification of defects (i.e., using "Cup Tests"), which was conducted at the Almacafé quality control laboratory in Cúcuta, Colombia. The results obtained show that the application of an electronic nose called "A-NOSE", may be used in the coffee industry for the cupping tests. The results show that e-nose technology can be a useful tool for quality control to evaluate the excellence of the Colombian coffee produced by National Federation of Coffee Growers.

  1. Electronic Nose and Exhaled Breath NMR-based Metabolomics Applications in Airways Disease.

    PubMed

    Santini, Giuseppe; Mores, Nadia; Penas, Andreu; Capuano, Rosamaria; Mondino, Chiara; Trové, Andrea; Macagno, Francesco; Zini, Gina; Cattani, Paola; Martinelli, Eugenio; Motta, Andrea; Macis, Giuseppe; Ciabattoni, Giovanni; Montuschi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Breathomics, the multidimensional molecular analysis of exhaled breath, includes analysis of exhaled breath with gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and electronic noses (e-noses), and metabolomics of exhaled breath condensate (EBC), a non-invasive technique which provides information on the composition of airway lining fluid, generally by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or MS methods. Metabolomics is the identification and quantification of small molecular weight metabolites in a biofluid. Specific profiles of volatile compounds in exhaled breath and metabolites in EBC (breathprints) are potentially useful surrogate markers of inflammatory respiratory diseases. Electronic noses (e-noses) are artificial sensor systems, usually consisting of chemical cross-reactive sensor arrays for characterization of patterns of breath volatile compounds, and algorithms for breathprints classification. E-noses are handheld, portable, and provide real-time data. E-nose breathprints can reflect respiratory inflammation. E-noses and NMR-based metabolomics of EBC can distinguish patients with respiratory diseases such as asthma, COPD, and lung cancer, or diseases with a clinically relevant respiratory component including cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia, and healthy individuals. Breathomics has also been reported to identify patients affected by different types of respiratory diseases. Patterns of breath volatile compounds detected by e-nose and EBC metabolic profiles have been associated with asthma phenotypes. In combination with other -omics platforms, breathomics might provide a molecular approach to respiratory disease phenotyping and a molecular basis to tailored pharmacotherapeutic strategies. Breathomics might also contribute to identify new surrogate markers of respiratory inflammation, thus, facilitating drug discovery. Validation in newly recruited, prospective independent cohorts is essential for development of e-nose

  2. Development of a Portable Electronic Nose System for the Detection and Classification of Fruity Odors

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kea-Tiong; Chiu, Shih-Wen; Pan, Chih-Heng; Hsieh, Hung-Yi; Liang, Yao-Sheng; Liu, Ssu-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a prototype of a portable electronic nose (E-Nose) comprising a sensor array of eight commercially available sensors, a data acquisition interface PCB, and a microprocessor. Verification software was developed to verify system functions. Experimental results indicate that the proposed system prototype is able to identify the fragrance of three fruits, namely lemon, banana, and litchi. PMID:22163403

  3. Diagnostic performance of an electronic nose, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, and lung function testing in asthma.

    PubMed

    Montuschi, Paolo; Santonico, Marco; Mondino, Chiara; Pennazza, Giorgio; Mantini, Giulia; Martinelli, Eugenio; Capuano, Rosamaria; Ciabattoni, Giovanni; Paolesse, Roberto; Di Natale, Corrado; Barnes, Peter J; D'Amico, Arnaldo

    2010-04-01

    Analysis of exhaled breath by biosensors discriminates between patients with asthma and healthy subjects. An electronic nose consists of a chemical sensor array for the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and an algorithm for pattern recognition. We compared the diagnostic performance of a prototype of an electronic nose with lung function tests and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) in patients with atopic asthma. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 27 patients with intermittent and persistent mild asthma and in 24 healthy subjects. Two procedures for collecting exhaled breath were followed to study the differences between total and alveolar air. Seven patients with asthma and seven healthy subjects participated in a study with mass spectrometry (MS) fingerprinting as an independent technique for assessing between group discrimination. Classification was based on principal component analysis and a feed-forward neural network. The best results were obtained when the electronic nose analysis was performed on alveolar air. Diagnostic performance for electronic nose, FENO, and lung function testing was 87.5%, 79.2%, and 70.8%, respectively. The combination of electronic nose and FENO had the highest diagnostic performance for asthma (95.8%). MS fingerprints of VOCs could discriminate between patients with asthma and healthy subjects. The electronic nose has a high diagnostic performance that can be increased when combined with FENO. Large studies are now required to definitively establish the diagnostic performance of the electronic nose. Whether this integrated noninvasive approach will translate into an early diagnosis of asthma has to be clarified. EUDRACT https://eudralink.emea.europa.eu; Identifier: 2007-000890-51; and clinicaltrials.gov; Identifier: NCT00819676.

  4. Feasibility of electronic nose technology for discriminating between head and neck, bladder, and colon carcinomas.

    PubMed

    van de Goor, R M G E; Leunis, N; van Hooren, M R A; Francisca, E; Masclee, A; Kremer, B; Kross, K W

    2017-02-01

    Electronic nose (e-nose) technology has the potential to detect cancer at an early stage and can differentiate between cancer origins. Our objective was to compare patients who had head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with patients who had colon or bladder cancer to determine the distinctive diagnostic characteristics of the e-nose. Feasibility study An e-nose device was used to collect samples of exhaled breath from patients who had HNSCC and those who had bladder or colon cancer, after which the samples were analyzed and compared. One hundred patients with HNSCC, 40 patients with bladder cancer, and 28 patients with colon cancer exhaled through an e-nose for 5 min. An artificial neural network was used for the analysis, and double cross-validation to validate the model. In differentiating HNSCC from colon cancer, a diagnostic accuracy of 81 % was found. When comparing HNSCC with bladder cancer, the diagnostic accuracy was 84 %. A diagnostic accuracy of 84 % was found between bladder cancer and colon cancer. The e-nose technique using double cross-validation is able to discriminate between HNSCC and colon cancer and between HNSCC and bladder cancer. Furthermore, the e-nose technique can distinguish colon cancer from bladder cancer.

  5. Detection And Identification Of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covington, J. A.; Ouaret, N.; Gardner, J. W.; Nwokolo, C.; Bardhan, K. D.; Arasaradnam, R. P.

    2011-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammation of the lining of the human bowel and a major health issue in Europe. IBD carries with it significant morbidity from toxic treatment, surgery and a risk of developing bowel cancer. Thus there is a need for early identification of the disease using non-invasive tests. Present diagnostic techniques are based around invasive tests (i.e. endoscopy) and laboratory culture; the latter is limited as only 50% of the gut bacteria can be identified. Here we explore the use of an e-nose as a tool to detect and identify two IBDs (i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) & Ulcerative Colitis (UC)) based on headspace analysis from urine samples. We believe that the gut bacterial flora is altered by disease (due to fermentation) that in-turn modulates the gas composition within urine samples. 24 samples (9 CD, 6 UC, 9 controls) were analysed with an in-house e-nose and an Owlstone IMS instrument. Data analysis was performed using linear discriminant analysis (LDA and principal components analysis (PCA). Using the e-nose, LDA separates both disease groups and control, whilst PCA shows a small overlap of classes. The IMS data are more complex but shows some disease/control separation. We are presently collecting further samples for a larger study using more advanced data processing methods.

  6. In Tube Integrated Electronic Nose System on a Flexible Polymer Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Kinkeldei, Thomas; Zysset, Christoph; Münzenrieder, Niko; Petti, Luisa; Tröster, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication of electronic devices, such as gas sensors on flexible polymer substrates, enables the use of electronics in applications where conventional devices on stiff substrates could not be used. We demonstrate the development of a new intra-tube electronic-nose (e-nose) gas sensor device with multiple sensors fabricated and integrated on a flexible substrate. For this purpose, we developed a new method of fabricating a sensor array of four gas sensors on a flexible polymer substrate. The method allowed the use of lithography techniques to pattern different polymers with a broad range of solubility parameters. Conductive polymer composites were used as a gas sensitive layer due to the high stretchability of the material. Each of the 30 e-nose devices on one substrate was designed to fit on a polymer strip with a width of 2 mm. A single e-nose strip was successfully integrated into the inlet tube of a gas-measurement apparatus with an inner-tube diameter of 3 mm. Using the e-nose, we were able to differentiate between four different volatile solvent vapors. The tube-integrated e-nose outperformed a chamber-integrated e-nose of the same type in terms of response time and flow-rate influences. The sensor array inside the tube showed a faster response time and detected short pulses of analyte exposure compared to the same sensor array outside of the tube. We measured gas flow rates from 1,000 to 30 sccm without significant changes in sensor performance using this intra-tube e-nose prototype. The tube could be bent to radii <15 mm with a sensor performance similar to an unbent sensor. PMID:23202016

  7. In tube integrated electronic nose system on a flexible polymer substrate.

    PubMed

    Kinkeldei, Thomas; Zysset, Christoph; Münzenrieder, Niko; Petti, Luisa; Tröster, Gerhard

    2012-10-12

    The fabrication of electronic devices, such as gas sensors on flexible polymer substrates, enables the use of electronics in applications where conventional devices on stiff substrates could not be used. We demonstrate the development of a new intra-tube electronic-nose (e-nose) gas sensor device with multiple sensors fabricated and integrated on a flexible substrate. For this purpose, we developed a new method of fabricating a sensor array of four gas sensors on a flexible polymer substrate. The method allowed the use of lithography techniques to pattern different polymers with a broad range of solubility parameters. Conductive polymer composites were used as a gas sensitive layer due to the high stretchability of the material. Each of the 30 e-nose devices on one substrate was designed to fit on a polymer strip with a width of 2 mm. A single e-nose strip was successfully integrated into the inlet tube of a gas-measurement apparatus with an inner-tube diameter of 3 mm. Using the e-nose, we were able to differentiate between four different volatile solvent vapors. The tube-integrated e-nose outperformed a chamber-integrated e-nose of the same type in terms of response time and flow-rate influences. The sensor array inside the tube showed a faster response time and detected short pulses of analyte exposure compared to the same sensor array outside of the tube. We measured gas flow rates from 1,000 to 30 sccm without significant changes in sensor performance using this intra-tube e-nose prototype. The tube could be bent to radii < 15 mm with a sensor performance similar to an unbent sensor.

  8. Identification of Chinese Herbal Medicines with Electronic Nose Technology: Applications and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huaying; Luo, Dehan; GholamHosseini, Hamid; Li, Zhong; He, Jiafeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the most recent works in machine olfaction as applied to the identification of Chinese Herbal Medicines (CHMs). Due to the wide variety of CHMs, the complexity of growing sources and the diverse specifications of herb components, the quality control of CHMs is a challenging issue. Much research has demonstrated that an electronic nose (E-nose) as an advanced machine olfaction system, can overcome this challenge through identification of the complex odors of CHMs. E-nose technology, with better usability, high sensitivity, real-time detection and non-destructive features has shown better performance in comparison with other analytical techniques such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Although there has been immense development of E-nose techniques in other applications, there are limited reports on the application of E-noses for the quality control of CHMs. The aim of current study is to review practical implementation and advantages of E-noses for robust and effective odor identification of CHMs. It covers the use of E-nose technology to study the effects of growing regions, identification methods, production procedures and storage time on CHMs. Moreover, the challenges and applications of E-nose for CHM identification are investigated. Based on the advancement in E-nose technology, odor may become a new quantitative index for quality control of CHMs and drug discovery. It was also found that more research could be done in the area of odor standardization and odor reproduction for remote sensing. PMID:28486407

  9. Electronic Nose Testing Procedure for the Definition of Minimum Performance Requirements for Environmental Odor Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Eusebio, Lidia; Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena

    2016-01-01

    Despite initial enthusiasm towards electronic noses and their possible application in different fields, and quite a lot of promising results, several criticalities emerge from most published research studies, and, as a matter of fact, the diffusion of electronic noses in real-life applications is still very limited. In general, a first step towards large-scale-diffusion of an analysis method, is standardization. The aim of this paper is describing the experimental procedure adopted in order to evaluate electronic nose performances, with the final purpose of establishing minimum performance requirements, which is considered to be a first crucial step towards standardization of the specific case of electronic nose application for environmental odor monitoring at receptors. Based on the experimental results of the performance testing of a commercialized electronic nose type with respect to three criteria (i.e., response invariability to variable atmospheric conditions, instrumental detection limit, and odor classification accuracy), it was possible to hypothesize a logic that could be adopted for the definition of minimum performance requirements, according to the idea that these are technologically achievable. PMID:27657086

  10. Evaluation of an electronic nose for odorant and process monitoring of alkaline-stabilized biosolids production.

    PubMed

    Romero-Flores, Adrian; McConnell, Laura L; Hapeman, Cathleen J; Ramirez, Mark; Torrents, Alba

    2017-11-01

    Electronic noses have been widely used in the food industry to monitor process performance and quality control, but use in wastewater and biosolids treatment has not been fully explored. Therefore, we examined the feasibility of an electronic nose to discriminate between treatment conditions of alkaline stabilized biosolids and compared its performance with quantitative analysis of key odorants. Seven lime treatments (0-30% w/w) were prepared and the resultant off-gas was monitored by GC-MS and by an electronic nose equipped with ten metal oxide sensors. A pattern recognition model was created using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and principal component analysis (PCA) of the electronic nose data. In general, LDA performed better than PCA. LDA showed clear discrimination when single tests were evaluated, but when the full data set was included, discrimination between treatments was reduced. Frequency of accurate recognition was tested by three algorithms with Euclidan and Mahalanobis performing at 81% accuracy and discriminant function analysis at 70%. Concentrations of target compounds by GC-MS were in agreement with those reported in literature and helped to elucidate the behavior of the pattern recognition via comparison of individual sensor responses to different biosolids treatment conditions. Results indicated that the electronic nose can discriminate between lime percentages, thus providing the opportunity to create classes of under-dosed and over-dosed relative to regulatory requirements. Full scale application will require careful evaluation to maintain accuracy under variable process and environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Detection of TVOC and odor in industrial park using electronic nose].

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiu-Ying; Cai, Qiang; Ye, Zhao-Xia; Guo, Wei; Lu, Yan-Wen; Zhang, Yong-Ming

    2011-12-01

    The main volatile compounds belong to TVOC or odor which may generate from industrial park,special sensors were adopted to build electronic nose for detecting those compounds. TVOC pollution index (TPI) and odor pollution index (OPI) were designed as well as detecting method based on electronic nose in the field. On this basis, considering the pollution situation of chemical industrial of Zhapu port in Jiaxing, six detecting points were selected to be tested by electronic nose on site. Each sensor responses processed by principal components analysis (PCA), two principal components were extracted, that is, eight sensors can be divided into two groups including the types of TVOC (S1) and odor (S2-S8). Meanwhile, the on site collected samples were qualitatively analyzed with GC/ MS. At each testing point, integral area percentage of the compounds being a part of TVOC accumulated mostly over 90% and to odor, mostly was below 10%. Results show: (1) Choosing appropriate sensors combining PCA can preliminarily reflect the pollution condition of TVOC and odor in industrial park; (2) Combining pollution indexes measured with electronic nose and results of qualitative analysis with GC/MS can generally concluded the overall pollution situation of TVOC and odor in industrial park and distribution of each pollutant; (3) Application of electronic noses and GIS to detect TVOC and odor in industrial park can preliminary assess space pollution situation in industrial park.

  12. Electronic Nose Testing Procedure for the Definition of Minimum Performance Requirements for Environmental Odor Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Eusebio, Lidia; Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena

    2016-09-21

    Despite initial enthusiasm towards electronic noses and their possible application in different fields, and quite a lot of promising results, several criticalities emerge from most published research studies, and, as a matter of fact, the diffusion of electronic noses in real-life applications is still very limited. In general, a first step towards large-scale-diffusion of an analysis method, is standardization. The aim of this paper is describing the experimental procedure adopted in order to evaluate electronic nose performances, with the final purpose of establishing minimum performance requirements, which is considered to be a first crucial step towards standardization of the specific case of electronic nose application for environmental odor monitoring at receptors. Based on the experimental results of the performance testing of a commercialized electronic nose type with respect to three criteria (i.e., response invariability to variable atmospheric conditions, instrumental detection limit, and odor classification accuracy), it was possible to hypothesize a logic that could be adopted for the definition of minimum performance requirements, according to the idea that these are technologically achievable.

  13. Recent advances in electronic nose techniques for monitoring of fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Hang; Chen, Quansheng; Mei, Congli; Liu, Guohai

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fermentation process is often sensitive to even slight changes of conditions that may result in unacceptable end-product quality. Thus, the monitoring of the process is critical for discovering unfavorable deviations as early as possible and taking the appropriate measures. However, the use of traditional analytical techniques is often time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this sense, the most effective way of developing rapid, accurate and relatively economical method for quality assurance in microbial fermentation process is the use of novel chemical sensor systems. Electronic nose techniques have particular advantages in non-invasive monitoring of microbial fermentation process. Therefore, in this review, we present an overview of the most important contributions dealing with the quality control in microbial fermentation process using the electronic nose techniques. After a brief description of the fundamentals of the sensor techniques, some examples of potential applications of electronic nose techniques monitoring are provided, including the implementation of control strategies and the combination with other monitoring tools (i.e. sensor fusion). Finally, on the basis of the review, the electronic nose techniques are critically commented, and its strengths and weaknesses being highlighted. In addition, on the basis of the observed trends, we also propose the technical challenges and future outlook for the electronic nose techniques.

  14. Recognition of anaerobic bacterial isolates in vitro using electronic nose technology.

    PubMed

    Pavlou, A; Turner, A P F; Magan, N

    2002-01-01

    Use of an electronic nose (e.nose) system to differentiation between anaerobic bacteria grown in vitro on agar media. Cultures of Clostridium spp. (14 strains) and Bacteroides fragilis (12 strains) were grown on blood agar plates and incubated in sampling bags for 30 min before head space analysis of the volatiles. Qualitative analyses of the volatile production patterns was carried out using an e.nose system with 14 conducting polymer sensors. Using data analysis techniques such as principal components analysis (PCA), genetic algorithms and neural networks it was possible to differentiate between agar blanks and individual species which accounted for all the data. A total of eight unknowns were correctly discriminated into the bacterial groups. This is the first report of in vitro complex volatile pattern recognition and differentiation of anaerobic pathogens. These results suggest the potential for application of e.nose technology in early diagnosis of microbial pathogens of medical importance.

  15. A novel method for qualitative analysis of edible oil oxidation using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lirong; Yu, Xiuzhu; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Rui

    2016-07-01

    An electronic nose (E-nose) was used for rapid assessment of the degree of oxidation in edible oils. Peroxide and acid values of edible oil samples were analyzed using data obtained by the American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS) Official Method for reference. Qualitative discrimination between non-oxidized and oxidized oils was conducted using the E-nose technique developed in combination with cluster analysis (CA), principal component analysis (PCA), and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). The results from CA, PCA and LDA indicated that the E-nose technique could be used for differentiation of non-oxidized and oxidized oils. LDA produced slightly better results than CA and PCA. The proposed approach can be used as an alternative to AOCS Official Method as an innovative tool for rapid detection of edible oil oxidation.

  16. Coupling gas chromatography and electronic nose detection for detailed cigarette smoke aroma characterization.

    PubMed

    Rambla-Alegre, Maria; Tienpont, Bart; Mitsui, Kazuhisa; Masugi, Eri; Yoshimura, Yuta; Nagata, Hisanori; David, Frank; Sandra, Pat

    2014-10-24

    Aroma characterization of whole cigarette smoke samples using sensory panels or electronic nose (E-nose) devices is difficult due to the masking effect of major constituents and solvent used for the extraction step. On the other hand, GC in combination with olfactometry detection does not allow to study the delicate balance and synergetic effect of aroma solutes. To overcome these limitations a new instrumental set-up consisting of heart-cutting gas chromatography using a capillary flow technology based Deans switch and low thermal mass GC in combination with an electronic nose device is presented as an alternative to GC-olfactometry. This new hyphenated GC-E-nose configuration is used for the characterization of cigarette smoke aroma. The system allows the transfer, combination or omission of selected GC fractions before injection in the E-nose. Principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant factor analysis (DFA) allowed clear visualizing of the differences among cigarette brands and classifying them independently of their nicotine content. Omission and perceptual interaction tests could also be carried out using this configuration. The results are promising and suggest that the GC-E-nose hyphenation is a good approach to measure the contribution level of individual compounds to the whole cigarette smoke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Multi-Chamber Electronic Nose--an improved olfaction sensor for mobile robotics.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Jimenez, Javier; Monroy, Javier G; Blanco, Jose Luis

    2011-01-01

    One of the major disadvantages of the use of Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) technology as a transducer for electronic gas sensing devices (e-noses) is the long recovery period needed after each gas exposure. This severely restricts its usage in applications where the gas concentrations may change rapidly, as in mobile robotic olfaction, where allowing for sensor recovery forces the robot to move at a very low speed, almost incompatible with any practical robot operation. This paper describes the design of a new e-nose which overcomes, to a great extent, such a limitation. The proposed e-nose, called Multi-Chamber Electronic Nose (MCE-nose), comprises several identical sets of MOS sensors accommodated in separate chambers (four in our current prototype), which alternate between sensing and recovery states, providing, as a whole, a device capable of sensing changes in chemical concentrations faster. The utility and performance of the MCE-nose in mobile robotic olfaction is shown through several experiments involving rapid sensing of gas concentration and mobile robot gas mapping.

  18. Electronic Nose Functionality for Breath Gas Analysis during Parabolic Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolch, Michael E.; Hummel, Thomas; Fetter, Viktor; Helwig, Andreas; Lenic, Joachim; Moukhamedieva, Lana; Tsarkow, Dimitrij; Chouker, Alexander; Schelling, Gustav

    2017-06-01

    The presence of humans in space represents a constant threat for their health and safety. Environmental factors such as living in a closed confinement, as well as exposure to microgravity and radiation, are associated with significant changes in bone metabolism, muscular atrophy, and altered immune response, which has impacts on human performance and possibly results in severe illness. Thus, maintaining and monitoring of crew health status has the highest priority to ensure whole mission success. With manned deep space missions to moon or mars appearing at the horizon where short-term repatriation back to earth is impossible the availability of appropriate diagnostic platforms for crew health status is urgently needed. In response to this need, the present experiment evaluated the functionality and practicability of a metal oxide based sensor system (eNose) together with a newly developed breath gas collecting device under the condition of altering acceleration. Parabolic flights were performed with an Airbus A300 ZeroG at Bordeaux, France. Ambient air and exhaled breath of five healthy volunteers was analyzed during steady state flight and parabolic flight maneuvres. All volunteers completed the study, the breath gas collecting device valves worked appropriately, and breathing through the collecting device was easy and did not induce discomfort. During breath gas measurements, significant changes in metal oxide sensors, mainly sensitive to aromatic and sulphur containing compounds, were observed with alternating conditions of acceleration. Similarly, metal oxide sensors showed significant changes in all sensors during ambient air measurements. The eNose as well as the newly developed breath gas collecting device, showed appropriate functionality and practicability during alternating conditions of acceleration which is a prerequisite for the intended use of the eNose aboard the International Space Station (ISS) for breath gas analysis and crew health status

  19. Electronic Nose Functionality for Breath Gas Analysis during Parabolic Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolch, Michael E.; Hummel, Thomas; Fetter, Viktor; Helwig, Andreas; Lenic, Joachim; Moukhamedieva, Lana; Tsarkow, Dimitrij; Chouker, Alexander; Schelling, Gustav

    2017-02-01

    The presence of humans in space represents a constant threat for their health and safety. Environmental factors such as living in a closed confinement, as well as exposure to microgravity and radiation, are associated with significant changes in bone metabolism, muscular atrophy, and altered immune response, which has impacts on human performance and possibly results in severe illness. Thus, maintaining and monitoring of crew health status has the highest priority to ensure whole mission success. With manned deep space missions to moon or mars appearing at the horizon where short-term repatriation back to earth is impossible the availability of appropriate diagnostic platforms for crew health status is urgently needed. In response to this need, the present experiment evaluated the functionality and practicability of a metal oxide based sensor system (eNose) together with a newly developed breath gas collecting device under the condition of altering acceleration. Parabolic flights were performed with an Airbus A300 ZeroG at Bordeaux, France. Ambient air and exhaled breath of five healthy volunteers was analyzed during steady state flight and parabolic flight maneuvres. All volunteers completed the study, the breath gas collecting device valves worked appropriately, and breathing through the collecting device was easy and did not induce discomfort. During breath gas measurements, significant changes in metal oxide sensors, mainly sensitive to aromatic and sulphur containing compounds, were observed with alternating conditions of acceleration. Similarly, metal oxide sensors showed significant changes in all sensors during ambient air measurements. The eNose as well as the newly developed breath gas collecting device, showed appropriate functionality and practicability during alternating conditions of acceleration which is a prerequisite for the intended use of the eNose aboard the International Space Station (ISS) for breath gas analysis and crew health status

  20. COPD Identification By The Analysis Of Breath With An Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Rosamaria; Santonico, Marco; Martinelli, Eugenio; Paolesse, Roberto; Bergamini, Alberto; Cazzola, Mario; Ciaprini, Chiara; Segreti, Andrea; Di Natale, Corrado; D'Amico, Arnaldo

    2011-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a non fully reversible pathology characterized by airflow limitation. Spirometry (pulmonary function) is the gold standard to diagnose COPD, but often in the early stage of the pathology breathing symptoms might not be clinically evident. For this reason, there is an increasing demand for non-invasive diagnostic techniques. In this paper an electronic nose has been applied to the breath analysis of COPD patients. Breath samples of COPD patients and control subjects were analyzed with the electronic nose. Classification of sensors data illustrates the ability of this instrument to distinguish between the two groups. Electronic nose data were complemented by GC-MS analysis for a thorough characterization of the breath samples.

  1. Discrimination of Beef Samples by Electronic Nose and Pattern Recognition Techniques Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornale, P.; Barbera, S.

    2009-05-01

    In this paper a study about the possibility of beef characterization with electronic nose is presented. Three beef classes were compared: Piemontese (PIE), Limousin (FRA) and meat from Argentine (ARG). 150 meat samples were put in glass vials and analysed with a commercial electronic nose instrument based on 10 metal oxide semiconductor sensors. Sensors response of beef classes seemed to be different. Different supervised and unsupervised pattern recognition procedures were applied to sensors signal: principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Multivariate analysis pointed out promising classification and prediction results. Three clusters (according to the beef classes) can be clearly discriminated in PCA score plot. Statistical parameters from calibration, validation and prediction of PLS-DA model revealed themselves to be indices of a good model. These results demonstrate that electronic nose technology with multivariate analysis models is promising for the rapid determination of differences in meat aroma.

  2. Electronic Nose: A Promising Tool For Early Detection Of Alicyclobacillus spp In Soft Drinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concina, I.; Bornšek, M.; Baccelliere, S.; Falasconi, M.; Sberveglieri, G.

    2009-05-01

    In the present work we investigate the potential use of the Electronic Nose EOS835 (SACMI scarl, Italy) to early detect Alicyclobacillus spp in two flavoured soft drinks. These bacteria have been acknowledged by producer companies as a major quality control target microorganisms because of their ability to survive commercial pasteurization processes and produce taint compounds in final product. Electronic Nose was able to distinguish between uncontaminated and contaminated products before the taint metabolites were identifiable by an untrained panel. Classification tests showed an excellent rate of correct classification for both drinks (from 86% uo to 100%). High performance liquid chromatography analyses showed no presence of the main metabolite at a level of 200 ppb, thus confirming the skill of the Electronic Nose technology in performing an actual early diagnosis of contamination.

  3. Quality evaluation of agricultural distillates using different types of electronic noses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymerski, Tomasz; Gebicki, Jacek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation on quality evaluation of agricultural distillates using a prototype of electronic nose instrument and a commercial electronic nose of Fast/Flash GC type- HERACLES II. The prototype was equipped with TGS type semiconductor sensors. HERACLES II included two chromatographic columns with different polarity of stationary phase and two FID detectors. In case of the prototype volatile fraction of the agricultural distillate was prepared via barbotage process, whereas HERACLES II analysed the headspace fraction. Classification of the samples into three quality classes was performed using: quadratic discriminant function (QDA), supported with cross-validation method. Over 95% correct classification of the agricultural distillates into particular quality classes was observed for the analyses with HERACLES II. The prototype of electronic nose provided correct classification at the level of 70%.

  4. [Applicability of an electronic nose for detection of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons in soil].

    PubMed

    Bu, Fan-Yang; Wen, Xiao-Gang; Wan, Mei; Liu, Rui; Cai, Qiang; Chen, Lü-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Ming

    2011-12-01

    An electronic nose principally composed of a photo ionization detector (PID) was developed for rapid detection of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHs) in contaminated soil. Removal of interference gas such as benzene homologues with a pre-filtration tube was analyzed with gas chromatography (GC). A standard gas generator was applied to generate different concentrations of perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) gas, with which the determine precision and reproducibility of the electronic nose were evaluated by comparison with GC. Finally, simulated contamination soil with three typical paddy soils in Yangtze river delta region were used for ventilation purification experiments, the change of VCHs concentrations in the ventilation gas was monitored, based on which the applicability of the electronic nose was evaluated for on-line detection of the on-going of the ventilation purification process. Results showed that a halogenated hydrocarbon RAE-SEP tube was effective to remove interference gas, with 80%-97% of benzene homologues such as benzene and ethyl benzene being removed while more than 90% of VCHs passed through. With PCE or TCE gas, a linear dependence was derived between the data determined with the electronic nose and GC, the linear slope being 1.012 and R2 > 0.99. The electronic nose showed data consistent with GC (R2 > 0.99, n = 47) when applied for monitoring the remediation progress in a soil ventilation process. The electronic nose is therefore possibly applicable for rapid determination of soil pollution by VCHs, improving the efficiency of pollution diagnosis and remediation.

  5. Design of a portable electronic nose for real-fake detection of liquors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Pei-Feng; Zeng, Ming; Li, Zhi-Hua; Sun, Biao; Meng, Qing-Hao

    2017-09-01

    Portability is a major issue that influences the practical application of electronic noses (e-noses). For liquors detection, an e-nose must preprocess the liquid samples (e.g., using evaporation and thermal desorption), which makes the portable design even more difficult. To realize convenient and rapid detection of liquors, we designed a portable e-nose platform that consists of hardware and software systems. The hardware system contains an evaporation/sampling module, a reaction module, a control/data acquisition and analysis module, and a power module. The software system provides a user-friendly interface and can achieve automatic sampling and data processing. This e-nose platform has been applied to the real-fake recognition of Chinese liquors. Through parameter optimization of a one-class support vector machine classifier, the error rate of the negative samples is greatly reduced, and the overall recognition accuracy is improved. The results validated the feasibility of the designed portable e-nose platform.

  6. Threshold detection of aromatic compounds in wine with an electronic nose and a human sensory panel.

    PubMed

    Santos, José Pedro; Lozano, Jesús; Aleixandre, Manuel; Arroyo, Teresa; Cabellos, Juan Mariano; Gil, Mar; Horrillo, Maria del Carmen

    2010-03-15

    An electronic nose (e-nose) based on thin film semiconductor sensors has been developed in order to compare the performance in threshold detection and concentration quantification with a trained human sensory panel in order to demonstrate the use of an e-nose to assess the enologists in an early detection of some chemical compounds in order to prevent wine defects. The panel had 25 members and was trained to detect concentration thresholds of some compounds of interest present in wine. Typical red wine compounds such as whiskeylactone and white wine compounds such as 3-methyl butanol were measured at different concentrations starting from the detection threshold found in literature (in the nanograms to milligrams per liter range). Pattern recognition methods (principal component analysis (PCA) and neural networks) were used to process the data. The results showed that the performance of the e-nose for threshold detection was much better than the human panel. The compounds were detected by the e-nose at concentrations up to 10 times lower than the panel. Moreover the e-nose was able to identify correctly each concentration level therefore quantitative applications are devised for this system. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection and Classification of Human Body Odor Using an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Wongchoosuk, Chatchawal; Lutz, Mario; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2009-01-01

    An electronic nose (E-nose) has been designed and equipped with software that can detect and classify human armpit body odor. An array of metal oxide sensors was used for detecting volatile organic compounds. The measurement circuit employs a voltage divider resistor to measure the sensitivity of each sensor. This E-nose was controlled by in-house developed software through a portable USB data acquisition card with a principle component analysis (PCA) algorithm implemented for pattern recognition and classification. Because gas sensor sensitivity in the detection of armpit odor samples is affected by humidity, we propose a new method and algorithms combining hardware/software for the correction of the humidity noise. After the humidity correction, the E-nose showed the capability of detecting human body odor and distinguishing the body odors from two persons in a relative manner. The E-nose is still able to recognize people, even after application of deodorant. In conclusion, this is the first report of the application of an E-nose for armpit odor recognition. PMID:22399995

  8. Diverse Applications of Electronic-Nose Technologies in Agriculture and Forestry

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alphus D.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic-nose (e-nose) instruments, derived from numerous types of aroma-sensor technologies, have been developed for a diversity of applications in the broad fields of agriculture and forestry. Recent advances in e-nose technologies within the plant sciences, including improvements in gas-sensor designs, innovations in data analysis and pattern-recognition algorithms, and progress in material science and systems integration methods, have led to significant benefits to both industries. Electronic noses have been used in a variety of commercial agricultural-related industries, including the agricultural sectors of agronomy, biochemical processing, botany, cell culture, plant cultivar selections, environmental monitoring, horticulture, pesticide detection, plant physiology and pathology. Applications in forestry include uses in chemotaxonomy, log tracking, wood and paper processing, forest management, forest health protection, and waste management. These aroma-detection applications have improved plant-based product attributes, quality, uniformity, and consistency in ways that have increased the efficiency and effectiveness of production and manufacturing processes. This paper provides a comprehensive review and summary of a broad range of electronic-nose technologies and applications, developed specifically for the agriculture and forestry industries over the past thirty years, which have offered solutions that have greatly improved worldwide agricultural and agroforestry production systems. PMID:23396191

  9. An improved approach to identify irradiated spices using electronic nose, FTIR, and EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Bhaskar; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Maeng, Jeong-Hwan; Kyung, Hyun-Kyu; Lim, Ha-Kyeong; Sharma, Arun; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2014-09-01

    Changes in cumin and chili powder from India resulting from electron-beam irradiation were investigated using 3 analytical methods: electronic nose (E-nose), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The spices had been exposed to 6 to 14 kGy doses recommended for microbial decontamination. E-nose measured a clear difference in flavor patterns of the irradiated spices in comparison with the nonirradiated samples. Principal component analysis further showed a dose-dependent variation. FTIR spectra of the samples showed strong absorption bands at 3425, 3007 to 2854, and 1746 cm(-1). However, both nonirradiated and irradiated spice samples had comparable patterns without any noteworthy changes in functional groups. EPR spectroscopy of the irradiated samples showed a radiation-specific triplet signal at g = 2.006 with a hyper-fine coupling constant of 3 mT confirming the results obtained with the E-nose technique. Thus, E-nose was found to be a potential tool to identify irradiated spices.

  10. Diverse applications of electronic-nose technologies in agriculture and forestry.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Alphus D

    2013-02-08

    Electronic-nose (e-nose) instruments, derived from numerous types of aroma-sensor technologies, have been developed for a diversity of applications in the broad fields of agriculture and forestry. Recent advances in e-nose technologies within the plant sciences, including improvements in gas-sensor designs, innovations in data analysis and pattern-recognition algorithms, and progress in material science and systems integration methods, have led to significant benefits to both industries. Electronic noses have been used in a variety of commercial agricultural-related industries, including the agricultural sectors of agronomy, biochemical processing, botany, cell culture, plant cultivar selections, environmental monitoring, horticulture, pesticide detection, plant physiology and pathology. Applications in forestry include uses in chemotaxonomy, log tracking, wood and paper processing, forest management, forest health protection, and waste management. These aroma-detection applications have improved plant-based product attributes, quality, uniformity, and consistency in ways that have increased the efficiency and effectiveness of production and manufacturing processes. This paper provides a comprehensive review and summary of a broad range of electronic-nose technologies and applications, developed specifically for the agriculture and forestry industries over the past thirty years, which have offered solutions that have greatly improved worldwide agricultural and agroforestry production systems.

  11. Use of electronic nose and GC-MS in detection and monitoring some VOC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Rodríguez, M.; Ruiz-Montoya, M.; Giraldez, I.; López, R.; Madejón, E.; Díaz, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of an electronic nose (e-nose) as on-line, rapid method to quantify the MSW composting gases. Changes in selected VOCs (limonene, β-pinene, 2-butanone, undecane, toluene and dimethyl disulfide) during composting were studied and quantified by means of two different analytical methods (GC-MS and e-nose). The results of this study indicate that it is possible to differentiate and quantify the main gases emitted during Municipal Solid Waste- Legume Trimming Residues composting using an electronic nose equipped with 10 Metal Oxide Sensors. The electronic nose was able to detect a clear difference in volatile compounds profile of emitted gases in composting, using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) analysis. PCA successfully reduced the data sets from the sensors to two principal components, which accounted for 74.5%, 68.8% and 62.8% of the total variance by using patterns for initial, thermophilic and mesophilic composting phases respectively.

  12. Electronic Nose Evaluation of Storage Days of Fresh and Thawed Trout Fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Natale, Corrado; Macagnano, Antonella; Nardis, Sara; Paolesse, Roberto; Mantini, Alessandro; Martinelli, Eugenio; D'Amico, Arnaldo

    2000-12-01

    Fish freshness is one of the major concerns in food analysis. Several methods are currently employed to get information about freshness of samples, while many of these methods give sufficient information for freshly stored fish they are not reliable in case of thawed fishes. In this paper an electronic nose is applied to the analysis of trout fishes both freshly stored and thawed. Results show a good capability of the electronic nose to discriminate among the different storage days (93% of correct classification) and between freshly stored and thawed fishes, disregarding the freshness degree (84% of correct classification).

  13. Differential Detection of Potentially Hazardous Fusarium Species in Wheat Grains by an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Eifler, Jakob; Martinelli, Eugenio; Santonico, Marco; Capuano, Rosamaria; Schild, Detlev; Di Natale, Corrado

    2011-01-01

    Fungal infestation on wheat is an increasingly grave nutritional problem in many countries worldwide. Fusarium species are especially harmful pathogens due to their toxic metabolites. In this work we studied volatile compounds released by F. cerealis, F. graminearum, F. culmorum and F. redolens using SPME-GC/MS. By using an electronic nose we were able to differentiate between infected and non-infected wheat grains in the post-harvest chain. Our electronic nose was capable of distinguishing between four wheat Fusaria species with an accuracy higher than 80%. PMID:21695232

  14. Bacterial wetwood detection in Fagus grandifolia and Prunus serotina sapwood using a conducting polymer electronic-nose device

    Treesearch

    A.D. Wilson

    2014-01-01

    New electronic gas-detection methods were developed and tested for the diagnosis of bacterial wetwood disease in Fagus grandifolia (American beech) and Prunus serotina (black cherry) using a Conducting Polymer (CP)-type electronic nose (e-nose), the Aromascan A32S, based on detection of headspace...

  15. JPL/USC GAIM: Validating COSMIC and Ground-Based GPS Assimilation Results to Estimate Ionospheric Electron Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komjathy, A.; Wilson, B.; Akopian, V.; Pi, X.; Mannucci, A.; Wang, C.

    2008-12-01

    We seem to be in the midst of a revolution in ionospheric remote sensing driven by the abundance of ground and space-based GPS receivers, new UV remote sensing satellites, and the advent of data assimilation techniques for space weather. In particular, the COSMIC 6-satellite constellation was launched in April 2006. COSMIC now provides unprecedented global coverage of GPS occultations measurements, each of which yields electron density information with unprecedented ~1 km vertical resolution. Calibrated measurements of ionospheric delay (total electron content or TEC) suitable for input into assimilation models is currently made available in near real-time (NRT) from the COSMIC with a latency of 30 to 120 minutes. The University of Southern California (USC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have jointly developed a real-time Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model (GAIM) to monitor space weather, study storm effects, and provide ionospheric calibration for DoD customers and NASA flight projects. JPL/USC GAIM is a physics- based 3D data assimilation model that uses both 4DVAR and Kalman filter techniques to solve for the ion and electron density state and key drivers such as equatorial electrodynamics, neutral winds, and production terms. Daily (delayed) GAIM runs can accept as input ground GPS TEC data from 1200+ sites, occultation links from CHAMP, SAC-C, and the COSMIC constellation, UV limb and nadir scans from the TIMED and DMSP satellites, and in situ data from a variety of satellites (DMSP and C/NOFS). Real-Time GAIM (RTGAIM) ingests multiple data sources in real time, updates the 3D electron density grid every 5 minutes, and solves for improved drivers every 1-2 hours. Since our forward physics model and the adjoint model were expressly designed for data assimilation and computational efficiency, all of this can be accomplished on a single dual- processor Unix workstation. Customers are currently evaluating the accuracy of JPL/USC GAIM 'nowcasts' for ray

  16. Application and Uses of Electronic Noses for Clinical Diagnosis on Urine Samples: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Laura; Taverna, Gianluigi; Bellini, Alessia; Eusebio, Lidia; Buffi, Niccolò; Lazzeri, Massimo; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Bozzini, Giorgio; Seveso, Mauro; Mandressi, Alberto; Tidu, Lorenzo; Grizzi, Fabio; Sardella, Paolo; Latorre, Giuseppe; Hurle, Rodolfo; Lughezzani, Giovanni; Casale, Paolo; Meregali, Sara; Sironi, Selena

    2016-01-01

    The electronic nose is able to provide useful information through the analysis of the volatile organic compounds in body fluids, such as exhaled breath, urine and blood. This paper focuses on the review of electronic nose studies and applications in the specific field of medical diagnostics based on the analysis of the gaseous headspace of human urine, in order to provide a broad overview of the state of the art and thus enhance future developments in this field. The research in this field is rather recent and still in progress, and there are several aspects that need to be investigated more into depth, not only to develop and improve specific electronic noses for different diseases, but also with the aim to discover and analyse the connections between specific diseases and the body fluids odour. Further research is needed to improve the results obtained up to now; the development of new sensors and data processing methods should lead to greater diagnostic accuracy thus making the electronic nose an effective tool for early detection of different kinds of diseases, ranging from infections to tumours or exposure to toxic agents. PMID:27754437

  17. Electronic noses and tongues: Applications for the food and pharmaceutical industries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The electronic nose (enose) is designed to crudely mimic the human brain in that most contain sensors that non-selectively interact with odor molecules to produce some sort of signal that is then sent to a computer that uses multivariate statistics to determine patterns in the data. This pattern rec...

  18. Detection of Acetic Acid in wine by means of an electronic nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Jesús; Álvarez, Fernando; Santos, José Pedro; Horrillo, Carmen

    2011-09-01

    A portable electronic nose (see Fig.1) based on metal oxide semiconductor thin-film sensors has been developed to detect acetic acid present in four types of wines. The wines analyzed are from the same cellar but are made with different varieties of grapes. Data analysis was performed by two pattern recognition methods: principal component analysis (PCA) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN).

  19. Development of an Electronic Nose Sensing Platform for Undergraduate Education in Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Daniel V.; Burek, Michael J.; Iutzi, Ryan M.; Mracek, James A.; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    The teaching of the different aspects of a sensor system, with a focus on the involved nanotechnology, is a challenging, yet important task. We present the development of an electronic nose system that utilizes a nanoscale amperometric sensing mechanism for gas mixtures. The fabrication of the system makes use of a basic microfabrication facility,…

  20. Use of electronic nose technology to identify cattle experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis: A pilot study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electronic nose technology has historically been utilized for the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile compounds in air, soil, water, and for quality control in food, beverage and cosmetic industries. Breath analysis has been used experimentally in humans and animals to ...

  1. Mass-producible and wireless wide-area networks of electronic noses: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Bos, A

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a wide-area network of wireless electronic noses and the solutions found to the problems encountered, both of a technical nature and the management involved when employing large amounts of field units. Examples of field test results are given, to illustrate the abilities of such a system.

  2. Development of an Electronic Nose Sensing Platform for Undergraduate Education in Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Daniel V.; Burek, Michael J.; Iutzi, Ryan M.; Mracek, James A.; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    The teaching of the different aspects of a sensor system, with a focus on the involved nanotechnology, is a challenging, yet important task. We present the development of an electronic nose system that utilizes a nanoscale amperometric sensing mechanism for gas mixtures. The fabrication of the system makes use of a basic microfabrication facility,…

  3. Improving Short Term Instability for Quantitative Analyses with Portable Electronic Noses

    PubMed Central

    Macías, Miguel Macías; Agudo, J. Enrique; Manso, Antonio García; Orellana, Carlos Javier García; Velasco, Horacio Manuel González; Caballero, Ramón Gallardo

    2014-01-01

    One of the main problems when working with electronic noses is the lack of reproducibility or repeatability of the sensor response, so that, if this problem is not properly considered, electronic noses can be useless, especially for quantitative analyses. On the other hand, irreproducibility is increased with portable and low cost electronic noses where laboratory equipment like gas zero generators cannot be used. In this work, we study the reproducibility of two portable electronic noses, the PEN3 (commercial) and CAPINose (a proprietary design) by using synthetic wine samples. We show that in both cases short term instability associated to the sensors' response to the same sample and under the same conditions represents a major problem and we propose an internal normalization technique that, in both cases, reduces the variability of the sensors' response. Finally, we show that the normalization proposed seems to be more effective in the CAPINose case, reducing, for example, the variability associated to the TGS2602 sensor from 12.19% to 2.2%. PMID:24932869

  4. Acetic acid detection threshold in synthetic wine samples of a portable electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Macías, Miguel Macías; Manso, Antonio García; Orellana, Carlos Javier García; Velasco, Horacio Manuel González; Caballero, Ramón Gallardo; Chamizo, Juan Carlos Peguero

    2012-12-24

    Wine quality is related to its intrinsic visual, taste, or aroma characteristics and is reflected in the price paid for that wine. One of the most important wine faults is the excessive concentration of acetic acid which can cause a wine to take on vinegar aromas and reduce its varietal character. Thereby it is very important for the wine industry to have methods, like electronic noses, for real-time monitoring the excessive concentration of acetic acid in wines. However, aroma characterization of alcoholic beverages with sensor array electronic noses is a difficult challenge due to the masking effect of ethanol. In this work, in order to detect the presence of acetic acid in synthetic wine samples (aqueous ethanol solution at 10% v/v) we use a detection unit which consists of a commercial electronic nose and a HSS32 auto sampler, in combination with a neural network classifier (MLP). To find the characteristic vector representative of the sample that we want to classify, first we select the sensors, and the section of the sensors response curves, where the probability of detecting the presence of acetic acid will be higher, and then we apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA) such that each sensor response curve is represented by the coefficients of its first principal components. Results show that the PEN3 electronic nose is able to detect and discriminate wine samples doped with acetic acid in concentrations equal or greater than 2 g/L.

  5. Acetic Acid Detection Threshold in Synthetic Wine Samples of a Portable Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Macías, Miguel Macías; Manso, Antonio García; Orellana, Carlos Javier García; Velasco, Horacio Manuel González; Caballero, Ramón Gallardo; Chamizo, Juan Carlos Peguero

    2013-01-01

    Wine quality is related to its intrinsic visual, taste, or aroma characteristics and is reflected in the price paid for that wine. One of the most important wine faults is the excessive concentration of acetic acid which can cause a wine to take on vinegar aromas and reduce its varietal character. Thereby it is very important for the wine industry to have methods, like electronic noses, for real-time monitoring the excessive concentration of acetic acid in wines. However, aroma characterization of alcoholic beverages with sensor array electronic noses is a difficult challenge due to the masking effect of ethanol. In this work, in order to detect the presence of acetic acid in synthetic wine samples (aqueous ethanol solution at 10% v/v) we use a detection unit which consists of a commercial electronic nose and a HSS32 auto sampler, in combination with a neural network classifier (MLP). To find the characteristic vector representative of the sample that we want to classify, first we select the sensors, and the section of the sensors response curves, where the probability of detecting the presence of acetic acid will be higher, and then we apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA) such that each sensor response curve is represented by the coefficients of its first principal components. Results show that the PEN3 electronic nose is able to detect and discriminate wine samples doped with acetic acid in concentrations equal or greater than 2 g/L. PMID:23262483

  6. Romanenko works with the Electronic Nose (Enose) Hardware in the SM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-21

    ISS034-E-051551 (21 Feb. 2013) --- Cosmonaut Roman Romanenko, Expedition 34 flight engineer, works with the Electronic Nose hardware in the Zvezda service module aboard the International Space Station in Earth orbit. This hardware is used to measure contamination in the environment should there be hard to detect chemical leaks or spills.

  7. Detection of off-flavor in catfish using a conducting polymer electronic-nose technology

    Treesearch

    Alphus D Wilson; Charisse Oberle; Daniel F. Oberle

    2013-01-01

    The Aromascan A32S conducting polymer electronic nose was evaluated for the capability of detecting the presence of off-flavor malodorous compounds in catfish meat fillets to assess meat quality for potential merchantability. Sensor array outputs indicated that the aroma profiles of good-flavor (on-flavor) and off-flavor fillets were strongly different as confirmed by...

  8. Electronic nose with an air sensor matrix for detecting beef freshness

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The design of an electronic nose includes the design of a matrix of chemical sensors such as gas sensors, and development of a pattern-recognition algorithm. The sensor matrix sniffs the vapor from a sample and provides a set of measurements. The pattern-recognizer compares the pattern of the meas...

  9. Application of Combined Electronic Nose and Tongue Technology in Petfood Flavor Development and Quality Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladipupo, Bola; Stough, Jean; Guthrie, Nicky

    2011-09-01

    This work demonstrates the use of combined Electronic Nose and Tongue (ENT) technology in pet food flavor development and quality control. ENT with multivariate data analysis was used to effectively screen multiple flavor formulations during development, discriminate Off the Shelf (OTS) kibbles from different plants, and assess the quality of finished flavors; with good correlation to animal sensory results.

  10. A Study on Electronic Nose for Clinical Breath Diagnosis of Lung Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Di; Wang, Le; Yu, Jin; Wang, Ping; Hu, Yanjie; Ying, Kejing

    2009-05-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most deadly diseases and the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women. The high mortality in patients with lung cancer results, in part, from the lack of effective tools to diagnose the disease at an early stage before it has spread to regional nodes or has metastasized beyond the lung. The electronic nose combined with a diagnosis model which based on the biomarkers can provide a non-invasive and more convenient method. The article presented an improved e-Nose based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors and an a diagnosis model to diagnose lung cancer.

  11. Semiconductor Sensor Array Based Electronic Nose for Milk, Rancid Milk and Yoghurt Odors Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botre, B.; Gharpure, D.; Shaligram, A.; Sadistap, S.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents the use semiconductor sensor array based electronic nose for the identification of milk, rancid milk and yoghurt odors. A low cost sensor array, serial data acquisition system and E-nose software package (ESP) tool are used to generate the database, feature extraction and normalization. The MLP NN is trained using the NeuroSolutions for the identification. The network has successfully classified milk, rancid milk and yoghurt odors with 96% success rate. A sensitivity analysis is done to test the performance of the sensor data in the trained network

  12. Methods of determining electron concentrations in the magnetosphere from nose whistlers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Whistler propagation in the magnetosphere was studied in detail to find accurate and economical means of determining the path latitude and the electron concentration along the path from whistler parameters of nose frequency and travel time at the nose. Longitudinal propagation in field aligned whistler ducts of cold plasma was assumed, and the earth's magnetic field was approximated by a centered dipole. The effects of whistler propagation in the earth-ionosphere waveguide and through the conjugate ionospheres were treated as small perturbations. Several alternative methods are described so that the most economical method may be chosen depending on the desired accuracy and the availability of a computer or a calculator.

  13. Stable Odor Recognition by a neuro-adaptive Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, Eugenio; Magna, Gabriele; Polese, Davide; Vergara, Alexander; Schild, Detlev; di Natale, Corrado

    2015-06-01

    Sensitivity, selectivity and stability are decisive properties of sensors. In chemical gas sensors odor recognition can be severely compromised by poor signal stability, particularly in real life applications where the sensors are exposed to unpredictable sequences of odors under changing external conditions. Although olfactory receptor neurons in the nose face similar stimulus sequences under likewise changing conditions, odor recognition is very stable and odorants can be reliably identified independently from past odor perception. We postulate that appropriate pre-processing of the output signals of chemical sensors substantially contributes to the stability of odor recognition, in spite of marked sensor instabilities. To investigate this hypothesis, we use an adaptive, unsupervised neural network inspired by the glomerular input circuitry of the olfactory bulb. Essentially the model reduces the effect of the sensors’ instabilities by utilizing them via an adaptive multicompartment feed-forward inhibition. We collected and analyzed responses of a 4 × 4 gas sensor array to a number of volatile compounds applied over a period of 18 months, whereby every sensor was sampled episodically. The network conferred excellent stability to the compounds’ identification and was clearly superior over standard classifiers, even when one of the sensors exhibited random fluctuations or stopped working at all.

  14. Molecular modeling of polymer composite interactions with analytes in electronic nose sensors for environmental monitoring in International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Manfreda, A. M.; Zhou, H.; Manatt, K.

    2002-01-01

    We report a molecular modeling study to investigate the polymer-carbon black (CB) composite-analyte interactions in resistive sensors. These sensors comprise the JPL Electronic Nose (ENose) sensing array developed for monitoring breathing air in human habitats. The polymer in the composite is modeled based on its stereisomerism and sequence isomerism, while the CB is modeled as uncharged naphthalene rings (with no hydrogens). The Dreiding 2.21 force field is used for the polymer and solvent molecules and graphite parameters are assigned to the carbon black atoms. A combination of molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (NPT-MD and NVT-MD) techniques are used to obtain the equilibrium composite structure by inserting naphthalene rings in the polymer matrix. Polymers considered for this work include poly(4- vinylphenol), polyethylene oxide, and ethyl cellulose. Analytes studied are representative of both inorganic (ammonia) and organic (methanol, toluene, hydrazine) compounds. The results are analyzed for the composite microstructure by calculating the radial distribution profiles as well as for the sensor response by predicting the interaction energies of the analytes with the composites.

  15. Molecular modeling of polymer composite interactions with analytes in electronic nose sensors for environmental monitoring in International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Manfreda, A. M.; Zhou, H.; Manatt, K.

    2002-01-01

    We report a molecular modeling study to investigate the polymer-carbon black (CB) composite-analyte interactions in resistive sensors. These sensors comprise the JPL Electronic Nose (ENose) sensing array developed for monitoring breathing air in human habitats. The polymer in the composite is modeled based on its stereisomerism and sequence isomerism, while the CB is modeled as uncharged naphthalene rings (with no hydrogens). The Dreiding 2.21 force field is used for the polymer and solvent molecules and graphite parameters are assigned to the carbon black atoms. A combination of molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (NPT-MD and NVT-MD) techniques are used to obtain the equilibrium composite structure by inserting naphthalene rings in the polymer matrix. Polymers considered for this work include poly(4- vinylphenol), polyethylene oxide, and ethyl cellulose. Analytes studied are representative of both inorganic (ammonia) and organic (methanol, toluene, hydrazine) compounds. The results are analyzed for the composite microstructure by calculating the radial distribution profiles as well as for the sensor response by predicting the interaction energies of the analytes with the composites.

  16. Enhancing Electronic Nose Performance Based on a Novel QPSO-KELM Model

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chao; Yan, Jia; Duan, Shukai; Wang, Lidan; Jia, Pengfei; Zhang, Songlin

    2016-01-01

    A novel multi-class classification method for bacteria detection termed quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization-based kernel extreme learning machine (QPSO-KELM) based on an electronic nose (E-nose) technology is proposed in this paper. Time and frequency domain features are extracted from E-nose signals used for detecting four different classes of wounds (uninfected and infected with Staphylococcu aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in this experiment. In addition, KELM is compared with five existing classification methods: Linear discriminant analysis (LDA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), extreme learning machine (ELM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN) and support vector machine (SVM). Meanwhile, three traditional optimization methods including particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO), genetic algorithm (GA) and grid search algorithm (GS) and four kernel functions (Gaussian kernel, linear kernel, polynomial kernel and wavelet kernel) for KELM are discussed in this experiment. Finally, the QPSO-KELM model is also used to deal with another two experimental E-nose datasets in the previous experiments. The experimental results demonstrate the superiority of QPSO-KELM in various E-nose applications. PMID:27077860

  17. The potential of a portable, point-of-care electronic nose to diagnose tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Coronel Teixeira, Rosarito; Rodríguez, Mabel; Jiménez de Romero, Nilda; Bruins, Marcel; Gómez, Roscio; Yntema, Jan Bart; Chaparro Abente, Gilberto; Gerritsen, Jan Willem; Wiegerinck, Wim; Pérez Bejerano, Domingo; Magis-Escurra, Cecile

    2017-08-10

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death due to an infectious disease worldwide. Especially in low-income countries, new diagnostic techniques that are accessible, inexpensive and easy-to-use, are needed to shorten transmission time and initiate treatment earlier. We conducted a study with a handheld, point-of-care electronic nose (eNose) device to diagnose TB through exhaled breath. This study includes a total of 110 patients and visitors of an expert centre of respiratory diseases in Asunción, Paraguay. TB diagnosis was established by culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and compared with the eNose results in two phases. The calibration phase, including only culture confirmed TB cases versus healthy people, demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 93% respectively. The confirmation phase, including all participants, showed a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 92%. The eNose showed high acceptance rate among participants, and was easy to operate. The eNose resulted in a powerful technique to differentiate between healthy people and TB patients. Its comfort, speed and usability promise great potential in vulnerable groups, in remote areas and hospital settings to triage patients with suspicion of TB. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An electronic nose for reliable measurement and correct classification of beverages.

    PubMed

    Mamat, Mazlina; Samad, Salina Abdul; Hannan, Mahammad A

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the design of an electronic nose (E-nose) prototype for reliable measurement and correct classification of beverages. The prototype was developed and fabricated in the laboratory using commercially available metal oxide gas sensors and a temperature sensor. The repeatability, reproducibility and discriminative ability of the developed E-nose prototype were tested on odors emanating from different beverages such as blackcurrant juice, mango juice and orange juice, respectively. Repeated measurements of three beverages showed very high correlation (r > 0.97) between the same beverages to verify the repeatability. The prototype also produced highly correlated patterns (r > 0.97) in the measurement of beverages using different sensor batches to verify its reproducibility. The E-nose prototype also possessed good discriminative ability whereby it was able to produce different patterns for different beverages, different milk heat treatments (ultra high temperature, pasteurization) and fresh and spoiled milks. The discriminative ability of the E-nose was evaluated using Principal Component Analysis and a Multi Layer Perception Neural Network, with both methods showing good classification results.

  19. Detecting cannabis use on the human skin surface via an electronic nose system.

    PubMed

    Voss, Andreas; Witt, Katharina; Kaschowitz, Tobias; Poitz, Wolf; Ebert, Andreas; Roser, Patrik; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2014-07-23

    The most commonly used drug testing methods are based on the analysis of hair and urine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry or immunoassay screening. These methods are time-consuming and partly expensive. One alternative method could be the application of an "electronic nose" (eNose). We have developed an eNose to detect directly on the human skin surface metabolic changes in the human body odor caused by cannabis consumption. Twenty cannabis-smoking and 20 tobacco-smoking volunteers were enrolled in this study. For the sensor signal data processing, two different methods were applied: Principle component analysis (PCA) with discriminant analysis, and the method of pattern recognition with subsequent support vector machines (SVM) processing. The PCA analysis achieved a correct classification of 70%, whereas the SVM obtained an accuracy of 92.5% (sensitivity 95%, specificity 90%) between cannabis-consuming volunteers and tobacco-smoking subjects. This study shows evidence that a low-cost, portable and fast-working eNose system could be useful for health protection, security agencies and for forensic investigations. The ability to analyze human body odor with an eNose opens up a wide field for diagnosing other drugs and also various diseases.

  20. Enhancing Electronic Nose Performance Based on a Novel QPSO-KELM Model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Yan, Jia; Duan, Shukai; Wang, Lidan; Jia, Pengfei; Zhang, Songlin

    2016-04-11

    A novel multi-class classification method for bacteria detection termed quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization-based kernel extreme learning machine (QPSO-KELM) based on an electronic nose (E-nose) technology is proposed in this paper. Time and frequency domain features are extracted from E-nose signals used for detecting four different classes of wounds (uninfected and infected with Staphylococcu aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in this experiment. In addition, KELM is compared with five existing classification methods: Linear discriminant analysis (LDA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), extreme learning machine (ELM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN) and support vector machine (SVM). Meanwhile, three traditional optimization methods including particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO), genetic algorithm (GA) and grid search algorithm (GS) and four kernel functions (Gaussian kernel, linear kernel, polynomial kernel and wavelet kernel) for KELM are discussed in this experiment. Finally, the QPSO-KELM model is also used to deal with another two experimental E-nose datasets in the previous experiments. The experimental results demonstrate the superiority of QPSO-KELM in various E-nose applications.

  1. Electronic nose guided determination of frying disposal time of sunflower oil using fuzzy logic analysis.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Rohit; Sehwag, Sneha; Mishra, Hari Niwas

    2017-04-15

    An electronic nose (e-nose), having 18 metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) sensors, guided determination of frying disposal time of sunflower oil is reported. The ranking and screening of MOS sensors, specific for volatile organic compounds, was performed using fuzzy logic. A correlation was examined between rancidity indices of fried oil (total polar compounds (TPC), and triglyceride dimers-polymers (TGDP), among others) and e-nose based odor index. Fuzzy logic screened 6 MOS sensors (LY2/G, LY2/AA, LY2/GH, LY2/gCT1, T30/1, and P30/1) to deconvolute the rancid fried oils using hierarchical clustering on principal component space. A good relationship was noted between rancidity indices and odor index (R(2)>0.85). Based on maximum discard limits of rancidity indices (25% TPC and 10% TGDP), the frying disposal time of 15.2h (TPC) vs. 15.8h (e-nose) and 15.5h (TGDP) vs. 16.3h (e-nose) was determined. The demonstrated methodology holds a potential extension to different fried oils and products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application Of Electronic Nose And Ion Mobility Spectrometer To Quality Control Of Spice Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Banach, U.; Tiebe, C.; Huebert, Th.

    2009-05-23

    The aim of the paper is to demonstrate the application of electronic nose (e-nose) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) to quality control and to find out product adulteration of spice mixtures. Therefore the gaseous head space phase of four different spice mixtures (spices for sausages and saveloy) was differed from original composition and product adulteration. In this set of experiments metal-oxide type e-nose (KAMINA-type) has been used, and characteristic patterns of data corresponding to various complex odors of the four different spice mixtures were generated. Simultaneously an ion mobility spectrometer was coupled also to an emission chamber for the detection of gaseous components of spice mixtures. The two main methods that have been used show a clear discrimination between the original spice mixtures and product adulteration could be distinguished from original spice mixtures.

  3. A novel wearable electronic nose for healthcare based on flexible printed chemical sensor array.

    PubMed

    Lorwongtragool, Panida; Sowade, Enrico; Watthanawisuth, Natthapol; Baumann, Reinhard R; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2014-10-22

    A novel wearable electronic nose for armpit odor analysis is proposed by using a low-cost chemical sensor array integrated in a ZigBee wireless communication system. We report the development of a carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/polymer sensor array based on inkjet printing technology. With this technique both composite-like layer and actual composite film of CNTs/polymer were prepared as sensing layers for the chemical sensor array. The sensor array can response to a variety of complex odors and is installed in a prototype of wearable e-nose for monitoring the axillary odor released from human body. The wearable e-nose allows the classification of different armpit odors and the amount of the volatiles released as a function of level of skin hygiene upon different activities.

  4. A Novel Wearable Electronic Nose for Healthcare Based on Flexible Printed Chemical Sensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Lorwongtragool, Panida; Sowade, Enrico; Watthanawisuth, Natthapol; Baumann, Reinhard R.; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2014-01-01

    A novel wearable electronic nose for armpit odor analysis is proposed by using a low-cost chemical sensor array integrated in a ZigBee wireless communication system. We report the development of a carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/polymer sensor array based on inkjet printing technology. With this technique both composite-like layer and actual composite film of CNTs/polymer were prepared as sensing layers for the chemical sensor array. The sensor array can response to a variety of complex odors and is installed in a prototype of wearable e-nose for monitoring the axillary odor released from human body. The wearable e-nose allows the classification of different armpit odors and the amount of the volatiles released as a function of level of skin hygiene upon different activities. PMID:25340447

  5. Quality Detection of Litchi Stored in Different Environments Using an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sai; Lü, Enli; Lu, Huazhong; Zhou, Zhiyan; Wang, Yu; Yang, Jing; Wang, Yajuan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to explore the utility of an electronic nose to detect the quality of litchi fruit stored in different environments. In this study, a PEN3 electronic nose was adopted to test the storage time and hardness of litchi that were stored in three different types of environment (room temperature, refrigerator and controlled-atmosphere). After acquiring data about the hardness of the sample and from the electronic nose, linear discriminant analysis (LDA), canonical correlation analysis (CCA), BP neural network (BPNN) and BP neural network-partial least squares regression (BPNN-PLSR), were employed for data processing. The experimental results showed that the hardness of litchi fruits stored in all three environments decreased during storage. The litchi stored at room temperature had the fastest rate of decrease in hardness, followed by those stored in a refrigerator environment and under a controlled-atmosphere. LDA has a poor ability to classify the storage time of the three environments in which litchi was stored. BPNN can effectively recognize the storage time of litchi stored in a refrigerator and a controlled-atmosphere environment. However, the BPNN classification of the effect of room temperature storage on litchi was poor. CCA results show a significant correlation between electronic nose data and hardness data under the room temperature, and the correlation is more obvious for those under the refrigerator environment and controlled-atmosphere environment. The BPNN-PLSR can effectively predict the hardness of litchi under refrigerator storage conditions and a controlled-atmosphere environment. However, the BPNN-PLSR prediction of the effect of room temperature storage on litchi and global environment storage on litchi were poor. Thus, this experiment proved that an electronic nose can detect the quality of litchi under refrigeratored storage and a controlled-atmosphere environment. These results provide a useful reference for future

  6. Quality Detection of Litchi Stored in Different Environments Using an Electronic Nose.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sai; Lü, Enli; Lu, Huazhong; Zhou, Zhiyan; Wang, Yu; Yang, Jing; Wang, Yajuan

    2016-06-08

    The purpose of this paper was to explore the utility of an electronic nose to detect the quality of litchi fruit stored in different environments. In this study, a PEN3 electronic nose was adopted to test the storage time and hardness of litchi that were stored in three different types of environment (room temperature, refrigerator and controlled-atmosphere). After acquiring data about the hardness of the sample and from the electronic nose, linear discriminant analysis (LDA), canonical correlation analysis (CCA), BP neural network (BPNN) and BP neural network-partial least squares regression (BPNN-PLSR), were employed for data processing. The experimental results showed that the hardness of litchi fruits stored in all three environments decreased during storage. The litchi stored at room temperature had the fastest rate of decrease in hardness, followed by those stored in a refrigerator environment and under a controlled-atmosphere. LDA has a poor ability to classify the storage time of the three environments in which litchi was stored. BPNN can effectively recognize the storage time of litchi stored in a refrigerator and a controlled-atmosphere environment. However, the BPNN classification of the effect of room temperature storage on litchi was poor. CCA results show a significant correlation between electronic nose data and hardness data under the room temperature, and the correlation is more obvious for those under the refrigerator environment and controlled-atmosphere environment. The BPNN-PLSR can effectively predict the hardness of litchi under refrigerator storage conditions and a controlled-atmosphere environment. However, the BPNN-PLSR prediction of the effect of room temperature storage on litchi and global environment storage on litchi were poor. Thus, this experiment proved that an electronic nose can detect the quality of litchi under refrigeratored storage and a controlled-atmosphere environment. These results provide a useful reference for future

  7. Quantitative determination of pulp and paper industry emissions and associated odor intensity in methyl mercaptan equivalent using electronic nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Sharvari; Jana, Arun; Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Bandyopadhyay, Rajib; Pandey, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    The obnoxious odors generated from pulp and paper industries have been the cause of nuisance since the instigation of these industries. The objective of the study was to develop a metal oxide sensor based electronic nose for rapid measurement of odorant concentration and associated odor intensity of major reduced sulfur compounds emitted from different sources of these pulp and paper mills. The gas samples collected from the surroundings of major source points of industry were exposed to sensor array of the electronic nose and the change in voltage was measured and taken to PC through data acquisition cards. The same sets of samples were also tested with gas chromatography. The results of electronic nose and GC-FPD were correlated using response surface methodology to know the odorant concentration. The model fed with unknown industrial samples had more than 95% prediction capability. To determine odor intensity by electronic nose firstly a collective index was generated using SVD based 2-norm method (e-nose index) proportional to the sensors response relative to reference gas, methyl mercaptan. Secondly the e-nose index was associated with human expert evaluations. The training of the electronic nose enabled it to predict odorant concentration found at the industrial site and associated odor intensity in methyl mercaptan equivalent. The overall results of the experiments carried out suggest the potential of electronic nose as a device for on or off line measurement of odorant concentration and odor intensity.

  8. Electronic-Nose Applications for Fruit Identification, Ripeness and Quality Grading

    PubMed Central

    Baietto, Manuela; Wilson, Alphus D.

    2015-01-01

    Fruits produce a wide range of volatile organic compounds that impart their characteristically distinct aromas and contribute to unique flavor characteristics. Fruit aroma and flavor characteristics are of key importance in determining consumer acceptance in commercial fruit markets based on individual preference. Fruit producers, suppliers and retailers traditionally utilize and rely on human testers or panels to evaluate fruit quality and aroma characters for assessing fruit salability in fresh markets. We explore the current and potential utilization of electronic-nose devices (with specialized sensor arrays), instruments that are very effective in discriminating complex mixtures of fruit volatiles, as new effective tools for more efficient fruit aroma analyses to replace conventional expensive methods used in fruit aroma assessments. We review the chemical nature of fruit volatiles during all stages of the agro-fruit production process, describe some of the more important applications that electronic nose (e-nose) technologies have provided for fruit aroma characterizations, and summarize recent research providing e-nose data on the effectiveness of these specialized gas-sensing instruments for fruit identifications, cultivar discriminations, ripeness assessments and fruit grading for assuring fruit quality in commercial markets. PMID:25569761

  9. An electronic nose for amine detection based on polymer/SWNT-COOH nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Lorwongtragooll, Panida; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2011-12-01

    An electronic nose (e-nose) system based on polymer/carboxylic-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-COOH) was developed for sensing various volatile amines. The SWNT-COOH dispersed in the matrix of different polymers; namely, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), cumene terminated polystyrene-co-maleic anhydride (cumene-PSMA), poly(styrenecomaleic acid) partial isobutyl/methyl mixed ester (PSE), and polyvinylpyrrolidon (PVP), were deposited on interdigitated gold electrodes to make the gas sensors. The response of these sensors to volatile amines was studied by both static and dynamic flow measurements. It was found that all sensors exhibited behaviors corresponding to Plateau-Bretano-Stevens law (R2 = 0.81 to 0.99) as the response to volatile amines. Real-world application was demonstrated by applying this e-nose to monitor the odor of sun-dried snakeskin gourami that was pre-processed by salting-preservation. This electronic nose can discriminate sun-dried fish odors with different stored days using a simple pattern recognition based on the principal component analysis (PCA).

  10. Advances in electronic-nose technologies for the detection of volatile biomarker metabolites in the human breath

    Treesearch

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in the use of electronic-nose (e-nose) devices to analyze human breath profiles for the presence of specific volatile metabolites, known as biomarkers or chemical bio-indicators of specific human diseases, metabolic disorders and the overall health status of individuals, are providing the potential for new noninvasive tools and techniques useful to...

  11. Electronic-nose applications in forensic science and for analysis of volatile biomarkers in the human breath

    Treesearch

    AD Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The application of electronic-nose (E-nose) technologies in forensic science is a recent new development following a long history of progress in the development of diverse applications in the related biomedical and pharmaceutical fields. Data from forensic analyses must satisfy the needs and requirements of both the scientific and legal communities. The type of data...

  12. Use of electronic nose and tongue for separation of fruit aromas and non-aroma compounds for quality evaluation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The electronic nose (e-nose) was used to distinguish differences between mango fruit of different harvest maturities, apple fruit to which different coatings were applied, cut apple subjected to heat and ethanol treatments as well as strawberries of different ripeness stages, based on their volatile...

  13. Monitoring of alcoholic fermentation using near infrared and mid infrared spectroscopies combined with electronic nose and electronic tongue.

    PubMed

    Buratti, S; Ballabio, D; Giovanelli, G; Dominguez, C M Zuluanga; Moles, A; Benedetti, S; Sinelli, N

    2011-07-04

    Effective fermentation monitoring is a growing need due to the rapid pace of change in the wine industry, which calls for fast methods providing real time information in order to assure the quality of the final product. The objective of this work is to investigate the potential of non-destructive techniques associated with chemometric data analysis, to monitor time-related changes that occur during red wine fermentation. Eight micro-fermentation trials conducted in the Valtellina region (Northern Italy) during the 2009 vintage, were monitored by a FT-NIR and a FT-IR spectrometer and by an electronic nose and tongue. The spectroscopic technique was used to investigate molecular changes, while electronic nose and electronic tongue evaluated the evolution of the aroma and taste profile during the must-wine fermentation. Must-wine samples were also analysed by traditional chemical methods in order to determine sugars (glucose and fructose) consumption and alcohol (ethanol and glycerol) production. Principal Component Analysis was applied to spectral, electronic nose and electronic tongue data, as an exploratory tool, to uncover molecular, aroma and taste modifications during the fermentation process. Furthermore, the chemical data and the PC1 scores from spectral, electronic nose and electronic tongue data were modelled as a function of time to identify critical points during fermentation. The results showed that NIR and MIR spectroscopies are useful to investigate molecular changes involved in wine fermentation while electronic nose and electronic tongue can be applied to detect the evolution of taste and aroma profile. Moreover, as demonstrated through the modeling of NIR, MIR, electronic nose and electronic tongue data, these non destructive methods are suitable for the monitoring of must-wine fermentation giving crucial information about the quality of the final product in agreement with chemical parameters. Although in this study the measurements were carried out

  14. Potential application of the electronic nose for shelf-life determination of raw milk and red meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, Aziz; El Barbri, Noureddine; El Bari, Nezha; Llobet, Eduard; Correig, Xavier; Bouchikhi, Benachir

    2009-05-01

    The present study describes the performance of an electronic nose in food odor analysis. This methodology was successfully applied to odor characterization of milk stored at 4° C during 4 days and of beef and sheep meat stored at 4° C for up to 15 days. The electronic nose sensor system coupled to PCA as a pattern recognition technique, is able to reveal characteristic changes in raw milk and red meat quality related to storage time. Additionally, a bacteriological method was selected as the reference method to consistently train the electronic nose system for both beef and sheep meat analysis.

  15. Novel method for the producing area identification of Zhongning Goji berries by electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Yu, Xiuzhu; Xu, Lirong; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2017-04-15

    High-quality Zhongning Goji berries (ZNG) are illegally adulterated in the market by adding non-ZNG (NZNG). An accurate, rapid, and effective approach for the producing area identification of ZNG is needed to protect the geographical indications of Goji berry products and to ensure fair trade. Samples from different regions were collected and their odors were detected by an electronic nose (E-nose). Principal component analysis (PCA), cluster analysis (CA), and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were employed to build identification models. The E-nose models were further verified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The identification rates of the PCA, CA, and LDA models were 91.0%, 98.9%, and 100%, respectively. The PCA and CA models presented good results, and the LDA model showed optimum performance. These conditions indicate the feasibility of using the E-nose technique for ZNG identification. GC-MS analysis revealed differences and similarities in total ion current chromatograms between ZNG and NZNG.

  16. Detecting Cannabis Use on the Human Skin Surface via an Electronic Nose System

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Andreas; Witt, Katharina; Kaschowitz, Tobias; Poitz, Wolf; Ebert, Andreas; Roser, Patrik; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly used drug testing methods are based on the analysis of hair and urine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry or immunoassay screening. These methods are time-consuming and partly expensive. One alternative method could be the application of an “electronic nose” (eNose). We have developed an eNose to detect directly on the human skin surface metabolic changes in the human body odor caused by cannabis consumption. Twenty cannabis-smoking and 20 tobacco-smoking volunteers were enrolled in this study. For the sensor signal data processing, two different methods were applied: Principle component analysis (PCA) with discriminant analysis, and the method of pattern recognition with subsequent support vector machines (SVM) processing. The PCA analysis achieved a correct classification of 70%, whereas the SVM obtained an accuracy of 92.5% (sensitivity 95%, specificity 90%) between cannabis-consuming volunteers and tobacco-smoking subjects. This study shows evidence that a low-cost, portable and fast-working eNose system could be useful for health protection, security agencies and for forensic investigations. The ability to analyze human body odor with an eNose opens up a wide field for diagnosing other drugs and also various diseases. PMID:25057136

  17. Evaluation of an electronic nose for the early detection of organic overload of anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Adam, Gilles; Lemaigre, Sébastien; Romain, Anne-Claude; Nicolas, Jacques; Delfosse, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at analysing the utilization of an electronic nose (e-nose) to serve as a specific monitoring tool for anaerobic digestion process, especially for detecting organic overload. An array of non specific metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors were used to detect process faults due to organic overload events in twelve 1.8-L anaerobic semi-continuous reactors. Three different load strategies were followed: (1) a cautious organic load (1.3 gVS L(-1) day(-1)); (2) an increasing load strategy (1.3-5.3 gVS L(-1) day(-1)) and (3) a cautious organic load with load pulses of up to 12 gVS L(-1) day(-1). A first monitoring campaign was conducted with three different substrates: sucrose, maize oil and a mix of sucrose/oil during 60 days. The second campaign was run with dry sugar beet pulp for 45 days. Hotelling's T(2) value and upper control limit to a reference set of digesters fed with a cautious OLR (1.3 gVS L(-1) day(-1)) was used as indirect state variable of the reactors. Overload situations were identified by the e-nose apparatus with Hotelling's T(2) values at least four times higher in magnitude than the upper control limit of 23.7. These results confirmed that the e-nose technology appeared promising for online detection of process imbalances in the domain of anaerobic digestion.

  18. Detection of off-flavor in catfish using a conducting polymer electronic-nose technology.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Alphus D; Oberle, Charisse S; Oberle, Daniel F

    2013-11-25

    The Aromascan A32S conducting polymer electronic nose was evaluated for the capability of detecting the presence of off-flavor malodorous compounds in catfish meat fillets to assess meat quality for potential merchantability. Sensor array outputs indicated that the aroma profiles of good-flavor (on-flavor) and off-flavor fillets were strongly different as confirmed by a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and a Quality Factor value (QF > 7.9) indicating a significant difference at (P < 0.05). The A32S e-nose effectively discriminated between good-flavor and off-flavor catfish at high levels of accuracy (>90%) and with relatively low rates (≤5%) of unknown or indecisive determinations in three trials. This A32S e-nose instrument also was capable of detecting the incidence of mild off-flavor in fillets at levels lower than the threshold of human olfactory detection. Potential applications of e-nose technologies for pre- and post-harvest management of production and meat-quality downgrade problems associated with catfish off-flavor are discussed.

  19. Valid Probabilistic Predictions for Ginseng with Venn Machines Using Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Wang, You; Miao, Jiacheng; Lyu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Linfeng; Luo, Zhiyuan; Li, Guang

    2016-01-01

    In the application of electronic noses (E-noses), probabilistic prediction is a good way to estimate how confident we are about our prediction. In this work, a homemade E-nose system embedded with 16 metal-oxide semi-conductive gas sensors was used to discriminate nine kinds of ginsengs of different species or production places. A flexible machine learning framework, Venn machine (VM) was introduced to make probabilistic predictions for each prediction. Three Venn predictors were developed based on three classical probabilistic prediction methods (Platt’s method, Softmax regression and Naive Bayes). Three Venn predictors and three classical probabilistic prediction methods were compared in aspect of classification rate and especially the validity of estimated probability. A best classification rate of 88.57% was achieved with Platt’s method in offline mode, and the classification rate of VM-SVM (Venn machine based on Support Vector Machine) was 86.35%, just 2.22% lower. The validity of Venn predictors performed better than that of corresponding classical probabilistic prediction methods. The validity of VM-SVM was superior to the other methods. The results demonstrated that Venn machine is a flexible tool to make precise and valid probabilistic prediction in the application of E-nose, and VM-SVM achieved the best performance for the probabilistic prediction of ginseng samples. PMID:27420074

  20. Screening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome by Electronic-Nose Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Scarlata, Simone; Pennazza, Giorgio; Santonico, Marco; Santangelo, Simona; Rossi Bartoli, Isaura; Rivera, Chiara; Vernile, Chiara; De Vincentis, Antonio; Antonelli Incalzi, Raffaele

    2017-09-20

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) carries important social and economic implications. Once the suspicion of OSAS has arisen, Polysomnography (PSG) represents the diagnostic gold standard. However, about 45% of people who have undergone PSG are free from OSAS. Thus, efforts should be made to improve the selection of subjects. We verified whether the pattern of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) helps to select patients amenable to PSG. We studied 136 subjects (20 obese non-OSAS, 20 hypoxic OSAS, 20 non-hypoxic OSAS, and 20 non-hypoxic Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) vs 56 healthy controls) without any criteria of exclusion for comorbidity to deal with a real-life population. VOCs patterns were analyzed using electronic-nose (e-nose) technology. A Discriminant Analysis (Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis) was performed to predict respiratory functions and PSG parameters. E-nose distinguished controls (100% correct classification) from others and identified 60% of hypoxic, and 35% of non-hypoxic OSAS patients. Similarly, it identified 60% of COPD patients. One-by-one group comparison yielded optimal discrimination of OSAS vs controls and of COPD vs controls (100% correct classification). In conclusion, e-nose technology applied to breath-analysis can discriminate non-respiratory from respiratory diseased populations in real-life multimorbid populations and exclude OSAS. If confirmed, this evidence may become pivotal for screening purposes.

  1. Detection of Off-Flavor in Catfish Using a Conducting Polymer Electronic-Nose Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alphus D.; Oberle, Charisse S.; Oberle, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    The Aromascan A32S conducting polymer electronic nose was evaluated for the capability of detecting the presence of off-flavor malodorous compounds in catfish meat fillets to assess meat quality for potential merchantability. Sensor array outputs indicated that the aroma profiles of good-flavor (on-flavor) and off-flavor fillets were strongly different as confirmed by a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and a Quality Factor value (QF > 7.9) indicating a significant difference at (P < 0.05). The A32S e-nose effectively discriminated between good-flavor and off-flavor catfish at high levels of accuracy (>90%) and with relatively low rates (≤5%) of unknown or indecisive determinations in three trials. This A32S e-nose instrument also was capable of detecting the incidence of mild off-flavor in fillets at levels lower than the threshold of human olfactory detection. Potential applications of e-nose technologies for pre- and post-harvest management of production and meat-quality downgrade problems associated with catfish off-flavor are discussed. PMID:24287526

  2. Application of the electronic nose to the classification of resistance to Western flower thrips in chrysanthemums.

    PubMed

    McKellar, Robin C; McGarvey, Brian D; Tsao, Rong; Lu, Xuewen; Knight, Kelley P

    2005-10-01

    A metal oxide sensor-based electronic nose was tested for its ability to discriminate among chrysanthemum cultivars with varying degrees of resistance to western flower thrips (WFT), based on volatile chemicals released from cut leaves. Cultivars that were susceptible, intermediate, or resistant to WFT [based on mean cultivar rank (MCR)] were used as standards, and were correctly classified (> 90%) by using discriminant function analysis. Several cultivars with unknown resistance were classified based on the standards, and were used as standards in a subsequent trial to classify other unknowns. The results of this study demonstrate some agreement between the WFT resistance categories as designated by the electronic nose and results of feeding bioassays (MCR), suggesting that this technique may serve as a useful screening tool for WFT resistance.

  3. Screening Cereals Quality by Electronic Nose: the Example of Mycotoxins Naturally Contaminated Maize and Durum Wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnoli, Anna; Dell'Orto, Vittorio; Savoini, Giovanni; Cheli, Federica

    2009-05-01

    Mycotoxins represent an heterogeneous group of toxic compounds from fungi metabolism. Due to the frequent occurrence of mycotoxins in cereals commodities the develop of cost/effective screening methods represent an important topic to ensure food and feed safety. In the presented study a commercial electronic nose constituted by ten MOS (Metal Oxide Sensors) was applied to verify the possibility of discriminating between mycotoxins contaminated and non-contaminated cereals. The described analytical approach was able to discriminate contaminated and non-contaminated samples both in the case of aflatoxins infected maize and deoxynivalenol infected durum wheat samples. In the case of maize data two sensors from the array revealed a partial relation with the level of aflatoxins. These results could be promising for a further improvement of electronic nose application in order to develop a semi-quantitative screening approach to mycotoxins contamination.

  4. Electronic Nose Breathprints Are Independent of Acute Changes in Airway Caliber in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Zsofia; Fens, Niki; van der Maten, Jan; van der Schee, Marc P.; Wagener, Ariane H.; de Nijs, Selma B.; Dijkers, Erica; Sterk, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular profiling of exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOC) by electronic nose technology provides breathprints that discriminate between patients with different inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma and COPD. However, it is unknown whether this is determined by differences in airway caliber. We hypothesized that breathprints obtained by electronic nose are independent of acute changes in airway caliber in asthma. Ten patients with stable asthma underwent methacholine provocation (Visit 1) and sham challenge with isotonic saline (Visit 2). At Visit 1, exhaled air was repetitively collected pre-challenge, after reaching the provocative concentration (PC20) causing 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and after subsequent salbutamol inhalation. At Visit 2, breath was collected pre-challenge, post-saline and post-salbutamol. At each occasion, an expiratory vital capacity was collected after 5 min of tidal breathing through an inspiratory VOC-filter in a Tedlar bag and sampled by electronic nose (Cyranose 320). Breathprints were analyzed with principal component analysis and individual factors were compared with mixed model analysis followed by pairwise comparisons. Inhalation of methacholine led to a 30.8 ± 3.3% fall in FEV1 and was followed by a significant change in breathprint (p = 0.04). Saline inhalation did not induce a significant change in FEV1, but altered the breathprint (p = 0.01). However, the breathprint obtained after the methacholine provocation was not significantly different from that after saline challenge (p = 0.27). The molecular profile of exhaled air in patients with asthma is altered by nebulized aerosols, but is not affected by acute changes in airway caliber. Our data demonstrate that breathprints by electronic nose are not confounded by the level of airway obstruction. PMID:22163399

  5. Electronic Noses As Flexible Tools For Evaluating Food Quality And Safety: Can We Trust Them?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.; Sberveglieri, G.

    2011-09-01

    Since most food adulterations are reflected on volatile chemical profile, Electronic Noses (ENs) appear as excellent candidates for process monitoring, freshness evaluation, shelf-life investigation, sensory and authenticity assessment, microbial contamination diagnosis [1]. In this study three applications recently carried out in our laboratory are presented and discussed, with the aim to illustrate three paradigmatic and diverse issues related to food quality control in which EN can find application and discuss the reliability of sensor technology in food analysis.

  6. Electronic Nose Characterization of the Quality Parameters of Freeze-Dried Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, R.; Santonico, M.; Martinelli, E.; Paolesse, R.; Passot, S.; Fonseca, F.; Cenard, S.; Trelea, C.; Di Natale, C.

    2011-09-01

    Freeze-drying is the method of choice for preserving heat sensitive biological products such as microorganisms. The development of a fast analytical method for evaluating the properties of the dehydrated bacteria is then necessary for a proper utilization of the product in several food processes. In this paper, dried bacteria headspace is analyzed by a GC-MS and an electronic nose. Results indicate that headspace contains enough information to assess the products quality.

  7. Electronic nose application for determination of Penicillium digitatum in Valencia oranges.

    PubMed

    Pallottino, Federico; Costa, Corrado; Antonucci, Francesca; Strano, Maria Concetta; Calandra, Mariarosaria; Solaini, Silvia; Menesatti, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum are responsible for one the most serious diseases occurring during storage of citrus fruits. Its early detection allows a relevant increase in shelf life, and in situ monitoring of fungal infections represents a very efficient tool to improve storage quality. In the case of metabolic alterations due to physiological or fungal pathologies, olfactometric analysis allows the detection of specific volatile biomarkers, thus providing an effective tool for postharvest quality control of fruits and vegetables. A total of 300 Valencia oranges were analysed with an electronic nose and results were screened by a multivariate classification technique, partial least squares discriminant analysis, in order to investigate whether the electronic nose could distinguish between Penicillium-infected and non-infected samples and to evaluate the efficiency of the group classifications. High percentages of correct classification were obtained at low levels of infection (100% for 2-5% infection in an independent test). The electronic nose may be successfully applied as a reliable, non-destructive and non-contact indirect technology for the identification of fungal strains in storage rooms, especially when the infection occurs in small percentages that are not easily identifiable by classic methodologies of inspection. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. The electronic NOSE and its application to the manufacture of food products

    PubMed Central

    Hodgins, Diana; Sirnmonds, Derek

    1995-01-01

    The Electronic NOSE (Neotronics Olfactory Sensing Equipment) is an instrument which mimics the human olfactory sensory system. It analyses complex vapours and produces a simple output. In the food industry there are numerous examples where the aroma from the raw ingredients through to the final product are important. These aromas are currently analysed using human sensory panels or analytical equipment such as gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The Electronic NOSE described in this paper was not developed to replace the GC/MS or the sensory panel but to provide an instrumental measure of aroma quality which would be related to and complement the current methodology. The Electronic NOSE is a robust system which can detect complex vapours at levels similar to the human, which means typically in the parts per billion range. The system produces an output which can be easily related to sensory data and is easy to interpret by a non-skilled operator. No part of this system reacts with the sample under test. PMID:18925038

  9. A comparison of different chemometrics approaches for the robust classification of electronic nose data.

    PubMed

    Gromski, Piotr S; Correa, Elon; Vaughan, Andrew A; Wedge, David C; Turner, Michael L; Goodacre, Royston

    2014-11-01

    Accurate detection of certain chemical vapours is important, as these may be diagnostic for the presence of weapons, drugs of misuse or disease. In order to achieve this, chemical sensors could be deployed remotely. However, the readout from such sensors is a multivariate pattern, and this needs to be interpreted robustly using powerful supervised learning methods. Therefore, in this study, we compared the classification accuracy of four pattern recognition algorithms which include linear discriminant analysis (LDA), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), random forests (RF) and support vector machines (SVM) which employed four different kernels. For this purpose, we have used electronic nose (e-nose) sensor data (Wedge et al., Sensors Actuators B Chem 143:365-372, 2009). In order to allow direct comparison between our four different algorithms, we employed two model validation procedures based on either 10-fold cross-validation or bootstrapping. The results show that LDA (91.56% accuracy) and SVM with a polynomial kernel (91.66% accuracy) were very effective at analysing these e-nose data. These two models gave superior prediction accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in comparison to the other techniques employed. With respect to the e-nose sensor data studied here, our findings recommend that SVM with a polynomial kernel should be favoured as a classification method over the other statistical models that we assessed. SVM with non-linear kernels have the advantage that they can be used for classifying non-linear as well as linear mapping from analytical data space to multi-group classifications and would thus be a suitable algorithm for the analysis of most e-nose sensor data.

  10. Canine olfaction and electronic nose detection of volatile organic compounds in the detection of cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Spencer W; Moore, Daniel R; Marzouk, Evan B; Glenn, Frasier R; Hallock, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory cancer detection shows promise as an affordable, precise, and noninvasive way to screen for cancer. This review focuses on two methods of olfactory cancer detection: first, the ability of canines to differentiate between cancerous and healthy individuals through the use of biological samples and second, electronic nose technology that uses chemical sensors to detect known biomarkers in exhaled breath. This review summarizes and critiques past research and outlines future directions to improve understanding of both canine olfaction and electronic nose technology.

  11. Electronic Nose Based on Metal Oxide Semiconductor Sensors as an Alternative Technique for the Spoilage Classification of Red Meat

    PubMed Central

    El Barbri, Noureddine; Llobet, Eduard; El Bari, Nezha; Correig, Xavier; Bouchikhi, Benachir

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop an electronic nose for the quality control of red meat. Electronic nose and bacteriological measurements are performed to analyse samples of beef and sheep meat stored at 4°C for up to 15 days. Principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine (SVM) based classification techniques are used to investigate the performance of the electronic nose system in the spoilage classification of red meats. The bacteriological method was selected as the reference method to consistently train the electronic nose system. The SVM models built classified meat samples based on the total microbial population into “unspoiled” (microbial counts < 6 log10 cfu/g) and “spoiled” (microbial counts ≥ 6 log10 cfu/g). The preliminary results obtained by the bacteria total viable counts (TVC) show that the shelf-life of beef and sheep meats stored at 4 °C are 7 and 5 days, respectively. The electronic nose system coupled to SVM could discriminate between unspoiled/ spoiled beef or sheep meats with a success rate of 98.81 or 96.43 %, respectively. To investigate whether the results of the electronic nose correlated well with the results of the bacteriological analysis, partial least squares (PLS) calibration models were built and validated. Good correlation coefficients between the electronic nose signals and bacteriological data were obtained, a clear indication that the electronic nose system can become a simple and rapid technique for the quality control of red meats. PMID:27879699

  12. Pressure-driven fast reaction and recovery of peptide receptor for an electronic nose application

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Yong Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Myung; Chae, Myung-Sic; Yoon Kang, Ji; Song Kim, Tae; Seon Hwang, Kyo E-mail: jhlee@kw.ac.kr; Hoon Lee, Jeong E-mail: jhlee@kw.ac.kr

    2014-02-24

    Combining a highly sensitive sensor platform with highly selective recognition elements is essential for micro/nanotechnology-based electronic nose applications. Particularly, the regeneration sensor surface and its conditions are key issues for practical e-nose applications. We propose a highly sensitive piezoelectric-driven microcantilever array chip with highly selective peptide receptors. By utilizing the peptide receptor, which was discovered by a phase display screening process, we immobilized a dinitrotoluene (DNT) specific peptide as well as a DNT nonspecific peptide on the surface of the cantilever array. The delivery of DNT gas via pressure-driven flow led to a greater instant response of ∼30 Hz, compared to diffusion only (∼15 Hz for 15 h). Using a simple pressure-driven air flow of ∼50 sccm, we confirmed that a ratio of ∼70% of the specific-bounded sites from DNT gas molecules could be regenerated, showing re-usability of the peptide receptor in on-site monitoring for electronic nose applications.

  13. A Framework for the Multi-Level Fusion of Electronic Nose and Electronic Tongue for Tea Quality Assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Ruicong; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Dezheng

    2017-05-03

    Electronic nose (E-nose) and electronic tongue (E-tongue) can mimic the sensory perception of human smell and taste, and they are widely applied in tea quality evaluation by utilizing the fingerprints of response signals representing the overall information of tea samples. The intrinsic part of human perception is the fusion of sensors, as more information is provided comparing to the information from a single sensory organ. In this study, a framework for a multi-level fusion strategy of electronic nose and electronic tongue was proposed to enhance the tea quality prediction accuracies, by simultaneously modeling feature fusion and decision fusion. The procedure included feature-level fusion (fuse the time-domain based feature and frequency-domain based feature) and decision-level fusion (D-S evidence to combine the classification results from multiple classifiers). The experiments were conducted on tea samples collected from various tea providers with four grades. The large quantity made the quality assessment task very difficult, and the experimental results showed much better classification ability for the multi-level fusion system. The proposed algorithm could better represent the overall characteristics of tea samples for both odor and taste.

  14. Evaluation of oxygen exposure levels and polyphenolic content of red wines using an electronic panel formed by an electronic nose and an electronic tongue.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mendez, M L; Apetrei, C; Gay, M; Medina-Plaza, C; de Saja, J A; Vidal, S; Aagaard, O; Ugliano, M; Wirth, J; Cheynier, V

    2014-07-15

    An electronic panel formed by an electronic nose and an electronic tongue has been used to analyse red wines showing high and low phenolic contents, obtained by flash release and traditional soaking, respectively, and processed with or without micro-oxygenation. Four oxygen transfer rate conditions (0.8, 1.9, 8.0, and 11.9 μl oxygen/bottle/day) were ensured by using synthetic closures with controlled oxygen permeability and storage under controlled atmosphere. Twenty-five chemical parameters associated with the polyphenolic composition, the colour indices and the levels of oxygen were measured in triplicate and correlated with the signals registered (seven replicas) by means of the electronic nose and the electronic tongue using partial least squares regression analysis. The electronic nose and the electronic tongue showed particularly good correlations with those parameters associated with the oxygen levels and, in particular, with the influence of the porosity of the closure to oxygen exposure. In turn, the electronic tongue was particularly sensitive to redox species including oxygen and phenolic compounds. It has been demonstrated that a combined system formed from the electronic nose and the electronic tongue provides information about the chemical composition of both the gas and the liquid phase of red wines. This complementary information improves the capacity to predict values of oxygen-related parameters, phenolic content and colour parameters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of Different Classification Methods for Analyzing Electronic Nose Data to Characterize Sesame Oils and Blends

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiaolong; Li, Hui; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    An electronic nose (e-nose) was used to characterize sesame oils processed by three different methods (hot-pressed, cold-pressed, and refined), as well as blends of the sesame oils and soybean oil. Seven classification and prediction methods, namely PCA, LDA, PLS, KNN, SVM, LASSO and RF, were used to analyze the e-nose data. The classification accuracy and MAUC were employed to evaluate the performance of these methods. The results indicated that sesame oils processed with different methods resulted in different sensor responses, with cold-pressed sesame oil producing the strongest sensor signals, followed by the hot-pressed sesame oil. The blends of pressed sesame oils with refined sesame oil were more difficult to be distinguished than the blends of pressed sesame oils and refined soybean oil. LDA, KNN, and SVM outperformed the other classification methods in distinguishing sesame oil blends. KNN, LASSO, PLS, and SVM (with linear kernel), and RF models could adequately predict the adulteration level (% of added soybean oil) in the sesame oil blends. Among the prediction models, KNN with k = 1 and 2 yielded the best prediction results. PMID:26506350

  16. Headspace Analysis of Philippine Civet Coffee Beans Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongo, E.; Sevilla, F.; Antonelli, A.; Sberveglieri, G.; Montevecchi, G.; Sberveglieri, V.; de Paola, E. L.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Civet coffee, the most expensive and best coffee in the world, is an economically important export product of the Philippines. With a growing threat of food adulteration and counterfeiting, a need for quality authentication is essential to protect the integrity and strong market value of Philippine civet coffee. At present, there is no internationally accepted method of verifying whether a bean is an authentic civet coffee. This study presented a practical and promising approach to identify and establish the headspace qualitative profile of Philippine civet coffee using electronic nose (E-nose) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). E-nose analysis revealed that aroma characteristic is one of the most important quality indicators of civet coffee. The findings were supported by GC-MS analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) exhibited a clearly separated civet coffees from their control beans. The chromatographic fingerprints indicated that civet coffees differed with their control beans in terms of composition and concentration of individual volatile constituents.

  17. Determination of Ignitable Liquids in Fire Debris: Direct Analysis by Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Ferreiro-González, Marta; Barbero, Gerardo F.; Palma, Miguel; Ayuso, Jesús; Álvarez, José A.; Barroso, Carmelo G.

    2016-01-01

    Arsonists usually use an accelerant in order to start or accelerate a fire. The most widely used analytical method to determine the presence of such accelerants consists of a pre-concentration step of the ignitable liquid residues followed by chromatographic analysis. A rapid analytical method based on headspace-mass spectrometry electronic nose (E-Nose) has been developed for the analysis of Ignitable Liquid Residues (ILRs). The working conditions for the E-Nose analytical procedure were optimized by studying different fire debris samples. The optimized experimental variables were related to headspace generation, specifically, incubation temperature and incubation time. The optimal conditions were 115 °C and 10 min for these two parameters. Chemometric tools such as hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were applied to the MS data (45–200 m/z) to establish the most suitable spectroscopic signals for the discrimination of several ignitable liquids. The optimized method was applied to a set of fire debris samples. In order to simulate post-burn samples several ignitable liquids (gasoline, diesel, citronella, kerosene, paraffin) were used to ignite different substrates (wood, cotton, cork, paper and paperboard). A full discrimination was obtained on using discriminant analysis. This method reported here can be considered as a green technique for fire debris analyses. PMID:27187407

  18. A False Alarm Reduction Method for a Gas Sensor Based Electronic Nose.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Mizanur; Charoenlarpnopparut, Chalie; Suksompong, Prapun; Toochinda, Pisanu; Taparugssanagorn, Attaphongse

    2017-09-12

    Electronic noses (E-Noses) are becoming popular for food and fruit quality assessment due to their robustness and repeated usability without fatigue, unlike human experts. An E-Nose equipped with classification algorithms and having open ended classification boundaries such as the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), support vector machine (SVM), and multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN), are found to suffer from false classification errors of irrelevant odor data. To reduce false classification and misclassification errors, and to improve correct rejection performance; algorithms with a hyperspheric boundary, such as a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) and generalized regression neural network (GRNN) with a Gaussian activation function in the hidden layer should be used. The simulation results presented in this paper show that GRNN has more correct classification efficiency and false alarm reduction capability compared to RBFNN. As the design of a GRNN and RBFNN is complex and expensive due to large numbers of neuron requirements, a simple hyperspheric classification method based on minimum, maximum, and mean (MMM) values of each class of the training dataset was presented. The MMM algorithm was simple and found to be fast and efficient in correctly classifying data of training classes, and correctly rejecting data of extraneous odors, and thereby reduced false alarms.

  19. Electronic nose with polymer-composite sensors for monitoring fungal deterioration of stored rapeseed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancarz, Marek; Wawrzyniak, Jolanta; Gawrysiak-Witulska, Marzena; Wiącek, Dariusz; Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Rusinek, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Investigations were performed to examine the possibility of using an electronic nose to monitor development of fungal microflora during the first eighteen days of rapeseed storage. The Cyranose 320 device manufactured by Sensigent was used to analyse volatile organic compounds. Each sample of infected material was divided into three parts and the degree of spoilage was measured in three ways: analysis of colony forming units, determination of ergosterol content, and measurement of volatile organic compounds with the e-nose. Principal component analysis was performed on the generated patterns of signals and six groups of different spoilage levels were isolated. An analysis of sensorgrams for a few sensors with a strong signal for each group of rapeseed spoilage was performed. The ratio of the association time to the steady state was calculated. This ratio was different for the low level and the highest level of ergosterol and colony forming units. The results have shown that the e-nose can be a useful tool for quick estimation of the degree of rapeseed spoilage.

  20. A Portable Electronic Nose for Toxic Vapor Detection, Identification, and Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linnell, B. R.; Young, R. C.; Griffin, T. P.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Peterson, B. V.; Brooks, K. B.

    2005-01-01

    The Space Program and military use large quantities of hydrazine and monomethyl hydrazine as rocket propellant, which are very toxic and suspected human carcinogens. Current off-the-shelf portable instruments require 10 to 20 minutes of exposure to detect these compounds at the minimum required concentrations and are prone to false positives, making them unacceptable for many operations. In addition, post-mission analyses of grab bag air samples from the Shuttle have confirmed the occasional presence of on-board volatile organic contaminants, which also need to be monitored to ensure crew safety. A new prototype instrument based on electronic nose (e-nose) technology has demonstrated the ability to qualify (identify) and quantify many of these vapors at their minimum required concentrations, and may easily be adapted to detect many other toxic vapors. To do this, it was necessary to develop algorithms to classify unknown vapors, recognize when a vapor is not any of the vapors of interest, and estimate the concentrations of the contaminants. This paper describes the design of the portable e-nose instrument, test equipment setup, test protocols, pattern recognition algorithms, concentration estimation methods, and laboratory test results.

  1. Determination of Ignitable Liquids in Fire Debris: Direct Analysis by Electronic Nose.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro-González, Marta; Barbero, Gerardo F; Palma, Miguel; Ayuso, Jesús; Álvarez, José A; Barroso, Carmelo G

    2016-05-13

    Arsonists usually use an accelerant in order to start or accelerate a fire. The most widely used analytical method to determine the presence of such accelerants consists of a pre-concentration step of the ignitable liquid residues followed by chromatographic analysis. A rapid analytical method based on headspace-mass spectrometry electronic nose (E-Nose) has been developed for the analysis of Ignitable Liquid Residues (ILRs). The working conditions for the E-Nose analytical procedure were optimized by studying different fire debris samples. The optimized experimental variables were related to headspace generation, specifically, incubation temperature and incubation time. The optimal conditions were 115 °C and 10 min for these two parameters. Chemometric tools such as hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were applied to the MS data (45-200 m/z) to establish the most suitable spectroscopic signals for the discrimination of several ignitable liquids. The optimized method was applied to a set of fire debris samples. In order to simulate post-burn samples several ignitable liquids (gasoline, diesel, citronella, kerosene, paraffin) were used to ignite different substrates (wood, cotton, cork, paper and paperboard). A full discrimination was obtained on using discriminant analysis. This method reported here can be considered as a green technique for fire debris analyses.

  2. Electronic Nose Based on Independent Component Analysis Combined with Partial Least Squares and Artificial Neural Networks for Wine Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Teodoro; Lozano, Jesús; Paredes, José A.; Álvarez, Fernando J.; Suárez, José I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to propose an alternative way for wine classification and prediction based on an electronic nose (e-nose) combined with Independent Component Analysis (ICA) as a dimensionality reduction technique, Partial Least Squares (PLS) to predict sensorial descriptors and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for classification purpose. A total of 26 wines from different regions, varieties and elaboration processes have been analyzed with an e-nose and tasted by a sensory panel. Successful results have been obtained in most cases for prediction and classification. PMID:22969387

  3. Portable Electronic Nose System for Identification of Synthesized Gasoline Using Metal Oxide Gas Sensor and Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Wung; Park, Hong Bae; Lee, In Soo; Cho, Jung Hwan

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a portable electronic nose (e-nose) system for use in the identification of synthesized gasoline, comprised of a single semiconductor type of gas sensor and pattern recognition neural networks. The designed e-nose system consists of a one-chip microcontroller, a pre-concentrator, and a gas sensor. Two different neural networks, a multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network and a fuzzy ARTMAP neural network were applied to discriminate synthesized gasoline from normal gasoline. The results of the classification showed 100% and 85% recognition rates for the training data set and testing data set, respectively.

  4. Detection of potato brown rot and ring rot by electronic nose: from laboratory to real scale.

    PubMed

    Biondi, E; Blasioli, S; Galeone, A; Spinelli, F; Cellini, A; Lucchese, C; Braschi, I

    2014-11-01

    A commercial electronic nose (e-nose) equipped with a metal oxide sensor array was trained to recognize volatile compounds emitted by potatoes experimentally infected with Ralstonia solanacearum or Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, which are bacterial agents of potato brown and ring rot, respectively. Two sampling procedures for volatile compounds were tested on pooled tubers sealed in 0.5-1 L jars at room temperature (laboratory conditions): an enrichment unit containing different adsorbent materials (namely, Tenax(®) TA, Carbotrap, Tenax(®) GR, and Carboxen 569) directly coupled with the e-nose (active sampling) and a Radiello(™) cartridge (passive sampling) containing a generic Carbograph fiber. Tenax(®) TA resulted the most suitable adsorbent material for active sampling. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) correctly classified 57.4 and 81.3% total samples as healthy or diseased, when using active and passive sampling, respectively. These results suggested the use of passive sampling to discriminate healthy from diseased tubers under intermediate and real scale conditions. 80 and 90% total samples were correctly classified by LDA under intermediate (100 tubers stored at 4°C in net bag passively sampled) and real scale conditions (tubers stored at 4°C in 1.25 t bags passively sampled). Principal component analysis (PCA) of sensorial analysis data under laboratory conditions highlighted a strict relationship between the disease severity and the responses of the e-nose sensors, whose sensitivity threshold was linked to the presence of at least one tuber per sample showing medium disease symptoms. At intermediate and real scale conditions, data distribution agreed with disease incidence (percentage of diseased tubers), owing to the low storage temperature and volatile compounds unconfinement conditions adopted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Discrimination between washed Arabica, natural Arabica and Robusta coffees by using near infrared spectroscopy, electronic nose and electronic tongue analysis.

    PubMed

    Buratti, Susanna; Sinelli, Nicoletta; Bertone, Elisa; Venturello, Alberto; Casiraghi, Ernestina; Geobaldo, Francesco

    2015-08-30

    The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a 'holistic' approach, using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and electronic devices (electronic nose and electronic tongue), as instrumental tools for the classification of different coffee varieties. Analyses were performed on green coffee, on ground roasted coffee and on coffee beverage. Principal component analysis was applied on spectral and sensory data to uncover correlations between samples and variables. After variable selection, linear discriminant analysis was used to classify the samples on the basis of the three coffee classes: Robusta, natural Arabica and washed Arabica. Linear discriminant analysis demonstrates the practicability of this approach: the external test set validation performed with NIR data showed 100% of correctly classified samples. Moreover, a satisfying percentage of correct classification in cross-validation was obtained for the electronic devices: the average values of correctly classified samples were 81.83% and 78.76% for electronic nose and electronic tongue, respectively. NIR spectroscopy was shown to be a very reliable and useful tool to classify coffee samples in a fast, clean and inexpensive way compared to classical analysis, while the electronic devices could assume the role of investigating techniques to depict the aroma and taste of coffee samples. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Evaluation of aroma generation of Lactococcus lactis with an electronic nose and sensory analysis.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Méndez, N; Vallejo-Cordoba, B; González-Córdova, A F; Nevárez-Moorillón, G V; Rivera-Chavira, B

    2008-01-01

    There is an increased interest in exploring the potential of new Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from different natural ecosystems for the production of aroma compounds. Thus, the objective of this study was to screen the aroma generation of Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from different sources by an electronic nose and sensory evaluation for their potential use in starter cheese cultures. Twenty-three strains of Lactococcus lactis were isolated from dairy sources such as artisanal raw-milk cheeses, nondairy sources, and commercial starter cultures (industrial). All the strains were assessed for their ability to produce aromas by an electronic nose and sensory analysis after their incubation in milk. Some phenotypic characteristics of technological importance such as lactose fermentation, proteolytic activity, and citrate utilization were also evaluated. Lactococcus lactis strains showed clear phenotypic differences related to their isolation source. Strains isolated from raw-milk dairy products or commercial starter cultures presented faster lactose fermentation and proteolytic activity than those presented by strains isolated from nondairy sources. Additionally, strains isolated from dairy and nondairy sources presented better citrate utilization than strains isolated from commercial dairy starters. On the other hand, there was not a clear relationship between the source of isolation and the ability of lactococci strains to produce aroma. Principal components analysis of electronic nose data revealed 4 distinctive groups based on aroma profiles. Additionally, odor intensity scores (yogurt-like and Fresco cheese-like) for these 4 groups revealed the nature of their differences. In general, strains from dairy products presented intense yogurt-like and Fresco cheese-like aromas, with the latter being the most intense for one specific strain. On the other hand, the majority of wild strains from nondairy sources presented a stronger yogurt-like aroma, whereas

  7. A surface acoustic wave bio-electronic nose for detection of volatile odorant molecules.

    PubMed

    Di Pietrantonio, F; Benetti, M; Cannatà, D; Verona, E; Palla-Papavlu, A; Fernández-Pradas, J M; Serra, P; Staiano, M; Varriale, A; D'Auria, S

    2015-05-15

    In this work, a "bio-electronic nose" for vapour phase detection of odorant molecules based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators is presented. The biosensor system is composed of an array of five SAW resonators coated with three types of odorant-binding proteins (OBPs): the wild-type OBP from bovine (wtbOBP), a double-mutant of the OBP from bovine (dmbOBP), and the wild-type OBP from pig (wtpOBP). High resolution deposition of OBPs onto the active area of SAW resonators was implemented through laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT). The resonant frequency shifts of the SAW resonators after the deposition of the biomolecules confirmed the immobilisation of the proteins onto the Al/Au inter-digital transducers (IDTs). In addition, a low increase of insertion losses with a limited degradation of Q-factors is reported. The "bio-electronic nose" fabricated by LIFT is tested in nitrogen upon exposure to separated concentrations of R-(-)-1-octen-3-ol (octenol) and R-(-)-carvone (carvone) vapours. The "bio-electronic nose" showed low detection limits for the tested compounds (i.e. 0.48 ppm for the detection of octenol, and 0.74 ppm for the detection of carvone). In addition, the bio-sensing system was able to discriminate the octenol molecules from the carvone molecules, making it pertinent for the assessment of food contamination by moulds, or for the evaluation of indoor air quality in buildings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification Of Geographical Origin Of Coffee Before And After Roasting By Electronic Noses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sberveglieri, V.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.; Ongo, E.; Pulvirenti, A.; Fava, P.

    2011-09-01

    Geographical origin traceability of food is a relevant issue for both producers' business protection and customers' rights safeguard. Differentiation of coffees on the basis of geographical origin is still a challenging issue, though possible by means of chemical techniques [1]. Between the most widely consumed beverage, coffee is a valuable one, with an aroma constituted by hundreds of volatiles [2]. Since the final global volatile composition is also determined by the cultivation climatic conditions, Electronic Noses (ENs) could be interesting candidates for distinguishing the geographical provenience by exploiting differences in chemical volatile profile. The present investigation is directed toward the characterization of green and roasted coffees samples according to their geographical origin.

  9. Electronic nose for the identification of pig feeding and ripening time in Iberian hams.

    PubMed

    Santos, J P; García, M; Aleixandre, M; Horrillo, M C; Gutiérrez, J; Sayago, I; Fernández, M J; Arés, L

    2004-03-01

    An electronic nose system to control the processing of dry-cured Iberian ham is presented. The sensors involved are tin oxide semiconductors thin films. They were prepared by RF sputtering. Some of the sensors were doped with metal catalysts as Pt and Pd, in order to improve the selectivity of the sensors. The multisensor with 16 semiconductor sensors, gave different responses from two types of dry-cured Iberian hams which differ in the feeding and curing time. The data has been analysed using the PCA (principal component analysis) and backpropagation and probabilistic neural networks. The analysis shows that different types of Iberian ham can be discriminated and identified successfully.

  10. Ground red peppers: capsaicinoids content, Scoville scores, and discrimination by an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Korel, Figen; Bagdatlioglu, Neriman; Balaban, Murat O; Hişil, Yaşar

    2002-05-22

    High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine the capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, and total capsaicinoids levels of different ground red pepper samples obtained from local retail markets in Izmir, Turkey. Scoville scores were determined using sensory tests. An electronic nose (EN) was used to discriminate ground red pepper samples by headspace volatiles. EN data were analyzed using discriminant function analysis (DFA). An overall correct classification rate of pepper varieties by EN of 91% was obtained. A linear correlation between capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, and total capsaicinoids and Scoville scores was also observed, and R (2) values of 0.89, 0.85, and 0.91 were obtained, respectively.

  11. Polymer-carbon black composite sensors in an electronic nose for air-quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M A; Shevade, A V; Zhou, H; Homer, M L

    2004-10-01

    An electronic nose that uses an array of 32 polymer-carbon black composite sensors has been developed, trained, and tested. By selecting a variety of chemical functionalities in the polymers used to make sensors, it is possible to construct an array capable of identifying and quantifying a broad range of target compounds, such as alcohols and aromatics, and distinguishing isomers and enantiomers (mirror-image isomers). A model of the interaction between target molecules and the polymer-carbon black composite sensors is under development to aid in selecting the array members and to enable identification of compounds with responses not stored in the analysis library.

  12. Polymer-carbon black composite sensors in an electronic nose for air-quality monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Shevade, A. V.; Zhou, H.; Homer, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    An electronic nose that uses an array of 32 polymer-carbon black composite sensors has been developed, trained, and tested. By selecting a variety of chemical functionalities in the polymers used to make sensors, it is possible to construct an array capable of identifying and quantifying a broad range of target compounds, such as alcohols and aromatics, and distinguishing isomers and enantiomers (mirror-image isomers). A model of the interaction between target molecules and the polymer-carbon black composite sensors is under development to aid in selecting the array members and to enable identification of compounds with responses not stored in the analysis library.

  13. A Novel Feature Extraction Approach Using Window Function Capturing and QPSO-SVM for Enhancing Electronic Nose Performance.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiuzhen; Peng, Chao; Zhang, Songlin; Yan, Jia; Duan, Shukai; Wang, Lidan; Jia, Pengfei; Tian, Fengchun

    2015-06-29

    In this paper, a novel feature extraction approach which can be referred to as moving window function capturing (MWFC) has been proposed to analyze signals of an electronic nose (E-nose) used for detecting types of infectious pathogens in rat wounds. Meanwhile, a quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO) algorithm is implemented in conjunction with support vector machine (SVM) for realizing a synchronization optimization of the sensor array and SVM model parameters. The results prove the efficacy of the proposed method for E-nose feature extraction, which can lead to a higher classification accuracy rate compared to other established techniques. Meanwhile it is interesting to note that different classification results can be obtained by changing the types, widths or positions of windows. By selecting the optimum window function for the sensor response, the performance of an E-nose can be enhanced.

  14. A Novel Feature Extraction Approach Using Window Function Capturing and QPSO-SVM for Enhancing Electronic Nose Performance

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiuzhen; Peng, Chao; Zhang, Songlin; Yan, Jia; Duan, Shukai; Wang, Lidan; Jia, Pengfei; Tian, Fengchun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel feature extraction approach which can be referred to as moving window function capturing (MWFC) has been proposed to analyze signals of an electronic nose (E-nose) used for detecting types of infectious pathogens in rat wounds. Meanwhile, a quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO) algorithm is implemented in conjunction with support vector machine (SVM) for realizing a synchronization optimization of the sensor array and SVM model parameters. The results prove the efficacy of the proposed method for E-nose feature extraction, which can lead to a higher classification accuracy rate compared to other established techniques. Meanwhile it is interesting to note that different classification results can be obtained by changing the types, widths or positions of windows. By selecting the optimum window function for the sensor response, the performance of an E-nose can be enhanced. PMID:26131672

  15. Serum Headspace Analysis With An Electronic Nose And Comparison With Clinical Signs Following Experimental Infection Of Cattle With Mannheimia Haemolytica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, Henri; Turner, Claire; Chambers, Mark; Reinhold, Petra

    2009-05-01

    Electronic noses (e-noses) have been widely used for medical applications or in the food industry. However, little is known about their utility for early disease detection in animals. In this study, 20 calves were experimentally infected with Mannheimia haemolytica A1. Blood serum was collected from 7 days before infection to 5 days after infection and headspace of sera was analysed using the ST214 (Scensive Tech. Ltd., Leeds, UK) e-nose. Differences between pre- and post infection status were investigated and a temporal profile of sensor responses was compared with body temperature over the course of infection. A similar profile for sensor responses and body temperature indicated the e-nose was detecting a genuine physiological response following infection.

  16. Diagnosing viral and bacterial respiratory infections in acute COPD exacerbations by an electronic nose: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    van Geffen, Wouter H; Bruins, Marcel; Kerstjens, Huib A M

    2016-06-16

    Respiratory infections, viral or bacterial, are a common cause of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). A rapid, point-of-care, and easy-to-use tool distinguishing viral and bacterial from other causes would be valuable in routine clinical care. An electronic nose (e-nose) could fit this profile but has never been tested in this setting before. In a single-center registered trial (NTR 4601) patients admitted with AECOPD were tested with the Aeonose(®) electronic nose, and a diagnosis of viral or bacterial infection was obtained by bacterial culture on sputa and viral PCR on nose swabs. A neural network with leave-10%-out cross-validation was used to assess the e-nose data. Forty three patients were included. In the bacterial infection model, 22 positive cases were tested versus the negatives; and similarly 18 positive cases were tested in the viral infection model. The Aeonose was able to distinguish between COPD-subjects suffering from a viral infection and COPD patients without infection, showing an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.74. Similarly, for bacterial infections, an AUC of 0.72 was obtained. The Aeonose e-nose yields promising results in 'smelling' the presence or absence of a viral or bacterial respiratory infection during an acute exacerbation of COPD. Validation of these results using a new and large cohort is required before introduction into clinical practice.

  17. Electronic Noses for Well-Being: Breath Analysis and Energy Expenditure.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Julian W; Vincent, Timothy A

    2016-06-23

    The wealth of information concealed in a single human breath has been of interest for many years, promising not only disease detection, but also the monitoring of our general well-being. Recent developments in the fields of nano-sensor arrays and MEMS have enabled once bulky artificial olfactory sensor systems, or so-called "electronic noses", to become smaller, lower power and portable devices. At the same time, wearable health monitoring devices are now available, although reliable breath sensing equipment is somewhat missing from the market of physical, rather than chemical sensor gadgets. In this article, we report on the unprecedented rise in healthcare problems caused by an increasingly overweight population. We first review recently-developed electronic noses for the detection of diseases by the analysis of basic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Then, we discuss the primary cause of obesity from over eating and the high calorific content of food. We present the need to measure our individual energy expenditure from our exhaled breath. Finally, we consider the future for handheld or wearable devices to measure energy expenditure; and the potential of these devices to revolutionize healthcare, both at home and in hospitals.

  18. Microbiological, sensory, and electronic nose evaluation of yellowfin tuna under various storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Du, W X; Kim, J; Cornell, J A; Huang, T; Marshall, M R; Wei, C I

    2001-12-01

    Microbiological assessment, sensory evaluation, and electronic nose (AromaScan) analysis were performed on yellowfin tuna stored at 0, 4, 10, and 22 degrees C for 0, 1, 3, 5, and 9 days. Fish color, texture, appearance, and odor were evaluated by a trained sensory panel, while aroma-odor properties were evaluated using an AromaScan. Bacterial enumeration was performed using plate count agar containing 1.5% NaCl. Tuna fillets stored at 22 degrees C for 3 days or longer had a bacterial load of over 10(7) CFU/g and were rated not acceptable for consumption (grade C) by the sensory panel. Tuna fillets stored at 4 degrees C for 9 days or 10 degrees C for over 5 days were rated as grade C products and also had a bacterial load of over 10(7) CFU/g. The change in fish quality as determined by AromaScan followed increases in microbiological counts in tuna fillets, indicating that bacterial load can serve as a useful and objective indicator of gross spoilage. Electronic nose devices can be used in conjunction with microbial counts and sensory panels to evaluate the degree of decomposition in tuna during storage.

  19. Monitoring the Freshness of Moroccan Sardines with a Neural-Network Based Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Amari, Aziz; Barbri, Noureddine El; Llobet, Eduard; Bari, Nezha El; Correig, Xavier; Bouchikhi, Benachir

    2006-01-01

    An electronic nose was developed and used as a rapid technique to classify the freshness of sardine samples according to the number of days spent under cold storage (4 ± 1°C, in air). The volatile compounds present in the headspace of weighted sardine samples were introduced into a sensor chamber and the response signals of the sensors were recorded as a function of time. Commercially available gas sensors based on metal oxide semiconductors were used and both static and dynamic features from the sensor conductance response were input to the pattern recognition engine. Data analysis was performed by three different pattern recognition methods such as probabilistic neural networks (PNN), fuzzy ARTMAP neural networks (FANN) and support vector machines (SVM). The objective of this study was to find, among these three pattern recognition methods, the most suitable one for accurately identifying the days of cold storage undergone by sardine samples. The results show that the electronic nose can monitor the freshness of sardine samples stored at 4°C, and that the best classification and prediction are obtained with SVM neural network. The SVM approach shows improved classification performances, reducing the amount of misclassified samples down to 3.75 %.

  20. Advances in electronic-nose technologies for the detection of volatile biomarker metabolites in the human breath.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Alphus D

    2015-03-02

    Recent advancements in the use of electronic-nose (e-nose) devices to analyze human breath profiles for the presence of specific volatile metabolites, known as biomarkers or chemical bio-indicators of specific human diseases, metabolic disorders and the overall health status of individuals, are providing the potential for new noninvasive tools and techniques useful to point-of-care clinical disease diagnoses. This exciting new area of electronic disease detection and diagnosis promises to yield much faster and earlier detection of human diseases and disorders, allowing earlier, more effective treatments, resulting in more rapid patient recovery from various afflictions. E-nose devices are particularly suited for the field of disease diagnostics, because they are sensitive to a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and can effectively distinguish between different complex gaseous mixtures via analysis of electronic aroma sensor-array output profiles of volatile metabolites present in the human breath. This review provides a summary of some recent developments of electronic-nose technologies, particularly involving breath analysis, with the potential for providing many new diagnostic applications for the detection of specific human diseases associated with different organs in the body, detectable from e-nose analyses of aberrant disease-associated VOCs present in air expired from the lungs.

  1. Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies for the Detection of Volatile Biomarker Metabolites in the Human Breath

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alphus D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in the use of electronic-nose (e-nose) devices to analyze human breath profiles for the presence of specific volatile metabolites, known as biomarkers or chemical bio-indicators of specific human diseases, metabolic disorders and the overall health status of individuals, are providing the potential for new noninvasive tools and techniques useful to point-of-care clinical disease diagnoses. This exciting new area of electronic disease detection and diagnosis promises to yield much faster and earlier detection of human diseases and disorders, allowing earlier, more effective treatments, resulting in more rapid patient recovery from various afflictions. E-nose devices are particularly suited for the field of disease diagnostics, because they are sensitive to a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and can effectively distinguish between different complex gaseous mixtures via analysis of electronic aroma sensor-array output profiles of volatile metabolites present in the human breath. This review provides a summary of some recent developments of electronic-nose technologies, particularly involving breath analysis, with the potential for providing many new diagnostic applications for the detection of specific human diseases associated with different organs in the body, detectable from e-nose analyses of aberrant disease-associated VOCs present in air expired from the lungs. PMID:25738426

  2. Towards an Electronic Dog Nose: Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunosensor for Security and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Takeshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    This review describes an “electronic dog nose” based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor and an antigen–antibody interaction for security and safety. We have concentrated on developing appropriate sensor surfaces for the SPR sensor for practical use. The review covers different surface fabrications, which all include variations of a self-assembled monolayer containing oligo(ethylene glycol), dendrimer, and hydrophilic polymer. We have carried out detection of explosives using the sensor surfaces. For the SPR sensor to detect explosives, the vapor or particles of the target substances have to be dissolved in a liquid. Therefore, we also review the development of sampling processes for explosives, and a protocol for the measurement of explosives on the SPR sensor in the field. Additionally, sensing elements, which have the potential to be applied for the electronic dog nose, are described. PMID:25198004

  3. Application of Electronic Nose for Measuring Total Volatile Basic Nitrogen and Total Viable Counts in Packaged Pork During Refrigerated Storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Miaoyun; Wang, Haibiao; Sun, Lingxia; Zhao, Gaiming; Huang, Xianqing

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to predict the total viable counts (TVC) and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) in pork using an electronic nose (E-nose), and to assess the freshness of chilled pork during storage using different packaging methods, including pallet packaging (PP), vacuum packaging (VP), and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP, 40% O2 /40% CO2 /20% N2 ). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the E-nose signals, and the results showed that the relationships between the freshness of chilled pork and E-nose signals could be distinguished in the loadings plots, and the freshness of chilled pork could be distributed along 2 first principal components. Multiple linear regression (MLR) was used to correlate TVC and TVB-N to E-nose signals. High F and R2 values were obtained in the MLR output of TVB-N (F = 32.1, 21.6, and 24.2 for PP [R2 = 0.93], VP [R2 = 0.94], and MAP [R2 = 0.95], respectively) and TVC (F = 34.2, 46.4, and 7.8 for PP [R2 = 0.98], VP [R2 = 0.89], and MAP [R2 = 0.85], respectively). The results of this study suggest that it is possible to use the E-nose technology to predict TVB-N and TVC for assessing the freshness of chilled pork during storage.

  4. Differentiating head and neck carcinoma from lung carcinoma with an electronic nose: a proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    van Hooren, Michel R A; Leunis, Nicoline; Brandsma, Dirk S; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C; Kremer, Bernd; Kross, Kenneth W

    2016-11-01

    Disease specific patterns of volatile organic compounds can be detected in exhaled breath using an electronic nose (e-nose). The aim of this study is to explore whether an e-nose can differentiate between head and neck, and lung carcinoma. Eighty-seven patients received an e-nose measurement before any oncologic treatment. We used PARAFAC/TUCKER3 tensor decomposition for data reduction and an artificial neural network for analysis to obtain binary results; either diagnosed as head and neck or lung carcinoma. Via a leave-one-out method, cross-validation of the data was performed. In differentiating head and neck from lung carcinoma patients, a diagnostic accuracy of 93 % was found. After cross-validation of the data, this resulted in a diagnostic accuracy of 85 %. There seems to be a potential for e-nose as a diagnostic tool in HNC and lung carcinoma. With a fair diagnostic accuracy, an e-nose can differentiate between the two tumor entities.

  5. A Novel Semi-Supervised Method of Electronic Nose for Indoor Pollution Detection Trained by M-S4VMs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tailai; Jia, Pengfei; He, Peilin; Duan, Shukai; Yan, Jia; Wang, Lidan

    2016-01-01

    Electronic nose (E-nose), as a device intended to detect odors or flavors, has been widely used in many fields. Many labeled samples are needed to gain an ideal E-nose classification model. However, the labeled samples are not easy to obtain and there are some cases where the gas samples in the real world are complex and unlabeled. As a result, it is necessary to make an E-nose that cannot only classify unlabeled samples, but also use these samples to modify its classification model. In this paper, we first introduce a semi-supervised learning algorithm called S4VMs and improve its use within a multi-classification algorithm to classify the samples for an E-nose. Then, we enhance its performance by adding the unlabeled samples that it has classified to modify its model and by using an optimization algorithm called quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO) to find the optimal parameters for classification. The results of comparing this with other semi-supervised learning algorithms show that our multi-classification algorithm performs well in the classification system of an E-nose after learning from unlabeled samples. PMID:27626420

  6. Design and test of an electronic nose for monitoring the air quality in the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, E.; Zampetti, E.; Pantalei, S.; Lo Castro, F.; Santonico, M.; Pennazza, G.; Paolesse, R.; Natale, C. Di; D'Amico, A.; Giannini, F.; Mascetti, G.; Cotronei, V.

    2007-09-01

    Long-term manned space missions requires a continuous monitoring of the air quality inside the spacecraft. For this scope, among several different solutions, electronic noses have been considered. On behalf of European Space Agency an electronic nose specifically designed for air quality control in closed environment is under development. After several ground experiments concerning the monitoring of a biofilter efficiency, the instrument has been tested during the ENEIDE mission on board of the International Space Station. in this paper the instrument main concepts and its performance in ground and space experiments are illustrated.

  7. Development of Fabric-Based Chemical Gas Sensors for Use as Wearable Electronic Noses

    PubMed Central

    Seesaard, Thara; Lorwongtragool, Panida; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2015-01-01

    Novel gas sensors embroidered into fabric substrates based on polymers/ SWNT-COOH nanocomposites were proposed in this paper, aiming for their use as a wearable electronic nose (e-nose). The fabric-based chemical gas sensors were fabricated by two main processes: drop coating and embroidery. Four potential polymers (PVC, cumene-PSMA, PSE and PVP)/functionalized-SWCNT sensing materials were deposited onto interdigitated electrodes previously prepared by embroidering conductive thread on a fabric substrate to make an optimal set of sensors. After preliminary trials of the obtained sensors, it was found that the sensors yielded a electrical resistance in the region of a few kilo-Ohms. The sensors were tested with various volatile compounds such as ammonium hydroxide, ethanol, pyridine, triethylamine, methanol and acetone, which are commonly found in the wastes released from the human body. These sensors were used to detect and discriminate between the body odors of different regions and exist in various forms such as the urine, armpit and exhaled breath odor. Based on a simple pattern recognition technique, we have shown that the proposed fabric-based chemical gas sensors can discriminate the human body odor from two persons. PMID:25602265

  8. Development of fabric-based chemical gas sensors for use as wearable electronic noses.

    PubMed

    Seesaard, Thara; Lorwongtragool, Panida; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2015-01-16

    Novel gas sensors embroidered into fabric substrates based on polymers/ SWNT-COOH nanocomposites were proposed in this paper, aiming for their use as a wearable electronic nose (e-nose). The fabric-based chemical gas sensors were fabricated by two main processes: drop coating and embroidery. Four potential polymers (PVC, cumene-PSMA, PSE and PVP)/functionalized-SWCNT sensing materials were deposited onto interdigitated electrodes previously prepared by embroidering conductive thread on a fabric substrate to make an optimal set of sensors. After preliminary trials of the obtained sensors, it was found that the sensors yielded a electrical resistance in the region of a few kilo-Ohms. The sensors were tested with various volatile compounds such as ammonium hydroxide, ethanol, pyridine, triethylamine, methanol and acetone, which are commonly found in the wastes released from the human body. These sensors were used to detect and discriminate between the body odors of different regions and exist in various forms such as the urine, armpit and exhaled breath odor. Based on a simple pattern recognition technique, we have shown that the proposed fabric-based chemical gas sensors can discriminate the human body odor from two persons.

  9. On-line classification of pollutants in water using wireless portable electronic noses.

    PubMed

    Herrero, José Luis; Lozano, Jesús; Santos, José Pedro; Suárez, José Ignacio

    2016-06-01

    A portable electronic nose with database connection for on-line classification of pollutants in water is presented in this paper. It is a hand-held, lightweight and powered instrument with wireless communications capable of standalone operation. A network of similar devices can be configured for distributed measurements. It uses four resistive microsensors and headspace as sampling method for extracting the volatile compounds from glass vials. The measurement and control program has been developed in LabVIEW using the database connection toolkit to send the sensors data to a server for training and classification with Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). The use of a server instead of the microprocessor of the e-nose increases the capacity of memory and the computing power of the classifier and allows external users to perform data classification. To address this challenge, this paper also proposes a web-based framework (based on RESTFul web services, Asynchronous JavaScript and XML and JavaScript Object Notation) that allows remote users to train ANNs and request classification values regardless user's location and the type of device used. Results show that the proposed prototype can discriminate the samples measured (Blank water, acetone, toluene, ammonia, formaldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, benzene, dichloromethane, acetic acid, xylene and dimethylacetamide) with a 94% classification success rate.

  10. Classification of root canal microorganisms using electronic-nose and discriminant analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Root canal treatment is a debridement process which disrupts and removes entire microorganisms from the root canal system. Identification of microorganisms may help clinicians decide on treatment alternatives such as using different irrigants, intracanal medicaments and antibiotics. However, the difficulty in cultivation and the complexity in isolation of predominant anaerobic microorganisms make clinicians resort to empirical medical treatments. For this reason, identification of microorganisms is not a routinely used procedure in root canal treatment. In this study, we aimed at classifying 7 different standard microorganism strains which are frequently seen in root canal infections, using odor data collected using an electronic nose instrument. Method Our microorganism odor data set consisted of 5 repeated samples from 7 different classes at 4 concentration levels. For each concentration, 35 samples were classified using 3 different discriminant analysis methods. In order to determine an optimal setting for using electronic-nose in such an application, we have tried 3 different approaches in evaluating sensor responses. Moreover, we have used 3 different sensor baseline values in normalizing sensor responses. Since the number of sensors is relatively large compared to sample size, we have also investigated the influence of two different dimension reduction methods on classification performance. Results We have found that quadratic type dicriminant analysis outperforms other varieties of this method. We have also observed that classification performance decreases as the concentration decreases. Among different baseline values used for pre-processing the sensor responses, the model where the minimum values of sensor readings in the sample were accepted as the baseline yields better classification performance. Corresponding to this optimal choice of baseline value, we have noted that among different sensor response model and feature reduction method

  11. Electronic Nose for Quality Control of Colombian Coffee through the Detection of Defects in “Cup Tests”

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Juan; Durán, Cristhian; Reyes, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Electronic noses (ENs), are used for many applications, but we must emphasize the importance of their application to foodstuffs like coffee. This paper presents a research study about the analysis of Colombian coffee samples for the detection and classification of defects (i.e., using “Cup Tests”), which was conducted at the Almacafé quality control laboratory in Cúcuta, Colombia. The results obtained show that the application of an electronic nose called “A-NOSE”, may be used in the coffee industry for the cupping tests. The results show that e-nose technology can be a useful tool for quality control to evaluate the excellence of the Colombian coffee produced by National Federation of Coffee Growers. PMID:22315525

  12. A Novel Pre-Processing Technique for Original Feature Matrix of Electronic Nose Based on Supervised Locality Preserving Projections

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Pengfei; Huang, Tailai; Wang, Li; Duan, Shukai; Yan, Jia; Wang, Lidan

    2016-01-01

    An electronic nose (E-nose) consisting of 14 metal oxide gas sensors and one electronic chemical gas sensor has been constructed to identify four different classes of wound infection. However, the classification results of the E-nose are not ideal if the original feature matrix containing the maximum steady-state response value of sensors is processed by the classifier directly, so a novel pre-processing technique based on supervised locality preserving projections (SLPP) is proposed in this paper to process the original feature matrix before it is put into the classifier to improve the performance of the E-nose. SLPP is good at finding and keeping the nonlinear structure of data; furthermore, it can provide an explicit mapping expression which is unreachable by the traditional manifold learning methods. Additionally, some effective optimization methods are found by us to optimize the parameters of SLPP and the classifier. Experimental results prove that the classification accuracy of support vector machine (SVM combined with the data pre-processed by SLPP outperforms other considered methods. All results make it clear that SLPP has a better performance in processing the original feature matrix of the E-nose. PMID:27376295

  13. Molecular modeling of interactions in electronic nose sensors for environmental monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Manfreda, A. M.; Yen, S. -P. S.; Zhou, H.; Manatt, K.

    2002-01-01

    We report a study aimed at understanding analyte interactions with sensors made from polymer-carbon black composite films. The sensors are used in an Electronic Nose (ENose) which is used for monitoring the breathing air quality in human habitats. The model mimics the experimental conditions of the composite film deposition and formation and was developed using molecular modeling and simulation tools. The Dreiding 2.21 Force Field was used for the polymer and analyte molecules while graphite parameters were assigned to the carbon black atoms. The polymer considered for this work is methyl vinyl ether / maleic acid copolymer. The target analytes include both inorganic (NH3) and organic (methanol) types of compound. Results indicate different composite-analyte interaction behavior.

  14. Development of an electronic nose sensing platform for undergraduate education in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Daniel V.; Burek, Michael J.; Iutzi, Ryan M.; Mracek, James A.; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2011-05-01

    The teaching of the different aspects of a sensor system, with a focus on the involved nanotechnology, is a challenging, yet important task. We present the development of an electronic nose system that utilizes a nanoscale amperometric sensing mechanism for gas mixtures. The fabrication of the system makes use of a basic microfabrication facility, as well as an undergraduate chemistry laboratory for material synthesis and preparation. The sensing device consists of an array of cross-reactive sensors composed of metal-oxide semiconducting nanoparticles. Each sensor in the array produces a unique response in the presence of a target gas, allowing the sensor to determine the identity and concentration of multiple gases in a mixture. The educational aspects include microheater simulation and fabrication, design and fabrication of interdigitated electrodes, development of interfacing circuitry and software, development and calibration of a sensory array, sol-gel processing of nanoparticle films and their characterization, and details of the fundamental chemical sensing mechanism.

  15. Direct identification of bacteria in blood culture samples using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Trincavelli, Marco; Coradeschi, Silvia; Loutfi, Amy; Söderquist, Bo; Thunberg, Per

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a method for identification of bacteria in human blood culture samples using an electronic nose. The method uses features, which capture the static (steady state) and dynamic (transient) properties of the signal from the gas sensor array and proposes a means to ensemble results from consecutive samples. The underlying mechanism for ensembling is based on an estimation of posterior probability, which is extracted from a support vector machine classifier. A large dataset representing ten different bacteria cultures has been used to validate the presented methods. The results detail the performance of the proposed algorithm and show that through ensembling decisions on consecutive samples, significant reliability in classification accuracy can be achieved.

  16. Least Square Regression Method for Estimating Gas Concentration in an Electronic Nose System

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Walaa; Pace, Calogero; Gaudioso, Manlio

    2009-01-01

    We describe an Electronic Nose (ENose) system which is able to identify the type of analyte and to estimate its concentration. The system consists of seven sensors, five of them being gas sensors (supplied with different heater voltage values), the remainder being a temperature and a humidity sensor, respectively. To identify a new analyte sample and then to estimate its concentration, we use both some machine learning techniques and the least square regression principle. In fact, we apply two different training models; the first one is based on the Support Vector Machine (SVM) approach and is aimed at teaching the system how to discriminate among different gases, while the second one uses the least squares regression approach to predict the concentration of each type of analyte. PMID:22573980

  17. Prediction of Penicillium expansum spoilage and patulin concentration in apples used for apple juice production by electronic nose analysis.

    PubMed

    Karlshøj, Kristian; Nielsen, Per V; Larsen, Thomas O

    2007-05-30

    Classification models for Penicillium expansum spoilage of apples and prediction models for patulin concentration in apples usable for apple juice production were made on the basis of electronic nose (e-nose) analysis correlated to HPLC quantification of patulin. A total of 15 Golden Delicious and 4 Jonagold apples were surface sterilized and divided into three groups per variety. The Golden Delicious group consisted of five apples each. Group 1 was untreated control, group 2 was surface inoculated with P. expansum, and group 3 was inoculated in the core with P. expansum. The apples were incubated at 25 degrees C for 10 days. E-nose analysis was performed daily. At day 10 the Golden Delicious apples were individually processed for apple juice production. During apple juice production the mash and juice were analyzed by e-nose, and samples were taken for patulin analysis by HPLC. The volatile metabolite profile was obtained by collection of volatile metabolites, on tubes containing Tenax TA, overnight between the 9th and 10th days of incubation and subsequent analysis of the collected compounds by GC-MS. Prediction models using partial least-squares, with high correlation, for prediction of patulin concentration in shredded apples as well as apple juice were successfully created. It was also shown that it is possible to classify P. expansum spoilage in apples correctly on the basis of soft independent modeling of class analogy classification of e-nose analysis data. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of a regression model between e-nose data and mycotoxin content in which actual concentrations are reported. This implies that it is possible to predict mycotoxin production and concentration by e-nose analysis.

  18. Use of an electronic-nose device for profiling headspace volatile metabolites to rapidly identify phytopathogenic microbes [Abstract].

    Treesearch

    A. Dan Wilson; D.G. Lester

    1997-01-01

    A new electronic-nose device (AromaScan A32S), consisting of an organic matrix-coated polymer-type 32-detector array, was tested as a novel tool for the detection, identification, and discrimination of phytopathogenic microbes. The sensor array detects the unique mixture of volatile metabolites released by microbes growing on standardized growth media by measuring...

  19. ``Low-cost Electronic nose evaluated on Thai-herb of Northern-Thailand samples using multivariate analysis methods''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    na ayudhaya, Paisarn Daungjak; Klinbumrung, Arrak; Jaroensutasinee, Krisanadej; Pratontep, Sirapat; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2009-05-01

    In case of species of natural and aromatic plant originated from the northern Thailand, sensory characteristics, especially odours, have unique identifiers of herbs. The instruments sensory analysis have performed by several of differential of sensing, so call `electronic nose', to be a significantly and rapidly for chemometrics. The signal responses of the low cost electronic nose were evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA). The aims of this paper evaluated various of Thai-herbs grown in Northern of Thailand as data preprocessing tools of the Low-cost electronic nose (enNU-PYO1). The essential oil groups of Thai herbs such as Garlic, Lemongrass, Shallot (potato onion), Onion, Zanthoxylum limonella (Dennst.) Alston (Thai name is Makaen), and Kaffir lime leaf were compared volatilized from selected fresh herbs. Principal component analysis of the original sensor responses did clearly distinguish either all samples. In all cases more than 97% for cross-validated group were classified correctly. The results demonstrated that it was possible to develop in a model to construct a low-cost electronic nose to provide measurement of odoriferous herbs.

  20. Improving the Performance of an Electronic Nose by Wine Aroma Training to Distinguish between Drip Coffee and Canned Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Tomizawa, Yasuko; Shimizu, Nobuo; Ikeda, Keiichi; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Coffee aroma, with more than 600 components, is considered as one of the most complex food aromas. Although electronic noses have been successfully used for objective analysis and differentiation of total coffee aromas, it is difficult to use them to describe the specific features of coffee aroma (i.e., the type of smell). This is because data obtained by electronic noses are generally based on electrical resistance/current and samples are distinguished by principal component analysis. In this paper, we present an electronic nose that is capable of learning the wine related aromas using the aroma kit “Le Nez du Vin,” and the potential to describe coffee aroma in a similar manner comparable to how wine experts describe wine aroma. The results of our investigation showed that the aromas of three drip coffees were more similar to those of pine and honey in the aroma kit than to the aromas of three canned coffees. Conversely, the aromas of canned coffees were more similar to the kit coffee aroma. In addition, the aromatic patterns of coffees were different from those of green tea and red wine. Although further study is required to fit the data to human olfaction, the presented method and the use of vocabularies in aroma kits promise to enhance objective discrimination and description of aromas by electronic noses. PMID:25587981

  1. Improving the performance of an electronic nose by wine aroma training to distinguish between drip coffee and canned coffee.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kouki; Tomizawa, Yasuko; Shimizu, Nobuo; Ikeda, Keiichi; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-12

    Coffee aroma, with more than 600 components, is considered as one of the most complex food aromas. Although electronic noses have been successfully used for objective analysis and differentiation of total coffee aromas, it is difficult to use them to describe the specific features of coffee aroma (i.e., the type of smell). This is because data obtained by electronic noses are generally based on electrical resistance/current and samples are distinguished by principal component analysis. In this paper, we present an electronic nose that is capable of learning the wine related aromas using the aroma kit "Le Nez du Vin," and the potential to describe coffee aroma in a similar manner comparable to how wine experts describe wine aroma. The results of our investigation showed that the aromas of three drip coffees were more similar to those of pine and honey in the aroma kit than to the aromas of three canned coffees. Conversely, the aromas of canned coffees were more similar to the kit coffee aroma. In addition, the aromatic patterns of coffees were different from those of green tea and red wine. Although further study is required to fit the data to human olfaction, the presented method and the use of vocabularies in aroma kits promise to enhance objective discrimination and description of aromas by electronic noses.

  2. A conductive polymer based electronic nose for early detection of Penicillium digitatum in post-harvest oranges.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Jonas; Nascimento, Henry M; Yamauchi, Elaine Y; Li, Rosamaria W C; Esteves, Carlos H A; Rehder, Gustavo P; Gaylarde, Christine C; Shirakawa, Márcia A

    2013-07-01

    We describe the construction of an electronic nose, comprising four chemiresistive sensors formed by the deposition of thin conductive polymer films onto interdigitated electrodes, attached to a personal computer via a data acquisition board. This e-nose was used to detect biodeterioration of oranges colonized by Penicillium digitatum. Significant responses were obtained after only 24 h of incubation i.e. at an early stage of biodeterioration, enabling remedial measures to be taken in storage facilities and efficiently distinguishing between good and poor quality fruits. The instrument has a very low analysis time of 40 s.

  3. Litchi freshness rapid non-destructive evaluating method using electronic nose and non-linear dynamics stochastic resonance model.

    PubMed

    Ying, Xiaoguo; Liu, Wei; Hui, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, litchi freshness rapid non-destructive evaluating method using electronic nose (e-nose) and non-linear stochastic resonance (SR) was proposed. EN responses to litchi samples were continuously detected for 6 d Principal component analysis (PCA) and non-linear stochastic resonance (SR) methods were utilized to analyze EN detection data. PCA method could not totally discriminate litchi samples, while SR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) eigen spectrum successfully discriminated all litchi samples. Litchi freshness predictive model developed using SNR eigen values shows high predictive accuracy with regression coefficients R(2) = 0 .99396.

  4. Rapid and accurate detection of urinary pathogens by mobile IMS-based electronic nose: a proof-of-principle study.

    PubMed

    Roine, Antti; Saviauk, Taavi; Kumpulainen, Pekka; Karjalainen, Markus; Tuokko, Antti; Aittoniemi, Janne; Vuento, Risto; Lekkala, Jukka; Lehtimäki, Terho; Tammela, Teuvo L; Oksala, Niku K J

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common disease with significant morbidity and economic burden, accounting for a significant part of the workload in clinical microbiology laboratories. Current clinical chemisty point-of-care diagnostics rely on imperfect dipstick analysis which only provides indirect and insensitive evidence of urinary bacterial pathogens. An electronic nose (eNose) is a handheld device mimicking mammalian olfaction that potentially offers affordable and rapid analysis of samples without preparation at athmospheric pressure. In this study we demonstrate the applicability of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) -based eNose to discriminate the most common UTI pathogens from gaseous headspace of culture plates rapidly and without sample preparation. We gathered a total of 101 culture samples containing four most common UTI bacteries: E. coli, S. saprophyticus, E. faecalis, Klebsiella spp and sterile culture plates. The samples were analyzed using ChemPro 100i device, consisting of IMS cell and six semiconductor sensors. Data analysis was conducted by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and logistic regression (LR). The results were validated by leave-one-out and 5-fold cross validation analysis. In discrimination of sterile and bacterial samples sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 97% were achieved. The bacterial species were identified with sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 96% using eNose as compared to urine bacterial cultures. These findings strongly demonstrate the ability of our eNose to discriminate bacterial cultures and provides a proof of principle to use this method in urinanalysis of UTI.

  5. Influence of age and gender on the profile of exhaled volatile organic compounds analyzed by an electronic nose

    PubMed Central

    Dragonieri, Silvano; Quaranta, Vitaliano Nicola; Carratu, Pierluigi; Ranieri, Teresa; Resta, Onofrio

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of age and gender on the profile of exhaled volatile organic compounds. We evaluated 68 healthy adult never-smokers, comparing them by age and by gender. Exhaled breath samples were analyzed by an electronic nose (e-nose), resulting in "breathprints". Principal component analysis and canonical discriminant analysis showed that older subjects (≥ 50 years of age) could not be distinguished from younger subjects on the basis of their breathprints, as well as that the breathprints of males could not distinguished from those of females (cross-validated accuracy, 60.3% and 57.4%, respectively).Therefore, age and gender do not seem to affect the overall profile of exhaled volatile organic compounds measured by an e-nose. PMID:27167436

  6. Electronic nose with a new feature reduction method and a multi-linear classifier for Chinese liquor classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yaqi; Meng, Qinghao; Qi, Peifeng; Zeng, Ming; Li, Wei; Ma, Shugen

    2014-05-01

    An electronic nose (e-nose) was designed to classify Chinese liquors of the same aroma style. A new method of feature reduction which combined feature selection with feature extraction was proposed. Feature selection method used 8 feature-selection algorithms based on information theory and reduced the dimension of the feature space to 41. Kernel entropy component analysis was introduced into the e-nose system as a feature extraction method and the dimension of feature space was reduced to 12. Classification of Chinese liquors was performed by using back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN), linear discrimination analysis (LDA), and a multi-linear classifier. The classification rate of the multi-linear classifier was 97.22%, which was higher than LDA and BP-ANN. Finally the classification of Chinese liquors according to their raw materials and geographical origins was performed using the proposed multi-linear classifier and classification rate was 98.75% and 100%, respectively.

  7. Electronic nose with a new feature reduction method and a multi-linear classifier for Chinese liquor classification

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Yaqi; Meng, Qinghao Qi, Peifeng; Zeng, Ming; Li, Wei; Ma, Shugen

    2014-05-15

    An electronic nose (e-nose) was designed to classify Chinese liquors of the same aroma style. A new method of feature reduction which combined feature selection with feature extraction was proposed. Feature selection method used 8 feature-selection algorithms based on information theory and reduced the dimension of the feature space to 41. Kernel entropy component analysis was introduced into the e-nose system as a feature extraction method and the dimension of feature space was reduced to 12. Classification of Chinese liquors was performed by using back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN), linear discrimination analysis (LDA), and a multi-linear classifier. The classification rate of the multi-linear classifier was 97.22%, which was higher than LDA and BP-ANN. Finally the classification of Chinese liquors according to their raw materials and geographical origins was performed using the proposed multi-linear classifier and classification rate was 98.75% and 100%, respectively.

  8. Calibration transfer between electronic nose systems for rapid in situ measurement of pulp and paper industry emissions.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sharvari; Kamde, Kalyani; Jana, Arun; Korde, Sanjivani; Bandyopadhyay, Rajib; Sankar, Ravi; Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Pandey, R A

    2014-09-02

    Electronic nose systems when deployed in network mesh can effectively provide a low budget and onsite solution for the industrial obnoxious gaseous measurement. For accurate and identical prediction capability by all the electronic nose systems, a reliable calibration transfer model needs to be implemented in order to overcome the inherent sensor array variability. In this work, robust regression (RR) is used for calibration transfer between two electronic nose systems using a Box-Behnken (BB) design. Out of the two electronic nose systems, one was trained using industrial gas samples by four artificial neural network models, for the measurement of obnoxious odours emitted from pulp and paper industries. The emissions constitute mainly of hydrogen sulphide (H2S), methyl mercaptan (MM), dimethyl sulphide (DMS) and dimethyl disulphide (DMDS) in different proportions. A Box-Behnken design consisting of 27 experiment sets based on synthetic gas combinations of H2S, MM, DMS and DMDS, were conducted for calibration transfer between two identical electronic nose systems. Identical sensors on both the systems were mapped and the prediction models developed using ANN were then transferred to the second system using BB-RR methodology. The results showed successful transmission of prediction models developed for one system to other system, with the mean absolute error between the actual and predicted concentration of analytes in mg L(-1) after calibration transfer (on second system) being 0.076, 0.1801, 0.0329, 0.427 for DMS, DMDS, MM, H2S respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Conformal Prediction Based on K-Nearest Neighbors for Discrimination of Ginsengs by a Home-Made Electronic Nose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhan; Sun, Xiyang; Miao, Jiacheng; Wang, You; Luo, Zhiyuan; Li, Guang

    2017-08-14

    An estimate on the reliability of prediction in the applications of electronic nose is essential, which has not been paid enough attention. An algorithm framework called conformal prediction is introduced in this work for discriminating different kinds of ginsengs with a home-made electronic nose instrument. Nonconformity measure based on k-nearest neighbors (KNN) is implemented separately as underlying algorithm of conformal prediction. In offline mode, the conformal predictor achieves a classification rate of 84.44% based on 1NN and 80.63% based on 3NN, which is better than that of simple KNN. In addition, it provides an estimate of reliability for each prediction. In online mode, the validity of predictions is guaranteed, which means that the error rate of region predictions never exceeds the significance level set by a user. The potential of this framework for detecting borderline examples and outliers in the application of E-nose is also investigated. The result shows that conformal prediction is a promising framework for the application of electronic nose to make predictions with reliability and validity.

  10. Development Of An Electronic Nose For Environmental Monitoring: Detection Of Specific Environmentally Important Gases At Their Odor Detection Threshold Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentoni, Licinia; Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Del Rosso, Renato; Centola, Paolo; Della Torre, Matteo; Demattè, Fabrizio

    2011-09-01

    The use of a sensor array is demonstrated to be an effective approach to evaluate hazardous odor (or gas) emissions from industrial sites1. Therefore the possibility to use electronic noses for the prolonged survey of odor emissions from industrial sites is of particular interest for environmental monitoring purposes2. At the Olfactometric Laboratory of the Politecnico di Milano, in collaboration with Sacmi Group, Imola, an innovative electronic nose for the continuous monitoring of environmental odors is being developed. The aim of this work is to show the laboratory tests conducted to evaluate the capability of the electronic nose to recognize some specific environmentally important gases at their odor detection threshold concentration. The laboratory studies up to now focused on ammonia and butyric acid, those being compounds that can typically be found in the emissions from waste treatment plants, that may cause health effects when they exceed a given concentration level. The laboratory tests proved the sensors to be sensitive towards the considered compounds and the system to be capable of discriminating between odorous or non-odorous air, with a detection limit comparable with the detection limit of human nose.

  11. Electronic Noses for Well-Being: Breath Analysis and Energy Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Julian W.; Vincent, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of information concealed in a single human breath has been of interest for many years, promising not only disease detection, but also the monitoring of our general well-being. Recent developments in the fields of nano-sensor arrays and MEMS have enabled once bulky artificial olfactory sensor systems, or so-called “electronic noses”, to become smaller, lower power and portable devices. At the same time, wearable health monitoring devices are now available, although reliable breath sensing equipment is somewhat missing from the market of physical, rather than chemical sensor gadgets. In this article, we report on the unprecedented rise in healthcare problems caused by an increasingly overweight population. We first review recently-developed electronic noses for the detection of diseases by the analysis of basic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Then, we discuss the primary cause of obesity from over eating and the high calorific content of food. We present the need to measure our individual energy expenditure from our exhaled breath. Finally, we consider the future for handheld or wearable devices to measure energy expenditure; and the potential of these devices to revolutionize healthcare, both at home and in hospitals. PMID:27347946

  12. Geographical origin of Sauvignon Blanc wines predicted by mass spectrometry and metal oxide based electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Berna, Amalia Z; Trowell, Stephen; Clifford, David; Cynkar, Wies; Cozzolino, Daniel

    2009-08-26

    Analysis of 34 Sauvignon Blanc wine samples from three different countries and six regions was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) showed that there were three distinct clusters or classes of wines with different aroma profiles. Wines from the Loire region in France and Australian wines from Tasmania and Western Australia were found to have similar aroma patterns. New Zealand wines from the Marlborough region as well as the Australian ones from Victoria were grouped together based on the volatile composition. Wines from South Australia region formed one discrete class. Seven analytes, most of them esters, were found to be the relevant chemical compounds that characterized the classes. The grouping information obtained by GC-MS, was used to train metal oxide based electronic (MOS-Enose) and mass spectrometry based electronic (MS-Enose) noses. The combined use of solid phase microextraction (SPME) and ethanol removal prior to MOS-Enose analysis, allowed an average error of prediction of the regional origins of Sauvignon Blanc wines of 6.5% compared to 24% when static headspace (SHS) was employed. For MS-Enose, the misclassification rate was higher probably due to the requirement to delimit the m/z range considered.

  13. Kiwi fruit (Actinidia chinensis) quality determination based on surface acoustic wave resonator combined with electronic nose

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liu; Guohua, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, electronic nose (EN) combined with a 433 MHz surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) was used to determine Kiwi fruit quality under 12-day storage. EN responses to Kiwi samples were measured and analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and stochastic resonance (SR) methods. SAWR frequency eigen values were also measured to predict freshness. Kiwi fruit sample's weight loss index and human sensory evaluation were examined to characteristic its quality and freshness. Kiwi fruit's quality predictive models based on EN, SAWR, and EN combined with SAWR were developed, respectively. Weight loss and human sensory evaluation results demonstrated that Kiwi fruit's quality decline and overall acceptance decrease during the storage. Experiment result indicated that the PCA method could qualitatively discriminate all Kiwi fruit samples with different storage time. Both SR and SAWR frequency analysis methods could successfully discriminate samples with high regression coefficients (R = 0.98093 and R = 0.99014, respectively). The validation experiment results showed that the mixed predictive model developed using EN combined with SAWR present higher quality prediction accuracy than the model developed either by EN or by SAWR. This method exhibits some advantages including high accuracy, non-destructive, low cost, etc. It provides an effective way for fruit quality rapid analysis. PMID:25551334

  14. Early detection of fungal contamination on green coffee by a MOX sensors based Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sberveglieri, V.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.; Gobbi, E.; Pulvirenti, A.; Fava, P.

    2011-09-01

    Fungal growth can occur on green coffee beans along all the distribution chain, eventually bringing on health hazards to consumers, because of the production of toxic metabolites (mycotoxins) [1]. Besides, the sensorial contamination due to volatiles by-products of fungal metabolism could cause defects on coffee also after roasting. Therefore, it is necessary to devise strategies to detect and quantify fungal infection and toxin production at early stages of the food chain. One of the most promising techniques is the analysis of volatile compounds in the headspace gas surrounding the samples. The aim of this work was to verify the ability of the Electronic Nose (EN EOS835) to early detect the microbial contamination of Arabica green coffee. This EN is equipped with Metal Oxide Semiconductor sensor array. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the static headspace of non-contaminated Arabica green coffee samples was carried out to confirm the EN ability to provide satisfactory indications about the presence of contamination.

  15. Winter jujube (Zizyphus jujuba Mill.) quality forecasting method based on electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Hui, Guohua; Jin, Jiaojiao; Deng, Shanggui; Ye, Xiao; Zhao, Mengtian; Wang, Minmin; Ye, Dandan

    2015-03-01

    Winter jujube (Zizyphus jujuba Mill.) quality forecasting method utilising electronic nose (EN) and double-layered cascaded series stochastic resonance (DCSSR) was investigated. EN responses to jujubes stored at room temperature were continuously measured for 8 days. Jujubes' physical/chemical indexes, such as firmness, colour, total soluble solids (TSS), and ascorbic acid (AA), were synchronously examined. Examination results indicated that jujubes were getting ripe during storage. EN measurement data was processed by stochastic resonance (SR) and DCSSR. SR and DCSSR output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) maximums (SNR-MAX) discriminated jujubes under different storage time successfully. Multiple variable regression (MVR) results between physical/chemical indexes and SR/DCSSR eigen values demonstrated that DCSSR eigen values were more suitable for jujube quality determination. Quality forecasting model was developed using non-linear fitting regression of DCSSR eigen values. Validating experiments demonstrated that forecasting accuracy of this model is 97.35%. This method also presented other advantages including fast response, non-destructive, etc. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hildebrand and Hansen solubility parameters from molecular dynamics with applications to electronic nose polymer sensors.

    PubMed

    Belmares, M; Blanco, M; Goddard, W A; Ross, R B; Caldwell, G; Chou, S-H; Pham, J; Olofson, P M; Thomas, Cristina

    2004-11-30

    We introduce the Cohesive Energy Density (CED) method, a multiple sampling Molecular Dynamics computer simulation procedure that may offer higher consistency in the estimation of Hildebrand and Hansen solubility parameters. The use of a multiple sampling technique, combined with a simple but consistent molecular force field and quantum mechanically determined atomic charges, allows for the precise determination of solubility parameters in a systematic way (sigma = 0.4 hildebrands). The CED method yields first-principles Hildebrand parameter predictions in good agreement with experiment [root-mean-square (rms) = 1.1 hildebrands]. We apply the CED method to model the Caltech electronic nose, an array of 20 polymer sensors. Sensors are built with conducting leads connected through thin-film polymers loaded with carbon black. Odorant detection relies on a change in electric resistivity of the polymer film as function of the amount of swelling caused by the odorant compound. The amount of swelling depends upon the chemical composition of the polymer and the odorant molecule. The pattern is unique, and unambiguously identifies the compound. Experimentally determined changes in relative resistivity of seven polymer sensors upon exposure to 24 solvent vapors were modeled with the CED estimated Hansen solubility components. Predictions of polymer sensor responses result in Pearson R2 coefficients between 0.82 and 0.99.

  17. Pattern Classification Using an Olfactory Model with PCA Feature Selection in Electronic Noses: Study and Application

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jun; Huang, Canqin; Xing, Jianguo; Zheng, Junbao

    2012-01-01

    Biologically-inspired models and algorithms are considered as promising sensor array signal processing methods for electronic noses. Feature selection is one of the most important issues for developing robust pattern recognition models in machine learning. This paper describes an investigation into the classification performance of a bionic olfactory model with the increase of the dimensions of input feature vector (outer factor) as well as its parallel channels (inner factor). The principal component analysis technique was applied for feature selection and dimension reduction. Two data sets of three classes of wine derived from different cultivars and five classes of green tea derived from five different provinces of China were used for experiments. In the former case the results showed that the average correct classification rate increased as more principal components were put in to feature vector. In the latter case the results showed that sufficient parallel channels should be reserved in the model to avoid pattern space crowding. We concluded that 6∼8 channels of the model with principal component feature vector values of at least 90% cumulative variance is adequate for a classification task of 3∼5 pattern classes considering the trade-off between time consumption and classification rate. PMID:22736979

  18. Pattern classification using an olfactory model with PCA feature selection in electronic noses: study and application.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jun; Huang, Canqin; Xing, Jianguo; Zheng, Junbao

    2012-01-01

    Biologically-inspired models and algorithms are considered as promising sensor array signal processing methods for electronic noses. Feature selection is one of the most important issues for developing robust pattern recognition models in machine learning. This paper describes an investigation into the classification performance of a bionic olfactory model with the increase of the dimensions of input feature vector (outer factor) as well as its parallel channels (inner factor). The principal component analysis technique was applied for feature selection and dimension reduction. Two data sets of three classes of wine derived from different cultivars and five classes of green tea derived from five different provinces of China were used for experiments. In the former case the results showed that the average correct classification rate increased as more principal components were put in to feature vector. In the latter case the results showed that sufficient parallel channels should be reserved in the model to avoid pattern space crowding. We concluded that 6~8 channels of the model with principal component feature vector values of at least 90% cumulative variance is adequate for a classification task of 3~5 pattern classes considering the trade-off between time consumption and classification rate.

  19. Electronic Nose analysis of milk from cows grazing on two different Alpine vegetation types.

    PubMed

    Falchero, Luca; Sala, Giacomo; Gorlier, Alessandra; Lombardi, Giampiero; Lonati, Michele; Masoero, Giorgio

    2009-08-01

    The nutritional distinctiveness of pasture-fed dairy products is mainly influenced by the transfer of specific chemical compounds from the grass to the milk and by their effect on rumen microflora and animal metabolism. Thus, the pasture-fed origin has to be objectively proven, using fast and reproducible analytical methods applied to finished products, in order to protect consumers against potential frauds. In this work, Electronic Nose patterns of Alpine milks produced by cows grazing Trifolium alpinum and Festuca nigrescens pasture types have been examined, in order to test the potential use of this device for routine control analyses of the botanical origin of milk and dairy products. The data have been treated with different multivariate analyses (MANOVA, LDA) and chemometrics (MPLS). The results allow a very good classification of the milks, according to the two treatments. Such results demonstrate that this device could be successfully applied to PDO dairy products food chain as a tool for the determination of their dietary origin.

  20. Kiwi fruit (Actinidia chinensis) quality determination based on surface acoustic wave resonator combined with electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liu; Guohua, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, electronic nose (EN) combined with a 433 MHz surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) was used to determine Kiwi fruit quality under 12-day storage. EN responses to Kiwi samples were measured and analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and stochastic resonance (SR) methods. SAWR frequency eigen values were also measured to predict freshness. Kiwi fruit sample's weight loss index and human sensory evaluation were examined to characteristic its quality and freshness. Kiwi fruit's quality predictive models based on EN, SAWR, and EN combined with SAWR were developed, respectively. Weight loss and human sensory evaluation results demonstrated that Kiwi fruit's quality decline and overall acceptance decrease during the storage. Experiment result indicated that the PCA method could qualitatively discriminate all Kiwi fruit samples with different storage time. Both SR and SAWR frequency analysis methods could successfully discriminate samples with high regression coefficients (R = 0.98093 and R = 0.99014, respectively). The validation experiment results showed that the mixed predictive model developed using EN combined with SAWR present higher quality prediction accuracy than the model developed either by EN or by SAWR. This method exhibits some advantages including high accuracy, non-destructive, low cost, etc. It provides an effective way for fruit quality rapid analysis.

  1. [Combination of near infrared spectroscopy and electronic nose for alcohol quantification during the red wine fermentation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Ni, Yuan-Ying

    2012-11-01

    The red wine fermentation needs fast and nondestructive techniques, which can help to control the fermentation process and assure the quality of wine. In the present study, near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and electronic nose (EN) were used to predict the alcohol content during the red wine alcoholic fermentation. Calibration models were developed between instru- mental data and chemical analysis using principal component regression (PCR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) with cross validation. Good correlations (R > 0.99) were acquired for both the models developed by the NIR and EN data. However, RMSEC and RMSEP were a little larger. Combining NIR and EN can optimize the model and improve the prediction accuracy. The PLSR model based on combined data shows the best correlation (R = 0.999 2), with RMSEC and RMSEP being 0. 206 and 0.205% (v/v), respectively. Both NIR spectroscopy and EN can predict the alcohol concentration during the alcoholic fermentation of red wine, and the combination of two instruments can improve the analysis precision. Although the measurements were carried out in off-line mode, this study demonstrates that NIR and EN can be used as on line, fast, nondestructive and in time techniques to provide in-time information about the fermentation process and to assure the quality of final products.

  2. Monitoring of taints related to printed solid boards with an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Heiniö, R L; Ahvenainen, R

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives were to combine knowledge gathered from the electronic nose (EN) with traditional analytical reference methods for measuring volatile compounds, such as sensory and headspace methods. The impacts of different colouring agents on the sensory properties of packaging materials when analysed by EN were determined. The first step in investigations using the EN was optimization of sample treatment and analysis parameters for the samples. The best resolution was achieved at 60 degrees C in 20 min, and the effect of humidity on the EN sensors was confirmed. A comparison was made of three sensory methods for analysing taints of packaging materials. The study showed that the odour of the packaging itself was often not a reliable indication of the taint perceived in the packed foodstuff and should be regarded only as indicative. Taints caused by pigments of printed solid boards were analysed by EN. Twenty samples were studied, representing unprinted solid board, lacquered solid board, offset printed solid board with 14 different colours and offset printed, lacquered solid board with four colours. The EN succeeded in grouping these materials according to their colouring agents or lacquering, despite slight overlapping of replicates, and the results appeared to reflect at least to some extent the off-flavours perceived in sensory evaluation. The results of this study are only indicative, because the analysis of results from different sources or equipment requires more extensive use of statistical methods.

  3. Application of an Electronic Nose Instrument to Fast Classification of Polish Honey Types

    PubMed Central

    Dymerski, Tomasz; Gębicki, Jacek; Wardencki, Waldemar; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents practical utilization of an electronic nose prototype, based on the FIGARO semiconductor sensors, in fast classification of Polish honey types—acacia flower, linden flower, rape, buckwheat and honeydew ones. A set of thermostating modules of the prototype provided gradient temperature characteristics of barbotage-prepared gas mixtures and stable measurement conditions. Three chemometric data analysis methods were employed for the honey samples classification: principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and cluster analysis (CA) with the furthest neighbour method. The investigation confirmed usefulness of this type of instrument in correct classification of all aforementioned honey types. In order to provide optimum measurement conditions during honey samples classification the following parameters were selected: volumetric flow rate of carrier gas—15 L/h, barbotage temperature—35 °C, time of sensor signal acquisition since barbotage process onset—60 s. Chemometric analysis allowed discrimination of three honey types using PCA and CA and all five honey types with LDA. The reproducibility of 96% of the results was within the range 4.9%–8.6% CV. PMID:24945677

  4. Electronic nose screening of limonene release from multicomponent essential oils encapsulated in pectin gels.

    PubMed

    Monge, María Eugenia; Bulone, Donatella; Giacomazza, Daniela; Negri, Martín; Bernik, Delia L

    2004-06-01

    Multicomponent essential oils Tagetes Minuta and Poleo as well as pure limonene were encapsulated in Tween doped-high methoxylated pectin gels. Optical microscopy reveals that the obtained gels containing limonene consisted in a highly heterogeneous oil-in-water emulsion stabilised by the gelled medium. The influence of limonene encapsulation in pectin gelation kinetics and the gel structural properties were followed by dynamic rheological measurements. An electronic nose device developed in our laboratory was used to follow the flavour release of the three systems in order to discriminate the samples according to the main components released to the headspace. PCA and Neural Network Analysis allowed us to discriminate Tagetes Minuta from Poleo due to the difference in their limonene content. It is remarkable that the fingerprints of encapsulated complex mixtures differ from those obtained for the non-encapsulated oils, showing a preferential release of some components. In the case of limonene, the effect of the encapsulated concentration on the detected odour was also studied.

  5. Biofiltration of composting gases using different municipal solid waste-pruning residue composts: monitoring by using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    López, R; Cabeza, I O; Giráldez, I; Díaz, M J

    2011-09-01

    The concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the composting of kitchen waste and pruning residues, and the abatement of VOCs by different compost biofilters was studied. VOCs removal efficiencies greater than 90% were obtained using composts of municipal solid waste (MSW) or MSW-pruning residue as biofilter material. An electronic nose identified qualitative differences among the biofilter output gases at very low concentrations of VOCs. These differences were related to compost constituents, compost particle size (2-7 or 7-20mm), and a combination of both factors. The total concentration of VOCs determined by a photoionization analyser and inferred from electronic nose data sets were correlated over an ample range of concentrations of VOCs, showing that these techniques could be specially adapted for the monitoring of these processes.

  6. Rapid identification of pork for halal authentication using the electronic nose and gas chromatography mass spectrometer with headspace analyzer.

    PubMed

    Nurjuliana, M; Che Man, Y B; Mat Hashim, D; Mohamed, A K S

    2011-08-01

    The volatile compounds of pork, other meats and meat products were studied using an electronic nose and gas chromatography mass spectrometer with headspace analyzer (GCMS-HS) for halal verification. The zNose™ was successfully employed for identification and differentiation of pork and pork sausages from beef, mutton and chicken meats and sausages which were achieved using a visual odor pattern called VaporPrint™, derived from the frequency of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector of the electronic nose. GCMS-HS was employed to separate and analyze the headspace gasses from samples into peaks corresponding to individual compounds for the purpose of identification. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied for data interpretation. Analysis by PCA was able to cluster and discriminate pork from other types of meats and sausages. It was shown that PCA could provide a good separation of the samples with 67% of the total variance accounted by PC1.

  7. Comparative Analysis of Volatile Composition in Chinese Truffles via GC × GC/HR-TOF/MS and Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Haitao; Sun, Baoguo; Mao, Xueying; Zhang, Yuyu; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To compare the volatile compounds of Chinese black truffle and white truffle from Yunnan province, this study presents the application of a direct solvent extraction/solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (DSE-SAFE) coupled with a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HR-TOF/MS) and an electronic nose. Both of the analytical methods could distinguish the aroma profile of the two samples. In terms of the overall profile of truffle samples in this research, more kinds of acids were detected via the method of DSE-SAFE. Besides, compounds identified in black truffle (BT), but not in white truffle (WT), or vice versa, and those detected in both samples at different levels were considered to play an important role in differentiating the two samples. According to the analysis of electronic nose, the two samples could be separated, as well. PMID:27058524

  8. Close-To-Practice Assessment Of Meat Freshness With Metal Oxide Sensor Microarray Electronic Nose

    SciTech Connect

    Musatov, V. Yu.; Sysoev, V. V.; Sommer, M.; Kiselev, I.

    2009-05-23

    In this report we estimate the ability of KAMINA e-nose, based on a metal oxide sensor (MOS) microarray and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) pattern recognition, to evaluate meat freshness. The received results show that, 1) one or two exposures of standard meat samples to the e-nose are enough for the instrument to recognize the fresh meat prepared by the same supplier with 100% probability; 2) the meat samples of two kinds, stored at 4 deg. C and 25 deg. C, are mutually recognized at early stages of decay with the help of the LDA model built independently under the e-nose training to each kind of meat; 3) the 3-4 training cycles of exposure to meat from different suppliers are necessary for the e-nose to build a reliable LDA model accounting for the supplier factor. This study approves that the MOS e-nose is ready to be currently utilised in food industry for evaluation of product freshness. The e-nose performance is characterized by low training cost, a confident recognition power of various product decay conditions and easy adjustment to changing conditions.

  9. Use Of Electronic Noses For Continuous Monitoring And Recognition Of Environmental Odours In Presence Of Multiple Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; De Luca, Sandra; Del Rosso, Renato; Céntola, Paolo

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes an experimental monitoring conducted in order to study the olfactory impact on a small town located in the North of Italy, where the coexistence of more different factories is the cause of an olfactory nuisance problem. Three electronic noses were first trained to recognize the characteristic odours of the plants considered as the major sources of odour emissions in the studied area, then installed on the territory with the aim of continuously analyzing the ambient air in order to detect the presence of odours and to identify their origin. The results of the study demonstrate how specific electronic noses developed for environmental applications, once suitably trained, can successfully be applied for the continuous monitoring of odours and their identification in presence of multiple sources. In this specific case, the continuous odour monitoring at the first receptor, i.e. the nearest dwelling to the industrial zone, resulted in the detection of odours for 11.6% of the total monitoring period. Moreover, the qualitative classification of the electronic nose installed at this receptor enabled to identify the major source of odour nuisance, which turned out to be the aluminium foundry.

  10. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila in Liquid Media by Volatile Production Similarity Patterns, Using a FF-2A Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Arakawa, Eiji; Kita, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Yoshihiro; Manome, Yoshinobu; Ikeda, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    A technique for rapid detection of pathogenic microorganisms is essential for the diagnosis of associated infections and for food safety analysis. Aeromonas hydrophila is one such food contaminant. Several methods for rapid detection of this pathogen have been developed; these include multiplex polymerase chain reaction assays and the colony overlay procedure for peptidases. However, these conventional methods can only be used to detect the microorganisms at high accuracy after symptomatic onset of the disease. Therefore, in the future, simple pre-screening methods may be useful for preventing food poisoning and disease. In this paper, we present a novel system for the rapid detection of the microorganism A. hydrophila in cultured media (in <2 h), with the use of an electronic nose (FF-2A). With this electronic nose, we detected the changes of volatile patterns produced by A. hydrophila after 30 min culture. Our calculations revealed that the increased volatiles were similar to the odours of organic acids and esters. In future, distinctive volatile production patterns of microorganisms identified with the electronic nose may have the potential in microorganism detection. PMID:23296330

  11. Identification and quantification of components in ternary vapor mixtures using a microelectromechanical-system-based electronic nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weichang; Pinnaduwage, Lal A.; Leis, John W.; Gehl, Anthony C.; Allman, Steve L.; Shepp, Allan; Mahmud, Ken K.

    2008-05-01

    We report the experimental details on the successful application of the electronic nose approach to identify and quantify components in ternary vapor mixtures. Preliminary results have recently been presented [L. A. Pinnaduwage et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 044105 (2007)]. Our microelectromechanical-system-based electronic nose is composed of a microcantilever sensor array with seven individual sensors used for vapor detection and an artificial neural network for pattern recognition. A set of custom vapor generators generated reproducible vapor mixtures in different compositions for training and testing of the neural network. The sensor array was selected to be capable of generating different response patterns to mixtures with different component proportions. Therefore, once the electronic nose was trained by using the response patterns to various compositions of the mixture, it was able to predict the composition of "unknown" mixtures. We have studied two vapor systems: one included the nerve gas simulant dimethylmethyl phosphonate at ppb concentrations and water and ethanol at ppm concentrations; the other system included acetone, water, and ethanol all of which were at ppm concentrations. In both systems, individual, binary, and ternary mixtures were analyzed with good reproducibility.

  12. Factors Influencing Continuous Breath Signal in Intubated and Mechanically-Ventilated Intensive Care Unit Patients Measured by an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jan Hendrik; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Colombo, Camilla; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bos, Lieuwe D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Continuous breath analysis by electronic nose (eNose) technology in the intensive care unit (ICU) may be useful in monitoring (patho) physiological changes. However, the application of breath monitoring in a non-controlled clinical setting introduces noise into the data. We hypothesized that the sensor signal is influenced by: (1) humidity in the side-stream; (2) patient-ventilator disconnections and the nebulization of medication; and (3) changes in ventilator settings and the amount of exhaled CO2. We aimed to explore whether the aforementioned factors introduce noise into the signal, and discuss several approaches to reduce this noise. Methods: Study in mechanically-ventilated ICU patients. Exhaled breath was monitored using a continuous eNose with metal oxide sensors. Linear (mixed) models were used to study hypothesized associations. Results: In total, 1251 h of eNose data were collected. First, the initial 15 min of the signal was discarded. There was a negative association between humidity and Sensor 1 (Fixed-effect β: −0.05 ± 0.002) and a positive association with Sensors 2–4 (Fixed-effect β: 0.12 ± 0.001); the signal was corrected for this noise. Outliers were most likely due to noise and therefore removed. Sensor values were positively associated with end-tidal CO2, tidal volume and the pressure variables. The signal was corrected for changes in these ventilator variables after which the associations disappeared. Conclusion: Variations in humidity, ventilator disconnections, nebulization of medication and changes of ventilator settings indeed influenced exhaled breath signals measured in ventilated patients by continuous eNose analysis. We discussed several approaches to reduce the effects of these noise inducing variables. PMID:27556467

  13. Rapid and Accurate Detection of Urinary Pathogens by Mobile IMS-Based Electronic Nose: A Proof-of-Principle Study

    PubMed Central

    Roine, Antti; Saviauk, Taavi; Kumpulainen, Pekka; Karjalainen, Markus; Tuokko, Antti; Aittoniemi, Janne; Vuento, Risto; Lekkala, Jukka; Lehtimäki, Terho; Tammela, Teuvo L.; Oksala, Niku K. J.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common disease with significant morbidity and economic burden, accounting for a significant part of the workload in clinical microbiology laboratories. Current clinical chemisty point-of-care diagnostics rely on imperfect dipstick analysis which only provides indirect and insensitive evidence of urinary bacterial pathogens. An electronic nose (eNose) is a handheld device mimicking mammalian olfaction that potentially offers affordable and rapid analysis of samples without preparation at athmospheric pressure. In this study we demonstrate the applicability of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) –based eNose to discriminate the most common UTI pathogens from gaseous headspace of culture plates rapidly and without sample preparation. We gathered a total of 101 culture samples containing four most common UTI bacteries: E. coli, S. saprophyticus, E. faecalis, Klebsiella spp and sterile culture plates. The samples were analyzed using ChemPro 100i device, consisting of IMS cell and six semiconductor sensors. Data analysis was conducted by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and logistic regression (LR). The results were validated by leave-one-out and 5-fold cross validation analysis. In discrimination of sterile and bacterial samples sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 97% were achieved. The bacterial species were identified with sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 96% using eNose as compared to urine bacterial cultures. In conclusion: These findings strongly demonstrate the ability of our eNose to discriminate bacterial cultures and provides a proof of principle to use this method in urinanalysis of UTI. PMID:25526592

  14. A Novel Optimization Technique to Improve Gas Recognition by Electronic Noses Based on the Enhanced Krill Herd Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Jia, Pengfei; Huang, Tailai; Duan, Shukai; Yan, Jia; Wang, Lidan

    2016-01-01

    An electronic nose (E-nose) is an intelligent system that we will use in this paper to distinguish three indoor pollutant gases (benzene (C6H6), toluene (C7H8), formaldehyde (CH2O)) and carbon monoxide (CO). The algorithm is a key part of an E-nose system mainly composed of data processing and pattern recognition. In this paper, we employ support vector machine (SVM) to distinguish indoor pollutant gases and two of its parameters need to be optimized, so in order to improve the performance of SVM, in other words, to get a higher gas recognition rate, an effective enhanced krill herd algorithm (EKH) based on a novel decision weighting factor computing method is proposed to optimize the two SVM parameters. Krill herd (KH) is an effective method in practice, however, on occasion, it cannot avoid the influence of some local best solutions so it cannot always find the global optimization value. In addition its search ability relies fully on randomness, so it cannot always converge rapidly. To address these issues we propose an enhanced KH (EKH) to improve the global searching and convergence speed performance of KH. To obtain a more accurate model of the krill behavior, an updated crossover operator is added to the approach. We can guarantee the krill group are diversiform at the early stage of iterations, and have a good performance in local searching ability at the later stage of iterations. The recognition results of EKH are compared with those of other optimization algorithms (including KH, chaotic KH (CKH), quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO), particle swarm optimization (PSO) and genetic algorithm (GA)), and we can find that EKH is better than the other considered methods. The research results verify that EKH not only significantly improves the performance of our E-nose system, but also provides a good beginning and theoretical basis for further study about other improved krill algorithms’ applications in all E-nose application areas. PMID

  15. Early detection of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii--spawned spoilage in apple juice by electronic nose combined with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huxuan; Hu, Zhongqiu; Long, Fangyu; Guo, Chunfeng; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2016-01-18

    Spoilage spawned by Zygosaccharomyces rouxii can cause sensory defect in apple juice, which could hardly be perceived in the early stage and therefore would lead to the serious economic loss. Thus, it is essential to detect the contamination in early stage to avoid costly waste of products or recalls. In this work the performance of an electronic nose (e-nose) coupled with chemometric analysis was evaluated for diagnosis of the contamination in apple juice, using test panel evaluation as reference. The feasibility of using e-nose responses to predict the spoilage level of apple juice was also evaluated. Coupled with linear discriminant analysis (LDA), detection of the contamination was achieved after 12h, corresponding to the cell concentration of less than 2.0 log 10 CFU/mL, the level at which the test panelists could not yet identify the contamination, indicating that the signals of e-nose could be utilized as early indicators for the onset of contamination. Loading analysis indicated that sensors 2, 6, 7 and 8 were the most important in the detection of Z. rouxii-contaminated apple juice. Moreover, Z. rouxii counts in unknown samples could be well predicted by the established models using partial least squares (PLS) algorithm with high correlation coefficient (R) of 0.98 (Z. rouxii strain ATCC 2623 and ATCC 8383) and 0.97 (Z. rouxii strain B-WHX-12-53). Based on these results, e-nose appears to be promising for rapid analysis of the odor in apple juice during processing or on the shelf to realize the early detection of potential contamination caused by Z. rouxii strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of solid phase-microextraction (SPME) and electronic nose techniques to differentiate volatiles of sesame oils prepared with diverse roasting conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Hee; Jeong, Min Kyu; Yeo, JuDong; Son, Hee-Jin; Lim, Chae-Lan; Hong, Eun Jeung; Noh, Bong-Soo; Lee, JaeHwan

    2011-01-01

    Headspace volatiles of sesame oil (SO) from sesame seeds roasted at 9 different conditions were analyzed by a combination of solid phase microextraction (SPME)-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), electronic nose/metal oxide sensors (MOS), and electronic nose/MS. As roasting temperature increased from 213 to 247 °C, total headspace volatiles and pyrazines increased significantly (P < 0.05). Pyrazines were major volatiles in SO and furans, thiazoles, aldehydes, and alcohols were also detected. Roasting temperature was more discrimination factor than roasting time for the volatiles in SO through the principal component analysis (PCA) of SPME-GC/MS, electronic nose/MOS, and electronic nose/MS. Electronic nose/MS showed that ion fragment 52, 76, 53, and 51 amu played important roles in discriminating volatiles in SO from roasted sesame seeds, which are the major ion fragments from pyrazines, furans, and furfurals. SO roasted at 213, 230, and 247 °C were clearly differentiated from each other on the base of volatile distribution by SPME-GC/MS, electronic nose/MOS, and electronic nose/MS analyses. Practical Application: The results of this study are ready to apply for the discriminating samples using a combinational analysis of volatiles. Not only vegetable oils prepared from roasting process but also any food sample possessing volatiles could be targets for the SPME-GC/MS and electronic nose assays. Contents and types of pyrazines in sesame seed oil could be used as markers to track down the degree of roasting and oxidation during oil preparation.

  17. Detection and quantification of ochratoxin A and deoxynivalenol in barley grains by GC-MS and electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Olsson, J; Börjesson, T; Lundstedt, T; Schnürer, J

    2002-02-05

    Mycotoxin contamination of cereal grains can be detected and quantified using complex extraction procedures and analytical techniques. Normally, the grain odour, i.e. the presence of non-grain volatile metabolites, is used for quality classification of grain. We have investigated the possibility of using fungal volatile metabolites as indicators of mycotoxins in grain. Ten barley samples with normal odour, and 30 with some kind of off-odour were selected from Swedish granaries. The samples were evaluated with regard to moisture content, fungal contamination, ergosterol content, and levels of ochratoxin A (OA) and deoxynivalenol (DON). Volatile compounds were also analysed using both an electronic nose and gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Samples with normal odour had no detectable ochratoxin A and average DON contents of 16 microg kg(-1) (range 0-80), while samples with off-odour had average OA contents of 76 microg kg(-1) (range 0-934) and DON contents of 69 microg kg(-1) (range 0-857). Data were evaluated by multivariate data analysis using projection methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS). The results show that it was possible to classify the OA level as below or above the maximum limit of 5 microg kg(-1) cereal grain established by the Swedish National Food Administration, and that the DON level could be estimated using PLS. Samples with OA levels below 5 microg kg(-1) had higher concentration of aldehydes (nonanal, 2-hexenal) and alcohols (1-penten-3-ol, 1-octanol). Samples with OA levels above 5 microg kg(-1) had higher concentrations of ketones (2-hexanone, 3-octanone). The GC-MS system predicted OA concentrations with a higher accuracy than the electronic nose, since the GC-MS misclassified only 3 of 37 samples and the electronic nose 7 of 37 samples. No correlation was found between odour and OA level, as samples with pronounced or strong off-odours had OA levels both below and above 5

  18. Use of an electronic nose to diagnose Mycobacterium bovis infection in badgers and cattle.

    PubMed

    Fend, R; Geddes, R; Lesellier, S; Vordermeier, H-M; Corner, L A L; Gormley, E; Costello, E; Hewinson, R G; Marlin, D J; Woodman, A C; Chambers, M A

    2005-04-01

    It is estimated that more than 50 million cattle are infected with Mycobacterium bovis worldwide, resulting in severe economic losses. Current diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in cattle relies on tuberculin skin testing, and when combined with the slaughter of test-positive animals, it has significantly reduced the incidence of bovine TB. The failure to eradicate bovine TB in Great Britain has been attributed in part to a reservoir of the infection in badgers (Meles meles). Accurate and reliable diagnosis of infection is the cornerstone of TB control. Bacteriological diagnosis has these characteristics, but only with samples collected postmortem. Unlike significant wild animal reservoirs of M. bovis that are considered pests in other countries, such as the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand, the badger and its sett are protected under United Kingdom legislation (The Protection of Badgers Act 1992). Therefore, an accurate in vitro test for badgers is needed urgently to determine the extent of the reservoir of infection cheaply and without destroying badgers. For cattle, a rapid on-farm test to complement the existing tests (the skin test and gamma interferon assay) would be highly desirable. To this end, we have investigated the potential of an electronic nose (EN) to diagnose infection of cattle or badgers with M. bovis, using a serum sample. Samples were obtained from both experimentally infected badgers and cattle, as well as naturally infected badgers. Without exception, the EN was able to discriminate infected animals from controls as early as 3 weeks after infection with M. bovis, the earliest time point examined postchallenge. The EN approach described here is a straightforward alternative to conventional methods of TB diagnosis, and it offers considerable potential as a sensitive, rapid, and cost-effective means of diagnosing M. bovis infection in cattle and badgers.

  19. Species discrimination among three kinds of puffer fish using an electronic nose combined with olfactory sensory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meixiu; Wang, Xichang; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2012-01-01

    Species discrimination among three kinds of puffer fish, Takifugu obscurus, Takifugu flavidus and Takifugu rubripes, was conducted using an electronic nose combined with olfactory sensory evaluation. All data were treated by multivariate data processing based on principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant factor analysis (DFA). The results showed the discriminant model by PCA method and DFA method. Using PCA and DFA, it was shown that the electronic nose was able to reasonably distinguish between each of the eleven puffer fish groups, with a discrimination index of 85. The olfactory sensory evaluation was undertaken in accordance to Sensory analysis-Methodology-Initiation and training of assessors in the detection and recognition of odors (BS ISO 5496-2006), and the results showed that the evaluation was able to identify puffer fish samples according to their species, geographical origin and age. Results from this analysis demonstrate that the E-nose can be used to complement the discrimination of odors by sensory evaluation from the three species of puffer fish studied here.

  20. Natural Satellite Ephemerides at JPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Robert Arthur; Brozovic, Marina

    2015-08-01

    There are currently 176 known natural planetary satellites in the solar system; 150 are officially recognized by the IAU and 26 have IAU provisional designations. We maintain ephemerides for all of the satellites at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and make them available electronically through the On-Line Solar System Data Service known as Horizons(http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/horizons) and in the form of generic Spice Kernels (SPK files) from NASA's Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility (http://naif.jpl.nasa.gov/naif). General satellite information such as physical constants and descriptive orbital elements can be found on the JPL Solar System Dynamics Website (http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov). JPL's ephemerides directly support planetary spacecraft missions both in navigation and science data analysis. They are also used in general scientific investigations of planetary systems. We produce the ephemerides by fitting numerically integrated orbits to observational data. Our model for the satellite dynamics accounts for the gravitational interactions within a planetary system and the external gravitational perturbations from the Sun and planets. We rely on an extensive data set to determine the parameters in our dynamical models. The majority of the observations are visual, photographic, and CCD astrometry acquired from Earthbased observatories worldwide and the Hubble Space Telescope. Additional observations include optical and photoelectric transits, eclipses, occultations, Earthbased radar ranging, spacecraft imaging,and spacecraft radiometric tracking. The latter data provide information on the planet and satellite gravity fields as well as the satellite position at the times of spacecraft close encounters. In this paper we report on the status of the ephemerides and our plan for future development, specifically that in support of NASA's Juno, Cassini, and New Horizons missions to Jupiter, Saturn, and Pluto, respectively.

  1. Objective display and discrimination of floral odors from Amorphophallus titanum, bloomed on different dates and at different locations, using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kouki; Shirasu, Mika; Manome, Yoshinobu; Ito, Nobuo; Kakishima, Satoshi; Minami, Tomohiro; Tominaga, Tadashi; Shimozono, Fumio; Iwamoto, Takeo; Ikeda, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Murata, Jin; Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2012-01-01

    As olfactory perceptions vary from person to person, it is difficult to describe smells objectively. In contrast, electronic noses also detect smells with their sensors, but in addition describe those using electronic signals. Here we showed a virtual connection method between a human nose perceptions and electronic nose responses with the smell of standard gases. In this method, Amorphophallus titanum flowers, which emit a strong carrion smell, could objectively be described using an electronic nose, in a way resembling the skill of sommeliers. We could describe the flower smell to be close to that of a mixture of methyl mercaptan and propionic acid, by calculation of the dilution index from electronic resistances. In other words, the smell resembled that of "decayed cabbage, garlic and pungent sour" with possible descriptors. Additionally, we compared the smells of flowers which bloomed on different dates and at different locations and showed the similarity of odor intensities visually, in standard gas categories. We anticipate our assay to be a starting point for a perceptive connection between our noses and electronic noses.

  2. Objective Display and Discrimination of Floral Odors from Amorphophallus titanum, Bloomed on Different Dates and at Different Locations, Using an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Shirasu, Mika; Manome, Yoshinobu; Ito, Nobuo; Kakishima, Satoshi; Minami, Tomohiro; Tominaga, Tadashi; Shimozono, Fumio; Iwamoto, Takeo; Ikeda, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Murata, Jin; Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2012-01-01

    As olfactory perceptions vary from person to person, it is difficult to describe smells objectively. In contrast, electronic noses also detect smells with their sensors, but in addition describe those using electronic signals. Here we showed a virtual connection method between a human nose perceptions and electronic nose responses with the smell of standard gases. In this method, Amorphophallus titanum flowers, which emit a strong carrion smell, could objectively be described using an electronic nose, in a way resembling the skill of sommeliers. We could describe the flower smell to be close to that of a mixture of methyl mercaptan and propionic acid, by calculation of the dilution index from electronic resistances. In other words, the smell resembled that of “decayed cabbage, garlic and pungent sour” with possible descriptors. Additionally, we compared the smells of flowers which bloomed on different dates and at different locations and showed the similarity of odor intensities visually, in standard gas categories. We anticipate our assay to be a starting point for a perceptive connection between our noses and electronic noses. PMID:22438757

  3. Your Nose

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can probably guess what happens next. You sneeze . Sneezes can send those unwelcome particles speeding out ... ON THIS TOPIC Movie: Nose What Makes Me Sneeze? When Sinuses Attack! Why Does My Nose Run? ...

  4. Chocolate Classification by an Electronic Nose with Pressure Controlled Generated Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Luis F; Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-20

    In this work, we will analyze the response of a Metal Oxide Gas Sensor (MOGS) array to a flow controlled stimulus generated in a pressure controlled canister produced by a homemade olfactometer to build an E-nose. The built E-nose is capable of chocolate identification between the 26 analyzed chocolate bar samples and four features recognition (chocolate type, extra ingredient, sweetener and expiration date status). The data analysis tools used were Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). The chocolate identification E-nose average classification rate was of 81.3% with 0.99 accuracy (Acc), 0.86 precision (Prc), 0.84 sensitivity (Sen) and 0.99 specificity (Spe) for test. The chocolate feature recognition E-nose gives a classification rate of 85.36% with 0.96 Acc, 0.86 Prc, 0.85 Sen and 0.96 Spe. In addition, a preliminary sample aging analysis was made. The results prove the pressure controlled generated stimulus is reliable for this type of studies.

  5. Chocolate Classification by an Electronic Nose with Pressure Controlled Generated Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Luis F.; Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we will analyze the response of a Metal Oxide Gas Sensor (MOGS) array to a flow controlled stimulus generated in a pressure controlled canister produced by a homemade olfactometer to build an E-nose. The built E-nose is capable of chocolate identification between the 26 analyzed chocolate bar samples and four features recognition (chocolate type, extra ingredient, sweetener and expiration date status). The data analysis tools used were Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). The chocolate identification E-nose average classification rate was of 81.3% with 0.99 accuracy (Acc), 0.86 precision (Prc), 0.84 sensitivity (Sen) and 0.99 specificity (Spe) for test. The chocolate feature recognition E-nose gives a classification rate of 85.36% with 0.96 Acc, 0.86 Prc, 0.85 Sen and 0.96 Spe. In addition, a preliminary sample aging analysis was made. The results prove the pressure controlled generated stimulus is reliable for this type of studies. PMID:27775628

  6. Effects of Sampling Conditions and Environmental Factors on Fecal Volatile Organic Compound Analysis by an Electronic Nose Device

    PubMed Central

    Berkhout, Daniel J. C.; Benninga, Marc A.; van Stein, Ruby M.; Brinkman, Paul; Niemarkt, Hendrik J.; de Boer, Nanne K. H.; de Meij, Tim G. J.

    2016-01-01

    Prior to implementation of volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis in clinical practice, substantial challenges, including methodological, biological and analytical difficulties are faced. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of several sampling conditions and environmental factors on fecal VOC profiles, analyzed by an electronic nose (eNose). Effects of fecal sample mass, water content, duration of storage at room temperature, fecal sample temperature, number of freeze–thaw cycles and effect of sampling method (rectal swabs vs. fecal samples) on VOC profiles were assessed by analysis of totally 725 fecal samples by means of an eNose (Cyranose320®). Furthermore, fecal VOC profiles of totally 1285 fecal samples from 71 infants born at three different hospitals were compared to assess the influence of center of origin on VOC outcome. We observed that all analyzed variables significantly influenced fecal VOC composition. It was feasible to capture a VOC profile using rectal swabs, although this differed significantly from fecal VOC profiles of similar subjects. In addition, 1285 fecal VOC-profiles could significantly be discriminated based on center of birth. In conclusion, standardization of methodology is necessary before fecal VOC analysis can live up to its potential as diagnostic tool in clinical practice. PMID:27886068

  7. Early detection of fungal growth in bakery products by use of an electronic nose based on mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vinaixa, Maria; Marín, Sonia; Brezmes, Jesús; Llobet, Eduard; Vilanova, Xavier; Correig, Xavier; Ramos, Antonio; Sanchis, Vicent

    2004-10-06

    This paper presents the design, optimization, and evaluation of a mass spectrometry-based electronic nose (MS e-nose) for early detection of unwanted fungal growth in bakery products. Seven fungal species (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Eurotium amstelodami, Eurotium herbariorum, Eurotium rubrum, Eurotium repens, and Penicillium corylophillum) were isolated from bakery products and used for the study. Two sampling headspace techniques were tested: static headspace (SH) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME). Cross-validated models based on principal component analysis (PCA), coupled to discriminant function analysis (DFA) and fuzzy ARTMAP, were used as data treatment. When attempting to discriminate between inoculated and blank control vials or between genera or species of in vitro growing cultures, sampling based on SPME showed better results than those based on static headspace. The SPME-MS-based e-nose was able to predict fungal growth with 88% success after 24 h of inoculation and 98% success after 48 h when changes were monitored in the headspace of fungal cultures growing on bakery product analogues. Prediction of the right fungal genus reached 78% and 88% after 24 and 96 h, respectively.

  8. A Low Noise CMOS Readout Based on a Polymer-Coated SAW Array for Miniature Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Chun; Liu, Szu-Chieh; Chiu, Shih-Wen; Tang, Kea-Tiong

    2016-01-01

    An electronic nose (E-Nose) is one of the applications for surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors. In this paper, we present a low-noise complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) based on an SAW sensor array for achieving a miniature E-Nose. The center frequency of the SAW sensors was measured to be approximately 114 MHz. Because of interference between the sensors, we designed a low-noise CMOS frequency readout circuit to enable the SAW sensor to obtain frequency variation. The proposed circuit was fabricated in Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.18 μm 1P6M CMOS process technology. The total chip size was nearly 1203 × 1203 μm2. The chip was operated at a supply voltage of 1 V for a digital circuit and 1.8 V for an analog circuit. The least measurable difference between frequencies was 4 Hz. The detection limit of the system, when estimated using methanol and ethanol, was 0.1 ppm. Their linearity was in the range of 0.1 to 26,000 ppm. The power consumption levels of the analog and digital circuits were 1.742 mW and 761 μW, respectively. PMID:27792131

  9. A Low Noise CMOS Readout Based on a Polymer-Coated SAW Array for Miniature Electronic Nose.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Chun; Liu, Szu-Chieh; Chiu, Shih-Wen; Tang, Kea-Tiong

    2016-10-25

    An electronic nose (E-Nose) is one of the applications for surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors. In this paper, we present a low-noise complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) based on an SAW sensor array for achieving a miniature E-Nose. The center frequency of the SAW sensors was measured to be approximately 114 MHz. Because of interference between the sensors, we designed a low-noise CMOS frequency readout circuit to enable the SAW sensor to obtain frequency variation. The proposed circuit was fabricated in Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.18 μm 1P6M CMOS process technology. The total chip size was nearly 1203 × 1203 μm². The chip was operated at a supply voltage of 1 V for a digital circuit and 1.8 V for an analog circuit. The least measurable difference between frequencies was 4 Hz. The detection limit of the system, when estimated using methanol and ethanol, was 0.1 ppm. Their linearity was in the range of 0.1 to 26,000 ppm. The power consumption levels of the analog and digital circuits were 1.742 mW and 761 μW, respectively.

  10. Performance Comparison of Fuzzy ARTMAP and LDA in Qualitative Classification of Iranian Rosa damascena Essential Oils by an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Gorji-Chakespari, Abbas; Nikbakht, Ali Mohammad; Sefidkon, Fatemeh; Ghasemi-Varnamkhasti, Mahdi; Brezmes, Jesús; Llobet, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Quality control of essential oils is an important topic in industrial processing of medicinal and aromatic plants. In this paper, the performance of Fuzzy Adaptive Resonant Theory Map (ARTMAP) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) algorithms are compared in the specific task of quality classification of Rosa damascene essential oil samples (one of the most famous and valuable essential oils in the world) using an electronic nose (EN) system based on seven metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) sensors. First, with the aid of a GC-MS analysis, samples of Rosa damascene essential oils were classified into three different categories (low, middle, and high quality, classes C1, C2, and C3, respectively) based on the total percent of the most crucial qualitative compounds. An ad-hoc electronic nose (EN) system was implemented to sense the samples and acquire signals. Forty-nine features were extracted from the EN sensor matrix (seven parameters to describe each sensor curve response). The extracted features were ordered in relevance by the intra/inter variance criterion (Vr), also known as the Fisher discriminant. A leave-one-out cross validation technique was implemented for estimating the classification accuracy reached by both algorithms. Success rates were calculated using 10, 20, 30, and the entire selected features from the response of the sensor array. The results revealed a maximum classification accuracy of 99% when applying the Fuzzy ARTMAP algorithm and 82% for LDA, using the first 10 features in both cases. Further classification results explained that sub-optimal performance is likely to occur when all the response features are applied. It was found that an electronic nose system employing a Fuzzy ARTMAP classifier could become an accurate, easy, and inexpensive alternative tool for qualitative control in the production of Rosa damascene essential oil. PMID:27153069

  11. Performance Comparison of Fuzzy ARTMAP and LDA in Qualitative Classification of Iranian Rosa damascena Essential Oils by an Electronic Nose.

    PubMed

    Gorji-Chakespari, Abbas; Nikbakht, Ali Mohammad; Sefidkon, Fatemeh; Ghasemi-Varnamkhasti, Mahdi; Brezmes, Jesús; Llobet, Eduard

    2016-05-04

    Quality control of essential oils is an important topic in industrial processing of medicinal and aromatic plants. In this paper, the performance of Fuzzy Adaptive Resonant Theory Map (ARTMAP) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) algorithms are compared in the specific task of quality classification of Rosa damascene essential oil samples (one of the most famous and valuable essential oils in the world) using an electronic nose (EN) system based on seven metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) sensors. First, with the aid of a GC-MS analysis, samples of Rosa damascene essential oils were classified into three different categories (low, middle, and high quality, classes C1, C2, and C3, respectively) based on the total percent of the most crucial qualitative compounds. An ad-hoc electronic nose (EN) system was implemented to sense the samples and acquire signals. Forty-nine features were extracted from the EN sensor matrix (seven parameters to describe each sensor curve response). The extracted features were ordered in relevance by the intra/inter variance criterion (Vr), also known as the Fisher discriminant. A leave-one-out cross validation technique was implemented for estimating the classification accuracy reached by both algorithms. Success rates were calculated using 10, 20, 30, and the entire selected features from the response of the sensor array. The results revealed a maximum classification accuracy of 99% when applying the Fuzzy ARTMAP algorithm and 82% for LDA, using the first 10 features in both cases. Further classification results explained that sub-optimal performance is likely to occur when all the response features are applied. It was found that an electronic nose system employing a Fuzzy ARTMAP classifier could become an accurate, easy, and inexpensive alternative tool for qualitative control in the production of Rosa damascene essential oil.

  12. An Electronic Nose Based on Coated Piezoelectric Quartz Crystals to Certify Ewes’ Cheese and to Discriminate between Cheese Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Vânia F.; Oliveira, João A. B. P.; Gomes, Maria Teresa S. R.

    2012-01-01

    An electronic nose based on coated piezoelectric quartz crystals was used to distinguish cheese made from ewes’ milk, and to distinguish cheese varieties. Two sensors coated with Nafion and Carbowax could certify half the ewes’ cheese samples, exclude 32 cheeses made from cow’s milk and to classify half of the ewes’ cheese samples as possibly authentic. Two other sensors, coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone and triethanolamine clearly distinguished between Flamengo, Brie, Gruyère and Mozzarella cheeses. Brie cheeses were further separated according to their origin, and Mozzarella grated cheese also appeared clearly separated from non-grated Mozzarella. PMID:22438717

  13. An Analog Multilayer Perceptron Neural Network for a Portable Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chih-Heng; Hsieh, Hung-Yi; Tang, Kea-Tiong

    2013-01-01

    This study examines an analog circuit comprising a multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN). This study proposes a low-power and small-area analog MLP circuit to implement in an E-nose as a classifier, such that the E-nose would be relatively small, power-efficient, and portable. The analog MLP circuit had only four input neurons, four hidden neurons, and one output neuron. The circuit was designed and fabricated using a 0.18 μm standard CMOS process with a 1.8 V supply. The power consumption was 0.553 mW, and the area was approximately 1.36 × 1.36 mm2. The chip measurements showed that this MLPNN successfully identified the fruit odors of bananas, lemons, and lychees with 91.7% accuracy. PMID:23262482

  14. The prediction of food additives in the fruit juice based on electronic nose with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shanshan; Wang, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Food additives are added to products to enhance their taste, and preserve flavor or appearance. While their use should be restricted to achieve a technological benefit, the contents of food additives should be also strictly controlled. In this study, E-nose was applied as an alternative to traditional monitoring technologies for determining two food additives, namely benzoic acid and chitosan. For quantitative monitoring, support vector machine (SVM), random forest (RF), extreme learning machine (ELM) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were applied to establish regression models between E-nose signals and the amount of food additives in fruit juices. The monitoring models based on ELM and RF reached higher correlation coefficients (R(2)s) and lower root mean square errors (RMSEs) than models based on PLSR and SVM. This work indicates that E-nose combined with RF or ELM can be a cost-effective, easy-to-build and rapid detection system for food additive monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. JPL web team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) WEB Team activities were reported for activities which were directed toward identifying and attacking areas in the growth of dendritic web ribbon, to complement the program at Westinghouse Electric Corp.

  16. Odor Profile of Different Varieties of Extra-Virgin Olive Oil During Deep Frying Using an Electronic Nose and SPME-GC-FID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Valeria; Biolatto, Andrea; Sancho, Ana; Descalzo, Adriana; Grigioni, Gabriela; de Reca, Noemí Walsöe

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the performed work was to evaluate with an electronic nose changes in odor profile of Arauco and Arbequina varieties of extra-virgin olive oil during deep-frying. Changes in odor were analyzed using an electronic nose composed of 16 sensors. Volatile compounds were analyzed by SPME-GC-FID. Principal Component Analysis was applied for electronic results. Arauco variety showed the highest response for sensors. Statistical analysis for volatile compounds indicated a significant (P<0.001) interaction between variety and time of frying processes. Arauco variety showed the highest production of volatile compounds at 60 min of deep frying. The two varieties presented distinct patterns of volatile products, being clearly identified with the electronic nose.

  17. Estimation of the age and amount of brown rice plant hoppers based on bionic electronic nose use.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sai; Zhou, Zhiyan; Lu, Huazhong; Luo, Xiwen; Lan, Yubin; Zhang, Yang; Li, Yanfang

    2014-09-29

    The brown rice plant hopper (BRPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stal), is one of the most important insect pests affecting rice and causes serious damage to the yield and quality of rice plants in Asia. This study used bionic electronic nose technology to sample BRPH volatiles, which vary in age and amount. Principal component analysis (PCA), linear discrimination analysis (LDA), probabilistic neural network (PNN), BP neural network (BPNN) and loading analysis (Loadings) techniques were used to analyze the sampling data. The results indicate that the PCA and LDA classification ability is poor, but the LDA classification displays superior performance relative to PCA. When a PNN was used to evaluate the BRPH age and amount, the classification rates of the training set were 100% and 96.67%, respectively, and the classification rates of the test set were 90.67% and 64.67%, respectively. When BPNN was used for the evaluation of the BRPH age and amount, the classification accuracies of the training set were 100% and 48.93%, respectively, and the classification accuracies of the test set were 96.67% and 47.33%, respectively. Loadings for BRPH volatiles indicate that the main elements of BRPHs' volatiles are sulfur-containing organics, aromatics, sulfur-and chlorine-containing organics and nitrogen oxides, which provide a reference for sensors chosen when exploited in specialized BRPH identification devices. This research proves the feasibility and broad application prospects of bionic electronic noses for BRPH recognition.

  18. Variation Of Odour Profile Detected In The Floral Stages of Prunus Persica (L) Batsch Using An Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeria, Messina; Silvia, Radice; Rosa, Baby; de Reca Noemí, Walsöe

    2009-05-01

    Bees use signals from plants to identify worthwhile visits. They learn quickly to differentiate mainly their floral odor than their colour. In some species the flowers remain open, intact and turgid until they are pollinated (anthesis) after which they are no longer attractive to pollinators (post-anthesis). Pollinators use fragrance for distance orientation, approach, landing, feeding and associative learning. The aim of this work was to study the variation of odor profile between anthesis and post-anthesis produced in flowers of different cultivars of Prunus Persica (L.) batsch, using an electronic nose since odor is a communication between flowering plants and bees. Visual results on field showed that peach flowers are generally more visited in the anthesis stage. Among all the analysed cultivars, Forastero cultivar was the only one visited in this floral stage. Statistical analysis of the electronic nose data showed that doped semiconductuvtive SnO2 sensors could differentiate between stages (anthesis and post-anthesis) only in case of Forastero cultivar.

  19. Composition of commercial truffle flavored oils with GC-MS analysis and discrimination with an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Pacioni, Giovanni; Cerretani, Lorenzo; Procida, Giuseppe; Cichelli, Angelo

    2014-03-01

    Truffles are among the most expensive foods and their quality depends on their unique aroma, composed of complex mixtures of lipophilic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). There are many foods flavored with truffle, and oils are particularly common. Using DHS-GC-MS and an electronic nose (MOS), 18 samples of olive oil flavored with white and black truffles from the Italian market were subjected to a blind analysis. Qualitative and quantitative analysis with DHS-GC-MS detected the presence of 63 VOCs, 32 of which can be attributed to olive oil, also defective, and 19 to truffles, while 12 foreign compounds are of dubious origin (synthesis and/or demolition). The data obtained with the electronic nose (MOS), processed statistically, was able to discriminate the aromas coincident with the three species of truffle declared on the label (the white truffle Tuber magnatum and the black truffles Tuber melanosporum and Tuber aestivum), demonstrating the potential and reliability of this technique, confirming the established malpractice of the use of bismethyl(dithio)methane in black truffles flavorings.

  20. Discrimination of volatiles of refined and whole wheat bread containing red and white wheat bran using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Sapirstein, Harry D; Siddhu, Silvi; Aliani, Michel

    2012-11-01

    The principal objective of this study was to evaluate the capability of electronic (E) nose technology to discriminate refined and whole wheat bread made with white or red wheat bran according to their headspace volatiles. Whole wheat flour was formulated with a common refined flour from hard red spring wheat, blended at the 15% replacement level with bran milled from representative samples of one hard red and 2 hard white wheats. A commercial formula was used for breadmaking. Results varied according to the nature of the sample, that is, crust, crumb, or whole slices. Bread crust and crumb were completely discriminated. Crumb of whole wheat bread made with red bran was distinct from other bread types. When misclassified, whole wheat bread crumb with white bran was almost invariably identified as refined flour bread crumb. Using crust as the basis for comparisons, the largest difference in volatiles was between refined flour bread and whole wheat bread as a group. When refined flour bread crust was misclassified, samples tended to be confused with whole white wheat crust. Samples prepared from whole bread slices were poorly discriminated in general. E-nose results indicated that whole wheat bread formulated with white bran was more similar in volatile makeup to refined flour bread compared to whole wheat bread made with red bran. The E-nose appears to be very capable to accommodate differentiation of bread volatiles whose composition varies due to differences in flour or bran type. Consumer preference of bread made using refined flour in contrast to whole wheat flour is partly due to the different aroma of whole wheat bread. This study used an electronic nose to analyze bread volatiles, and showed that whole wheat bread incorporating white bran was different from counterpart bread made using red bran, and was closer in volatile makeup to "white" bread made without bran. Commercial millers and bakers can take advantage of these results to formulate whole wheat flour

  1. Characterization of Fuji apples from different harvest dates and storage conditions from measurements of volatiles by gas chromatography and electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, Gemma; Correa, Eva; Ruiz-Altisent, Margarita; Graell, Jordi; Puy, Jaume; López, Luisa

    2004-05-19

    Volatile compounds in Fuji apples harvested at two different maturities were measured at harvest and after 5 and 7 months of cold storage (1 degrees C) in four different atmospheres. When the samples were characterized by both chromatographic measurements of volatiles and responses of an electronic nose, the analyses showed a clear separation between fruits from different storage conditions (a normal cold atmosphere and three controlled atmospheres). During poststorage, the apples were left to ripen for 1, 5, and 10 days at 20 degrees C before analytical measurements were done involving headspace-gas chromatography methods and electronic nose type quartz crystal microbalances. Electronic nose responses registered by seven different sensors were used to classify the apples using principal component analysis. It was possible to identify the samples from different storage periods, days of shelf life, and harvest dates, but it was not possible to differentiate the fruits corresponding to different cold storage atmospheres.

  2. A wireless and portable electronic nose to differentiate musts of different ripeness degree and grape varieties.

    PubMed

    Aleixandre, Manuel; Santos, Jose Pedro; Sayago, Isabel; Cabellos, Juan Mariano; Arroyo, Teresa; Horrillo, Maria Carmen

    2015-04-13

    Two novel applications using a portable and wireless sensor system (e-nose) for the wine producing industry-The recognition and classification of musts coming from different grape ripening times and from different grape varieties-Are reported in this paper. These applications are very interesting because a lot of varieties of grapes produce musts with low and similar aromatic intensities so they are very difficult to distinguish using a sensory panel. Therefore the system could be used to monitor the ripening evolution of the different types of grapes and to assess some useful characteristics, such as the identification of the grape variety origin and to prediction of the wine quality. Ripening grade of collected samples have been also evaluated by classical analytical techniques, measuring physicochemical parameters, such as, pH, Brix, Total Acidity (TA) and Probable Grade Alcoholic (PGA). The measurements were carried out for two different harvests, using different red (Barbera, Petit Verdot, Tempranillo, and Touriga) and white (Malvar, Malvasía, Chenin Blanc, and Sauvignon Blanc) grape musts coming from the experimental cellar of the IMIDRA at Madrid. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Probabilistic Neural Networks (PNN) have been used to analyse the obtained data by e-nose. In addition, and the Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) method has been carried out to correlate the results obtained by both technologies.

  3. A Wireless and Portable Electronic Nose to Differentiate Musts of Different Ripeness Degree and Grape Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Aleixandre, Manuel; Santos, Jose Pedro; Sayago, Isabel; Cabellos, Juan Mariano; Arroyo, Teresa; Horrillo, Maria Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Two novel applications using a portable and wireless sensor system (e-nose) for the wine producing industry—The recognition and classification of musts coming from different grape ripening times and from different grape varieties—Are reported in this paper. These applications are very interesting because a lot of varieties of grapes produce musts with low and similar aromatic intensities so they are very difficult to distinguish using a sensory panel. Therefore the system could be used to monitor the ripening evolution of the different types of grapes and to assess some useful characteristics, such as the identification of the grape variety origin and to prediction of the wine quality. Ripening grade of collected samples have been also evaluated by classical analytical techniques, measuring physicochemical parameters, such as, pH, Brix, Total Acidity (TA) and Probable Grade Alcoholic (PGA). The measurements were carried out for two different harvests, using different red (Barbera, Petit Verdot, Tempranillo, and Touriga) and white (Malvar, Malvasía, Chenin Blanc, and Sauvignon Blanc) grape musts coming from the experimental cellar of the IMIDRA at Madrid. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Probabilistic Neural Networks (PNN) have been used to analyse the obtained data by e-nose. In addition, and the Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) method has been carried out to correlate the results obtained by both technologies. PMID:25871715

  4. JPL Innovation Foundry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent; McCleese, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA supports the community of mission principal investigators by helping them ideate, mature, and propose concepts for new missions. As NASA's Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), JPL is a primary resource for providing this service. The environmental context for the formulation lifecycle evolves continuously. Contemporary trends include: more competitors; more-complex mission ideas; scarcer formulation resources; and higher standards for technical evaluation. Derived requirements for formulation support include: stable, clear, reliable methods tailored for each stage of the formulation lifecycle; on-demand access to standout technical and programmatic subject-matter experts; optimized, outfitted facilities; smart access to learning embodied in a vast oeuvre of prior formulation work; hands-on method coaching. JPL has retooled its provision of integrated formulation lifecycle support to PIs, teams, and program offices in response to this need. This mission formulation enterprise is the JPL Innovation Foundry.

  5. JPL Contamination Control Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakkolb, Brian

    2013-01-01

    JPL has extensive expertise fielding contamination sensitive missions-in house and with our NASA/industry/academic partners.t Development and implementation of performance-driven cleanliness requirements for a wide range missions and payloads - UV-Vis-IR: GALEX, Dawn, Juno, WFPC-II, AIRS, TES, et al - Propulsion, thermal control, robotic sample acquisition systems. Contamination control engineering across the mission life cycle: - System and payload requirements derivation, analysis, and contamination control implementation plans - Hardware Design, Risk trades, Requirements V-V - Assembly, Integration & Test planning and implementation - Launch site operations and launch vehicle/payload integration - Flight ops center dot Personnel on staff have expertise with space materials development and flight experiments. JPL has capabilities and expertise to successfully address contamination issues presented by space and habitable environments. JPL has extensive experience fielding and managing contamination sensitive missions. Excellent working relationship with the aerospace contamination control engineering community/.

  6. JPL Innovation Foundry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent; McCleese, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA supports the community of mission principal investigators by helping them ideate, mature, and propose concepts for new missions. As NASA's Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), JPL is a primary resource for providing this service. The environmental context for the formulation lifecycle evolves continuously. Contemporary trends include: more competitors; more-complex mission ideas; scarcer formulation resources; and higher standards for technical evaluation. Derived requirements for formulation support include: stable, clear, reliable methods tailored for each stage of the formulation lifecycle; on-demand access to standout technical and programmatic subject-matter experts; optimized, outfitted facilities; smart access to learning embodied in a vast oeuvre of prior formulation work; hands-on method coaching. JPL has retooled its provision of integrated formulation lifecycle support to PIs, teams, and program offices in response to this need. This mission formulation enterprise is the JPL Innovation Foundry.

  7. JPL Contamination Control Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakkolb, Brian

    2013-01-01

    JPL has extensive expertise fielding contamination sensitive missions-in house and with our NASA/industry/academic partners.t Development and implementation of performance-driven cleanliness requirements for a wide range missions and payloads - UV-Vis-IR: GALEX, Dawn, Juno, WFPC-II, AIRS, TES, et al - Propulsion, thermal control, robotic sample acquisition systems. Contamination control engineering across the mission life cycle: - System and payload requirements derivation, analysis, and contamination control implementation plans - Hardware Design, Risk trades, Requirements V-V - Assembly, Integration & Test planning and implementation - Launch site operations and launch vehicle/payload integration - Flight ops center dot Personnel on staff have expertise with space materials development and flight experiments. JPL has capabilities and expertise to successfully address contamination issues presented by space and habitable environments. JPL has extensive experience fielding and managing contamination sensitive missions. Excellent working relationship with the aerospace contamination control engineering community/.

  8. JPL Administration Building

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-27

    This archival image was released as part of a gallery comparing JPL's past and present, commemorating the 80th anniversary of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Oct. 31, 2016. The Administration Building of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Building 180) is pictured in January 1965. What appears as a parking lot in this photograph later becomes "The Mall", a landscaped open-air gathering place. A small security control post can be seen at the left of the 1965 image. And Building 167, one of the lab's cafeterias, is on the right. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21121

  9. Improved algorithms for the classification of rough rice using a bionic electronic nose based on PCA and the Wilks distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sai; Zhou, Zhiyan; Lu, Huazhong; Luo, Xiwen; Lan, Yubin

    2014-03-19

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is one of the main methods used for electronic nose pattern recognition. However, poor classification performance is common in classification and recognition when using regular PCA. This paper aims to improve the classification performance of regular PCA based on the existing Wilks Λ-statistic (i.e., combined PCA with the Wilks distribution). The improved algorithms, which combine regular PCA with the Wilks Λ-statistic, were developed after analysing the functionality and defects of PCA. Verification tests were conducted using a PEN3 electronic nose. The collected samples consisted of the volatiles of six varieties of rough rice (Zhongxiang1, Xiangwan13, Yaopingxiang, WufengyouT025, Pin 36, and Youyou122), grown in same area and season. The first two principal components used as analysis vectors cannot perform the rough rice varieties classification task based on a regular PCA. Using the improved algorithms, which combine the regular PCA with the Wilks Λ-statistic, many different principal components were selected as analysis vectors. The set of data points of the Mahalanobis distance between each of the varieties of rough rice was selected to estimate the performance of the classification. The result illustrates that the rough rice varieties classification task is achieved well using the improved algorithm. A Probabilistic Neural Networks (PNN) was also established to test the effectiveness of the improved algorithms. The first two principal components (namely PC1 and PC2) and the first and fifth principal component (namely PC1 and PC5) were selected as the inputs of PNN for the classification of the six rough rice varieties. The results indicate that the classification accuracy based on the improved algorithm was improved by 6.67% compared to the results of the regular method. These results prove the effectiveness of using the Wilks Λ-statistic to improve the classification accuracy of the regular PCA approach. The results

  10. Improved Algorithms for the Classification of Rough Rice Using a Bionic Electronic Nose Based on PCA and the Wilks Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sai; Zhou, Zhiyan; Lu, Huazhong; Luo, Xiwen; Lan, Yubin

    2014-01-01

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is one of the main methods used for electronic nose pattern recognition. However, poor classification performance is common in classification and recognition when using regular PCA. This paper aims to improve the classification performance of regular PCA based on the existing Wilks Λ-statistic (i.e., combined PCA with the Wilks distribution). The improved algorithms, which combine regular PCA with the Wilks Λ-statistic, were developed after analysing the functionality and defects of PCA. Verification tests were conducted using a PEN3 electronic nose. The collected samples consisted of the volatiles of six varieties of rough rice (Zhongxiang1, Xiangwan13, Yaopingxiang, WufengyouT025, Pin 36, and Youyou122), grown in same area and season. The first two principal components used as analysis vectors cannot perform the rough rice varieties classification task based on a regular PCA. Using the improved algorithms, which combine the regular PCA with the Wilks Λ-statistic, many different principal components were selected as analysis vectors. The set of data points of the Mahalanobis distance between each of the varieties of rough rice was selected to estimate the performance of the classification. The result illustrates that the rough rice varieties classification task is achieved well using the improved algorithm. A Probabilistic Neural Networks (PNN) was also established to test the effectiveness of the improved algorithms. The first two principal components (namely PC1 and PC2) and the first and fifth principal component (namely PC1 and PC5) were selected as the inputs of PNN for the classification of the six rough rice varieties. The results indicate that the classification accuracy based on the improved algorithm was improved by 6.67% compared to the results of the regular method. These results prove the effectiveness of using the Wilks Λ-statistic to improve the classification accuracy of the regular PCA approach. The results

  11. Electronic nose based on multipatterns of ZnO nanorods on a quartz resonator with remote electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ko, Wooree; Jung, Namchul; Lee, Moonchan; Yun, Minhyuk; Jeon, Sangmin

    2013-08-27

    An electrodeless monolithic multichannel quartz crystal microbalance (MQCM) sensor was developed via the direct growth of ZnO nanorod patterns of various sizes onto an electrodeless quartz crystal plate. The patterned ZnO nanorods acted as independent resonators with different frequencies upon exposure to an electric field. The added mass of ZnO nanostructures was found to significantly enhance the quality factor (QF) of the resonator in electrodeless QCM configuration. The QF increased with the length of the ZnO nanorods; ZnO nanorods 5 μm in length yielded a 7-fold higher QF compared to the QF of a quartz plate without ZnO nanorods. In addition, the ZnO nanorods offered enhanced sensitivity due to the enlarged sensing area. The developed sensor was used as an electronic nose for detection of vapor mixtures with impurities.

  12. Prospects for clinical application of electronic-nose technology to early detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in culture and sputum.

    PubMed

    Fend, Reinhard; Kolk, Arend H J; Bessant, Conrad; Buijtels, Patricia; Klatser, Paul R; Woodman, Anthony C

    2006-06-01

    Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) staining for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is time-consuming and operator dependent and lacks sensitivity. A new method is urgently needed. We investigated the potential of an electronic nose (EN) (gas sensor array) comprising 14 conducting polymers to detect different Mycobacterium spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the headspaces of cultures, spiked sputa, and sputum samples from 330 culture-proven and human immunodeficiency virus-tested TB and non-TB patients. The data were analyzed using principal-component analysis, discriminant function analysis, and artificial neural networks. The EN differentiated between different Mycobacterium spp. and between mycobacteria and other lung pathogens both in culture and in spiked sputum samples. The detection limit in culture and spiked sputa was found to be 1 x 10(4) mycobacteria ml(-1). After training of the neural network with 196 sputum samples, 134 samples (55 M. tuberculosis culture-positive samples and 79 culture-negative samples) were used to challenge the model. The EN correctly predicted 89% of culture-positive patients; the six false negatives were the four ZN-negative and two ZN-positive patients. The specificity and sensitivity of the described method were 91% and 89%, respectively, compared to culture. At present, the reasons for the false negatives and false positives are unknown, but they could well be due to the nonoptimized system used here. This study has shown the ability of an electronic nose to detect M. tuberculosis in clinical specimens and opens the way to making this method a rapid and automated system for the early diagnosis of respiratory infections.

  13. Comparative analysis of two species of Asari Radix et Rhizoma by electronic nose, headspace GC-MS and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Xu, Feng; Cao, Chen; Shang, Ming-Ying; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Yu, Jie; Liu, Guang-Xue; Wang, Xuan; Cai, Shao-Qing

    2013-11-01

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) can be identified by experts according to their odors. However, the identification of these medicines is subjective and requires long-term experience. In this paper, electronic nose, headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and chemometrics methods were applied to differentiate two species of Asari Radix et Rhizoma by their odors. The samples used were the dried roots and rhizomes of Asarum heterotropoides var. mandshuricum (AH) and Asarum sieboldii (AS). The electronic nose was used to determine the odors of the samples and enabled rapid differentiation of AH and AS when coupled with principal component analysis. Headspace GC-MS was utilized to reveal the differences between the volatile constituents of AH and AS. In all, 54 volatile constituents were identified, and 9 major constituents (eucalyptol, eucarvone, 3,5-dimethoxytoluene, 3,4,5-trimethoxytoluene, methyleugenol, 2,3,5-trimethoxytoluene, croweacin, pentadecane and asaricin) could be used as chemical markers to distinguish these two species. AH contained higher relative contents of eucarvone (1.79-16.76%), 3,5-dimethoxytoluene (6.64-26.52%), 3,4,5-trimethoxytoluene/methyleugenol (6.43-31.67%) and 2,3,5-trimethoxytoluene (1.64-6.66%), whereas AS had higher relative contents of eucalyptol (14.06-24.95%), croweacin (5.64-13.55%), pentadecane (8.44-20.82%) and asaricin (7.03-13.45%). Moreover, AH and AS could be distinguished according to the contents of either all 54 identified volatile constituents or only the 9 major constituents by employing cluster analysis. The proposed method is rapid, simple, eco-friendly and can successfully differentiate these two species of Asari Radix et Rhizoma by their odors.

  14. JPL Innovation Foundry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent; McCleese, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Space science missions are increasingly challenged today: in ambition, by increasingly sophisticated hypotheses tested; in development, by the increasing complexity of advanced technologies; in budgeting, by the decline of flagship-class mission opportunities; in management, by expectations for breakthrough science despite a risk-averse programmatic climate; and in planning, by increasing competition for scarce resources. How are the space-science missions of tomorrow being formulated? The paper describes the JPL Innovation Foundry, created in 2011, to respond to this evolving context. The Foundry integrates methods, tools, and experts that span the mission concept lifecycle. Grounded in JPL's heritage of missions, flight instruments, mission proposals, and concept innovation, the Foundry seeks to provide continuity of support and cost-effective, on-call access to the right domain experts at the right time, as science definition teams and Principal Investigators mature mission ideas from "cocktail napkin" to PDR. The Foundry blends JPL capabilities in proposal development and concurrent engineering, including Team X, with new approaches for open-ended concept exploration in earlier, cost-constrained phases, and with ongoing research and technology projects. It applies complexity and cost models, projectformulation lessons learned, and strategy analyses appropriate to each level of concept maturity. The Foundry is organizationally integrated with JPL formulation program offices; staffed by JPL's line organizations for engineering, science, and costing; and overseen by senior Laboratory leaders to assure experienced coordination and review. Incubation of each concept is tailored depending on its maturity and proposal history, and its highest leverage modeling and analysis needs.

  15. JPL Innovation Foundry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent; McCleese, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Space science missions are increasingly challenged today: in ambition, by increasingly sophisticated hypotheses tested; in development, by the increasing complexity of advanced technologies; in budgeting, by the decline of flagship-class mission opportunities; in management, by expectations for breakthrough science despite a risk-averse programmatic climate; and in planning, by increasing competition for scarce resources. How are the space-science missions of tomorrow being formulated? The paper describes the JPL Innovation Foundry, created in 2011, to respond to this evolving context. The Foundry integrates methods, tools, and experts that span the mission concept lifecycle. Grounded in JPL's heritage of missions, flight instruments, mission proposals, and concept innovation, the Foundry seeks to provide continuity of support and cost-effective, on-call access to the right domain experts at the right time, as science definition teams and Principal Investigators mature mission ideas from "cocktail napkin" to PDR. The Foundry blends JPL capabilities in proposal development and concurrent engineering, including Team X, with new approaches for open-ended concept exploration in earlier, cost-constrained phases, and with ongoing research and technology projects. It applies complexity and cost models, projectformulation lessons learned, and strategy analyses appropriate to each level of concept maturity. The Foundry is organizationally integrated with JPL formulation program offices; staffed by JPL's line organizations for engineering, science, and costing; and overseen by senior Laboratory leaders to assure experienced coordination and review. Incubation of each concept is tailored depending on its maturity and proposal history, and its highest leverage modeling and analysis needs.

  16. JPL Innovation Foundry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Brent; McCleese, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Space science missions are increasingly challenged today: in ambition, by increasingly sophisticated hypotheses tested; in development, by the increasing complexity of advanced technologies; in budgeting, by the decline of flagship-class mission opportunities; in management, by expectations for breakthrough science despite a risk-averse programmatic climate; and in planning, by increasing competition for scarce resources. How are the space-science missions of tomorrow being formulated? The paper describes the JPL Innovation Foundry, created in 2011, to respond to this evolving context. The Foundry integrates methods, tools, and experts that span the mission concept lifecycle. Grounded in JPL's heritage of missions, flight instruments, mission proposals, and concept innovation, the Foundry seeks to provide continuity of support and cost-effective, on-call access to the right domain experts at the right time, as science definition teams and Principal Investigators mature mission ideas from "cocktail napkin" to PDR. The Foundry blends JPL capabilities in proposal development and concurrent engineering, including Team X, with new approaches for open-ended concept exploration in earlier, cost-constrained phases, and with ongoing research and technology projects. It applies complexity and cost models, project-formulation lessons learned, and strategy analyses appropriate to each level of concept maturity. The Foundry is organizationally integrated with JPL formulation program offices; staffed by JPL's line organizations for engineering, science, and costing; and overseen by senior Laboratory leaders to assure experienced coordination and review. Incubation of each concept is tailored depending on its maturity and proposal history, and its highest-leverage modeling and analysis needs.

  17. Progress in interferometry for LISA at JPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spero, Robert; Bachman, Brian; de Vine, Glenn; Dickson, Jeffrey; Klipstein, William; Ozawa, Tetsuo; McKenzie, Kirk; Shaddock, Daniel; Robison, David; Sutton, Andrew; Ware, Brent

    2011-05-01

    Recent advances at JPL in experimentation and design for LISA interferometry include the demonstration of time delay interferometry using electronically separated end stations, a new arm-locking design with improved gain and stability, and progress in flight readiness of digital and analog electronics for phase measurements.

  18. Detection of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Candida tropicalis in a High-Sugar Medium by a Metal Oxide Sensor-Based Electronic Nose and Comparison with Test Panel Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huxuan; Hu, Zhongqiu; Long, Fangyu; Guo, Chunfeng; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2015-11-01

    Osmotolerant yeasts are primarily responsible for spoilage of sugar-rich foods. In this work, an electronic nose (e-nose) was used to diagnose contamination caused by two osmotolerant yeast strains (Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Candida tropicalis) in a high-sugar medium using test panel evaluation as the reference method. Solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to determine the evolution of the volatile organic compound fingerprint in the contaminated samples during yeast growth. Principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis revealed that the e-nose could identify contamination after 48 h, corresponding to the total yeast levels of 3.68 (Z. rouxii) and 3.09 (C. tropicalis) log CFU/ml. At these levels, the test panel could not yet diagnose the spoilage, indicating that the e-nose approach was more sensitive than the test panel evaluation. Loading analysis indicated that sensors 8 and 6 were the most important for detection of these two yeasts. Based on the result obtained with the e-nose, the incubation time and total yeast levels could be accurately predicted by established multiple regression models with a correlation of greater than 0.97. In the sensory evaluation, spoilage was diagnosed after 72 h in samples contaminated with C. tropicalis and after 48 to 72 h for samples contaminated with Z. rouxii. GC-MS revealed that compounds such as acetaldehyde, acetone, ethyl acetate, alcohol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol contributed to spoilage detection by the e-nose after 48 h. In the high-sugar medium, the e-nose was more sensitive than the test panel evaluation for detecting contamination with these test yeast strains. This information could be useful for developing instruments and techniques for rapid scanning of sugar-rich foods for contamination with osmotolerant yeasts before such spoilage could be detected by the consumer.

  19. Broken Nose

    MedlinePlus

    ... include contact sports, physical fights, falls and motor vehicle accidents that result in facial trauma. A broken ... such as football or hockey Physical altercations Motor vehicle accidents Falls A broken nose can even be ...

  20. Upscaling of an electronic nose for completely stirred tank reactor stability monitoring from pilot-scale to real-scale agricultural co-digestion biogas plant.

    PubMed

    Adam, Gilles; Lemaigre, Sébastien; Goux, Xavier; Delfosse, Philippe; Romain, Anne-Claude

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the use of an electronic nose for on-line anaerobic reactor state monitoring at the pilot-scale level and then upscaling to the full-scale level. E-nose indicator was compared to classical state indicators such as pH, alkalinity, volatile fatty acids concentration and to other gas phase compounds. Multivariate statistical process control method, based on principal component analysis and the Hotelling's T(2) statistics was used to derive an indicator representative of the reactor state. At the pilot-scale level, the e-nose indicator was relevant and could distinguish 3 process states: steady-state, transient and collapsing process. At the full-scale level, the e-nose indicator could provide the warning of the major disturbance whereas two slight disturbances were not detected and it gave one major false alarm. This work showed that gas phase relation with anaerobic process should be deeper investigated, as an e-nose could indicate the reactor state, focusing on the gas phase.

  1. JPL Mission Bibliometrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppin, Ann

    2013-01-01

    For a number of years ongoing bibliographies of various JPL missions (AIRS, ASTER, Cassini, GRACE, Earth Science, Mars Exploration Rovers (Spirit & Opportunity)) have been compiled by the JPL Library. Mission specific bibliographies are compiled by the Library and sent to mission scientists and managers in the form of regular (usually quarterly) updates. Charts showing publications by years are periodically provided to the ASTER, Cassini, and GRACE missions for supporting Senior Review/ongoing funding requests, and upon other occasions as a measure of the impact of the missions. Basically the Web of Science, Compendex, sometimes Inspec, GeoRef and Aerospace databases are searched for the mission name in the title, abstract, and assigned keywords. All get coded for journal publications that are refereed publications.

  2. JPL Mission Bibliometrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppin, Ann

    2013-01-01

    For a number of years ongoing bibliographies of various JPL missions (AIRS, ASTER, Cassini, GRACE, Earth Science, Mars Exploration Rovers (Spirit & Opportunity)) have been compiled by the JPL Library. Mission specific bibliographies are compiled by the Library and sent to mission scientists and managers in the form of regular (usually quarterly) updates. Charts showing publications by years are periodically provided to the ASTER, Cassini, and GRACE missions for supporting Senior Review/ongoing funding requests, and upon other occasions as a measure of the impact of the missions. Basically the Web of Science, Compendex, sometimes Inspec, GeoRef and Aerospace databases are searched for the mission name in the title, abstract, and assigned keywords. All get coded for journal publications that are refereed publications.

  3. JPL Non-NASA Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing JPL's non-NASA Programs is shown. The contents include: 1) JPL/Caltech: National Security Heritage; 2) Organization and Portfolio; 3) Synergistic Areas of Interest; 4) Business Environment; 5) National Space Community; 6) New Business Environment; 7) Technology Transfer Techniques; 8) Innovative Partnership Program (IPP); and 9) JPL's Track Record.

  4. Advanced methods for teaching electronic-nose technologies to diagnosticians and clinical laboratory technicians

    Treesearch

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Electronic-detection technologies and instruments increasingly are being utilized in the biomedical field to perform a wide variety of clinical operations and laboratory analyses to facilitate the delivery of health care to patients. The introduction of improved electronic instruments for diagnosing diseases and for administering treatments has required new training of...

  5. Variation in Gas and Volatile Compound Emissions from Human Urine as It Ages, Measured by an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Siavash; Sagar, Nidhi M.; Kyrou, Ioannis; Mozdiak, Ella; O’Connell, Nicola; Nwokolo, Chuka; Bardhan, Karna D.; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P.; Covington, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The medical profession is becoming ever more interested in the use of gas-phase biomarkers for disease identification and monitoring. This is due in part to its rapid analysis time and low test cost, which makes it attractive for many different clinical arenas. One technology that is showing promise for analyzing these gas-phase biomarkers is the electronic nose—an instrument designed to replicate the biological olfactory system. Of the possible biological media available to “sniff”, urine is becoming ever more important as it is easy to collect and to store for batch testing. However, this raises the question of sample storage shelf-life, even at −80 °C. Here we investigated the effect of storage time (years) on stability and reproducibility of total gas/vapour emissions from urine samples. Urine samples from 87 patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus were collected over a four-year period and stored at −80 °C. These samples were then analyzed using FAIMS (field-asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry—a type of electronic nose). It was discovered that gas emissions (concentration and diversity) reduced over time. However, there was less variation in the initial nine months of storage with greater uniformity and stability of concentrations together with tighter clustering of the total number of chemicals released. This suggests that nine months could be considered a general guide to a sample shelf-life. PMID:26821055

  6. SU-E-T-632: Preliminary Study On Treating Nose Skin Using Energy and Intensity Modulated Electron Beams with Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L; Eldib, A; Li, J; Price, R; Ma, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Uneven nose surfaces and air cavities underneath and the use of bolus present complexity and dose uncertainty when using a single electron energy beam to plan treatments of nose skin with a pencil beam-based planning system. This work demonstrates more accurate dose calculation and more optimal planning using energy and intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) delivered with a pMLC. Methods: An in-house developed Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculation/optimization planning system was employed for treatment planning. Phase space data (6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV) were used as an input source for MC dose calculations for the linac. To reduce the scatter-caused penumbra, a short SSD (61 cm) was used. Our previous work demonstrates good agreement in percentage depth dose and off-axis dose between calculations and film measurement for various field sizes. A MERT plan was generated for treating the nose skin using a patient geometry and a dose volume histogram (DVH) was obtained. The work also shows the comparison of 2D dose distributions between a clinically used conventional single electron energy plan and the MERT plan. Results: The MERT plan resulted in improved target dose coverage as compared to the conventional plan, which demonstrated a target dose deficit at the field edge. The conventional plan showed higher dose normal tissue irradiation underneath the nose skin while the MERT plan resulted in improved conformity and thus reduces normal tissue dose. Conclusion: This preliminary work illustrates that MC-based MERT planning is a promising technique in treating nose skin, not only providing more accurate dose calculation, but also offering an improved target dose coverage and conformity. In addition, this technique may eliminate the necessity of bolus, which often produces dose delivery uncertainty due to the air gaps that may exist between the bolus and skin.

  7. Theoretical and practical considerations for teaching diagnostic electronic-nose technologies to clinical laboratory technicians

    Treesearch

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development of new electronic technologies and instruments, utilized to perform many current clinical operations in the biomedical field, is changing the way medical health care is delivered to patients. The majority of test results from laboratory analyses, performed with these analytical instruments often prior to clinical examinations, are frequently used...

  8. Electronic-nose devices - Potential for noninvasive early disease-detection applications

    Treesearch

    Alphus Dan Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Significant progress in the development of portable electronic devices is showing considerable promise to facilitate clinical diagnostic processes. The increasing global trend of shifts in healthcare policies and priorities toward shortening and improving the effectiveness of diagnostic procedures by utilizing non-invasive methods should provide multiple benefits of...

  9. Fungicide residue identification and discrimination using a conducting polymer electronic-nose

    Treesearch

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2013-01-01

    The identification of fungicide residues on crop foliage is necessary to make periodic pest management decisions. The determination of fungicide residue identities currently is difficult and time consuming using conventional chemical analysis methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Different fungicide types produce unique electronic aroma signature...

  10. A Wireless Electronic Nose System Using a Fe2O3 Gas Sensing Array and Least Squares Support Vector Regression

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kai; Wang, Qi; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Hongquan; Cheng, Yingguo

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a wireless electronic nose (WEN) system which can online detect the combustible gases methane and hydrogen (CH4/H2) and estimate their concentrations, either singly or in mixtures. The system is composed of two wireless sensor nodes—a slave node and a master node. The former comprises a Fe2O3 gas sensing array for the combustible gas detection, a digital signal processor (DSP) system for real-time sampling and processing the sensor array data and a wireless transceiver unit (WTU) by which the detection results can be transmitted to the master node connected with a computer. A type of Fe2O3 gas sensor insensitive to humidity is developed for resistance to environmental influences. A threshold-based least square support vector regression (LS-SVR)estimator is implemented on a DSP for classification and concentration measurements. Experimental results confirm that LS-SVR produces higher accuracy compared with artificial neural networks (ANNs) and a faster convergence rate than the standard support vector regression (SVR). The designed WEN system effectively achieves gas mixture analysis in a real-time process. PMID:22346587

  11. Nonlinear Least-Squares Based Method for Identifying and Quantifying Single and Mixed Contaminants in Air with an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hanying; Homer, Margie L.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Ryan, Margaret A.

    2006-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has recently developed and built an electronic nose (ENose) using a polymer-carbon composite sensing array. This ENose is designed to be used for air quality monitoring in an enclosed space, and is designed to detect, identify and quantify common contaminants at concentrations in the parts-per-million range. Its capabilities were demonstrated in an experiment aboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Flight STS-95. This paper describes a modified nonlinear least-squares based algorithm developed to analyze data taken by the ENose, and its performance for the identification and quantification of single gases and binary mixtures of twelve target analytes in clean air. Results from laboratory-controlled events demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm to identify and quantify a gas event if concentration exceeds the ENose detection threshold. Results from the flight test demonstrate that the algorithm correctly identifies and quantifies all registered events (planned or unplanned, as singles or mixtures) with no false positives and no inconsistencies with the logged events and the independent analysis of air samples.

  12. Analyzing the flavor compounds in Chinese traditional fermented shrimp pastes by HS-SPME-GC/MS and electronic nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yan; Yin, Li'ang; Xue, Yong; Li, Zhaojie; Hou, Hu; Xue, Changhu

    2017-04-01

    Shrimp paste is a type of condiments with high nutritional value. However, the flavors of shrimp paste, particularly the non-uniformity flavors, have limited its application in food processing. In order to identify the characteristic flavor compounds in Chinese traditional shrimp pastes, five kinds of typical commercial products were evaluated in this study. The differences in the volatile composition of the five products were investigated. Solid phase micro-extraction method was employed to extract the volatile compounds. GC-MS and electronic nose were applied to identify the compounds, and the data were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). A total of 62 volatile compounds were identified, including 8 alcohols, 7 aldehydes, 3 ketones, 7 ethers, 7 acids, 3 esters, 6 hydrocarbons, 12 pyrazines, 2 phenols, and 7 other compounds. The typical volatile compounds contributing to the flavor of shrimp paste were found as follows: dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl tetrasulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, 2, 3, 5-trimethyl-6-ethyl pyrazine, ethyl-2, 5-dimethyl-pyrazine, phenol and indole. Propanoic acid, butanoic acid, furans, and 2-hydroxy-3-pentanone caused unpleasant odors, such as pungent and rancid odors. Principal component analysis showed that the content of volatile compounds varied depending on the processing conditions and shrimp species. These results indicated that the combinations of multiple analysis and identification methods could make up the limitations of a single method, enhance the accuracy of identification, and provide useful information for sensory research and product development.

  13. Differentiation of Chinese robusta coffees according to species, using a combined electronic nose and tongue, with the aid of chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenjiang; Zhao, Jianping; Hu, Rongsuo; Dong, Yunping; Tan, Lehe

    2017-08-15

    Electronic nose and tongue sensors and chemometric multivariate analysis were applied to characterize and classify 7 Chinese robusta coffee cultivars with different roasting degrees. Analytical data were obtained from 126 samples of roasted coffee beans distributed in the Hainan Province of China. Physicochemical qualities, such as the pH, titratable acidity (TA), total soluble solids (TSS), total solids (TS), and TSS/TA ratio, were determined by wet chemistry methods. Data fusion strategies were investigated to improve the performance of models relative to the performance of a single technique. Clear classification of all the studied coffee samples was achieved by principal component analysis, K-nearest neighbour analysis, partial least squares discriminant analysis, and a back-propagation artificial neural network. Quantitative models were established between the sensor responses and the reference physicochemical qualities, using partial least squares regression (PLSR). The PLSR model with a fusion data set was considered the best model for determining the quality parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid prediction of ochratoxin A-producing strains of Penicillium on dry-cured meat by MOS-based electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Lippolis, Vincenzo; Ferrara, Massimo; Cervellieri, Salvatore; Damascelli, Anna; Epifani, Filomena; Pascale, Michelangelo; Perrone, Giancarlo

    2016-02-02

    The availability of rapid diagnostic methods for monitoring ochratoxigenic species during the seasoning processes for dry-cured meats is crucial and constitutes a key stage in order to prevent the risk of ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination. A rapid, easy-to-perform and non-invasive method using an electronic nose (e-nose) based on metal oxide semiconductors (MOS) was developed to discriminate dry-cured meat samples in two classes based on the fungal contamination: class P (samples contaminated by OTA-producing Penicillium strains) and class NP (samples contaminated by OTA non-producing Penicillium strains). Two OTA-producing strains of Penicillium nordicum and two OTA non-producing strains of Penicillium nalgiovense and Penicillium salamii, were tested. The feasibility of this approach was initially evaluated by e-nose analysis of 480 samples of both Yeast extract sucrose (YES) and meat-based agar media inoculated with the tested Penicillium strains and incubated up to 14 days. The high recognition percentages (higher than 82%) obtained by Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA), either in calibration and cross-validation (leave-more-out approach), for both YES and meat-based samples demonstrated the validity of the used approach. The e-nose method was subsequently developed and validated for the analysis of dry-cured meat samples. A total of 240 e-nose analyses were carried out using inoculated sausages, seasoned by a laboratory-scale process and sampled at 5, 7, 10 and 14 days. DFA provided calibration models that permitted discrimination of dry-cured meat samples after only 5 days of seasoning with mean recognition percentages in calibration and cross-validation of 98 and 88%, respectively. A further validation of the developed e-nose method was performed using 60 dry-cured meat samples produced by an industrial-scale seasoning process showing a total recognition percentage of 73%. The pattern of volatile compounds of dry-cured meat samples was identified and

  15. The Verification of the Usefulness of Electronic Nose Based on Ultra-Fast Gas Chromatography and Four Different Chemometric Methods for Rapid Analysis of Spirit Beverages

    PubMed Central

    Śliwińska, Magdalena; Namieśnik, Jacek; Wardencki, Waldemar; Dymerski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Spirit beverages are a diverse group of foodstuffs. They are very often counterfeited which cause the appearance of low quality products or wrongly labelled products on the market. It is important to find a proper quality control and botanical origin method enabling the same time preliminary check of the composition of investigated samples, which was the main goal of this work. For this purpose, the usefulness of electronic nose based on ultra-fast gas chromatography (fast GC e-nose) was verified. A set of 24 samples of raw spirits, 33 samples of vodkas, and 8 samples of whisky were analysed by fast GC e-nose. Four data analysis methods were used. The PCA was applied for the visualization of dataset, observation of the variation inside groups of samples, and selection of variables for the other three statistical methods. The SQC method was utilized to compare the quality of the samples. Both the DFA and SIMCA data analysis methods were used for discrimination of vodka, whisky, and spirits samples. The fast GC e-nose combined with four statistical methods can be used for rapid discrimination of raw spirits, vodkas, and whisky and in the same for preliminary determination of the composition of investigated samples. PMID:27446633

  16. The Verification of the Usefulness of Electronic Nose Based on Ultra-Fast Gas Chromatography and Four Different Chemometric Methods for Rapid Analysis of Spirit Beverages.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewska, Paulina; Śliwińska, Magdalena; Namieśnik, Jacek; Wardencki, Waldemar; Dymerski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Spirit beverages are a diverse group of foodstuffs. They are very often counterfeited which cause the appearance of low quality products or wrongly labelled products on the market. It is important to find a proper quality control and botanical origin method enabling the same time preliminary check of the composition of investigated samples, which was the main goal of this work. For this purpose, the usefulness of electronic nose based on ultra-fast gas chromatography (fast GC e-nose) was verified. A set of 24 samples of raw spirits, 33 samples of vodkas, and 8 samples of whisky were analysed by fast GC e-nose. Four data analysis methods were used. The PCA was applied for the visualization of dataset, observation of the variation inside groups of samples, and selection of variables for the other three statistical methods. The SQC method was utilized to compare the quality of the samples. Both the DFA and SIMCA data analysis methods were used for discrimination of vodka, whisky, and spirits samples. The fast GC e-nose combined with four statistical methods can be used for rapid discrimination of raw spirits, vodkas, and whisky and in the same for preliminary determination of the composition of investigated samples.

  17. Quasi Real Time Data Analysis for Air Quality Monitoring with an Electronic Nose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Hanying; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Pelletier, Christine C.; Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, M. Amy

    2006-01-01

    Cabin Air Quality Monitoring: A) Functions; 1) Incident monitor for targeted contaminants exceeding targeted concentrations. Identify and quantify. 2) Monitor for presence of compounds associated with fires or overheating electronics. 3) Monitor clean-up process. B) Characteristics; 1) Low mass, low power device. 2) Requires little crew time for maintenance and calibration. 3) Detects, identifies and quantifies selected chemical species at or below 24 hour SMAC.

  18. Quasi Real Time Data Analysis for Air Quality Monitoring with an Electronic Nose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Hanying; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Pelletier, Christine C.; Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, M. Amy

    2006-01-01

    Cabin Air Quality Monitoring: A) Functions; 1) Incident monitor for targeted contaminants exceeding targeted concentrations. Identify and quantify. 2) Monitor for presence of compounds associated with fires or overheating electronics. 3) Monitor clean-up process. B) Characteristics; 1) Low mass, low power device. 2) Requires little crew time for maintenance and calibration. 3) Detects, identifies and quantifies selected chemical species at or below 24 hour SMAC.

  19. Changes in the aromatic profile of espresso coffee as a function of the grinding grade and extraction time: a study by the electronic nose system.

    PubMed

    Severini, C; Ricci, I; Marone, M; Derossi, A; De Pilli, T

    2015-03-04

    The changes in chemical attributes and aromatic profile of espresso coffee (EC) were studied taking into account the extraction time and grinding level as independent variables. Particularly, using an electronic nose system, the changes of the global aromatic profile of EC were highlighted. The results shown as the major amounts of organic acids, solids, and caffeine were extracted in the first 8 s of percolation. The grinding grade significantly affected the quality of EC probably as an effect of the particle size distribution and the percolation pathways of water through the coffee cake. The use of an electronic nose system allowed us to discriminate the fractions of the brew as a function of the percolation time and also the regular coffee obtained from different grinding grades. Particularly, the aromatic profile of a regular coffee (25 mL) was significantly affected by the grinding level of the coffee grounds and percolation time, which are two variables under the control of the bar operator.

  20. Effect of transportation and storage using sorbent tubes of exhaled breath samples on diagnostic accuracy of electronic nose analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Schee, M P; Fens, N; Brinkman, P; Bos, L D J; Angelo, M D; Nijsen, T M E; Raabe, R; Knobel, H H; Vink, T J; Sterk, P J

    2013-03-01

    Many (multi-centre) breath-analysis studies require transport and storage of samples. We aimed to test the effect of transportation and storage using sorbent tubes of exhaled breath samples for diagnostic accuracy of eNose and GC-MS analysis. As a reference standard for diagnostic accuracy, breath samples of asthmatic patients and healthy controls were analysed by three eNose devices. Samples were analysed by GC-MS and eNose after 1, 7 and 14 days of transportation and storage using sorbent tubes. The diagnostic accuracy for eNose and GC-MS after storage was compared to the reference standard. As a validation, the stability was assessed of 15 compounds known to be related to asthma, abundant in breath or related to sampling and analysis. The reference test discriminated asthma and healthy controls with a median AUC (range) of 0.77 (0.72-0.76). Similar accuracies were achieved at t1 (AUC eNose 0.78; GC-MS 0.84), t7 (AUC eNose 0.76; GC-MS 0.79) and t14 (AUC eNose 0.83; GC-MS 0.84). The GC-MS analysis of compounds showed an adequate stability for all 15 compounds during the 14 day period. Short-term transportation and storage using sorbent tubes of breath samples does not influence the diagnostic accuracy for discrimination between asthma and health by eNose and GC-MS.

  1. Recognition of the Duration and Prediction of Insect Prevalence of Stored Rough Rice Infested by the Red Flour Beetle (Tribolium castaneum Herbst) Using an Electronic Nose.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sai; Zhou, Zhiyan; Li, Keliang; Jamir, Sierra Mari; Luo, Xiwen

    2017-04-14

    The purpose of this research is to explore the feasibility of applying an electronic nose for the intelligent monitoring of injurious insects in a stored grain environment. In this study, we employed an electronic nose to sample rough rice that contained three degrees of red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum Herbst) infestation for different durations-light degree (LD), middle degree (MD), and heavy degree (HD)-and manually investigated the insect situation at the same time. Manual insect situation investigation shows that, in all three rice treatments, the insect amounts gradually decreased after infestation. When the insect population of stored rough rice was under 13 insects per 60 g of rough rice, the natural speed of decrease of the insect population became very slow and reached the best artificial insect killing period. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) provided good performance for MD and HD insect harm duration identification, but performed poorly for LD insect harm duration identification. Both k-means clustering analysis (K-means) and fuzzy c-means analysis (FCM) effectively identified the insect harm duration for stored rough rice. The results from the back-propagation artificial neural network (BPNN) insect prevalence prediction for the three degrees of rough rice infestation demonstrated that the electronic nose could effectively predict insect prevalence in stored grain (fitting coefficients were larger than 0.89). The predictive ability was best for LD, second best for MD, and least accurate for HD. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of electronic noses for detecting both the duration and prevalence of an insect infestation in stored grain and provides a reference for the intelligent monitoring of an insect infestation in stored grains.

  2. Customized design of electronic noses placed on top of air-lift bioreactors for in situ monitoring the off-gas patterns.

    PubMed

    Rosi, Pablo E; Miscoria, Silvia A; Bernik, Delia L; Martín Negri, R

    2012-06-01

    A specially designed electronic nose was coupled to an air-lift bioreactor in order to perform on-line monitoring of released vapors. The sensor array was placed at the top of the bioreactor sensing the headspace in equilibrium with the evolving liquor at any time without the need of aspiration and pumping of gases into a separated sensor chamber. The device was applied to follow the off-gas of a bioreactor with Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans grown on beds of elemental sulfur under aerobic conditions. Evolution was monitored by acid titration, pH and optical density measurements. The electronic nose was capable to differentiate each day of reactor evolution since inoculation within periods marked off culture medium replacements using multivariate data analysis. Excellent discrimination was obtained indicating the potentiality for on-line monitoring in non-perturbed bioreactors. The prospects for electronic nose/bioreactor merging are valuable for whatever the bacterial strain or consortium used in terms of scent markers to monitor biochemical processes.

  3. JPL antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Plans for evaluating, designing, fabricating, transporting and deploying cost effective and STS compatible offset wrap rib antennas up to 300 meters in diameter for mobile communications, Earth resources observation, and for the orbiting VLBI are reviewed. The JPL surface measurement system, intended for large mesh deployable antenna applications will be demonstrated and validated as part of the antenna ground based demonstration program. Results of the offset wrap rib deployable antenna technology development will include: (1) high confidence structural designs for antennas up to 100 meters in diameter; (2) high confidence estimates of functional performance and fabrication cost for a wide range of antenna sizes (up to 300 meters in diameter); (3) risk assessment for fabricating the large size antennas; and (4) 55 meter diameter flight quality hardware that can be cost effectively completed toto accommodate a flight experiment and/or application.

  4. Optical Communications at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K. E.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews JPL's optical communications program, This program has (1) Demonstrated optical communications to spacecraft at deep space and geostationary ranges, (2) Demonstrated advantages of multi-beam transmissions in ground-to-ground and ground-to space experiments, (3)Developed an optical communications terminal that is readily converted from deep space to Earth-orbiting applications (4) Developed laboratory and field capabilities to evaluate optical a communications terminal performance. The program is supporting:(1) Construction of an optical communications laboratory at its TMF to support future demonstrations (ground-to-ground to space-to-ground), (2) Continuing development of visibility models from statistics acquired from autonomous monitoring stations in the southwestern US, (3)Development of optical com terminal for space-to-ground link form ISS in 2002

  5. Summary of JPL Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, Paul J.; Surampudi, Subbarao

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) flight programs, including past, present and future missions targeting Solar System exploration. Details, including launch dates and batteries used, are given for Deep Space 1 (Asteroid Rendezvous), Deep Space 2 (Mars Penetrator), Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Surveyor '98, Stardust, Europa Orbiter, Mars Surveyor 2001, Mars 2003 Lander and Rover, and Genesis (Solar Dust Return). Earth science projects are also outlined: Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ARIMSAT), Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX/Poseidon), Jason-1 (TOPEX follow-on), and QuikScat/Seawinds (Ocean Winds Tracking). The status, background, and plans are given for several batteries: (1) 2.5 inch common pressure vessel (CPV), (2) 3.5 inch CPV, (3) Ni-H2, and (4) Li-Ion.

  6. The JPL Uranian Radiation Model (UMOD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry; Martinez-Sierra, Luz Maria; Evans, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is the development of a comprehensive radiation model (UMOD) of the Uranian environment for JPL mission planning. The ultimate goal is to provide a description of the high energy electron and proton environments and the magnetic field at Uranus that can be used for engineering design. Currently no model exists at JPL. A preliminary electron radiation model employing Voyager 2 data was developed by Selesnick and Stone in 1991. The JPL Uranian Radiation Model extends that analysis, which modeled electrons between 0.7 MeV and 2.5 MeV based on the Voyager Cosmic Ray Subsystem electron telescope, down to an energy of 0.022 MeV for electrons and from 0.028 MeV to 3.5 MeV for protons. These latter energy ranges are based on measurements by the Applied Physics Laboratory Low Energy Charged Particle Detector on Voyager 2. As in previous JPL radiation models, the form of the Uranian model is based on magnetic field coordinates and requires a conversion from spacecraft coordinates to Uranian-centered magnetic "B-L" coordinates. Two magnetic field models have been developed for Uranus: 1) a simple "offset, tilted dipole" (OTD), and 2) a complex, multi-pole expansion model ("Q3"). A review of the existing data on Uranus and a search of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) were completed to obtain the latest, up to date descriptions of the Uranian high energy particle environment. These data were fit in terms of the Q3 B-L coordinates to extend and update the original Selesnick and Stone electron model in energy and to develop the companion proton flux model. The flux predictions of the new model were used to estimate the total ionizing dose for the Voyager 2 flyby, and a movie illustrating the complex radiation belt variations was produced to document the uses of the model for planning purposes.

  7. Improved Maturity and Ripeness Classifications of Magnifera Indica cv. Harumanis Mangoes through Sensor Fusion of an Electronic Nose and Acoustic Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Ammar; Shakaff, Ali Yeon Md; Masnan, Maz Jamilah; Saad, Fathinul Syahir Ahmad; Adom, Abdul Hamid; Ahmad, Mohd Noor; Jaafar, Mahmad Nor; Abdullah, Abu Hassan; Kamarudin, Latifah Munirah

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there have been a number of reported studies on the use of non-destructive techniques to evaluate and determine mango maturity and ripeness levels. However, most of these reported works were conducted using single-modality sensing systems, either using an electronic nose, acoustics or other non-destructive measurements. This paper presents the work on the classification of mangoes (Magnifera Indica cv. Harumanis) maturity and ripeness levels using fusion of the data of an electronic nose and an acoustic sensor. Three groups of samples each from two different harvesting times (week 7 and week 8) were evaluated by the e-nose and then followed by the acoustic sensor. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) were able to discriminate the mango harvested at week 7 and week 8 based solely on the aroma and volatile gases released from the mangoes. However, when six different groups of different maturity and ripeness levels were combined in one classification analysis, both PCA and LDA were unable to discriminate the age difference of the Harumanis mangoes. Instead of six different groups, only four were observed using the LDA, while PCA showed only two distinct groups. By applying a low level data fusion technique on the e-nose and acoustic data, the classification for maturity and ripeness levels using LDA was improved. However, no significant improvement was observed using PCA with data fusion technique. Further work using a hybrid LDA-Competitive Learning Neural Network was performed to validate the fusion technique and classify the samples. It was found that the LDA-CLNN was also improved significantly when data fusion was applied. PMID:22778629

  8. Starshade Deployed at JPL

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-09

    is image shows a deployed half-scale starshade with four petals at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California in 2014. The full-scale of this starshade (not shown) will measure at 111 feet (34 meters). The flower-like petals of the starshade are designed to diffract bright starlight away from telescopes seeking the dim light of exoplanets. The starshade was re-designed from earlier models to allow these petals to furl, or wrap around the spacecraft, for launch into space. Each petal is covered in a high-performance plastic film that resembles gold foil. On a starshade ready for launch, the thermal gold foil will only cover the side of the petals facing away from the telescope, with black on the other, so as not to reflect other light sources such as the Earth into its lens. The starshade is light enough for space and cannot support its own weight on Earth. Is it shown offloaded with counterweights, much like an elevator. Starlight-blocking technologies such as the starshade are being developed to help image exoplanets, with a focus on Earth-sized, habitable worlds. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20909

  9. Mobile antenna development at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Jamnejad, V.; Densmore, A.; Tulintseff, A.; Thomas, R.; Woo, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), under the sponsorship of NASA, has pioneered the development of land vehicle antennas for commercial mobile satellite communications. Several novel antennas have been developed at L-band frequencies for the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) program initiated about a decade ago. Currently, two types of antennas are being developed at K- and Ka-band frequencies for the ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. For the future, several hand-held antenna concepts are proposed for the small terminals of the Ka-band Personal Access Satellite System (PASS). For the L-band MSAT program, a number of omni-directional low-gain antennas, such as the crossed drooping-dipoles, the higher-order-mode circular microstrip patch, the quadrifilar helix, and the wrapped-around microstrip 'mast' array, have been developed for lower data rate communications. Several medium-gain satellite tracking antennas, such as the electronically scanned low-profile phased array, the mechanically steered tilted microstrip array, the mechanically steered low-profile microstrip Yagi array, and the hybrid electronically/mechanically steered low-profile array, have been developed for the MSAT's higher data rate and voice communications. To date, for the L-band vehicle application, JPL has developed the world's lowest-profile phased array (1.8 cm height), as well as the lowest-profile mechanically steered antenna (3.7 cm height). For the 20/30 GHz AMT project, a small mechanically steered elliptical reflector antenna with a gain of 23 dBi has recently been developed to transmit horizontal polarization at 30 GHz and receive vertical polarization at 20 GHz. Its hemispherical radome has a height of 10 cm and a base diameter of 23 cm. In addition to the reflector, a mechanically steered printed MMIC active array is currently being developed to achieve the same electrical requirements with a low profile capability. These AMT antenna developments

  10. Mobile antenna development at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Jamnejad, V.; Densmore, A.; Tulintseff, A.; Thomas, R.; Woo, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), under the sponsorship of NASA, has pioneered the development of land vehicle antennas for commercial mobile satellite communications. Several novel antennas have been developed at L-band frequencies for the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) program initiated about a decade ago. Currently, two types of antennas are being developed at K- and Ka-band frequencies for the ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. For the future, several hand-held antenna concepts are proposed for the small terminals of the Ka-band Personal Access Satellite System (PASS). For the L-band MSAT program, a number of omni-directional low-gain antennas, such as the crossed drooping-dipoles, the higher-order-mode circular microstrip patch, the quadrifilar helix, and the wrapped-around microstrip 'mast' array, have been developed for lower data rate communications. Several medium-gain satellite tracking antennas, such as the electronically scanned low-profile phased array, the mechanically steered tilted microstrip array, the mechanically steered low-profile microstrip Yagi array, and the hybrid electronically/mechanically steered low-profile array, have been developed for the MSAT's higher data rate and voice communications. To date, for the L-band vehicle application, JPL has developed the world's lowest-profile phased array (1.8 cm height), as well as the lowest-profile mechanically steered antenna (3.7 cm height). For the 20/30 GHz AMT project, a small mechanically steered elliptical reflector antenna with a gain of 23 dBi has recently been developed to transmit horizontal polarization at 30 GHz and receive vertical polarization at 20 GHz. Its hemispherical radome has a height of 10 cm and a base diameter of 23 cm. In addition to the reflector, a mechanically steered printed MMIC active array is currently being developed to achieve the same electrical requirements with a low profile capability. These AMT antenna developments

  11. Mobile antenna development at JPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Jamnejad, V.; Densmore, A.; Tulintseff, A.; Thomas, R.; Woo, K.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), under the sponsorship of NASA, has pioneered the development of land vehicle antennas for commercial mobile satellite communications. Several novel antennas have been developed at L-band frequencies for the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) program initiated about a decade ago. Currently, two types of antennas are being developed at K- and Ka-band frequencies for the ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. For the future, several hand-held antenna concepts are proposed for the small terminals of the Ka-band Personal Access Satellite System (PASS). For the L-band MSAT program, a number of omni-directional low-gain antennas, such as the crossed drooping-dipoles, the higher-order-mode circular microstrip patch, the quadrifilar helix, and the wrapped-around microstrip 'mast' array, have been developed for lower data rate communications. Several medium-gain satellite tracking antennas, such as the electronically scanned low-profile phased array, the mechanically steered tilted microstrip array, the mechanically steered low-profile microstrip Yagi array, and the hybrid electronically/mechanically steered low-profile array, have been developed for the MSAT's higher data rate and voice communications. To date, for the L-band vehicle application, JPL has developed the world's lowest-profile phased array (1.8 cm height), as well as the lowest-profile mechanically steered antenna (3.7 cm height). For the 20/30 GHz AMT project, a small mechanically steered elliptical reflector antenna with a gain of 23 dBi has recently been developed to transmit horizontal polarization at 30 GHz and receive vertical polarization at 20 GHz. Its hemispherical radome has a height of 10 cm and a base diameter of 23 cm. In addition to the reflector, a mechanically steered printed MMIC active array is currently being developed to achieve the same electrical requirements with a low profile capability. These AMT antenna developments

  12. Nondestructive measurement of total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) in pork meat by integrating near infrared spectroscopy, computer vision and electronic nose techniques.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng; Zhang, Yanhua

    2014-02-15

    Total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) content is an important reference index for evaluating pork freshness. This paper attempted to measure TVB-N content in pork meat using integrating near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), computer vision (CV), and electronic nose (E-nose) techniques. In the experiment, 90 pork samples with different freshness were collected for data acquisition by three different techniques, respectively. Then, the individual characteristic variables were extracted from each sensor. Next, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to achieve data fusion based on these characteristic variables from 3 different sensors data. Back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) was used to construct the model for TVB-N content prediction, and the top principal components (PCs) were extracted as the input of model. The result of the model was achieved as follows: the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) = 2.73 mg/100g and the determination coefficient (R(p)(2)) = 0.9527 in the prediction set. Compared with single technique, integrating three techniques, in this paper, has its own superiority. This work demonstrates that it has the potential in nondestructive detection of TVB-N content in pork meat using integrating NIRS, CV and E-nose, and data fusion from multi-technique could significantly improve TVB-N prediction performance. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Electronic nose screening of ethanol release during sol-gel encapsulation. A novel non-invasive method to test silica polymerisation.

    PubMed

    Lovino, Magalí; Cardinal, M Fernanda; Zubiri, Diana B V; Bernik, Delia L

    2005-12-15

    Porous silica matrices prepared by sol-gel process yield biocompatible materials adequate for encapsulation of biomolecules or drugs. The procedure is simple and fast, but when alkoxyde precursors like tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) are used the polymerisation reaction leads to the formation of alcohol as a by-product, which can produce undesirable effects on the activity of entrapped enzymes or modify a drug release kinetic. Therefore, it is critical to determine that no remnant ethanol is left prior using or storing the obtained biomaterial. In this regard, the technique used in the alcohol determination should be non-invasive and non-destructive to preserve the encapsulation device intact and ready to use. In this work we have successfully used a portable electronic nose (e-nose) for the screening of silica polymerisation process during theophylline encapsulation. TEOS reaction was "smelt" since precursor pre-hydrolysis until the end of ethanol release, sensed directly at the headspace of matrices slabs. Measurements showed that ethanol was negligible since 10th day in polymeric slabs of 10 mm width and 2 cm diameter. This first use of e-nose following a polymerisation reaction opens a wide number of putative applications in pharmaceutical and biochemical fields.

  14. A miniature electronic nose system based on an MWNT-polymer microsensor array and a low-power signal-processing chip.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shih-Wen; Wu, Hsiang-Chiu; Chou, Ting-I; Chen, Hsin; Tang, Kea-Tiong

    2014-06-01

    This article introduces a power-efficient, miniature electronic nose (e-nose) system. The e-nose system primarily comprises two self-developed chips, a multiple-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT)-polymer based microsensor array, and a low-power signal-processing chip. The microsensor array was fabricated on a silicon wafer by using standard photolithography technology. The microsensor array comprised eight interdigitated electrodes surrounded by SU-8 "walls," which restrained the material-solvent liquid in a defined area of 650 × 760 μm(2). To achieve a reliable sensor-manufacturing process, we used a two-layer deposition method, coating the MWNTs and polymer film as the first and second layers, respectively. The low-power signal-processing chip included array data acquisition circuits and a signal-processing core. The MWNT-polymer microsensor array can directly connect with array data acquisition circuits, which comprise sensor interface circuitry and an analog-to-digital converter; the signal-processing core consists of memory and a microprocessor. The core executes the program, classifying the odor data received from the array data acquisition circuits. The low-power signal-processing chip was designed and fabricated using the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company 0.18-μm 1P6M standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process. The chip consumes only 1.05 mW of power at supply voltages of 1 and 1.8 V for the array data acquisition circuits and the signal-processing core, respectively. The miniature e-nose system, which used a microsensor array, a low-power signal-processing chip, and an embedded k-nearest-neighbor-based pattern recognition algorithm, was developed as a prototype that successfully recognized the complex odors of tincture, sorghum wine, sake, whisky, and vodka.

  15. Analysis of volatile flavor compounds influencing Chinese-type soy sauces using GC-MS combined with HS-SPME and discrimination with electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lihua; Liu, Ting; An, Xinjing; Zhang, Jinlan; Ma, Xiaoran; Cui, Jinmei

    2017-01-01

    Soy sauce contains a variety of volatiles that are highly valuable to its quality with regard to sensory characteristics. This paper describes the analysis of volatile compounds influencing the flavor quality of Chinese-type soy sauces. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) combined with headspace-solid phase microextraction and electronic nose (E-nose) were applied for identifying the volatile flavor compounds as well as determining their volatile profiles of 12 soy sauces manufactured by different fermentation process. Forty one key volatile components of these 12 soy sauce products, a pure soy sauce and an acid-hydrolyzed vegetable protein sample, were compared in semi-quantitative form, and their volatile flavor profiles were analyzed by E-nose. The substantially similar results between hierarchical cluster analysis based on GC-MS data and E-nose analysis suggested that both techniques may be useful in evaluating the flavor quality of soy sauces and differentiating soy sauce products. The study also showed that there were less volatile flavor compounds in soy sauces produced through low-salt solid-state fermentation process, a traditional manufacturing technology and a widely adopted technology in Chinese soy sauce industries. In addition, the investigation suggested that the flavor quality of soy sauce varied widely in Chinese domestic market, and that the present Chinese national standards of soy sauce should be further perfected by the addition of flavor grades of soy sauce in the physical and chemical index. Meanwhile, this research provided valuable information to manufacturers and government regulators, which have practical significance to improve quality of soy sauces.

  16. Detection of Helicobacter pylori infection by examination of human breath odor using electronic nose Bloodhound-214ST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnayder, E. P.; Moshkin, M. P.; Petrovskii, D. V.; Shevela, A. I.; Babko, A. N.; Kulikov, V. G.

    2009-05-01

    Our aim was to examine the possibility of use e-nose Bloodhound-214ST to determine presence or absence of H. pylori infection using exhalation samples of patients. Breath samples were collected twice: at baseline and after oral administration of 500 mg of urea. H. pylori status of patients was confirmed by antral biopsy. Using two approaches for the data analysis we showed the possibility to distinguish H. pylori free and infected patients.

  17. Proceedings of the 11th JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2002-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop forum held to report science research and applications results with spectral images measured by the NASA Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). These papers were presented at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory from March 5-8, 2001. Electronic versions of these papers may be found at the A VIRIS Web http://popo.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/docs/workshops/aviris.proceedings.html

  18. Discrimination method of the volatiles from fresh mushrooms by an electronic nose using a trapping system and statistical standardization to reduce sensor value variation.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kouki; Shimizu, Nobuo; Manome, Yoshinobu; Ikeda, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2013-11-13

    Electronic noses have the benefit of obtaining smell information in a simple and objective manner, therefore, many applications have been developed for broad analysis areas such as food, drinks, cosmetics, medicine, and agriculture. However, measurement values from electronic noses have a tendency to vary under humidity or alcohol exposure conditions, since several types of sensors in the devices are affected by such variables. Consequently, we show three techniques for reducing the variation of sensor values: (1) using a trapping system to reduce the infering components; (2) performing statistical standardization (calculation of z-score); and (3) selecting suitable sensors. With these techniques, we discriminated the volatiles of four types of fresh mushrooms: golden needle (Flammulina velutipes), white mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), shiitake (Lentinus edodes), and eryngii (Pleurotus eryngii) among six fresh mushrooms (hen of the woods (Grifola frondosa), shimeji (Hypsizygus marmoreus) plus the above mushrooms). Additionally, we succeeded in discrimination of white mushroom, only comparing with artificial mushroom flavors, such as champignon flavor and truffle flavor. In conclusion, our techniques will expand the options to reduce variations in sensor values.

  19. Discrimination Method of the Volatiles from Fresh Mushrooms by an Electronic Nose Using a Trapping System and Statistical Standardization to Reduce Sensor Value Variation

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Shimizu, Nobuo; Manome, Yoshinobu; Ikeda, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2013-01-01

    Electronic noses have the benefit of obtaining smell information in a simple and objective manner, therefore, many applications have been developed for broad analysis areas such as food, drinks, cosmetics, medicine, and agriculture. However, measurement values from electronic noses have a tendency to vary under humidity or alcohol exposure conditions, since several types of sensors in the devices are affected by such variables. Consequently, we show three techniques for reducing the variation of sensor values: (1) using a trapping system to reduce the infering components; (2) performing statistical standardization (calculation of z-score); and (3) selecting suitable sensors. With these techniques, we discriminated the volatiles of four types of fresh mushrooms: golden needle (Flammulina velutipes), white mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), shiitake (Lentinus edodes), and eryngii (Pleurotus eryngii) among six fresh mushrooms (hen of the woods (Grifola frondosa), shimeji (Hypsizygus marmoreus) plus the above mushrooms). Additionally, we succeeded in discrimination of white mushroom, only comparing with artificial mushroom flavors, such as champignon flavor and truffle flavor. In conclusion, our techniques will expand the options to reduce variations in sensor values. PMID:24233028

  20. Application of multi-way analysis to UV-visible spectroscopy, gas chromatography and electronic nose data for wine ageing evaluation.

    PubMed

    Prieto, N; Rodriguez-Méndez, M L; Leardi, R; Oliveri, P; Hernando-Esquisabel, D; Iñiguez-Crespo, M; de Saja, J A

    2012-03-16

    In this study, a multi-way method (Tucker3) was applied to evaluate the performance of an electronic nose for following the ageing of red wines. The odour evaluation carried out with the electronic nose was combined with the quantitative analysis of volatile composition performed by GC-MS, and colour characterisation by UV-visible spectroscopy. Thanks to Tucker3, it was possible to understand connections among data obtained from these three different systems and to estimate the effect of different sources of variability on wine evaluation. In particular, the application of Tucker3 supplied a global visualisation of data structure, which was very informative to understand relationships between sensors responses and chemical composition of wines. The results obtained indicate that the analytical methods employed are useful tools to follow the wine ageing process, to differentiate wine samples according to ageing type (either in barrel or in stainless steel tanks with the addition of small oak wood pieces) and to the origin (French or American) of the oak wood. Finally, it was possible to designate the volatile compounds which play a major role in such a characterisation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A local weighted nearest neighbor algorithm and a weighted and constrained least-squared method for mixed odor analysis by electronic nose systems.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kea-Tiong; Lin, Yi-Shan; Shyu, Jyuo-Min

    2010-01-01

    A great deal of work has been done to develop techniques for odor analysis by electronic nose systems. These analyses mostly focus on identifying a particular odor by comparing with a known odor dataset. However, in many situations, it would be more practical if each individual odorant could be determined directly. This paper proposes two methods for such odor components analysis for electronic nose systems. First, a K-nearest neighbor (KNN)-based local weighted nearest neighbor (LWNN) algorithm is proposed to determine the components of an odor. According to the component analysis, the odor training data is firstly categorized into several groups, each of which is represented by its centroid. The examined odor is then classified as the class of the nearest centroid. The distance between the examined odor and the centroid is calculated based on a weighting scheme, which captures the local structure of each predefined group. To further determine the concentration of each component, odor models are built by regressions. Then, a weighted and constrained least-squares (WCLS) method is proposed to estimate the component concentrations. Experiments were carried out to assess the effectiveness of the proposed methods. The LWNN algorithm is able to classify mixed odors with different mixing ratios, while the WCLS method can provide good estimates on component concentrations.

  2. Effect of hot air drying on volatile compounds of Flammulina velutipes detected by HS-SPME-GC-MS and electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjian; Yu, Jie; Pei, Fei; Mariga, Alfred Mugambi; Ma, Ning; Fang, Yong; Hu, Qiuhui

    2016-04-01

    Volatile compounds are important factors that affect the flavor quality of Flammulina velutipes, but the changes occurring during hot air drying is still unclear. To clarify the dynamic changes of flavor components during hot air drying, comprehensive flavor characterization and volatile compounds of F. velutipes were evaluated using electronic nose technology and headspace solid phase micro-extraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS), respectively. Results showed that volatile components in F. velutipes significantly changed during hot air drying according to the principal component analysis and radar fingerprint chart of electronic nose. Volatile compounds of fresh F. velutipes consisted mainly of ketones, aldehydes and alcohols, and 3-octanone was the dominant compound. Drying process could significantly decrease the relative content of ketones and promoted the generation of alcohols, acids, and esters, which became the main volatile compounds of dried F. velutipes. These may provide a theoretical basis for the formation mechanism of flavor substances in dried F. velutipes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of Electronic Nose and Near Infrared Spectroscopy Analysis Techniques to Monitor the Critical Time in SSF Process of Feed Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hui; Chen, Quansheng

    2014-01-01

    In order to assure the consistency of the final product quality, a fast and effective process monitoring is a growing need in solid state fermentation (SSF) industry. This work investigated the potential of non-invasive techniques combined with the chemometrics method, to monitor time-related changes that occur during SSF process of feed protein. Four fermentation trials conducted were monitored by an electronic nose device and a near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) spectrometer. Firstly, principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA) were respectively applied to the feature extraction and information fusion. Then, the BP_AdaBoost algorithm was used to develop the fused model for monitoring of the critical time in SSF process of feed protein. Experimental results showed that the identified results of the fusion model are much better than those of the single technique model both in the training and validation sets, and the complexity of the fusion model was also less than that of the single technique model. The overall results demonstrate that it has a high potential in online monitoring of the critical moment in SSF process by use of integrating electronic nose and NIRS techniques, and data fusion from multi-technique could significantly improve the monitoring performance of SSF process. PMID:25330048

  4. Development of electronic nose and near infrared spectroscopy analysis techniques to monitor the critical time in SSF process of feed protein.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui; Chen, Quansheng

    2014-10-17

    In order to assure the consistency of the final product quality, a fast and effective process monitoring is a growing need in solid state fermentation (SSF) industry. This work investigated the potential of non-invasive techniques combined with the chemometrics method, to monitor time-related changes that occur during SSF process of feed protein. Four fermentation trials conducted were monitored by an electronic nose device and a near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) spectrometer. Firstly, principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA) were respectively applied to the feature extraction and information fusion. Then, the BP_AdaBoost algorithm was used to develop the fused model for monitoring of the critical time in SSF process of feed protein. Experimental results showed that the identified results of the fusion model are much better than those of the single technique model both in the training and validation sets, and the complexity of the fusion model was also less than that of the single technique model. The overall results demonstrate that it has a high potential in online monitoring of the critical moment in SSF process by use of integrating electronic nose and NIRS techniques, and data fusion from multi-technique could significantly improve the monitoring performance of SSF process.

  5. GPS Position Time Series @ JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Susan; Moore, Angelyn; Kedar, Sharon; Liu, Zhen; Webb, Frank; Heflin, Mike; Desai, Shailen

    2013-01-01

    Different flavors of GPS time series analysis at JPL - Use same GPS Precise Point Positioning Analysis raw time series - Variations in time series analysis/post-processing driven by different users. center dot JPL Global Time Series/Velocities - researchers studying reference frame, combining with VLBI/SLR/DORIS center dot JPL/SOPAC Combined Time Series/Velocities - crustal deformation for tectonic, volcanic, ground water studies center dot ARIA Time Series/Coseismic Data Products - Hazard monitoring and response focused center dot ARIA data system designed to integrate GPS and InSAR - GPS tropospheric delay used for correcting InSAR - Caltech's GIANT time series analysis uses GPS to correct orbital errors in InSAR - Zhen Liu's talking tomorrow on InSAR Time Series analysis

  6. GPS Position Time Series @ JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Susan; Moore, Angelyn; Kedar, Sharon; Liu, Zhen; Webb, Frank; Heflin, Mike; Desai, Shailen

    2013-01-01

    Different flavors of GPS time series analysis at JPL - Use same GPS Precise Point Positioning Analysis raw time series - Variations in time series analysis/post-processing driven by different users. center dot JPL Global Time Series/Velocities - researchers studying reference frame, combining with VLBI/SLR/DORIS center dot JPL/SOPAC Combined Time Series/Velocities - crustal deformation for tectonic, volcanic, ground water studies center dot ARIA Time Series/Coseismic Data Products - Hazard monitoring and response focused center dot ARIA data system designed to integrate GPS and InSAR - GPS tropospheric delay used for correcting InSAR - Caltech's GIANT time series analysis uses GPS to correct orbital errors in InSAR - Zhen Liu's talking tomorrow on InSAR Time Series analysis

  7. The JPL Neptune Radiation Model (NMOD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry; Evans, Robin

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is the development of a comprehensive radiation model of the Neptunian environment for JPL mission planning. The ultimate goal is to provide a description of the high-energy electron and proton environments and the magnetic field at Neptune that can be used for engineering design. The JPL Neptune Radiation Model (NMOD) models the high-energy electrons and protons between 0.025 MeV and 5 MeV based on the California Institute of Technology's Cosmic Ray Subsystem and the Applied Physics Laboratory's Low Energy Charged Particle Detector on Voyager 2. As in previous JPL radiation models, the form of the Neptunian model is based on magnetic field coordinates and requires a conversion from spacecraft coordinates to Neptunian-centered magnetic "B-L" coordinates. Two types of magnetic field models have been developed for Neptune: 1) simple "offset, tilted dipoles" (OTD), and 2) a complex, multi-pole expansion model ("O8"). A review of the existing data on Neptune and a search of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) were completed to obtain the most current descriptions of the Neptunian high-energy particle environment. These data were fit in terms of the O8 B-L coordinates to develop the electron and proton flux models. The flux predictions of the new model were used to estimate the total ionizing dose (TID) rate along the Neptunian equator, meridional flux contours for the electrons and protons, and for flux and dose comparisons with the other radiation belts in the Solar System.

  8. Bioconversion study conducted by JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J.

    1978-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of Caltech conducted a study of bioconversion as a means of identifying the role of biomass for meeting the national energy fuel and chemical requirements and the role and means for JPL-Caltech involvement in bioconversion. The bioconversion study included the following categories; biomass sources, chemicals from biomass, thermochemical conversion of biomass to fuels, biological conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals, and basic bioconversion sciences. A detailed review is included of the bioconversion fields cited with specific conclusions and recommendations given for future research and development and overall biomass system engineering and economic studies.

  9. JPL Development Ephemeris number 96

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standish, E. M., Jr.; Keesey, M. S. W.; Newhall, X. X.

    1976-01-01

    The fourth issue of JPL Planetary Ephemerides, designated JPL Development Ephemeris No. 96 (DE96), is described. This ephemeris replaces a previous issue which has become obsolete since its release in 1969. Improvements in this issue include more recent and more accurate observational data, new types of data, better processing of the data, and refined equations of motion which more accurately describe the actual physics of the solar system. The descriptions in this report include these new features as well as the new export version of the ephemeris. The tapes and requisite software will be distributed through the NASA Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia.

  10. An electronic-nose sensor node based on a polymer-coated surface acoustic wave array for wireless sensor network applications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kea-Tiong; Li, Cheng-Han; Chiu, Shih-Wen

    2011-01-01

    This study developed an electronic-nose sensor node based on a polymer-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor array. The sensor node comprised an SAW sensor array, a frequency readout circuit, and an Octopus II wireless module. The sensor array was fabricated on a large K(2) 128° YX LiNbO3 sensing substrate. On the surface of this substrate, an interdigital transducer (IDT) was produced with a Cr/Au film as its metallic structure. A mixed-mode frequency readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) was fabricated using a TSMC 0.18 μm process. The ASIC output was connected to a wireless module to transmit sensor data to a base station for data storage and analysis. This sensor node is applicable for wireless sensor network (WSN) applications.

  11. Electronic nose and isotope ratio mass spectrometry in combination with chemometrics for the characterization of the geographical origin of Italian sweet cherries.

    PubMed

    Longobardi, F; Casiello, G; Ventrella, A; Mazzilli, V; Nardelli, A; Sacco, D; Catucci, L; Agostiano, A

    2015-03-01

    Sweet cherries from two Italian regions, Apulia and Emilia Romagna, were analysed using electronic nose (EN) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), with the aim of distinguishing them according to their geographic origin. The data were elaborated by statistical techniques, examining the EN and IRMS datasets both separately and in combination. Preliminary exploratory overviews were performed and then linear discriminant analyses (LDA) were used for classification. Regarding EN, different approaches for variable selection were tested, and the most suitable strategies were highlighted. The LDA classification results were expressed in terms of recognition and prediction abilities and it was found that both EN and IRMS performed well, with IRMS showing better cross-validated prediction ability (91.0%); the EN-IRMS combination gave slightly better results (92.3%). In order to validate the final results, the models were tested using an external set of samples with excellent results.

  12. Nose Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... suffer. For example, the stuffy nose of the common cold can make it hard for you to breathe, sleep, or get comfortable. Many problems besides the common cold can affect the nose. They include Deviated septum - ...

  13. JPL nuclear electric propulsion task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivirotto, Tom; Goodfellow, Keith; Polk, Jay

    The development of lithium magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters at JPL is discussed. The following topics are presented in vugraph form: mercury vapor mass flow control; porous tungsten vaporizer and housing; the lithium vaporizer experiment; a dry box for handling solid lithium; MPD thruster electrode modeling; engine lifetime definitions; cathode failure modeling; cathode erosion modeling; cathode thermal modeling; near cathode plasma model regions; cathode work function modeling; anode work function modeling; and radiation-cooled anodes.

  14. JPL nuclear electric propulsion task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, Tom; Goodfellow, Keith; Polk, Jay

    1993-01-01

    The development of lithium magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters at JPL is discussed. The following topics are presented in vugraph form: mercury vapor mass flow control; porous tungsten vaporizer and housing; the lithium vaporizer experiment; a dry box for handling solid lithium; MPD thruster electrode modeling; engine lifetime definitions; cathode failure modeling; cathode erosion modeling; cathode thermal modeling; near cathode plasma model regions; cathode work function modeling; anode work function modeling; and radiation-cooled anodes.

  15. Effect of high pressure treatment on the aging characteristics of Chinese liquor as evaluated by electronic nose and chemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, S. M.; Xu, M. L.; Ramaswamy, H. S.; Yang, M. Y.; Yu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Several high pressure (HP) treatments (100–400 MPa; 15 and 30 min) were applied to Chinese “Junchang” liquor, and aging characteristics of the liquor were evaluated. Results from the principal component analysis and the discriminant factor analysis of E-Nose demonstrated that HP treatment at 300 and 400 MPa resulted in significant (p < 0.05) changes in aroma components of the liquor. An increase in total ester content and a decrease in total acid content were observed for all treated samples (p < 0.05), which was verified by gas chromatography analysis. In addition, a slight decrease in alcohol content was found for HP treatment at 400 MPa for 30 min. These changes and trends were in accordance with the natural aging process of Chinese liquor. However, HP treatment caused a slight increase in solid content, which might be somewhat undesirable. Sensory evaluation results confirmed that favorable changes in color and flavor of Chinese liquor were induced by HP treatment; however, overall gaps still existed between the quality of treated and six-year aged samples. HP treatment demonstrated a potential to accelerate the natural aging process for Chinese liquor, but long term studies may be needed further to realize the full potential. PMID:27484292

  16. Effect of high pressure treatment on the aging characteristics of Chinese liquor as evaluated by electronic nose and chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, S. M.; Xu, M. L.; Ramaswamy, H. S.; Yang, M. Y.; Yu, Y.

    2016-08-01

    Several high pressure (HP) treatments (100-400 MPa 15 and 30 min) were applied to Chinese “Junchang” liquor, and aging characteristics of the liquor were evaluated. Results from the principal component analysis and the discriminant factor analysis of E-Nose demonstrated that HP treatment at 300 and 400 MPa resulted in significant (p < 0.05) changes in aroma components of the liquor. An increase in total ester content and a decrease in total acid content were observed for all treated samples (p < 0.05), which was verified by gas chromatography analysis. In addition, a slight decrease in alcohol content was found for HP treatment at 400 MPa for 30 min. These changes and trends were in accordance with the natural aging process of Chinese liquor. However, HP treatment caused a slight increase in solid content, which might be somewhat undesirable. Sensory evaluation results confirmed that favorable changes in color and flavor of Chinese liquor were induced by HP treatment; however, overall gaps still existed between the quality of treated and six-year aged samples. HP treatment demonstrated a potential to accelerate the natural aging process for Chinese liquor, but long term studies may be needed further to realize the full potential.

  17. Space Images for NASA/JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggs, Karen; Gutheinz, Sandy C.; Watanabe, Susan M.; Oks, Boris; Arca, Jeremy M.; Stanboli, Alice; Peez, Martin; Whatmore, Rebecca; Kang, Minliang; Espinoza, Luis A.

    2010-01-01

    Space Images for NASA/JPL is an Apple iPhone application that allows the general public to access featured images from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). A back-end infrastructure stores, tracks, and retrieves space images from the JPL Photojournal Web server, and catalogs the information into a streamlined rating infrastructure.

  18. Review and Assessment of JPL's Thermal Margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebes, G.; Kingery, C.; Farguson, C.; White, M.; Blakely, M.; Nunes, J.; Avila, A.; Man, K.; Hoffman, A.; Forgrave, J.

    2012-01-01

    JPL has captured its experience from over four decades of robotic space exploration into a set of design rules. These rules have gradually changed into explicit requirements and are now formally implemented and verified. Over an extended period of time, the initial understanding of intent and rationale for these rules has faded and rules are now frequently applied without further consideration. In the meantime, mission classes and their associated risk postures have evolved, coupled with resource constraints and growing design diversity, bringing into question the current "one size fits all" thermal margin approach. This paper offers a systematic review of the heat flow path from an electronic junction to the eventual heat rejection to space. This includes the identification of different regimes along this path and the associated requirements. The work resulted in a renewed understanding of the intent behind JPL requirements for hot thermal margins and a framework for relevant considerations, which in turn enables better decision making when a deviation to these requirements is considered.

  19. Love Acoustic Wave-Based Devices and Molecularly-Imprinted Polymers as Versatile Sensors for Electronic Nose or Tongue for Cancer Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dejous, Corinne; Hallil, Hamida; Raimbault, Vincent; Lachaud, Jean-Luc; Plano, Bernard; Delépée, Raphaël; Favetta, Patrick; Agrofoglio, Luigi; Rebière, Dominique

    2016-06-20

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and actual analytical techniques are restrictive in detecting it. Thus, there is still a challenge, as well as a need, for the development of quantitative non-invasive tools for the diagnosis of cancers and the follow-up care of patients. We introduce first the overall interest of electronic nose or tongue for such application of microsensors arrays with data processing in complex media, either gas (e.g., Volatile Organic Compounds or VOCs as biomarkers in breath) or liquid (e.g., modified nucleosides as urinary biomarkers). Then this is illustrated with a versatile acoustic wave transducer, functionalized with molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIP) synthesized for adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a model for nucleosides. The device including the thin film coating is described, then static measurements with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrical characterization after each step of the sensitive MIP process (deposit, removal of AMP template, capture of AMP target) demonstrate the thin film functionality. Dynamic measurements with a microfluidic setup and four targets are presented afterwards. They show a sensitivity of 5 Hz·ppm(-1) of the non-optimized microsensor for AMP detection, with a specificity of three times compared to PMPA, and almost nil sensitivity to 3'AMP and CMP, in accordance with previously published results on bulk MIP.

  20. Love Acoustic Wave-Based Devices and Molecularly-Imprinted Polymers as Versatile Sensors for Electronic Nose or Tongue for Cancer Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Dejous, Corinne; Hallil, Hamida; Raimbault, Vincent; Lachaud, Jean-Luc; Plano, Bernard; Delépée, Raphaël; Favetta, Patrick; Agrofoglio, Luigi; Rebière, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and actual analytical techniques are restrictive in detecting it. Thus, there is still a challenge, as well as a need, for the development of quantitative non-invasive tools for the diagnosis of cancers and the follow-up care of patients. We introduce first the overall interest of electronic nose or tongue for such application of microsensors arrays with data processing in complex media, either gas (e.g., Volatile Organic Compounds or VOCs as biomarkers in breath) or liquid (e.g., modified nucleosides as urinary biomarkers). Then this is illustrated with a versatile acoustic wave transducer, functionalized with molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIP) synthesized for adenosine-5′-monophosphate (AMP) as a model for nucleosides. The device including the thin film coating is described, then static measurements with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrical characterization after each step of the sensitive MIP process (deposit, removal of AMP template, capture of AMP target) demonstrate the thin film functionality. Dynamic measurements with a microfluidic setup and four targets are presented afterwards. They show a sensitivity of 5 Hz·ppm−1 of the non-optimized microsensor for AMP detection, with a specificity of three times compared to PMPA, and almost nil sensitivity to 3′AMP and CMP, in accordance with previously published results on bulk MIP. PMID:27331814

  1. Developing the JPL Engineering Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linick, Dave; Briggs, Clark

    2004-01-01

    This paper briefly recounts the recent history of process reengineering at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with a focus on the engineering processes. The JPL process structure is described and the process development activities of the past several years outlined. The main focus of the paper is on the current process structure, the emphasis on the flight project life cycle, the governance approach that lead to Flight Project Practices, and the remaining effort to capture process knowledge at the detail level of the work group.

  2. Faecal gas analysis by electronic nose as novel, non-invasive method for assessment of active and quiescent paediatric inflammatory bowel disease: Proof of principle study.

    PubMed

    de Meij, Tim G J; de Boer, Nanne K H; Benninga, Marc A; Lentferink, Yvette E; de Groot, Evelien F J; van de Velde, Mirjam E; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A; van der Schee, Marc P

    2014-09-22

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and its two phenotypes ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are essentially assessed by endoscopy, both in initial diagnostic work-up and during follow-up. This carries a high burden, especially on paediatric patients. Faecal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are considered potential non-invasive biomarkers for intestinal diseases linked to gut microbiota alterations. We hypothesized that faecal VOC analysis by electronic nose allows discrimination of children with CD, UC and controls during active disease and remission. Faecal VOC patterns of children with newly diagnosed IBD and controls were studied by an electronic nose (Cyranose 320®), at baseline and upon achieving remission at 6-weeks of follow-up. Disease activity was assessed by global physician's assessment, substantiated by serum C-reactive protein and faecal calprotectin. Internally cross-validated receiver-operator-characteristic curves and corresponding sensitivity and specificity for detection of IBD were calculated RESULTS: Faecal VOC profiles of patients with UC (26) and CD (29) differed from controls (28); in active disease (AUC±95% CI, p-value, sensitivity, specificity: 1.00±0.00; p<0.001, 100%, 100%) and (0.85±0.05, p<0.001, 86%, 67%) and in clinical remission (0.94±0.06, p<0.001, 94%, 94%) and (0.94±0.06, p<0.001, 94%, 94%), respectively. Furthermore, CD-patients differed from UC-patients during active disease (0.96±0.03; p<0.001, 97%, 92%), and upon achieving clinical remission (0.81±0.08, p=0.002, 88%, 72%). Faecal VOC analysis allowed discrimination of paediatric patients with IBD from controls, both during active disease and remission. It therefore has potential as non-invasive test, in both diagnostic work-up and assessment of disease activity in IBD. Copyright © 2014 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ion nose spectral structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J.-C.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B. A.; Reeves, G.; Skoug, R.; Funsten, H.

    2016-12-01

    We present a statistical study of nose-like structures observed in energetic hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions near the inner edge of the plasma sheet. Nose structures are spectral features named after the characteristic shapes of energy bands or gaps in the energy-time spectrograms of in situ measured ion fluxes. Using 22 months of observations from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron instrument onboard Van Allen Probe A, we determine the number of noses observed, and the minimum L shell reached and energy of each nose on each pass through the inner magnetosphere. We find that multiple noses occur more frequently in heavy ions than in H+ and are most often observed during quiet times. The heavy-ion noses penetrate to lower L shells than H+ noses, and there is an energy-magnetic local time (MLT) dependence in the nose locations and energies that is similar for all species. The observations are interpreted by using a steady state model of ion drift in the inner magnetosphere. The model is able to explain the energy and MLT dependence of the different types of nose structures. Different ion charge-exchange lifetimes are the main cause for the deeper penetration of heavy-ion noses. The species dependence and preferred geomagnetic conditions of multiple-nose events indicate that they must be on long drift paths, leading to strong charge-exchange effects. The results provide important insight into the spatial distribution, species dependence, and geomagnetic conditions under which nose structures occur.

  4. A novel method to quantify the activity of alcohol acetyltransferase Using a SnO2-based sensor of electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhongqiu; Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Huxuan; Niu, Chen; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2016-07-15

    Alcohol acetyltransferase (AATFase) extensively catalyzes the reactions of alcohols to acetic esters in microorganisms and plants. In this work, a novel method has been proposed to quantify the activity of AATFase using a SnO2-based sensor of electronic nose, which was determined on the basis of its higher sensitivity to the reducing alcohol than the oxidizing ester. The maximum value of the first-derivative of the signals from the SnO2-based sensor was therein found to be an eigenvalue of isoamyl alcohol concentration. Quadratic polynomial regression perfectly fitted the correlation between the eigenvalue and the isoamyl alcohol concentration. The method was used to determine the AATFase activity in this type of reaction by calculating the conversion rate of isoamyl alcohol. The proposed method has been successfully applied to determine the AATFase activity of a cider yeast strain. Compared with GC-MS, the method shows promises with ideal recovery and low cost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Using multilayer perceptron computation to discover ideal insect olfactory receptor combinations in the mosquito and fruit fly for an efficient electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Bachtiar, Luqman R; Unsworth, Charles P; Newcomb, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    The model organism, Drosophila melanogaster, and the mosquito Anopheles gambiae use 60 and 79 odorant receptors, respectively, to sense their olfactory world. However, a commercial "electronic nose" in the form of an insect olfactory biosensor demands very low numbers of receptors at its front end of detection due to the difficulties of receptor/sensor integration and functionalization. In this letter, we demonstrate how computation via artificial neural networks (ANNs), in the form of multilayer perceptrons (MLPs), can be successfully incorporated as the signal processing back end of the biosensor to drastically reduce the number of receptors to three while still retaining 100% performance of odorant detection to that of a full complement of receptors. In addition, we provide a detailed performance comparison between D. melanogaster and A. gambiae odorant receptors and demonstrate that A. gambiae receptors provide superior olfaction detection performance over D. melanogaster for very low receptor numbers. The results from this study present the possibility of using the computation of MLPs to discover ideal biological olfactory receptors for an olfactory biosensor device to provide maximum classification performance of unknown odorants.

  6. Effect of pretreatment with dehulling and microwaving on the flavor characteristics of cold-pressed rapeseed oil by GC-MS-PCA and electronic nose discrimination.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Yang, Mei; Huang, Fenghong; Zheng, Chang; Deng, Qianchun

    2013-07-01

    Raw and dehulled rapeseeds were treated with microwave energy (800 W) from 1 to 8 min with 1-min intervals at a frequency of 2450 MHz to investigate the influence of microwaving and dehulling pretreatment on the flavor characteristics of rapeseed oil extracted by pressing. Headspace solid phase microextraction was used to isolate the volatile compounds of rapeseed oil, which were then identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The results indicated that microwave and dehulling pretreatment of rapeseed can significantly influence the kinds and content of volatile compounds. The key flavor compounds in rapeseed oil were oxidized volatiles, heterocyclic compounds, and degradation products of glucosinolates. A pungent compound, 4-isothiocyanato-1-butene, was reduced by 97% in rapeseed treated for 3 min with microwaves energy when compared to the rapeseed oil without any treatment. The pyrazine compounds in the oil appeared after 6 min of microwave pretreatment and give a pleasant roasting flavor when compared to crude oils. Principal component analysis was able to differentiate between oils obtained using 4 pretreatment processes based on volatile compounds and electronic nose. The results showed that dehulling pretreatment could improve the flavor, yet microwaving had a greater effect on the flavor of rapeseed oils. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. 2012 Robotics Activities at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volpe, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The Robotics Section of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, is engaged in a full spectrum of flight project and research activities. This paper will provide an overview of these efforts, and discuss the recent accomplishments and future directions of them. Specific activities will be high- lighted based on their level of accomplishment, impact on the community, maturity, or novelty. Robotics activities on flight projects are a significant subset of the full effort for these large missions. Complementing flight activities is a diverse set of research efforts for NASA and other U.S. Government agencies. Future directions will be motivated by NASA and other sponsor objectives, as well as success experienced in these current endeavours.

  8. Lunar rover developments at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James D.; Bickler, Donald B.; Pivirotto, Donna L.

    1990-01-01

    Results of previous JPL developments are summarized and the current work related to lunar roving missions is discussed. Objectives of a long lunar transverse are reviewed and include lunar resource prospecting and base site surveys. Rover design criteria are presented, noting that payload instrumentation would include both television cameras for driving and cameras producing panoramic facsimile for high-fidelity scientific imaging and landmark navigation, as well as a multipurpose imaging system with multispectral, close-up, and microscopic capabilities. Instrumentation providing for chemical and mineral analysis, a gravimeter, and a magnetometer are also important. Rover performance requirements include a capability to support a 50 kg payload mass with a rover mass of 500 to 600 kg, powering and supporting the payload, managing the on-board resources available to each instrument, and handling all of the mission data. Desert tests of lunar roving navigation and field geology are discussed.

  9. First Starshade Prototype at JPL

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-09

    The first prototype starshade developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, shown in technology partner Astro Aerospace/Northrup Grumman's facility in Santa Barbara, California, in 2013. As shown by this 66 foot (20-meter) model, starshades can come in many shapes and sizes. This design shows petals that are more extreme in shape which properly diffracts starlight for smaller telescopes. Each petal is covered in a high-performance plastic film that resembles gold foil. On a starshade ready for launch, the thermal gold foil will only cover the side of the petals facing away from the telescope, with black on the other, so as not to reflect other light sources such as the Earth into its camera. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20906

  10. 2012 Robotics Activities at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volpe, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The Robotics Section of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, is engaged in a full spectrum of flight project and research activities. This paper will provide an overview of these efforts, and discuss the recent accomplishments and future directions of them. Specific activities will be high- lighted based on their level of accomplishment, impact on the community, maturity, or novelty. Robotics activities on flight projects are a significant subset of the full effort for these large missions. Complementing flight activities is a diverse set of research efforts for NASA and other U.S. Government agencies. Future directions will be motivated by NASA and other sponsor objectives, as well as success experienced in these current endeavours.

  11. Modernizing the JPL VLBI Correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogstad, S.; Goodhart, C. E.; Clark, J. E.; Finley, S.; Lanyi, G. E.; White, L. A.; Jacobs, Christopher S.>

    This poster will present the current capabilities of the JPL VLBI Correlator (JVC) and the general architecture of the equipment. In addition, the scientific and navigation uses of the JVC will be enumerated for background purposes. The JVC is a software correlator based on a Beowulf cluster of computers. It replaces a thirty year old correlator based on custom designed digital hardware. General comparisons between the old and new equipment will be made. The JVC makes use of a separate program, SoftC, to do the actual correlations. The JVC manages the sending of data to multiple machines in a Beowulf cluster each running SoftC in parallel on small chunks of the data. The basic architecture of SoftC will also be described.

  12. Mars Observer Press Conference JPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-08-01

    The Mars Observer mission spacecraft was primarily designed for exploring Mars and the Martian environment. The Mars Observer was launched on September 25, 1992. The spacecraft was lost in the vicinity of Mars on August 21, 1993 when the spacecraft began its maneuvering sequence for Martian orbital insertion. This videotape shows a press briefing, held after the spacecraft had not responded to attempts to communicate with it, to explain to the press the problems and the steps that were being taken to re-establish communication with the spacecraft. The communications had been shutdown prior to the orbital insertion burn to protect the instruments. At the time of the press conference, the communications system was still not operational, and attempts were being made to re-establish communication. Bob McMillan of the Public Affairs Office at JPL gives the initial announcement of the continuing communication problem with the spacecraft. Mr. McMillan introduces William Piotrowski, acting director of solar system exploration, who reiterates that there is indeed no communication with the Observer spacecraft. He is followed by Glenn Cunningham, the Project Manager of the Mars Observer who speaks about the attempts to re-establish contact. Mr. Cunningham is followed by Satenios Dallas, the Mission Manager for the Mars Observer Project, who speaks about the sequence of events leading up to the communication failure, and shows an animated video presenting the orbital insertion maneuvers. The briefing was then opened up for questions from the assembled press, both at JPL and at the other NASA Centers. The questions are about the possible reasons for the communication failure, and the attempts to restore communications with the spacecraft. Dr. Arden L. Albee, chief scientist for the Mars Observer Mission, joins the other panel members to answer questions. At the end of the press briefing the animation of the Mars orbital insertion is shown again.

  13. Mars Observer Press Conference JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Mars Observer mission spacecraft was primarily designed for exploring Mars and the Martian environment. The Mars Observer was launched on September 25, 1992. The spacecraft was lost in the vicinity of Mars on August 21, 1993 when the spacecraft began its maneuvering sequence for Martian orbital insertion. This videotape shows a press briefing, held after the spacecraft had not responded to attempts to communicate with it, to explain to the press the problems and the steps that were being taken to re-establish communication with the spacecraft. The communications had been shutdown prior to the orbital insertion burn to protect the instruments. At the time of the press conference, the communications system was still not operational, and attempts were being made to re-establish communication. Bob McMillan of the Public Affairs Office at JPL gives the initial announcement of the continuing communication problem with the spacecraft. Mr. McMillan introduces William Piotrowski, acting director of solar system exploration, who reiterates that there is indeed no communication with the Observer spacecraft. He is followed by Glenn Cunningham, the Project Manager of the Mars Observer who speaks about the attempts to re-establish contact. Mr. Cunningham is followed by Satenios Dallas, the Mission Manager for the Mars Observer Project, who speaks about the sequence of events leading up to the communication failure, and shows an animated video presenting the orbital insertion maneuvers. The briefing was then opened up for questions from the assembled press, both at JPL and at the other NASA Centers. The questions are about the possible reasons for the communication failure, and the attempts to restore communications with the spacecraft. Dr. Arden L. Albee, chief scientist for the Mars Observer Mission, joins the other panel members to answer questions. At the end of the press briefing the animation of the Mars orbital insertion is shown again.

  14. The crooked nose.

    PubMed

    Shipchandler, Taha Z; Papel, Ira D

    2011-04-01

    Straightening a crooked nose is a challenge. Several techniques exist ranging from simple to technically complex. It is important to approach the nose systematically and to remember that perfection may be impossible to achieve. If straightening is not attainable, softening grafts or onlay grafts should be used to camouflage subtle irregularities.

  15. Qualitative characteristics and comparison of volatile fraction of vodkas made from different botanical materials by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and the electronic nose based on the technology of ultra-fast gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewska, Paulina; Śliwińska, Magdalena; Dymerski, Tomasz; Wardencki, Waldemar; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2017-03-01

    Vodka is a spirit-based beverage made from ethyl alcohol of agricultural origin. At present, increasingly more vodka brands have labels that specify the botanical origin of the product. Until now, the techniques for distinguishing between vodkas of different botanical origin have been costly, time-consuming and insufficient for making a distinction between vodka produced from similar raw materials. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to find a fast and relatively inexpensive technique for conducting such tests. In the present study, we employed comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and an electronic nose based on the technology of ultra-fast GC with chemometric methods such as partial least square discriminant analysis, discriminant function analysis and soft independent modeling of class analogy. Both techniques allow a distinction between the vodkas produced from different raw materials. In the case of GC×GC, the differences between vodkas were more noticeable than in the analysis by electronic nose; however, the electronic nose allowed the significantly faster analysis of vodkas. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Uncertainties in the JPL planetary ephemeris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkner, W. M.

    2011-10-01

    The numerically integrated planetary ephemerides by JPL, IMCCE, and IPA are largely based on the same observation set and dynamical models. The differences between ephemerides are expected to be consistent within uncertainties. Uncertainties in the orbits of the major planets and the dwarf planet Pluto based on recent analysis at JPL are described.

  17. JPL HAMSR Takes Hurricane Matthew Temperature

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-07

    JPL's High-Altitude Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) instrument captured this look inside Hurricane Matthew's spiral clouds on Oct. 7, 2016, flying on a NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft. Red colors show cloud bands without precipitation; blues show rain bands. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21093

  18. The JPL Field Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hook, Simon J.; Kahle, Anne B.

    1995-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Field Emission Spectrometer (FES) was built by Designs and Prototypes based on a set of functional requirements supplied by JPL. The instrument has a spectral resolution of 6 wavenumbers (wn) and can acquire spectra from either the Mid Infrared (3-5 mu m) or the Thermal Infrared (8-12 pm) depending on whether the InSb or HgCdTe detector is installed respectively. The instrument consists of an optical head system unit and battery. The optical head which is tripod mounted includes the interferometer and detector dewar assembly. Wavelength calibration of the interferometer is achieved using a Helium-Neon laser diode. The dewar needs replenishing with liquid Nitrogen approximately every four hours. The system unit includes the controls for operation and the computer used for acquiring viewing and processing spectra. Radiometric calibration is achieved with an external temperature-controlled blackbody that mounts on the fore-optics of the instrument. The blackbody can be set at 5 C increments between 10 and 55 C. The instrument is compact and weighs about 33 kg. Both the wavelength calibration and radiometric calibration of the instrument have been evaluated. The wavelength calibration was checked by comparison of the position of water features in a spectrum of the sky with their position in the output from a high resolution atmospheric model. The results indicatethat the features in the sky spectrum are within 6-8 wn of their position ill the model spectrum. The radiometric calibration was checked by first calibrating the instrument using the external blackbody supplied with the instrument and then measuring the radiance from another external blackbody at a series of temperatures. The temperatures of these radiance spectra were then recovered by inventing Planck's law and the recovered temperatures compared lo the measured blackbody temperature. These results indicate that radiometric calibration is good to 0.5 C over the range of

  19. MEMS Micropropulsion Activities at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Juergen; Chakraborty, Indrani; Vargo, Stephen; Bame, David; Marrese, Colleen; Tang, William C.

    1999-01-01

    A status of MEMS-based micropropulsion activities conducted at JPL will be given. These activities include work conducted on the so called Vaporizing Liquid Micro-Thruster (VLM) which recently underwent proof-of-concept testing, demonstrating the ability to vaporize water propellant at 2 W and 2 V. Micro-ion engine technologies, such m field emitter arrays and micro-grids are being studied. Focus in the field emitter area is on arrays able to survive in thruster plumes and micro-ion engine plasmas to serve as neutralizers aW engine cathodes. Integrated, batch-fabricated Ion repeller grid structures are being studied as well as different emitter tip materials are being investigated to meet these goals. A micro-isolation valve is being studied to isolate microspacecraft feed system during long interplanetary cruises, avoiding leakage and prolonging lifetime and reliability of such systems. This concept relies on the melting of a thin silicon barrier. Burst pressure values as high as 2,900 psig were obtained for these valves and power requirements to melt barriers ranging between 10 - 50 microns in thickness, as determined through thermal finite element calculations, varied between 10 - 30 W to be applied over a duration of merely 0.5 ms.

  20. Progress of Biomimetic Artificial Nose and Tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Qingjun

    2009-05-01

    As two of the basic senses of human beings, olfaction and gustation play a very important role in daily life. These two types of chemical sensors are important for recognizing environmental conditions. Electronic nose and electronic tongue, which mimics animals' olfaction and gustation to detect odors and chemical components, have been carried out due to their potential commercial applications for biomedicine, food industry and environmental protection. In this report, the biomimetic artificial nose and tongue is presented. Firstly, the smell and taste sensors mimicking the mammalian olfaction and gustation was described, and then, some mimetic design of electronic nose and tongue for odorants and tastants detection are developed. Finally, olfactory and gustatory biosensors are presented as the developing trends of this field.

  1. Nose Hill Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Vivian

    2008-01-01

    A Blackfoot woman, caught in the act of adultery, was condemned at this site to have her nose cut off as a penalty for her actions. People do not know her story. The tribe cast it on the ground. And so She, Nose Hill, was named. John Laurie Boulevard holds her mound in a circlet of asphalt, defining the map of her "terra incognita." She…

  2. Electronic nose to detect volatile compound profile and quality changes in 'spring Belle' peach (Prunus persica L.) during cold storage in relation to fruit optical properties measured by time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rizzolo, Anna; Bianchi, Giulia; Vanoli, Maristella; Lurie, Susan; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2013-02-27

    The aim of this research was to study the relationships between electronic nose (E-nose) pattern, maturity class of peaches assessed at harvest by means of absorption coefficient at 670 nm (μ(a)670) measured in fruit pulp by time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy (TRS), and quality evolution during a 4 week cold storage. 'Spring Belle' peaches were measured for μ(a)670 by TRS, ranked according to decreasing μ(a)670 value, divided into three TRS maturity classes (less (LeM), medium (MeM), and more (MoM) mature), and randomized into 9 samples of 30 fruit each, so that fruits from the whole μ(a)670 range were present in each sample. At harvest and after 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks of storage at 0 and 4 °C, fruits of each sample were evaluated for firmness, expressible juice, μ(a)670, and ethylene production. LeM and MoM peaches of each sample were analyzed for aroma pattern by a commercial electronic nose and by static HS-GC and for sugar (glucose, fructose, sucrose, and sorbitol) and organic acid (quinic, malic, and citric acids) compositions by HPLC. Principal component analysis (PCA) of electronic nose data emphasized the ability of the E-nose to assess the ripening stage of fruit associated with maturity class, storage time, and storage temperature. The sensors having the highest influence on the pattern were W5S in PC-1, W1S in PC-2, and W2S in PC-3. From linear correlation analysis between PCs and firmness, flavor, and volatile compounds, it was found that PC-1 was related to ethylene production and volatile compounds (mainly acetate esters and ethanol); the highest PC-1 scores were found for fruit belonging to the MoM class after 2 weeks of storage at 4 °C, which showed the rise in ethylene production coupled with the highest total volatile production and sugar and acid composition of ripe peach fruits. PC-2 correlated with hexanal, ethyl acetate, and sugar composition, and PC-3 was mainly related to flavor compounds; both functions significantly changed with

  3. JPL-20170926-TECHf-0001-Robot Descends into Alaska Moulin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-26

    JPL engineer Andy Klesh lowers a robotic submersible into a moulin. Klesh and JPL's John Leichty used robots and probes to explore the Matanuska Glacier in Alaska this past July. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

  4. Rover Rehearses Roll-Off at JPL

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-15

    Footage from the JPL In-Situ Instruments Laboratory, or testbed, shows engineers rehearsing a crucial maneuver called egress in which NASA Mars Exploration Rover Spirit rolls off its lander platform and touches martian soil.

  5. Cascade Helps JPL Explore the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, G. R.

    1996-01-01

    At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), we are involved with the unmanned exploration of the solar system. Unmanned probes observe the planet surfaces using radar and optical cameras to take a variety of measurements.

  6. Mixed Reality Technology at NASA JPL

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-16

    NASA's JPL is a center of innovation in virtual and augmented reality, producing groundbreaking applications of these technologies to support a variety of missions. This video is a collection of unedited scenes released to the media.

  7. Radar Technology Development at NASA/JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Radar at JPL and worldwide is enjoying a period of unprecedented development. JPL's science-driven program focuses on exploiting commercially available components to build new technologies to meet NASA's science goals. Investments in onboard-processing, advanced digital systems, and efficient high-power devices, point to a new generation of high-performance scientific SAR systems in the US. Partnerships are a key strategy for US missions in the coming decade

  8. Radar Technology Development at NASA/JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Radar at JPL and worldwide is enjoying a period of unprecedented development. JPL's science-driven program focuses on exploiting commercially available components to build new technologies to meet NASA's science goals. Investments in onboard-processing, advanced digital systems, and efficient high-power devices, point to a new generation of high-performance scientific SAR systems in the US. Partnerships are a key strategy for US missions in the coming decade

  9. Ion nose spectral structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    DOE PAGES

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J. -C.; Spence, H. E.; ...

    2016-11-22

    Here, we present a statistical study of nose-like structures observed in energetic hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions near the inner edge of the plasma sheet. Nose structures are spectral features named after the characteristic shapes of energy bands or gaps in the energy-time spectrograms of in situ measured ion fluxes. Using 22 months of observations from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument onboard Van Allen Probe A, we determine the number of noses observed, and the minimum L-shell reached and energy of each nose on each pass through the inner magnetosphere. We find that multiple noses occur more frequentlymore » in heavy ions than in H+, and are most often observed during quiet times. The heavy-ion noses penetrate to lower L shells than H+ noses and there is an energy-magnetic local time (MLT) dependence in the nose locations and energies that is similar for all species. The observations are interpreted using a steady-state model of ion drift in the inner magnetosphere. The model is able to explain the energy and MLT dependence of the different types of nose structures. Different ion charge exchange lifetimes are the main cause for the deeper penetration of heavy-ion noses. The species dependence and preferred geomagnetic conditions of multiple-nose events indicate that they must be on long drift paths, leading to strong charge-exchange effects. The results provide important insight into the spatial distribution, species dependence, and geomagnetic conditions under which nose structures occur.« less

  10. Ion nose spectral structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J. -C.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, Brian Arthur; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Funsten, Herbert O.

    2016-11-22

    Here, we present a statistical study of nose-like structures observed in energetic hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions near the inner edge of the plasma sheet. Nose structures are spectral features named after the characteristic shapes of energy bands or gaps in the energy-time spectrograms of in situ measured ion fluxes. Using 22 months of observations from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument onboard Van Allen Probe A, we determine the number of noses observed, and the minimum L-shell reached and energy of each nose on each pass through the inner magnetosphere. We find that multiple noses occur more frequently in heavy ions than in H+, and are most often observed during quiet times. The heavy-ion noses penetrate to lower L shells than H+ noses and there is an energy-magnetic local time (MLT) dependence in the nose locations and energies that is similar for all species. The observations are interpreted using a steady-state model of ion drift in the inner magnetosphere. The model is able to explain the energy and MLT dependence of the different types of nose structures. Different ion charge exchange lifetimes are the main cause for the deeper penetration of heavy-ion noses. The species dependence and preferred geomagnetic conditions of multiple-nose events indicate that they must be on long drift paths, leading to strong charge-exchange effects. The results provide important insight into the spatial distribution, species dependence, and geomagnetic conditions under which nose structures occur.

  11. Stuffy or runny nose - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... stuffy or runny nose may be caused by: Common cold Flu Sinus infection The congestion typically goes away ... D.A.M. Editorial team. Allergy Read more Common Cold Read more Nose Injuries and Disorders Read more ...

  12. JPL Solar System Dynamics WWW Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, A. B.; Yeomans, D. K.; Chodas, P. W.; Giorgini, J. D.; Jacobson, R. A.; Keesey, M. S.; Lieske, J. H.; Ostro, S. J.; Standish, E. M.; Wimberly, R. N.

    1997-07-01

    The new JPL solar system dynamics WWW site is being made available to the public at ``http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/''. The site includes, but is not limited to, the following features: * simple ephemeris generation for planets, satellites, asteroids and comets * physical and orbital parameters for the planets and their satellites * asteroid and comet observer tools for object identification and listing all objects observable from a given location * Earth close-approaches by asteroids and comets (past and future) * custom table generation of up-to-date asteroid and comet orbital elements * radar astrometry data of asteroids and comets * distribution graphs of the asteroids and comets within the inner solar system * ecliptic-plane orbit plots of the inner and outer solar system * searchable asteroid discovery circumstances * description of great comets in history * spacecraft in heliocentric orbits (list of names, launch dates, mission, and country of origin) Data contained within this site will be updated regularly and new features will be added in the future (such as discovery circumstances for comets). The JPL solar system dynamics WWW site is designed to complement ``JPL's On-Line Solar System Data Service'' (J.D. Giorgini et al., BAAS 28:1158) known as the Horizons system which is available via telnet to host ssd.jpl.nasa.gov on port 6775.

  13. Why Does My Nose Run?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Puberty Train Your Temper Why Does My Nose Run? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Does My Nose Run? Print A A A en ... smell, you must be upside down! But why does your nose run? Read on to find out ...

  14. Runny and stuffy nose (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... runny or stuffy nose can be due to colds, allergies, sinus infections or the flu. When there is an excess of mucus secretions the nose is runny. The additional secretions drain from the front of the nose, or down the back (post- ...

  15. The MPD thruster program at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, John; Goodfellow, Keith; Polk, James; Pivirotto, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The main topics covered include: (1) the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) context; (2) critical issues of MPD Thruster design; and (3) the Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) Thruster Program at JPL. Under the section on the SEI context the nuclear electric propulsion system and some electric thruster options are addressed. The critical issues of MPD Thruster development deal with the requirements, status, and approach taken. The following areas are covered with respect to the MPD Thruster Program at JPL: (1) the radiation-cooled MPD thruster; (2) the High-Current Cathode Test Facility; (3) thruster component thermal modeling; and (4) alkali metal propellant studies.

  16. The NASA-JPL advanced propulsion program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Propulsion Concepts (APC) program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) consists of two main areas: The first involves cooperative modeling and research activities between JPL and various universities and industry; the second involves research at universities and industry that is directly supported by JPL. The cooperative research program consists of mission studies, research and development of ion engine technology using C-60 (Buckminsterfullerene) propellant, and research and development of lithium-propellant Lorentz-force accelerator (LFA) engine technology. The university/industry- supported research includes research (modeling and proof-of-concept experiments) in advanced, long-life electric propulsion, and in fusion propulsion. These propulsion concepts were selected primarily to cover a range of applications from near-term to far-term missions. For example, the long-lived pulsed-xenon thruster research that JPL is supporting at Princeton University addresses the near-term need for efficient, long-life attitude control and station-keeping propulsion for Earth-orbiting spacecraft. The C-60-propellant ion engine has the potential for good efficiency in a relatively low specific impulse (Isp) range (10,000 - 30,000 m/s) that is optimum for relatively fast (less than 100 day) cis-lunar (LEO/GEO/Lunar) missions employing near-term, high-specific mass electric propulsion vehicles. Research and modeling on the C-60-ion engine are currently being performed by JPL (engine demonstration), Caltech (C-60 properties), MIT (plume modeling), and USC (diagnostics). The Li-propellant LFA engine also has good efficiency in the modest Isp range (40,000 - 50,000 m/s) that is optimum for near-to-mid-term megawatt-class solar- and nuclear-electric propulsion vehicles used for Mars missions transporting cargo (in support of a piloted mission). Research and modeling on the Li-LFA engine are currently being performed by JPL (cathode development), Moscow Aviation

  17. JPL Testbed Image of Airbag Retraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows the deflated airbags retracted underneath the lander petal at the JPL In-Situ Instrument Laboratory. Retracting the airbags helps clear the path for the rover to roll off the lander and onto the martian surface.

  18. JPL Testbed Image of Airbag Retraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows the deflated airbags retracted underneath the lander petal at the JPL In-Situ Instrument Laboratory. Retracting the airbags helps clear the path for the rover to roll off the lander and onto the martian surface.

  19. Land Mobile Satellite Antenna Development at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, A.; Jamnejad, V.; Tulintseff, A.; Huang, J.; Lee, K.; Sukamto, L.; Crist, R.

    1993-01-01

    JPL has developed several mobile-vehicular antenna systems for satellite service throughout the last decade. The frequency bands cover UHF through Ka-band, and the antennas vary from high-gain with automatic satellite-tracking to omni-directional.

  20. Engineers Test Roll-Off at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at JPL shows engineers testing the route by which the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity will roll off its lander. Opportunity touched down at Meridiani Planum, Mars on Jan. 24, 9:05 p.m. PST, 2004, Earth-received time.

  1. Emerging Array Antenna Technologies at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.

    1998-01-01

    JPL/NASA's Earth remote sensing and deep-space exploration programs have been placing emphasis on their spacecraft's high-gain and large-aperture antennas. At the same time, however, low mass and small storage volume are demanded in order to reduce payload weight and reduce shroud size and thus reduce launch cost.

  2. Silicon stress/strain activities at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    In-house Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) work is described for silicon stress/strain, including the study of fracture mechanics, and on the high-temperature test program in which the low-strain response of silicon sheet materials above 1000 C is being measured and high temperature material property data are being determined.

  3. The JPL/KSC telerobotic inspection demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittman, David; Bon, Bruce; Collins, Carol; Fleischer, Gerry; Litwin, Todd; Morrison, Jack; Omeara, Jacquie; Peters, Stephen; Brogdon, John; Humeniuk, Bob

    1990-01-01

    An ASEA IRB90 robotic manipulator with attached inspection cameras was moved through a Space Shuttle Payload Assist Module (PAM) Cradle under computer control. The Operator and Operator Control Station, including graphics simulation, gross-motion spatial planning, and machine vision processing, were located at JPL. The Safety and Support personnel, PAM Cradle, IRB90, and image acquisition system, were stationed at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Images captured at KSC were used both for processing by a machine vision system at JPL, and for inspection by the JPL Operator. The system found collision-free paths through the PAM Cradle, demonstrated accurate knowledge of the location of both objects of interest and obstacles, and operated with a communication delay of two seconds. Safe operation of the IRB90 near Shuttle flight hardware was obtained both through the use of a gross-motion spatial planner developed at JPL using artificial intelligence techniques, and infrared beams and pressure sensitive strips mounted to the critical surfaces of the flight hardward at KSC. The Demonstration showed that telerobotics is effective for real tasks, safe for personnel and hardware, and highly productive and reliable for Shuttle payload operations and Space Station external operations.

  4. JPL CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will present the JPL-developed complementary metal- oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology. The CMOS APS has achieved performance comparable to charge coupled devices, yet features ultra low power operation, random access readout, on-chip timing and control, and on-chip analog to digital conversion. Previously published open literature will be reviewed.

  5. The Indian Nose.

    PubMed

    Nagarkar, Purushottam; Pezeshk, Ronnie A; Rohrich, Rod J

    2016-11-01

    Despite the growing number of rhinoplasty procedures being performed on Indian patients, there is a very limited body of literature regarding nuances of the Indian rhinoplasty. The authors review the spectrum of nasal phenotypes that fall under the category of the Indian nose; goals of rhinoplasty in these patients; operative techniques that can be used to address them; and, importantly, the specific pitfalls to be avoided in these groups.

  6. The average Indian female nose.

    PubMed

    Patil, Surendra B; Kale, Satish M; Jaiswal, Sumeet; Khare, Nishant; Math, Mahantesh

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to delineate the anthropometric measurements of the noses of young women of an Indian population and to compare them with the published ideals and average measurements for white women. This anthropometric survey included a volunteer sample of 100 young Indian women ages 18 to 35 years with Indian parents and no history of previous surgery or trauma to the nose. Standardized frontal, lateral, oblique, and basal photographs of the subjects' noses were taken, and 12 standard anthropometric measurements of the nose were determined. The results were compared with published standards for North American white women. In addition, nine nasal indices were calculated and compared with the standards for North American white women. The nose of Indian women differs significantly from the white nose. All the nasal measurements for the Indian women were found to be significantly different from those for North American white women. Seven of the nine nasal indices also differed significantly. Anthropometric analysis suggests differences between the Indian female nose and the North American white nose. Thus, a single aesthetic ideal is inadequate. Noses of Indian women are smaller and wider, with a less projected and rounded tip than the noses of white women. This study established the nasal anthropometric norms for nasal parameters, which will serve as a guide for cosmetic and reconstructive surgery in Indian women.

  7. E-nose based rapid prediction of early mouldy grain using probabilistic neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Xiaoguo; Liu, Wei; Hui, Guohua; Fu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, early mouldy grain rapid prediction method using probabilistic neural network (PNN) and electronic nose (e-nose) was studied. E-nose responses to rice, red bean, and oat samples with different qualities were measured and recorded. E-nose data was analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA), back propagation (BP) network, and PNN, respectively. Results indicated that PCA and BP network could not clearly discriminate grain samples with different mouldy status and showed poor predicting accuracy. PNN showed satisfying discriminating abilities to grain samples with an accuracy of 93.75%. E-nose combined with PNN is effective for early mouldy grain prediction. PMID:25714125

  8. The JPL Cryogenic Dilatometer: Measuring the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Aerospace Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halverson, Peter G.; Dudick, Matthew J.; Karlmann, Paul; Klein, Kerry J.; Levine, Marie; Marcin, Martin; Parker, Tyler J.; Peters, Robert D.; Shaklan, Stuart; VanBuren, David

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation details the cryogenic dilatometer, which is used by JPL to measure the thermal expansion coefficient of materials used in Aerospace. Included is a system diagram, a picture of the dilatometer chamber and the laser source, a description of the laser source, pictures of the interferometer, block diagrams of the electronics and software and a picture of the electronics, and software. Also there is a brief review of the accurace.error budget. The materials tested are also described, and the results are shown in strain curves, JPL measured strain fits are described, and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is also shown for the materials tested.

  9. The JPL Cryogenic Dilatometer: Measuring the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Aerospace Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halverson, Peter G.; Dudick, Matthew J.; Karlmann, Paul; Klein, Kerry J.; Levine, Marie; Marcin, Martin; Parker, Tyler J.; Peters, Robert D.; Shaklan, Stuart; VanBuren, David

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation details the cryogenic dilatometer, which is used by JPL to measure the thermal expansion coefficient of materials used in Aerospace. Included is a system diagram, a picture of the dilatometer chamber and the laser source, a description of the laser source, pictures of the interferometer, block diagrams of the electronics and software and a picture of the electronics, and software. Also there is a brief review of the accurace.error budget. The materials tested are also described, and the results are shown in strain curves, JPL measured strain fits are described, and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is also shown for the materials tested.

  10. GRACE Harmonic and Mascon Solutions at JPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, M. M.; Yuan, D.; Kuang, D.; Bertiger, W.; Kim, M.; Kruizinga, G. L.

    2005-12-01

    Gravity field solutions at JPL over the past few years have explored use of range, range-rate, and range-acceleration K/Ka-band satellite-satellite data types (with and without GPS), and with both spherical harmonic and mascon-type local mass representations. Until recently, resource and computing limitations have limited the scope of our mascon and other local solutions to a few months and/or small spatial regions and the standard GRACE products have remained spherical harmonic fields. The use of a new very large (~500 node) beowulf machine at JPL is now enabling a wider range of solutions over longer time spans and deeper understanding of their characteristics. These include much higher spherical harmonic degrees, mascons, and hybrids of the two. We will present the current status for several solution types, strengths and weaknesses of each, and our assessments of limiting errors including data noise and aliasing sensitivity.

  11. Nose: Applied Aspects in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Dammaningala Venkataramaiah; Shilpa, Kanathur; Nataraja, Holavanahally Veerabhadrappa; Divya, Kallapa Gorur

    2016-01-01

    Nose is the most prominent part of the mid-face and has important physiological, aesthetic and psychological functions. Skin diseases on the nose are commonly seen by dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, and plastic surgeons. Because of its exposed, highly visible localization, lesions on the skin of the nose are often noticed by patients themselves, typically very early in the course of the disease. Similarly, the dermatological lexicon is well known with descriptive terminologies, synonyms, acronyms, eponyms, toponyms, misnomers. We have tried to compile the anatomical applications of nose in cosmetology and dermatosurgery subspecialities with nasal eponyms and signs encountered in clinical dermatology that would be helpful for residents. PMID:27057038

  12. MEMS Reliability Assurance Activities at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayali, S.; Lawton, R.; Stark, B.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) reliability assurance and qualification activities at JPL is presented along with the a discussion of characterization of MEMS structures implemented on single crystal silicon, polycrystalline silicon, CMOS, and LIGA processes. Additionally, common failure modes and mechanisms affecting MEMS structures, including radiation effects, are discussed. Common reliability and qualification practices contained in the MEMS Reliability Assurance Guideline are also presented.

  13. JPL's role in the SETI program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of the JPL SETI Team is to develop the strategies and the instrumentation required to carry out an effective, yet affordable, SETI Microwave Observing Program. The primary responsibility for JPL is the development and implementation of the Sky Survey component of the bimodal search program recommended by the SETI Science Working Group (NASA Technical Paper 2244, 1983). JPL is also responsible for the design and implementation of microwave analog instrumentation (including antenna feed systems, low noise RF amplifiers, antenna monitor and control interfaces, etc.) to cover the microwave window for the Sky Survey and the Target Search observations. The primary site for the current SETI Field Test activity is the Venus Station of the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. A SETI controller was constructed and installed so that pre-programmed and real time SETI monitor and control data can be sent to and from the station controller. This unit will be interfaced with the MCSA. A SETI Hardware Handbook was prepared to describe the various systems that will be used by the project at the Venus Station; the handbook is frequently being expanded and updated. The 65,000 channel FFT Spectrum analyzer in the RFI Surveillance System was modified to permit operation with variable resolutions (300 Hz to less than 1 Hz) and with real-time accumulation, which will enhance the capability of the system for testing Sky Survey search strategies and signal detection algorithms.

  14. JPL Earth Science Center Visualization Multitouch Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, R.; Dodge, K.; Malhotra, S.; Chang, G.

    2014-12-01

    JPL Earth Science Center Visualization table is a specialized software and hardware to allow multitouch, multiuser, and remote display control to create seamlessly integrated experiences to visualize JPL missions and their remote sensing data. The software is fully GIS capable through time aware OGC WMTS using Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal as the GIS backend to continuously ingest and retrieve realtime remote sending data and satellite location data. 55 inch and 82 inch unlimited finger count multitouch displays allows multiple users to explore JPL Earth missions and visualize remote sensing data through very intuitive and interactive touch graphical user interface. To improve the integrated experience, Earth Science Center Visualization Table team developed network streaming which allows table software to stream data visualization to near by remote display though computer network. The purpose of this visualization/presentation tool is not only to support earth science operation, but specifically designed for education and public outreach and will significantly contribute to STEM. Our presentation will include overview of our software, hardware, and showcase of our system.

  15. Protecting Against Faults in JPL Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paula

    2007-01-01

    A paper discusses techniques for protecting against faults in spacecraft designed and operated by NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The paper addresses, more specifically, fault-protection requirements and techniques common to most JPL spacecraft (in contradistinction to unique, mission specific techniques), standard practices in the implementation of these techniques, and fault-protection software architectures. Common requirements include those to protect onboard command, data-processing, and control computers; protect against loss of Earth/spacecraft radio communication; maintain safe temperatures; and recover from power overloads. The paper describes fault-protection techniques as part of a fault-management strategy that also includes functional redundancy, redundant hardware, and autonomous monitoring of (1) the operational and health statuses of spacecraft components, (2) temperatures inside and outside the spacecraft, and (3) allocation of power. The strategy also provides for preprogrammed automated responses to anomalous conditions. In addition, the software running in almost every JPL spacecraft incorporates a general-purpose "Safe Mode" response algorithm that configures the spacecraft in a lower-power state that is safe and predictable, thereby facilitating diagnosis of more complex faults by a team of human experts on Earth.

  16. JPL's role in the SETI program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of the JPL SETI Team is to develop the strategies and the instrumentation required to carry out an effective, yet affordable, SETI Microwave Observing Program. The primary responsibility for JPL is the development and implementation of the Sky Survey component of the bimodal search program recommended by the SETI Science Working Group (NASA Technical Paper 2244, 1983). JPL is also responsible for the design and implementation of microwave analog instrumentation (including antenna feed systems, low noise RF amplifiers, antenna monitor and control interfaces, etc.) to cover the microwave window for the Sky Survey and the Target Search observations. The primary site for the current SETI Field Test activity is the Venus Station of the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. A SETI controller was constructed and installed so that pre-programmed and real time SETI monitor and control data can be sent to and from the station controller. This unit will be interfaced with the MCSA. A SETI Hardware Handbook was prepared to describe the various systems that will be used by the project at the Venus Station; the handbook is frequently being expanded and updated. The 65,000 channel FFT Spectrum analyzer in the RFI Surveillance System was modified to permit operation with variable resolutions (300 Hz to less than 1 Hz) and with real-time accumulation, which will enhance the capability of the system for testing Sky Survey search strategies and signal detection algorithms.

  17. Lupus vulgaris of external nose.

    PubMed

    Bhandary, Satheesh Kumar; Ranganna, B Usha

    2008-12-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the commonest form of cutaneous tuberculosis which commonly involve trunk and buttocks. Lupus vulgaris affecting nose and face, are rarely reported in India. This study reports an unusual case of lupus vulgaris involving the external nose that showed dramatic outcome after six months of anti- tubercular treatment.

  18. Foreign body in the nose

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as marbles), crayon pieces, erasers, paper wads, cotton, and beads. A foreign body in a child's ... DO NOT search the nose with cotton swabs or other tools. This may push the object further into the nose. DO NOT use tweezers or other tools to remove ...

  19. Space Images for NASA JPL Android Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Jon D.; Gutheinz, Sandy C.; Strom, Joshua R.; Arca, Jeremy M.; Perez, Martin; Boggs, Karen; Stanboli, Alice

    2013-01-01

    This software addresses the demand for easily accessible NASA JPL images and videos by providing a user friendly and simple graphical user interface that can be run via the Android platform from any location where Internet connection is available. This app is complementary to the iPhone version of the application. A backend infrastructure stores, tracks, and retrieves space images from the JPL Photojournal and Institutional Communications Web server, and catalogs the information into a streamlined rating infrastructure. This system consists of four distinguishing components: image repository, database, server-side logic, and Android mobile application. The image repository contains images from various JPL flight projects. The database stores the image information as well as the user rating. The server-side logic retrieves the image information from the database and categorizes each image for display. The Android mobile application is an interfacing delivery system that retrieves the image information from the server for each Android mobile device user. Also created is a reporting and tracking system for charting and monitoring usage. Unlike other Android mobile image applications, this system uses the latest emerging technologies to produce image listings based directly on user input. This allows for countless combinations of images returned. The backend infrastructure uses industry-standard coding and database methods, enabling future software improvement and technology updates. The flexibility of the system design framework permits multiple levels of display possibilities and provides integration capabilities. Unique features of the software include image/video retrieval from a selected set of categories, image Web links that can be shared among e-mail users, sharing to Facebook/Twitter, marking as user's favorites, and image metadata searchable for instant results.

  20. Evaluating Soil Moisture Status Using an e-Nose

    PubMed Central

    Bieganowski, Andrzej; Jaromin-Glen, Katarzyna; Guz, Łukasz; Łagód, Grzegorz; Jozefaciuk, Grzegorz; Franus, Wojciech; Suchorab, Zbigniew; Sobczuk, Henryk

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of distinguishing different soil moisture levels by electronic nose (e-nose) was studied. Ten arable soils of various types were investigated. The measurements were performed for air-dry (AD) soils stored for one year, then moistened to field water capacity and finally dried within a period of 180 days. The volatile fingerprints changed during the course of drying. At the end of the drying cycle, the fingerprints were similar to those of the initial AD soils. Principal component analysis (PCA) and artificial neural network (ANN) analysis showed that e-nose results can be used to distinguish soil moisture. It was also shown that different soils can give different e-nose signals at the same moistures. PMID:27338404

  1. NASA/JPL Aircraft SAR Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, N. (Editor); Evans, D. L. (Editor); Held, D. N. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Speaker-supplied summaries of the talks given at the NASA/JPL Aircraft SAR Workshop on February 4 and 5, 1985, are provided. These talks dealt mostly with composite quadpolarization imagery from a geologic or ecologic prespective. An overview and summary of the system characteristics of the L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) flown on the NASA CV-990 aircraft are included as supplementary information. Other topics ranging from phase imagery and interferometric techniques classifications of specific areas, and the potentials and limitations of SAR imagery in various applications are discussed.

  2. DOE/JPL advanced thermionic technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments in the DOE program include: continuing stable output from the combustion life test of the one-inch diameter hemispherical silicon carbine diode (Converter No. 239) at an emitter temperature of 1730 K for a period of over 4200 hours; construction of four diode module completed; favorable results obtained from TAM combustor-gas turbine system analyses; and obtained a FERP work function of 2.3 eV with the W(100)-O-Zr-C electrode. JPL program accomplishments include: the average minimum barrier index of the last six research diodes built with sublimed molybdenum oxide collectors was 20 eV (WHK).

  3. JPL VLBI Analysis Center Report for 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the JPL VLBI Analysis Center for the year 2012. The highlight of the year was the successful MSL rover Mars landing, which was supported by VLBI-based navigation using our combined spacecraft, celestial reference frame, terrestrial reference frame, earth orientation, and planetary ephemeris VLBI systems. We also supported several other missions with VLBI navigation measurements. A combined NASA-ESA network was demonstrated with first Ka-band fringes to ESA's Malargue, Argentina 35 m. We achieved first fringes with our new digital back end and Mark 5C recorders.

  4. JPL Space Telecommunications Radio System Operating Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James P.; Lang, Minh; Peters, Kenneth J.; Taylor, Gregory H.; Duncan, Courtney B.; Orozco, David S.; Stern, Ryan A.; Ahten, Earl R.; Girard, Mike

    2013-01-01

    A flight-qualified implementation of a Software Defined Radio (SDR) Operating Environment for the JPL-SDR built for the CoNNeCT Project has been developed. It is compliant with the NASA Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture Standard, and provides the software infrastructure for STRS compliant waveform applications. This software provides a standards-compliant abstracted view of the JPL-SDR hardware platform. It uses industry standard POSIX interfaces for most functions, as well as exposing the STRS API (Application Programming In terface) required by the standard. This software includes a standardized interface for IP components instantiated within a Xilinx FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array). The software provides a standardized abstracted interface to platform resources such as data converters, file system, etc., which can be used by STRS standards conformant waveform applications. It provides a generic SDR operating environment with a much smaller resource footprint than similar products such as SCA (Software Communications Architecture) compliant implementations, or the DoD Joint Tactical Radio Systems (JTRS).

  5. JPL stories: story on the story (series) Careering through JPL, presented by Alice M. Fairhurst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrickson, S.

    2002-01-01

    Alice Fairhurst, co-author of Effective Teaching, Effective Learning, presented an enthusiastic overview of her tenure as a JPL career development and mentoring coordinator (1991-2001). Among other things, Alice is an expert in Keirseyian Temperament and Myers-Briggs typology.

  6. Cutaneous lesions of the nose

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose. This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon. In this review, we focus on those skin diseases on the nose where surgery or laser therapy is considered a possible treatment option or that can be surgically evaluated. PMID:20525327

  7. Status of the JPL Horizons Ephemeris System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgini, Jon D.

    2015-08-01

    Since 1996, the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory on-line Horizons system has provided open access to the latest JPL orbit solutions through customizable ephemeris generation and searches. Currently, high-precision ephemerides for more than 683,000 objects are available: all known solar system bodies, several dozen spacecraft, system barycenters, and some libration points.Since inception, Horizons has produced 150 million ephemeris products in response to 70.4 million connections by 800,000 unique IP addresses. Recent usage is typically 6000 unique users requesting 4,000,000 ephemeris products per month.Horizons is freely accessible without an account and may be used and automated through any of three interfaces: interactive telnet connection, web-browser form, or by sending e-mail command-files.Asteroid and comet ephemerides are numerically integrated on request using JPL's DASTCOM5 database of initial conditions which is kept current by a separate process; as new measurements and discoveries are reported by the Minor Planet Center, they are automatically processed into new JPL orbit solutions. Radar targets and other objects of high interest have their orbit solutions manually examined and updated into the database.For asteroids and comets, SPK files may be dynamically created using Horizons. This is effectively a recording of the integrator output. The binary files may then be efficiently interpolated by user software to exactly reproduce the trajectory without having to duplicate the numerically integrated n-body dynamical model or PPN equations of motion.Other Horizons output is numerical and in the form of plain-text observer, vector, osculating element, and close-approach tables. More than one hundred quantities can be requested in various time-scales and coordinate systems. For asteroids and comets, statistical uncertainties can be mapped to output times to assess position and motion uncertainties.Horizons is consistent with the DE431 solar system solution

  8. Stuffy or runny nose - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... stuffy or runny nose may be caused by: Common cold Flu Sinus infection The congestion typically goes away ... D.A.M. Editorial team. Allergy Read more Common Cold Read more Drug Reactions Read more A.D. ...

  9. An encephalocele replacing nose completely.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, G

    1999-01-01

    Congenital encephalocele presenting in the nasal region is extremely rare. We present here a case ot tncephaloce lecompletely replacing the nose of a five year old boy and duscuss about similar swellings in this region.

  10. Correction of the crooked nose.

    PubMed

    Potter, Jason K

    2012-02-01

    Correction of the deviated nose is one of the most difficult tasks in rhinoplasty surgery and should be approached in a systematic manner to ensure a satisfied patient and surgeon. Correction of the deviated nose is unique in that the patient's complaints frequently include aesthetic and functional characteristics. Equal importance should be given to the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative aspects of the patient's treatment to ensure a favorable outcome.

  11. [Surgical anatomy of the nose].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, P S; Bardot, J; Duron, J B; Jallut, Y; Aiach, G

    2014-12-01

    Thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the nose is an essential prerequisite for preoperative analysis and the understanding of surgical techniques. Like a tent supported by its frame, the nose is an osteo-chondral structure covered by a peri-chondroperiosteal envelope, muscle and cutaneous covering tissues. For didactic reasons, we have chosen to treat this chapter in the form of comments from eight key configurations that the surgeon should acquire before performing rhinoplasty.

  12. Archived 1976-1985 JPL Aircraft SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.; Blom, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    This report describes archived data from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) aircraft radar expeditions in the mid-1970s through the mid-1980s collected by Ron Blom, JPL Radar Geologist. The dataset was collected during Ron's career at JPL from the 1970s through 2015. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data in the 1970s and 1980s were recorded optically on long strips of film. SAR imagery was produced via an optical, holographic technique that resulted in long strips of film imagery.

  13. The navigation system of the JPL robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    The control structure of the JPL research robot and the operations of the navigation subsystem are discussed. The robot functions as a network of interacting concurrent processes distributed among several computers and coordinated by a central executive. The results of scene analysis are used to create a segmented terrain model in which surface regions are classified by traversibility. The model is used by a path planning algorithm, PATH, which uses tree search methods to find the optimal path to a goal. In PATH, the search space is defined dynamically as a consequence of node testing. Maze-solving and the use of an associative data base for context dependent node generation are also discussed. Execution of a planned path is accomplished by a feedback guidance process with automatic error recovery.

  14. JPL Ultrastable Trapped Ion Atomic Frequency Standards.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Yi, Lin; Tucker, Blake; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, room temperature trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on three directions: 1) ultrastable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate stability performance and autonomous timekeeping; 2) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements; and 3) miniature clocks. In this paper, we concentrate on the first direction and present a design and the initial results from a new ultrastable clock referred to as L10 that achieves a short-term stability of 4.5 ×10(-14)/τ(1/2) and an initial measurement of no significant drift with an uncertainty of 2.4 ×10(-16) /day over a two-week period.

  15. Operations at the JPL OCTL Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Keith E.; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Biswas, Abhijit; Roberts, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The JPL Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) is a 200 sq-m located at 2.2.km altitude in Wrightwood California and houses a state-of-the-art 1-m telescope. The OCTL team is involved in the development of operational strategies for ground-to-space laser beam propagation for future NASA optical communications missions. Strategies include safe beam propagation through navigable air space, line of sight optical attenuation monitoring, adaptive optics, and multi-beam scintillation mitigation. This paper presents the results of recent operations at the OCTL facility including telescope characterization data and laser beam propagation experiments to Earth-orbiting retro-reflecting satellites; experiments that validate the telescope's tracking and blind-pointing performance and safe laser beam transmission procedures for propagating through navigable airspace.

  16. Cassini Spacecraft in a JPL Assembly Room

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-02

    On October of 1997, a two-story-tall robotic spacecraft will begin a journey of many years to reach and explore the exciting realm of Saturn, the most distant planet that can easily be seen by the unaided human eye. In addition to Saturn's interesting atmosphere and interior, its vast system contains the most spectacular of the four planetary ring systems, numerous icy satellites with a variety of unique surface features. A huge magnetosphere teeming with particles that interact with the rings and moons, and the intriguing moon Titan, which is slightly larger than the planet Mercury, and whose hazy atmosphere is denser than that of Earth, make Saturn a fascinating planet to study. The Cassini mission is an international venture involving NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and several separate European academic and industrial partners. The mission is managed for NASA by JPL. The spacecraft will carry a sophisticated complement of scientific sensors to support 27 different investigations to probe the mysteries of the Saturn system. The large spacecraft will consist of an orbiter and ESA's Huygens Titan probe. The orbiter mass at launch will be nearly 5300 kg, over half of which is propellant for trajectory control. The mass of the Titan probe (2.7 m diameter) is roughly 350 kg. The mission is named in honor of the seventeenth-century, French-Italian astronomer Jean Dominique Cassini, who discovered the prominent gap in Saturn's main rings, as well as the icy moons Iapetus, Rhea, Dione, and Tethys. The ESA Titan probe is named in honor of the exceptional Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens, who discovered Titan in 1655, followed in 1659 by his announcement that the strange Saturn "moons" seen by Galileo in 1610 were actually a ring system surrounding the planet. Huygens was also famous for his invention of the pendulum clock, the first accurate timekeeping device. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04603

  17. Detection of hydrazine (H) and (MMH) using cyranose E-nose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Young, Rebecca; Ryan, Margaret A.

    2001-01-01

    The Cyranose electronic nose (e-nose) has been used for the first time to detect hydrazine (H) and monomethyl hydrazine (MMH). The concentrations of hydrazine chosen in this study were 52 ppm (parts per million), 18 ppm, and 1.1 ppm and the concentrations of MMH was 14 ppm and 1 ppm. The Cyranose E-nose has detected hydrazine of 52 ppm and 18 ppm with a good response. The response of the E-Nose for 1.1 ppm hydrazine was insignificant. The response of E-Nose for 14 ppm MMH was significant and 1 ppm MMH was reasonably identifiable. The Cyranose E-Nose may be used to detect hydrazine and MMH with concentrations of at least 18 ppm and 1 ppm, respectively.

  18. Electronic neuroprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Anil

    1991-01-01

    The JPL Center for Space Microelectronics Technology (CSMT) is actively pursuing research in the neural network theory, algorithms, and electronics as well as optoelectronic neural net hardware implementations, to explore the strengths and application potential for a variety of NASA, DoD, as well as commercial application problems, where conventional computing techniques are extremely time-consuming, cumbersome, or simply non-existent. An overview of the JPL electronic neural network hardware development activities and some of the striking applications of the JPL electronic neuroprocessors are presented.

  19. 7. Credit JPL. Photographic copy of photograph, view south on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Credit JPL. Photographic copy of photograph, view south on west side of Test Stand 'A' during excavation for new intra-stand tunnel system. Note equipment, tanks and piping installed in tower. (JPL negative no. 384-1540-D, 7 January 1957) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. Desirements of Next Generation Spacecraft Interconnects : The JPL NEXUS Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Yutao; Some, Rafi

    2011-01-01

    Objectives of NEXUS (NEXt bUS) (1) A research task funded by JPL R&TD program (2) Develop a common highly-capable next generation avionics interconnect with the following features: (a) Transparently compatible with wired, fiber-optic, and RF physical layers (b) A clear and feasible path-to-flight to ensure infusion into future NASA/JPL missions

  1. JPL HAMSR Looks Inside Hurricane Matthew Spiral Cloud Bands

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-07

    JPL's HAMSR instrument flew above Hurricane Matthew on Oct. 7 aboard a NASA Global Hawk aircraft. Right: atmospheric temperatures overlaid atop ground-based radar and satellite visible images. Reds are areas without clouds; blues show ice and heavy precipitation. Upper left: Global Hawk visible image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21094

  2. Integration of Satellite and Terrestrial Networks at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinck, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the activities at JPL on the integration of satellite and terrestrial networks for mobile and personal communications. Activities fall into two categories: 1)advanced systems work, and 2)laboratory and field experimentation. Results of a workshop held at JPL on PCS integration and interoperability will be presented. Experiments will be described.

  3. Comparison of JPL and European Environmental Testing Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Man, Kin Fung; Forgave, John C.; Hoffman, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    A comparison of JPL and European environmental testing standards is presented. The contents include: 1) JPL Environmental Testing Documents; 2) Focus of the Comparison; 3) Test Policy; 4) Documentation; 5) Programmatics; 6) Functional Testing; 7) Reporting; 8) Dynamics Test Levels, Durations, & Margins; 9) Thermal Test Levels, Durations, & Margins; and 10) EMC Test Levels, Durations, & Margins.

  4. Nonaerospace uses of JPL technology: a report on technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    This report examines various nonaerospace applications of JPL technology. JPL has developed and applied a number of models for the effective transfer of space technology to uses in the public and private sector. Successful technology transfers were achieved in the following areas: chromosome analysis mass spectrometry manufacturing cost prediction gas detection by lasers blood substitutes ultrasound imaging composite materials and detonation and flame arresters.

  5. Comparison of JPL and European Environmental Testing Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Man, Kin Fung; Forgave, John C.; Hoffman, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    A comparison of JPL and European environmental testing standards is presented. The contents include: 1) JPL Environmental Testing Documents; 2) Focus of the Comparison; 3) Test Policy; 4) Documentation; 5) Programmatics; 6) Functional Testing; 7) Reporting; 8) Dynamics Test Levels, Durations, & Margins; 9) Thermal Test Levels, Durations, & Margins; and 10) EMC Test Levels, Durations, & Margins.

  6. 2. Credit JPL. Photographic copy of photograph, looking northwest at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Credit JPL. Photographic copy of photograph, looking northwest at Test Stand 'B' set up to test a 20,000 pound thrust rocket engine. (JPL negative no. 384-1509-B, 22 October 1956) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand B, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. JPL Big Data Technologies for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dayton L.; D'Addario, L. R.; De Jong, E. M.; Mattmann, C. A.; Rebbapragada, U. D.; Thompson, D. R.; Wagstaff, K.

    2014-04-01

    During the past three years the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been working on several technologies to deal with big data challenges facing next-generation radio arrays, among other applications. This program has focused on the following four areas: 1) We are investigating high-level ASIC architectures that reduce power consumption for cross-correlation of data from large interferometer arrays by one to two orders of magnitude. The cost of operations for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which may be dominated by the cost of power for data processing, is a serious concern. A large improvement in correlator power efficiency could have a major positive impact. 2) Data-adaptive algorithms (machine learning) for real-time detection and classification of fast transient signals in high volume data streams are being developed and demonstrated. Studies of the dynamic universe, particularly searches for fast (<< 1 second) transient events, require that data be analyzed rapidly and with robust RFI rejection. JPL, in collaboration with the International Center for Radio Astronomy Research in Australia, has developed a fast transient search system for eventual deployment on ASKAP. In addition, a real-time transient detection experiment is now running continuously and commensally on NRAO's Very Long Baseline Array. 3) Scalable frameworks for data archiving, mining, and distribution are being applied to radio astronomy. A set of powerful open-source Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT) tools is now available through Apache. OODT was developed at JPL for Earth science data archives, but it is proving to be useful for radio astronomy, planetary science, health care, Earth climate, and other large-scale archives. 4) We are creating automated, event-driven data visualization tools that can be used to extract information from a wide range of complex data sets. Visualization of complex data can be improved through algorithms that detect events or features of interest and autonomously

  8. Plane flame furnace combustion tests on JPL desulfurized coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, J. J.; Kim, H. T.; Lima, J. G. H.

    1982-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of three raw bituminous (PSOC-282 and 276) and subbituminous (PSOC-230) coals, the raw coals partially desulfurized (ca -60%) by JPL chlorinolysis, and the chlorinated coals more completely desulfurized (ca -75%) by JPL hydrodesulfurization were determined. The extent to which the combustion characteristics of the untreated coals were altered upon JPL sulfur removal was examined. Combustion conditions typical of utility boilers were simulated in the plane flame furnace. Upon decreasing the parent coal voltaile matter generically by 80% and the sulfur by 75% via the JPL desulfurization process, ignition time was delayed 70 fold, burning velocity was retarded 1.5 fold, and burnout time was prolonged 1.4 fold. Total flame residence time increased 2.3 fold. The JPL desulfurization process appears to show significant promise for producing technologically combustible and clean burning (low SO3) fuels.

  9. The Snow Data System at NASA JPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laidlaw, R.; Painter, T. H.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Brodzik, M. J.; Rittger, K.; Bormann, K. J.; Burgess, A. B.; Zimdars, P.; McGibbney, L. J.; Goodale, C. E.; Joyce, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Snow Data System at NASA JPL includes a data processing pipeline built with open source software, Apache 'Object Oriented Data Technology' (OODT). It produces a variety of data products using inputs from satellites such as MODIS, VIIRS and Landsat. Processing is carried out in parallel across a high-powered computing cluster. Algorithms such as 'Snow Covered Area and Grain-size' (SCAG) and 'Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow' (DRFS) are applied to satellite inputs to produce output images that are used by many scientists and institutions around the world. This poster will describe the Snow Data System, its outputs and their uses and applications, along with recent advancements to the system and plans for the future. Advancements for 2015 include automated daily processing of historic MODIS data for SCAG (MODSCAG) and DRFS (MODDRFS), automation of SCAG processing for VIIRS satellite inputs (VIIRSCAG) and an updated version of SCAG for Landsat Thematic Mapper inputs (TMSCAG) that takes advantage of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) for faster processing speeds. The pipeline has been upgraded to use the latest version of OODT and its workflows have been streamlined to enable computer operators to process data on demand. Additional products have been added, such as rolling 8-day composites of MODSCAG data, a new version of the MODSCAG 'annual minimum ice and snow extent' (MODICE) product, and recoded MODSCAG data for the 'Satellite Snow Product Intercomparison and Evaluation Experiment' (SnowPEx) project.

  10. Test aspects of the JPL Viterbi decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breuer, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    The generation of test vectors and design-for-test aspects of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) Viterbi decoder chip is discussed. Each processor integrated circuit (IC) contains over 20,000 gates. To achieve a high degree of testability, a scan architecture is employed. The logic has been partitioned so that very few test vectors are required to test the entire chip. In addition, since several blocks of logic are replicated numerous times on this chip, test vectors need only be generated for each block, rather than for the entire circuit. These unique blocks of logic have been identified and test sets generated for them. The approach employed for testing was to use pseudo-exhaustive test vectors whenever feasible. That is, each cone of logid is tested exhaustively. Using this approach, no detailed logic design or fault model is required. All faults which modify the function of a block of combinational logic are detected, such as all irredundant single and multiple stuck-at faults.

  11. JPL Advanced Thermal Control Technology Roadmap - 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, Gaj

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of thermal control technology at JPL and NASA.It shows the active spacecraft that are in vairous positions in the solar syatem, and beyond the solar system and the future missions that are under development. It then describes the challenges that the past missions posed with the thermal control systems. The various solutions that were implemented duirng the decades prior to 1990 are outlined. A review of hte thermal challenges of the future misions is also included. The exploration plan for Mars is then reviewed. The thermal challenges of the Mars Rovers are then outlined. Also the challenges of systems that would be able to be used in to explore Venus, and Titan are described. The future space telescope missions will also need thermal control technological advances. Included is a review of the thermal requirements for manned missions to the Moon. Both Active and passive technologies that have been used and will be used are reviewed. Those that are described are Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loops (MPFL), Loop Heat Pipes, an M3 Passive Cooler, Heat Siwtch for Space and Mars surface applications, phase change material (PCM) technology, a Gas Gap Actuateor using ZrNiH(x), the Planck Sorption Cooler (PCS), vapor compression -- Hybrid two phase loops, advanced pumps for two phase cooling loops, and heat pumps that are lightweight and energy efficient.

  12. Understanding Colds: Anatomy of the Nose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colds Prevention Treatment Children Complications Special Features References Common Cold Understanding Colds Anatomy of the Nose The nose ... cm (3/8 inch) per minute. What a Common Cold Is A common cold is an illness caused ...

  13. Petroleum Jelly: Safe for a Dry Nose?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safe for a dry nose? I've put petroleum jelly on the inside of my nose for years ... safe? Answers from Lawrence E. Gibson, M.D. Petroleum jelly is generally safe to use. Rarely, however, inhaling ...

  14. Cassini Spacecraft in a JPL Assembly Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    On October of 1997, a two-story-tall robotic spacecraft will begin a journey of many years to reach and explore the exciting realm of Saturn, the most distant planet that can easily be seen by the unaided human eye. In addition to Saturn's interesting atmosphere and interior, its vast system contains the most spectacular of the four planetary ring systems, numerous icy satellites with a variety of unique surface features. A huge magnetosphere teeming with particles that interact with the rings and moons, and the intriguing moon Titan, which is slightly larger than the planet Mercury, and whose hazy atmosphere is denser than that of Earth, make Saturn a fascinating planet to study.

    The Cassini mission is an international venture involving NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and several separate European academic and industrial partners. The mission is managed for NASA by JPL. The spacecraft will carry a sophisticated complement of scientific sensors to support 27 different investigations to probe the mysteries of the Saturn system. The large spacecraft will consist of an orbiter and ESA's Huygens Titan probe. The orbiter mass at launch will be nearly 5300 kg, over half of which is propellant for trajectory control. The mass of the Titan probe (2.7 m diameter) is roughly 350 kg.

    The mission is named in honor of the seventeenth-century, French-Italian astronomer Jean Dominique Cassini, who discovered the prominent gap in Saturn's main rings, as well as the icy moons Iapetus, Rhea, Dione, and Tethys. The ESA Titan probe is named in honor of the exceptional Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens, who discovered Titan in 1655, followed in 1659 by his announcement that the strange Saturn 'moons' seen by Galileo in 1610 were actually a ring system surrounding the planet. Huygens was also famous for his invention of the pendulum clock, the first accurate timekeeping device.

  15. Cassini Spacecraft in a JPL Assembly Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    On October of 1997, a two-story-tall robotic spacecraft will begin a journey of many years to reach and explore the exciting realm of Saturn, the most distant planet that can easily be seen by the unaided human eye. In addition to Saturn's interesting atmosphere and interior, its vast system contains the most spectacular of the four planetary ring systems, numerous icy satellites with a variety of unique surface features. A huge magnetosphere teeming with particles that interact with the rings and moons, and the intriguing moon Titan, which is slightly larger than the planet Mercury, and whose hazy atmosphere is denser than that of Earth, make Saturn a fascinating planet to study.

    The Cassini mission is an international venture involving NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and several separate European academic and industrial partners. The mission is managed for NASA by JPL. The spacecraft will carry a sophisticated complement of scientific sensors to support 27 different investigations to probe the mysteries of the Saturn system. The large spacecraft will consist of an orbiter and ESA's Huygens Titan probe. The orbiter mass at launch will be nearly 5300 kg, over half of which is propellant for trajectory control. The mass of the Titan probe (2.7 m diameter) is roughly 350 kg.

    The mission is named in honor of the seventeenth-century, French-Italian astronomer Jean Dominique Cassini, who discovered the prominent gap in Saturn's main rings, as well as the icy moons Iapetus, Rhea, Dione, and Tethys. The ESA Titan probe is named in honor of the exceptional Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens, who discovered Titan in 1655, followed in 1659 by his announcement that the strange Saturn 'moons' seen by Galileo in 1610 were actually a ring system surrounding the planet. Huygens was also famous for his invention of the pendulum clock, the first accurate timekeeping device.

  16. Odor source identification by grounding linguistic descriptions in an artificial nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutfi, Amy; Coradeschi, Silvia; Duckett, Tom; Wide, Peter

    2001-03-01

    This paper addresses the problem of enabling autonomous agents (e.g., robots) to carry out human oriented tasks using an electronic nose. The nose consists of a combination of passive gas sensors with different selectivity, the outputs of which are fused together with an artificial neural network in order to recognize various human-determined odors. The basic idea is to ground human-provided linguistic descriptions of these odors in the actual sensory perceptions of the nose through a process of supervised learning. Analogous to the human nose, the paper explains a method by which an electronic nose can be used for substance identification. First, the receptors of the nose are exposed to a substance by means of inhalation with an electric pump. Then a chemical reaction takes place in the gas sensors over a period of time and an artificial neural network processes the resulting sensor patterns. This network was trained to recognize a basic set of pure substances such as vanilla, lavender and yogurt under controlled laboratory conditions. The complete system was then validated through a series of experiments on various combinations of the basic substances. First, we showed that the nose was able to consistently recognize unseen samples of the same substances on which it had been trained. In addition, we presented some first results where the nose was tested on novel combinations of substances on which it had not been trained by combining the learned descriptions - for example, it could distinguish lavender yogurt as a combination of lavender and yogurt.

  17. 2. Credit JPL. Photographic copy of photograph, looking northeast at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Credit JPL. Photographic copy of photograph, looking northeast at unfinished original Test Stand 'C' construction. A portion of the corrugated steel tunnel tube connecting Test Stand 'C' to the first phase of JPL tunnel system construction is visible in the foreground. The steel frame used to support propellant tanks and engine equipment has been erected. The open trap door leads to a chamber inside the Test Stand 'C' base where gaseous nitrogen is distributed via manifolds to Test Stand 'C' control valves. (JPL negative no. 384-1568-A, 19 March 1957) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand C, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. 21 CFR 868.6225 - Nose clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nose clip. 868.6225 Section 868.6225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6225 Nose clip. (a) Identification. A nose clip is a device...

  19. 21 CFR 868.6225 - Nose clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nose clip. 868.6225 Section 868.6225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6225 Nose clip. (a) Identification. A nose clip is a device...

  20. Designing the design at JPL'S innovation foundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Freeman, Anthony

    2017-08-01

    -engineering disciplines, such as industrial and graphic design, human centered design, and even art. Communicating the information more effectively through conversations and symbolic means benefits from the skills of human centered designers and artists. In this paper we will discuss how design is being designed at JPL's Innovation Foundry, by focusing on novel languages, storytelling, conversations, boundary objects in support of improved communications both externally to stakeholders and sponsors, and internally within the design teams. We will also highlight how these new design driven approaches provide a strategic strength for the organization when competing for funding in a resource-constrained environment.