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Sample records for jr model dehavilland

  1. 75 FR 57846 - Airworthiness Directives; Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk 22, and DH.C1... installation, with replacement as necessary for Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1...

  2. 75 FR 53861 - Airworthiness Directives; Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... in an un-commanded retraction of the flaps. This failure could lead to a stall during a landing... corrected, could result in an un-commanded retraction of the flaps. This failure could lead to a stall...

  3. 75 FR 34956 - Airworthiness Directives; Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... retraction of the flaps. This failure could lead to a stall during a landing approach. DATES: We must receive...-commanded retraction of the flaps. This failure could lead to a stall during a landing approach. Relevant... result in an un-commanded retraction of the flaps. This failure could lead to a stall during a landing...

  4. John H Glenn Jr.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-02-20

    Project Mercury astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., enters the Friendship 7 spacecraft during the last part of the countdown on Feb. 20, 1962. At 9:47 a.m. EST, the Atlas launch vehicle lifted the spacecraft into orbit for a three-orbit mission lasting four hours, 55 minutes and 23 seconds. Glenn and his spacecraft were recovered by the destroyer Noa just 21 minutes after landing in the Atlantic near Grand Turk Island, to successfully complete the nation's first manned orbital flight.

  5. A CR-HYDRO-NEI MODEL OF MULTI-WAVELENGTH EMISSION FROM THE VELA JR. SUPERNOVA REMNANT (SNR RX J0852.0-4622)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Slane, Patrick O.

    Based largely on energy budget considerations and the observed cosmic-ray (CR) ionic composition, supernova remnant (SNR) blast waves are the most likely sources of CR ions with energies at least up to the 'knee' near 10{sup 15} eV. Shocks in young shell-type TeV-bright SNRs are surely producing TeV particles, but the emission could be dominated by ions producing {pi}{sup 0}-decay emission or electrons producing inverse Compton gamma rays. Unambiguously identifying the GeV-TeV emission process in a particular SNR will not only help pin down the origin of CRs, it will also add significantly to our understanding of the diffusive shockmore » acceleration (DSA) mechanism and improve our understanding of supernovae and the impact SNRs have on the circumstellar medium. In this study, we investigate the Vela Jr. SNR, an example of TeV-bright non-thermal SNRs. We perform hydrodynamic simulations coupled with nonlinear DSA and non-equilibrium ionization near the forward shock to confront currently available multi-wavelength data. We find, with an analysis similar to that used earlier for SNR RX J1713.7-3946, that self-consistently modeling the thermal X-ray line emission with the non-thermal continuum in our one-dimensional model strongly constrains the fitting parameters, and this leads convincingly to a leptonic origin for the GeV-TeV emission for Vela Jr. This conclusion is further supported by applying additional constraints from observation, including the radial brightness profiles of the SNR shell in TeV gamma rays, and the spatial variation of the X-ray synchrotron spectral index. We will discuss implications of our models on future observations by the next-generation telescopes.« less

  6. Edwin W. Lewis, Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Edwin W. Lewis Jr. is a research pilot in the Airborne Science program, Flight Crew Branch, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. He currently flies the DC-8, F/A-18, Lear Jet 24, King Air, and T-34C in support of Dryden's flight operations and is mentor pilot for the King Air and the Lear Jet. Prior to accepting this assignment Lewis was a pilot for eight years at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, flying 10 different aircraft - C-130B, DC-8-72, UH-1, SH-3, King Air, Lear 24, T-38A, T-39G and YO-3A - in support of NASA flight missions. Lewis also flew the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (a modified civilian version of the Lockheed C-141 Starlifter). He was project pilot for Ames' 747 and T-38 programs. Lewis was born in New York City on May 19, 1936, and began flight training as a Civil Air Patrol cadet in 1951, ultimately earning his commercial pilot's certificate in 1958. He received a bachelor of arts degree in biology from Hobart College, Geneva, N.Y., and entered the U.S. Air Force through the Reserve Officer Training Corps. Following pilot training he was assigned to Moody Air Force Base, Ga., as an instructor pilot, for both the T-33 and T-37 aircraft. He served in Vietnam in 1965 and 1966, where he was a forward air controller, instructor and standardization/evaluation pilot, flying more than 1,000 hours in the O-1 'Bird Dog.' Lewis separated from the regular Air Force and joined Pan American World Airways and the 129th Air Commando Group, California Air National Guard (ANG) based in Hayward, California. During his 18-year career with the California ANG he flew the U-6, U-10, C-119, HC-130 aircraft and the HH-3 helicopter. He retired as commander, 129th Air Rescue and Recovery Group, a composite combat rescue group, in the grade of colonel. During his 22 years as an airline pilot, he flew the Boeing 707, 727 and 747. He took early retirement from Pan American in 1989 to become a pilot with NASA.

  7. Edwin W. Lewis, Jr.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-29

    Edwin W. Lewis Jr. is a research pilot in the Airborne Science program, Flight Crew Branch, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. He currently flies the DC-8, F/A-18, Lear Jet 24, King Air, and T-34C in support of Dryden's flight operations and is mentor pilot for the King Air and the Lear Jet. Prior to accepting this assignment Lewis was a pilot for eight years at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, flying 10 different aircraft C-130B, DC-8-72, UH-1, SH-3, King Air, Lear 24, T-38A, T-39G and YO-3A in support of NASA flight missions. Lewis also flew the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (a modified civilian version of the Lockheed C-141 Starlifter). He was project pilot for Ames' 747 and T-38 programs. Lewis was born in New York City on May 19, 1936, and began flight training as a Civil Air Patrol cadet in 1951, ultimately earning his commercial pilot's certificate in 1958. He received a bachelor of arts degree in biology from Hobart College, Geneva, N.Y., and entered the U.S. Air Force through the Reserve Officer Training Corps. Following pilot training he was assigned to Moody Air Force Base, Ga., as an instructor pilot, for both the T-33 and T-37 aircraft. He served in Vietnam in 1965 and 1966, where he was a forward air controller, instructor and standardization/evaluation pilot, flying more than 1,000 hours in the O-1 "Bird Dog." Lewis separated from the regular Air Force and joined Pan American World Airways and the 129th Air Commando Group, California Air National Guard (ANG) based in Hayward, California. During his 18-year career with the California ANG he flew the U-6, U-10, C-119, HC-130 aircraft and the HH-3 helicopter. He retired as commander, 129th Air Rescue and Recovery Group, a composite combat rescue group, in the grade of colonel. During his 22 years as an airline pilot, he flew the Boeing 707, 727 and 747. He took early retirement from Pan American in 1989 to become a pilot with NASA.

  8. Official portrait of astronaut Brewster H. Shaw, Jr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Official portrait of Brewster H. Shaw, Jr, United States Air Force (USAF) Colonel, member of Astronaut Class 8 (1978), and space shuttle commander. Shaw wears blue pressure suit with space shuttle model displayed on table on his left.

  9. The somatostatin receptor 2 antagonist 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 outperforms 64Cu-DOTA-TATE in a mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Rylova, Svetlana N.; Stoykow, Christian; Del Pozzo, Luigi; Abiraj, Keelara; Tamma, Maria Luisa; Kiefer, Yvonne; Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R.

    2018-01-01

    Copper-64 is an attractive radionuclide for PET imaging and is frequently used in clinical applications. The aim of this study was to perform a side-by-side comparison of the in vitro and in vivo performance of 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 (NODAGA = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane,1-glutaric acid,4,7-acetic acid, JR11 = p-Cl-Phe-cyclo(D-Cys-Aph(Hor)-D-Aph(cbm)-Lys-Thr-Cys)D-Tyr-NH2), a somatostatin receptor 2 antagonist, with the clinically used sst2 agonist 64Cu-DOTA-TATE ((TATE = D-Phe-cyclo(Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Cys)Thr). In vitro studies demonstrated Kd values of 5.7±0.95 nM (Bmax = 4.1±0.18 nM) for the antagonist 64/natCu-NODAGA-JR11 and 20.1±4.4. nM (Bmax = 0.48±0.18 nM) for the agonist 64/natCu-DOTA-TATE. Cell uptake studies showed the expected differences between agonists and antagonists. Whereas 64Cu-DOTA-TATE (the agonist) showed very effective internalization in the cell culture assay (with 50% internalized at 4 hours post-peptide addition under the given experimental conditions), 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 (the antagonist) showed little internalization but strong receptor-mediated uptake at the cell membrane. Biodistribution studies of 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 showed rapid blood clearance and tumor uptake with increasing tumor-to-relevant organ ratios within the first 4 hours and in some cases, 24 hours, respectively. The tumor washout was slow or non-existent in the first 4 hours, whereas the kidney washout was very efficient, leading to high and increasing tumor-to-kidney ratios over time. Specificity of tumor uptake was proven by co-injection of high excess of non-radiolabeled peptide, which led to >80% tumor blocking. 64Cu-DOTA-TATE showed less favorable pharmacokinetics, with the exception of lower kidney uptake. Blood clearance was distinctly slower and persistent higher blood values were found at 24 hours. Uptake in the liver and lung was relatively high and also persistent. The tumor uptake was specific and similar to that of 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 at 1 h, but release from the tumor

  10. The somatostatin receptor 2 antagonist 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 outperforms 64Cu-DOTA-TATE in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Rylova, Svetlana N; Stoykow, Christian; Del Pozzo, Luigi; Abiraj, Keelara; Tamma, Maria Luisa; Kiefer, Yvonne; Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R

    2018-01-01

    Copper-64 is an attractive radionuclide for PET imaging and is frequently used in clinical applications. The aim of this study was to perform a side-by-side comparison of the in vitro and in vivo performance of 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 (NODAGA = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane,1-glutaric acid,4,7-acetic acid, JR11 = p-Cl-Phe-cyclo(D-Cys-Aph(Hor)-D-Aph(cbm)-Lys-Thr-Cys)D-Tyr-NH2), a somatostatin receptor 2 antagonist, with the clinically used sst2 agonist 64Cu-DOTA-TATE ((TATE = D-Phe-cyclo(Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Cys)Thr). In vitro studies demonstrated Kd values of 5.7±0.95 nM (Bmax = 4.1±0.18 nM) for the antagonist 64/natCu-NODAGA-JR11 and 20.1±4.4. nM (Bmax = 0.48±0.18 nM) for the agonist 64/natCu-DOTA-TATE. Cell uptake studies showed the expected differences between agonists and antagonists. Whereas 64Cu-DOTA-TATE (the agonist) showed very effective internalization in the cell culture assay (with 50% internalized at 4 hours post-peptide addition under the given experimental conditions), 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 (the antagonist) showed little internalization but strong receptor-mediated uptake at the cell membrane. Biodistribution studies of 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 showed rapid blood clearance and tumor uptake with increasing tumor-to-relevant organ ratios within the first 4 hours and in some cases, 24 hours, respectively. The tumor washout was slow or non-existent in the first 4 hours, whereas the kidney washout was very efficient, leading to high and increasing tumor-to-kidney ratios over time. Specificity of tumor uptake was proven by co-injection of high excess of non-radiolabeled peptide, which led to >80% tumor blocking. 64Cu-DOTA-TATE showed less favorable pharmacokinetics, with the exception of lower kidney uptake. Blood clearance was distinctly slower and persistent higher blood values were found at 24 hours. Uptake in the liver and lung was relatively high and also persistent. The tumor uptake was specific and similar to that of 64Cu-NODAGA-JR11 at 1 h, but release from the tumor

  11. The Words of Martin Luther King, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Today's Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Excerpts from speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., are reprinted. Topics discussed include discrimination, the South, education, nonviolent resistance, poverty, economic opportunity, and world peace. (LH)

  12. Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr., metallurgist extraordinaire.

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, Floyd Michael

    The organizers of the Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr. Memorial Symposium: Deformation and Interfacial Phenomena in Advanced High-Temperature Materials are honoring the memory of Dr. Stephens and his many technical contributions that were accomplished over a relatively brief twenty year career. His research spanned the areas of creep and deformation of metals, dispersion-strengthened alloys and their properties, metal matrix composite materials, processing and properties of refractory metals, joining of ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic systems, active braze alloy development, and mechanical modeling of soldered and brazed assemblies. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight his research and engineering accomplishments, particularly duringmore » his professional career at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM.« less

  13. Edward Wheeler Hones Jr. (1922-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; McPherron, Robert L.; Birn, Joachim

    2013-02-01

    Space physicist Edward Wheeler Hones Jr. died on 17 September 2012 at his home in Los Alamos, N. M. He was 90 years old. The cause of death was a heart attack that came following a brief hospitalization.

  14. 1997 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sport Scholars Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Winners of the "Black Issues in Higher Education" Arthur Ashe Jr. 1997 athletes of the year, one male and one female, are profiled and Sport Scholars are listed for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, archery, football, handball, soccer, field hockey, crew, swimming, gymnastics, tennis, squash, golf, volleyball, lacrosse, wrestling, water…

  15. Karl A. Gschneidner Jr (1930–2016)

    SciTech Connect

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    Presented here is the obituary for Karl Albert Gschneidner Jr. He died on 27 April 2016. Nicknamed Mr Rare Earth, he holds an unparalleled place as the renowned authority in just about every aspect related to the science, technology and history of a very special family of elements — the rare earths.

  16. Martin Luther King, Jr. Teacher's Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

    This Connecticut teachers' manual on Martin Luther King, Jr. includes: (1) teacher background information; (2) five excerpts from King's speeches; (3) four themes for lesson plans; and (4) sample lesson plans. The teacher's background information provides biographical sketches of King and his precursors. The five speeches reproduced here are…

  17. 77 FR 38795 - Gerry E. Greenfield Jr.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL12-78-000] Gerry E. Greenfield Jr. v. Benton County, WA; Notice of Petition To Enforce PURPA Take notice that on June 21, 2012, pursuant to section 210(h) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA),\\1\\ Gerry E...

  18. SCHIRRA, WALTER, JR., ASTRONAUT - TRAINING - CENTRIFUGE - PA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1960-11-22

    G60-02461 (1960) --- Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr. prepares to enter gondola of centrifuge which is used to test gravitational stress on astronauts training for spaceflight. Schirra became the pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 8 (MA-8) six-orbit space mission. Photo credit: NASA

  19. Karl A. Gschneidner Jr (1930–2016)

    DOE PAGES

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2016-09-23

    Presented here is the obituary for Karl Albert Gschneidner Jr. He died on 27 April 2016. Nicknamed Mr Rare Earth, he holds an unparalleled place as the renowned authority in just about every aspect related to the science, technology and history of a very special family of elements — the rare earths.

  20. SHEPARD, ALAN B., JR. ASTRONAUT - WASHINGTON, DC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-06

    S63-06268 (8 May 1963) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard, Jr., receives his NASA's Distinguished Service Medal from President John F. Kennedy, after his Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) flight, in a Rose Garden ceremony on May 8, 1961 at the White House.

  1. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elfman, Lois; Walker, Marlon A.

    2011-01-01

    "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" established the Sports Scholars Awards to honor undergraduate students of color who have made achieving both academically and athletically a winning combination. Inspired by tennis legend Arthur Ashe Jr.'s commitment to education as well as his love for the game of tennis, "Diverse" invites every college and…

  2. NASA Administrator Speaks at Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorati

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-16

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, right, joins in a group portrait with the niece of Martin Luther King, Jr., Alveda King, far left, Father Frank Pavone, wife of Martin Luther King, Jr's brother, Mrs. Naomi Barber King, Dr. Cameron Alexander, Dr. Frederick D. Haynes III, daughter of Martin Luther King, Jr., Dr. Bernice A. King, Kasim Reed, Mayor of Atlanta, Dr. Christine King Farris, Martin Luther King, Jr's sister, and Ms. Raj Razdan shortly after the 44th annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Service on Monday, Jan. 16, 2012 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George Jr., Photographer September, 1961 EAST ELEVATION. - Hill County Courthouse, Public Squre, Waco, Elm, Covington & Franklin Streets, Hillsboro, Hill County, TX

  4. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George Jr., Photographer September, 1961 NORTHEAST ELEVATION. - Hill County Courthouse, Public Squre, Waco, Elm, Covington & Franklin Streets, Hillsboro, Hill County, TX

  5. Tribute to A. W. Castleman, Jr.

    SciTech Connect

    Knappenberger, Jr., Kenneth L.; Johnson, Grant E.; El-Sayed, Mostafa A.

    It is with great pleasure that we join our many colleagues who contributed to this special issue of The Journal of Physical Chemistry A in dedicating it in honor of Professor A. W. “Will” Castleman, Jr. Will is a pioneer in the field of cluster science, and the far-reaching impact of his career is demonstrated by the broad range of topics covered in this issue. This diversity validates Will’s teaching that “fundamental research in cluster science allows you to explore any problem you want”. This ability to extend to other research areas comes because, as Will has shown both rigorouslymore » and elegantly, clusters are an intermediate state of matter that bridge the gap between molecular and bulk levels.« less

  6. Arthur L. Schmeltekopf Jr. (1932-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Carleton J.

    2009-05-01

    Arthur Louis Schmeltekopf Jr. died of mesothelioma, a lung cancer associated with exposure to asbestos, at his home in Marshall, N. C., on 20 August 2007. He was born on 24 February 1932, in Kyle, Tex., to Arthur L. and Meta (Engelbrecht) Schmeltekopf and grew up nearby on the family farm. Art had an early interest in science. A dispute over the reactivity of alkali metals toward water led to an experiment at Kyle High School involving a chunk of sodium metal and a toilet in the boys' room. The resulting explosion shattered the toilet, creating a flood, multiple geysers and panic in the nearby girls' room, a displaced lid on the school’s septic tank, and an enduring school legend.

  7. Herbert L. Pick Jr. (1930-2012).

    PubMed

    Rieser, John J; Lockman, Jeffrey J

    2013-01-01

    Presents an obituary for Herbert L. Pick Jr. For 49 years at the University of Minnesota's Institute of Child Development, new students were often greeted by an unassuming guy who rode to work on his bike, helped them carry boxes of books to their offices, and turned out to be a famous professor. Herbert L. Pick Jr. was a fabulous mentor, teacher, and developmental scientist. His work on perception and perceptual development spanned basic and applied science, laboratory and real-world settings. He was honored with the Division 7 (Developmental Psychology) Mentor Award from the American Psychological Association in 1998. He was honored again in 2002, jointly with his wife Anne D. Pick, with a volume of the Minnesota Symposium on Child Psychology based on a central theme of their work and titled "Action as an Organizer of Learning and Development." Two weeks before his death he was honored yet again with a Festschrift titled "Realism to Relevance: An Ecological Approach to Perception, Action and Cognition." Former students and academic admirers gave talks focused on the scientific themes Herb championed, namely, effects of experience on learning and development, organism-environment fit, environmental structure, and societal applications of research about basic psychological processes. He gave the final talk, and after thanking everyone in his typically humble way, he discussed his new research on visual-locomotor coordination. Herb died on June 18, 2012. He is greatly missed by Anne, his wife of 50 years; his sister Barbara; his daughters (and their husbands) Cindy (Jon), Karen (John), and Gretchen (Michael); and his grandchildren Alex, Ted, Katy, Joe, Eva, Sam, Rowan, and Culley. He is also missed by his many students, colleagues, friends, and admirers.

  8. The Newest Monument: The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Studies and the Young Learner, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article features the newest monument, the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial. The memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. will be an engaging landscape experience to convey four fundamental and recurring themes throughout Dr. King's life--democracy, justice, hope, and love. Natural…

  9. Dr. Johney Green Jr. - Associate Laboratory Director for Mechanical and

    Science.gov Websites

    Thermal Engineering Sciences | NREL Dr. Johney Green Jr. - Associate Laboratory Director for Mechanical and Thermal Engineering Sciences Dr. Johney Green Jr. - Associate Laboratory Director for Mechanical and Thermal Engineering Sciences A photo of Johney Green In his role, Johney Green oversees early

  10. 77 FR 61003 - Stephen C. Delaney, Jr.: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ...] Stephen C. Delaney, Jr.: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) debarring Stephen C. Delaney, Jr. for a period of 5 years from importing... INFORMATION: I. Background Section 306(b)(1)(C) of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C. 335a(b)(1)(C)) permits FDA to debar...

  11. Obituary: Leverett Davis, Jr., 1914-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokipii, Jack Randolph

    2004-12-01

    Professor Leverett Davis Jr., Professor of theoretical physics at the California Institute of Technology, died on June 15, 2003 after a long illness. He was 89 years old. He contributed many important ideas and concepts to theoretical astrophysics and was a pioneer in the in situ scientific exploration of space using observations from spacecraft. Davis was born in Elgin, Illinois on March 3, 1914, the eldest of four children of Louis Leverett Davis and Susan Gulick Davis. His parents moved several times as he grew up because his father, a mining engineer, became involved in different mining operations in the American West. Leverett married Victoria Stocker in June 1943. They had two children who died in childhood and subsequently adopted a son, Jeffrey. His wife and son survive him. Davis's early education was rather fractured and uneven because of the many family moves, with periods of home schooling alternating with regular school. His high school education was, on the other hand, reasonably normal. It was while in high school that he decided that he wanted to do physics or mathematics. He went on to earn his Bachelor of Science degree at Oregon State College in 1936, after which he started graduate studies at the California Institute of Technology, to pursue a graduate degree in physics. His advisor was William V. Houston and Davis received his PhD in 1941 for a thesis on electrical properties in nerves. He briefly entertained the idea of changing to work in biophysics. During World War II, Davis became an integral member of the Caltech project for rockets, which developed a number of different types of rockets used in the war. As a result of this war work, Davis wrote a book on Exterior Ballistics, published by Van Nostrand in 1958. He joined the faculty at the California Institute of Technology in 1946, after several years on campus as an instructor. In all, he taught there for nearly four decades before retiring as Professor of Theoretical Physics in 1981

  12. Fighting Fair. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for Kids. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Fran; Friedman, Alice

    This curriculum guide for grades 4 through 9 uses the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., to teach conflict resolution and to explore the philosophy of non-violence for daily life. To enable students to learn and apply non-violence, it must be modeled in a classroom environment that builds trust and a sense of community. Each of the…

  13. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George, Jr., Photographer July, 1961 CHIMNEY DETAIL (SOUTH ELEVATION). - Eugenio Rodriguez House & Post Office, Farm Road 649, Cuevitas, Jim Hogg County, TX

  14. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George, Jr., Photographer July, 1961 NORTH DOOR DETAIL (AUXILIARY BUILDING). - Eugenio Rodriguez House & Post Office, Farm Road 649, Cuevitas, Jim Hogg County, TX

  15. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer August 1931, EXTERIOR VIEW OF KILN, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker Church Family Apple Drying Kiln, Shaker Road, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  16. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George Jr., Photographer September, 1961 WEST WINDOW DETAIL. - Hill County Courthouse, Public Squre, Waco, Elm, Covington & Franklin Streets, Hillsboro, Hill County, TX

  17. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George Jr., Photographer September, 1961 DETAILS OF EAST ENTABLATURE. - Hill County Courthouse, Public Squre, Waco, Elm, Covington & Franklin Streets, Hillsboro, Hill County, TX

  18. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George Jr., Photographer September, 1961 WEST DOOR DETAIL. - Hill County Courthouse, Public Squre, Waco, Elm, Covington & Franklin Streets, Hillsboro, Hill County, TX

  19. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer Summer 1931, EAST SIDE, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker North Family Barn, State Route 22 & U.S. Route 20, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  20. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer August 1931, SOUTH SIDES, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker North Family Barn, State Route 22 & U.S. Route 20, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  1. 22. Historic American Buildings Survey William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Historic American Buildings Survey William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer 1931 LATHE, THIRD FLOOR, NORTHEAST CORNER - Shaker Church Family Washhouse & Machine Shop, U.S. Route 20, Hancock, Berkshire County, MA

  2. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer Summer 1930, SOUTH WINGS, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker North Family Barn, State Route 22 & U.S. Route 20, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  3. NASA Administrator Speaks at Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorati

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-16

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks and delivers greetings from President Obama at the 44th annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Service on Monday, Jan. 16, 2012 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. 188. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer April 1998 VIEW OF SUSPENSION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    188. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer April 1998 VIEW OF SUSPENSION BRIDGE, SOUTH SIDE, WITH SAN FRANCISCO IN BACKGROUND, FACING WEST. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, September 1926, VIEW FROM NORTHWEST, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker Church Family, Herb House, Watervliet Shaker Road, Colonie Township, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  6. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, April 1926, VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker Church Family Brethren's Workshop, Watervliet Shaker Road, Colonie Township, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  7. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, April 1925, VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker Church Family Brethren's Workshop, Watervliet Shaker Road, Colonie Township, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  8. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer 1920's, EAST (FRONT) AND NORTH SIDES, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker North Family, Dwelling House, Shaker Road, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  9. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer Spring 1931, GENERAL VIEW - SHOPS, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker Upper Canaan Family, Shop Buildings, Shaker Road, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  10. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer Summer 1930, WEST (REAR) AND NORTH SIDES, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker North Family, Dwelling House, Shaker Road, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  11. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, 1920's, VIEW FROM NORTHWEST, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker Church Family Brethren's Workshop, Watervliet Shaker Road, Colonie Township, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  12. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer Summer 1931, EAST (FRONT) SIDE, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker North Family, Dwelling House, Shaker Road, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  13. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, April 1925, INTERIOR VIEW WITH HERB PRESS, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker Church Family, Herb House, Watervliet Shaker Road, Colonie Township, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  14. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, September 1926, VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker Church Family Seed House, Watervliet Shaker Road, Colonie Township, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  15. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer 1920's, VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker Church Family Seed House, Shaker Road, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  16. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey E. A. Shuster, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey E. A. Shuster, Jr., Photographer (U.S. Geological Survey) September 4, 1899 copy PIERCE MILL DAM - Pierce Mill, Tilden Street & Beach Drive Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. 262. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer June 1998 AERIAL VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    262. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer June 1998 AERIAL VIEW OF CANTILEVER TRUSS CANTILEVER ARM AND SUSPENDED SPAN, NORTH SIDE, FACING SOUTH. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  18. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis C. Page, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis C. Page, Jr., Photographer April 4, 1934 RECENT ADDITION FROM EAST. - French Legation to Republic of Texas, Seventh & San Marcos Streets, Austin, Travis County, TX

  19. 238. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer May 1998 AERIAL VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    238. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer May 1998 AERIAL VIEW OF DECK TRUSS AT YERBA BUENA ISLAND, SOUTH SIDE, WITH TREASURE ISLAND IN BACKGROUND, FACING NORTHWEST. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  20. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer 1920's, EXTRACTING ROOM, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker Centre Family Medicine Factory, Shaker Road, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  1. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer August 1931, BOTTLING AND PACKING ROOM, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker Centre Family Medicine Factory, Shaker Road, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  2. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer June 1931, NORTH AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker Centre Family Medicine Factory, Shaker Road, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  3. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Samuel Wilson, Jr., Photographer, November ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Samuel Wilson, Jr., Photographer, November 30, 1934 VIEW OF TOWER ACROSS BLIND BAY MARSH - Frank's Island Lighthouse, North East Pass, Mississippi River, Boothville, Plaquemines Parish, LA

  4. Draft genome sequence of Therminicola potens strain JR

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne-Bailey, K.G.; Wrighton, K.C.; Melnyk, R.A.

    'Thermincola potens' strain JR is one of the first Gram-positive dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) for which there is a complete genome sequence. Consistent with the physiology of this organism, preliminary annotation revealed an abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes that are putatively associated with the periplasm and cell surface in a Gram-positive bacterium. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain JR.

  5. Walter Rowe Courtenay, Jr. (1933–2014)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    WALTER R. COURTENAY, JR., ichthyologist and retired professor, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida, died in Gainesville, Florida, on 30 January 2014 at age 80. Walt was born in Neenah, Wisconsin, on 6 November 1933, son of Walter and Emily Courtenay. Walt's interest in fish began at a young age as evidenced by a childhood diary in which at 13 years of age he wrote about his first catch—a two-and-a-half pound “pike” from Lake Winnebago. When Walt turned ten, the family moved from Wisconsin to Nashville, Tennessee, the move precipitated by his father accepting a position as pastor of the First Presbyterian Church. During those early days in Nashville, Walt's father would take summers off and travel to Michigan to teach at Camp Miniwanca along the shore of Lake Michigan where father and son honed their angling skills. It was also at that time Walt's father had definite views on what his son should be doing in adult life—in Walt's case it was to become a medical doctor. However, his Woods Hole internship in marine biology and oceanography toward the end of his undergraduate years was a transformative experience for him so much so that he abandoned all ideas of becoming a medical doctor and instead specialized in ichthyology and oceanography. Apart from the inherent interest and opportunities Woods Hole opened to him, being back at the shore of a large body of water, in this case the Atlantic Ocean, was far more interesting than sitting in lectures on organic chemistry. With that, Walt completed his B.A. degree at Vanderbilt University in 1956. In 1960 while in graduate school in Miami, Walt met and married Francine Saporito, and over the next several years had two children, Walter III and Catherine. He went on to receive his M.S. in 1961 from The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami on the systematics of the genus Haemulon (grunts) and his Ph.D. degree in 1965 working under his advisor C. Richard

  6. Simulation Model Development for Icing Effects Flight Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, Billy P.; Dickes, Edward G.; Gingras, David R.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2003-01-01

    A high-fidelity simulation model for icing effects flight training was developed from wind tunnel data for the DeHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft. First, a flight model of the un-iced airplane was developed and then modifications were generated to model the icing conditions. The models were validated against data records from the NASA Twin Otter Icing Research flight test program with only minimal refinements being required. The goals of this program were to demonstrate the effectiveness of such a simulator for training pilots to recognize and recover from icing situations and to establish a process for modeling icing effects to be used for future training devices.

  7. Finding the Right Formula: Edwin H. Walker Jr

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keels, Crystal L.

    2005-01-01

    Edwin H. Walker Jr earned his doctorate in chemistry at age 27 and has barely looked back. With 13 publications under his belt before coming out of graduate school, he has also given more than 20 poster presentations in national venues, most recently at the American Chemical Society. He can also include securing a half-million-dollar National…

  8. Writing, Teaching, and Researching: An Interview with Rene Saldana, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saldana, Rene, Jr.; Moore, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Rene Saldana, Jr., an assistant professor at Texas Tech University, is a writer of short stories, poetry, and novels. In order to get his storytelling right, he has relied on his memory when writing memoirs and consulted popular culture and family when writing fiction. In order to get his university teaching right, he reads seminal texts on…

  9. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars 2009--Male Finalists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article features the male and female finalists of the Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars 2009. The male finalists are: (1) Sam Bradford (University of Oklahoma); (2) Jamaal Parker (University of Georgia); (3) Masumi Turnbull (University of Kentucky); and (4) Brian Robiskie (The Ohio State University). The female finalists are: (1) Shardea Croes…

  10. Astronaut John Glenn, Jr. - Insertion - Mercury Spacecraft - Cape

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-02-20

    S62-00371 (20 Feb. 1962) --- Mercury astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 6 (MA-6) spaceflight, enters the Mercury "Friendship 7" spacecraft during the MA-6 prelaunch preparations at Cape Canaveral, Florida. Glenn became the first American to orbit Earth. Photo credit: NASA

  11. ASTRONAUT JAMES A. LOVELL, JR. - MISC. - GT-7 RECOVERY

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-18

    S65-61828 (18 Dec. 1965) --- Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., pilot of the Gemini-7 spaceflight, is hoisted from the water by a recovery helicopter from the Aircraft Carrier USS Wasp. Astronaut Frank Borman, command pilot, waits in the raft to be hoisted aboard the helicopter. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Official portrait of Astronaut Charles F. Bolden, Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    New Official portrait of Astronaut Charles F. Bolden Jr. Bolden is in the blue shuttle flight suit with his helmet under his arm and an American flag behind him. Above and to the right of his head is a view of the shuttle flying.

  13. 300. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer June 1998 VIEW OF THROUGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    300. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer June 1998 VIEW OF THROUGH TRUSS AND DECK TRUSS SPANS AT PIERS E-8 THROUGH E-l 1, SOUTH SIDE, FACING NORTH-NORTHEAST. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  14. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer June 1931, SOUTH (LEFT) AND EAST SIDES, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker North Family Dwelling House (second), State Route 22 & U.S. Route 20, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  15. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer Summer 1931, ATTIC WITH JOINING CHIMNEYS, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker North Family Dwelling House (second), State Route 22 & U.S. Route 20, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  16. Robert Curl, Jr. and the Discovery of Fullerenes

    Science.gov Websites

    produced thousands of variations of the buckyball, including carbon sheets one atom thick and microscopic equilibrium in the carbon vapor that allowed the group to identify a unique, 60-atom configuration of carbon Interview with Robert F. Curl, Jr., nobelprize.org (video) Interview with Robert Curl (video) Buckyballs

  17. William Francis Rienhoff, Jr., MD - Halsted's Last Resident.

    PubMed

    Heitmiller, Richard F

    2017-12-01

    : William Francis Rienhoff Jr. was a skilled and innovative surgeon whose career spanned over 4 decades of patient care, clinical investigative research, and surgical education. He was an unforgettable character for those who knew him. Colleagues, coworkers, and friends developed strong and divergent opinions of him. His professional life coincided with the early development of general and thoracic surgery to which he contributed.

  18. 75 FR 3839 - Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... Part III The President Proclamation 8473--Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2010 Proclamation 8474--Religious Freedom Day, 2010 Notice of January 20, 2010--Continuation of the National... only by the power of his words, which still call on us to perfect those sacred ideals enshrined in our...

  19. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, 1920's. GENERAL VIEW OF INNER 'YARD' LOOKING NORTH - CLOSE-UP, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker Church Family (General Views), Watervliet Shaker Road, Colonie Township, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  20. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, William F. Winter, Jr., Photographer, 1920's or 1930's GENERAL VIEW OF WATERVLIET SHAKERS SOUTH FAMILY, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker South Family, General Views, Watervliet Shaker Road, Colonie Township, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  1. 76 FR 3819 - Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... changed the course of history. The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. devoted his life to the struggle for justice and equality, sowing seeds of hope for a day when all people might claim ``the riches of... celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. King. Dr. King guided us toward a mountaintop on which all Americans...

  2. DCEG Symposium to Honor Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr. | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer On May 6, the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) will sponsor a symposium to honor 50 years of leadership from its founding director, Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr., M.D., who stepped down from the position in July 2012. The conference, entitled “Cancer Epidemiology: From Pedigrees to Populations,” will highlight critical findings in

  3. 236. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer May 1998 AERIAL VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    236. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer May 1998 AERIAL VIEW OF DECK TRUSS AT YERBA BUENA ISLAND, SOUTH SIDE, WITH TREASURE ISLAND IN BACKGROUND, FACING NORTH NORTHWEST. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. 213. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer May 1998 DETAIL VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    213. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer May 1998 DETAIL VIEW OF ROCKER ARM IN YERBA BUENA ANCHORAGE, NORTHWEST CORNER (HUMAN SCALE: CHUCK HAZELWOOD, CALTRANS EMPLOYEE), FACING WEST. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. 156. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer December 1997 DETAIL VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    156. Frank Deras Jr., Photographer December 1997 DETAIL VIEW OF STRAND SHOE AND EYE BAR AT SAN FRANCISCO ANCHORAGE (HUMAN SCALE: TERRY COSTA, CALTRANS EMPLOYEE), FACING SOUTHEAST. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. Jules Verne Voyager, Jr: An Interactive Map Tool for Teaching Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, M. W.; Meertens, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present an interactive, web-based map utility that can make new geological and geophysical results accessible to a large number and variety of users. The tool provides a user-friendly interface that allows users to access a variety of maps, satellite images, and geophysical data at a range of spatial scales. The map tool, dubbed 'Jules Verne Voyager, Jr.', allows users to interactively create maps of a variety of study areas around the world. The utility was developed in collaboration with the UNAVCO Consortium for study of global-scale tectonic processes. Users can choose from a variety of base maps (including "Face of the Earth" and "Earth at Night" satellite imagery mosaics, global topography, geoid, sea-floor age, strain rate and seismic hazard maps, and others), add a number of geographic and geophysical overlays (coastlines, political boundaries, rivers and lakes, earthquake and volcano locations, stress axes, etc.), and then superimpose both observed and model velocity vectors representing a compilation of 2933 GPS geodetic measurements from around the world. A remarkable characteristic of the geodetic compilation is that users can select from some 21 plates' frames of reference, allowing a visual representation of both 'absolute' plate motion (in a no-net rotation reference frame) and relative motion along all of the world's plate boundaries. The tool allows users to zoom among at least three map scales. The map tool can be viewed at http://jules.unavco.org/VoyagerJr/Earth. A more detailed version of the map utility, developed in conjunction with the EarthScope initiative, focuses on North America geodynamics, and provides more detailed geophysical and geographic information for the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The ‘EarthScope Voyager’ can be accessed at http://jules.unavco.org/VoyagerJr/EarthScope. Because the system uses pre-constructed gif images and overlays, the system can rapidly create and display maps to a large number of users

  7. 1. John C. Garner, Jr., Photographer 1967 PRINCIPAL (NORTH) SIDE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. John C. Garner, Jr., Photographer 1967 PRINCIPAL (NORTH) SIDE, FROM NORTHWEST. THE RIGHT END OF THE BLOCK IS THE E.S. WOOD BUILDING; THE BUILDING WITH A FIRE ESCAPE IS THE ROSENFIELD BUILDING; THE T.W. HOUSE BUILDING IS TO THE LEFT OF THE PRECEDING BUILDING; JOHN BERLOCHER BUILDING IS AT THE LEFT END OF THE BLOCK. - Strand Historic District, Wood-Rosenfield-House-Berlocher Buildings, 2213-2223 Strand, Galveston, Galveston County, TX

  8. NASA honors Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise Jr.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Apollo 13 astronaut and Biloxi native Fred Haise Jr. was honored for a lifetime of achievement with NASA's Ambassador of Exploration Award during a Dec. 2 ceremony at Gorenflo Elementary School in Biloxi. Haise subsequently presented the moon rock award to Gorenflo for display at the school. Participating in the ceremony were (l to r): Gorenflo Principal Tina Thompson, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, Haise, Biloxi Public School District Superintendent Paul Tisdale and Stennis Director Gene Goldman.

  9. Hip-Hop to Health Jr. Randomized Effectiveness Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Angela; Buscemi, Joanna; Stolley, Melinda R.; Schiffer, Linda A.; Kim, Yoonsang; Braunschweig, Carol L.; Gomez-Perez, Sandra L.; Blumstein, Lara B.; Van Horn, Linda; Dyer, Alan R.; Fitzgibbon, Marian L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The preschool years provide a unique window of opportunity to intervene on obesity-related lifestyle risk factors during the formative years of a child’s life. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a preschool-based obesity prevention effectiveness trial at 1-year follow-up. Design RCT. Settings/participants Primarily African American children (aged 3–5 years, N=618) attending Head Start preschool programs administered by Chicago Public Schools. Methods Eighteen preschools were randomly assigned in 2007–2008 to receive either: (1) a 14-week teacher-delivered intervention focused on healthy lifestyle behaviors; or (2) a 14-week teacher-delivered general health curriculum (control group). Main outcome measures The primary outcome, BMI, was measured at baseline, post-intervention, and 1-year follow-up. Diet and screen time behaviors were also assessed at these time points. Multilevel mixed effects models were used to test for between-group differences. Data were analyzed in 2014. Results Significant between-group differences were observed in diet, but not in BMI z-score or screen time at 1-year follow-up. Diet differences favored the intervention arm over controls in overall diet quality (p=0.02) and in subcomponents of diet quality, as measured by the Healthy Eating Index-2005, and in fruit intake (servings/day, excludes juice) (p=0.02). Diet quality worsened more among controls than the intervention group at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions The adaptation of Hip-Hop to Health Jr. produced modest benefits in diet quality, but did not significantly impact weight gain trajectory. Not unlike other effectiveness trials, this real-world version delivered by Head Start teachers produced fewer benefits than the more rigorous efficacy trial. It is important to understand and build upon the lessons learned from these types of trials so that we can design, implement, and disseminate successful evidence-based programs more widely and effectively

  10. James E. Watson, Jr.: Named to the Health Physics Society

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.; Stansbury, Paul S.

    At its 2010 Annual Meeting, the Health Physics Society named James E. Watson, Jr. to its Honor Roll of distinguished members. This citation summarizes Professor Jim Watson's life and professional career at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he led the Radiological Hygiene program in the School of Public Health for nearly 3 decades. He was President of the Health Physics Society during the 1985-1986 term. He did pioneering work in radiation dose reconstruction for epidemiology as part of the U.S. Department of Energy Health and Mortality Studies.

  11. [Obituary] In memoriam: Mortimer Brooke Meanley, Jr., 1915-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Matthew C.

    2008-01-01

    Mortimer Brooke Meanley, Jr., was born at Riderwood, Baltimore County, Maryland, on 19 January 1915, and died at home in Maine on 19 August 2007. He was always called “Brooke” as an adult. Much of his youth was spent in birding and other natural-history activities, interest he credits to the Boy Scouts and his teachers. These activities directed him toward a professional career in wildlife biology. He was educated at McDonogh High School in Owings Mill, Maryland – at the time a private, semimilitary school for boys – and graduated in 1934.

  12. Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital and community involvement.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, M M

    1973-07-01

    Community involvement is not just one facet of the new Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital's existence. It is the mainstream from which all other activities flow. In addition to meeting the conventional needs of a conventional hospital staff with the core collection of texts and journals, this library goes one step further. It acts as a resource for its community health workers, dietitians, and nurses in their various outreach programs. It serves as a stimulus for the high school or community college student who may be curious about a health career. It also finds time to provide reading material for its patients.

  13. Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital and, Community Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, M. Moss

    1973-01-01

    Community involvement is not just one facet of the new Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital's existence. It is the mainstream from which all other activities flow. In addition to meeting the conventional needs of a conventional hospital staff with the core collection of texts and journals, this library goes one step further. It acts as a resource for its community health workers, dietitians, and nurses in their various outreach programs. It serves as a stimulus for the high school or community college student who may be curious about a health career. It also finds time to provide reading material for its patients. PMID:4725343

  14. Hip-Hop to Health Jr. for Latino preschool children.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Stolley, Melinda R; Schiffer, Linda; Van Horn, Linda; KauferChristoffel, Katherine; Dyer, Alan

    2006-09-01

    Hip-Hop to Health Jr. was a diet/physical activity intervention designed to reduce gains in BMI (kilograms per meter squared) in preschool minority children. Twelve predominantly Latino Head Start centers participated in a group-randomized trial conducted between Fall 2001 and Winter 2003. Six centers were randomized to a culturally proficient 14-week (three times weekly) diet/physical activity intervention. Parents participated by completing weekly homework assignments. The children in the other six centers received a general health intervention that did not address either diet or physical activity. The primary outcome was change in BMI, and secondary outcomes were changes in dietary intake and physical activity. Measures were collected at baseline, post-intervention, and at Years 1 and 2 follow-up. There were no significant differences between intervention and control schools in either primary or secondary outcomes at post-intervention, Year 1, or Year 2 follow-ups. When Hip-Hop to Health Jr. was conducted in predominantly black Head Start centers, it was effective in reducing subsequent increases in BMI in preschool children. In contrast, when the program was conducted in Latino centers, it was not effective. Although the intervention did not prevent excessive weight gain in Latino children, it was very well received. Future interventions with this population may require further cultural tailoring and a more robust parent intervention.

  15. Thomas Graham, Jr.: Preparing for the 1995 NPT Conference

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    With attention increasingly focused on the critical nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) extension and review conference beginning in April 1995, Thomas Graham, Jr. plays a key role in negotiations to gain indefinite treaty extension during voting at the conference. He has been Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) general counsel since 1983, served as acting director from January to November 1992 and since November 23, 1992, has been acting deputy director. Among other assignments, he served as legal advisor to the US SALT II delegation and senior ACDA representative to the US Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces delegation in 1981-82. He was interviewedmore » May 26 by Jack Mendelsohn and Jon B. Wolfsthal.« less

  16. NASA honors Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise Jr.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden (left) presents the Ambassador of Exploration Award (an encased moon rock) to Biloxi native and Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise Jr. (right) for his contributions to space exploration. During a Dec. 2 ceremony at Gorenflo elementary School in Biloxi, Miss., Bolden praised Haise for his overall space career and his performance on the Apollo 13 mission that was crippled two days after launch. Haise and fellow crewmembers nursed the spacecraft on a perilous trip back to Earth. 'The historic Apollo 13 mission was as dramatic as any Hollywood production,' Bolden said. 'When an explosion crippled his command module, Fred and his crewmates, Jim Lovell and Jack Swigert, guided their spacecraft around the moon and back to a successful splashdown in the Pacific Ocean - all while the world held its breath. While Fred didn't have the chance to walk on the moon, the cool courage and concentration in the face of crisis is among NASA's most enduring legacies.'

  17. NASA honors Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise Jr.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Apollo 13 astronaut and Biloxi native Fred Haise Jr. smiles during a Dec. 2 ceremony at Gorenflo Elementary School in Biloxi honoring his space career. During the ceremony, Haise was presented with NASA's Ambassador of Exploration Award (an encased moon rock). He subsequently presented the moon rock to Gorenflo officials for display at the school. Haise is best known as one of three astronauts who nursed a crippled Apollo 13 spacecraft back to Earth during a perilous 1970 mission. Although he was unable to walk on the moon as planned for that mission, Haise ended his astronaut career having logged 142 hours and 54 minutes in space. During the ceremony, he praised all those who contributed to the space program.

  18. NASA honors Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden (left) presents the Ambassador of Exploration Award (an encased moon rock) to Biloxi native and Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise Jr. (right) for his contributions to space exploration. During a Dec. 2 ceremony at Gorenflo elementary School in Biloxi, Miss., Bolden praised Haise for his overall space career and his performance on the Apollo 13 mission that was crippled two days after launch. Haise and fellow crewmembers nursed the spacecraft on a perilous trip back to Earth. 'The historic Apollo 13 mission was as dramatic as any Hollywood production,' Bolden said. 'When an explosion crippled his command module, Fred and his crewmates, Jim Lovell and Jack Swigert, guided their spacecraft around the moon and back to a successful splashdown in the Pacific Ocean - all while the world held its breath. While Fred didn't have the chance to walk on the moon, the cool courage and concentration in the face of crisis is among NASA's most enduring legacies.'

  19. Obituary: George Hamilton Bowen Jr. (1925-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, Lee Anne; Struck, Curtis

    2011-12-01

    Our colleague and collaborator George Hamilton Bowen, Jr., passed away November 1, 2009 in Ames, Iowa. George was born June 20, 1925 in Tulsa, Oklahoma to George and Dorothy (Huntington) Bowen. He married Marjorie Brown June 19, 1948 in Redondo Beach, California; they had five children, with eight grandchildren and five great-grandchildren at the time of his death. George H. Bowen's third or perhaps his fourth career was in astronomy. He was drafted into the navy in 1944, at the end of his first year as a student at Caltech, and ended his war-time service as an electronic technician on the aircraft carrier Shangri-La. He later said "In just nine months, starting from scratch (Ohm's law!), we learned an amazing amount - not by memorization, of course, but by study and real understanding of the basic function of the most advanced AC circuits then being used for instrumentation, measurements, communications, control systems, and much more." He gained a confidence that he could quickly and accurately diagnose and solve technical problems that stood him well in future work. One accomplishment he took particular pride in was figuring out how the radar control used cams and gears to solve the trigonometry for accurate pointing. He also described how the captain was alarmed when weather conditions changed so that refraction no longer showed them distant, small boats around the curvature of Earth. After the war, George Bowen returned to undergraduate and eventually graduate study at Caltech, where he was recruited to the biophysics research group headed by future Nobel Laureate Max Delbrück. George often described his joy in working with these first-rate scientists and finding himself accepted as a part of the effort. He finished his BS with honors in 1949 and his PhD in 1953 with a thesis on "Kinetic Studies on the Mechanism of Photoreactivation of Bacteriophase T2 Inactivated by Ultraviolet Light" involving work with E Coli. This work was supported by grants from the U

  20. ASTRONAUT JAMES A. LOVELL, JR. - RECOVERY - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-12 - ON BOARD CARRIER - ATLANTIC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-15

    S66-59997 (15 Nov. 1966) --- A happy Gemini-12 prime crew arrives aboard the aircraft carrier, USS Wasp. Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (left), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, had just been picked up from the splashdown area by helicopter. Photo credit: NASA

  1. 76 FR 71048 - Sixth Annual Philip S. Chen, Jr. Distinguished Lecture on Innovation and Technology Transfer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ..., Jr. Distinguished Lecture on Innovation and Technology Transfer AGENCY: National Institutes of Health... sixth annual Philip S. Chen, Jr., Ph.D. Distinguished Lecture on Innovation and Technology Transfer... present ``Treatment of Cancer with Recombinant Immunotoxins: From Technology Transfer to the Patient.'' Dr...

  2. Connect the Book. Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, this month's featured book is "Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." The book was written by Doreen Rappaport and illustrated by Bryan Collier (Jump at the Sun, 2001. 40p. ISBN 0786807148). This pictorial biography of the world-renowned civil rights leader has one of the most striking…

  3. Obituary: Benjamin Franklin Peery Jr. (1922-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Charles

    2011-12-01

    Professor Benjamin F. Peery, Jr. died at his home in Silver Spring, MD of natural causes on 30 November 2010. His full life began in St. Joseph, MO (home of the Pony Express) on 4 March 1922. His father was a railway mail clerk, so his family moved frequently. Most of his childhood was spent in southeastern Minnesota. He enlisted in the army in 1942, and served in campaigns in North Africa and Italy. After his discharge in 1945, he enrolled in the University of Minnesota, earning a BS in Physics in 1949. One of his early hobbies was to build and fly model airplanes. His intention to pursue aeronautical engineering changed to physics, but after receiving a MS in physics from Fisk University in 1955, he decided on a career in astronomy. He told the editors of the PBS series The Astronomers (1991, in which his career is highlighted) he thought it was shamefully absurd not to know what made the stars shine. So he began PhD studies in astronomy at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor). His dissertation was on the complex eclipsing binary VV Cephei, where a compact hot star passes behind a cool giant star, revealing the structure of that giant's atmosphere. This task was especially demanding because of the complexity of the system's spectrum and the formidable array of observations assembled by Ben's advisor, Dean McLaughlin. Fortunately, Ben's strong physics background enabled him to design and construct one of the first oscilloscope measuring engines, which his fellow students called the PeeryScope. The final (1961) dissertation is an impressive combination of observational and astrophysical analysis. His degree was obtained in 1962; he had already begun a career at the University of Indiana, where he taught and did research (1959--1976). The Indiana years were highly productive. In addition to his own research, he was advisor on six PhD dissertations, and a master's thesis. Several of his students have also had productive careers. An ADS search on his students' names

  4. Collected Papers in Structural Mechanics Honoring Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr. (Compiler); Nemeth, Michael P. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    2006-01-01

    This special publication contains a collection of structural mechanics papers honoring Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr. presented at the 46th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference held in Austin, Texas, April 18-21, 2005. Contributors to this publication represent a small number of those influenced by Dr. Starnes' technical leadership, his technical prowess and diversity, and his technical breath and depth in engineering mechanics. These papers cover some of the research areas Dr. Starnes investigated, which included buckling, postbuckling, and collapse of structures; composite structural mechanics, residual strength and damage tolerance of metallic and composite structures; and aircraft structural design, certification and verification. He actively pursued technical understanding and clarity, championed technical excellence, and modeled humility and perseverance.

  5. Obituary: Timothy P. McCullough, Jr., 1910-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Charles

    2007-12-01

    Timothy Pendleton McCullough Jr., 93, a retired research physicist who was a pioneer in the measurement of microwave radiation from planetary surfaces, died of cardiac arrest on 19 November 2004, at Inova Fairfax Hospital. He lived in Springfield, VA. McCullough, who was principally a radio astronomer, published 22 scientific research papers while working in the Atmosphere and Astrophysics Division of NRL, from 1946 until his retirement in 1975. He spent the early part of his career in planetary observation and was among the first in his field to use radio astronomy to measure the surface temperature of Venus. He also studied Mars and Jupiter. Later, his interest turned to supernovas, galaxies and solar flares. He was an emeritus member of the American Astronomical Society and a member of the Sigma Xi Scientific Research Society. McCullough was born on 9 December 1910 in Vardaman, Mississippi. His father, Timothy P. McCullough, was a farmer and bookkeeper. His mother, Annie W. McCullough, was a homemaker. Timothy McCullough, Jr.'s parents, as well as two sisters and a brother, are deceased. McCullough graduated from the University of Mississippi in Oxford in 1936 and received a master's degree in physics from North Carolina State University in Raleigh. He taught physics and aviation navigation before entering the Navy during World War II. He instructed Russian sailors on anti-submarine warfare. McCullough left the Navy at the end of the war, but continued to serve in the Naval Reserve. He was recalled to active duty during the Korean War and was stationed at Potomac River Naval Command, where he wrote technical documents on electronic warfare systems. McCullough retired from the Naval Reserve in 1969 with the rank of commander. He was a charter member of First Baptist Church in Springfield and a former deacon and Sunday school teacher at First Baptist Church in Alexandria. Survivors include his wife of 63 years, Virginia Ball McCullough of Springfield; three

  6. 2011 AMCA Memorial Lecture honoree: Dr. Harrison Gray Dyar Jr.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Terry L; Klein, Terry A

    2011-09-01

    Dr. Harrison Gray Dyar Jr. (1866-1929) was an early-20th-century expert in taxonomy and biology of culicid Diptera. At an early age, Dyar became interested in the biology, life history, and taxonomy of Lepidoptera, which he continued throughout his entire career. Dyar pursued his passion for entomology, and during his formative years, professionals sent Lepidoptera specimens to him for identification. As his prominence was well known to Leland Howard, then the honorary curator of the US National Museum of Natural History, he was asked and accepted the position as honorary custodian of Lepidoptera in 1897, which later included periods of service with the US Department of Agriculture Bureau of Entomology and the US Army Officers' Reserve Corps. This position went without stipend and it was Dyar's personal wealth that allowed him to continue his love of entomology. However, the museum did provide limited staff and funds for illustrators, supplies, and travel. In the early 1900s, his interests expanded to include mosquitoes where he concentrated on their life histories and taxonomy. Throughout his career, Dyar often criticized colleagues, both personally and in publications, often with interludes of peace to coauthor articles and books. His legacy of original scientific work is of lasting significance to public health and entomology communities, in recognition of which he was selected as the 2011 AMCA memorial lecture honoree.

  7. Interaction between xanthan gum and cationic cellulose JR400 in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiping; Hou, Wanguo; Li, Xiuzhi

    2012-06-05

    The electrostatic and hydrogen bonding interactions between xanthan gum (XG) and semisynthetic cationic cellulose (JR400) in aqueous solution are investigated via stability map, FT-IR spectra, thermogravimetric analysis, potentiometric measurement and rheological method. The stability map shows three regions, a stable region with XG as the major component, a flocculated region and another stable region with JR400 as the major component. The stability of mixing system depends on both the concentration fraction of JR400 (fJR) and the overlapping concentrations of these two polymers. In the region near the stoichiometric fJR, the mixture shows stoichiometric flocculation, which is independent of the total polymer concentration. However, in the regions away from the stoichiometric fJR, the mixtures are stable when the concentration of major polymer component is higher than its overlapping concentration. In stable regions, the electrostatic and hydrogen bonding interactions can enhance the viscosity of mixing system at appropriate fJR values. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. TDRS-L Tribute Decal to Arthur "Skip" Mackey, Jr.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-22

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – This memorial message was added to the Atlas V rocket for NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, or TDRS-L, spacecraft being prepared for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Launch Complex 41. Arthur J. "Skip" Mackey Jr. was the “Voice of NASA” during the 1960s, 1970s and early 1980s for flight commentary after liftoff for expendable vehicles launched from Cape Canaveral. Mackey served as branch chief for Telemetry and Communications at Hangar AE in the agency’s Expendable Launch Vehicle Program and then the Launch Services Program for 39 years. He died in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on Nov. 19, 2013. The TDRS-L spacecraft is the second of three new satellites designed to ensure vital operational continuity for NASA by expanding the lifespan of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System TDRSS fleet, which consists of eight satellites in geosynchronous orbit. The spacecraft provide tracking, telemetry, command and high bandwidth data return services for numerous science and human exploration missions orbiting Earth. These include NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the International Space Station. TDRS-L has a high-performance solar panel designed for more spacecraft power to meet the growing S-band communications requirements. TDRSS is one of NASA Space Communication and Navigation’s SCaN three networks providing space communications to NASA’s missions. For more information more about TDRS-L, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/tdrs To learn more about SCaN, visit: www.nasa.gov/scan For more on "Skip" Mackey go to: http://www.nasa.gov/content/skip-mackey-remembered-by-colleagues-as-voice-of-nasa/ Image credit: United Launch Alliance

  9. Lynn White Jr. and the greening-of-religion hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Bron; Van Wieren, Gretel; Zaleha, Bernard Daley

    2016-10-01

    Lynn White Jr.'s "The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis," which was published in Science in 1967, has played a critical role in precipitating interdisciplinary environmental studies. Although White advances a multifaceted argument, most respondents focus on his claim that the Judeo-Christian tradition, especially Christianity, has promoted anthropocentric attitudes and environmentally destructive behaviors. Decades later, some scholars argue contrarily that Christianity in particular and the world's predominant religions in general are becoming more environmentally friendly, known as the greening-of-religion hypothesis. To test these claims, we conducted a comprehensive review of over 700 articles-historical, qualitative, and quantitative-that are pertinent to them. Although definitive conclusions are difficult, we identified many themes and dynamics that hinder environmental understanding and mobilization, including conservative theological orientations and beliefs about the role of divine agency in preventing or promoting natural events, whether the religion is an Abrahamic tradition or originated in Asia. On balance, we found the thrust of White's thesis is supported, whereas the greening-of-religion hypothesis is not. We also found that indigenous traditions often foster proenvironmental perceptions. This finding suggests that indigenous traditions may be more likely to be proenvironmental than other religious systems and that some nature-based cosmologies and value systems function similarly. Although we conclude White's thesis and subsequent claims are largely born out, additional research is needed to better understand under what circumstances and communication strategies religious or other individuals and groups may be more effectively mobilized to respond to contemporary environmental challenges. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  10. Obituary: Edward W. Burke, Jr. (1924-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomer, Raymond, Jr.

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Edward W. Burke Jr. passed away on June 15, 2011, after suffering a heart attack. Dr. Burke devoted his professional life to the research and teaching of physics and astronomy at King College in Bristol, Tennessee. Edward W. Burke, Jr., was born in Macon, Georgia, on September 16, 1924. He was a Navy veteran, having been commissioned as an ensign in 1944. He served in the Pacific near the end of World War II. He proceeded to complete his undergraduate degree in mathematics from Presbyterian College in 1947 and pursued the M.S. and Ph.D. in physics (1949 and 1954, respectively) at the University of Wisconsin. Under the direction of Professor Julian Mack, his thesis was titled "Isotope Shift in the Spectra of Boron." Although he did research in atomic spectra in the early part of his career, his interest in astronomy and variable stars in particular were his primary interests during his long academic career. Dr. Burke began his illustrious career at King College in 1949. He initiated the astronomy program there in 1950, included constructing a 12.5 inch Newtonian telescope, homemade as was most everything in those days. Many of his students learned about photometry at the Burke Observatory on the college campus. Burke was known for his trips to the Kitt Peak and Lowell observatories accompanied by undergraduate students on his trips, all of which were made by automobile which he preferred over flying. His initial interest in Ap stars later broadened into variable and especially eclipsing binary stars. His motivation was maintained by his desire to have his students experience basic research and to spark their interest in advanced degrees. Numerous students achieved advanced science and medical degrees because of Burke's encouragement and mentoring. In 1959, Dr. Burke was awarded a Fulbright professorship and traveled to Chile where he taught physics for a year in the Engineering School at the University of Chile in Santiago. He worked to establish a physics

  11. Obituary: Raymond Edwin White Jr., 1933-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, James William

    2004-12-01

    Raymond E. White, Jr., died unexpectedly at his home, in the early morning hours of October 12, 2004. Death appears to have been caused by severe diabetic shock. He retired from the Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory in July 1999 with the title of University Distinguished Professor, after serving on the faculty of this institution for over 35 years. He was born in Freeport, Illinois, on 6 May 1933, to Beatrice and Raymond E, Sr. -the latter being a career soldier in the US Army. Ray's early schooling took place in Illinois, New Jersey, Germany and Switzerland, following his father's assignments. He obtained a bachelors degree from the University of Illinois in 1955. Next Ray enlisted in the US Army, but quickly was enrolled in Officer Candidate School. He then served as lst Lt. in the US Army Corps of Engineers. Although military affairs remained a lifelong interest, and he was a member of the Company of Military Historians, Ray decided after three years to return to academia. He entered the astronomy PhD program at the University of Illinois in 1958. His PhD dissertation was supervised by Ivan R. King. Ray accepted a faculty position at the University of Arizona in 1964. First and foremost, Ray White was known at Arizona as an excellent teacher, revered by a large number of former students. When the astronomy major program was begun in 1967, Ray was one of three, original, major advisors. Over the next three decades, he was a leader at the University level in reforming the undergraduate program and courses. He was selected Outstanding University Faculty Member in April 1989 and he served as one of a handful of professors who are Faculty Fellows. These Fellows devote untold hundreds of hours as part-time residents at student dormitories, to give students a friendly face to address their problems. In 1995, Ray was among the first group of faculty to be recognized as University Distinguished Professors. In the year of his retirement, 1999, University

  12. Critical Void Volume Fraction fc at Void Coalescence for S235JR Steel at Low Initial Stress Triaxiality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorz Kossakowski, Paweł; Wciślik, Wiktor

    2017-10-01

    The paper is concerned with the nucleation, growth and coalescence of microdefects in the form of voids in S235JR steel. The material is known to be one of the basic steel grades commonly used in the construction industry. The theory and methods of damage mechanics were applied to determine and describe the failure mechanisms that occur when the material undergoes deformation. Until now, engineers have generally employed the Gurson-Tvergaard- Needleman model. This material model based on damage mechanics is well suited to define and analyze failure processes taking place in the microstructure of S235JR steel. It is particularly important to determine the critical void volume fraction fc , which is one of the basic parameters of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman material model. As the critical void volume fraction fc refers to the failure stage, it is determined from the data collected for the void coalescence phase. A case of multi-axial stresses is considered taking into account the effects of spatial stress state. In this study, the parameter of stress triaxiality η was used to describe the failure phenomena. Cylindrical tensile specimens with a circumferential notch were analysed to obtain low values of initial stress triaxiality (η = 0.556 of the range) in order to determine the critical void volume fraction fc . It is essential to emphasize how unique the method applied is and how different it is from the other more common methods involving parameter calibration, i.e. curve-fitting methods. The critical void volume fraction fc at void coalescence was established through digital image analysis of surfaces of S235JR steel, which involved studying real, physical results obtained directly from the material tested.

  13. A Mutation in the Start Codon of γ-Crystallin D Leads to Nuclear Cataracts in the Dahl SS/Jr-Ctr Strain

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ashley C.; Lee, Jonathan W.; Harmon, Ashlyn C.; Morris, Zaliya; Wang, Xuexiang; Fratkin, Jonathan; Rapp, John P.; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise; Garrett, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Cataracts are a major cause of blindness. The most common forms of cataracts are age and UV related and develops mostly in the elderly, while congenital cataracts appear at birth or in early childhood. The Dahl salt-sensitive (SS/Jr) rat is an extensively used model of salt-sensitive hypertension that exhibits concomitant renal disease. In the mid 1980’s, cataracts appeared in a few animals in the Dahl S colony, presumably the result of a spontaneous mutation. The mutation was fixed and bred to establish the SS/Jr-Ctr substrain. The SS/Jr-Ctr substrain has been exclusively used by a single investigator to study the role of steroids and hypertension. Using a classical positional cloning approach, we localized the cataract gene with high-resolution to a less than 1 Mbp region on chromosome 9 using an F1 (SS/Jr-Ctr X SHR) X SHR backcross population. The 1 Mbp region contained only 13 genes, including 4 genes from the γ-crystallins (Cryg) gene family which are known to play a role in cataract formation. All of the γ-crystallins were sequenced and a novel point mutation in the start codon (ATG → GTG) of the Crygd gene was identified which led to the complete absence of CRYGD protein in the eyes of the SS/Jr-Ctr strain. In summary, the identification of the genetic cause in this novel cataract model may provide an opportunity to better understand the development of cataracts, particularly in the context of hypertension. PMID:23404175

  14. The Weather family's Hurricane Katrina saga: Leonard Weather Jr., MD of New Orleans. Interview by George Dawson.

    PubMed Central

    Weather, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    This interview of Leonard Weather Jr., MD was conducted so as to give our members and the medical community at large a version of what a New Orleans, LA physician of African-American descent experienced during Hurricane Katrina and its devastating aftermath. Emile Riley, MD, Meharry Medical School graduate, general surgeon, role model, and New Orleans Civic Leader who helped to blaze the trail for other local African-American physicians, died January 31, 2006 at the St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston, TX at the age of 71. He evacuated to Houston prior to Hurricane Katrina. PMID:16749655

  15. The Weather family's Hurricane Katrina saga: Leonard Weather Jr., MD of New Orleans. Interview by George Dawson.

    PubMed

    Weather, Leonard

    2006-05-01

    This interview of Leonard Weather Jr., MD was conducted so as to give our members and the medical community at large a version of what a New Orleans, LA physician of African-American descent experienced during Hurricane Katrina and its devastating aftermath. Emile Riley, MD, Meharry Medical School graduate, general surgeon, role model, and New Orleans Civic Leader who helped to blaze the trail for other local African-American physicians, died January 31, 2006 at the St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston, TX at the age of 71. He evacuated to Houston prior to Hurricane Katrina.

  16. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: J.R. SIMPLOT EX-SITU BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY: DINOSEB

    EPA Science Inventory

    The J.R. Simplot Ex-Situ Bioremediation Technology is designed to anaerobically degrade nitroaromatic and energetic compounds in soils and liquids without forming identifiable toxic intermediate compounds produced by other biotreatment methods. This technology was evaluated un...

  17. Studying - Astronaut John H. Glenn, Jr. - Mercury-Atlas (MA)-6 - Cape

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    S61-04546 (1961) --- Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 6 (MA-6) "Friendship 7" mission, takes part in spacecraft systems briefing during preflight activity at Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photo credit: NASA

  18. ASTRONAUT COOPER, L. GORDON, JR. - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-9 - PREFLIGHT TESTING - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-01

    S63-01922 (1963) --- Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., pilot for the Mercury-Atlas 9 (MA-9) mission, stands fully suited beside his spacecraft during preflight testing. Cooper named his spacecraft the Faith 7. Photo credit: NASA

  19. 3 CFR 8773 - Proclamation 8773 of January 13, 2012. Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., sharing his dream of an America that ensured the true equality of all our people. From the steps of the... remarkable dream is unending, with persistence, progress is within our reach. On the Martin Luther King, Jr...

  20. 3 CFR 8927 - Proclamation 8927 of January 18, 2013. Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech, challenging America to take up...'s dream, but our work is not yet done. Too many young people still grow up in forgotten...

  1. Great East Japan earthquake, JR East mitigation successes, and lessons for California high-speed rail.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-04-01

    California and Japan both experience frequent seismic activity, which is often damaging to infrastructure. Seismologists have : developed systems for detecting and analyzing earthquakes in real-time. JR East has developed systems to mitigate the : da...

  2. Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr. working with control panel in Skylab simulation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-02-01

    S73-16765 (1 Feb. 1973) --- Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr. is seen working with the control panels of the Skylab Orbital Workshop trainer during Skylab training at the Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  3. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey John N. DeHaas, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey John N. DeHaas, Jr., Photographer August 1963 COLUMN DETAILS AT APSE AND SIDE ALTAR - Sacred Heart Mission, Interstate 90 & Interchange 39, Cataldo, Shoshone County, ID

  4. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey John N. DeHaas, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey John N. DeHaas, Jr., Photographer August 1963 VIEW OF HAND CARVED CEILING PANEL - Sacred Heart Mission, Interstate 90 & Interchange 39, Cataldo, Shoshone County, ID

  5. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey John N. DeHaas, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey John N. DeHaas, Jr., Photographer August 1963 VIEW OF HAND CARVED CEILING PANEL - Sacred Heart Mission, Interstate 90 & Interchange 39, Cataldo, Shoshone County, ID

  6. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey John N. DeHaas, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey John N. DeHaas, Jr., Photographer August 1963 EAST ELEVATION (Looking Northward) - Sacred Heart Mission, Interstate 90 & Interchange 39, Cataldo, Shoshone County, ID

  7. ASTRONAUT JAMES A. LOVELL, JR. - PRELAUNCH - GT-12 - LEAVE TRAILER - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-11

    S66-59974 (11 Nov. 1966) --- Prime crew for the Gemini-12 spaceflight, astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., (leading), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, leave the suiting trailer at Launch Complex 16 during prelaunch countdown. Moments later they entered a transport van which carried them to Pad 19 and their waiting spacecraft. The liftoff was at 3:46 p.m. (EST), Nov. 11, 1966. Photo credit: NASA

  8. Case report: massive postpartum transfusion of Jr(a+) red cells in the presence of anti-Jra.

    PubMed

    Yuan, S; Armour, R; Reid, A; Abdel-Rahman, K F; Rumsey, D M; Phillips, M; Nester, T

    2005-01-01

    Jr(a) is a high-prevalence antigen. The rare Jr(a-) individuals can form anti-Jr(a) after exposure to the Jr(a) antigen through transfusion or pregnancy. The clinical significance of anti-Jr(a) is not well established. This study reports a case of a 31-year-old woman with a previously identified anti-Jr(a) who required massive transfusion of RBCs after developing life-threatening postpartum disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Despite the emergent transfusion of 15 units of Jr(a) untested RBCs, she did not develop laboratory or clinical evidence of acute hemolysis. The patient's anti-Jr(a) had a pretransfusion titer of 4 and a monocyte monolayer assay (MMA) reactivity of 68.5% (reactivity > 5% is considered capable of shortening the survival of incompatible RBCs). The titer increased fourfold to 64 and the MMA reactivity was 72.5% on Day 10 posttransfusion. Review of laboratory data showed evidence of a mild delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction by Day 10 posttransfusion. Despite rare reports of hemolytic transfusion reactions due to anti-Jr(a) in the literature, most cases, including this one, report that this antibody is clinically insignificant or causes only mild delayed hemolysis. Clinicians should be advised to balance the risks of withholding transfusion with the small chance of significant hemolysis after transfusion of Jr(a+) RBCs in the presence of anti-Jr(a).

  9. William D. Harper, Jr, MS, DC: Anything Can Cause Anything

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Trained as an engineer and a chiropractor, William D. Harper, Jr. made his career in the healing arts as instructor, writer and president of the Texas Chiropractic College (TCC). A native of Texas who grew up in various locales in the Lone Star State, in Mexico and in the Boston area, he took his bachelor’s and master’s degree in engineering in 1933 and 1934 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his chiropractic degree at TCC in 1942. Dissatisfied with the “foot-on-the-hose” concept of subluxation syndrome (D.D. Palmer’s second theory), Dr. Harper studied and wrote about aberrant neural irritation as an alternative explanation for disease and for the broad clinical value he perceived in the chiropractic art. In this he paralleled much of D.D. Palmer’s third theory of chiropractic. His often reprinted textbook, Anything Can Cause Anything, brought together much of what he had lectured and written about in numerous published articles. He was well prepared for the defense of chiropractic that he offered in 1965 in the trial of the England case in federal district court in Louisiana. The case was lost when the court ruled that the legislature rather than the judiciary should decide whether to permit chiropractors to practice, but Harper’s performance was considered excellent. He went on to guide the TCC as president from 1965 through 1976, its first 11 years after relocating from San Antonio to Pasadena, Texas. Harper built the school – its faculty, staff and facilities – from very meager beginnings to a small but financially viable institution when he departed. Along the way he found fault with both chiropractic political camps that vied for federal recognition as the accrediting agency for chiropractic colleges in the United States. Dr. Bill Harper was a maverick determined to do things his way, and in many respects he was successful. He left a mark on the profession that merits critical analysis. PMID:18327301

  10. Obituary: Ernest Hurst Cherrington, Jr., 1909-1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    2003-12-01

    Ernest H. Cherrington, Jr., a long-time member of the AAS, died in San Jose, California on 13 July 1996, following a long illness. He had a short but active career as a research astronomer at Perkins Observatory at Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware, Ohio before World War II, in which he served as an officer in the Army Air Force. After the war ended he turned to full-time teaching and administration at the University of Akron, and then at Hood College in Frederick, Maryland. Ernest was born on 10 September 1909 in Westerville, Ohio, where his father, Ernest H. Cherrington, Sr., was a leader in the temperance movement and publisher of "American Issue", a Prohibitionist magazine. Ernest Jr.'s mother, Betty Clifford (née Denny) Cherrington, was a homemaker. He was an outstanding student in high school and at Ohio Wesleyan University, which he entered in 1927. The little university's Perkins Observatory with its 69-inch reflector, briefly the second largest telescope in the United States, had just been built and gone into operation. After graduating with a BA magna cum laude in astronomy in 1931, Ernest stayed on one more year and earned his MS with a thesis on the motion of material in the tail of Comet Morehouse, supervised by Nicholas T. Bobrovnikoff. In 1932 Ernest entered the University of California at Berkeley as a graduate student, with a one-year teaching assistantship in the Astronomical Department. This was followed by a two-year Lick Observatory Fellowship. In June 1933 he married Ann McAfee Naylor, who had been a classmate at Delaware High School and Ohio Wesleyan. Ernest did his PhD thesis on spectrophotometry of the Mg I b lines in the solar spectrum, using a high-resolution grating spectrograph on the Berkeley campus, designed by C. Donald Shane, his adviser. In this thesis, Ernest tested and improved the then current theory of strong absorption lines in stellar atmospheres. He also spent several short periods at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton

  11. Obituary: Ralph Robert Robbins, Jr., 1938-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Jefferys, William H.; Lambert, David L.

    2007-12-01

    Ralph Robert Robbins, Jr., died on 2 December 2005, in Kyle, Texas. His wife, Maria Elena Robbins, his daughters Julia Robbins Kelso and Stephanie Juarez Balles, his son Matthew Juarez, and five grandchildren survive him. Bob was on the faculty at the University of Texas from 1968 until his retirement in 2003. Bob was born in Wichita, Kansas, on 2 September 1938, the only son of Mildred and Ralph Robert Robbins, Sr. Guided by his high school's policy to provide a practical education to children of working-class parents, Bob began high school with a heavy dose of vocational courses until the results of a test indicated his special talent in mathematics. He was awarded a full scholarship to Yale University, graduating magna cum laude in mathematics in 1960. He won the Warner Prize in Mathematics at Yale that year. He received his Ph.D. in 1966 with a dissertation entitled "The Triplet Spectrum of Neutral Helium in Expanding Nebulae" from the University of California at Berkeley. His interest in college teaching was ignited at this time through summer teaching positions at San Mateo California Junior College and the Ohio State University. Following a year at Texas as a McDonald Observatory Post-doctoral Fellow, Bob taught for a year in the physics department of the University of Houston before returning to the University of Texas at Austin as an Assistant Professor of Astronomy in 1968. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 1972. Bob's research in the early 1970s on theoretical studies of helium was of vital importance to astronomers for over three decades. These pioneering calculations became vital to observational astronomers in the mid-1990s as interest grew in the primordial helium produced by the Big Bang. Bob's interest and influence in education was international in scope. In the summers 1968-1970, he was a government consultant in Mathematics in East Pakistan (now Bangladesh). He consulted with the government that was preparing a master plan for technical

  12. Obituary: Richard L. (Dick) Walker, Jr., 1938-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Jeffrey R.; Mason, Brian

    2005-12-01

    Koch Center for Science, Math, and Technology at Deerfield Academy in Massachusetts. He also consulted with James Turrell, providing astronomical position information for the design of the Roden Crater Project outside of Flagstaff. While he will be remembered for his significant scientific contributions to the field of astronomy, those who knew Dick, both scientists and non-scientists alike, will probably remember him best for his humility, his humanity, and his loyal and abiding friendship. He was a man with a terrific sense of humor and an infectious laugh. It was always an honor and pleasure to be in his company. Richard L. Walker, Jr. is survived by his wife, Patricia, two daughters from his first marriage: Brenda Walker of Las Vegas, NV, and Pamela Hepburn of Holland, OH, as well as four children from Patricia's first marriage: Doug Browning of Lake Havasu City, AZ, Michael Browning of Kingman, AZ, Kim Bructo of Orient, OH, and Jennifer Brown of Lake Havasu City, AZ. He is also survived by ten grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his father Richard, mother Mary, and daughter, Paula Jean Elizabeth Stone.

  13. Mounting a Curricular Revolution: An Interview with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Zastrow, Claus

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Harvard professor and cultural critic who has captured 25 million viewers with his PBS documentary series, African American Lives (WNET). Using genealogical research and DNA science, Gates traces the family history of 19 famous African Americans. What results is a rich and moving…

  14. A Long View of the Literary Debate: E. D. Hirsch Jr. and His Forebears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Richard J.

    An immediate best seller when it was published in 1987, E. D. Hirsch, Jr.'s "Cultural Literacy: What Every American Needs To Know" galvanized legions on both sides of the sociopolitical aisle that divides education. The book has become a revered text regularly referenced by those scholars who take up a position that may be loosely…

  15. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: EX-SITU ANAEROBIC BIOREMEDIATION SYSTEM: DINOSEB - J.R. SIMPLOT COMPANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The J.R. Simplot Ex-situ Anaerobic Bioremediation System is a technology designed to destroy nitroaromatic compounds without forming any toxic intermediates. The nitroaromatic compound of interest during this demonstration was dinoseb (2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol) an agricul...

  16. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: J.R. SIMPLOT EX-SITU ANAEROBIC BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY: TNT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The J.R. Simplot Ex-Situ Bioremediation Technology is designed to degrade nitroaromatic compounds anaerobically, with total destruction of toxic intermediates at the completion of treatment. An evaluation of this technology was conducted under the SITE Program on TNT-contaminated...

  17. Engineer W.J. O'Sullivan, Jr. with 20 Inch Subsatellite

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1957-01-05

    L57-525 Engineer W.J. O Sullivan, Jr., looks at inflated 20 inch subsatellite while holding inflation bottle and folded duplicate copy, February 1957. Photograph published in A New Dimension Wallops Island Flight Test Range: The First Fifteen Years by Joseph Shortal. A NASA publication. Page 601.

  18. Astronauts Mario Runco, Jr. and Andrew S. W. Thomas, both mission specialists, pose for photo while

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 ESC VIEW --- Astronauts Mario Runco, Jr. and Andrew S. W. Thomas, both mission specialists, pose for photo while in the mid-deck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. The scene was recorded with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC).

  19. 12. Photographic copy of photograph, I.E. Houk, Jr., photographer, 26 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photographic copy of photograph, I.E. Houk, Jr., photographer, 26 September 1951 (original print located at U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Upper Columbia Area Office, Yakima, Washington). "Keechelus Dam spillway. Placing concrete with scoopmobile and 'buggies', Hall Atwater Co." - Keechelus Dam, Spillway, Yakim River, 10 miles northwest of Easton, Easton, Kittitas County, WA

  20. ASTRONAUT GLENN, JOHN H., JR. - INSERTION PRACTICE - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-6 - FRIENDSHIP "7" - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-02-05

    S62-00994 (1962) --- Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 6 mission, practices insertion into the Mercury "Friendship 7? spacecraft, with help of a McDonnell Aircraft Corporation technician, during MA-6 preflight training activity at Cape Canaveral, Florida. He is wearing the full pressure suit. Photo credit: NASA

  1. View of Crew Commander Henry Hartsfield Jr. loading film into IMAX camera

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1984-09-08

    41D-11-004 (8 September 1984 --- View of Crew Commander Henry Hartsfield Jr. loading film into the IMAX camera during the 41-D mission. The camera is floating in front of the middeck lockers. Above it is a sticker of the University of Kansas mascott, the Jayhawk.

  2. ASTRONAUT GLENN, JOHN H., JR. - INSERTION PRACTICE - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-6 - FRIENDSHIP "7" - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-02-05

    S62-00993 (1962) --- Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 6 (MA-6) mission, practices insertion into the Mercury "Friendship 7" spacecraft during MA-6 preflight training activity at Cape Canaveral, Florida. He is wearing the full pressure suit and helmet. Photo credit: NASA

  3. ASTRONAUT COOPER, GORDON L., JR. - LIFTOFF - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-9 -CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-15

    S63-06427 (15-16 May 1963) --- Burma's west coast, west of Rangoon and Irrawaddy River (right), are featured in this image photographed by astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., during his 22-orbit Mercury Atlas 9 (MA-9) spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA

  4. ASTRONAUT COOPER, GORDON L., JR. - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-9 PRELAUNCH -HANGAR "S" - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-01

    S63-06252 (May 1963) --- Mercury workers and news media are greeted by astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., prime pilot for the Mercury-Atlas 9 (MA-9) mission, as he leaves Hanger "S" for Pad 14 to start his 22-orbit MA-9 mission. Photo credit: NASA

  5. Sharing the Gift of Jazz: An Interview with Willie L. Hill Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Brad

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Willie L. Hill Jr., founder and director of the Society for Jazz Education. Currently a professor of music education at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and the director of the UMass Fine Arts Center, Hill has served as director of education for the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz. He is a past…

  6. Apollo 7 Mission,Apollo Commander Walter Schirra Jr. inside Co

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-10-20

    AS07-04-1596 (20 Oct. 1968) --- A heavy beard covers the face of astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr., Apollo 7 commander, as he looks out the rendezvous window in front of the commander's station on the ninth day of the Apollo 7 mission.

  7. Has the Dream Been Fulfilled? Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. & President Barack Hussein Obama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Nichelle Boyd; Moore, Virginia J.; Williams-Black, Thea H.

    2015-01-01

    Equality for all was the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and he knowingly laid the foundation for and inspired the first African-American President of the United States of America, Barack Hussein Obama, who also had the dream of "Change" for America. These men exhibited how working together can make dreams become reality. For the…

  8. ASTRONAUT JAMES A. LOVELL, JR. - TRAINING - WEIGHT AND BALANCE - PRIME CREW (GT-7)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-10-25

    S65-57481 (25 Oct. 1965) --- Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., pilot of the Gemini-7 spaceflight, undergoes weight and balance tests in the Pyrotechnic Installation Building, Merritt Island, Kennedy Space Center. Talking with Lovell are (left to right) Charlie Beaty, McDonnell Aircraft Corporation; Karl Stoien, MAC; NASA suit technician Al Rochferd; and Norm Batterson, Weber Aircraft Corporation. Photo credit: NASA

  9. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: EX-SITU ANAEROBIC BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY - TNT - J.R. SIMPLOT COMPANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The J. R. Simplot Ex-Situ Anaerobic Bioremediation System, also known as the J.R. Simplot Anaerobic Biological Remediaton Process (the SABRE™ Process), is a technology designed to destroy nitroaromatic and energetic compounds. The process does not evolve any known toxic intermedi...

  10. "Ebony Jr.!": The Rise and Demise of an African American Children's Magazine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Laretta

    2006-01-01

    "Ebony Jr.!" was a very popular periodical magazine that targeted an audience of African American children from five to eleven-years-old, as it combined all the elements of popular culture, African-American history and an elementary school curriculum for them. With the passage of time, it became a relatively irrelevant and bland magazine, leaving…

  11. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Power of Nonviolence. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    This lesson plan introduces students in grades 6-8 to Martin Luther King Jr.'s philosophy of nonviolence and the teachings of Mohandas K. Gandhi that influenced King's views. After considering the political impact of this philosophy, students explore its relevance to personal life. In these 6 lessons students will: (1) examine the philosophy of…

  12. William G. Demmert, Jr. and the Circumpolar North: A Personal Remembrance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This article traces the work of William Demmert, Jr. in the Arctic and Subarctic as a member of the Steering Committee on Cross-Cultural Education in the Circumpolar North. It seeks to fulfill in part Demmert's wish that the work of the steering committee, of which he was the last chairman, be chronicled. From the time of the first planning…

  13. Hoyt Sherman, Adelbert Aims, Jr. & Betty Edwards on Drawing and Seeing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Whinnie, Harold J.

    This paper discusses and review the ideas of Hoyt L. Sherman who taught art and visual perception at the Ohio State University. It explores some of the psychological sources for his work and ideas about the teaching of drawing by seeing which relates to the work and ideas of Adelbert Ames, Jr. The article traces the influences of both Ames and…

  14. School Renovation and the Importance of Maintenance. [Interview with Charles Boney, Jr.].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Eric

    Charles Boney, Jr., Director of Boney Architects, offers his views on school districts that build schools that have to be replaced too soon, general problems concerning renovation of older buildings, and keeping maintenance costs down. He discusses the types of flooring materials school districts should consider using to lower maintenance costs…

  15. 78 FR 41831 - Charles Barenfanger, Jr.-Acquisition of Control Exemption-Vandalia Railroad Company 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... control'' exemption, with Charles Barenfanger, Jr. and Agracel, Inc. (Agracel) as co-applicants. On June... Acquis. or Operation of Rail Lines by Class III Rail Carriers Under 49 U.S.C. 10902, EP 529, slip op. at 2 (STB served Nov. 29, 1996); Nev. 5, Inc.--Control Exemption--GTR Leasing LLC, FD 35635, slip op...

  16. 78 FR 57105 - Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company; Filing of Color Additive Petition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 73 [Docket No. FDA-2013-C-1008] Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company; Filing of Color Additive Petition AGENCY: Food and Drug... additive regulations be amended to expand the use of synthetic iron oxide to include soft and hard candy...

  17. Hermeneutic Haunting: E. D. Hirsch, Jr. and the Ghost of Interpretive Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This article applies criteria for validity in interpretation to Eric Donald Hirsch, Jr.'s interpretations of John Dewey. Specifically, three criteria that Hirsch, himself, established in his earlier work are used to evaluate Hirsch's interpretation of John Dewey as a member of a class (romantics) who embraced a naive naturalism (trait) more often…

  18. Thomas Midgley, Jr., and the Development of New Substances: A Case Study for Chemical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viana, Hélio Elael Bonini; Porto, Paulo Alves

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a history of chemistry case study focusing on selected aspects of the work of American engineer Thomas Midgley, Jr. (1889-1944): the development of tetraethyl lead as an antiknock gasoline additive and of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as fluids for refrigeration devices. One general aim of this case study is to display the complex…

  19. Constructing the ScratchJr Programming Language in the Early Childhood Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portelance, Dylan J.; Strawhacker, Amanda L.; Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2016-01-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to the growing literature on children and computer programming by focusing on a programming language for children in Kindergarten through second grade. Sixty-two students were exposed to a 6-week curriculum using ScartchJr. They learned foundational programming concepts and applied those concepts to create personally…

  20. Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Lesson with Interdisciplinary Connections for Middle-Level Music Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early, Mary Frances; Terry, Cynthia

    This lesson begins with a very brief biography of Martin Luther King, Jr. The lesson identifies its educational objectives; addresses National Standards for Music Education; lists materials needed; details six step-by-step classroom procedures for lesson implementation; and provides curriculum connections for language arts, visual art, physical…

  1. ASTRONAUT LOVELL, JAMES A., JR. - APOLLO VIII (GUIDANCE & NAVIGATION [G&N])

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-05-25

    S69-35099 (21-27 Dec. 1968) --- Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., Apollo 8 command module pilot, is seen at the Apollo 8 Spacecraft Command Module's Guidance and Navigation station during the Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission. This picture was taken from 16mm motion picture film.

  2. Addressing Curriculum Deficiencies on Martin Luther King, Jr. through Computer Assisted Instruction and Multimedia Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, James S.

    Students need to see past heroes as real people who struggled with ordinary problems in order to see the relevancy of studying history and to act practically upon the lessons that each leader teaches them. This study attempts to answer two questions relating to Martin Luther King, Jr.: (1) What do we teach our children about King? and (2) Can we…

  3. Astronaut Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, works with his life raft during emergency bailout training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 TRAINING VIEW --- Astronaut Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, works with his life raft during emergency bailout training for crew members in the Johnson Space Centers (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F). Brown will join five other astronauts for nine days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour next month.

  4. 78 FR 44524 - In the Matter of: Orville L. Parker, Jr., 2647 W. Walton Street, Chicago, IL 60622, Respondent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ...., 2647 W. Walton Street, Chicago, IL 60622, Respondent; Order Relating to Orville L. Parker, Jr. The... this Order, Orville L. Parker, Jr., with a last known address of 2647 W. Walton Street, Chicago, IL... 9, 2013. David W. Mills, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Export Enforcement. [FR Doc. 2013-17824...

  5. Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr. - Misc. - Gemini-Titan (GT)-5 - Suiting-Up - Prime Crew - Cape

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-08-19

    S65-46367 (19 Aug. 1965) --- Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr. (right) and L. Gordon Cooper Jr. are pictured during suiting up operations before Gemini-5 spaceflight. Editor's note: The scheduled Aug. 19 launch was postponed due to weather conditions and problems with loading cryogenic fuel for the fuel cell. The launch occurred on Aug. 21, 1965.

  6. J.R. SIMPLOT EX-SITU BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATMENT OF DINOSEB-CONTAMINATED SOILS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings of an evaluation of the J.R. Simplot Ex-Situ Bioremediation Technology on the degradation of dinoseb (2-set-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol) an agricultural herbicide. This technology was developed by the J.R. Simplot Company (Simplot) to biologically ...

  7. J.R. SIMPLOT EX-SITU BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATMENT OF TNT-CONTAMINATED SOILS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings of the second evaluation of the J.R. Simplot Ex-situ Bioremediation Technology also known as the Simplot Anaerobic Bioremediation (SABRE™) process. This technology was developed by the J.R. Simplot Company to biologically degrade nitroaromatic...

  8. Remembering Dr. George J. Apel, Jr: A Posthumous Tribute to an Innovative, Obscure Pioneer in Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumadue, Richard T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper is a belated tribute to George J. Apel, Jr., an innovative and obscure Christian higher educator. Peruse the name and subject indices of any and all books about Christian higher education, and nowhere will there appear even a reference to George J. Apel, Jr. Although Apel never finished high school or college, he was awarded an honorary…

  9. The Microcosm within: An interview with William B. Miller, Jr., on the Extended Hologenome theory of evolution.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Tam

    2015-01-01

    There is a singular unifying reality underlying every biologic interaction on our planet. In immunology, that which does not kill you makes you different. -William B. Miller, Jr. We are experiencing a revolution in our understanding of inner space on a par with our exponentially increasing understanding of outer space. In biology, we are learning that the genetic and epigenetic complexity within organisms is far deeper than suspected. This is a key theme in William B. Miller Jr.'s book, The Microcosm Within: Evolution and Extinction in the Hologenome. We are learning also that a focus on the human genome alone is misleading when it comes to who we really are as biological entities, and in terms of how we and other creatures have evolved. Rather than being defined by the human genome alone, we are instead defined by the "hologenome," the sum of the human genome and the far larger genetic endowment of the microbiome and symbiotic communities that reside within and around us. Miller is a medical doctor previously in private practice in Pennsylvania and Phoenix, Arizona. This book is his first foray into evolutionary theory. His book could have been titled "The Origin of Variation" because this is his primary focus. He accepts that natural selection plays a role in evolution, but he demotes this mechanism to a less important role than the Modern Synthesis suggests. His main gripe, however, concerns random variation. He argues that random variation is unable to explain the origin and evolution of biological forms that we see in the world around us and in the historical record. Miller suggests that, rather than random variation as the engine of novelty, there is a creative impulse at the heart of cellular life, and even at the level of the genetic aggregate, that generates novelty on a regular basis. I probe this assertion in the interview below. He also highlights the strong role of "exogenous genetic assault" in variation and in his immunological model of evolution.

  10. Obituary: Norman Hodgson Baker, Jr., 1931-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, David J.

    2005-12-01

    Norman H. Baker, a key contributor to the foundation of modern stellar pulsation theory and former editor of the "Astronomical Journal", died on 11 October 2005 in Watertown, New York near his beloved summer home in Natural Bridge. He succumbed to complications of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, a bone marrow lymphoma that he had successfully surmounted for twenty-two years. Norm, as he was known to all, was born 23 October 1931 in Fergus Falls, Minnesota to Norman Hodgson and Jeannette (née Lieber) Baker. He attended the University of Minnesota where he met the first of many lifelong astronomical friends, Bill Erickson. He received his BA in 1952. He went on to do his PhD, "Radiation from Particle Interactions which Create Current," at Cornell University under Phil Morrison. He then moved to a postdoctoral position at the Max Planck Institut für Physik und Astrophysik in München with the intent of pursuing his work in plasma physics with Ludwig Biermann and Arnulf Schlüter. However, Rudolf (Rudi) Kippenhan snatched him away to pursue what became his lifelong interest, stellar physics. This was the dawn of the era in which electronic computers were becoming practical for scientific calculations, and Norm immediately adopted this new tool. Indeed, he remained at the forefront of computing technology throughout his life: He was certainly the first member of the Astronomy Department at Columbia to buy a Mac, and was undoubtedly one of the few emeritus professors in the world known by all the administrative staff as the first person to turn to when stumped by a computer problem. Following his first paper with Kippenhan on stellar rotation, Norm turned his attention to stellar pulsations, a topic he would pursue throughout his career. His 1962 paper in "Zeitschrift für Astrophysik" on pulsational models of Cepheids (Baker and Kippenhan 1962, 54, 155) is a classic in the field. The first figure displays the three dimensional model of the atmospheric absorption

  11. Astronaut Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, gets helped with the final touches of suit donning during

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 TRAINING VIEW --- Astronaut Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, gets helped with the final touches of suit donning during emergency bailout training for crew members in the Johnson Space Centers (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F). Astronaut John H. Casper (in background), mission commander, awaits the actual training to begin. Brown and Casper will join four other astronauts for nine days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour next month.

  12. Neutron beam characterization measurements at the Manuel Lujan Jr. neutron scattering center

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal; Muhrer, Guenter; Daemen, Luke L

    We have measured the neutron beam characteristics of neutron moderators at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE. The absolute thermal neutron flux, energy spectra and time emission spectra were measured for the high resolution and high intensity decoupled water, partially coupled liquid hydrogen and partially coupled water moderators. The results of our experimental study will provide an insight into aging of different target-moderator-reflector-shield components as well as new experimental data for benchmarking of neutron transport codes.

  13. ASTRONAUT JAMES A. LOVELL, JR. - MEDICAL - PREFLIGHT (GEMINI-TITAN [GT]-7) - EYES EXAMINED - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-02

    S65-66703 (18 Dec. 1965) --- Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., pilot of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Gemini-7 spaceflight, undergoes an eye examination during a postflight medical checkup aboard the aircraft carrier USS Wasp. Gemini-7 splashed down in the western Atlantic recovery area at 9:05 a.m. (EST) Dec. 16, 1965, after a 14-day mission in space. Photo credit: NASA

  14. ASTRONAUT CONRAD, CHARLES (PETE), JR. - X-RAYS - MEDICAL TEAM MEMBERS - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-08-17

    S65-28699 (17 Aug. 1965) --- Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr. (dark shirt), pilot for the Gemini-5 spaceflight, discusses x-rays with members of the medical team at Cape Kennedy. Left to right are Dr. Eugene Tubbs; astronaut Conrad; Dr. Charles A. Berry, chief, Center Medical Programs, Manned Spacecraft Center; and Dr. Robert Moser (seated), Medical Monitor with the U.S. Army.

  15. Left to right, astronauts John H. Casper, mission commander, and Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, get

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 TRAINING VIEW --- Left to right, astronauts John H. Casper, mission commander, and Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, get help with the final touches of suit donning during emergency bailout training for STS-77 crew members in the Johnson Space Centers (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F). Casper and Brown will join four other astronauts for nine days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour next month.

  16. GT-6 PREFLIGHT ACTIVITY (LEAVE SUITING TRAILER) - ASTRONAUT WALTER M. SCHIRRA, JR. - SUIT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-15

    S65-59974 (15 Dec. 1965) --- Astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr. (leading), command pilot; and Thomas P. Stafford, pilot, leave the suiting trailer at Launch Complex 16 during the Gemini-6 prelaunch countdown at Cape Kennedy, Florida. They entered a special transport van which carried them to Pad 19 and their spacecraft. Gemini-6 lifted off at 8:37 a.m. (EST) on Dec. 15, 1965. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  17. Community control of health services. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center's community management system.

    PubMed

    Tichy, N M; Taylor, J I

    1976-01-01

    This article presents the case of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Health Center's unique community management system in which neighborhood workers have been developed to assume managerial responsibilities and are directing the Center. The Martin Luther King Center experience is instructive because the Center was able to achieve significant community control by focusing primarily on the internal dimension of control, namely, management, without experiencing destructive conflicts and the deterioration of health services.

  18. Hip-Hop to Health Jr. Randomized Effectiveness Trial: 1-Year Follow-up Results.

    PubMed

    Kong, Angela; Buscemi, Joanna; Stolley, Melinda R; Schiffer, Linda A; Kim, Yoonsang; Braunschweig, Carol L; Gomez-Perez, Sandra L; Blumstein, Lara B; Van Horn, Linda; Dyer, Alan R; Fitzgibbon, Marian L

    2016-02-01

    The preschool years provide a unique window of opportunity to intervene on obesity-related lifestyle risk factors during the formative years of a child's life. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a preschool-based obesity prevention effectiveness trial at 1-year follow-up. RCT. Primarily African American children (aged 3-5 years, N=618) attending Head Start preschool programs administered by Chicago Public Schools. Eighteen preschools were randomly assigned in 2007-2008 to receive either (1) a 14-week teacher-delivered intervention focused on healthy lifestyle behaviors or (2) a 14-week teacher-delivered general health curriculum (control group). The primary outcome, BMI, was measured at baseline, postintervention, and 1-year follow-up. Diet and screen time behaviors were also assessed at these time points. Multilevel mixed effects models were used to test for between-group differences. Data were analyzed in 2014. Significant between-group differences were observed in diet, but not in BMI z-score or screen time at 1-year follow-up. Diet differences favored the intervention arm over controls in overall diet quality (p=0.02) and in subcomponents of diet quality, as measured by the Healthy Eating Index-2005, and in fruit intake (servings/day, excludes juice) (p=0.02). Diet quality worsened more among controls than the intervention group at 1-year follow-up. The adaptation of Hip-Hop to Health Jr. produced modest benefits in diet quality but did not significantly impact weight gain trajectory. Not unlike other effectiveness trials, this real-world version delivered by Head Start teachers produced fewer benefits than the more rigorous efficacy trial. It is important to understand and build upon the lessons learned from these types of trials so that we can design, implement, and disseminate successful evidence-based programs more widely and effectively. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00241878. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of

  19. STS-116 crewmembers Oefelin and Curbeam, Jr., work with lithium hydroxide in the MDDK on Space Shuttle Discovery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-10

    S116-E-05293 (10 Dec. 2006) --- Astronauts William A. (Bill) Oefelein (bottom) and Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., STS-116 pilot and mission specialist, respectively, work with the lithium hydroxide (LiOH) canisters beneath Space Shuttle Discovery's middeck.

  20. Shearographic Inspection of a DeHavilland DHC-7

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1993-12-01

    Under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (VNTSC) and Henson Aviation, Inc., operator of US Air Express, a shearographic demonstration inspection of the fuselage of a DeHavill and ...

  1. Astronaut Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, is seen on the starboard side of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 ESC VIEW --- Astronaut Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, is seen on the starboard side of the Space Shuttle Endeavour's aft flight deck just prior to the deployment of the Satellite Test Unit (STU), part of the Passive Aerodynamically Stabilized Magnetically Damped Satellite (PAMS). Brown's image was captured with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC). Minutes later the camera was being used to document the deployment of PAMS-STU. The six-member crew will continue operations (tracking, rendezvousing and station-keeping) with PAMS-STU periodically throughout the remainder of the mission. GMT: 03:26:36.

  2. The leadership principles of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and their relevance to surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brunicardi, F. Charles; Cotton, Ronald T.; Cole, George W.; Martinez, George

    2007-01-01

    In order to face the challenges in healthcare this century, it is essential that surgeons understand modern leadership principles. One of the greatest leaders in history was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who provides a shining example of level-5 leadership for us to study. The study of leadership principles of great leaders can provide us with practical methods of conflict resolution as well as inspiration to keep us engaged and focused. As leaders of the medical community, we face numerous challenges, including discovering and implementing new treatments for disease, providing care for the indigent, overcoming educational challenges such as incorporating the ACGME Core Competencies into our surgical training and promoting diversity in education. Achieving these goals is often hindered by the environment in which we labor-nearly 50 million are uninsured, the rising cost of medical care is currently at 16% of the GNP, and reimbursement rates are falling-which makes the practice of surgery a significant challenge. Effective leadership will be paramount in achieving these goals. In this editorial, which summarizes a presentation given to the Surgical Section of the annual National Medical Association meeting, five important leadership principles that are important for surgeons have been selected and related to the outstanding leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:17304963

  3. JR Live: Lessons Learned from Ship-to-Shore Interactions with the JOIDES Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, S. K.

    2016-02-01

    Live ship-to-shore events have been conducted regularly from the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) research vessel JOIDES Resolution since 2009. These 45-minute events have reached thousands of students, educators and members of the general public with the JR's cutting edge science and technology and the excitement of discovery, science process and careers. Conducted by trained on-board Education/Outreach Officers on board the JR's two-month expeditions, the programs vary over time and have evolved with available technology. Each event incorporates collaboration between the Education Officer, scientists who are a part of the expedition science party, and requests from shore-side audiences. These collaborations have been successful in igniting interest among students and educators, providing scientists with outreach experiences and in meeting education standards and goals. Over the past six years, many lessons have been learned about procedures, technology, content, follow-up and impact. This session will share some of these lessons, identify opportunities for collaboration and engagement, and explore growth opportunities and directions.

  4. John H. Glenn Jr. poses with his family after arriving at KSC for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr. (second from right), senator from Ohio, poses (left to right) with his son, David, daughter, Lyn, and (far right) his wife, Annie, after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. Glenn and other crewmembers flew into KSC to make final preparations for launch. Targeted for liftoff at 2 p.m. on Oct. 29, the STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process. The mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC on Nov. 7. The other STS-95 crew members are Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA), and Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA).

  5. The leadership principles of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and their relevance to surgery.

    PubMed

    Brunicardi, F Charles; Cotton, Ronald T; Cole, George W; Martinez, George

    2007-01-01

    In order to face the challenges in healthcare this century, it is essential that surgeons understand modern leadership principles. One of the greatest leaders in history was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who provides a shining example of level-5 leadership for us to study. The study of leadership principles of great leaders can provide us with practical methods of conflict resolution as well as inspiration to keep us engaged and focused. As leaders of the medical community, we face numerous challenges, including discovering and implementing new treatments for disease, providing care for the indigent, overcoming educational challenges such as incorporating the ACGME Core Competencies into our surgical training and promoting diversity in education. Achieving these goals is often hindered by the environment in which we labor-nearly 50 million are uninsured, the rising cost of medical care is currently at 16% of the GNP, and reimbursement rates are falling-which makes the practice of surgery a significant challenge. Effective leadership will be paramount in achieving these goals. In this editorial, which summarizes a presentation given to the Surgical Section of the annual National Medical Association meeting, five important leadership principles that are important for surgeons have been selected and related to the outstanding leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

  6. John H. Glenn Jr. is greeted by his wife after arriving at KSC for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, reaches to embrace his wife, Annie, after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. Behind the couple is the mate/demate device used to raise and lower the orbiter from its shuttle carrier aircraft during ferry operations. Glenn and other crewmembers flew into KSC to make final preparations for launch. Targeted for liftoff at 2 p.m. on Oct. 29, the STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process. The mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC on Nov. 7. The other STS-95 crew members are Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA), and Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA).

  7. J-R fracture characteristics of ferritic steels for RPVs and RCS piping of nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Bong-Sang; Hong, Jun-Hwa

    2001-10-01

    J-R fracture resistance tests have been performed on 3 heats of SA508-Gr.3 nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel as well as 2 heats of SA516-Gr.70 and a heat of SA508-Gr.1a steels for nuclear reactor coolant system (RCS) piping. For the latter two steels, dynamic in addition to static J-R fracture resistances were investigated. From the test results of the SA508-Gr.3 steels, the J-R fracture resistance was superior in the following order: Si-killing steel, modified VCD steel and VCD steel. Microstructural analyses were carried out to correlate J-R fracture resistances with microstructural characteristics. According to the test results for SA508-Gr.1a and SA516-Gr.70 steels, all of the tested steels showed steep drops in fracture resistance at certain temperature and loading rate combinations. One heat of SA516-Gr.70 steel was very sensitive to dynamic strain aging and its fracture resistance was significantly low. It was concluded that microstructural and chemical factors affect the J-R fracture and DSA characteristics of SA516-Gr.70 steels.

  8. Linearized mathematical models for De Havilland Canada "Buffalo & Twin Otter" STOL transports.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1971-06-01

    Linearized six degree of freedom rigid body aircraft equations of motion are presented in a stability axes system. Values of stability derivatives are estimated for two representative STOL aircraft - the DeHavilland of Canada 'Buffalo' and 'Twin Otte...

  9. An initial survey of the cattle grub Dermatobia hominis (L. Jr.) in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Villarino, Mario A; Garcia, Omar; Fussell, Weyman; Preston, Kelly; Wagner, Gale G

    2003-12-12

    After the civil war and the Hurricane-Mitch disaster, cattlemen in Nicaragua were forced to transport their cattle from lowland areas to higher, dryer areas of the country. These areas are natural ecological niches for the cattle grub Dermatobia hominis (L. Jr.) (Diptera: Cuterebridae). To determine the importance of this infestation, the Agricultural and Livestock-Forestry Ministry selected a central area of Nicaragua to run a pioneer survey program to acquire information about hosts involved, number of cases, treatments applied and general knowledge of 42 farmers about the life cycle of the parasite. The subjects were either farm owners or farm managers. Ninety-five percentage of the farms indicated cases of D. hominis infestation in their animals, with cattle being the most affected host (100% of the affected farms). There was poor understanding of the D. hominis life cycle, vectors and control methods. A misuse of insecticides for the treatment of larval infestation by D. hominis was indicated.

  10. Astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., in shadow of Lunar Module behind ultraviolet camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., lunar module pilot, stands in the shadow of the Lunar Module (LM) behind the ultraviolet (UV) camera which is in operation. This photograph was taken by astronaut John W. Young, mission commander, during the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA-2). The UV camera's gold surface is designed to maintain the correct temperature. The astronauts set the prescribed angles of azimuth and elevation (here 14 degrees for photography of the large Magellanic Cloud) and pointed the camera. Over 180 photographs and spectra in far-ultraviolet light were obtained showing clouds of hydrogen and other gases and several thousand stars. The United States flag and Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) are in the left background. While astronauts Young and Duke descended in the Apollo 16 Lunar Module (lm) 'Orion' to explore the Descartes highlands landing site on the Moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (csm) 'Casper' in lunar orbit.

  11. MidAmerican's Walter Scott, Jr. Energy Center Unit 4 earns Power's highest honor

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, R.

    MidAmerican Energy Co. and its project partners are convinced that supercritical coal-firing technology's inherently higher efficiency and lower CO{sub 2} emissions no longer come with a price: reduced reliability. Unit 4 of the Walter Scott, Jr. Energy Center (WSEC) entered into service in June 2006 doubling the capacity of the PRB-coal fuelled plant to 1,600 MW. This is the first major new supercritical plant in the US in more than 15 years. The design of the boiler and the air pollution control systems downstream are described and illustrated. Unit 4 won the 2007 Plant of the Year awarded by Powermore » magazine. 11 figs.« less

  12. STS-55 MS3 Bernard A. Harris, Jr in EMU at JSC's WETF for EVA simulation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-11-08

    S91-51058 (Dec 1991) --- Partially attired in a special training version of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit, astronaut Bernard A. Harris Jr. is pictured before a training session at the Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F). Minutes later the STS-55 mission specialist was in a 25-feet deep pool simulating a contingency extravehicular activity (EVA). The platform on which he is standing was used to lower him into the water where, with the aid of weights on his environmentally-controlled pressurized suit, he was able to achieve neutral buoyancy. There is no scheduled EVA for the 1993 flight but each space flight crew includes astronauts trained for a variety of contingency tasks that could require exiting the shirt-sleeve environment of a Shuttle's cabin.

  13. Gunshot wounds to the hand. The Martin Luther King, Jr, General Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Phillips, P; Hansraj, K K; Cox, E E; Ashley, E M

    1995-01-01

    This article is a retrospective review of patients who presented to Martin Luther King, Jr./Drew Medical Center with gunshot wounds and had either isolated or associated injuries to the hand. The following is an account of those injuries noting the location, soft-tissue or bony involvement, and interventional methods that were implemented in the treatment of these patients who resided primarily in South Central Los Angeles. Prompt evaluation and initiation of treatment is essential in the management of both high- and low-velocity gunshot wounds so as to decrease the potential morbidity that often follows. Society must also look at the prevalence of these injuries and address the underlying issues that often are the root of the acts of violence.

  14. The Son's Fault: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Search for and Recovery of Sonship.

    PubMed

    Hinds, Jay-Paul

    2018-04-01

    This article examines the role of sonship in the psychological and spiritual development of men. In using the methodology of psychobiography, I explore the life history of Martin Luther King, Jr. to analyze his search for and recovery of sonship. I propose that sonship helps men rebel against and, in the end, overcome the feelings of inadequacy that are experienced in their struggles to achieve manhood, particularly within the father-son dyad. The scholarship of pastoral theologian Donald Capps is instructive in this regard, in that he suggests that sons should be allowed to search for a male figure, a father-substitute, who can affirm, not disdain or reject, this state of sonship. In the end, what is often viewed as a negative act of regression-i.e., the recovery of and return to sonship-is recognized instead as a positive one that assists a man in his journey toward wholeness.

  15. Current status of endovascular treatment for vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage: analysis of JR-NET2.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Hirao, Tomohito; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Nagata, Izumi

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular treatments are employed for cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is not responded to the medical treatments. However, the effect or complication of the treatments is not known well. Here, we analyzed the data of Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy 2 (JR-NET2) and revealed current status of the endovascular treatment for the cerebral vasospasm. JR-NET2 is conducted from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2009. Information on the clinical status, imaging studies, treatment methods, the results of treatment, and status 30 days later were recorded. Totally 645 treatments for 480 patients (mean age, 59.4 years; 72.7% woman) were included. Factors related to the neurological improvement and treatment related complications were statistically analyzed. Treatments for ruptured cerebral aneurysm were direct surgery for 366 cases and endovascular treatment for 253 cases. The timing of the endovascular treatment for the cerebral vasospasm was within 3 hours in 209 cases, 3-6 hours in 158 cases, and more than 6 hours in 158 cases. Intra-arterial vasodilator was employed for the 495 cases and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for 140 cases. Neurological improvement was observed in 372 cases and radiological improvement was seen in 623 cases. The treatment related complication occurred in 20 cases (3.1%), including 6 cases of intracranial hemorrhage, 5 cases of cerebral ischemia, a case of puncture site trouble, and 8 cases of others. Statistical analysis showed early treatment was related to the neurological improvement. Current status of endovascular treatment for cerebral vasospasm was revealed. Endovascular treatment was effective for vasospasm especially was performed early.

  16. Current Status of Endovascular Treatment for Vasospasm following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Analysis of JR-NET2.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Hirao, Tomohito; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Nagata, Izumi

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular treatments are employed for cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is not responded to the medical treatments. However, the effect or complication of the treatments is not known well. Here, we analyzed the data of Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy 2 (JR-NET2) and revealed current status of the endovascular treatment for the cerebral vasospasm. JR-NET2 is conducted from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2009. Information on the clinical status, imaging studies, treatment methods, the results of treatment, and status 30 days later were recorded. Totally 645 treatments for 480 patients (mean age, 59.4 years; 72.7% woman) were included. Factors related to the neurological improvement and treatment related complications were statistically analyzed. Treatments for ruptured cerebral aneurysm were direct surgery for 366 cases and endovascular treatment for 253 cases. The timing of the endovascular treatment for the cerebral vasospasm was within 3 hours in 209 cases, 3–6 hours in 158 cases, and more than 6 hours in 158 cases. Intra-arterial vasodilator was employed for the 495 cases and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for 140 cases. Neurological improvement was observed in 372 cases and radiological improvement was seen in 623 cases. The treatment related complication occurred in 20 cases (3.1%), including 6 cases of intracranial hemorrhage, 5 cases of cerebral ischemia, a case of puncture site trouble, and 8 cases of others. Statistical analysis showed early treatment was related to the neurological improvement. Current status of endovascular treatment for cerebral vasospasm was revealed. Endovascular treatment was effective for vasospasm especially was performed early.

  17. "God and Man at Yale" and beyond: The Thoughts of William F. Buckley, Jr. on Higher Education, 1949-1955

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, James

    2012-01-01

    The March 24, 2008, edition of "National Review" (NR) was dedicated to the memory of its founder: William F. Buckley, Jr., who had passed away on February 27, 2008. It included thirty two different memorials about him written by prominent authors, editors, social commentators, fellow journalists, politicians, and historians. Then NR…

  18. Warble? What’s a Warble? A recap of the human bot fly, Dermatobia hominis (L. Jr. 1781)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The human bot fly, Dermatobia hominis (Linnaeus Jr., 1781) is a major pest of livestock in Mexico, Central and South America. Myiasis caused by the larvae result in economic losses due to hide damage and reductions in weight gain and milk production. They have a broad host range which includes wildl...

  19. Study, Stance, and Stamina in the Research on Teachers' Lives: A Rejoinder to Robert V. Bullough, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelchtermans, Geert

    2008-01-01

    Robert V. Bullough, Jr.'s article demonstrated in an impressive way how autobiographical accounts, as well as single person narratives, are intertwined with much larger issues in society, international politics, and economical interests, as well as consequences for people in general and educators in particular. The way he proves capable of…

  20. Pretext, Context, Subtext: Textual Power in the Writing of Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogumil, Mary L.; Molino, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    Studies verbal pretexts, social subtexts, and interpretive contexts of works by Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Notes that cultural repression is propagated (and dispelled) in part through the power of language. Notes that these texts are relevant for teaching textual power in hopes of affecting social change. (RS)

  1. Health Care Fraud: Characteristics, Sanctions, and Prevention. Briefing Report to the Honorable William V. Roth, Jr., U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Accounting and Financial Management Div.

    At the request of Senator William Roth, Jr., the General Accounting Office (GAO) reviewed Medicare and Medicaid fraud investigations that agency inspectors general referred to the Department of Justice for prosecution to identify characteristics of alleged fraud against the government and to determine actions taken against those caught defrauding…

  2. "I Just Want to Do God's Will:" Teaching Martin Luther King, Jr. as a Religious Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, David

    2018-01-01

    Teachers often respond to the perils of teaching about religion by simply avoiding the subject. An investigation of secondary lesson plans on three prominent Martin Luther King, Jr. websites reveals little attention to the ideology of the civil rights movement, especially those touching on religious ideas. Ignoring King's religious views risks…

  3. The Limits of Master Narratives in History Textbooks: An Analysis of Representations of Martin Luther King, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alridge, Derrick P.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, I argue that American history textbooks present discrete, heroic, one-dimensional, and neatly packaged master narratives that deny students a complex, realistic, and rich understanding of people and events in American history. In making this argument, I examine the master narratives of Martin Luther King, Jr., in high school history…

  4. Pragmatic Analyses of Martin Luther King (Jr)'s Speech: "I Have a Dream"--An Introspective Prognosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josiah, Ubong E.; Oghenerho, Gift

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the speech of Martin Luther King (Jr.) titled: "I Have a Dream", presented in 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial. This speech is selected for use because it involves a speaker and an audience who belong to a particular speech community. The speech is about the failed promises by the Americans whose dream advocate…

  5. Missions and Medicine at Amherst: Family Ties to Edward Hitchcock Jr., the Missionary Movement, and the American University of Beirut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The Haystack Movement began at Williams College in 1805, occasioning the spread of American missions throughout the world. A half century later, two graduates of nearby Amherst College, Edward Hitchcock Jr. and Daniel Bliss, laid the foundations for college health services in this country and for mission work and education in the Middle East. The…

  6. 75 FR 51159 - B. Robert DeMento, Jr., and Baggio Herman DeMento-Continuance in Control Exemption-BDB Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Transfer, L.P.--Lease and Operation Exemption--BDB Company, in which SRT seeks Board approval to acquire..., Jr., and Baggio Herman DeMento--Continuance in Control Exemption--BDB Company and Swanson Rail Transfer, L.P. B. Robert DeMento, Jr., and Baggio Herman DeMento (DeMento Brothers), noncarrier partners...

  7. Bacillus sp. JR3 esterase LipJ: A new mesophilic enzyme showing traces of a thermophilic past.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Judit; Estupiñán, Mónica; Fuentes, Alba; Fillat, Amanda; Martínez, Josefina; Diaz, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    A search for extremophile enzymes from ancient volcanic soils in El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain) allowed isolation of a microbial sporulated strain collection from which several enzymatic activities were tested. Isolates were obtained after sample cultivation under several conditions of nutrient contents and temperature. Among the bacterial isolates, supernatants from the strain designated JR3 displayed high esterase activity at temperatures ranging from 30 to 100°C, suggesting the presence of at least a hyper-thermophilic extracellular lipase. Sequence alignment of known thermophilic lipases allowed design of degenerated consensus primers for amplification and cloning of the corresponding lipase, named LipJ. However, the cloned enzyme displayed maximum activity at 30°C and pH 7, showing a different profile from that observed in supernatants of the parental strain. Sequence analysis of the cloned protein showed a pentapeptide motif -GHSMG- distinct from that of thermophilic lipases, and much closer to that of esterases. Nevertheless, the 3D structural model of LipJ displayed the same folding as that of thermophilic lipases, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. A phylogenetic study confirmed this possibility, positioning LipJ as a new member of the thermophilic family of bacterial lipases I.5. However, LipJ clusters in a clade close but separated from that of Geobacillus sp. thermophilic lipases. Comprehensive analysis of the cloned enzyme suggests a common origin of LipJ and other bacterial thermophilic lipases, and highlights the most probable divergent evolutionary pathway followed by LipJ, which during the harsh past times would have probably been a thermophilic enzyme, having lost these properties when the environment changed to more benign conditions.

  8. Bacillus sp. JR3 esterase LipJ: A new mesophilic enzyme showing traces of a thermophilic past

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, Judit; Estupiñán, Mónica; Fuentes, Alba; Fillat, Amanda; Martínez, Josefina

    2017-01-01

    A search for extremophile enzymes from ancient volcanic soils in El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain) allowed isolation of a microbial sporulated strain collection from which several enzymatic activities were tested. Isolates were obtained after sample cultivation under several conditions of nutrient contents and temperature. Among the bacterial isolates, supernatants from the strain designated JR3 displayed high esterase activity at temperatures ranging from 30 to 100°C, suggesting the presence of at least a hyper-thermophilic extracellular lipase. Sequence alignment of known thermophilic lipases allowed design of degenerated consensus primers for amplification and cloning of the corresponding lipase, named LipJ. However, the cloned enzyme displayed maximum activity at 30°C and pH 7, showing a different profile from that observed in supernatants of the parental strain. Sequence analysis of the cloned protein showed a pentapeptide motif -GHSMG- distinct from that of thermophilic lipases, and much closer to that of esterases. Nevertheless, the 3D structural model of LipJ displayed the same folding as that of thermophilic lipases, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. A phylogenetic study confirmed this possibility, positioning LipJ as a new member of the thermophilic family of bacterial lipases I.5. However, LipJ clusters in a clade close but separated from that of Geobacillus sp. thermophilic lipases. Comprehensive analysis of the cloned enzyme suggests a common origin of LipJ and other bacterial thermophilic lipases, and highlights the most probable divergent evolutionary pathway followed by LipJ, which during the harsh past times would have probably been a thermophilic enzyme, having lost these properties when the environment changed to more benign conditions. PMID:28742841

  9. Model Career Exploratory Program. Junction City Jr. High School. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Anthony

    The report describes a career education demonstration project conducted in Junction City, Oregon, a city of 2,535 people with a high concentration of low-income families. Major limitations encountered were resistance to change and lack of funds. Procedures included four inservice sessions for instructional and guidance staff and four visitations…

  10. Alberto Urrets-Zavalía Jr (1920-2010): An Argentinian contributor to ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Urrets-Zavalía, Julio A; Ascaso, Francisco J

    2016-05-01

    Alberto Urrets-Zavalía Jr was born in Córdoba (Argentina) in 1920. Chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology of the National University of Córdoba and founder of the Cornea and Glaucoma Surgical Center in the same city, in 1956 he created the first residency programme in Ophthalmology in his country. He founded the first Eye Bank and introduced one of the first argon laser photocoagulators in South America. He authored around 200 scientific presentations and publications, describing new findings and clinical entities. Thus, his individualisation of the cyclovertical component in strabismus contributed to important evolution of ideas concerning pathogenesis and therapy in oculomotor disorders of infancy. He was the first to propose the dehydration of the vitreous body in glaucoma patients before ocular surgery and developed a fixation pick and scleral depressor for retinal detachment surgery. He also described a new technique, the V-Z procedures for the correction of senile ectropion. In 1968, he published his Décollement de la rétine, considered a masterpiece in retinal detachment literature for many years. Urrets-Zavalía died in his native city at the age of 89. His prolific scientific and educational contributions make him one of the most brilliant and influential ophthalmologists of the 20th-century. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Effects of hydrogen-charging on the properties of S235JR steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietkun-Greber, Izabela

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the test results of the S235JR steel susceptibility to damage under the influence of hydrogen. The test of mechanical properties was performed on the basis of a static stretch test of non-hydrogenated samples and after cathodic polarization. Electrochemical measurements for the assessment of corrosion resistance of non-hydrogenated and hydrogenated steels were carried out using open circuit potential measurement and registering of potentiodynamic polarization curves in a three-electrode measuring system. Hydrogenation was carried out for between 3 and 24 hours in a solution of 0.1 N sulfuric acid (VI) with the addition of 2 mg/dm 3 of arsenic oxide (III) at an electric current density of 10 mA/cm2. The hydrogen content in the steel before and after saturation with hydrogen was determined using the analyzer. Fracture samples after tensile test were observed using scanning electron microscope. The results of the research showed that as the hydrogen concentration in the examined steel increased (the lengthening of the saturation time), the deterioration of its mechanical and electrochemical properties occurred.

  12. Dr Albert L. Rhoton Jr's Time at the Mayo Clinic: The Beginnings of a Remarkable Career.

    PubMed

    Rayan, Tarek; Carlson, Matthew L; Piepgras, David G; Link, Michael J; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2017-08-09

    Dr Albert L. Rhoton Jr became the focal point of neurosurgery's evolution in understanding the intricate and complex microanatomy of the human brain over the last 4 decades. His pioneering work on cadaveric specimens proved to be a pivotal endeavor in the pursuit to better understand the complex microsurgical anatomy of cranial surgery. This paper details his early career at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. A comprehensive review and synthesis of data acquired from the institutional historical archives including the Annual Reports to the Executive Committee, the Reports to the Board of Directors, the MAYOVOX Newsletter, the illustration archives of the Mayo Clinic Division of Creative Media, staff biographies, curriculum vitae, personal interviews, as well as full-text journal articles, and book publications was performed. Dr Rhoton was engaged in a busy clinical practice as a young staff at the Mayo Clinic. Records show he focused on tackling complex intracranial pathologies along with numerous basic research and neuroanatomy projects that became a major part of his life's work and passion. He was a great teacher and friend to countless individuals and his work will continue to impact and improve the care provided to neurosurgery patients for generations to come. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  13. Hip-Hop to Health Jr. Obesity Prevention Effectiveness Trial: postintervention results.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Stolley, Melinda R; Schiffer, Linda A; Braunschweig, Carol L; Gomez, Sandra L; Van Horn, Linda; Dyer, Alan R

    2011-05-01

    The preschool years offer an opportunity to interrupt the trajectory toward obesity in black children. The Hip-Hop to Health Jr. Obesity Prevention Effectiveness Trial was a group-randomized controlled trial assessing the feasibility and effectiveness of a teacher-delivered weight control intervention for black preschool children. The 618 participating children were enrolled in 18 schools administered by the Chicago Public Schools. Children enrolled in the nine schools randomized to the intervention group received a 14-week weight control intervention delivered by their classroom teachers. Children in the nine control schools received a general health intervention. Height and weight, physical activity, screen time, and diet data were collected at baseline and postintervention. At postintervention, children in the intervention schools engaged in more moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) than children in the control schools (difference between adjusted group means = 7.46 min/day, P = 0.02). Also, children in the intervention group had less total screen time (-27.8 min/day, P = 0.05). There were no significant differences in BMI, BMI Z score, or dietary intake. It is feasible to adapt an obesity prevention program to be taught by classroom teachers. The intervention showed positive influences on physical activity and screen time, but not on diet. Measuring diet and physical activity in preschool children remains a challenge, and interventions delivered by classroom teachers require both intensive initial training and ongoing individualized supervision.

  14. Hip-Hop to Health Jr. Obesity Prevention Effectiveness Trial: Post-Intervention Results

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgibbon, M. L.; Stolley, M. R.; Schiffer, L.; Braunschweig, C. L.; Gomez, S. L.; Van Horn, L.; Dyer, A.

    2013-01-01

    The preschool years offer an opportunity to interrupt the trajectory toward obesity in black children. The Hip-Hop to Health Jr. Obesity Prevention Effectiveness Trial was a group-randomized controlled trial assessing the feasibility and effectiveness of a teacher-delivered weight control intervention for black preschool children. The 618 participating children were enrolled in 18 schools administered by the Chicago Public Schools. Children enrolled in the 9 schools randomized to the intervention group received a 14-week weight control intervention delivered by their classroom teachers. Children in the 9 control schools received a general health intervention. Height and weight, physical activity, screen time, and diet data were collected at baseline and post-intervention. At post-intervention, children in the intervention schools engaged in more moderate-to vigorous physical activity than children in the control schools (difference between adjusted group means=7.46 min/day, p=.02). Also, children in the intervention group had less total screen time (−27.8 min/day, p=.05). There were no significant differences in BMI, BMI Z score, or dietary intake. It is feasible to adapt an obesity prevention program to be taught by classroom teachers. The intervention showed positive influences on physical activity and screen time, but not diet. Measuring diet and physical activity in preschool children remains a challenge, and interventions delivered by classroom teachers require both intensive initial training and ongoing individualized supervision. PMID:21193852

  15. 2006 Henry f. Smyth jr. Award lecture historical review--employer responsibility for workplace health and safety.

    PubMed

    Henshaw, John L

    2007-02-01

    The Academy of Industrial Hygiene established the Henry F. Smyth Jr. Award in 1981. The Award is presented to that individual who has recognized the needs of the industrial hygiene profession and has made major contributions to fulfill those needs, thereby contributing to the improvement of the public welfare. This year's Award was presented to John L. Henshaw, CIH, at the 2006 Professional Conference on Industrial Hygiene (PCIH) in San Jose, California.

  16. ASTRONAUT JAMES A. LOVELL, JR. - MEDICAL - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-7 PRELAUNCH CHECKUP - TEMPERATURE CHECK - PILOT - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-04

    S65-59934 (4 Dec. 1965) --- Gemini-7 pilot James A. Lovell Jr. has a temperature check with an oral temperature probe attached to his spacesuit during a final preflight preparations for the Gemini-7 space mission. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has planned a 14-day mission for the Gemini-7. The temperature probe allows doctors to monitor astronauts' body temperature at any time during the mission. Photo credit: NASA

  17. Current Status of Endovascular Treatment for Vasospasm following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Analysis of JR-NET2

    PubMed Central

    HAYASHI, Kentaro; HIRAO, Tomohito; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; NAGATA, Izumi

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular treatments are employed for cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is not responded to the medical treatments. However, the effect or complication of the treatments is not known well. Here, we analyzed the data of Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy 2 (JRNET2) and revealed current status of the endovascular treatment for the cerebral vasospasm. JR-NET2 is conducted from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2009. Information on the clinical status, imaging studies, treatment methods, the results of treatment, and status 30 days later were recorded. Totally 645 treatments for 480 patients (mean age, 59.4 years; 72.7% woman) were included. Factors related to the neurological improvement and treatment related complications were statistically analyzed. Treatments for ruptured cerebral aneurysm were direct surgery for 366 cases and endovascular treatment for 253 cases. The timing of the endovascular treatment for the cerebral vasospasm was within 3 hours in 209 cases, 3–6 hours in 158 cases, and more than 6 hours in 158 cases. Intra-arterial vasodilator was employed for the 495 cases and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for 140 cases. Neurological improvement was observed in 372 cases and radiological improvement was seen in 623 cases. The treatment related complication occurred in 20 cases (3.1%), including 6 cases of intracranial hemorrhage, 5 cases of cerebral ischemia, a case of puncture site trouble, and 8 cases of others. Statistical analysis showed early treatment was related to the neurological improvement. Current status of endovascular treatment for cerebral vasospasm was revealed. Endovascular treatment was effective for vasospasm especially was performed early. PMID:24257541

  18. Making history: Thomas Francis, Jr, MD, and the 1954 Salk Poliomyelitis Vaccine Field Trial.

    PubMed

    Lambert, S M; Markel, H

    2000-05-01

    This article focuses on the poliomyelitis vaccine field trial directed by Thomas Francis,Jr, MD, of the University of Michigan Vaccine Evaluation Center and sponsored by the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (NFIP) or, as it was better known to the public, the March of Dimes. It was a landmark in the widescale testing of a vaccine and the ethical use of human subjects. Millions of American parents readily volunteered their healthy children to participate. A total of 150,000 volunteers, including schoolteachers, physicians, nurses, and health officers all endorsed the study and donated their time and effort to make it successful. Avoiding the use of marginalized groups, the field trial purposefully did not involve institutionalized children; instead, it was based in 15,000 public schools in 44 of the 48 states as clinic sites. A group of 650,000 children received some type of injection, either the vaccine or a placebo, and another 1.18 million served as controls. The field trial depended, most essentially, on both public support and the participation of millions of children who remained enrolled in a study that required a series of 3 injections and a 6-month evaluation period. Enlisting the huge number of participants presented practical examples of the difficulties in experimenting on human subjects. On April 26, 1954, Randy Kerr, a participant or "Polio Pioneer" as the children involved were called, received the first inoculation of the Salk poliomyelitis vaccine. The nationwide study "designed to test the safety and efficacy" of the Salk vaccine had officially begun.

  19. Emil Godlewski, Jr. (1875-1944) pioneer of embryology at the Jagiellonian University of Krakow (Poland).

    PubMed

    Sliwa, Leopold

    2008-01-01

    Emil Godlewski, Jr. (1875-1944) lived and worked in Krakow. He graduated from the Faculty of Medicine of the Jagiellonian University with the title of Doctor of Medical Science. He worked at the Faculty of Medicine, first in the Institute of Descriptive Anatomy and later as Professor of Biology and Embryology in the Department of Biology and Embryology, which he founded and led for many years. After early research on the development and histogenesis of muscles, professor Godlewski's scientific interests focused on regeneration and mechanisms regulating the process of fertilization, as well as early embryo development, blastulation and gastrulation. He was also interested in the origin of the primary differentiating cells in regenerates. He postulated the importance of epithelial tissue in this process and was the first to point out the change in the function, organization and role of the cells under the influence of external stimuli. Investigating fertilization and early development, he focused on the cooperation between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in the regulation of the early stages of development. Godlewski was also the author of the theory of migration of the inherited substances from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and, after their processing, from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. His works were never fragmentary, but always synthetical attempts at explaining important issues relating to the mechanisms of development. In 1936 Professor Godlewski was awarded the title of Member of the Pontifica Accademia delle Scienze. Apart from doing research and teaching, Emil Godlewski devoted a lot of time to social issues, especially those connected to medicine. When Poland regained independence after World War I, he actively participated in the reopening of the Jagiellonian University.

  20. IG Statement: Arthur A. Elkins, Jr., on OIG report Early Warning Report: Main EPA Headquarters Warehouse in Landover, Maryland, Requires Immediate EPA Attention

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Statement of Inspector General Arthur A. Elkins, Jr., on the Office of Inspector General (OIG) report Early Warning Report: Main EPA Headquarters Warehouse in Landover, Maryland, Requires Immediate EPA Attention.

  1. Application of a Novel DCPD Adjustment Method for the J-R Curve Characterization: A study based on ORNL and ASTM Interlaboratory Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Nanstad, Randy K

    Material fracture toughness in the fully ductile region can be described by a J-integral vs. crack growth resistance curve (J-R curve). As a conventional J-R curve measurement method, the elastic unloading compliance (EUC) method becomes impractical for elevated temperature testing due to relaxation of the material and friction induced back-up shape of the J-R curve. One alternative solution of J-R curve testing applies the Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) technique for measuring crack extension. However, besides crack growth, potential drop can also be influenced by plastic deformation, crack tip blunting, etc., and uncertainties exist in the current DCPD methodology especiallymore » in differentiating potential drop due to stable crack growth and due to material deformation. Thus, using DCPD for J-R curve determination remains a challenging task. In this study, a new adjustment procedure for applying DCPD to derive the J-R curve has been developed for conventional fracture toughness specimens, including compact tension, three-point bend, and disk-shaped compact specimens. Data analysis has been performed on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) interlaboratory results covering different specimen thicknesses, test temperatures, and materials, to evaluate the applicability of the new DCPD adjustment procedure for J-R curve characterization. After applying the newly-developed procedure, direct comparison between the DCPD method and the normalization method on the same specimens indicated close agreement for the overall J-R curves, as well as the provisional values of fracture toughness near the onset of ductile crack extension, Jq, and of tearing modulus.« less

  2. Special issue dedicated in memory of Dr. Edward H. Ahrens, Jr.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Edward H

    2002-01-01

    This special issue of the "Cardiovascular Drug Reviews" is dedicated in memory of Dr. Edward H. Ahrens, Jr., who died on Dec. 9th, 2000 at the Princeton Medical Center in New Jersey at the age of 85. Dr. Ahrens was the Director of the Lipid Metabolism Laboratory at the Rockefeller University. Dr. Alexander Scriabine conceived the idea for the issue at the special memorial symposium held at the Rockefeller University on Feb. 05, 2002 under the auspices of The New York Lipid and Vascular Biology Research Club. Dr. Ahrens was the first president of the club. He started this club with Drs. Howard Eder and DeWitt Goodman. Dr. Eder thought that it would be a fitting attribute to honor one of the founding fathers of the club by hosting a memorial symposium. I, as the President of the club for that academic year, had no hesitation in accepting the proposal. This year will be the 40th anniversary of the club and its continued success provides a glimpse of the fine legacy left behind by Dr. Ahrens. Dr. Ahrens also played a pivotal role in the establishment of the Journal of Lipid Research. This is the 43rd year of the journal and in this commemorative issue we are reproducing a review he wrote for the 25th anniversary of the journal. I was never personally acquainted with Dr. Ahrens. However, I am honored that I got this opportunity to pay tribute to a great scientist whose work has contributed immensely to the progress of lipid research. He was a person who touched many lives and still continues to do so. My involvement in the remembrance of Dr. Ahrens shows that science not only impacts your contemporaries but also generations that follow you. Scientific research is a journey where you can leave your trails behind and be remembered for your work long after your departure from this world. Dr. Ahrens contributed immensely to the understanding of cholesterol metabolism. In the early stages of his career he showed that phospholipids solubilize fat in the blood. Now we know

  3. John F. Kennedy, Jr., speaks to the media at KSC's HBO premiere 'From the Earth to the Moon.'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    John F. Kennedy, Jr., editor-in-chief of George Magazine, speaks with members of the national media at the Home Box Office (HBO) and Imagine Entertainment premiere of the 12-part miniseries 'From the Earth to the Moon' at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The series was filmed in part on location at KSC and dramatizes the human aspects of NASA's efforts to launch Americans to the Moon. The miniseries highlights NASA's Apollo program and the events leading up to and including the six successful missions to the Moon. A special 500-seat theater was constructed next to the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the KSC premiere showing. Speakers at the event included KSC Director Roy Bridges (at right); Jeff Bewkes, chairman and CEO for HBO; and John F. Kennedy, Jr. Also attending the event, which featured the episode entitled '1968,' were Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 astronaut, and Al Worden, Apollo 15 astronaut. The original miniseries event, created for HBO by actor Tom Hanks and Imagine Entertainment, will premiere on HBO beginning April 5, 1998.

  4. John F. Kennedy, Jr., speaks to invited guests at KSC's HBO premiere 'From the Earth to the Moon.'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    John F. Kennedy, Jr., editor-in-chief of George Magazine, greets invited guests at the Home Box Office (HBO) and Imagine Entertainment premiere of the 12-part miniseries 'From the Earth to the Moon' at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The series was filmed in part on location at KSC and dramatizes the human aspects of NASA's efforts to launch Americans to the Moon. The miniseries highlights NASA's Apollo program and the events leading up to and including the six successful missions to the Moon. A special 500- seat theater was constructed next to the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the KSC premiere showing. Speakers at the event included KSC Director Roy Bridges (at right); Jeff Bewkes, chairman and CEO for HBO; and John F. Kennedy, Jr. Also attending the event, which featured the episode entitled '1968,' were Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 astronaut, and Al Worden, Apollo 15 astronaut. The original miniseries event, created for HBO by actor Tom Hanks and Imagine Entertainment, will premiere on HBO beginning April 5, 1998.

  5. A community-based obesity prevention program for minority children: rationale and study design for Hip-Hop to Health Jr.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Stolley, Melinda R; Dyer, Alan R; VanHorn, Linda; KauferChristoffel, Katherine

    2002-02-01

    BACKGROUND; The increasing prevalence of overweight among children in the United States presents a national health priority. Higher rates of overweight/obesity among minority women place their children at increased risk. Although increased rates of overweight are observed in 4- to 5-year-old children, they are not observed in 2- to 3-year-old children. Therefore, early prevention efforts incorporating families are critical. The primary aim of Hip-Hop to Health Jr. is to alter the trajectory toward overweight/obesity among preschool African-American and Latino children. This 5-year randomized intervention is conducted in 24 Head Start programs, where each site is randomized to either a 14-week dietary/physical activity intervention or a general health intervention. This paper presents the rationale and design of the study. Efficacy of the intervention will be determined by weight change for the children and parent/caretaker. Secondary measures include reductions in dietary fat and increases in fiber, fruit/vegetable intake, and physical activity. Baseline data will be presented in future papers. The problem of overweight/obesity is epidemic in the United States. Behaviors related to diet and physical activity are established early in life and modeled by family members. Early intervention efforts addressing the child and family are needed to prevent obesity later in life. This paper describes a comprehensive, family-oriented obesity prevention program for minority preschool children. Copyright 2002 American Health Foundation and Elsevier Science (USA).

  6. Flex-rigid pleuroscopic biopsy with the SB knife Jr is a novel technique for diagnosis of malignant or benign fibrothorax.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Bo; Yin, Yan; Miao, Yuan; Eberhardt, Ralf; Hou, Gang; Herth, Felix J; Kang, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Diagnosing pleural effusion is challenging, especially in patients with malignant or benign fibrothorax, which is difficult to sample using standard flexible forceps (SFF) via flex-rigid pleuroscopy. An adequate sample is crucial for the differential diagnosis of malignant fibrothorax (malignant pleural mesothelioma, metastatic lung carcinoma, etc.) from benign fibrothorax (benign asbestos pleural disease, tuberculous pleuritis, etc.). Novel biopsy techniques are required in flex-rigid pleuroscopy to improve the sample size and quality. The SB knife Jr, which is a scissor forceps that uses a mono-pole high frequency, was developed to allow convenient and accurate resection of larger lesions during endoscopic dissection (ESD). Herein, we report two patients with fibrothorax who underwent a pleural biopsy using an SB knife Jr to investigate the potential use of this tool in flex-rigid pleuroscopy when pleural lesions are difficult to biopsy via SFF. The biopsies were successful, with sufficient size and quality for definitive diagnosis. We also successfully performed adhesiolysis with the SB knife Jr in one case, and adequate biopsies were conducted. No complications were observed. Electrosurgical biopsy with the SB knife Jr during flex-rigid pleuroscopy allowed us to obtain adequate samples for the diagnosis of malignant versus benign fibrothorax, which is usually not possible with SFF. The SB knife Jr also demonstrated a potential use for pleuropulmonary adhesions.

  7. Real-time simulation program for De Havilland (Canada) "Buffalo" and "Twin Otter" STOL transports

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1971-06-25

    Simulation models of two representative STOL aircraft - the DeHavilland (Canada) "Buffalo" and "Twin Otter" transports - have been generated. The aircraft are described by means of nonlinear equations that will accommodate gross changes in angle of a...

  8. National Dam Safety Program. John D. Rockefeller Jr. Dam (Inventory Number N.Y. 665), Lower Hudson River Basin, Westchester County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-05

    r .~ ASSIFIED National Dam Safety Program. John D. ASSICATIO1J OWOAGRA01G Rockefeller Jr. Dam (Inventory Number ouL IS. 0:STP.3...JOH A: ROCKEELLE JR. DM.9 Ii Zee~~~~~1- n.,..d*-~~)~ ~ >-. I 20 * * I o u 4V e- VIWN.T MA 21. Ih ftJ 28I ChA S" r . I.’I ’Pi JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER JR. D...AI~~~ ~btt 4f p*~ SCLZ 40 L~~~~-w u 4 1.1l1d~ ___ -I~~-’ JOHN .. AOIEELR R A -*~ - a1 h I VU I I 0 i fe~. f~ ~A I * 1" ~mz ~Z1~t - I +9’-. I ii __

  9. Impeaching G. Thomas Porteous, Jr., judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana, for high crimes and misdemeanors.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Conyers, John, Jr. [D-MI-14

    2010-01-21

    Senate - 12/08/2010 The motion to forever disqualify G. Thomas Porteous, Jr. to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States agreed to by Yea-Nay Vote. 94 - 2. Record Vote Number: 265. (All Actions) Notes: Note: On 3/11/2010, the House agreed to the resolution of impeachment. On 12/8/2010, the Senate adjudged G. Thomas Porteous, Jr., guilty as charged in the four Articles of the Impeachment. Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. First Observations of a Stellar Occultation by KBO (50000) Quaoar from MIT's George R. Wallace, Jr., Astrophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallum, Stephanie; Brothers, T.; Elliot, J. L.; Person, M. J.; Bosh, A. S.; Zangari, A.; Zuluaga, C.; Levine, S.; Bright, L.; Sheppard, S.; Tilleman, T.

    2011-05-01

    Here we report the first recorded observations of a stellar occultation by Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) (50000) Quaoar. We detected a single-chord stellar occultation by Quaoar of a magnitude 16.2 star designated 26029635 UCAC2 (2MASS ID 1275509401), which occurred on 11 February 2011 UT. The prediction of the occultation was made using long baseline astrometric observations of Quaoar from several sites as part of the MIT Planetary Astronomy Laboratory's continuing effort to improve KBO positions for occultation prediction. The successful observations were made with a Celestron C14 0.36 m telescope and an SBIG STL-1001E CCD camera on a Paramount ME robotic mount. These observations show that a relatively accessible level of astronomical equipment, of the class often used by amateur astronomers, can be used to record KBO occultations. The data were taken at MIT's George R. Wallace, Jr., Astrophysical Observatory in Westford, MA. A light curve was generated from the data using aperture photometry on the individual images and is presented here. This light curve is being analyzed by Person et al. (this meeting) to provide constraints on Quaoar's size. We also discuss various observing strategies that could be used in the future to optimize the data from this type of event. This work was supported in part by grant NNX10AB27G to MIT from NASA's Planetary Astronomy Division. Student participation was supported in part by NSF's REU program, MIT's Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program, NASA's Massachusetts Space Grant, and the George R. Wallace, Jr., Astrophysical Observatory.

  11. The Hospital for Special Surgery 1972–1989; Philip D. Wilson, Jr., Eighth Surgeon-in-Chief

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    After nearly a decade as the seventh Surgeon-in-Chief (1963–1972) of The Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), Robert Lee Patterson, Jr., MD (1907–1994) retired, having repaired adverse relations between HSS and the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. Patterson, who had first joined the staff of The Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled in 1936 as a Visiting Surgeon, was able to accomplish this very challenging task mainly through his close relationship with Preston Wade, MD (1901–1982), a general surgeon who had served with Patterson as Co-Chief of the combined New York Hospital-HSS Fracture service. The Board of Trustees of the New York Society for the Relief of the Ruptured and Crippled appointed Philip D. Wilson, Jr. MD, as the eighth Surgeon-in-Chief of The Hospital for Special Surgery. He assumed that office on July 1, 1972. Wilson, who had joined the staff as an Orthopaedic Surgeon to the Out-Patient Department in 1951, had trained as an orthopaedic resident at HSS from 1948 to 1950 and in 1951, finished his residency at the University of California Hospital Medical Center, San Francisco. During his 17 years as Surgeon-in-Chief, he led the hospital into the advanced field of implant research and development and building a world-class center for patient care. Additionally, many other orthopaedic services such as Sports Medicine, Scoliosis and Metabolic Bone Diseases became the leaders in their fields. Supporting Departments of Rheumatology, Anesthesia and others were likewise recognized foremost in the country. PMID:21886524

  12. Basil A. Pruitt Jr. MD and the US Army Institute for Surgical Research: Five Decades of Science, Clinical Care, Mentorship, and Leadership.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ronald M

    2017-08-24

    Over the past half century Dr. Basil A. Pruitt, Jr., a great citizen, surgeon, innovator, mentor and leader, transformed our world through his dogged commitment to science and service to humanity. Dr. Pruitt's contribution lives on in the work of the US Army Institute of Surgical Research and the surgeons, physicians and scientists he shaped and inspired.

  13. Peer-Reviewed Research and the IEP: Implications of "Ridley School District v. M.R. and J.R. ex rel. E.R." (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yell, Mitchell L.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Losinski, Mickey; Marshall, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    This article examines a case out of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit: "Ridley School District v. M.R and J.R. ex rel. E.R." (2012). The case is the first circuit court case in which the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act requirement that special education services be based on peer-reviewed research…

  14. The Academy on the Firing Line: William F. Buckley, Jr.'s "God and Man at Yale" and the Modern Conservative Critique of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laukaitis, John J.

    2013-01-01

    In 1951, William F. Buckley, Jr. was a recent alumnus of Yale University and former editor of the "Yale Daily News" when his first major work, "God and Man at Yale: The Superstitions of 'Academic Freedom'," became a controversial polemic that attracted national attention. In his work, Buckley claimed Yale's faculty advanced…

  15. Mitchell Red Cloud, Jr., Winnebago Medal of Honor Recipient, 1924-1950. With Teacher's Guide. Native Americans of the Twentieth Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Public Schools, MN.

    A biography for elementary school students tells about Mitchell Red Cloud, Jr. (Winnebago), an American Indian Army corporal who received a Congressional Medal of Honor for bravery in the Korean War. Photographs of Corporal Red Cloud and his gravesite are included. A teaching guide following the bibliography contains information on the Medal of…

  16. Eagle Pass Jr. High Seismology Team: Strategies for Engaging Middle School "At-Risk" Students in Authentic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, M. R.; Ellins, K. K.; Frohlich, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2008, during my participation in the NSF-sponsored Texas Earth & Space Science (TXESS) Revolution professional development program, I was awarded an AS-1 seismograph through IRIS's Seismographs in Schools Program. This program serves to create an international educational seismic network that allows teachers across the country and around the world to share seismic data in real-time using online tools, classroom activities, and technical support documents for seismic instruments. Soon after receiving my AS-1, I founded and began sponsoring the Eagle Pass Jr. High Seismology Team which consists of selected 7th and 8th grade students. Eagle Pass Jr. High is a Title 1 school that serves a predominantly "at-risk" Hispanic population. We meet after school once a week to learn about earthquakes, seismic waves, analyze recorded seismic event data using computer software programming, and correspond with other students from schools around the country. This team approach has been well received by fellow TXESS Revolution teachers with AS-1 seismographs and will be implemented by David Boyd, STEM coordinator for Williams Preparatory Academy in Dallas, Texas this fall 2011. All earthquakes recorded by our seismograph station (EPTX), which has remained online and actively recording seismic data since 2008, are catalogued and then plotted on a large world map displayed on my classroom wall. A real-time seismogram image updates every five minutes and along with all earthquakes recorded since installation can be viewed on our webpage http://www.iris.edu/hq/ssn/schools/view/eptx. During the 2010-2011 school year, my seismology team and I participated in an earthquake research study led by Dr. Cliff Frohlich at the Institute for Geophysics. The study examined seismograms and felt reports for the 25 April 2010 Alice, Texas, earthquake, in order to investigate its possible connection to oil and gas production in the Stratton oil and gas field. A research paper detailing our findings

  17. Genetic and Environmental Influences on the Verbal-Perceptual-Image Rotation (VPR) Model of the Structure of Mental Abilities in the Minnesota Study of Twins Reared Apart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; Bouchard, Thomas J.; McGue, Matt; Segal, Nancy L.; Tellegen, Auke; Keyes, Margaret; Gottesman, Irving I.

    2007-01-01

    In previous papers [Johnson, W., & Bouchard Jr., T. J. (2005a). Constructive Replication of the Visual-Perceptual-Image Rotation (VPR) Model in Thurstone's (1941) Battery of 60 Tests of Mental Ability. Intelligence, 33, 417-430.] [Johnson, W., & Bouchard Jr., T. J. (2005b). The Structure of Human Intelligence: It's Verbal, perceptual, and image…

  18. From Catheters To Ventricular Assist Devices: 60 Years of Cardiovascular Experiences With William L. Winters, JR., M.D.

    PubMed

    Winters, W L

    2015-01-01

    Automatic typewriters, transistor radios, microfiche, black and white television…while considered high-tech in the 1950s, these technologies seem limited when viewed from the 21st century. The same is true for cardiovascular medicine, which back then relied on electrocardiograms and X-rays for most diagnoses. In the 60 years since, advances in medical capabilities have progressed at a staggering pace. Patient research that once required months poring over paper charts is now reduced to hours using electronic medical record databases. Diagnostic images that once took days to process can now be accessed instantly through ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. While a half-century ago no one would have imagined accessing any and all information with a 5-second Google search, so too would noninvasive heart surgery been considered unimaginable. Since the 1950s when he graduated from medical school, William L. Winters, Jr., has been a first-hand witness to breathtaking innovations in cardiovascular medicine-both globally and in Houston. Author of Houston Hearts: A History of Cardiovascular Surgery and Medicine at Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center and long-time medical editor of the Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal, Dr. Winters sat down with the journal editors this past April to share his insights from the last half-century of medical practice.

  19. Hip-Hop to Health Jr., an obesity prevention program for minority preschool children: baseline characteristics of participants.

    PubMed

    Stolley, Melinda R; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Dyer, Alan; Van Horn, Linda; KauferChristoffel, Katherine; Schiffer, Linda

    2003-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States is a significant public health problem. Many obesity-related risk factors are more prevalent in minority populations. Given the recalcitrant nature of weight loss interventions for adults, prevention of overweight and obesity has become a high priority. The present study reports baseline data from an obesity prevention intervention developed for minority preschool children. Hip-Hop to Health Jr. is a 5-year randomized controlled intervention that targets 3- to 5-year-old minority children enrolled in 24 Head Start programs. Our primary aim is to test the effect of the intervention on change in body mass index. Data were collected on sociodemographic, anthropometric, behavioral, and cognitive variables for the children and parents at baseline. Participants included 416 black children, 337 black parents, 362 Latino children, and 309 Latino parents. Using body mass index for age and sex > or = the 95th percentile as the definition of overweight, 15% of the black children and 28% of the Latino children were overweight. More than 75% of the parents were either overweight or obese. The development of interventions to effectively prevent or control obesity early in life is crucial. These data highlight the escalating problem of weight control in minority populations.

  20. Video Release: 47th Vice President of the United States Joseph R. Biden Jr. Speech at HUPO2017 Global Leadership Gala | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) has released a video of the keynote speech given by the 47th Vice President of the United States of America Joseph R. Biden Jr. at the HUPO2017 Global Leadership Gala. Under the gala theme “International Cooperation in the Fight Against Cancer,” Biden recognized cancer as a collection of related diseases, the importance of data sharing and harmonization, and the need for collaboration across scientific disciplines as inflection points in cancer research.

  1. The Compleat Professor, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Harriet W.

    1988-01-01

    The issues of teacher training and what it takes to be a "compleat professor" are addressed. Faculty members find themselves trapped in the value system of the profession, knowing that status is gained through scholarly productivity, wanting to gain satisfaction from teaching but unprepared for its demands and buffeted by the changes in the…

  2. John H Glenn Jr.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-17

    Mercury astronaut John Glenn speaks during the "On Shoulders of Giants" program celebrating 50 years of Americans in orbit, an era which began with Glenn's MA-6 mission on Feb. 20, 1962. The event was conducted in the Rocket Garden at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida a few miles from the launch pad where Glenn and Scott Carpenter took flight in Mercury spacecraft. Glenn's launch aboard an Atlas rocket took with it the hopes of an entire nation and ushered in a new era of space travel that eventually led to Americans walking on the moon by the end of the 1960s. Glenn soon was followed into orbit by Scott Carpenter, Walter Schirra and Gordon Cooper. Their fellow Mercury astronauts Alan Shepard and Virgil "Gus" Grissom flew earlier suborbital flights. Deke Slayton, a member of NASA's original Mercury 7 astronauts, was grounded by a medical condition until the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in 1975.

  3. Water-quality assessment of the Frank Lyon, Jr., nursery pond releases into Lake Maumelle, Arkansas, 1991-1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, William Reed

    1998-01-01

    Releases of the Frank Lyon, Jr., Nursery Pond into Lake Maumelle were monitored during 1991 through 1996 to assess the impact that the releases have on the water quality of Lake Maumelle. Results indicated that the water-quality impact of the nursery pond release into Lake Maumelle is variable, and appears to be related to the volume of the nursery pond at release and the amount of fertilizer applied within the nursery pond earlier in the year. In 1991 through 1994 and in 1996, nursery pond release loads for nutrients (except for dissolved nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen), total and dissolved organic carbon, iron, and manganese were greater than what would be expected in the annual area load from that basin. In 1995, only ammonium nitrate was appliec to the nursery pond. As a result, the 1995 phosphorus load was lower than in other years, and was less than what would be expected in the annual areal load. Nutrient enrichment, on average, in Lake Maumelle from the nursery pond release resulted in what would be equivalent to an 8 percent increase in concentration of total phosphorus, 50 percent increase in dissolved orthophosphorus, 0.1 percent increase in dissolved nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, 2.5 percent increase in total ammonia plus organic nitrogen, and 5.7 percent increase in dissolved ammonia nitrogen, assuming that the nutrient load was conservative and evenly distributed throughout the water body. Evidence of elevated turbidity, nutrient, and chlorphyll a concentrations in the epilimnetic water outside the receiving embayment were apparent for as long as 3 weeks after the 1995 and 1996 releases. In general, highest values were found at the site located where the receiving embayment meets the open water of Lake Maumelle. Much of the released material in the nursery pond originated in the cooler, anoxic hypolimnetic water. The initial release water was seen to plunge beneath the warmer water existing in the receiving embayment and was transported into the open

  4. Characterization of the Photon Counting CHASE Jr., Chip Built in a 40-nm CMOS Process With a Charge Sharing Correction Algorithm Using a Collimated X-Ray Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Krzyżanowska, A.; Deptuch, G. W.; Maj, P.

    This paper presents the detailed characterization of a single photon counting chip, named CHASE Jr., built in a CMOS 40-nm process, operating with synchrotron radiation. The chip utilizes an on-chip implementation of the C8P1 algorithm. The algorithm eliminates the charge sharing related uncertainties, namely, the dependence of the number of registered photons on the discriminator’s threshold, set for monochromatic irradiation, and errors in the assignment of an event to a certain pixel. The article presents a short description of the algorithm as well as the architecture of the CHASE Jr., chip. The analog and digital functionalities, allowing for proper operationmore » of the C8P1 algorithm are described, namely, an offset correction for two discriminators independently, two-stage gain correction, and different operation modes of the digital blocks. The results of tests of the C8P1 operation are presented for the chip bump bonded to a silicon sensor and exposed to the 3.5- μm -wide pencil beam of 8-keV photons of synchrotron radiation. It was studied how sensitive the algorithm performance is to the chip settings, as well as the uniformity of parameters of the analog front-end blocks. Presented results prove that the C8P1 algorithm enables counting all photons hitting the detector in between readout channels and retrieving the actual photon energy.« less

  5. Two-year follow-up results for Hip-Hop to Health Jr.: a randomized controlled trial for overweight prevention in preschool minority children.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Stolley, Melinda R; Schiffer, Linda; Van Horn, Linda; KauferChristoffel, Katherine; Dyer, Alan

    2005-05-01

    To assess the impact of a culturally proficient dietary/physical activity intervention on changes in body mass index (BMI) (kg/m 2 ). Randomized controlled trial (Hip-Hop to Health Jr.) conducted between September 1999 and June 2002 in 12 Head Start preschool programs in Chicago, Illinois. Intervention children had significantly smaller increases in BMI compared with control children at 1-year follow-up, 0.06 vs 0.59 kg/m 2 ; difference -0.53 kg/m 2 (95% CI -0.91 to -0.14), P = .01; and at 2-year follow-up, 0.54 vs 1.08 kg/m 2 ; difference -0.54 kg/m 2 (95% CI -0.98 to -0.10), P = .02, with adjustment for baseline age and BMI. The only significant difference between intervention and control children in food intake/physical activity was the Year 1 difference in percent of calories from saturated fat, 11.6% vs 12.8% ( P = .002). Hip-Hop to Health Jr. was effective in reducing subsequent increases in BMI in preschool children. This represents a promising approach to prevention of overweight among minority children in the preschool years.

  6. Jr-ZFP2, encoding a Cys2/His2-type transcription factor, is involved in the early stages of the mechano-perception pathway and specifically expressed in mechanically stimulated tissues in woody plants.

    PubMed

    Leblanc-Fournier, Nathalie; Coutand, Catherine; Crouzet, Jerome; Brunel, Nicole; Lenne, Catherine; Moulia, Bruno; Julien, Jean-Louis

    2008-06-01

    Plants respond to environmental mechanical stimulation, such as wind, by modifying their growth and development. To study the molecular effects of stem bending on 3-week-old walnut trees, a cDNA-AFLP approach was developed. This study allowed the identification of a cDNA, known as Jr-ZFP2, encoding a Cys2/His2-type two-zinc-fingered transcription factor. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed that Jr-ZFP2 mRNA accumulation is rapidly and transiently induced after mechanical stimulation. After bending, Jr-ZFP2 transcript increase was restricted to the stem, the organ where the mechanical solicitation was applied. Furthermore, other abiotic factors, such as cold or salt, did not modify Jr-ZFP2 mRNA accumulation in walnut stems under our experimental conditions, whereas growth studies demonstrated that salt stress was actually perceived by the plants. These results suggest that the regulation of Jr-ZFP2 expression is more sensitive to mechanical stimulus. This gene will be a good marker for studying the early stages of mechanical perception in woody plants.

  7. Highly Increased 125I-JR11 Antagonist Binding In Vitro Reveals Novel Indications for sst2 Targeting in Human Cancers.

    PubMed

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Waser, Beatrice; Mäcke, Helmut; Rivier, Jean

    2017-02-01

    There is recent in vitro and in vivo evidence that somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst 2 ) antagonists are better tools to target neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) than sst 2 agonists. Indeed, antagonists bind to a greater number of sst 2 sites than agonists. Whether sst 2 antagonists could be used successfully to target non-NETs, expressing low sst 2 density, is unknown. Here, we compare quantitatively 125 I-JR11 sst 2 antagonist binding in vitro with that of the sst 2 agonist 125 I-Tyr 3 -octreotide in large varieties of non-NET and NET. In vitro receptor autoradiography was performed with 125 I-JR11 and 125 I-Tyr 3 -octreotide in cancers from prostate, breast, colon, kidney, thyroid, and lymphoid tissues as well as NETs as reference. In general, 125 I-JR11 binds to many more sst 2 sites than 125 I-Tyr 3 -octreotide. In 13 breast cancers, 8 had a low binding (mean density, 844 ± 168 dpm/mg of tissue) with the agonist whereas 12 had a high binding (mean density, 4,447 ± 1,128 dpm/mg of tissue) with the antagonist. All 12 renal cell cancers showed a low binding of sst 2 with the agonist (mean density, 348 ± 49 dpm/mg of tissue) whereas all cases had a high sst 2 binding with the antagonist (mean density, 3,777 ± 582 dpm/mg of tissue). One of 5 medullary thyroid cancers was positive with the agonist, whereas 5 of 5 were positive with the antagonist. In 15 non-Hodgkin lymphomas, many more sst 2 sites were labeled with the antagonist than with the agonist. In 14 prostate cancers, none had sst 2 binding with the agonist and only 4 had a weak binding with the antagonist. None of 17 colon cancers showed sst 2 sites with the agonist, and only 3 cases were weakly positive with the antagonist. In the various tumor types, adjacent sst 2 -expressing tissues such as vessels, lymphocytes, nerves, mucosa, or stroma were more strongly labeled with the antagonist than with the agonist. The reference NET cases, incubated with a smaller amount of tracer, were also found to have many

  8. Making lemonade from lemons: a case study on loss of space at the Dolph Briscoe, Jr. Library, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

    PubMed

    Tobia, Rajia C; Feldman, Jonquil D

    2010-01-01

    The setting for this case study is the Dolph Briscoe, Jr. Library, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, a health sciences campus with medical, dental, nursing, health professions, and graduate schools. During 2008-2009, major renovations to the library building were completed including office space for a faculty development department, multipurpose classrooms, a 24/7 study area, study rooms, library staff office space, and an information commons. The impetus for changes to the library building was the decreasing need to house collections in an increasingly electronic environment, the need for office space for other departments, and growth of the student body. About 40% of the library building was remodeled or repurposed, with a loss of approximately 25% of the library's original space. Campus administration proposed changes to the library building, and librarians worked with administration, architects, and construction managers to seek renovation solutions that meshed with the library's educational mission.

  9. Making lemonade from lemons: a case study on loss of space at the Dolph Briscoe, Jr. Library, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

    PubMed Central

    Tobia, Rajia C.; Feldman, Jonquil D.

    2010-01-01

    The setting for this case study is the Dolph Briscoe, Jr. Library, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, a health sciences campus with medical, dental, nursing, health professions, and graduate schools. During 2008–2009, major renovations to the library building were completed including office space for a faculty development department, multipurpose classrooms, a 24/7 study area, study rooms, library staff office space, and an information commons. The impetus for changes to the library building was the decreasing need to house collections in an increasingly electronic environment, the need for office space for other departments, and growth of the student body. About 40% of the library building was remodeled or repurposed, with a loss of approximately 25% of the library's original space. Campus administration proposed changes to the library building, and librarians worked with administration, architects, and construction managers to seek renovation solutions that meshed with the library's educational mission. PMID:20098652

  10. PULSAR: A High-Repetition-Rate, High-Power, CE Phase-Locked Laser for the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Itzhak, Itzik; Carnes, Kevin D.; Cocke, C. Lew

    2014-05-09

    This instrumentation grant funded the development and installation of a state-of-the-art laser system to be used for the DOE funded research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. Specifically, we purchased a laser based on the KMLABs Red-Dragon design, which has a high repetition rate of 10-20 kHz crucial for multi-parameter coincidence measurements conducted in our lab. This laser system is carrier-envelope phase (CEP) locked and provides pulses as short as 21 fs directly from the amplifier (see details below). In addition, we have developed a pulse compression setup that provides sub 5 fs pulses and a CEPmore » tagging capability that allows for long measurements of CEP dependent processes.« less

  11. Estimation of Vickers hardness uncertainty for a heterogeneous welded joint (S235JR+AR and X2CrNiMo17-12-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijmărescu, M. C.; Dijmărescu, M. R.

    2017-08-01

    When talking about tests that include measurements, the uncertainty of measurement is an essential element because it is important to know the limits within the obtained results may be assumed to lie and the influence the measurement technological system elements have on these results. The research presented in this paper focuses on the estimation of the Vickers hardness uncertainty of measurement for the heterogeneous welded joint between S235JR+AR and X2CrNiMo17-12-2 materials in order to establish the results relevance and the quality assessment of this joint. The paper contents are structured in three main parts. In the first part, the initial data necessary for the experiment is presented in terms of the welded joint and technological means characterisation. The second part presents the physical experiment development and its results and in the third part the uncertainty of the measurements is calculated and a results discussion is undertaken.

  12. A Rejoinder to Jrène Rahm's "Stories of Learning, Identity, Navigations and Boundary Crossings in STEM in Non-Dominant Communities: New Imaginaries for Research and Action"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civil, Marta

    2016-01-01

    This article presents my rejoinder to Jrène Rahm's response to my article "STEM learning research through a funds of knowledge lens." I focus on four themes that emerged from my reading of her commentary: the importance of the histories of youth of immigrant origin; her comments on globality; the theoretical lens that she brings to my…

  13. Extending the Technological, Discursive, and Rhetorical Horizons of Academic Research Libraries' Information Architectures: An Analysis of North Carolina State University's James B. Hunt Jr. Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Patrick L.

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes how North Carolina State University's (NCSU) James B. Hunt Jr. Library extends the ways in which the information architectures of academic research libraries can function as a technology, as discourse, and as rhetoric. The starting point for the analysis is the libraries of antiquity, which functioned technologically as…

  14. Real-world Experience of Carotid Artery Stenting in Japan: Analysis of 7,134 Cases from JR-NET1 and 2 Nationwide Retrospective Multi-center Registries

    PubMed Central

    EGASHIRA, Yusuke; YOSHIMURA, Shinichi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; ENOMOTO, Yukiko

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to demonstrate the “real-world” experiences of carotid artery stenting (CAS) in Japan using Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET) 1 and 2, retrospective nationwide multi-center surveillances. JR-NET1 and 2 registries are retrospective surveillances conducted between January 2005 and December 2007 and January 2008 and December 2009, respectively, in Japan regarding neuroendovascular therapy. A total of 7,134 procedures (1,943 for JR-NET1 and 5,191 for JR-NET2) were included in this study and retrieved data were analyzed retrospectively. Treatment results of two surveillance periods were similar. In JR-NET2 registry, total of 5,191 lesions were treated by CAS and 5,008 of 5,191 procedures (96.5%) were performed by the board-certified surgeons of Japanese Society of Neuroendovascular Therapy. The rate of technical success was extremely high (99.99%), and the rate of clinically significant complication was low (3.2%). These results were comparable to a previous large study in Japan. Multivariate logistic analysis revealed that age [odds ratio (OR), 1.04 per year; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02–1.07; p = 0.0004), symptomatic lesion (OR, 1.87; 95% CI; p = 0.0004), and the use of closed-cell type stent (OR, 0.58; 95% CT, 0.32–1.00; p = 0.05) were independently associated with clinically significant complications. It was revealed that good clinical results were achieved in patients who underwent CAS in Japan. It is expected that the evolution of devices and increasing experiences of surgeons would lead to further improvement of the clinical results, and further investigation would be required to clarify the optimal treatment strategy and therapeutic efficacy of CAS, especially in symptomatic lesions. PMID:24305031

  15. A SIMULINK environment for flight dynamics and control analysis: Application to the DHC-2 Beaver. Part 1: Implementation of a model library in SIMULINK. Part 2: Nonlinear analysis of the Beaver autopilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauw, Marc O.

    1993-01-01

    The design of advanced Automatic Aircraft Control Systems (AACS's) can be improved upon considerably if the designer can access all models and tools required for control system design and analysis through a graphical user interface, from within one software environment. This MSc-thesis presents the first step in the development of such an environment, which is currently being done at the Section for Stability and Control of Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering. The environment is implemented within the commercially available software package MATLAB/SIMULINK. The report consists of two parts. Part 1 gives a detailed description of the AACS design environment. The heart of this environment is formed by the SIMULINK implementation of a nonlinear aircraft model in block-diagram format. The model has been worked out for the old laboratory aircraft of the Faculty, the DeHavilland DHC-2 'Beaver', but due to its modular structure, it can easily be adapted for other aircraft. Part 1 also describes MATLAB programs which can be applied for finding steady-state trimmed-flight conditions and for linearization of the aircraft model, and it shows how the built-in simulation routines of SIMULINK have been used for open-loop analysis of the aircraft dynamics. Apart from the implementation of the models and tools, a thorough treatment of the theoretical backgrounds is presented. Part 2 of this report presents a part of an autopilot design process for the 'Beaver' aircraft, which clearly demonstrates the power and flexibility of the AACS design environment from part 1. Evaluations of all longitudinal and lateral control laws by means of nonlinear simulations are treated in detail. A floppy disk containing all relevant MATLAB programs and SIMULINK models is provided as a supplement.

  16. Stochastic Lanchester Air-to-Air Campaign Model: Model Description and Users Guides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    STOCHASTIC LANCHESTER AIR-TO-AIR CAMPAIGN MODEL MODEL DESCRIPTION AND USERS GUIDES—2009 REPORT PA702T1 Rober t V. Hemm Jr. Dav id A . Lee...LMI © 2009. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Stochastic Lanchester Air-to-Air Campaign Model: Model Description and Users Guides—2009 PA702T1/JANUARY...2009 Executive Summary This report documents the latest version of the Stochastic Lanchester Air-to-Air Campaign Model (SLAACM), developed by LMI for

  17. ON THE EXPANSION RATE, AGE, AND DISTANCE OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G266.2–1.2 (Vela Jr.)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G. E.; Chow, K.; DeLaney, T.

    An analysis of Chandra ACIS data for two relatively bright and narrow portions of the northwestern rim of G266.2–1.2 (a.k.a. RX J0852.0-4622 or Vela Jr.) reveal evidence of a radial displacement of 2.40 ± 0.56 arcsec between 2003 and 2008. The corresponding expansion rate (0.42 ± 0.10 arcsec yr{sup –1} or 13.6% ± 4.2% kyr{sup –1}) is about half the rate reported for an analysis of XMM-Newton data from a similar, but not identical, portion of the rim over a similar, but not identical, time interval (0.84 ± 0.23 arcsec yr{sup –1}). If the Chandra rate is representative of the remnant as amore » whole, then the results of a hydrodynamic analysis suggest that G266.2–1.2 is between 2.4 and 5.1 kyr old if it is expanding into a uniform ambient medium (whether or not it was produced by a Type Ia or Type II event). If the remnant is expanding into the material shed by a steady stellar wind, then the age could be as much as 50% higher. The Chandra expansion rate and a requirement that the shock speed be greater than or equal to 1000 km s{sup –1} yields a lower limit on the distance of 0.5 kpc. An analysis of previously published distance estimates and constraints suggests G266.2–1.2 is no further than 1.0 kpc. This range of distances is consistent with the distance to the nearer of two groups of material in the Vela Molecular Ridge (0.7 ± 0.2 kpc) and to the Vel OB1 association (0.8 kpc)« less

  18. A rejoinder to Jrène Rahm's "Stories of learning, identity, navigations and boundary crossings in STEM in non-dominant communities: new imaginaries for research and action"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civil, Marta

    2016-03-01

    This article presents my rejoinder to Jrène Rahm's response to my article "STEM learning research through a funds of knowledge lens." I focus on four themes that emerged from my reading of her commentary: the importance of the histories of youth of immigrant origin; her comments on globality; the theoretical lens that she brings to my research; and the methodological issues she discusses. I highlight Rahm's humanizing component and the need to understand the complexity of immigration. What are we doing in our global settings to build on the diversity of experiences and backgrounds among the youth as a resource towards STEM learning?

  19. Cocrystal Structures of Antibody N60-i3 and Antibody JR4 in Complex with gp120 Define More Cluster A Epitopes Involved in Effective Antibody-Dependent Effector Function against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Gohain, Neelakshi; Tolbert, William D; Acharya, Priyamvada; Yu, Lei; Liu, Tongyun; Zhao, Pingsen; Orlandi, Chiara; Visciano, Maria L; Kamin-Lewis, Roberta; Sajadi, Mohammad M; Martin, Loïc; Robinson, James E; Kwong, Peter D; DeVico, Anthony L; Ray, Krishanu; Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena

    2015-09-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates a role for Fc receptor (FcR)-mediated effector functions of antibodies, including antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), in prevention of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) acquisition and in postinfection control of viremia. Consequently, an understanding of the molecular basis for Env epitopes that constitute effective ADCC targets is of fundamental interest for humoral anti-HIV-1 immunity and for HIV-1 vaccine design. A substantial portion of FcR effector function of potentially protective anti-HIV-1 antibodies is directed toward nonneutralizing, transitional, CD4-inducible (CD4i) epitopes associated with the gp41-reactive region of gp120 (cluster A epitopes). Our previous studies defined the A32-like epitope within the cluster A region and mapped it to the highly conserved and mobile layers 1 and 2 of the gp120 inner domain within the C1-C2 regions of gp120. Here, we elucidate additional cluster A epitope structures, including an A32-like epitope, recognized by human monoclonal antibody (MAb) N60-i3, and a hybrid A32-C11-like epitope, recognized by rhesus macaque MAb JR4. These studies define for the first time a hybrid A32-C11-like epitope and map it to elements of both the A32-like subregion and the seven-layered β-sheet of the gp41-interactive region of gp120. These studies provide additional evidence that effective antibody-dependent effector function in the cluster A region depends on precise epitope targeting--a combination of epitope footprint and mode of antibody attachment. All together these findings help further an understanding of how cluster A epitopes are targeted by humoral responses. HIV/AIDS has claimed the lives of over 30 million people. Although antiretroviral drugs can control viral replication, no vaccine has yet been developed to prevent the spread of the disease. Studies of natural HIV-1 infection, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)- or simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV

  20. FROM INDIVIDUALS TO POPULATIONS: MODELING TOXICITY DATA ACROSS LEVELS OF BIOLOGICAL ORGANIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Raimondo, Sandy and Charles L. McKenney, Jr. In press. From Individuals to Populations: Modeling Toxicity Data Across Levels of Biological Organization (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB R1012).

    ...

  1. Analysis of Analytic Models for the Effect of Insurgency/Counterinsurgency Operations on the General Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    does not represent the reintroduction of "removed" insurgents back into the population. Enhanced models could represent detention and release of...34. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right-wing_politics>. 23 May 2008. Wolf , Charles Jr. Insurgency and Counterinsurgency: New Myths and Old

  2. Wave Forecasting in Muddy Coastal Environments: Model Development Based on Real-Time Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    oversees the operation of WAVCIS and tasks pertaining to it. Sheremet is responsible for data analysis . WORK COMPLETED The main effort has been...8, 1121-1131, 1978. Foda , M.A., J.R. Hunt and H.-T. Chou, A nonlinear model for the fluidization of marine mud by waves, J. Geophys. Res. 98

  3. Machine Visual Targeting Modeled on Biological Reflexes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    Released by Under authority of P. J. Heckman, Jr., Head N. B . Estabrook Undersea Al and Robotics Branch Ocean Engineering Division ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...elements are modeled after the small B type described by Sterling (1983) that have no gap junctions, and synapse only wvith rods and rod bipolars. Both on...of Y retina for motion detection showing receptors (R), horizonU~L% (H). on-center bilwobrs ( B ] . off-center bipolars (00), arnacrine (A). on-center

  4. USING MODELS TO EXTRAPOLATE POPULATION-LEVEL EFFECTS FROM LABORATORY TOXICITY TESTS IN SUPPORT OF POPULATION RISK ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using models to extrapolate population-level effects from laboratory toxicity tests in support of population risk assessments. Munns, W.R., Jr.*, Anne Kuhn, Matt G. Mitro, and Timothy R. Gleason, U.S. EPA ORD NHEERL, Narragansett, RI, USA. Driven in large part by management goa...

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (left) is welcomed to KSC by Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (right). Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module. His visit includes a tour of the Columbia Debris Hangar.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (left) is welcomed to KSC by Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (right). Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module. His visit includes a tour of the Columbia Debris Hangar.

  6. Experimental Research on the Elastic Deformation Mode of S235JR Rolled Steel Fastened between the Centers of a Universal Lathe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabacaru, LL; Axinte, E.; Musca, G.

    2016-11-01

    Elastic deformations of the technological system occur during the mechanical treatment of a blank, regardless of the manner in which it is fastened. The elastic deformation of the blank is significant especially when machining shaft-like parts. The purpose of our research is to compare the mathematical model of blank deformation to the experimental model when the blank, which is a part belonging to the shaft class, is fastened between centers.

  7. Clinical strategies to aim an adequate safety profile for patients and effective training for surgical residents: The laparoscopic cholecystectomy model.

    PubMed

    Bresadola, Vittorio; Pravisani, Riccardo; Pighin, Marina; Seriau, Luca; Cherchi, Vittorio; Giuseppe, Sergio; Risaliti, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Training programs for resident surgeons represent a challenge for the mentoring activity. The aim of the present study is to investigate the impact of our training program for laparoscopic cholecystectomy on patient's safety and on the modulation of the residents' exposure to clinical scenario with different grades of complexity. This is a retrospective study based on a clinical series of laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed in a teaching hospital. Study population was grouped according to the expertise of the attending primary operator among resident surgeons. Four groups were identified: consultant (C), senior resident (SR); intermediate level resident (IR); junior resident (JR). The intraoperative and postoperative outcomes were confronted to evaluate the patient's safety profile. 447 patients were submitted to LC: 96 cases were operated by a C, 200 by SR, 112 by IR and 39 by JR. The mean operative time was the longest for the JR group. A statistically higher rate of conversion to open approach was registered in C and IR groups in comparison to JR and SR groups. However, in C and IR groups, patients had worse ASA score, higher BMI and more frequent past history of previous abdominal surgery, cholecystitis or pancreatitis. Overall, it was not registered any statistically significant difference among the groups in terms of length of hospital stay and prevalence of major postoperative complications. Applying an educational model based on both graduated levels of responsibility and modulated grade of clinical complexity can guarantee an high safety profile.

  8. Solar Resource Measurements in 1400 JR Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-254

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, Tom

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: Equipment will be used by Jackson State University for solar radiation data monitoring. This is a continuing effort of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Solar Measurement Network; Provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; Support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; Provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. Data acquired under this agreement will bemore » available to the public through NREL's Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center (MIDC) (www.nrel.gov/midc) or the Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC ) (http://rredc.nrel.gov). The MIDC offers a variety of standard data display, access, and analysis tools designed to address the needs of a wide user audience (e.g., industry, academia, and government interests.« less

  9. Preparation of Underrepresented Males for Scientific Careers: A Study of the Dr. John H. Hopps Jr. Defense Research Scholars Program at Morehouse College

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Rahmelle C.; Monroe-White, Thema; Xavier, Jeffrey; Howell, Courtney; Moore, Myisha Roberson; Haynes, J. K.

    2016-01-01

    Equal representation within higher education science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields and the STEM workforce in the United States across demographically diverse populations is a long-standing challenge. This study uses two-to-one nearest-neighbor matched-comparison group design to examine academic achievement, pursuit of graduate science degree, and classification of graduate institution attended by students participating in the Hopps Scholars Program (Hopps) at Morehouse College. Hopps is a highly structured enrichment program aimed at increasing participation of black males in STEM fields. Morehouse institutional records, Hopps Program records, and National Student Clearinghouse data were used to examine differences between Hopps and non-Hopps STEM graduates of Morehouse. Two-way sample t tests and chi-square tests revealed significant differences in academic achievement, likelihood of STEM degree pursuit, and the classification of graduate institutions attended by Hopps versus non-Hopps students. Hopps Scholars were significantly more likely than non-Hopps STEM graduates both to pursue STEM doctoral degrees and to attend doctoral-granting institutions with higher research activity. The Hopps Program’s approach to training black male students for scientific careers is a model of success for other programs committed to increasing the number of black males pursuing advanced degrees in STEM. PMID:27562959

  10. Preparation of Underrepresented Males for Scientific Careers: A Study of the Dr. John H. Hopps Jr. Defense Research Scholars Program at Morehouse College.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Rahmelle C; Monroe-White, Thema; Xavier, Jeffrey; Howell, Courtney; Moore, Myisha Roberson; Haynes, J K

    Equal representation within higher education science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields and the STEM workforce in the United States across demographically diverse populations is a long-standing challenge. This study uses two-to-one nearest-neighbor matched-comparison group design to examine academic achievement, pursuit of graduate science degree, and classification of graduate institution attended by students participating in the Hopps Scholars Program (Hopps) at Morehouse College. Hopps is a highly structured enrichment program aimed at increasing participation of black males in STEM fields. Morehouse institutional records, Hopps Program records, and National Student Clearinghouse data were used to examine differences between Hopps and non-Hopps STEM graduates of Morehouse. Two-way sample t tests and chi-square tests revealed significant differences in academic achievement, likelihood of STEM degree pursuit, and the classification of graduate institutions attended by Hopps versus non-Hopps students. Hopps Scholars were significantly more likely than non-Hopps STEM graduates both to pursue STEM doctoral degrees and to attend doctoral-granting institutions with higher research activity. The Hopps Program's approach to training black male students for scientific careers is a model of success for other programs committed to increasing the number of black males pursuing advanced degrees in STEM. © 2016 R. C. Thompson et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Evaluation of semiempirical atmospheric density models for orbit determination applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, C. M.; Feiertag, R. J.; Oza, D. H.; Doll, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of the orbit determination performance of the Jacchia-Roberts (JR), mass spectrometer incoherent scatter 1986 (MSIS-86), and drag temperature model (DTM) atmospheric density models. Evaluation of the models was performed to assess the modeling of the total atmospheric density. This study was made generic by using six spacecraft and selecting time periods of study representative of all portions of the 11-year cycle. Performance of the models was measured for multiple spacecraft, representing a selection of orbit geometries from near-equatorial to polar inclinations and altitudes from 400 kilometers to 900 kilometers. The orbit geometries represent typical low earth-orbiting spacecraft supported by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD). The best available modeling and orbit determination techniques using the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS) were employed to minimize the effects of modeling errors. The latest geopotential model available during the analysis, the Goddard earth model-T3 (GEM-T3), was employed to minimize geopotential model error effects on the drag estimation. Improved-accuracy techniques identified for TOPEX/Poseidon orbit determination analysis were used to improve the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS)-based orbit determination used for most of the spacecraft chosen for this analysis. This paper shows that during periods of relatively quiet solar flux and geomagnetic activity near the solar minimum, the choice of atmospheric density model used for orbit determination is relatively inconsequential. During typical solar flux conditions near the solar maximum, the differences between the JR, DTM, and MSIS-86 models begin to become apparent. Time periods of extreme solar activity, those in which the daily and 81-day mean solar flux are high and change rapidly, result in significant differences between the models. During periods of high

  12. Expedition 3 Crew Interview: Frank Culbertson, Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 3 Commander Frank Culbertson is seen being interviewed before leaving to become part of the third resident crew on the International Space Station (ISS). He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He discusses his expectations for life on the ISS and the experiments he will be performing while on board. Culbertson gives details on the spacewalks that will take place during the STS-105 mission (the mission carrying the Expedition 3 crew up to the ISS) and the unloading operations for the Multipurpose Logistics Module.

  13. 1998 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenoweth, Karin; Evelyn, Jamilah

    1998-01-01

    Announces the Sports Scholars Awards for 1998. One male and one female college athlete are profiled, and others are named for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, riflery, bowling, football, wrestling, soccer, lacrosse, field hockey, swimming/diving, gymnastics, crew, tennis, golf, volleyball, track/field, cross country, downhill skiing, and…

  14. Aldrin, Edwin Eugene, Jr [`Buzz'] (1930-)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronaut, born in Montclair, NJ, trained as a fighter pilot (Korean War), he space-walked during the Gemini 12 mission, and was pilot of the lunar module of Apollo 11, the first manned lunar landing. Aldrin followed NEIL ARMSTRONG as the second man to walk on the Moon....

  15. John H Glenn Jr. Wreath Laying Ceremony

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-09

    Former astronaut Bob Cabana, director of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, speaks with news media members at the Heroes and Legends exhibit hall at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex following a ceremony remembering astronaut Sen. John Glenn, who passed away Dec. 8, 2016 at age 95. Glenn, one of the first seven astronauts NASA chose to fly the first missions of the Space Age, gained worldwide acclaim during his Mercury mission that made him the first American to orbit the Earth. He flew again in 1998 aboard space shuttle Discovery at age 77.

  16. John H Glenn Jr. Wreath Laying Ceremony

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-09

    A memorial wreath stands at the Heroes and Legends exhibit hall at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex before a ceremony remembering astronaut Sen. John Glenn, who passed away Dec. 8, 2016 at age 95. Glenn, one of the first seven astronauts NASA chose to fly the first missions of the Space Age, gained worldwide acclaim during his Mercury mission that made him the first American to orbit the Earth. He flew again in 1998 aboard space shuttle Discovery at age 77.

  17. John H Glenn Jr. Wreath Laying Ceremony

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-09

    Former space shuttle astronaut Jon McBride speaks at the Heroes and Legends exhibit hall at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex during a ceremony remembering astronaut Sen. John Glenn who passed away Dec. 8, 2016 at age 95. Glenn, one of the first seven astronauts NASA chose to fly the first missions of the Space Age, gained worldwide acclaim during his Mercury mission that made him the first American to orbit the Earth. He flew again in 1998 aboard space shuttle Discovery at age 77.

  18. John H Glenn Jr. Wreath Laying Ceremony

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-09

    Former astronaut Bob Cabana, director of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, speaks at the Heroes and Legends exhibit hall at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex during a ceremony remembering astronaut Sen. John Glenn who passed away Dec. 8, 2016 at age 95. Glenn, one of the first seven astronauts NASA chose to fly the first missions of the Space Age, gained worldwide acclaim during his Mercury mission that made him the first American to orbit the Earth. He flew again in 1998 aboard space shuttle Discovery at age 77.

  19. John H Glenn Jr. Wreath Laying Ceremony

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-09

    A portrait of Sen. John Glenn and a memorial wreath stand at the Heroes and Legends exhibit hall at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex before a ceremony remembering the iconic astronaut who passed away Dec. 8, 2016 at age 95. Glenn, one of the first seven astronauts NASA chose to fly the first missions of the Space Age, gained worldwide acclaim during his Mercury mission that made him the first American to orbit the Earth. He flew again in 1998 aboard space shuttle Discovery at age 77.

  20. John H Glenn Jr. Wreath Laying Ceremony

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-09

    An Atlas rocket and Mercury capsule like the ones that carried Sen. John Glenn into Earth orbit in February 1962 stand in the Rocket Garden at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex adjacent to the Heroes and Legends exhibit hall where Glenn was remembered during a ceremony Dec. 9, 2016. Glenn, one of the Mercury Seven astronauts NASA chose to fly the first missions of the Space Age, passed away on Dec. 8, 2016, at age 95. He gained worldwide acclaim during his Mercury mission that made him the first American to orbit the Earth. He flew again in 1998 aboard space shuttle Discovery at age 77.

  1. John H Glenn Jr. Wreath Laying Ceremony

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-09

    News media members and visitors gather at the Heroes and Legends exhibit hall at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex during a ceremony remembering astronaut Sen. John Glenn who passed away Dec. 8, 2016 at age 95. Glenn, one of the first seven astronauts NASA chose to fly the first missions of the Space Age, gained worldwide acclaim during his Mercury mission that made him the first American to orbit the Earth. He flew again in 1998 aboard space shuttle Discovery at age 77.

  2. Jamiel Shaw, Jr. Memorial Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Jones, Walter B., Jr. [R-NC-3

    2013-05-08

    House - 07/15/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Michael Pohle Jr. Campus Emergency Alert Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Menendez, Robert [D-NJ

    2012-04-16

    Senate - 04/16/2012 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. John H Glenn Jr. Wreath Laying Ceremony

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-09

    Former astronauts Bob Cabana, director of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, from left, Jon McBride, Al Worden and Winston Scott pose outside the Heroes and Legends exhibit hall at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex following a ceremony remembering astronaut Sen. John Glenn, who passed away Dec. 8, 2016 at age 95. Glenn, one of the first seven astronauts NASA chose to fly the first missions of the Space Age, gained worldwide acclaim during his Mercury mission that made him the first American to orbit the Earth. He flew again in 1998 aboard space shuttle Discovery at age 77.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Airblast.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    OIL . > L 3 4X4, Z, 8 W~ 0 N § I E L 4 CM0u5 L OF L L 0 0V00E0 01U 0 0 00 C C L 4...0 . . . .8 1- 12 𔃾 .6I~ 2. 22 .4 .62. 1. 3-21. 94 Lj UU LUV NOS >, , , , I ~ 4 j ~ 3 5 j 4 j I I JI ’ .LiI 4- ZAz 4-r:0 P. w 9- 0I1’ f *K I u V1 96...CHARI JR~Atj_ 49 w gI&’ I ~II OIICFILE Copy 0 NUMERICAL MODELING OF AIRLAST 1ST YEAR FINAL REPORT SAIC 87!/7Ol JUNE 1987 *dne4. -m~ca bilm i

  6. Measurement of Flying Qualities of a Dehavilland Mosquito F-8 Airplane (AAF No. 43-334960) I: Lateral and Directional Stability and Control Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, W.E.; Talmage, D.B.; Crane, H.L.

    1945-01-01

    The data presented have no bearing on performance characteristics of airplane, which were considered exceptionally good in previous tests. Some of the undesirable features of lateral and directional stability and control characteristics of the F-8 are listed. Directional stability, with rudder fixed, did not sufficiently restrict aileron yaw; rudder control was inadequate during take-off and landing, and was insufficient to fly airplane with one engine; in clean condition, power of ailerons was slightly below minimum value specified; it was difficult to trim airplane in rough air.

  7. Inverse Problems, Control and Modeling in the Presence of Uncertainty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-30

    using a Kelvin model, CRSC- TR07-08, March, 2007; IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, submitted. [P18] K. Ito, Q. Huynh and J . Toivanen, A fast...Science and Engineering, Springer (2006), 595 602 . [P19] K.Ito and J . Toivanen, A fast iterative solver for scattering by elastic objects in layered...and N.G. Medhin, " A stick-slip/Rouse hybrid model", CRSC-TR05-28, August, 2005. [P23] H.T. Banks, A . F. Karr, H. K. Nguyen, and J . R. Samuels, Jr

  8. Evaluation of Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment Products on South Florida Nested Simulations with the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Ocean Model 7:285-322 Halliwell GR Jr, Weisberg RH, Mayer DA (2003) A synthetic float analysis of upper-limb meridional overturning circulation ...encompasses a variety of coastal regions (the broad Southwest Florida shelf, the narrow Atlantic Keys shelf, the shallow Florida Bay, and Biscayne...products. The results indicate that the successful hindcasting of circulation patterns in a coastal area that is characterized by complex topography and

  9. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. (center, left and right) talk with Kathy Laufenberg, Orbiter Airframe Engineering ground rea manager, and Tom Roberts, Airframe Engineering System specialist, both with United Space Alliance. At far right is Bruce Buckingham, assistant to Dr. Whitlow. They are standing in front of the aft base heatshield of Endeavour, which is in its Orbiter Major Modification period that began in December 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-25

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. (center, left and right) talk with Kathy Laufenberg, Orbiter Airframe Engineering ground rea manager, and Tom Roberts, Airframe Engineering System specialist, both with United Space Alliance. At far right is Bruce Buckingham, assistant to Dr. Whitlow. They are standing in front of the aft base heatshield of Endeavour, which is in its Orbiter Major Modification period that began in December 2003.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. (center, left and right) talk with Kathy Laufenberg, Orbiter Airframe Engineering ground area manager, and Tom Roberts, Airframe Enginering System specialist, both with United Space Alliance. At far right is Bruce Buckingham, assistant to Dr. Whitlow. They are standing in front of the aft base heatshield of Endeavour, which is in its Orbiter Major Modification period that began in December 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-25

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. (center, left and right) talk with Kathy Laufenberg, Orbiter Airframe Engineering ground area manager, and Tom Roberts, Airframe Enginering System specialist, both with United Space Alliance. At far right is Bruce Buckingham, assistant to Dr. Whitlow. They are standing in front of the aft base heatshield of Endeavour, which is in its Orbiter Major Modification period that began in December 2003.

  12. Tax Evasion and Nonequilibrium Model on Apollonian Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    2012-11-01

    The Zaklan model had been proposed and studied recently using the equilibrium Ising model on square lattices (SLs) by [G. Zaklan, F. Westerhoff and D. Stauffer, J. Econ. Interact. Coord.4, 1 (2008), arXiv:0801.2980; G. Zaklan, F. W. S. Lima and F. Westerhoff, Physica A387, 5857 (2008)], near the critical temperature of the Ising model presenting a well-defined phase transition; but on normal and modified Apollonian networks (ANs), [J. S. Andrade, Jr., H. J. Herrmann, R. F. S. Andrade, and L. R. da Silva, Phys. Rev. Lett.94, 018702 (2005); R. F. S. Andrade, J. S. Andrade Jr. and H. J. Herrmann, Phys. Rev. E79, 036105 (2009)] studied the equilibrium Ising model. They showed the equilibrium Ising model not to present on ANs a phase transition of the type for the 2D Ising model. Here, using agent-based Monte Carlo simulations, we study the Zaklan model with the well-known majority-vote model (MVM) with noise and apply it to tax evasion on ANs, to show that differently from the Ising model the MVM on ANs presents a well-defined phase transition. To control the tax evasion in the economics model proposed by Zaklan et al., MVM is applied in the neighborhood of the critical noise qc to the Zaklan model. Here we show that the Zaklan model is robust because this can also be studied, besides using equilibrium dynamics of Ising model, through the nonequilibrium MVM and on various topologies giving the same behavior regardless of dynamic or topology used here.

  13. Statement of Rear Admiral Nevin P. Carr, Jr., United States Navy Chief of Naval Research before the Terrorism, Unconventional Threats and Capabilities Subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committee on The Fiscal year 2011 Budget Request

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-23

    foundation of our S&T portfolio by developing a broad base of scientific knowledge from which INP, FNC, and quick reaction efforts are generated...optimally tailoring experiences, in real-time, to current cognitive and physiological states of the learner. A unique human systems design approach is...efforts include modeling human responses to blast, ballistic, and blunt trauma, as well as modeling physical and cognitive effects of blast exposure and

  14. GEM System: automatic prototyping of cell-wide metabolic pathway models from genomes.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Kazuharu; Yamada, Yohei; Shinoda, Kosaku; Nakayama, Yoichi; Tomita, Masaru

    2006-03-23

    Successful realization of a "systems biology" approach to analyzing cells is a grand challenge for our understanding of life. However, current modeling approaches to cell simulation are labor-intensive, manual affairs, and therefore constitute a major bottleneck in the evolution of computational cell biology. We developed the Genome-based Modeling (GEM) System for the purpose of automatically prototyping simulation models of cell-wide metabolic pathways from genome sequences and other public biological information. Models generated by the GEM System include an entire Escherichia coli metabolism model comprising 968 reactions of 1195 metabolites, achieving 100% coverage when compared with the KEGG database, 92.38% with the EcoCyc database, and 95.06% with iJR904 genome-scale model. The GEM System prototypes qualitative models to reduce the labor-intensive tasks required for systems biology research. Models of over 90 bacterial genomes are available at our web site.

  15. What is the philosophy of modelling soil moisture movement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Wu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    In laboratory, the soil moisture movement in the different soil textures has been analysed. From field investigation, at a spot, the soil moisture movement in the root zone, vadose zone and shallow aquifer has been explored. In addition, on ground slopes, the interflow in the near surface soil layers has been studied. Along the regions near river reaches, the expansion and shrink of the saturated area due to rainfall occurrences have been observed. From those previous explorations regarding soil moisture movement, numerical models to represent this hydrologic process have been developed. However, generally, due to high heterogeneity and stratification of soil in a basin, modelling soil moisture movement is rather challenging. Normally, some empirical equations or artificial manipulation are employed to adjust the soil moisture movement in various numerical models. In this study, we inspect the soil moisture movement equations used in a watershed model, SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) (Neitsch et al., 2005), to examine the limitations of our knowledge in such a hydrologic process. Then, we adopt the features of a topographic-information based on a hydrologic model, TOPMODEL (Beven and Kirkby, 1979), to enhance the representation of soil moisture movement in SWAT. Basically, the results of the study reveal, to some extent, the philosophy of modelling soil moisture movement in numerical models, which will be presented in the conference. Beven, K.J. and Kirkby, M.J., 1979. A physically based variable contributing area model of basin hydrology. Hydrol. Science Bulletin, 24: 43-69. Neitsch, S.L., Arnold, J.G., Kiniry, J.R., Williams, J.R. and King, K.W., 2005. Soil and Water Assessment Tool Theoretical Documentation, Grassland, soil and research service, Temple, TX.

  16. O-regime dynamics and modeling in Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, F.; Giruzzi, G.; Imbeaux, F.; Udintsev, V. S.; Artaud, J. F.; Barana, O.; Dumont, R.; Mazon, D.; Ségui, J.-L.

    2009-06-01

    The regime of nonlinear temperature oscillations (O-regime), characteristic of noninductive discharges on Tore Supra [Équipe Tore Supra, Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Nice, France, 1988 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 9], is investigated in its triggering and suppressing mechanism. This regime can be described by two nonlinearly coupled equations for the current density j(r ) and the electron temperature Te(r) where the equation coefficients are functions of j and Te themselves. Both the integrated modeling code CRONOS [V. Basiuk et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 822 (2003)] and a two-patch predator-prey system with diffusion and noise have been used and results have been compared to the experimental observations of the O-regime. A database of discharges is analyzed which features monotonic, flat, and reversed safety factor (q) profiles in order to characterize the action of external actuators on the regime dynamics with the widest generality. Electron cyclotron current drive and neutral beam injections have been used in order to induce localized perturbations in the total current profile j(r ) as well as to change the plasma confinement conditions in the central region. Magnetic shear perturbations and modifications of the heat transport turn out to be the central parameters governing the dynamics of the O-regime.

  17. Investigation of Intravenous Hydroxocobalamin Compared to Hextend for Resuscitation in a Swine Model of Uncontrolled Hemorrhagic Shock: A Preliminary Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-27

    TYPE 0812712017 Poster 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investigation of intravenous hydroxocobalamin compared to Hcxtcnd for resuscitation in a S\\vinc...Praleos1onal 7,.0 ApprdvtJ 𔃻Jr ,~1~, re.l14’t. Oi*i~,J;D" i\\ vŕ:~1wJ. Investigation of intravenous Hydroxocobalamin compared to Hextend® for resu...effective as IV Hextend® in improving systolic blood pressure (SBP) in a controlled hemorrhagic shock model. We aimed to compare IV hydroxocobalamin (HOC

  18. A Detailed Study of the Interstellar Protons toward the TeV γ-Ray SNR RX J0852.0-4622 (G266.2-1.2, Vela Jr.): The Third Case of the γ-Ray and ISM Spatial Correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Y.; Sano, H.; Sato, J.; Okamoto, R.; Fukuda, T.; Yoshiike, S.; Hayashi, K.; Torii, K.; Hayakawa, T.; Rowell, G.; Filipović, M. D.; Maxted, N.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Kawamura, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Okuda, T.; Mizuno, N.; Tachihara, K.; Onishi, T.; Mizuno, A.; Ogawa, H.

    2017-11-01

    We present a new analysis of the interstellar protons toward the TeV γ-ray SNR RX J0852.0-4622 (G266.2-1.2, Vela Jr.). We used the NANTEN2 12CO(J = 1-0) and Australia Telescope Compact Array and Parkes H I data sets in order to derive the molecular and atomic gas associated with the TeV γ-ray shell of the SNR. We find that atomic gas over a velocity range from V LSR = -4 to 50 km s-1 or 60 km s-1 is associated with the entire SNR, while molecular gas is associated with a limited portion of the SNR. The large velocity dispersion of the H I is ascribed to the expanding motion of a few H I shells overlapping toward the SNR but is not due to the Galactic rotation. The total masses of the associated H I and molecular gases are estimated to be ˜ 2.5× {10}4 M ⊙ and ˜103 M ⊙, respectively. A comparison with the High Energy Stereoscopic System TeV γ-rays indicates that the interstellar protons have an average density around 100 cm-3 and shows a good spatial correspondence with the TeV γ-rays. The total cosmic-ray proton energy is estimated to be ˜1048 erg for the hadronic γ-ray production, which may still be an underestimate by a factor of a few due to a small filling factor of the SNR volume by the interstellar protons. This result presents a third case, after RX J1713.7-3946 and HESS J1731-347, of the good spatial correspondence between the TeV γ-rays and the interstellar protons, lending further support for a hadronic component in the γ-rays from young TeV γ-ray SNRs.

  19. In Memoriam: Herbert E. Wright, Jr., 1917-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, Cathy; Stein, Julie K.; Fritz, Sherilyn

    2016-01-01

    Professor Herbert E. Wright passed away on November 12, 2015 in his 98th year. His passing leaves many in Quaternary community reflecting on his enormous contributions to the discipline, as well as the many ways in which he touched our lives. Herb's legacy, writ large, is evidenced by decades of scholarly contributions to the fields of glacial geology, geomorphology, paleoecology, paleolimnology, paleoclimatology, and archaeology. During the course of his career, he authored and co-authored over 250 scientific publications and co-edited 16 influential volumes on the Quaternary.

  20. Dr. John H. Hopps Jr. Research Scholars Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-20

    Program staff, alumni and existing participants. Over the course of the last five months, SageFox has successfully obtained IRB approval for all...and awards. Progress made in development of the HoppsNet system included design and implementation of a relational database in MySQL , development of

  1. Consumer Chemistry for Middle/Jr. High Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Steven J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Objectives, materials needed, procedures, discussion questions, and follow-up activities are provided for five experiments. They include (1) testing for sugars; (2) comparing sugar to artificial sweeteners; (3) chewing gum scientifically; (4) soap making; and (5) making toothpaste. (JN)

  2. Martin Luther King, Jr. East Busway in Pittsburgh, PA

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1987-10-01

    The Port Authority of Allegheny County (PAT), the primary public transit operator in Pittsburgh, PA, built an exclusive roadway for buses which opened for service in February 1983. The two-lane, 6.8-mile facility serves the eastern suburbs via a righ...

  3. Aiming at Targets: The Autobiography of Robert C. Seamans, Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seamans, Robert C., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Bob Seamans originally was inspired to write this book for his family and friends. That is a large audience. By his own count his immediate family numbers twenty-four, not counting brothers and cousins and their families. His friends are uncounted but surely run to hundreds. As one of them and as a colleague at NASA, I am pleased and honored that he asked me to write this foreword. While written in Bob's unique and informal style, this autobiography has significance for many readers beyond his large circles of family and friends. Leaders and students of large, complex technological endeavors should be able to learn much from reading how Bob faced the daunting technical and management challenges in his career. As the title of this book implies, Bob has always set high goals for himself and then kept his eyes focused on both the necessary details and the broader picture. His ability to shift smoothly among jobs that required seemingly disparate abilities and skills speaks volumes about his insight, dedication, and enthusiasm for achievement. The book spans a truly remarkable life story. Bob first takes us through his growing up, education, and early professional and family life. Next he focuses on the crucial years when he was the general manager of NASA. Then he moves on to his career in the top jobs at the Air Force, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Energy Research and Development Administration. Finally, he touches on his later leadership activities in the academic and business worlds. Aiming at Targets is a series of fascinating topical vignettes covering his professional life. Taken together, like broad brushstrokes in an impressionist painting, they give a better picture of Bob Seamans and his work than a detailed recitation of facts and dates could hope to do. This is a cheerful account of an interesting and successful career. The book is full of good stories, with many memorable characters. Like the proverbial sundial, it counts the sunny hours. It is a good read. But it has its serious side. Bob's career wasn't all fun. The Apollo 204 fire, which killed three astronauts, was a terrible climax to his time at NASA. As one who lived through those days with him, I can recall the trauma and special sense of responsibility he felt. His account of this period and of the sad deterioration of his relationship with his boss, Jim Webb, is both fair and generous. Those were not happy times, but they should not be allowed to overshadow the fact that in his seven years at NASA, Bob Seamans led the agency to its first successes and laid the groundwork for the great successes that came later.

  4. ASTRONAUT CHARLES CONRAD, JR. - SKYLAB (SL)-2 - JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-02-27

    S73-17859 (January 1973) --- Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, pilot for Skylab 2 (first Skylab manned) mission, looks over off-duty recreational equipment in the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer during Skylab simulation activity at the Manned Spacecraft Center. The equipment includes such items as tape decks and stereo music equipment, playing cards, darts, etc. The OWS is a component of the Skylab space station cluster which will be launched unmanned aboard a Saturn V in summer of 1973, and will be visited three times by three-man crews over an eight month period. Photo credit: NASA

  5. Conversations with Rep. Ken Calvert. Interview by Frank Sietzen Jr.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Ken

    2005-07-01

    Rep. Calvert, chair of the House aeronautics and space subcommittee of the Science Committee, answers questions related to priorities for space in the current congressional session: the Vision for Space Exploration, development of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and other heavy-lift launch vehicles, entrepreneurial alliances in the space transportation industry, the U.S. aerospace industry, space tourism, entrepreneurs and NASA, U.S. aeronautics research, a service mission to the Hubble Space Telescope, and priority military space programs.

  6. William J. Brennan Jr.: Judicial Architect of Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisler, Kim Isaac

    1997-01-01

    More than any other Supreme Court Justice, William Brennan worked to level the playing field for black Americans. As the recognized architect of affirmative action strategies for higher education, he left an indelible imprint on equal education in America. (SLD)

  7. Willis Lamb, Jr., the Hydrogen Atom, and the Lamb Shift

    Science.gov Websites

    1955, Lamb won the Nobel Prize in Physics for his discoveries concerning "the fine structure of , May 7 - September 30, 1979 Fine Structure of the Hydrogen Atom, Part I; Part II; Part III; Part IV ; Part V; Part VI (from Physical Review 1950-1953) Microwave Technique for Determining the Fine Structure

  8. Dr. John H. Hopps Jr. Defense Research Scholars Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-16

    Summer 2011) Post -Graduation Plans • Employed as a mechanical engineer at Allegion. • Applying to graduate programs in industrial design and mechanical...Summer 2010) • Multi-Layer Mirror Design for Ultra-Soft X-Rays, Ecole Polytechnique (Summer 2011) Post -Graduation Plans • Post Baccalaureate Research...the year off to work while others planned on strengthening their applications by broadening their research skills in post baccalaureate programs

  9. The Legacy Project--William E. Dugger, Jr., DTE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moye, Johnny J.; Dugger, William E., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    This is the ninth in a series of articles entitled "The Legacy Project." The Legacy Project focuses on the lives and actions of leaders who have forged the educator profession into what it is today. Members of the profession owe a debt of gratitude to these leaders. One simple way to demonstrate that gratitude is to recognize these…

  10. Obituary: Harding Eugene (Gene) Smith, Jr., 1947-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Carol; Soifer, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Harding Eugene Smith Junior, or Gene, as he was known to family, friends, and colleagues, passed away after an automobile accident in Encinitas, California, on 16 August 2007. He was 60 years old. Gene had recently retired from UCSD after thirty years of service. A memorial service was held at Quail Botanical Gardens in Encinitas, California, on 23 August 2007. A web page is dedicated to his memory at http://harding.smith.muchloved.com, where contributions of memories are invited. Gene was born in San Jose, California in 1947, to Harding Eugene Smith Senior, and Bernice Smith (nee Smith). Harding Smith Senior was an air-force navigator; therefore Gene spent his childhood moving from one air-force base to another. Although an only child, Gene was very close to his cousin Meg, whom he lived nearby to in Gilroy for a time, and the two were like brother and sister. The elder Harding Smith was lost in action over Cambodia in the mid-sixties. Gene was a dedicated student, a boy scout, and a Presidential Scholar. He majored in Physics at Caltech, where he also took a lively interest in the football team and the Glee Club, and was elected a House Officer. To his close friends, he was known at Caltech as Smitty, and the closest of them was Rob Drew, who gave a glimpse into that period of Gene's life at the memorial: "Gene arrived early at campus his first year, in response to an invitation to join the football team. Gene's size and features reminded the head coach of a long-forgotten player named 'Johnson.' After a few days of confusion, Gene simply replaced the name on his helmet. 'Johnson!' coach would yell, 'get in there!' If Johnson was going to get to play, Gene was going to be the best Johnson available!" Gene spent the summer of 1966 working at Kitt Peak, where his lifetime love of observing with ground-based telescopes began, though he learned some things the hard way, such as the fact that trying to squeeze 40,000 numbers onto a computer that stored only 32,000 resulted in blown fuses. In a final letter of that summer back to Drew he wrote: "My summer is now complete. I have achieved the highest pinnacle in my quest for fulfillment. Striking a blow for humanity I just blew the whole Kitt Peak CDC3200 computer system. Those fuses were nothing compared to this!" Gene's graduate work, on the metal abundances in HII regions of nearby galaxies, was done at Berkeley, where Hyron Spinrad was his thesis advisor. He loved observing and spent numerous fun nights at Lick, Kitt Peak, Cerro Tololo, Keck, and many other observatories. He joined Margaret Burbidge at UCSD for a postdoctoral fellowship, and joined the teaching faculty there in 1978. Gene spent his entire professional career at UCSD. His research ranged from the study of quasar absorptions lines to the astrophysics of Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxies. He was a key participant in UC-wide astronomy support, including being the chair of the science-advisory committee for the Ten Meter Telescope project, which later "morphed" into the Keck Observatory. His contributions to enabling that project were both essential and unheralded. Gene was a dedicated and enthusiastic teacher. One of his favorite undergraduate classes gave him the opportunity to dress up in Renaissance garb and pretend to be Galileo, while the experiment most loved by his students was when they got to attempt to drop an egg on his head from several stories high. Gene was also an outstanding advisor and mentor, and both his first post-doc, Rick Puetter, and his last graduate student, Brian Siana, were able to attend his memorial service and provide some special memories of their experiences with him. Rick recalled a memorable trip to Cerro Tololo when they packed up two infrared spectrometers for the trip, and everything conceivable went wrong, from inspections at the airport to spectrometer parts broken on the plane and instrument failures at the observatory, to finally being completely clouded out. Brian recounted: "I spent countless cloudy nights listening to Gene's stories that began with "When men were men and giants roamed the Earth . . . ". I still don't know what that means, but it always preceded some sage advice." Besides astrophysics, Gene's passions included horse riding (the faster the better), sailing, hiking, the northern California coast and mountains, black-and-white photography, extremely strong coffee, travel (especially European castles and cathedrals, and any road-less-traveled that he came across), cooking and fine restaurants, Native American pottery, basketware and kachinas, and classical music. He also loved to sing, and friends would say he had a song for every occasion. He was a dedicated and enthusiastic supporter of all causes environmental and conservationist, and among figures he greatly admired were John Muir and Ansel Adams. Gene is survived by his wife of eighteen years, Dr. Carol Jean Lonsdale; step-daughter Kimberley; daughter Tamsyn; cousins Meg and Chris Bailey; in-laws Colin and Marilou Lonsdale, and Graham Lonsdale; niece Joanna; and two nephews Greg and Wes. He is also greatly missed by his many friends and colleagues, his golden retriever, Jasper, and his palomino horse, Sundance.

  11. The Gifted and Honors Program at Ridgeroad Jr. High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Bonnie

    1984-01-01

    Describes a science program for honors students that offers a blend of both teacher-directed and student-directed activities. Includes information on instructional strategies used, independent student study projects, financial considerations, grading, and student reaction to the program. (JN)

  12. John H Glenn Jr. Receives Presidential Medal of Freedom

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-29

    President Barack Obama presents former United States Marine Corps pilot, astronaut and United States Senator John Glenn with a Medal of Freedom, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, during a ceremony at the White House in Washington.

  13. Raymond Davis Jr., Solar Neutrinos, and the Solar Neutrino Problems

    Science.gov Websites

    Neutrinos. II. Experimental; DOE Technical Report, March 16, 1964 Search for Neutrinos from the Sun; DOE Raymond Davis Dies, BNL Newsroom, June 1, 2006 Top Some links on this page may take you to non-federal

  14. Letter to Robert Shinn, Jr. Dated 2-10-98

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  15. 78 FR 5247 - Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... continuous struggle.'' Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, he mobilized multitudes of men and women to take on a... that ``we are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny...

  16. SAVEWS Jr. User’s Manual, Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Botany 53: 227-233. Mueller-Dombois, D., and H. Ellenberg. 1974. Aims and methods of vegetation ecology. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Norris...videography. Aquatic Botany 58: 269-287. Sabol, B., R. E. Melton, R. Chamberlain, P. Doering, and K. Haunert. 2002. Evaluation of a digital echo

  17. The Office of The Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr.

    Science.gov Websites

    Releases and Statements En Español Departments Borough Operations Budget Community Boards Community Español Departments Borough Operations Budget Community Boards Community Services Constituent Services Borough President Diaz's biography. BUDGET Get information on our capital budget process. RECENT NEWS

  18. 77 FR 2905 - Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... generation of Americans to be ``voices of reason, sanity, and understanding amid the voices of violence... rest until victory was won. As we work to meet the challenges of our time--from fixing our schools so...

  19. The STS-95 crew poses with a Mercury capsule model before returning to JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Before returning to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, members of the STS-95 crew pose with a model of a Mercury capsule following a media briefing at the Kennedy Space Center Press Site Auditorium . From left to right are Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA); Pilot Steven W. Lindsey; Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; Friendship 7; Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio and one of the original seven Project Mercury astronauts; Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski; and Mission Specialist Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA). Also on the crew is Mission Specialist and Payload Commander Stephen K. Robinson (not shown). The STS-95 mission ended with landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility at 12:04 p.m. EST on Nov. 7. The mission included research payloads such as the Spartan-201 solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as a SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  20. A model of axonal transport drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper a model of targeted drug delivery by means of active (motor-driven) axonal transport is developed. The model is motivated by recent experimental research by Filler et al. (A.G. Filler, G.T. Whiteside, M. Bacon, M. Frederickson, F.A. Howe, M.D. Rabinowitz, A.J. Sokoloff, T.W. Deacon, C. Abell, R. Munglani, J.R. Griffiths, B.A. Bell, A.M.L. Lever, Tri-partite complex for axonal transport drug delivery achieves pharmacological effect, Bmc Neuroscience 11 (2010) 8) that reported synthesis and pharmacological efficiency tests of a tri-partite complex designed for axonal transport drug delivery. The developed model accounts for two populations of pharmaceutical agent complexes (PACs): PACs that are transported retrogradely by dynein motors and PACs that are accumulated in the axon at the Nodes of Ranvier. The transitions between these two populations of PACs are described by first-order reactions. An analytical solution of the coupled system of transient equations describing conservations of these two populations of PACs is obtained by using Laplace transform. Numerical results for various combinations of parameter values are presented and their physical significance is discussed.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Standing in front of the Space Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex, KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Center Director Jim Kennedy and Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott bow their heads in prayer during a memorial service remembering and honoring the crew of Columbia. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. Scott is a former astronaut who flew on Columbia in 1997. The public was also invited to the memorial service.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Standing in front of the Space Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex, KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Center Director Jim Kennedy and Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott bow their heads in prayer during a memorial service remembering and honoring the crew of Columbia. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. Scott is a former astronaut who flew on Columbia in 1997. The public was also invited to the memorial service.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A wreath and other floral arrangements rest beneath the Astronaut Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex following a memorial service held for the crew of Columbia on the anniversary of the tragic accident that took their lives Feb. 1, 2003. The black granite mirror honors astronauts, whose names are carved in the surface, who have given their lives for space exploration.  The service included comments by Center Director Jim Kennedy, Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, and Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation, who placed the wreath at the mirror.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A wreath and other floral arrangements rest beneath the Astronaut Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex following a memorial service held for the crew of Columbia on the anniversary of the tragic accident that took their lives Feb. 1, 2003. The black granite mirror honors astronauts, whose names are carved in the surface, who have given their lives for space exploration.  The service included comments by Center Director Jim Kennedy, Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, and Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation, who placed the wreath at the mirror.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A wreath and other floral arrangements rest beneath the Astronaut Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex following a memorial service held for the crew of Columbia on the anniversary of the tragic accident that took their lives Feb. 1, 2003.  The service included comments by Center Director Jim Kennedy, Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, and Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation, who placed the wreath at the mirror.  The black granite mirror honors astronauts, whose names are carved in the surface, who have given their lives for space exploration.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A wreath and other floral arrangements rest beneath the Astronaut Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex following a memorial service held for the crew of Columbia on the anniversary of the tragic accident that took their lives Feb. 1, 2003.  The service included comments by Center Director Jim Kennedy, Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, and Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation, who placed the wreath at the mirror.  The black granite mirror honors astronauts, whose names are carved in the surface, who have given their lives for space exploration.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (left) and Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (right) exchange mementos during Mr. Yamamoto’s visit to KSC. Mr. Bridges also holds the logo of the new Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, a merger of three Japanese aeronautical and space agencies effective Oct.1, 2003. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module. His visit includes a tour of the Columbia Debris Hangar.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (left) and Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (right) exchange mementos during Mr. Yamamoto’s visit to KSC. Mr. Bridges also holds the logo of the new Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, a merger of three Japanese aeronautical and space agencies effective Oct.1, 2003. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module. His visit includes a tour of the Columbia Debris Hangar.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (left) is welcomed to KSC by Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (right). On the table between them is the logo of the new Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, a merger of three Japanese aeronautical and space agencies effective Oct.1, 2003. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module. His visit includes a tour of the Columbia Debris Hangar.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (left) is welcomed to KSC by Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (right). On the table between them is the logo of the new Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, a merger of three Japanese aeronautical and space agencies effective Oct.1, 2003. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of the newest Space Station module, the Japanese Experiment Module/pressurized module. His visit includes a tour of the Columbia Debris Hangar.

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, Center Director Jim Kennedy (center) and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. (far left) look at the external tank door corrosion work being done on Endeavour. Next to Whitlow is Bruce Buckingham, assistant to the deputy director. Providing information, at right, are Orbiter Airframe Engineering ground area manager, and Tom Roberts, Airframe Engineering System specialist, both with United Space Alliance; and Joy Huff, with KSC Space Shuttle Processing. Endeavour is in its Orbiter Major Modification period, which began in December 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-25

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, Center Director Jim Kennedy (center) and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. (far left) look at the external tank door corrosion work being done on Endeavour. Next to Whitlow is Bruce Buckingham, assistant to the deputy director. Providing information, at right, are Orbiter Airframe Engineering ground area manager, and Tom Roberts, Airframe Engineering System specialist, both with United Space Alliance; and Joy Huff, with KSC Space Shuttle Processing. Endeavour is in its Orbiter Major Modification period, which began in December 2003.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, Center Director Jim Kennedy (center) and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. (far left) look at the external tank door corrosion work being done on Endeavour. Next to Whitlow is Bruce Buckingham, assistant to the deputy director. Providing information, at right, are Kathy Laufenberg, Orbiter Airframe Engineering ground area manager, and Tom Roberts, Airframe Engineering System specialist, both with United Space Alliance; and Joy Huff, with Space Shuttle Processing. Endeavour is in its Orbiter Major Modification period, which began in December 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-25

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, Center Director Jim Kennedy (center) and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. (far left) look at the external tank door corrosion work being done on Endeavour. Next to Whitlow is Bruce Buckingham, assistant to the deputy director. Providing information, at right, are Kathy Laufenberg, Orbiter Airframe Engineering ground area manager, and Tom Roberts, Airframe Engineering System specialist, both with United Space Alliance; and Joy Huff, with Space Shuttle Processing. Endeavour is in its Orbiter Major Modification period, which began in December 2003.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In front of the Space Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex, Center Director Jim Kennedy (right) speaks to visitors gathered for the memorial service honoring the crew of Columbia. At left are KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. and Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott; at right is Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. The public was also invited to the memorial service held at the KSC Visitor Complex.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In front of the Space Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex, Center Director Jim Kennedy (right) speaks to visitors gathered for the memorial service honoring the crew of Columbia. At left are KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. and Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott; at right is Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. The public was also invited to the memorial service held at the KSC Visitor Complex.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Suzy Cunningham sings the national anthem to kick off Center Director Jim Kennedy’s first all-hands meeting conducted for employees. She is senior spaceport manager, NASA/Air Force Spaceport Planning and Customer Service Office. Making presentations were Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr., KSC deputy director; Tim Wilson, assistant chief engineer for Shuttle; and Bill Pickavance, vice president and deputy program manager, Florida operations, United Space Alliance. Representatives from the Shuttle program and contractor team were on hand to discuss the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report and where KSC stands in its progress toward return to flight.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-17

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Suzy Cunningham sings the national anthem to kick off Center Director Jim Kennedy’s first all-hands meeting conducted for employees. She is senior spaceport manager, NASA/Air Force Spaceport Planning and Customer Service Office. Making presentations were Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr., KSC deputy director; Tim Wilson, assistant chief engineer for Shuttle; and Bill Pickavance, vice president and deputy program manager, Florida operations, United Space Alliance. Representatives from the Shuttle program and contractor team were on hand to discuss the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report and where KSC stands in its progress toward return to flight.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Before going on an air boat ride around Kennedy Space Center, Congressman Tom Feeney and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. are briefed about the trip. During January and February, Congressman Feeney traveled the entire coastline of Florida’s 24th District, and concluded his walks March 1 in Brevard County. On his walks, he met with constituents and community leaders to discuss legislative issues that will be addressed by the 108th Congress. Feeney ended his beach walk at the KSC Visitor Complex main entrance.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Before going on an air boat ride around Kennedy Space Center, Congressman Tom Feeney and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. are briefed about the trip. During January and February, Congressman Feeney traveled the entire coastline of Florida’s 24th District, and concluded his walks March 1 in Brevard County. On his walks, he met with constituents and community leaders to discuss legislative issues that will be addressed by the 108th Congress. Feeney ended his beach walk at the KSC Visitor Complex main entrance.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Congressman Tom Feeney (left) and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. talk on the ground after completing an air boat ride around Kennedy Space Center. During January and February, Congressman Feeney traveled the entire coastline of Florida’s 24th District, and concluded his walks March 1 in Brevard County. On his walks, he met with constituents and community leaders to discuss legislative issues that will be addressed by the 108th Congress. Feeney ended his beach walk at the KSC Visitor Complex main entrance.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Congressman Tom Feeney (left) and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. talk on the ground after completing an air boat ride around Kennedy Space Center. During January and February, Congressman Feeney traveled the entire coastline of Florida’s 24th District, and concluded his walks March 1 in Brevard County. On his walks, he met with constituents and community leaders to discuss legislative issues that will be addressed by the 108th Congress. Feeney ended his beach walk at the KSC Visitor Complex main entrance.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Congressman Tom Feeney (left) and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. take an air boat ride around Kennedy Space Center. During January and February, Congressman Feeney traveled the entire coastline of Florida’s 24th District, and concluded his walks March 1 in Brevard County. On his walks, he met with constituents and community leaders to discuss legislative issues that will be addressed by the 108th Congress. Feeney ended his beach walk at the KSC Visitor Complex main entrance.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Congressman Tom Feeney (left) and Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. take an air boat ride around Kennedy Space Center. During January and February, Congressman Feeney traveled the entire coastline of Florida’s 24th District, and concluded his walks March 1 in Brevard County. On his walks, he met with constituents and community leaders to discuss legislative issues that will be addressed by the 108th Congress. Feeney ended his beach walk at the KSC Visitor Complex main entrance.

  13. Isotropic model for cluster growth on a regular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Christian A.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2013-08-01

    There exists a plethora of mathematical models for cluster growth and/or aggregation on regular lattices. Almost all suffer from inherent anisotropy caused by the regular lattice upon which they are grown. We analyze the little-known model for stochastic cluster growth on a regular lattice first introduced by Ferreira Jr. and Alves [J. Stat. Mech. Theo. & Exp.1742-546810.1088/1742-5468/2006/11/P11007 (2006) P11007], which produces circular clusters with no discernible anisotropy. We demonstrate that even in the noise-reduced limit the clusters remain circular. We adapt the model by introducing a specific rearrangement algorithm so that, rather than adding elements to the cluster from the outside (corresponding to apical growth), our model uses mitosis-like cell splitting events to increase the cluster size. We analyze the surface scaling properties of our model and compare it to the behavior of more traditional models. In “1+1” dimensions we discover and explore a new, nonmonotonic surface thickness scaling relationship which differs significantly from the Family-Vicsek scaling relationship. This suggests that, for models whose clusters do not grow through particle additions which are solely dependent on surface considerations, the traditional classification into “universality classes” may not be appropriate.

  14. Unmanned Surface Sea Vehicle Power System Design and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-29

    Singh, C.J. Fennie , Jr., A.J. Salkind, and D.E. Reisner, "A Fuzzy Logic Methodology to Determine State-of-Charge (SOC) in Electric and Hybrid Vehicle...Systems", 16th IEEE Photovoltaic same length of 10 meters. Specialists Conference, pp. 513-518, 1982. [5] Pritpal Singh, Craig J. Fennie , Jr., Alvin J...34Estimation of Battery Charge in Photovoltaic Systems", 16th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference, pp. 513-518, 1982. [5] Pritpal Singh, Craig J. Fennie , Jr

  15. Gauge invariance of phenomenological models of the interaction of quantum dissipative systems with electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokman, M. D.

    2009-05-01

    We discuss specific features of the electrodynamic characteristics of quantum systems within the framework of models that include a phenomenological description of the relaxation processes. As is shown by W. E. Lamb, Jr., R. R. Schlicher, and M. O. Scully [Phys. Rev. A 36, 2763 (1987)], the use of phenomenological relaxation operators, which adequately describe the attenuation of eigenvibrations of a quantum system, may lead to incorrect solutions in the presence of external electromagnetic fields determined by the vector potential for different resonance processes. This incorrectness can be eliminated by giving a gauge-invariant form to the relaxation operator. Lamb, Jr., proposed the corresponding gauge-invariant modification for the Weisskopf-Wigner relaxation operator, which is introduced directly into the Schrödinger equation within the framework of the two-level approximation. In the present paper, this problem is studied for the von Neumann equation supplemented by a relaxation operator. First, we show that the solution of the equation for the density matrix with the relaxation operator correctly obtained “from the first principles” has properties that ensure gauge invariance for the observables. Second, we propose a common recipe for transformation of the phenomenological relaxation operator into the correct (gauge-invariant) form in the density-matrix equations for a multilevel system. Also, we discuss the methods of elimination of other inaccuracies (not related to the gauge-invariance problem) which arise if the electrodynamic response of a dissipative quantum system is calculated within the framework of simplified relaxation models (first of all, the model corresponding to constant relaxation rates of coherences in quantum transitions). Examples illustrating the correctness of the results obtained within the framework of the proposed methods in contrast to inaccuracy of the results of the standard calculation techniques are given.

  16. Examining a Proposed Job Retention Model for Adult Workers with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornes, Sandra L.

    2008-01-01

    This research provides an analysis of factors predicting job retention (JR), job satisfaction (JS), and job performance (JP) of workers with mental retardation (MR). The findings highlight self-determination as a critical skill in influencing three important employee's outcomes, JR, JS, and JP. The intent of the study was to develop job retention…

  17. 76 FR 62605 - Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air Limited Model DHC-3 (Otter) Airplanes With Supplemental Type...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ...- 10 or -12JR turboprop engine installed per STC SA09866SC (Texas Turbines Conversions, Inc.). The...) airplanes equipped with a Honeywell TPE331-10 or -12JR turboprop engine installed per STC SA09866SC (Texas... the installation of a turboprop engine. We are issuing this AD to prevent the loss of airplane...

  18. A PDP model of the simultaneous perception of multiple objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Cynthia M.; McClelland, James L.

    2011-06-01

    Illusory conjunctions in normal and simultanagnosic subjects are two instances where the visual features of multiple objects are incorrectly 'bound' together. A connectionist model explores how multiple objects could be perceived correctly in normal subjects given sufficient time, but could give rise to illusory conjunctions with damage or time pressure. In this model, perception of two objects benefits from lateral connections between hidden layers modelling aspects of the ventral and dorsal visual pathways. As with simultanagnosia, simulations of dorsal lesions impair multi-object recognition. In contrast, a large ventral lesion has minimal effect on dorsal functioning, akin to dissociations between simple object manipulation (retained in visual form agnosia and semantic dementia) and object discrimination (impaired in these disorders) [Hodges, J.R., Bozeat, S., Lambon Ralph, M.A., Patterson, K., and Spatt, J. (2000), 'The Role of Conceptual Knowledge: Evidence from Semantic Dementia', Brain, 123, 1913-1925; Milner, A.D., and Goodale, M.A. (2006), The Visual Brain in Action (2nd ed.), New York: Oxford]. It is hoped that the functioning of this model might suggest potential processes underlying dorsal and ventral contributions to the correct perception of multiple objects.

  19. The roles of prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex in algebra problem solving: a case of using cognitive modeling to inform neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Danker, Jared F; Anderson, John R

    2007-04-15

    In naturalistic algebra problem solving, the cognitive processes of representation and retrieval are typically confounded, in that transformations of the equations typically require retrieval of mathematical facts. Previous work using cognitive modeling has associated activity in the prefrontal cortex with the retrieval demands of algebra problems and activity in the posterior parietal cortex with the transformational demands of algebra problems, but these regions tend to behave similarly in response to task manipulations (Anderson, J.R., Qin, Y., Sohn, M.-H., Stenger, V.A., Carter, C.S., 2003. An information-processing model of the BOLD response in symbol manipulation tasks. Psychon. Bull. Rev. 10, 241-261; Qin, Y., Carter, C.S., Silk, E.M., Stenger, A., Fissell, K., Goode, A., Anderson, J.R., 2004. The change of brain activation patterns as children learn algebra equation solving. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 101, 5686-5691). With this study we attempt to isolate activity in these two regions by using a multi-step algebra task in which transformation (parietal) is manipulated in the first step and retrieval (prefrontal) is manipulated in the second step. Counter to our initial predictions, both brain regions were differentially active during both steps. We designed two cognitive models, one encompassing our initial assumptions and one in which both processes were engaged during both steps. The first model provided a poor fit to the behavioral and neural data, while the second model fit both well. This simultaneously emphasizes the strong relationship between retrieval and representation in mathematical reasoning and demonstrates that cognitive modeling can serve as a useful tool for understanding task manipulations in neuroimaging experiments.

  20. Application of a Statistical Linear Time-Varying System Model of High Grazing Angle Sea Clutter for Computing Interference Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-12-08

    1088793. 3. R. Price and P. E. Green, Jr., “Signal processing in radar astronomy – communication via fluctuating multipath media,” rept. 234, MIT...Lincoln Laboratory (October 1960). 4. P. E. Green, Jr., “Radar astronomy measurement techniques,” rept. 282, MIT Lincoln Laboratory (December 1962). 5. A

  1. Ethiopian Central Rift Valley basin hydrologic modelling using HEC-HMS and ArcSWAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual-Ferrer, Jordi; Candela, Lucila; Pérez-Foguet, Agustí

    2013-04-01

    , considering data uncertainty and model complexity a previous hydrologic assessment of the basin based in HEC-HMS simulation is advisable. As a first approach HEC-HMS was implemented for basin modeling in order to get physical parameters of interest, results from HEC-HMS calibration were used to setup the accuracy of the ArcSWAT numerical modelling. References Arnold, J.G., Srinivasan, R., Muttiah, R.S. & Williams, J.R. (1998). Large Area Hydrologic Modeling and Assessment Part I: Model Development. JAWRA Journal of the American Water Resources Association, Vol. 34, No. 1, pp. 73-89. Jansen, H., Hengsdijk, H., Legesse, D., Ayenew, T., Hellegers, P. & Spliethoff, P. (2007). Land and water resources assessment in the Ethiopian Central Rift Valley. In Alterra report 1587. Wageningen: Alterra. p. 81. Neitsch, S.L., Arnold, J.G., Kiniry, J.R. & Williams, J.R. (2005). Soil and Water Assessment Tool Theoretical Documentation. Version 2005, Temple, Texas.

  2. Original Mercury Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The original Mercury Astronauts are pictured around a table admiring an Atlas model. Standing, left to right are Alan B. Shepard, Jr., Walter M. Schirra, Jr., and John H. Glenn, Jr.; sitting, left to right are Virgil I. Grissom, M. Scott Carpenter, Donald Slayton, and L. Gordon Cooper, Jr. Below the photo is a copy of each man's signature. Alternative photo number is B-59-41.

  3. Replication of the Hierarchical Visual-Perceptual-Image Rotation Model in De Wolff and Buiten's (1963) Battery of 46 Tests of Mental Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; te Nijenhuis, Jan; Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    In two recent papers, Johnson & Bouchard [Johnson, W., & Bouchard, T. J., Jr. (2005a). The structure of human intelligence: It is verbal, perceptual, and image rotation (VPR) , not fluid and crystallized. "Intelligence," 33, 393-416, Johnson W., & Bouchard, T. J., Jr. (2005b). Constructive replication of the visual…

  4. The Luminous Convolution Model-The light side of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, Sophia; Oblath, Noah; Formaggio, Joe; Goedecke, George; Chester, David; Ott, Richard; Ashley, Aaron; Rodriguez, Adrianna

    2014-03-01

    We present a heuristic model for predicting the rotation curves of spiral galaxies. The Luminous Convolution Model (LCM) utilizes Lorentz-type transformations of very small changes in the photon's frequencies from curved space-times to construct a dynamic mass model of galaxies. These frequency changes are derived using the exact solution to the exterior Kerr wave equation, as opposed to a linearized treatment. The LCM Lorentz-type transformations map between the emitter and the receiver rotating galactic frames, and then to the associated flat frames in each galaxy where the photons are emitted and received. This treatment necessarily rests upon estimates of the luminous matter in both the emitter and the receiver galaxies. The LCM is tested on a sample of 22 randomly chosen galaxies, represented in 33 different data sets. LCM fits are compared to the Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) Dark Matter Model and to the Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) model when possible. The high degree of sensitivity of the LCM to the initial assumption of a luminous mass to light ratios (M/L), of the given galaxy, is demonstrated. We demonstrate that the LCM is successful across a wide range of spiral galaxies for predicting the observed rotation curves. Through the generous support of the MIT Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Fellowship program.

  5. Hepatic SILAC proteomic data from PANDER transgenic model.

    PubMed

    Athanason, Mark G; Stevens, Stanley M; Burkhardt, Brant R

    2016-12-01

    This article contains raw and processed data related to research published in "Quantitative Proteomic Profiling Reveals Hepatic Lipogenesis and Liver X Receptor Activation in the PANDER Transgenic Model" (M.G. Athanason, W.A. Ratliff, D. Chaput, C.B. MarElia, M.N. Kuehl, S.M., Jr. Stevens, B.R. Burkhardt (2016)) [1], and was generated by "spike-in" SILAC-based proteomic analysis of livers obtained from the PANcreatic-Derived factor (PANDER) transgenic mouse (PANTG) under various metabolic conditions [1]. The mass spectrometry output of the PANTG and wild-type B6SJLF mice liver tissue and resulting proteome search from MaxQuant 1.2.2.5 employing the Andromeda search algorithm against the UniprotKB reference database for Mus musculus has been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://www.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with dataset identifiers PRIDE: PXD004171 and doi:10.6019/PXD004171. Protein ratio values representing PANTG/wild-type obtained by MaxQuant analysis were input into the Perseus processing suite to determine statistical significance using the Significance A outlier test (p<0.05). Differentially expressed proteins using this approach were input into Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to determined altered pathways and upstream regulators that were altered in PANTG mice.

  6. The rapid terrain visualization interferometric synthetic aperture radar sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Robert H.; Bickel, Douglas L.; Hensley, William H.

    2003-11-01

    The Rapid Terrain Visualization interferometric synthetic aperture radar was designed and built at Sandia National Laboratories as part of an Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) to "demonstrate the technologies and infrastructure to meet the Army requirement for rapid generation of digital topographic data to support emerging crisis or contingencies." This sensor is currently being operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Joint Precision Strike Demonstration (JPSD) Project Office to provide highly accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) for military and civilian customers, both inside and outside of the United States. The sensor achieves better than DTED Level IV position accuracy in near real-time. The system is being flown on a deHavilland DHC-7 Army aircraft. This paper outlines some of the technologies used in the design of the system, discusses the performance, and will discuss operational issues. In addition, we will show results from recent flight tests, including high accuracy maps taken of the San Diego area.

  7. A portfolio of products from the rapid terrain visualization interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Douglas L.; Doerry, Armin W.

    2007-04-01

    The Rapid Terrain Visualization interferometric synthetic aperture radar was designed and built at Sandia National Laboratories as part of an Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) to "demonstrate the technologies and infrastructure to meet the Army requirement for rapid generation of digital topographic data to support emerging crisis or contingencies." This sensor was built by Sandia National Laboratories for the Joint Programs Sustainment and Development (JPSD) Project Office to provide highly accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) for military and civilian customers, both inside and outside of the United States. The sensor achieved better than HRTe Level IV position accuracy in near real-time. The system was flown on a deHavilland DHC-7 Army aircraft. This paper presents a collection of images and data products from the Rapid Terrain Visualization interferometric synthetic aperture radar. The imagery includes orthorectified images and DEMs from the RTV interferometric SAR radar.

  8. Humus and humility in ecosystem model design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Ed

    2015-04-01

    that are developed in collaboration with stakeholders are much more likely to be used (Sterk et al., 2012). Rather than trying to re-frame the question to suit the model, modellers need the humility to accept that the model is inappropriate and should develop the capacity to model the question. In this study these issues are explored using the MADOC model (Rowe et al., 2014) as an example. MADOC was developed by integrating existing models of humus development, acid-base exchange, and organic matter dissolution to answer a particular policy question: how do acidifying pollutants affect pH in humic soils? Including the negative feedback whereby an increase in pH reduces the solubility of organic acids improved the predictive accuracy for pH and dissolved organic carbon flux in the peats and organomineral soils that are widespread in upland Britain. The model has been used to generate the UK response to data requests under the UN Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. References: Funtowicz, S.O. & Ravetz, J.R., 1990. Uncertainty and Quality in Science for Policy. Kluwer. Rowe, E.C., et al. 2014. Environmental Pollution 184, 271-282. Sterk, B., et al. 2012. Environmental Modelling & Software 26, 310-316.

  9. Model-Based Control using Model and Mechanization Fusion Techniques for Image-Aided Navigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Magnet Motors . Magna Physics Publishing, Hillsboro, OH, 1994. 7. Houwu Bai, Xubo Song, Eric Wan and Andriy Myronenko. “Vision-only Navi- gation and...filter”. Proceedings of the Recent Advances in Space Technologies (RAST). Nov 2003. 6. Hendershot, J.R. and Tje Miller. Design of Brushless Permanent

  10. Modeling Predictors of Duties Not Including Flying Status.

    PubMed

    Tvaryanas, Anthony P; Griffith, Converse

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to reuse available datasets to conduct an analysis of potential predictors of U.S. Air Force aircrew nonavailability in terms of being in "duties not to include flying" (DNIF) status. This study was a retrospective cohort analysis of U.S. Air Force aircrew on active duty during the period from 2003-2012. Predictor variables included age, Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC), clinic location, diagnosis, gender, pay grade, and service component. The response variable was DNIF duration. Nonparametric methods were used for the exploratory analysis and parametric methods were used for model building and statistical inference. Out of a set of 783 potential predictor variables, 339 variables were identified from the nonparametric exploratory analysis for inclusion in the parametric analysis. Of these, 54 variables had significant associations with DNIF duration in the final model fitted to the validation data set. The predicted results of this model for DNIF duration had a correlation of 0.45 with the actual number of DNIF days. Predictor variables included age, 6 AFSCs, 7 clinic locations, and 40 primary diagnosis categories. Specific demographic (i.e., age), occupational (i.e., AFSC), and health (i.e., clinic location and primary diagnosis category) DNIF drivers were identified. Subsequent research should focus on the application of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention measures to ameliorate the potential impact of these DNIF drivers where possible.Tvaryanas AP, Griffith C Jr. Modeling predictors of duties not including flying status. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2018; 89(1):52-57.

  11. Jim Newman and Bob McDonald attach an M2-F2 lifting body model to the "Mothership"

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-06-26

    A photo of model airplane builders James B. Newman and Robert L. McDonald preparing for a flight with models of the M2-F2 and a “Mothership”. In 1968 a test flight was made on the Rosamond dry lakebed, Rosamond, California. The original idea of lifting bodies was conceived about 1957 by Dr. Alfred J. Eggers, Jr., then the assistant director for Research and Development Analysis and Planning at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Moffett Field, California. Nose cone studies led to the design known as the M-2, a modified half-cone, rounded on the bottom and flat on top, with a blunt, rounded nose and twin tail fins. To gather flight data on this configuration, models were found to be an effective method. A special twin-engined, 14-foot model “mothership” was used for carrying the M2-F2 model to altitude and a launch, much as was being done with the B-52 for the full-scale lifting bodies. Jim (on the left) will fly the “mothership” and Bob will take control of the M2-F2 at launch and fly it to a landing on the lakebed.

  12. Leadership Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Thomas J.

    This paper discusses six different models of organizational structure and leadership, including the scalar chain or pyramid model, the continuum model, the grid model, the linking pin model, the contingency model, and the circle or democratic model. Each model is examined in a separate section that describes the model and its development, lists…

  13. IMPACT OF CRITICAL ANION SOIL SOLUTION CONCENTRATION ON ALUMINUM ACTIVITY IN ALPINE TUNDRA SOIL Andrew Evans, Jr.1 , Michael B. Jacobs2, and Jason R. Janke1, (1) Metropolitan State University of Denver, Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, (2) Dept. of Chemistry, Denver, CO, United States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, A.

    2015-12-01

    Soil solution anionic composition can impact both plant and microbial activity in alpine tundra soils by altering biochemical cycling within the soil, either through base cation leaching, or shifts in aluminum controlling solid phases. Although anions play a critical role in the aqueous speciation of metals, relatively few high altitude field studies have examined their impact on aluminum controlling solid phases and aluminum speciation in soil water. For this study, thirty sampling sites were selected on Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain National Park, Estes Park, CO, and sampled during July, the middle of the growing season. Sampling elevations ranged from approximately 3560 - 3710 m. Soil samples were collected to a depth of 15.24 cm, and the anions were extracted using a 2:1 D.I. water to soil ratio. Filtered extracts were analyzed using IC and ICP-MS. Soil solution NO3- concentrations were significantly higher for sampling locations east of Iceberg Pass (EIBP) (mean = 86.94 ± 119.8 mg/L) compared to locations west of Iceberg Pass (WIBP) (mean 1.481 ± 2.444 mg/L). Both F- and PO43- soil solution concentrations, 0.533 and 0.440 mg/L, respectively, were substantially lower, for sampling sites located EIBP, while locations WIBP averaged 0.773 and 0.829 mg/L respectively, for F- and PO43-. Sulfate concentration averaged 3.869 ± 3.059 mg/L for locations EIBP, and 3.891 ± 3.1970 for locations WIBP. Geochemical modeling of Al3+ in the soil solution indicated that a suite of aluminum hydroxyl sulfate minerals controlled Al3+ activity in the alpine tundra soil, with shifts between controlling solid phases occurring in the presence of elevated F- concentrations.

  14. Models and role models.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    Developing experimental models to understand dental caries has been the theme in our research group. Our first, the pH-cycling model, was developed to investigate the chemical reactions in enamel or dentine, which lead to dental caries. It aimed to leverage our understanding of the fluoride mode of action and was also utilized for the formulation of oral care products. In addition, we made use of intra-oral (in situ) models to study other features of the oral environment that drive the de/remineralization balance in individual patients. This model addressed basic questions, such as how enamel and dentine are affected by challenges in the oral cavity, as well as practical issues related to fluoride toothpaste efficacy. The observation that perhaps fluoride is not sufficiently potent to reduce dental caries in the present-day society triggered us to expand our knowledge in the bacterial aetiology of dental caries. For this we developed the Amsterdam Active Attachment biofilm model. Different from studies on planktonic ('single') bacteria, this biofilm model captures bacteria in a habitat similar to dental plaque. With data from the combination of these models, it should be possible to study separate processes which together may lead to dental caries. Also products and novel agents could be evaluated that interfere with either of the processes. Having these separate models in place, a suggestion is made to design computer models to encompass the available information. Models but also role models are of the utmost importance in bringing and guiding research and researchers. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Effects of alpha stopping power modelling on the ignition threshold in a directly-driven inertial confinement fusion capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temporal, Mauro; Canaud, Benoit; Cayzac, Witold; Ramis, Rafael; Singleton, Robert L.

    2017-05-01

    The alpha-particle energy deposition mechanism modifies the ignition conditions of the thermonuclear Deuterium-Tritium fusion reactions, and constitutes a key issue in achieving high gain in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations have been performed with the code Multi-IFE [R. Ramis, J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, Comput. Phys. Commun. 203, 226 (2016)] to simulate the implosion of a capsule directly irradiated by a laser beam. The diffusion approximation for the alpha energy deposition has been used to optimize three laser profiles corresponding to different implosion velocities. A Monte-Carlo package has been included in Multi-IFE to calculate the alpha energy transport, and in this case the energy deposition uses both the LP [C.K. Li, R.D. Petrasso, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3059 (1993)] and the BPS [L.S. Brown, D.L. Preston, R.L. Singleton Jr., Phys. Rep. 410, 237 (2005)] stopping power models. Homothetic transformations that maintain a constant implosion velocity have been used to map out the transition region between marginally-igniting and high-gain configurations. The results provided by the two models have been compared and it is found that - close to the ignition threshold - in order to produce the same fusion energy, the calculations performed with the BPS model require about 10% more invested energy with respect to the LP model.

  16. An information-processing model of three cortical regions: evidence in episodic memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Myeong-Ho; Goode, Adam; Stenger, V Andrew; Jung, Kwan-Jin; Carter, Cameron S; Anderson, John R

    2005-03-01

    ACT-R (Anderson, J.R., et al., 2003. An information-processing model of the BOLD response in symbol manipulation tasks. Psychon. Bull. Rev. 10, 241-261) relates the inferior dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex to a retrieval buffer that holds information retrieved from memory and the posterior parietal cortex to an imaginal buffer that holds problem representations. Because the number of changes in a problem representation is not necessarily correlated with retrieval difficulties, it is possible to dissociate prefrontal-parietal activations. In two fMRI experiments, we examined this dissociation using the fan effect paradigm. Experiment 1 compared a recognition task, in which representation requirement remains the same regardless of retrieval difficulty, with a recall task, in which both representation and retrieval loads increase with retrieval difficulty. In the recognition task, the prefrontal activation revealed a fan effect but not the parietal activation. In the recall task, both regions revealed fan effects. In Experiment 2, we compared visually presented stimuli and aurally presented stimuli using the recognition task. While only the prefrontal region revealed the fan effect, the activation patterns in the prefrontal and the parietal region did not differ by stimulus presentation modality. In general, these results provide support for the prefrontal-parietal dissociation in terms of retrieval and representation and the modality-independent nature of the information processed by these regions. Using ACT-R, we also provide computational models that explain patterns of fMRI responses in these two areas during recognition and recall.

  17. Pumping Performance and Turbidity Generation of Model 600/100 PNEUMA Pump. Main Text and Appendixes A and B.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    E. Hite, Jr. Richard A. Shafer James D. Ethridge, Jr. 9 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS i0. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK AREA A WORK UNIT...Appendix C (bound separately) contains tables of measured dat a and cal-LnIuated parameters interpolated at 9 -sec intervals for each test run. Unc lassi...Test Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 PART III: TEST RESULTS....................... Data Reduction and Presentation

  18. Improving plot- and regional-scale crop models for simulating impacts of climate variability and extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, F.; Rötter, R.

    2013-12-01

    better informed decision-making on adaptation strategies. References 1. Coumou, D. & Rahmstorf, S. A decade of extremes. Nature Clim. Change, 2, 491-496 (2012). 2. Rötter, R. P., Carter, T. R., Olesen, J. E. & Porter, J. R. Crop-climate models need an overhaul. Nature Clim. Change, 1, 175-177 (2011). 3. Asseng, S. et al., Uncertainty in simulating wheat yields under climate change. Nature Clim. Change. 10.1038/nclimate1916. (2013). 4. Porter, J.R., & Semenov, M., Crop responses to climatic variation . Trans. R. Soc. B., 360, 2021-2035 (2005). 5. Porter, J.R. & Christensen, S. Deconstructing crop processes and models via identities. Plant, Cell and Environment . doi: 10.1111/pce.12107 (2013). 6. Boogaard, H.L., van Diepen C.A., Rötter R.P., Cabrera J.M. & van Laar H.H. User's guide for the WOFOST 7.1 crop growth simulation model and Control Center 1.5, Alterra, Wageningen, The Netherlands. (1998) 7. Tao, F. & Zhang, Z. Climate change, wheat productivity and water use in the North China Plain: a new super-ensemble-based probabilistic projection. Agric. Forest Meteorol., 170, 146-165. (2013).

  19. Automation of reverse engineering process in aircraft modeling and related optimization problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, W.; Swetits, J.

    1994-01-01

    During the year of 1994, the engineering problems in aircraft modeling were studied. The initial concern was to obtain a surface model with desirable geometric characteristics. Much of the effort during the first half of the year was to find an efficient way of solving a computationally difficult optimization model. Since the smoothing technique in the proposal 'Surface Modeling and Optimization Studies of Aerodynamic Configurations' requires solutions of a sequence of large-scale quadratic programming problems, it is important to design algorithms that can solve each quadratic program in a few interactions. This research led to three papers by Dr. W. Li, which were submitted to SIAM Journal on Optimization and Mathematical Programming. Two of these papers have been accepted for publication. Even though significant progress has been made during this phase of research and computation times was reduced from 30 min. to 2 min. for a sample problem, it was not good enough for on-line processing of digitized data points. After discussion with Dr. Robert E. Smith Jr., it was decided not to enforce shape constraints in order in order to simplify the model. As a consequence, P. Dierckx's nonparametric spline fitting approach was adopted, where one has only one control parameter for the fitting process - the error tolerance. At the same time the surface modeling software developed by Imageware was tested. Research indicated a substantially improved fitting of digitalized data points can be achieved if a proper parameterization of the spline surface is chosen. A winning strategy is to incorporate Dierckx's surface fitting with a natural parameterization for aircraft parts. The report consists of 4 chapters. Chapter 1 provides an overview of reverse engineering related to aircraft modeling and some preliminary findings of the effort in the second half of the year. Chapters 2-4 are the research results by Dr. W. Li on penalty functions and conjugate gradient methods for

  20. Modified dwell time optimization model and its applications in subaperture polishing.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhichao; Cheng, Haobo; Tam, Hon-Yuen

    2014-05-20

    The optimization of dwell time is an important procedure in deterministic subaperture polishing. We present a modified optimization model of dwell time by iterative and numerical method, assisted by extended surface forms and tool paths for suppressing the edge effect. Compared with discrete convolution and linear equation models, the proposed model has essential compatibility with arbitrary tool paths, multiple tool influence functions (TIFs) in one optimization, and asymmetric TIFs. The emulational fabrication of a Φ200  mm workpiece by the proposed model yields a smooth, continuous, and non-negative dwell time map with a root-mean-square (RMS) convergence rate of 99.6%, and the optimization costs much less time. By the proposed model, influences of TIF size and path interval to convergence rate and polishing time are optimized, respectively, for typical low and middle spatial-frequency errors. Results show that (1) the TIF size is nonlinear inversely proportional to convergence rate and polishing time. A TIF size of ~1/7 workpiece size is preferred; (2) the polishing time is less sensitive to path interval, but increasing the interval markedly reduces the convergence rate. A path interval of ~1/8-1/10 of the TIF size is deemed to be appropriate. The proposed model is deployed on a JR-1800 and MRF-180 machine. Figuring results of Φ920  mm Zerodur paraboloid and Φ100  mm Zerodur plane by them yield RMS of 0.016λ and 0.013λ (λ=632.8  nm), respectively, and thereby validate the feasibility of proposed dwell time model used for subaperture polishing.

  1. Helicopter Performance Evaluation (HELPE) Computer Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER U.S. Army Research Laboratory ATN: AMSRL-OP-AP-L Aberden Proving Ground , MD 21005...Laboratory report in process, Aberdeen Proving Ground , MD, 1994. McCormick, Jr., B. W. Aerodynamic of V/STOL Flight. Academic Press, p. 154, 1967...in process, Aberdeen Proving Ground , MD, 1994. Saunders, G. It Dynamics of Helicopter Fliht. NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., pp. 140-142, 1975. Walbert

  2. Transducer Analysis and ATILA++ Model Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-10

    the ATILA finite element software package. This will greatly enhance the state-of-the-art in transducer performance prediction and provide a tool...refereed publication. 15 IMPACT/APPLICATIONS This work is helping to enable the expansion of the functionality of the A TILA ++ finite element ...Sb. GRANT NUMBER N00014-13-1-0196 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER Richard J. Meyer, Jr. 20675 Douglas C. Markley Se

  3. Density Functional Theory Modeling of Ferrihydrite Nanoparticle Adsorption Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubicki, J.

    2016-12-01

    Ferrihydrite is a critical substrate for adsorption of oxyanion species in the environment1. The nanoparticulate nature of ferrihydrite is inherent to its formation, and hence it has been called a "nano-mineral"2. The nano-scale size and unusual composition of ferrihydrite has made structural determination of this phase problematic. Michel et al.3 have proposed an atomic structure for ferrihydrite, but this model has been controversial4,5. Recent work has shown that the Michel et al.3 model structure may be reasonably accurate despite some deficiencies6-8. An alternative model has been proposed by Manceau9. This work utilizes density functional theory (DFT) calculations to model both the structure of ferrihydrite nanoparticles based on the Michel et al. 3 model as refined in Hiemstra8 and the modified akdalaite model of Manceau9. Adsorption energies of carbonate, phosphate, sulfate, chromate, arsenite and arsenate are calculated. Periodic projector-augmented planewave calculations were performed with the Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP10) on an approximately 1.7 nm diameter Michel nanoparticle (Fe38O112H110) and on a 2 nm Manceau nanoparticle (Fe38O95H76). After energy minimization of the surface H and O atoms. The model will be used to assess the possible configurations of adsorbed oxyanions on the model nanoparticles. Brown G.E. Jr. and Calas G. (2012) Geochemical Perspectives, 1, 483-742. Hochella M.F. and Madden A.S. (2005) Elements, 1, 199-203. Michel, F.M., Ehm, L., Antao, S.M., Lee, P.L., Chupas, P.J., Liu, G., Strongin, D.R., Schoonen, M.A.A., Phillips, B.L., and Parise, J.B., 2007, Science, 316, 1726-1729. Rancourt, D.G., and Meunier, J.F., 2008, American Mineralogist, 93, 1412-1417. Manceau, A., 2011, American Mineralogist, 96, 521-533. Maillot, F., Morin, G., Wang, Y., Bonnin, D., Ildefonse, P., Chaneac, C., Calas, G., 2011, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 75, 2708-2720. Pinney, N., Kubicki, J.D., Middlemiss, D.S., Grey, C.P., and Morgan, D

  4. Wetland methane modelling over the Scandinavian Arctic: Performance of current land-surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, Garry; Quiquet, Aurélien; Gedney, Nicola; Clark, Douglas; Friend, Andrew; George, Charles; Prigent, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Holocene, Science, 303, 353-356, doi:10.1126/science.1090553, 2004; [3] Zhuang, Q., et al.: CO2 and CH4 exchanges between land ecosystems and the atmosphere in northern high latitudes over the 21st century, Geophysical Research Letters, 33, doi:10.1029/2006gl026972, 2006; [4] Melton, J.R., et al.: Present state of global wetland extent and wetland methane modelling: conclusions from a model inter-comparison project (WETCHIMP), Biogeosciences, 10, 753-788, doi:10.5194/bg-10-753-2013, 2013; [5] Best, M. J., et al.: The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), model description - Part 1: Energy and water fluxes, Geoscientific Model Development, 4, 677-699, doi:10.5194/gmd-4-677-2011, 2011; [6] Clark, D.B., et al.: The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), Model description - Part 2: Carbon fluxes and vegetation. Geoscientific Model Development, 4, 701-722, doi:10.5194/gmd-4-701-2011, 2011; [7] Friend, A.D., and N.Y. Kiang: Land surface model development for the GISS GCM: Effects of improved canopy physiology on simulated climate. J. Climate, 18, 2883-2902, doi:10.1175/JCLI3425.1, 2005; [8] Prigent, C., et al.: Changes in land surface water dynamics since the 1990s and relation to population pressure, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L08403, doi:10.1029/2012GL051276, 2012; [9] O'Shea, S., et al.: Methane and carbon dioxide fluxes from the European Arctic wetlands during the MAMM project, paper in preparation.

  5. A resolution to authorize legal representation in Edward Paul Celestine, Jr. v. Social Security Administration.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2011-10-20

    Senate - 10/21/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Lejaren A. Hiller, Jr.: A Memorial Tribute to a Chemist-Composer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamser, Christian A.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1996-07-01

    Lejaren Hiller (1924-1994) was trained in chemistry but maintained a lifelong love of music. Like Alexander Borodin, the Russian chemist-composer, but eventually dedicated his career solely to music. His early work on the chemistry of polymers with Fred Wall at the University of Illinois introduced him to the Illiac computer, with which he did Monte Carlo calculations of polymer conformations. He promptly collaborated with Leonard Isaacson, a graduate student also associated with the Wall group, to teach the Illiac to compose music. Using a modified Monte Carlo technique to select the notes and other aspects of the music, they applied increasingly complex rules to define what constituted acceptable music. The result was their String Quartet #4, produced in 1957, often called the Illiac Suite. It is generally acknowledged as the first piece of music composed by a computer. Hiller remained a pioneer in the field of copmuter composition during his distinguished career at the University of Illinois and the State University of New York at Buffalo. This paper traces Hiller's careers in chemistry and music and examines the connections between the two.

  7. Conversations: with Sean O'Keefe. Interview by Frank Sietzen Jr.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Sean

    2002-10-01

    Sean O'Keefe, who took office as the 10th NASA administrator in December 2001, is interviewed after 9 months on the job. Topics of conversation include his transition from the Office of Management and Budget to NASA, management priorities, space shuttle safety, the Space Launch Initiative and the National Aerospace Initiative, future space exploration, relationships with Congress and the President, and NASA's budget.

  8. John H Glenn Jr. Wreath Laying Ceremony - Inside Heroes and Lege

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-09

    A plaque inside the Heroes and Legends exhibit hall at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex shows astronaut Sen. John Glenn, along with his mission insignias for Friendship 7 and STS-95, the two flights he made into space. Glenn, who passed away Dec. 8, 2016 at age 95, was the last surviving member of NASA's original astronaut class. He gained worldwide acclaim during his Mercury mission that made him the first American to orbit the Earth. He flew again in 1998 aboard space shuttle Discovery at age 77.

  9. 3 CFR 8473 - Proclamation 8473 of January 15, 2010. Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... skin, their gender, the faith in their heart, the people they love, or the fortune of their birth—will... depend on how we prepare our next generation of leaders. We must fortify their ladders of opportunity by... defeat, but a call to action. In these challenging times, too many Americans face limited opportunities...

  10. MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-9 - SHEPARD, ALAN B., JR. ASTRONAUT - MERCURY CONTROL CENTER (MCC) - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-16

    S63-07857 (15-16 May 1963) --- Astronaut Alan Shepard (left) and Walter C. Williams monitor progress of the Mercury Atlas 9 (MA-9) mission from Mercury Control Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photo credit: NASA

  11. Great Expectations: Brigadier General Haywood S. Hansell, Jr.and the XXI Bomber Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Hansell also knew the dissipation of planes would severely hamstring air power’s ability to cow Germany from the air. Once again, Hansell had...Marianas on October 12, 1944, it was the first tangible evidence the efforts of those who fought the steaming heat and tropical rains was to bear fruit...equipment, due to a failure to adequately stress discipline in training, causing unnecessary tension on the logistical chain. Could Hansell have done

  12. The tadpole of Scinax melanodactylus (Lourenço, Luna & Pombal Jr, 2014) (Amphibia, Anura, Hylidae).

    PubMed

    Abreu, Rafael Oliveira De; Napoli, Marcelo Felgueiras; Trevisan, Camila Costa; Camardelli, Milena; Dória, Thais Andrade Ferreira; Silva, Lucas Menezes

    2015-07-06

    Scinax melanodactylus is a small treefrog distributed within the Tropical Atlantic morphoclimatic domain (see Ab'Sáber 1977 for South American morphoclimatic domains), from northern Espírito Santo state to Sergipe state in Brazil (Lourenço et al. 2014). The species is usually found inhabiting herbaceous and shrubby xerophytic vegetation (e.g. terrestrial tank-bromeliads) from sandy plains of beach ridges known in Brazil as Restingas (see Rocha et al. 2007 for a Restinga definition), and also the edge of forest areas with temporary ponds and/or permanent lakes and streams near these environments (Bastazini et al. 2007, as Scinax agilis; Lourenço et al. 2014). Scinax melanodactylus is currently placed in the S. catharinae species group (Lourenço et al. 2014), which in turn is included in the S. catharinae clade (sensu Faivovich et al. 2005). The S. catharinae clade is currently comprised of 46 species, 33 placed in the catharinae group and 13 in the perpusillus group (Faivovich et al. 2010, Silva & Alves-da-Silva 2011, Lourenço et al. 2014, Frost 2015). From these, 32 species have tadpoles with external morphology and oral disc formerly described. Here, we describe the external morphology, oral disc and color patterns of the previously unknown tadpole of S. melanodactylus.

  13. John H Glenn Jr. Wreath Laying Ceremony - Inside Hereos and Lege

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-09

    A plaque inside the Heroes and Legends exhibit hall at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex shows the name of astronaut Sen. John Glenn. Glenn, who passed away Dec. 8, 2016 at age 95, was the last surviving member of NASA's original astronaut class. He gained worldwide acclaim during his Mercury mission that made him the first American to orbit the Earth. He flew again in 1998 aboard space shuttle Discovery at age 77.

  14. Gen. Joseph F. Dunford, Jr. > Joint Chiefs of Staff > Article View

    Science.gov Websites

    Facebook on Flickr Joint Chiefs Army Chief of Staff Marine Corps Commandant Chief of Naval Operations Air Force Chief of Staff Chief of National Guard Bureau Biographies Directorates Directorates of Management Chiefs of Staff, the nation's highest-ranking military officer, and the principal military advisor to the

  15. A libertarian critique of H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr.'s The Foundations of Bioethics.

    PubMed

    Fry-Revere, Sigrid

    1992-01-01

    Although Engelhardt's The Foundations of Bioethics is an impressive work, it is plagued by problems of justification, conceptual confusion, and inconsistencies....A libertarian theory can arrive at the same basic requirements of mutual respect, autonomy, nonuse of force, and tolerance for a wide range of diverse life styles without relying on a lowest-common-denominator principle and without depriving fetuses, infants, and the mentally retarded of their status as persons. This can be done by taking a deontological approach to libertarian theory that denies that all moral beliefs are worthy of respect. Some beliefs, such as Engelhardt's belief that fetuses, infants, and the mentally retarded are nonpersons, simply fall beneath the floor of acceptable moral alternatives, even in a libertarian society, because such beliefs are based on a misunderstanding of personhood and violate the principle of mutual respect.

  16. John H Glenn Jr. Wreath Laying Ceremony - Inside Heroes and Lege

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-09

    A life-size photo inside the Heroes and Legends exhibit hall at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex shows astronaut Sen. John Glenn, center, with fellow Mercury Seven astronauts Gordon Cooper, left, and Gus Grissom. Glenn, who passed away Dec. 8, 2016 at age 95. Glenn, was the last surviving member of NASA's original astronaut class. He gained worldwide acclaim during his Mercury mission that made him the first American to orbit the Earth. He flew again in 1998 aboard space shuttle Discovery at age 77.

  17. Presentations - Smith, J.R. and others, 2013 | Alaska Division of

    Science.gov Websites

    Engineering Geology Alaska Tidal Datum Portal Climate and Cryosphere Hazards Coastal Hazards Program Guide to (1.4 M) Keywords Coastal; Coastal and River; Engineering Geology Posters and Presentations; Seward

  18. Letters of Second Lieutenant Charles Wesley Chapman, Jr. December 19, 1894 - May 3, 1918

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    you are doing I think that it is you who will be old soon. If I stay here much longer, I will be fat as I wish. To keep our brains from getting...moving—it is a shame because we have sort of had the idea that we were to stay here for the duration of the war (we will know better from now on

  19. 77 FR 57116 - Cleveland J. Enmon, Jr., M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... from out-of state who did not appear to be in pain), id. at 9-10 (statement of Ocean Care patient that...'' and in fact spurred him to open his own chronic pain management clinic. [Tr. 340, 343]. While Dr... Brunswick's patients were in fact ``legitimate'' pain patients. [Tr. 335]. D. Search Warrant Served on...

  20. 36 CFR 7.21 - John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... an oversnow vehicle without a lighted white headlamp and red taillight. (F) Operating an oversnow...'s blood or breath is 0.02 grams or more of alcohol per 100 milliliters of blood or 0.02 grams or... concentration in the operator's blood or breath is 0.04 grams or more of alcohol per 100 milliliters of blood or...

  1. 36 CFR 7.21 - John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... an oversnow vehicle without a lighted white headlamp and red taillight. (F) Operating an oversnow...'s blood or breath is 0.02 grams or more of alcohol per 100 milliliters of blood or 0.02 grams or... concentration in the operator's blood or breath is 0.04 grams or more of alcohol per 100 milliliters of blood or...

  2. 36 CFR 7.21 - John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... an oversnow vehicle without a lighted white headlamp and red taillight. (F) Operating an oversnow...'s blood or breath is 0.02 grams or more of alcohol per 100 milliliters of blood or 0.02 grams or... concentration in the operator's blood or breath is 0.04 grams or more of alcohol per 100 milliliters of blood or...

  3. LaSalle D. Leffall Jr., M.D. The Man and the Mission.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, Edward E

    2018-06-01

    On March 19-20, 2017; Howard University hosted a Festschrift inspired by Dr. Leffall's writings (Fig. 1). The celebrants highlighted the broad spectrum of Dr. Leffall's contributions in mentorship, leadership in American Surgery, breast cancer, endocrine cancer, pancreatic cancer, and familial polyposis coli. Perhaps most inspirational was the awe inspiring consistency the presenters demonstrated in describing the personal characteristics Dr. Leffall brings to his academic discourse: his encyclopedic knowledge and recall, his charm, eloquence, humility, and his total dedication to the patient, his students, and trainees. We are greatly indebted to Kirby Bland M.D., FACS for offering the pages of The American Journal of Surgery to illuminate this celebration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. From philosopher to psychologist: the early career of Edwin Ray Guthrie, Jr.

    PubMed

    Clark, David O

    2005-08-01

    Edwin R. Guthrie rose to prominence as a psychologist in the 1930s. His theoretical outlook was behavioristic. This approach came from his conviction that an objective method could be applied to a scientific treatment of mind. Prior to becoming a psychologist, he was a philosopher of mathematics. Guthrie was initiated into psychology by Stevenson Smith, from whom he learned a psychology of adjustment informed by comparative research, Columbia functionalism, and clinical psychology. Guthrie's first step into psychology was in collaboration with Smith on Chapters in General Psychology (S. Smith & E.R. Guthrie, 1921). To synthesize their own unique position on learning from the contemporary theory and research, they used the principle of association. This articles focuses on Guthrie's origin and his development into a learning theorist.

  5. Publications - Dutro, J.T., Jr. and Payne, T.G., 1957 | Alaska Division of

    Science.gov Websites

    Join our fan page on Facebook DGGS News Natural Resources Geological & Geophysical Surveys : 1957 Publisher: U.S. Geological Survey Ordering Info: This publication is out of print. Reproductions

  6. The Leadership Development of Dwight D. Eisenhower and George S. Patton Jr

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-12

    received a telegram from Senator Bard, informing him of Patton‘s selection for West Point. 35 Patton‘s dream of attending West Point finally emerged...foolish dream --it is me as I ever will be. I am different from other men my age. All they want to do is to live happily and die old. I would be...to the future asking himself how he could gain the fame he had looked for. He determined that his dream could not come true if America remained at

  7. A resolution honoring former Senator and Rear Admiral Jeremiah Andrew Denton, Jr.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Sessions, Jeff [R-AL

    2014-03-31

    Senate - 03/31/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Dorothy I. Height and Whitney M. Young, Jr. Social Work Reinvestment Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Towns, Edolphus [D-NY-10

    2009-02-03

    House - 03/23/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Higher Education, Lifelong Learning, and Competitiveness. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Dorothy I. Height and Whitney M. Young, Jr. Social Work Reinvestment Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Mikulski, Barbara A. [D-MD

    2009-03-24

    Senate - 03/24/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Dorothy I. Height and Whitney M. Young, Jr. Social Work Reinvestment Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Mikulski, Barbara A. [D-MD

    2011-03-15

    Senate - 03/15/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Dorothy I. Height and Whitney M. Young, Jr. Social Work Reinvestment Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Mikulski, Barbara A. [D-MD

    2013-05-21

    Senate - 05/21/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. 3 CFR 8624 - Proclamation 8624 of January 14, 2011. Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... rights leaders. As a country, we must expand access to opportunity and end structural inequalities for... contributions to our Nation and the world, but also a reminder that every day, each of us can play a part in...

  13. DefenseLink.mil - Special Report: Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr

    Science.gov Websites

    civil rights leader, is seen with a portrait of her late husband on January 14, 1972, at a time when she civil rights leader, is seen with a portrait of her late husband on January 14, 1972, at a time when she lunch counter when they came home. But he still insisted on the rightness of desegregating the Armed

  14. Indian Education and Training Opportunities at Columbia Jr. College, [Columbia, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Junior Coll., CA.

    The purpose of this project was to develop a transitional instructional program to serve out-of-school and drop-out American Indian youth entering vocational education programs in forest technology, fire science, heavy equipment maintenance and health occupations. The project was designed to develop a 3-quarter transitional program concerned with…

  15. U.S. Department of Defense Official Website - Martin Luther King Jr.

    Science.gov Websites

    Danger on Jan. 17. Chief Warrant Officer 2 Drayton L. Gilyard, a pastor with Headquarters and Luther King was a good man,'" said Col. Keith L. Cooper, 1st ID's chief of staff, after he returned , caption below. Chief Warrant Officer 2 Drayton L. Gilyard , a pastor with Headquarters and Headquarters

  16. 36 CFR 7.21 - John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...'s blood or breath is 0.02 grams or more of alcohol per 100 milliliters of blood or 0.02 grams or... concentration in the operator's blood or breath is 0.04 grams or more of alcohol per 100 milliliters of blood or.... Memorial Parkway. (a)(1) What is the scope of this section? The regulations contained in paragraphs (a)(2...

  17. 36 CFR 7.21 - John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...'s blood or breath is 0.02 grams or more of alcohol per 100 milliliters of blood or 0.02 grams or... concentration in the operator's blood or breath is 0.04 grams or more of alcohol per 100 milliliters of blood or.... Memorial Parkway. (a)(1) What is the scope of this section? The regulations contained in paragraphs (a)(2...

  18. 3 CFR 8340 - Proclamation 8340 of January 15, 2009. Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2009

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... powerful message of justice and hope. Our Nation is better because Dr. King was a man of courage and vision... government but a gift from the Author of Life. Dr. King trusted in these beliefs articulated in our founding... person is respected and that the hope for a better tomorrow reaches every community throughout the world...

  19. Libertarian bioethics and religion: the case of H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr.

    PubMed

    Merry, Michael S

    2004-09-01

    This paper is a critique of certain moral perspectives that are found in the second edition of Engelhardt's Foundation of Bioethics. These views are spelled out in explicit detail in his second edition, and follow on the heels of a profound religious conversion. Engelhardt is an eminent bioethicist with strong religious convictions that overlay much of his writing. The author wishes to question some of the conclusions that Engelhardt reaches as they touch upon moral frameworks, pluralism, and a 'secular' bioethics.

  20. Social Justice in Hard Times: Celebrating the Vision of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Sonia

    2005-01-01

    It is important to remember that one's presence "can" create a clamor, a person's action "does" make a difference. The author is reminded of this fact whenever he thinks about a poem by Angel Nieto. Similarly, individuals need to be reminded of this fact more than ever before because these are hard times for social justice. As individuals…

  1. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE experiment reports: 1990 Run Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    DiStravolo, M.A.

    1991-10-01

    This year was the third in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and anmore » associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each six-month LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred thirty-four proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic nature to the Laboratory. Our definition of beam availability is when the proton current from the PSR exceeds 50% of the planned value. The PSR ran at 65{mu}A current (average) at 20 Hz for most of 1990. All of the scheduled experiments were performed and experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods.« less

  2. Response to May 20, 1994 Letter from Robert H. Collom, Jr.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  3. A Model of United States Air Force Turnover.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    Retention, Enlisted Retention Division, AFMPC/HE. Telephone interview. 9 August 1983. 37. Sims, Henry P., Jr., Andrew D. Szilagyi , and Robert T...34 Human Relations, Vol. 35, No. 10 (1982), pp. 845-856. Sinaiko, H. Wallace . "First Term Enlisted Attrition." Conference Report No. TR-3 prepared

  4. Model Common-Core Unit Piloted for ELL Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2013-01-01

    Seventh and 8th grade English-learners in selected urban schools will soon dive into some of the most celebrated speeches in U.S. history. They'll dissect, for example, Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream," and Robert F. Kennedy's "On the Death of Martin Luther King." Though their…

  5. Developing an ACT-R Model of Mental Manipulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    entire test. However, from the verbal protocol and existing literature ( Biederman , 1987 ), it was clear that subjects had a tendency to break images into...Associates. Anderson, J.R. (1993). Rules of the mind. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Biederman , I. ( 1987 ). Recognition by components: A theory of human

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Brilliant roses and carnations frame the names of the Columbia crew carved onto the black granite surface of the Astronaut Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex.  The flowers were left by visitors who attended a memorial service for the crew on the anniversary of the tragic accident that claimed their lives Feb. 1, 2003.  The service included comments by Center Director Jim Kennedy, Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, and Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation, who placed the wreath at the mirror.  The mirror honors astronauts who have given their lives for space exploration.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Brilliant roses and carnations frame the names of the Columbia crew carved onto the black granite surface of the Astronaut Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex.  The flowers were left by visitors who attended a memorial service for the crew on the anniversary of the tragic accident that claimed their lives Feb. 1, 2003.  The service included comments by Center Director Jim Kennedy, Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, and Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation, who placed the wreath at the mirror.  The mirror honors astronauts who have given their lives for space exploration.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Roses and other flowers ring the base of the Astronaut Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex following a memorial service held for the crew of Columbia on the anniversary of the tragic accident that took their lives Feb. 1, 2003.  The public was invited to the service and encouraged to place the flowers on the fence.  The service included comments by Center Director Jim Kennedy, Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, and Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation.  The black granite mirror honors astronauts, whose names are carved in the surface, who have given their lives for space exploration.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Roses and other flowers ring the base of the Astronaut Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex following a memorial service held for the crew of Columbia on the anniversary of the tragic accident that took their lives Feb. 1, 2003.  The public was invited to the service and encouraged to place the flowers on the fence.  The service included comments by Center Director Jim Kennedy, Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, and Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation.  The black granite mirror honors astronauts, whose names are carved in the surface, who have given their lives for space exploration.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A wreath and other floral arrangements rest beneath the Astronaut Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex following a memorial service held for the crew of Columbia on the anniversary of the tragic accident that took their lives Feb. 1, 2003.  In the foreground are a portion of the roses and carnations left by visitors who attended the memorial.  The service included comments by Center Director Jim Kennedy, Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, and Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation, who placed the wreath at the mirror.  The black granite mirror honors astronauts, whose names are carved in the surface, who have given their lives for space exploration.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A wreath and other floral arrangements rest beneath the Astronaut Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex following a memorial service held for the crew of Columbia on the anniversary of the tragic accident that took their lives Feb. 1, 2003.  In the foreground are a portion of the roses and carnations left by visitors who attended the memorial.  The service included comments by Center Director Jim Kennedy, Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, and Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation, who placed the wreath at the mirror.  The black granite mirror honors astronauts, whose names are carved in the surface, who have given their lives for space exploration.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Friends, co-workers and families gather at the Space Memorial Mirror for KSC’s special service remembering and honoring the crew of Columbia. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. The public was invited to the memorial service held at the KSC Visitor Complex. Participants included Center Director Jim Kennedy, Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation, and dancers from the Shoshone-Bannock Native American community in Fort Hall, Idaho.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Friends, co-workers and families gather at the Space Memorial Mirror for KSC’s special service remembering and honoring the crew of Columbia. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. The public was invited to the memorial service held at the KSC Visitor Complex. Participants included Center Director Jim Kennedy, Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation, and dancers from the Shoshone-Bannock Native American community in Fort Hall, Idaho.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Jim Kennedy (right) speaks to attendees at a memorial service honoring the crew of Columbia. Behind him are KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. and Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, who is a former astronaut who flew on Columbia in 1997. They are standing in front of the Space Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex. Attended by many friends, co-workers and families, the memorial service was also open to the public, some of whom are seen at left. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Jim Kennedy (right) speaks to attendees at a memorial service honoring the crew of Columbia. Behind him are KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. and Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, who is a former astronaut who flew on Columbia in 1997. They are standing in front of the Space Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex. Attended by many friends, co-workers and families, the memorial service was also open to the public, some of whom are seen at left. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Jim Kennedy (right) speaks to attendees at a memorial service honoring the crew of Columbia. At left are KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. and Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, who was an invited speaker. Scott is a former astronaut who flew on Columbia in 1997. They are standing in front of the Space Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. Attended by many friends, co-workers and families, the memorial service was also open to the public.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Jim Kennedy (right) speaks to attendees at a memorial service honoring the crew of Columbia. At left are KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. and Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott, who was an invited speaker. Scott is a former astronaut who flew on Columbia in 1997. They are standing in front of the Space Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. Attended by many friends, co-workers and families, the memorial service was also open to the public.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the podium in front of the Space Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex is Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation. He spoke to attendees at the memorial service remembering and honoring the crew of Columbia. With him (from left) are KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Center Director Jim Kennedy and Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. Scott is a former astronaut who flew on Columbia in 1997. Attended by many friends, co-workers and families, the memorial service was also open to the public.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the podium in front of the Space Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex is Dr. Stephen Feldman, president of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation. He spoke to attendees at the memorial service remembering and honoring the crew of Columbia. With him (from left) are KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Center Director Jim Kennedy and Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. Scott is a former astronaut who flew on Columbia in 1997. Attended by many friends, co-workers and families, the memorial service was also open to the public.

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The second International Microgravity Laboratory-2 (IML-2) is off to an ontime start as the Space Shuttle Columbia lifts off from Launch Pad 39A at 12:43:00 p.m. EDT. On board are a crew of seven and more than 80 investigations developed by more than 200 scientists from 13 countries. The IML-2 complement includes materials science, bioprocessing, space and radiation biology, and human physiology experiments that will be carried out over the course of the 14-day flight. The commander of Space Shuttle Mission STS-65 is Robert D. Cabana. James D. Halsell Jr. is the pilot; the payload commander is Richard J. Hieb; the three mission specialists are Carl E. Walz, Leroy Chiao and Donald A. Thomas. Dr. Chiaki Mukai, representing NASDA, the National Space Development Agency of Japan, is the payload specialist. Mukai becomes the first Japanese woman to fly into space.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-07-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The second International Microgravity Laboratory-2 (IML-2) is off to an ontime start as the Space Shuttle Columbia lifts off from Launch Pad 39A at 12:43:00 p.m. EDT. On board are a crew of seven and more than 80 investigations developed by more than 200 scientists from 13 countries. The IML-2 complement includes materials science, bioprocessing, space and radiation biology, and human physiology experiments that will be carried out over the course of the 14-day flight. The commander of Space Shuttle Mission STS-65 is Robert D. Cabana. James D. Halsell Jr. is the pilot; the payload commander is Richard J. Hieb; the three mission specialists are Carl E. Walz, Leroy Chiao and Donald A. Thomas. Dr. Chiaki Mukai, representing NASDA, the National Space Development Agency of Japan, is the payload specialist. Mukai becomes the first Japanese woman to fly into space.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. closes the memorial service held for the crew of Columbia at the Space Memorial Mirror in the KSC Visitor Complex. He is surrounded by dancers of the Shoshone-Bannock Native American community who performed a healing ceremony during the memorial. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. Students and staff of the Shoshone-Bannock Nation had an experiment on board Columbia. The public was invited to the memorial service, held in the KSC Visitor Complex, which included comments by Center Director Jim Kennedy and Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott. Scott is a former astronaut who flew on Columbia in 1997.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. closes the memorial service held for the crew of Columbia at the Space Memorial Mirror in the KSC Visitor Complex. He is surrounded by dancers of the Shoshone-Bannock Native American community who performed a healing ceremony during the memorial. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. Students and staff of the Shoshone-Bannock Nation had an experiment on board Columbia. The public was invited to the memorial service, held in the KSC Visitor Complex, which included comments by Center Director Jim Kennedy and Executive Director of Florida Space Authority Winston Scott. Scott is a former astronaut who flew on Columbia in 1997.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The turbulent weather common to a Florida afternoon in the summer subsides into a serene canopy of cornflower blue, and a manmade "bird" takes flight. The Space Shuttle Discovery soars skyward from Launch Pad 39B on Mission STS-64 at 6:22:35 p.m. EDT, Sept. 9. On board are a crew of six: Commander Richard N. Richards; Pilot L. Blaine Hammond Jr.; and Mission Specialists Mark C. Lee, Carl J. Meade, Susan J. Helms and Dr. J.M. Linenger. Payloads for the flight include the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE), the Shuttle Pointed Autonomous Research Tool for Astronomy-201 (SPARTAN-201) and the Robot Operated Material Processing System (ROMPS). Mission Specialists Lee and Meade also are scheduled to perform an extravehicular activity during the 64th Shuttle mission.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The turbulent weather common to a Florida afternoon in the summer subsides into a serene canopy of cornflower blue, and a manmade "bird" takes flight. The Space Shuttle Discovery soars skyward from Launch Pad 39B on Mission STS-64 at 6:22:35 p.m. EDT, Sept. 9. On board are a crew of six: Commander Richard N. Richards; Pilot L. Blaine Hammond Jr.; and Mission Specialists Mark C. Lee, Carl J. Meade, Susan J. Helms and Dr. J.M. Linenger. Payloads for the flight include the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE), the Shuttle Pointed Autonomous Research Tool for Astronomy-201 (SPARTAN-201) and the Robot Operated Material Processing System (ROMPS). Mission Specialists Lee and Meade also are scheduled to perform an extravehicular activity during the 64th Shuttle mission.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director and former astronaut Roy D. Bridges, Jr., (holding scissors) cuts the ribbon at a ceremony officially opening the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame as part of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Invited guests and dignitaries look on, such as former astronauts Edgar D. Mitchell on Bridges' left and James Lovell on his right. The ceremony was held in conjunction with the induction of four Space Shuttle astronauts into the Hall of Fame including Daniel Brandenstein, Robert "Hoot" Gibson, Story Musgrave, and Sally Ride. Conceived by six of the Mercury Program astronauts, the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame opened in 1990 to provide a place where space travelers could be remembered for their participation and accomplishments in the U.S. space program. The four new inductees join 48 previously honored astronauts from the ranks of the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz, and Space Shuttle programs.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director and former astronaut Roy D. Bridges, Jr., (holding scissors) cuts the ribbon at a ceremony officially opening the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame as part of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Invited guests and dignitaries look on, such as former astronauts Edgar D. Mitchell on Bridges' left and James Lovell on his right. The ceremony was held in conjunction with the induction of four Space Shuttle astronauts into the Hall of Fame including Daniel Brandenstein, Robert "Hoot" Gibson, Story Musgrave, and Sally Ride. Conceived by six of the Mercury Program astronauts, the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame opened in 1990 to provide a place where space travelers could be remembered for their participation and accomplishments in the U.S. space program. The four new inductees join 48 previously honored astronauts from the ranks of the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz, and Space Shuttle programs.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director and former astronaut Roy D. Bridges, Jr., (holding scissors) cuts the ribbon at a ceremony officially opening the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame as part of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Invited guests and dignitaries look on, such as former astronauts Edgar D. Mitchell on Bridges' left and James Lovell (hand up) and Buzz Aldrin on his right. The ceremony was held in conjunction with the induction of four Space Shuttle astronauts into the Hall of Fame including Daniel Brandenstein, Robert "Hoot" Gibson, Story Musgrave, and Sally Ride. Conceived by six of the Mercury Program astronauts, the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame opened in 1990 to provide a place where space travelers could be remembered for their participation and accomplishments in the U.S. space program. The four new inductees join 48 previously honored astronauts from the ranks of the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz, and Space Shuttle programs.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director and former astronaut Roy D. Bridges, Jr., (holding scissors) cuts the ribbon at a ceremony officially opening the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame as part of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Invited guests and dignitaries look on, such as former astronauts Edgar D. Mitchell on Bridges' left and James Lovell (hand up) and Buzz Aldrin on his right. The ceremony was held in conjunction with the induction of four Space Shuttle astronauts into the Hall of Fame including Daniel Brandenstein, Robert "Hoot" Gibson, Story Musgrave, and Sally Ride. Conceived by six of the Mercury Program astronauts, the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame opened in 1990 to provide a place where space travelers could be remembered for their participation and accomplishments in the U.S. space program. The four new inductees join 48 previously honored astronauts from the ranks of the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz, and Space Shuttle programs.

  18. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling of Interstrain Variability in Trichloroethylene Metabolism in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jerry L.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Wright, Fred A.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2014-01-01

    . Citation: Chiu WA, Campbell JL Jr, Clewell HJ III, Zhou YH, Wright FA, Guyton KZ, Rusyn I. 2014. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling of interstrain variability in trichloroethylene metabolism in the mouse. Environ Health Perspect 122:456–463; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307623 PMID:24518055

  19. A physical model for z ~ 2 dust-obscured galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Desika; Dey, Arjun; Hayward, Christopher C.; Cox, Thomas J.; Bussmann, R. Shane; Brodwin, Mark; Jonsson, Patrik; Hopkins, Philip F.; Groves, Brent; Younger, Joshua D.; Hernquist, Lars

    2010-09-01

    worse matches. Our models provide testable predictions of the physical masses, dust temperatures, CO linewidths and location on the MBH-Mbulge relation of DOGs. Finally, we provide public SED templates derived from these simulations. This paper is dedicated to the original DOG himself, Cordozar Calvin Broadus, Jr. E-mail: dnarayanan@cfa.harvard.edu ‡ CfA Fellow. § Carnegie Fellow. ¶ W. M. Keck Postdoctoral Fellow. ∥ Miller Fellow. ** Hubble Fellow.

  20. Role of clouds, aerosols, and aerosol-cloud interaction in 20th century simulations with GISS ModelE2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, L.; Rind, D. H.; Bauer, S.; Del Genio, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    , N. Unger, E. Aguilar, G.A. Schmidt, D.M. Koch, S.E. Bauer, and J.R. Miller (2006), Simulations of preindustrial, present-day, and 2100 conditions in the NASA GISS composition and climate model G-PUCCINI, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 4427-4459.

  1. Enceladus' Interior: A Liquid Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence; Lunine, Jonathan; Castillo-Rogez, Julie

    We are studying a model for Enceladus' interior in which the water, gas, dust and heat are supplied to the plumes by a relatively deeply circulating brine solution. Data indicates such a source for the erupting material. On the basis of ammonia in the plume gas Waite et al. [1] suggested that the jets might originate from a liquid water region under Enceladus' icy surface. Postberg et al. [2] noted that the presence of ". . . grains that are rich in sodium salts (0.5-2 percent by mass). . . can arise only if the plumes originate from liquid water." Waite et al. [1] also regard the some of the plume chemicals as evidence for interactions with an ice layer presumably overlying the liquid water reservoir. They suggest that this could be in the form of dissociation of clathrate hydrates [3]. Additionally, there is a large heat flow of more than 15 GW [4, 5] coming out of Enceladus' south polar region. We consider a model that brings heat and chemical species up to the surface from a reservoir or "ocean" located below the ice crust that may be many tens of kilometers thick. Water transits to the surface via vertical conduits. The Cassini INMS data suggest that the water has a relatively large gas content of order a few percent. As the water travels upward and the pressure is released, exolving gases form bubbles. Since the bubbly liquid is less dense than the ice, it moves upward. (This part of the model is a variant of the "Perrier Ocean" Europa model of Crawford and Stevenson [6]. A similar model was studied for Ganymede by Murchie and Head [7].) Postberg et al. [2] model the plume eruptions that result from the water, gases, salts, and other chemicals that our circulation model provides. In the near-surface reservoir feeding the plumes, bubbles reaching the surface of the water pop and throw a very fine spray. Some of these very small droplets of brine exit with the plume gas and provide the observed salt-rich dust particles [2]. Much of the water-borne heat is

  2. Spatial and Temporal Self-Calibration of a Hydroeconomic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howitt, R. E.; Hansen, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    across key nodes on the network and to annual carryover storage at ground and surface water storage facilities. To our knowledge, this is the first hydroeconomic model to perform spatial and temporal calibration simultaneously. The base for the LFN model is CALVIN, a hydroeconomic optimization model of the California water system developed at the University of California, Davis (Draper, et al. 2003). The LFN model, programmed in GAMS, is nonlinear, which permits incorporation of dynamic groundwater pumping costs that reflect head elevation. Hydropower production, also nonlinear in storage levels, could be added in the future. In this paper, we describe model implementation and performance over a sequence of water years drawn from the historical hydrologic record in California. Preliminary findings indicate that calibration occurs within acceptable limits and simulations replicate base case results well. Cai, X., and Wang, D. 2006. "Calibrating Holistic Water Resources-Economic Models." Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management November-December. Draper, A.J., M.W. Jenkins, K.W. Kirby, J.R. Lund, and R.E. Howitt. 2003. "Economic-Engineering Optimization for California Water Management." Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 129(3):155-164. Howitt, R.E. 1995. "Positive Mathematical Programming." American Journal of Agricultural Economics 77:329-342. Howitt, R.E. 1998. "Self-Calibrating Network Flow Models." Working Paper, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California, Davis. October 1998. class="ab'>

  3. Effect of Dipolar Cross Correlation on Model-Free Motional Parameters Obtained from 13C Relaxation in AX 2 Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L. Y.; Kemple, M. D.; Landy, S. B.; Buckley, P.

    The importance of dipolar cross correlation in 13C relaxation studies of molecular motion in AX 2 spin systems (A = 13C, X = 1H) was examined. Several different models for the internal motion, including two restricted-diffusion, and two-site jump models, the Kinosita model [K. Kinosita, Jr., S. Kawato, and A. Ikegami, Biophys. J.20, 289 (1977)], and an axially symmetric model, were applied through the Lipari and Szabo [ J. Am. Chem. Soc.104, 4546 (1982)] formalism to calculate errors in 13C T1, obtained from inversion-recovery measurements under proton saturation, and NOE when dipolar cross correlation is neglected. Motional parameters in the Lipari and Szabo formalism, τ m, S2, and τ e, were then determined from T1 and NOE (including the errors) and compared with parameters initially used to simulate the relaxation data. The resulting differences in the motional parameters, while model dependent, were generally small for plausible motions. At larger S2 values (≥ 0.6), the errors in both τ m and S2 were <5%. Errors in τ e increased with S2 but were usually less than 10%. Larger errors in the parameters were found for an axially symmetric model, but with τ m fixed even those were >5% only for the τ m = 1 ns, τ e = 10 ps case. Furthermore, it was observed that deviations in a given motional parameter were mostly of the same sign, which allows bounds to be set on experimentally derived parameters. Relaxation data for the peptide melittin synthesized with gly enriched with 13C at the backbone cu position and with lys enriched with 13C in the side chain were examined in light of the results of the simulations. All in all, it appears that neglect of dipolar cross correlation in 13C T1 (With proton saturation) and NOE measurements in AX 2 systems does not lead to major problems in interpretation of the results in terms of molecular motion.

  4. Modeling Methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, Richard W.; Scanlon, Bridget R.

    2010-01-01

    Simulation models are widely used in all types of hydrologic studies, and many of these models can be used to estimate recharge. Models can provide important insight into the functioning of hydrologic systems by identifying factors that influence recharge. The predictive capability of models can be used to evaluate how changes in climate, water use, land use, and other factors may affect recharge rates. Most hydrological simulation models, including watershed models and groundwater-flow models, are based on some form of water-budget equation, so the material in this chapter is closely linked to that in Chapter 2. Empirical models that are not based on a water-budget equation have also been used for estimating recharge; these models generally take the form of simple estimation equations that define annual recharge as a function of precipitation and possibly other climatic data or watershed characteristics.Model complexity varies greatly. Some models are simple accounting models; others attempt to accurately represent the physics of water movement through each compartment of the hydrologic system. Some models provide estimates of recharge explicitly; for example, a model based on the Richards equation can simulate water movement from the soil surface through the unsaturated zone to the water table. Recharge estimates can be obtained indirectly from other models. For example, recharge is a parameter in groundwater-flow models that solve for hydraulic head (i.e. groundwater level). Recharge estimates can be obtained through a model calibration process in which recharge and other model parameter values are adjusted so that simulated water levels agree with measured water levels. The simulation that provides the closest agreement is called the best fit, and the recharge value used in that simulation is the model-generated estimate of recharge.

  5. Efficacy of Oritavancin in a Murine Model of Bacillus anthracis Spore Inhalation Anthrax

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-21

    Bélanger, and Adel Rafai Far for characterizing oritavancin pharmacokinetics in mice. We acknowledge the support of Ingrid Sarmiento for assistance...antibiotics. FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 26:511–532. 2. Arhin, F. F., I. Sarmiento , A. Belley, G. A. McKay, D. C. Draghi, P. Grover, D. Sahm, T. R. Parr, Jr...Chemother. 52:1597–1603. 3. Arhin, F. F., I. Sarmiento , T. R. Parr, Jr., and G. Moeck. 2007. Mechanisms of action of oritavancin in Staphylococcus

  6. Investigation of Local Hydrogen Uptake in Rescaled Model Occluded Sites Using Crevice Scaling Laws

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    13- 8 Mo . Under anodic polarization, there is a combination of x and G in a crevice or crack where the stainless steel would be passive and remain...2004). 8 . G.A. Young, Jr., J.R. Scully, "The Effects of Test Temperature , Temper and Alloyed Copper on Hydrogen Controlled Crack Growth of an A1-Zn-Mg...sharp crack tip.[16] Precipitation-aged hardened martensitic stainless steels (i.e., Fe-Cr-Ni- Mo alloys) that release hydrolysable Cr and Fe cations

  7. Implications of sediment redistribution on modeled sea-level changes over millennial timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Sea level is a critical link in feedbacks among topography, tectonics, and climate. Over millennial timescales, changes in sea level reshape river networks, regulate organic carbon burial, influence sediment deposition, and set moving boundary conditions for landscape evolution. Sea-level changes influence tectonics by regulating rates and patterns of erosion and deposition, which perturb the surface loads that drive geodynamic processes at depth. These interactions are complex because sea-level changes are influenced by the geomorphic processes that they themselves modify, since sediment redistribution deforms the gravitational and crustal elevation fields that define sea level. A recent advance in understanding the coupling between sea level, tectonics, and topography was the incorporation of sediment redistribution into a gravitationally self-consistent sea-level model, which permits the computation of sea-level responses to erosion and deposition (Dalca et al., 2013, Geophysical Journal International). Here I use this model to quantify changes in sea level resulting from the erosion of some of the most rapidly eroding sites on Earth and the deposition of sediment offshore. These model results show that the sea-level fingerprints of sediment redistribution are strongly variable in space, and that they can represent a significant component of the total sea level change since the last interglacial. This work provides a basis for understanding a fundamental driver of landscape evolution at some of Earth's most geomorphically dynamic sites, and thus aids investigation of the couplings among tectonics, climate, and topography. References Dalca A.V., Ferrier K.L., Mitrovica J.X., Perron J.T., Milne G.A., Creveling J.R., 2013. On postglacial sea level - III. Incorporating sediment redistribution. Geophysical Journal International, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggt089.

  8. ENTRAINMENT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presented information on entrainment models. Entrainment models use entrainment hypotheses to express the continuity equation. The advantage is that plume boundaries are known. A major disadvantage is that the problems that can be solved are rather simple. The ...

  9. Radiation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, W. G. G.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of both the wave and the corpuscular photon model of light. Suggests that students should be informed that the two models are complementary and that each model successfully describes a wide range of radiation phenomena. Cites 19 references which might be of interest to physics teachers and students. (LC)

  10. Phoenix model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phoenix (formerly referred to as the Second Generation Model or SGM) is a global general equilibrium model designed to analyze energy-economy-climate related questions and policy implications in the medium- to long-term. This model disaggregates the global economy into 26 industr...

  11. Stochastic Modeling Of Biochemical Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Escherichia coli cells,” Genetics, vol. 149, pp. 1633–1648, 1998. [3] J. L. Spudich and D. E . K. Jr, “Non-genetic indi- viduality: chance in the single...associated with m to be µ(m)(t) = E [ x(m)(t) ] , ∀t ≥ 0 (7) where E stands for the expected value and x(m) := xm11 x m2 2 · · ·x mn n . (8) The sum ∑nj=1m j...can show that the time derivative of a moment µ(m) is µ̇(m) = E [ K ∑ i=1 ( φi(x)(m)−x(m) ) λi(x) ] . (9) If any of the reactions have more than one

  12. Securing the Aviation Transportation System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    accessed 27 May 2007) 13 Robert W. Poole, Jr., “ Airport Security : Time for a New Model,” Reason Foundation online article, January 2006, Available from...15 Robert W. Poole, Jr., “ Airport Security : Time for a New Model,” Reason Foundation online article, January 2006...commercial jetliners. 24 Peter St. John, Air Piracy, Airport Security , and International Terrorism

  13. Modelling of agricultural diffuse pollution and mitigation measures effectiveness in Wallonia (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohier, C.; Deraedt, D.; Degré, A.

    2012-04-01

    Implementation of European directives in the environmental field and, specially, in the water management field, generates a request from policy-makers for news tools able to evaluate impact of management measures aiming at reducing pressures on ecosystems. In Wallonia (Southern Region of Belgium), the Nitrate Directive (EEC/676/91) was transposed into the "Walloon action plan for nitrogen sustainable management in agriculture" (PGDA1) in 2002. In 2007, a second plan was launched to reinforce some topics (PGDA2). Furthermore, the goal of "good quality" of surface waters and groundwater imposed by the Water Framework Directive poses new challenges in water management. In this context, a "soil and vadose" hydrological model is used in order to evaluate diffuse pollutions and efficiency of mitigation measures. This model, called EPICgrid, has been developed at catchment scale with an original modular concept on the basis of the field scale "water-soil-plant" EPIC model (Williams J.R., Jones C.A., Dyke P.T. (1984). A modelling approach to determining the relationship between erosion and soil productivity. Transactions of the ASAE. 27, 129-144). The model estimates, for each HRU identified into a 1km2 grid, water and nutrients flows into the plant-soil-vadose zone system (Sohier C., Degré A., Dautrebande S. (2009). From root zone modelling to regional forecasting of nitrate concentration in recharge flows - The case of the Walloon Region (Belgium). Journal of Hydrology, Volume 369, Issues 3-4, 15 May 2009, Pages 350-359). The model is used to make prospective simulations in order to evaluate the impact of measures currently performed to reduce the effect of diffuse pollution on water surface quality and groundwater quality, at regional scale. Response of the soil-vadose zone to agricultural practices modification is analyzed for the deadlines of the Water Framework Directive: 2015, 2021 and 2027, taking into account two climatic scenarios. Simulations results showed

  14. Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyan, Leonard M.

    2012-01-01

    Climate models is a very broad topic, so a single volume can only offer a small sampling of relevant research activities. This volume of 14 chapters includes descriptions of a variety of modeling studies for a variety of geographic regions by an international roster of authors. The climate research community generally uses the rubric climate models to refer to organized sets of computer instructions that produce simulations of climate evolution. The code is based on physical relationships that describe the shared variability of meteorological parameters such as temperature, humidity, precipitation rate, circulation, radiation fluxes, etc. Three-dimensional climate models are integrated over time in order to compute the temporal and spatial variations of these parameters. Model domains can be global or regional and the horizontal and vertical resolutions of the computational grid vary from model to model. Considering the entire climate system requires accounting for interactions between solar insolation, atmospheric, oceanic and continental processes, the latter including land hydrology and vegetation. Model simulations may concentrate on one or more of these components, but the most sophisticated models will estimate the mutual interactions of all of these environments. Advances in computer technology have prompted investments in more complex model configurations that consider more phenomena interactions than were possible with yesterday s computers. However, not every attempt to add to the computational layers is rewarded by better model performance. Extensive research is required to test and document any advantages gained by greater sophistication in model formulation. One purpose for publishing climate model research results is to present purported advances for evaluation by the scientific community.

  15. Cloud Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Moncrieff, Mitchell; Einaud, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerical cloud models have been developed and applied extensively to study cloud-scale and mesoscale processes during the past four decades. The distinctive aspect of these cloud models is their ability to treat explicitly (or resolve) cloud-scale dynamics. This requires the cloud models to be formulated from the non-hydrostatic equations of motion that explicitly include the vertical acceleration terms since the vertical and horizontal scales of convection are similar. Such models are also necessary in order to allow gravity waves, such as those triggered by clouds, to be resolved explicitly. In contrast, the hydrostatic approximation, usually applied in global or regional models, does allow the presence of gravity waves. In addition, the availability of exponentially increasing computer capabilities has resulted in time integrations increasing from hours to days, domain grids boxes (points) increasing from less than 2000 to more than 2,500,000 grid points with 500 to 1000 m resolution, and 3-D models becoming increasingly prevalent. The cloud resolving model is now at a stage where it can provide reasonably accurate statistical information of the sub-grid, cloud-resolving processes poorly parameterized in climate models and numerical prediction models.

  16. An Improved Smoke Obscuration Model ACT II. Part 1. Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    Fitz ) Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20305 ATTN: Code 6009 (Or. John MacCallum, Jr.) Washington, DC 20375 Director Defense Nuclear Agency...Sands Missile Range, NM 18F. Pasquill, 1974, Atmospheric Diffusion, second edition, Halsted Press Div., John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York 19C. H. B...18F. Pasquill, 1974, Atmospheric Diffusion, second edition, Halsted Press Div., John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York 19C. H. B. Priestley, 1956, "A

  17. Design, Fabrication, Characterization and Modeling of Integrated Functional Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    mechanical , optical, etc.), the connection to real-world applications and devices also requires the seamless integration of dimensions (nano, micro...underlying mechanism of magnetic interactions between graphene- mediated nanoparticles, and proximity effects at the interface between the nanoparticles and... mechanism for induced magnetic anisotropy in these alloys has been an area of active inquiry. Recently, Ohodnicki Jr et al. [14] reported on the

  18. Incorporating Model Parameter Uncertainty into Prostate IMRT Treatment Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    HD HJ. Fractionation in radiotherapy. London: Taylor & Francis, 1987. 8. Withers HR. Biologic basis for altered fractionation schemes. Cancer 1985; 55...of combined agent regimens. Int J Radiat Biol 1990; 57: 709-722. 15. Thames HD , Jr., Withers HR, Peters LJ, Fletcher GH. Changes in early and late...Oncology, Biology, Physics 2001; 50: 551-560. 30. Turesson I, Thames HD . Repair capacity and kinetics of human skin during fractionated radiotherapy

  19. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models which account for the effects of compressibility into the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code and to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into 3-D CFD codes for engineering applications.

  20. Thinkable Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Robert W.

    1996-01-01

    Argues that the organization of cognitive structures for technical domains can be visualized as a network of connected thinkable models. Describes a taxonomy of models that has been developed and discusses the issue of how representations relate to human modes of perception and action. Contains 25 references. (DDR)

  1. Phonological Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, W.L.

    1968-01-01

    The article discusses models of synchronic and diachronic phonology and suggests changes in them. The basic generative model of phonology is outlined with the author's reinterpretations. The systematic phonemic level is questioned in terms of its unreality with respect to linguistic performance and its lack of validity with respect to historical…

  2. Modeling Sunspots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Phil Seok; Oh, Sung Jin

    2013-01-01

    Modeling in science has been studied by education researchers for decades and is now being applied broadly in school. It is among the scientific practices featured in the "Next Generation Science Standards" ("NGSS") (Achieve Inc. 2013). This article describes modeling activities in an extracurricular science club in a high…

  3. Modeling and Control of State-Affine Probabilistic Systems for Atomic-Scale Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Analysis for Nonlinear Systems. New York: Spring -Verlag, 1987. [5] M. Itoh, "Atomic-scale homoepitaxial growth simulations of reconstructed III-V surfaces...Ridge, NJ; 1995. -- SSC function of the Node 182 [2] M. K. Weldon , K. T. Queeney, J. Eng Jr., K. Raghavachari, and Y. J. Chabal, "The surface science

  4. Applying Spatial-Temporal Model and Game Theory to Asymmetric Threat Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Genshe Chen, Denis Garagic, Xiaohuan Tan, Dongxu Li, Dan Shen, Mo Wei, Xu Wang, “Team Dynamics and Tactics for Mission Planning,” Proceedings...Cruz, Jr., Genshe Chen, Dongxu Li, and Denis Garagic, “Target Selection in UAV Cooperative Control Under Uncertain Environment: Genetic Algorithm

  5. The Pea Seedling as a Model of Normal and Abnormal Morphogenesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurkdjian, Armen; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes several simple and inexpensive experiments designed to facilitate the study of normal and abnormal morphogenesis in the biology laboratory. Seedlings of the common garden pea are used in the experiments, and abnormal morphogenesis (tumors) are induced by a virulent strain of the crown-gall organism, Agrobacterium tumefaciens. (JR)

  6. Crustal-scale geological and thermal models of the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippel, Judith; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Kröger, Karsten; Lewerenz, Björn

    2010-05-01

    of Tertiary deltaic sequences, AAPG Bulletin, 92(2): 225-247. Kroeger, K.F., di Primio, R. and Horsfield, B., (2009). Hydrocarbon flow modeling in complex structures (Mackenzie Basin, Canada), AAPG Bulletin, 93(9): 1-25. O'Leary, D.M., Ellis, R.M., Stephenson, R.A., Lane, L.S. and Zelt, C.A., 1995. Crustal structure of the northern Yukon and Mackenzie Delta, northwestern Canada, Journal of Geophysical Research 100(B7): 9905-9920. Stephenson, R.A., Coflin, K.C., Lane, L.S. and Dietrich, J.R., 1994. Crustal structure and tectonics of the southeastern Beaufort Sea continental margin, Tectonics, 13(2): 389-400.

  7. Modeling complexes of modeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Anishchenko, Ivan; Kundrotas, Petras J; Vakser, Ilya A

    2017-03-01

    Structural characterization of proteins is essential for understanding life processes at the molecular level. However, only a fraction of known proteins have experimentally determined structures. This fraction is even smaller for protein-protein complexes. Thus, structural modeling of protein-protein interactions (docking) primarily has to rely on modeled structures of the individual proteins, which typically are less accurate than the experimentally determined ones. Such "double" modeling is the Grand Challenge of structural reconstruction of the interactome. Yet it remains so far largely untested in a systematic way. We present a comprehensive validation of template-based and free docking on a set of 165 complexes, where each protein model has six levels of structural accuracy, from 1 to 6 Å C α RMSD. Many template-based docking predictions fall into acceptable quality category, according to the CAPRI criteria, even for highly inaccurate proteins (5-6 Å RMSD), although the number of such models (and, consequently, the docking success rate) drops significantly for models with RMSD > 4 Å. The results show that the existing docking methodologies can be successfully applied to protein models with a broad range of structural accuracy, and the template-based docking is much less sensitive to inaccuracies of protein models than the free docking. Proteins 2017; 85:470-478. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A Model for Math Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tony; Erfan, Sasan

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is an open-ended research subject where no definite answers exist for any problem. Math modeling enables thinking outside the box to connect different fields of studies together including statistics, algebra, calculus, matrices, programming and scientific writing. As an integral part of society, it is the foundation for many…

  9. Environmental Modeling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's modeling community is working to gain insights into certain parts of a physical, biological, economic, or social system by conducting environmental assessments for Agency decision making to complex environmental issues.

  10. Energy Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Energy models characterize the energy system, its evolution, and its interactions with the broader economy. The energy system consists of primary resources, including both fossil fuels and renewables; power plants, refineries, and other technologies to process and convert these r...

  11. Micromolecular modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillet, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    A reaction kinetics based model of the photodegradation process, which measures all important rate constants, and a computerized model capable of predicting the photodegradation rate and failure modes of a 30 year period, were developed. It is shown that the computerized photodegradation model for polyethylene correctly predicts failure of ELVAX 15 and cross linked ELVAX 150 on outdoor exposure. It is indicated that cross linking ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) does not significantly change its degradation rate. It is shown that the effect of the stabilizer package is approximately equivalent on both polymers. The computerized model indicates that peroxide decomposers and UV absorbers are the most effective stabilizers. It is found that a combination of UV absorbers and a hindered amine light stabilizer (HALS) is the most effective stabilizer system.

  12. Anchor Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regardt, Olle; Rönnbäck, Lars; Bergholtz, Maria; Johannesson, Paul; Wohed, Petia

    Maintaining and evolving data warehouses is a complex, error prone, and time consuming activity. The main reason for this state of affairs is that the environment of a data warehouse is in constant change, while the warehouse itself needs to provide a stable and consistent interface to information spanning extended periods of time. In this paper, we propose a modeling technique for data warehousing, called anchor modeling, that offers non-destructive extensibility mechanisms, thereby enabling robust and flexible management of changes in source systems. A key benefit of anchor modeling is that changes in a data warehouse environment only require extensions, not modifications, to the data warehouse. This ensures that existing data warehouse applications will remain unaffected by the evolution of the data warehouse, i.e. existing views and functions will not have to be modified as a result of changes in the warehouse model.

  13. Fracture Behavior of Boron Aluminum Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    listed in Table I. TABLE I: LIST OF FRACTURE MODELS REVIEWED Authors Ref. Abbrv. Criterion Hole Slits M.E. Waddoups J.R. Eisenmann 3 WEK LEFM V/ SB.E...Laminates: Predictions and Experiemtns - A Review", NASA CR , 1985, (to be published). 3. M.E. Waddoups, J.R. Eisenmann and B.E. Kaminski

  14. Incorporating Sediment Compaction Into a Gravitationally Self-consistent Model for Global Sea-level Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, K.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2015-12-01

    In sedimentary deltas and fans, sea-level changes are strongly modulated by the deposition and compaction of marine sediment. The deposition of sediment and incorporation of water into the sedimentary pore space reduces sea level by increasing the elevation of the seafloor, which reduces the thickness of sea-water above the bed. In a similar manner, the compaction of sediment and purging of water out of the sedimentary pore space increases sea level by reducing the elevation of the seafloor, which increases the thickness of sea water above the bed. Here we show how one can incorporate the effects of sediment deposition and compaction into the global, gravitationally self-consistent sea-level model of Dalca et al. (2013). Incorporating sediment compaction requires accounting for only one additional quantity that had not been accounted for in Dalca et al. (2013): the mean porosity in the sediment column. We provide a general analytic framework for global sea-level changes including sediment deposition and compaction, and we demonstrate how sea level responds to deposition and compaction under one simple parameterization for compaction. The compaction of sediment generates changes in sea level only by changing the elevation of the seafloor. That is, sediment compaction does not affect the mass load on the crust, and therefore does not generate perturbations in crustal elevation or the gravity field that would further perturb sea level. These results have implications for understanding sedimentary effects on sea-level changes and thus for disentangling the various drivers of sea-level change. ReferencesDalca A.V., Ferrier K.L., Mitrovica J.X., Perron J.T., Milne G.A., Creveling J.R., 2013. On postglacial sea level - III. Incorporating sediment redistribution. Geophysical Journal International, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggt089.

  15. Retro-action model for the erosion of rocky coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapoval, B.; Baldassarri, A.

    2009-12-01

    Rocky coasts are estimated to represent 75% of the world’s shorelines [1]. We discuss various situations where the formation of rocky coast morphology could be attributed to the retro-action of the coast morphology on the erosive power of the see. In the case of rocky coasts, erosion can spontaneously create irregular seashores. But, in turn, the geometrical irregularity participates to the damping of sea-waves, decreasing the average wave amplitude and erosive power. There may then exist a mutual self-stabilization of the waves amplitude together with the irregular morphology of the coast. A simple model of such stabilization is discussed. It leads, through a complex dynamics of the earth-sea interface, to the spontaneous appearance of an irregular sea-shore. The final coast morphology is found to depend on the morphology/damping coupling of the coast and on the possible existence of built-in correlations within the coast lithologic properties. This is illustrated in the figure. In the limit case where the morphology/damping coupling is weak and when the earth lithology distribution exhibit only short range correlations, the process spontaneously build fractal morphologies with a dimension close to 4/3 [2]. It is shown that this dimension refers to the dimension of the so-called accessible perimeter in gradient percolation. However, even rugged but non-fractal sea-coasts morphology may emerge for strong damping or during the erosion process. When the distributions of the lithologies exhibit long range correlations, a variety of complex morphologies are obtained which mimics observed coastline complexity, well beyond simple fractality. On a somewhat different perspective, the design of breakwaters is suggested to be improved by using global irregular geometry with features sizes of the order of the wave-length of the sea oscillations. [1] R. A. Davis, Jr, D. M. Fitzgerald, Beaches and Coasts,(Blackwell, Oxford 2004). [2] B. Sapoval, A. Baldassarri, A. Gabrielli

  16. The U.S. Marine Corps Leadership Model: Can the Central Intelligence Agency Model After It?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-26

    Daft , Richard L . Leadership Theory and Practice. The Dryden Press. Fort Worth, TX, 1999. Faddis, Charles S. Beyond Repair,· The Decline and Fall...Ora~ns~e Co aiftee :tyiember: (ck,uc:w--d ::r · Gr ~· d<Sm.-. \\f h l > Approved: t..lli~ Date: . . l c. rrr4t 0.01/: l Oral Defens r: 7J~P (tg/..’iJ...2009: 41 BffiLIOGRAPHY: Best, Jr., Richard A. Intelligence Community Reorganization: Potential Effects on DoD Intelligence Agencies. Washington, DC

  17. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    precipitation will be submitted in September 2012. The major highlights are as follows: a. The results indicate that NU-WRF model could capture observed diurnal variation of rainfall (composite not individual); b. NU-WRF model could simulate two different types (propagating and local type) of the diurnal variation of rainfall; c. NU-WRF model simulation show very good agreement with observation in terms of precipitation pattern (linear MCS), radar reflectivity (a second low peak shallow convection); d. NU-WRF model simulation indicates that the cool-pool dynamic is the main physical process for MCS propagation speed; e. Surface heat fluxes (including land surface model and initial surface condition) do not play a major role in phase of diurnal variation (change rainfall amount slightly); f. Terrain effect is important for initial stage of MCS (rainfall is increased and close to observation by increasing the terrain height that is also close to observed); g. Diurnal variation of radiation is not important for the simulated variation of rainfall. Publications: Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Powell, R. Houze, Jr., P. Ciesielski, N. Guy, H. Pierce and T. Matsui, 2012: A comparison of the water budgets between clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE. J. Atmos. Sci., 70, 487-503. Powell, S. W., R. A. Houze, Jr., A. Kumar, and S. A. McFarlane, 2012: Comparison of simulated and observed continental tropical anvil clouds and their radiative heating profiles. J. Atmos. Sci., 69, 2662-2681. Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, T. Matsui, S. Xie, S. Lang, M. Zhang, D. Starr, and X. Li, 2011: Estimating the Ice Crystal Enhancement Factor in the Tropics. J. Atmos. Sci., 68, 1424-1434. Conferences: Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Powell, R. Houze, Jr., P. Ciesielski, N. Guy, H. Pierce and T. Matsui, 2012: Comparison of water budget between AMMA and TWP-ICE clouds. The 3rd Annual ASR Science Team Meeting. Arlington, Virginia, Mar. 12-16, 2012. Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Powell, R. A. Houze Jr., and P. Ciesielski, 2011: Comparing the

  18. Assessment of HRSC Digital Terrain Models Produced for the South Polar Residual Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Alfiah Rizky Diana; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2017-04-01

    The current Digital Terrain Models available for Mars consist of NASA MOLA (Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter) Digital Terrain Models with an average resolution of 112 m/ pixel (512 pixels/degree) for the polar region. The ESA/DLR High Resolution Stereo Camera is currently orbiting Mars and mapping its surface, 98% with resolution of ≤100 m/pixel and better and 100% at lower resolution [1]. It is possible to produce Digital Terrain Models from HRSC images using various methods. In this study, the method developed on Kim and Muller [2] which uses the VICAR open source program together with photogrammetry sofrware from DLR (Deutschen Zentrums für Luft- und Raumfahrt) with image matching based on the GOTCHA (Gruen-Otto-Chau) algorithm [3]. Digital Terrain Models have been processed over the South Pole with emphasis on areas around South Polar Residual Cap from High Resolution Stereo Camera images [4]. Digital Terrain Models have been produced for 31 orbits out of 149 polar orbits available. This study analyses the quality of the DTMs including an assessment of accuracy of elevations using the MOLA MEGDR (Mission Experiment Gridded Data Records) which has roughly 42 million MOLA PEDR (Precision Experiment Data Records) points between latitudes of 78 o -90 o S. The issues encountered in the production of Digital Terrain Models will be described and the statistical results and assessment method will be presented. The resultant DTMs will be accessible via http://i-Mars.eu/web-GIS References: [1] Neukum, G. et. al, 2004. Mars Express: The Scientific Payload pp. 17-35. [2] Kim, J.-R. and J.-P. Muller. 2009. PSS vol. 57, pp. 2095-2112. [3] Shin, D. and J.-P. Muller. 2012. Pattern Recognition, 45(10), 3795 -3809. [4] Putri, A.R. D., et al., Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLI-B4, 463-469 Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received partial funding from the STFC "MSSL Consolidated Grant" ST/K000977/1 and partial support from the

  19. Conceptualizing Peatlands in a Physically-Based Spatially Distributed Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downer, Charles; Wahl, Mark

    2017-04-01

    moss and peat soils presented a conundrum in terms of conceptualizing the hydrology and identifying reasonable parameter ranges for physical properties. Various combinations of overland roughness, surface retention, and subsurface flow were used to represent the peatlands. The process resulted in some interesting results that may shed light on the dominant hydrologic processes associated with peatland, as well as what hydrologic conceptualizations, simulation tools, and approaches are applicable in modeling peatland hydrology. Downer, C.W., Ogden, F.L., 2004. GSSHA: Model to simulate diverse stream flow producing processes. J. Hydrol. Eng. 161-174. Rieger, S., Furbush, C.E., Schoephorster, D.B., Summerfield Jr., H., Geiger, L.C., 1972. Soils of the Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed, Interior Alaska. Hanover, New Hampshire. Wahrhaftig, C., 1965. Physiographic Divisions of Alaska. Washington, DC.

  20. WE-A-201-02: Modern Statistical Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Niemierko, A.

    Chris Marshall: Memorial Introduction Donald Edmonds Herbert Jr., or Don to his colleagues and friends, exemplified the “big tent” vision of medical physics, specializing in Applied Statistics and Dynamical Systems theory. He saw, more clearly than most, that “Making models is the difference between doing science and just fooling around [ref Woodworth, 2004]”. Don developed an interest in chemistry at school by “reading a book” - a recurring theme in his story. He was awarded a Westinghouse Science scholarship and attended the Carnegie Institute of Technology (later Carnegie Mellon University) where his interest turned to physics and led to amore » BS in Physics after transfer to Northwestern University. After (voluntary) service in the Navy he earned his MS in Physics from the University of Oklahoma, which led him to Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore to pursue a PhD. The early death of his wife led him to take a salaried position in the Physics Department of Colorado College in Colorado Springs so as to better care for their young daughter. There, a chance invitation from Dr. Juan del Regato to teach physics to residents at the Penrose Cancer Hospital introduced him to Medical Physics, and he decided to enter the field. He received his PhD from the University of London (UK) under Prof. Joseph Rotblat, where I first met him, and where he taught himself statistics. He returned to Penrose as a clinical medical physicist, also largely self-taught. In 1975 he formalized an evolving interest in statistical analysis as Professor of Radiology and Head of the Division of Physics and Statistics at the College of Medicine of the University of South Alabama in Mobile, AL where he remained for the rest of his career. He also served as the first Director of their Bio-Statistics and Epidemiology Core Unit working in part on a sickle-cell disease. After retirement he remained active as Professor Emeritus. Don served for several years as a consultant to the

  1. Modeling reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    Although powerful computers have allowed complex physical and manmade hardware systems to be modeled successfully, we have encountered persistent problems with the reliability of computer models for systems involving human learning, human action, and human organizations. This is not a misfortune; unlike physical and manmade systems, human systems do not operate under a fixed set of laws. The rules governing the actions allowable in the system can be changed without warning at any moment, and can evolve over time. That the governing laws are inherently unpredictable raises serious questions about the reliability of models when applied to human situations. In these domains, computers are better used, not for prediction and planning, but for aiding humans. Examples are systems that help humans speculate about possible futures, offer advice about possible actions in a domain, systems that gather information from the networks, and systems that track and support work flows in organizations.

  2. Photoionization Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, T.

    2010-01-01

    Warm absorber spectra are characterized by the many lines from partially ionized intermediate-Z elements, and iron, detected with the grating instruments on Chandra and XMM-Newton. If these ions are formed in a gas which is in photoionization equilibrium, they correspond to a broad range of ionization parameters, although there is evidence for certain preferred values. A test for any dynamical model for these outflows is to reproduce these properties, at some level of detail. In this paper we present a statistical analysis of the ionization distribution which can be applied both the observed spectra and to theoretical models. As an example, we apply it to our dynamical models for warm absorber outflows, based on evaporation from the molecular torus.

  3. Reflectance Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The overall goal of this work has been to develop a set of computational tools and media abstractions for the terrain bidirectional reflectance problem. The modeling of soil and vegetation surfaces has been emphasized with a gradual increase in the complexity of the media geometries treated. Pragmatic problems involved in the combined modeling of soil, vegetation, and atmospheric effects have been of interest and one of the objectives has been to describe the canopy reflectance problem in a classical radiative transfer sense permitting easier inclusion of our work by other workers in the radiative transfer field.

  4. Development and Utility of a Piloted Flight Simulator for Icing Effects Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Ranaudo, Richard J.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Dickes, Edward G.; Gingras, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A piloted flight simulator called the Ice Contamination Effects Flight Training Device (ICEFTD), which uses low cost desktop components and a generic cockpit replication is being developed. The purpose of this device is to demonstrate the effectiveness of its use for training pilots to recognize and recover from aircraft handling anomalies that result from airframe ice formations. High-fidelity flight simulation models for various baseline (non-iced) and iced configurations were developed from wind tunnel tests of a subscale DeHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft model. These simulation models were validated with flight test data from the NASA Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft, which included the effects of ice on wing and tail stall characteristics. These simulation models are being implemented into an ICEFTD that will provide representative aircraft characteristics due to airframe icing. Scenario-based exercises are being constructed to give an operational-flavor to the simulation. Training pilots will learn to recognize iced aircraft characteristics from the baseline, and will practice and apply appropriate recovery procedures to a handling event.

  5. A structural model for the flexural mechanics of nonwoven tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Engelmayr, George C; Sacks, Michael S

    2006-08-01

    The development of methods to predict the strength and stiffness of biomaterials used in tissue engineering is critical for load-bearing applications in which the essential functional requirements are primarily mechanical. We previously quantified changes in the effective stiffness (E) of needled nonwoven polyglycolic acid (PGA) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) scaffolds due to tissue formation and scaffold degradation under three-point bending. Toward predicting these changes, we present a structural model for E of a needled nonwoven scaffold in flexure. The model accounted for the number and orientation of fibers within a representative volume element of the scaffold demarcated by the needling process. The spring-like effective stiffness of the curved fibers was calculated using the sinusoidal fiber shapes. Structural and mechanical properties of PGA and PLLA fibers and PGA, PLLA, and 50:50 PGA/PLLA scaffolds were measured and compared with model predictions. To verify the general predictive capability, the predicted dependence of E on fiber diameter was compared with experimental measurements. Needled nonwoven scaffolds were found to exhibit distinct preferred (PD) and cross-preferred (XD) fiber directions, with an E ratio (PD/XD) of approximately 3:1. The good agreement between the predicted and experimental dependence of E on fiber diameter (R2 = 0.987) suggests that the structural model can be used to design scaffolds with E values more similar to native soft tissues. A comparison with previous results for cell-seeded scaffolds (Engelmayr, G. C., Jr., et al., 2005, Biomaterials, 26(2), pp. 175-187) suggests, for the first time, that the primary mechanical effect of collagen deposition is an increase in the number of fiber-fiber bond points yielding effectively stiffer scaffold fibers. This finding indicated that the effects of tissue deposition on needled nonwoven scaffold mechanics do not follow a rule-of-mixtures behavior. These important results underscore

  6. Modeling Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, James R.; Elliott, Nancy A.; Hurteau, Laura; Schulz, Amanda

    2004-01-01

    Students must understand the fundamental process of convection before they can grasp a wide variety of Earth processes, many of which may seem abstract because of the scales on which they operate. Presentation of a very visual, concrete model prior to instruction on these topics may facilitate students' understanding of processes that are largely…

  7. Ensemble Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ensemble forecasting has been used for operational numerical weather prediction in the United States and Europe since the early 1990s. An ensemble of weather or climate forecasts is used to characterize the two main sources of uncertainty in computer models of physical systems: ...

  8. Painting models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, F.; Donchyts, G.; van Dam, A.; Plieger, M.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of interactive art has blurred the line between electronic, computer graphics and art. Here we apply this art form to numerical models. Here we show how the transformation of a numerical model into an interactive painting can both provide insights and solve real world problems. The cases that are used as an example include forensic reconstructions, dredging optimization, barrier design. The system can be fed using any source of time varying vector fields, such as hydrodynamic models. The cases used here, the Indian Ocean (HYCOM), the Wadden Sea (Delft3D Curvilinear), San Francisco Bay (3Di subgrid and Delft3D Flexible Mesh), show that the method used is suitable for different time and spatial scales. High resolution numerical models become interactive paintings by exchanging their velocity fields with a high resolution (>=1M cells) image based flow visualization that runs in a html5 compatible web browser. The image based flow visualization combines three images into a new image: the current image, a drawing, and a uv + mask field. The advection scheme that computes the resultant image is executed in the graphics card using WebGL, allowing for 1M grid cells at 60Hz performance on mediocre graphic cards. The software is provided as open source software. By using different sources for a drawing one can gain insight into several aspects of the velocity fields. These aspects include not only the commonly represented magnitude and direction, but also divergence, topology and turbulence .

  9. Atmospheric Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although air quality models have been applied historically to address issues specific to ambient air quality standards (i.e., one criteria pollutant at a time) or welfare (e.g.. acid deposition or visibility impairment). they are inherently multipollutant based. Therefore. in pri...

  10. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  11. Hydroballistics Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    thai h’liathe0in antd is finaull’ %IIIrd alt %tramlit And drohlttle. Mike aplpars Ito inua•,e upward in outler a rei and dowoi. ward it %iunr areli, Oil...fiducial marks should be constant and the edges phobic nor hydrophilic is better for routine sharpl ) defined. model testing. Before each launching in

  12. model outputs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Figures 1-10 and Table 1This dataset is associated with the following publication:Chang, S.Y., S. Arunachalam, A. Valencia, B. Naess, V. Isakov , M. Breen , T. Palma , and W. Vizuete. A modeling framework for characterizing near-road air pollutant concentration at community scales. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT. Elsevier BV, AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS, 538: 905-921, (2015).

  13. Evidence for a ternary complex formed between flavodoxin and cytochrome c3: 1H-NMR and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Palma, P N; Moura, I; LeGall, J; Van Beeumen, J; Wampler, J E; Moura, J J

    1994-05-31

    Small electron-transfer proteins such as flavodoxin (16 kDa) and the tetraheme cytochrome c3 (13 kDa) have been used to mimic, in vitro, part of the complex electron-transfer chain operating between substrate electron donors and respiratory electron acceptors, in sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio species). The nature and properties of the complex formed between these proteins are revealed by 1H-NMR and molecular modeling approaches. Our previous study with the Desulfovibrio vulgaris proteins [Moura, I., Moura, J.J. G., Santos, M.H., & Xavier, A. V. (1980) Cienc. Biol. (Portugal) 5, 195-197; Stewart, D.E. LeGall, J., Moura, I., Moura, J. J. G., Peck, H.D. Jr., Xavier, A. V., Weiner, P. K., & Wampler, J.E. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 2444-2450] indicated that the complex between cytochrome c3 and flavodoxin could be monitored by changes in the NMR signals of the heme methyl groups of the cytochrome and that the electrostatic surface charge (Coulomb's law) on the two proteins favored interaction between one unique heme of the cytochrome with flavodoxin. If the interaction is indeed driven by the electrostatic complementarity between the acidic flavodoxin and a unique positive region of the cytochrome c3, other homologous proteins from these two families of proteins might be expected to interact similarly. In this study, three homologous Desulfovibrio cytochromes c3 were used, which show a remarkable variation in their individual isoelectric points (ranging from 5.5 to 9.5). On the basis of data obtained from protein-protein titrations followed at specific proton NMR signals (i.e., heme methyl resonances), a binding model for this complex has been developed with evaluation of stoichiometry and binding constants. This binding model involves one site on the cytochromes c3 and two sites on the flavodoxin, with formation of a ternary complex at saturation. In order to understand the potential chemical form of the binding model, a structural model for the hypothetical

  14. Models, Part V: Composition Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Describes four models: The Authoring Cycle, a whole language approach that reflects the inquiry process; I-Search, an approach to research that uses the power of student interests; Cultural Celebration, using local heritage topics; and Science Lab Report, for the composition of a lab report. (LRW)

  15. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  16. Dendrite Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Donald Gilles, the Discipline Scientist for Materials Science in NASA's Microgravity Materials Science and Applications Department, demonstrates to Carl Dohrman a model of dendrites, the branch-like structures found in many metals and alloys. Dohrman was recently selected by the American Society for Metals International as their 1999 ASM International Foundation National Merit Scholar. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign freshman recently toured NASA's materials science facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  17. Animal models.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ellen A

    2010-01-01

    As clinical studies reveal that chemotherapeutic agents may impair several different cognitive domains in humans, the development of preclinical animal models is critical to assess the degree of chemotherapy-induced learning and memory deficits and to understand the underlying neural mechanisms. In this chapter, the effects of various cancer chemotherapeutic agents in rodents on sensory processing, conditioned taste aversion, conditioned emotional response, passive avoidance, spatial learning, cued memory, discrimination learning, delayed-matching-to-sample, novel-object recognition, electrophysiological recordings and autoshaping is reviewed. It appears at first glance that the effects of the cancer chemotherapy agents in these many different models are inconsistent. However, a literature is emerging that reveals subtle or unique changes in sensory processing, acquisition, consolidation and retrieval that are dose- and time-dependent. As more studies examine cancer chemotherapeutic agents alone and in combination during repeated treatment regimens, the animal models will become more predictive tools for the assessment of these impairments and the underlying neural mechanisms. The eventual goal is to collect enough data to enable physicians to make informed choices about therapeutic regimens for their patients and discover new avenues of alternative or complementary therapies that reduce or eliminate chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits.

  18. Examination of the Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Prostate Cancer Using the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    overcomes bias in bisulfite PCR methylation analysis. Biotechniques, 42: 48, 50, 52 passim, 2007. 46. Warnecke, P. M., Stirzaker, C., Melki , J. R...overcomes bias in bisulfite PCR methylation analysis. Biotechniques 2007;42:48, 50, 2 passim. 36. Warnecke PM, Stirzaker C, Melki JR, Millar DS, Paul CL

  19. Exporting the Colombian Model Comparing Law Enfocement Stratregies Towards Security and Stability Operations in Colombia and Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Belen Boville provides a 7 Nathan Leites and Charles Wolf, Rebellion and Authority: An Analytic Essay ...Narcocorridos are so influential that the Mexican government has banned such music on public radio.189 Despite the government’s efforts, the lyrics ...and Wolf Jr., Charles. Rebellion and Authority: An Analytic Essay on Insurgent Conflicts. Chicago: Markham Publishing Company, 1970. Livingstone

  20. 75 FR 16513 - B&C Corporation, JR Engineering Division, Including B&C Distribution Center, Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... Engineering Division, Including B&C Distribution Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers From B&C Services, Inc., Barberton, OH; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment... Department of Labor issued a Certification of Eligibility to Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance on...

  1. Martin Luther King Jr. and Cesar E. Chavez: Legacies of Leadership and Inspiration for Today's Civic Education. Issue Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Anthony; Rodriguez, Julie Chavez

    2005-01-01

    This year, Americans celebrate and reflect on the 40th anniversary of the 1965 Voting Rights Act that secured the right to vote for millions of disenfranchised African Americans, as well as the 50th anniversary of the bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama, where Rosa Parks stood up for justice by sitting down on a bus, thus catalyzing the Civil …

  2. J.R. Simplot Company's Don Siding Plant and Issues Releated to Aggregation, Debottlenecking and Projected Actual Emissions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  3. 78 FR 25942 - J.R. Simplot Co.; Availability of Petition for Determination of Nonregulated Status of Potato...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... acrylamide potential (acrylamide is a human neurotoxicant and potential carcinogen that may form in potatoes.... Rebecca Stankiewicz Gabel, Chief, Biotechnology Environmental Analysis Branch, Environmental Risk Analysis Programs, Biotechnology Regulatory Services, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 147, Riverdale, MD 20737-1236...

  4. 78 FR 10172 - Lisa Anne Cornell and G. Ware Cornell, Jr. v. Princess Cruise Lines, Ltd. (Corp), Carnival PLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    .... Princess Cruise Lines, Ltd. (Corp), Carnival PLC, and Carnival Corporation; Notice of Filing of Complaint...,'' against Princess Cruise Lines, Ltd (Corp), Carnival plc, and Carnival Corporation hereinafter... from ports in the United States;'' Respondent Carnival plc ``is a corporation established under the...

  5. A resolution honoring the life, service, and sacrifice of Captain Colin P. Kelly Jr., United States Army.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Nelson, Bill [D-FL

    2011-10-20

    Senate - 11/16/2011 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and an amended preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. For the relief of Mary Cole, Decontee Cole, Emmanuel Cole, Anna Cole, Yon Deh Cole, and Emmanuel Cole, Jr.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Tiberi, Patrick J. [R-OH-12

    2009-04-02

    House - 04/27/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. George E. Valley, Jr. Prize Talk: Quantum Frustrated Magnetism and its Expression in the Ground State Selection of Pyrochlore Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Kate

    In the search for novel quantum states of matter, such as highly entangled Quantum Spin Liquids, ``geometrically frustrated'' magnetic lattices are essential for suppressing conventional magnetic order. In three dimensions, the pyrochlore lattice is the canonical frustrated geometry. Magnetic materials with pyrochlore structures have the potential to realize unusual phases such as ``quantum spin ice'', which is predicted to host emergent magnetic monopoles, electrons, and photons as its fundamental excitations. Even in pyrochlores that form long range ordered phases, this often occurs through unusual routes such as ``order by disorder'', in which the fluctuation spectrum dictates the preferred ordered state. The rare earth-based pyrochlore series R2Ti2O7 provides a fascinating variety of magnetic ground states. I will introduce the general anisotropic interaction Hamiltonian that has been successfully used to describe several materials in this series. Using inelastic neutron scattering, the relevant anisotropic interaction strengths can be extracted quantitatively. I will discuss this approach, and its application to two rare earth pyrochlore materials, Er2Ti2O7 and Yb2Ti<2O7, whose ground state properties have long been enigmatic. From these studies, ErTi2O7 and Yb2Ti2O7 have been suggested to be realizations of "quantum order by disorder" and "quantum spin ice", respectively. This research was supported by NSERC of Canada and the National Science Foundation.

  8. Expanding Concepts in Mental Retardation; Scientific Symposium of the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., Foundation (3rd, Boston, Massachusetts, 1966).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jervis, George A., Ed.

    The genetics of mental retardation are discussed in terms of geographical isolates, prospects for prevention of trisomic conditions, population genetics, and cytogenetics of Down's syndrome; problems of neurogenesis described are anabolic pathways of galactose and glucose metabolism, abnormal cell migrations in developing brains, and genetic…

  9. A resolution honoring the life, accomplishments, and legacy of Billy Frank, Jr., and expressing condolences on his passing.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Murray, Patty [D-WA

    2014-05-22

    Senate - 06/04/2014 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. A resolution relative to the death of Howard O. Greene, Jr., former Sergeant at Arms of the United States Senate.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. McConnell, Mitch [R-KY

    2014-11-17

    Senate - 11/17/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. E.S.L. Video Recording Project at Martin Luther King, Jr. High School, Spring 1988. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Tomi D.; Schlau, Beth

    The English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) video recording project was designed to use student-produced videotape recordings to help 120 limited-English-speaking students learn to speak, read, and write English. Staff participated in a series of workshops on video program development and production techniques. Four classes developed video productions,…

  12. A Cultural Resources Survey of the C. B. Maery Jr., L’Anguille River - 23 Permit Area, Cross County, Arkansas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    and hunting small mammals, deer and Pleistocene megafauna . Dalton : 8.000 - 7.000 B. C. Dalton materials, primarily the characteristic Dalton point...important subsystems to supplement the diet with prnteins and other nutrients . In addition, the maintenance of these subsystems could serve as a

  13. Biomimetic modelling.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Julian F V

    2003-01-01

    Biomimetics is seen as a path from biology to engineering. The only path from engineering to biology in current use is the application of engineering concepts and models to biological systems. However, there is another pathway: the verification of biological mechanisms by manufacture, leading to an iterative process between biology and engineering in which the new understanding that the engineering implementation of a biological system can bring is fed back into biology, allowing a more complete and certain understanding and the possibility of further revelations for application in engineering. This is a pathway as yet unformalized, and one that offers the possibility that engineers can also be scientists. PMID:14561351

  14. Students' Models of Curve Fitting: A Models and Modeling Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Shweta

    2010-01-01

    The Models and Modeling Perspectives (MMP) has evolved out of research that began 26 years ago. MMP researchers use Model Eliciting Activities (MEAs) to elicit students' mental models. In this study MMP was used as the conceptual framework to investigate the nature of students' models of curve fitting in a problem-solving environment consisting of…

  15. 10. MOVABLE BED SEDIMENTATION MODELS. DOGTOOTH BEND MODEL (MODEL SCALE: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. MOVABLE BED SEDIMENTATION MODELS. DOGTOOTH BEND MODEL (MODEL SCALE: 1' = 400' HORIZONTAL, 1' = 100' VERTICAL), AND GREENVILLE BRIDGE MODEL (MODEL SCALE: 1' = 360' HORIZONTAL, 1' = 100' VERTICAL). - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  16. Apollo 11 and 16 Soil Bi-directional Solar Reflectance Measurements, Models and LRO Diviner Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, E. J.; Paige, D. A.; Shepard, M. K.; Johnson, J. R.; Biggar, S. F.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Allen, C.

    2010-12-01

    We have compared laboratory solar reflectance measurements of Apollo 11 and 16 soil samples to Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Diviner orbital albedo measurements at the Apollo landing sites. The soil samples are two representative end member samples from the moon, low albedo lunar maria (sample 10084) and high albedo lunar highlands (sample 68810). Bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) measurements of the soil samples were conducted at Bloomsburg University (BUG) and at the University of Arizona [1,2]. We collected two different types of BUG datasets: a standard set of BRDF measurements at incidence angles of 0-60°, emission angles of 0-80°, and phase angles of 3-140°, and a high-incidence angle set of measurements along and perpendicular to the principal plane at incidence angles of 0-75° and phase angles of 3-155°. The BUG measurements generated a total of 765 data points in four different filters 450, 550, 750 and 950 nm. The Blacklab measurements were acquired at incidence angles of 60-88°, emission angles 60-82°, and phase angles of 17-93° at wavelengths of 455, 554, 699, 949nm. The BUG data were fit to two BRDF models: Hapke’s model [3] as described by Johnson et al, 2010 [4], and a simplified empirical function. The fact that both approaches can satisfactorily fit the BUG data is not unexpected, given the similarities between the functions and their input parameters, and the fact that the BRDF for dark lunar soil is dominated by the single scattering phase functions of the individual soil particles. To compare our lunar sample measurements with LRO Diviner data [5], we selected all daytime observations acquired during the first year of operation within 3 km square boxes centered at the landing sites. We compared Diviner Channel 1 (0.3 - 3 µm) Lambert albedos with model calculated Lambert albedos of the lunar samples at the same photometric angles. In general, we found good agreement between the laboratory and Diviner

  17. Molecular dynamics of β-hairpin models of epigenetic recognition motifs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiange; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W; Marshall, Garland R

    2012-09-26

    The conformations and stabilities of the β-hairpin model peptides of Waters (Riemen, A. J.; Waters, M. L. Biochemistry 2009, 48, 1525; Hughes, R. M.; Benshoff, M. L.; Waters, M. L. Chemistry 2007, 13, 5753) have been experimentally characterized as a function of lysine ε-methylation. These models were developed to explore molecular recognition of known epigenetic recognition motifs. This system offered an opportunity to computationally examine the role of cation-π interactions, desolvation of the ε-methylated ammonium groups, and aromatic/aromatic interactions on the observed differences in NMR spectra. AMOEBA, a second-generation force field (Ponder, J. W.; Wu, C.; Ren, P.; Pande, V. S.; Chodera, J. D.; Schnieders, M. J.; Haque, I.; Mobley, D. L.; Lambrecht, D. S.; DiStasio, R. A., Jr.; Head-Gordon, M.; Clark, G. N.; Johnson, M. E.; Head-Gordon, T. J. Phys. Chem. B 2010, 114, 2549), was chosen as it includes both multipole electrostatics and polarizability thought to be essential to accurately characterize such interactions. Independent parametrization of ε-methylated amines was required from which aqueous solvation free energies were estimated and shown to agree with literature values. Molecular dynamics simulations (100 ns) using the derived parameters with model peptides, such as Ac-R-W-V-W-V-N-G-Orn-K(Me)(n)-I-L-Q-NH(2), where n = 0, 1, 2, or 3, were conducted in explicit solvent. Distances between the centers of the indole rings of the two-tryptophan residues, 2 and 4, and the ε-methylated ammonium group on Lys-9 as well as the distance between the N- and C-termini were monitored to estimate the strength and orientation of the cation-π and aromatic/aromatic interactions. In agreement with the experimental data, the stability of the β-hairpin increased significantly with lysine ε-methylation. The ability of MD simulations to reproduce the observed NOEs for the four peptides was further estimated for the monopole-based force fields, AMBER, CHARMM, and

  18. Modeling fatigue.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Walton; Xu, Jin Zhong

    2002-01-01

    The American Board of Family Practice is developing a patient simulation program to evaluate diagnostic and management skills. The simulator must give temporally and physiologically reasonable answers to symptom questions such as "Have you been tired?" A three-step process generates symptom histories. In the first step, the simulator determines points in time where it should calculate instantaneous symptom status. In the second step, a Bayesian network implementing a roughly physiologic model of the symptom generates a value on a severity scale at each sampling time. Positive, zero, and negative values represent increased, normal, and decreased status, as applicable. The simulator plots these values over time. In the third step, another Bayesian network inspects this plot and reports how the symptom changed over time. This mechanism handles major trends, multiple and concurrent symptom causes, and gradually effective treatments. Other temporal insights, such as observations about short-term symptom relief, require complimentary mechanisms.

  19. High-resolution CO2 and CH4 flux inverse modeling combining GOSAT, OCO-2 and ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksyutov, S. S.; Oda, T.; Saito, M.; Ito, A.; Janardanan Achari, R.; Sasakawa, M.; Machida, T.; Kaiser, J. W.; Belikov, D.; Valsala, V.; O'Dell, C.; Yoshida, Y.; Matsunaga, T.

    2017-12-01

    We develop a high-resolution CO2 and CH4 flux inversion system that is based on the Lagrangian-Eulerian coupled tracer transport model, and is designed to estimate surface fluxes from atmospheric CO2 and CH4 data observed by the GOSAT and OCO-2 satellites and by global in-situ networks, including observation in Siberia. We use the Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) FLEXPART to estimate the surface flux footprints for each observation at 0.1-degree spatial resolution for three days of transport. The LPDM is coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model (NIES-TM). The adjoint of the coupled transport model is used in an iterative optimization procedure based on either quasi-Newtonian algorithm or singular value decomposition. Combining surface and satellite data for use in inversion requires correcting for biases present in satellite observation data, that is done in a two-step procedure. As a first step, bi-weekly corrections to prior flux fields are estimated for the period of 2009 to 2015 from in-situ CO2 and CH4 data from global observation network, included in Obspack-GVP (for CO2), WDCGG (CH4) and JR-STATION datasets. High-resolution prior fluxes were prepared for anthropogenic emissions (ODIAC and EDGAR), biomass burning (GFAS), and the terrestrial biosphere. The terrestrial biosphere flux was constructed using a vegetation mosaic map and separate simulations of CO2 fluxes by the VISIT model for each vegetation type present in a grid. The prior flux uncertainty for land is scaled proportionally to monthly mean GPP by the MODIS product for CO2 and EDGAR emissions for CH4. Use of the high-resolution transport leads to improved representation of the anthropogenic plumes, often observed at continental continuous observation sites. OCO-2 observations are aggregated to 1 second averages, to match the 0.1 degree resolution of the transport model. Before including satellite observations in the inversion, the monthly varying latitude-dependent bias is

  20. Ice Accretion Formations on a NACA 0012 Swept Wing Tip in Natural Icing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Giriunas, Julius A.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2002-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in the DeHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft at NASA Glenn Research Center to study the formation of ice accretions on swept wings in natural icing conditions. The experiment was designed to obtain ice accretion data to help determine if the mechanisms of ice accretion formation observed in the Icing Research Tunnel are present in natural icing conditions. The experiment in the Twin Otter was conducted using a NACA 0012 swept wing tip. The model enabled data acquisition at 0 deg, 15 deg, 25 deg, 30 deg, and 45 deg sweep angles. Casting data, ice shape tracings, and close-up photographic data were obtained. The results showed that the mechanisms of ice accretion formation observed in-flight agree well with the ones observed in the Icing Research Tunnel. Observations on the end cap of the airfoil showed the same strong effect of the local sweep angle on the formation of scallops as observed in the tunnel.