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Sample records for juan nuevos datos

  1. Turning scientific approaches into practical conservation actions: the case of Comunidad Indigena de Nuevo San Juan Parangaricutiro, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, A; Bocco, G; Torres, A

    2001-05-01

    Optimum natural resource management and biodiversity conservation are desirable goals. These, however, often exclude each other, since maximum economic benefits have promoted drastic reductions in biodiversity throughout the world. This dilemma confronts local stakeholders, who usually go for maximizing economic inputs, whereas other social (e.g., academic) sectors are favor conservation practices. In this paper we describe the way two scientific approaches--landscape and participatory research--were used to develop sound and durable land use scenarios. These two approaches included expert knowledge of both social and environmental conditions in indigenous communities. Our major emphasis was given to detect spatially explicit land use scenarios and capacity building in order to construct a decision support system operated by stakeholders of the Comunidad Indigena de Nuevo San Juan Parangaricutiro in Mexico. The system for decision-making was fed with data from inventories of both abiotic and biotic biodiversity components. All research, implementation, and monitoring activities were conducted in close collaboration with members of the indigenous community. As a major result we obtained a number of forest alternative uses that favor emerging markets and make this indigenous community less dependent on a single market. Furthermore, skilled members of the community are now running the automated system for decision-making. In conclusion, our results were better expressed as products with direct benefits in local livelihoods rather than pure academic outputs.

  2. Nuevo Observatorio Virtual Argentino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissera, P. B.

    We summarized the main events in the creation of the Nuevo Observatorio Virtual Argentino (NOVA) and its objectives. We also discuss the present advances and the goals for the near future. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  3. 33 CFR 165.754 - Safety Zone: San Juan Harbor, San Juan, PR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone: San Juan Harbor, San... Zone: San Juan Harbor, San Juan, PR. (a) Regulated area. A moving safety zone is established in the following area: (1) The waters around Liquefied Petroleum Gas ships entering San Juan Harbor in an area...

  4. 33 CFR 165.754 - Safety Zone: San Juan Harbor, San Juan, PR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone: San Juan Harbor, San... Zone: San Juan Harbor, San Juan, PR. (a) Regulated area. A moving safety zone is established in the following area: (1) The waters around Liquefied Petroleum Gas ships entering San Juan Harbor in an area...

  5. Nuevos sistemas de frecuencia intermedia para el IAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olalde, J. C.; Perilli, D.; Larrarte, J. J.

    Se presenta el diagrama en bloques de los nuevos sistemas de Frecuencia Intermedia para los dos radiómetros instalados en el IAR. Entre las características más importantes del sistema podemos mencionar la posibilidad de conectar cualquiera de las dos antenas a los ``backend" disponibles: analizador espectral de alta resolución (META II) de 0,05 Hz, autocorrelador de 1008 canales y contínuo. Se incorporan al sistema nuevos sintetizadores de frecuencia implementados con PLL y la moderna técnica de síntesis digital directa. Por último, el conjunto del sistema es susceptible de ser configurado por las computadoras de adquisición de datos, supervisadas por otra, que entrega el estado de funcionamiento actual y evita la selección de configuraciones incorrectas por parte del usuario.

  6. 33 CFR 165.754 - Safety Zone: San Juan Harbor, San Juan, PR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... following area: (1) The waters around Liquefied Petroleum Gas ships entering San Juan Harbor in an area one... referenced use datum: NAD 83. (2) The waters around Liquefied Petroleum Gas ships departing San Juan Harbor... Petroleum Gas vessels via a marine broadcast Notice to Mariners. (5) Should the actual time of entry of...

  7. 33 CFR 165.754 - Safety Zone: San Juan Harbor, San Juan, PR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... following area: (1) The waters around Liquefied Petroleum Gas ships entering San Juan Harbor in an area one... referenced use datum: NAD 83. (2) The waters around Liquefied Petroleum Gas ships departing San Juan Harbor... Petroleum Gas vessels via a marine broadcast Notice to Mariners. (5) Should the actual time of entry of...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1385 - Strait of Juan de Fuca.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca. 80.1385... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1385 Strait of Juan de Fuca. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of the Strait of Juan de Fuca....

  9. 77 FR 47358 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in...: The meeting will be held at the San Juan Public Lands Center, 15 Burnett Court, Durango, Colorado...

  10. 76 FR 40876 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... meeting will be held at the San Juan Public Lands Center, 15 Burnett Court, Durango, Colorado in...

  11. Hurricane Juan (2003): Structural Intensification and Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Perrie, W.

    2004-05-01

    From statistical studies, when tropical cyclones move polarward it is a relatively common phenomenon that they undergo transformation to become an extratropical system accompanied by the second re-intensification stage, in which the transformed tropical cyclone either dissipates or else re-intensifies, if the mid-latitude circulation structure is favorable for extratropical cyclogenesis. What makes Juan an interesting and special case is when it moves to the North Atlantic extratropical area it does not undergo this kind of process. Rather, it retains a strong tropical storm structure with a tight inner core, according to visible and infrared satellite imagery. Certainly the warmer-than-normal sea surface temperature during late September 2003 between the Gulf Stream and the Nova Scotia coast is one important responsible factor. But it is not the whole story. What is the structure of the mid-latitude environment and how does it contribute to Juan's evolution? Hurricane Juan made landfall near Halifax, Nova Scotia at 0300 UTC 29 September, as a category 2 hurricane (Saffir-Simpson scale), with maximum sustained winds near 44 m/s. Usually a landfalling hurricane would rapidly decay, and Juan was no exception, with observed SLP filling rapidly to 982 mb by 0600 UTC. This is about 9 mb within 3 hours. Our study attempts to simulate Juan, in its development and propagation to an extratropical area, while maintaining a strong tropical storm structure. We use a tropical bogus vortex scheme, to provide the initial fields. Special attention will be given to the structural evolution, especially at the moment when Juan made landfall and subsequent mechanism of its rapid decay after landing.

  12. Juan Carlos D'Olivo: A portrait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Arévalo, Alexis A.

    2013-06-01

    This report attempts to give a brief bibliographical sketch of the academic life of Juan Carlos D'Olivo, researcher and teacher at the Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares of UNAM, devoted to advancing the fields of High Energy Physics and Astroparticle Physics in Mexico and Latin America.

  13. Explorando nuevos horizontes en NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, G. L.

    A pesar de la incesante expansión del Universo iniciada con el Big Bang 14 mil millones de años atrás, nuestro Universo se siente cada día más cercano. La inquebrantable vocación de la humanidad por descubrir nuevos horizontes ha permitido el acercamiento de civilizaciones en nuestro planeta y nos ha permitido conocer nuestro lugar en el Universo como nunca antes. En este artículo presento una breve sinopsis de nuestro trabajo que se relaciona con diversas investigaciones con implicaciones astrobiológicas, desde el origen de los ingredientes de la "sopa de la vida", hasta la evolución y composición de la atmósfera de Marte.

  14. Chinanteco de San Juan Lealao, Oaxaca (Chinantec of San Juan Lealao, Oaxaca).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mexico Coll. (Mexico City)

    This document is one of 17 volumes on indigenous Mexican languages and is the result of a project undertaken by the Archivo de Lenguas Indigenas de Mexico. This volume contains information on Chinantec, an indigenous language of Mexico spoken in San Juan Lealao, in the state of Oaxaca. The objective of collecting such a representative sampling of…

  15. Trique de San Juan Copala, Oaxaca (Trique of San Juan Copala, Oaxaca).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mexico Coll. (Mexico City)

    This document is one of 17 volumes on indigenous Mexican languages and is the result of a project undertaken by the Archivo de Lenguas Indigenas de Mexico. This volume contains information on Trique, an indigenous language of Mexico spoken in San Juan Copala, in the state of Oaxaca. The objective of collecting such a representative sampling of the…

  16. Una Visita al Viejo San Juan (A Visit to Old San Juan).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabello, Victor; And Others

    Written in Spanish, this black and white illustrated booklet provides a tour of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico's oldest and most historic city. Brief historical information is provided on the Perro de San Jeronimo, a statue of a barking dog found in front of the Castillo; Plaza de Colon, a small plaza dedicated to Christopher Columbus; the Catedral de…

  17. 76 FR 12692 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... will be held Friday, March 18, 2011, 9 a.m.--12:30 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the...

  18. 75 FR 48306 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... will be held Wednesday, September 8, 2010, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the...

  19. Juan's Dilemma: A New Twist on the Old Lemon Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Vanessa; Sorey, Timothy; Balandova, Evguenia; Palmquist, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    When life hands you lemons, make a battery! In this article, the authors describe an activity they refer to as "Juan's Dilemma," an extension of the familiar lemon-battery activity (Goodisman 2001). Juan's Dilemma integrates oxidation and reduction chemistry with circuit theory in a fun, real-world exercise. The authors designed this activity for…

  20. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base... Guard District § 165.776 Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico (a.... Coast Guard or U.S. naval vessels. (c) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter into the...

  1. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base... Guard District § 165.776 Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico (a.... Coast Guard or U.S. naval vessels. (c) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter into the...

  2. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base... Guard District § 165.776 Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico (a.... Coast Guard or U.S. naval vessels. (c) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter into the...

  3. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base... Guard District § 165.776 Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico. (a.... Coast Guard or U.S. naval vessels. (c) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter into the...

  4. Utility of San Juan basin silcretes

    SciTech Connect

    Gassaway, J.S. )

    1989-09-01

    Silcretes are silicified paleosols that formed as part of deep-weathering profiles during depositional hiatuses under humid climatic regimes. They provide chronostratigraphic support for hypotheses regarding local and regional tectonic and surface events. Silcrete occurs in the San Juan basin (SJB), near the top of the Kirtland Shale (Cretaceous), in the Ojo Alamo Sandstone (Paleocene), and in the Nacimiento Formation (Paleocene). These occurrences mark the southern limit of a 1,000 mi-long, discontinuous outcrop of silcrete discovered during reconnaissance of 16 Western Interior basins. These silcretes, common in Upper Cretaceous to middle Paleocene rocks, are rare in older and younger rocks. Recognition of silcrete occurrences may prove useful to field geologists where other chronostratigraphic information is absent. For example, geologists searching for the K-T boundary could use the lowest silcrete as a starting point.

  5. Curiosity --El nuevo robot explorador de Marte

    NASA Video Gallery

    El nuevo Laboratorio Científico de Marte llamado Curiosity tiene grandes preguntas que responder una vez que llegue a Marte. Infórmese sobre la misión con el analista de trayectoria de la NASA Fern...

  6. The Forts of Old San Juan: Guardians of the Caribbean. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltzin, Rosanna

    The massive masonry defenses of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico, which were begun in the 16th century, exist today as the oldest European-style fortifications within the territory of the United States. This lesson is based on the World Heritage Site nomination file and the National Park Service Handbook, "San Juan: The Forts of Old San Juan." The lesson…

  7. 33 CFR 110.74c - Bahia de San Juan, PR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bahia de San Juan, PR. 110.74c... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74c Bahia de San Juan, PR. The waters of San Antonio Channel, Bahia de San Juan, eastward of longitude 66°05′45″ W....

  8. 33 CFR 110.74c - Bahia de San Juan, PR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bahia de San Juan, PR. 110.74c... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74c Bahia de San Juan, PR. The waters of San Antonio Channel, Bahia de San Juan, eastward of longitude 66°05′45″ W....

  9. 33 CFR 165.758 - Security Zone; San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; San Juan, Puerto... Security Zone; San Juan, Puerto Rico. (a) Location. Moving and fixed security zones are established 50 yards around all cruise ships entering, departing, moored or anchored in the Port of San Juan,...

  10. 33 CFR 165.758 - Security Zone; San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; San Juan, Puerto... Security Zone; San Juan, Puerto Rico. (a) Location. Moving and fixed security zones are established 50 yards around all cruise ships entering, departing, moored or anchored in the Port of San Juan,...

  11. LOD First Estimates In 7406 SLR San Juan Argentina Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, A.; Podestá, R.; Yin, Z.; Adarvez, S.; Liu, W.; Zhao, L.; Alvis Rojas, H.; Actis, E.; Quinteros, J.; Alacoria, J.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we show results derived from satellite observations at the San Juan SLR station of Felix Aguilar Astronomical Observatory (OAFA). The Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) telescope was installed in early 2006, in accordance with an international cooperation agreement between the San Juan National University (UNSJ) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The SLR has been in successful operation since 2011 using NAOC SLR software for the data processing. This program was designed to calculate satellite orbits and station coordinates, however it was used in this work for the determination of LOD (Length Of Day) time series and Earth Rotation speed.

  12. 33 CFR 3.35-25 - Sector San Juan Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sector San Juan Marine Inspection... CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventh Coast Guard District § 3.35-25 Sector San Juan Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector San Juan's office is located in San Juan, PR. The boundaries...

  13. 33 CFR 3.35-25 - Sector San Juan Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sector San Juan Marine Inspection... CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventh Coast Guard District § 3.35-25 Sector San Juan Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector San Juan's office is located in San Juan, PR. The boundaries...

  14. Ladrillo and Tales of Juan Bobo: Puerto Rican Folk Tales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matos, Reinaldo; Matos, Ana

    These two illustrated elementary readers contain the Spanish and English versions of the Puerto Rican folk tales, "Ladrillo" and "Cuentos de Juan Bobo." They are part of a series of reading materials for elementary-level migrant children. These materials are intended to help the child relate to his culture, develop interest in knowing about it and…

  15. Local Control and Self-Determination: The San Juan Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garman, Keats; Jack, Donald

    Rapidly increasing Navajo enrollment in San Juan County, Utah, public schools in the 1960's forced the rural school district to improve educational services to a sizable Navajo population while attempting to preserve local control in the face of changing Indian self-determination policy. The district implemented a Curriculum Development Center, a…

  16. [Psychiatric Hospital San Juan de Dios. One hundred years later].

    PubMed

    Cocula-León, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Mental health and psychiatric diseases have always attracted people's and health authorities' attention due to its magical approach, the lack of knowledge that surrounds them, and, at the same time, the religious fear they provoke. Both have played an important role in the history of humanity, of public health politics, and of physicians. The places where psychiatric patients were treated are of historical interest, because through the historical knowledge we can identify an approach from the science and the health policies that prevailed in each age. At the beginning of the 20th century, it was developed in México a new model of hospital care attention to psychiatric patients. La Casa de Salud San Juan de Dios para Pacientes Alienados is an example; the concept "alienated patients" suggests a social and cultural perspective. This paper presents a chronological type description of one of the major institutions involved in mental health care in México. Similarly, it shows a review of the events that affected the religious order San Juan de Dios from 1901 to 2012, when the hospitaller order was reinstated in México and established the Casa de Salud San Juan de Dios para Pacientes Alienados in the town of Zapopan, Jalisco, institution that exists up to the present day and keeps participating in the mental health care in the state of Jalisco, with the current name of Servicios de Salud San Juan de Dios.

  17. Offshore finfish mariculture in the Strait of Juan de Fuca

    SciTech Connect

    Rensel, Jack; Kiefer, Dale; Forster, John R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Evans, Nathan R.

    2007-10-07

    Finfish mariculture has existed in the U.S. Pacific Northwest for over thirty years, but for the past 15 years most effort has focused on culture of Atlantic salmon in protected, inshore cage sites. The Strait of Juan de Fuca (the "Strait") is a large area with relatively sparce shoreline development and several apparent advantages for mariculture using offshore technology.

  18. 78 FR 19103 - Safety Zone; Spanish Navy School Ship San Sebastian El Cano Escort; Bahia de San Juan; San Juan, PR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Spanish Navy School Ship San Sebastian El Cano Escort; Bahia de San Juan; San Juan, PR AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final...

  19. Juan Gabriel and audience interpretation. cultural impressions of effeminacy and sexuality in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sowards, S K

    2000-01-01

    Juan Gabriel's purported effeminacy and sexuality have made him a controversial subject in Mexico, but still loved by fans. Juan Gabriel, by trying to gain acceptance into Mexican society, has become part of a hybrid culture, between the feminine/masculine and homosexual/bisexual/heterosexual groups. This study focuses on interviews with 20 participants who discuss Juan Gabriel's popularity and sexuality. The findings of the study indicate that Juan Gabriel may be considered by his fans to be effeminate, and consequently homosexual. Even though homophobia is widespread in Mexico, Juan Gabriel's fans tend to ignore or exoticize his sexuality, thus affording his success. It is also possible that Juan Gabriel, consciously or not, uses his controversial sexuality as a way to generate popular interest. PMID:10933285

  20. Mineralogy from Cores in Prospect Gulch, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bove, Dana J.; Johnson, Raymond H.; Yager, Douglas B.

    2007-01-01

    In the late nineteenth century, San Juan County, Colorado, was the center of a metal mining boom in the San Juan Mountains. Although most mining activity ceased by the 1990s, the effects of historical mining continue to contribute metals to ground water and surface water. Previous research by the U.S. Geological Survey identified ground-water discharge as a significant pathway for the loading of metals to surface water from both acid-mine drainage and acid-rock drainage. In an effort to understand the ground-water flow system in the upper Animas River watershed, Prospect Gulch was selected for further study because of the amount of previous data provided in and around that particular watershed. In support of this ground-water research effort, data was collected from drill core, which included: (1) detailed descriptions of the subsurface geology and hydrothermal alteration patterns, (2) depth of sulfide oxidation, and (3) quantitative mineralogy.

  1. Oral anatomy in the sixteenth century: Juan Valverde de Amusco.

    PubMed

    López-Valverde, A; Gómez de Diego, R; De Vicente, J

    2013-08-01

    In 1554 Juan Valverde de Amusco, a Spanish anatomist, wrote the History of the composition of the human body, a complete anatomical treatise that took as its model the Vesalius school of thought (La fábrica of Vesalius). Considered one of the most complete anatomical treatises of the Renaissance and one of the most widely read books of the sixteenth century, it was translated into four languages in its day. The first chapter, devoted to bones, provides a meticulously detailed analysis of the bones of the facial structures and of the teeth, their supporting structures, vascularisation and innervation. Juan Valverde de Amusco even describes techniques for reducing mandibular luxations. Even with the imprecise observations typical of the time the treatise must be considered an exceptional document. PMID:23928611

  2. Teaching and Communicating Astronomy at Rey Juan Carlos University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernán-Obispo, M.; Serrano, A.; Aguirre, J.; Martín, P. San

    We present our activities of popularization of Astronomy at Rey Juan Carlos University in Madrid, especially our 30-h workshop for people older than 55 (University for the Elderly) held since the academic year 2002/2003. Our course aims to introduce the basic topics on Astronomy to a group of motivated students who, in most cases, were not able to complete their education in their youth due to the historical environment of Spain in the middle of the twentieth century.

  3. Seismic data acquisition over San Juan volcanic field, San Juan sag, south-central Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Henkel, R.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The San Juan sag, a foreland basin along the Uncompahgre-Brazos uplift, contains Mesozoic sediments overlain by up to 10,000 ft of Tertiary volcanics. Petroleum exploration beneath thick volcanic cover requires successful acquisition of seismic data; however, experience elsewhere has generally produced only marginal results. Commencing in 1983, Meridian Oil recorded 18 seismic lines comprising 260 mi of conventional and portable data. Noise test were performed at two sites to evaluate seismic response and to determine source and receiver parameters. Vibroseis, shothole, and surface dynamite were examined as sources and gave comparable results. Coherent noise trains with velocities from 4,000 to 8,000 ft/sec and dominant frequencies of 10 to 15 Hz were generated in the Tertiary section. The predominant factor affecting data quality was outcrop lithology. Data recorded over alluvial and other Quaternary deposits tended to be good to fair. Data quality over Tertiary volcanics was variable and highly unit dependent, ranging from fair over andesites and volcaniclastics, poor over ash-flow tuffs, and uniformly very poor over basalts. Seismic source appeared to have only a minor effect on quality. Data processing involved no unusual operations. Velocity filtering was used to suppress near-surface generated coherent noise, Refraction statics were applied to lines with significant elevation or lithologic variations. A successful acquisition program helped to establish the presence of a Mesozoic sedimentary section beneath the volcanics. these data revealed large structural features within the sedimentary section as well as a dramatic angular unconformity at the top of the Cretaceous section.

  4. Hydrologic data from wells at or in the vicinity of the San Juan coal mine, San Juan County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Anne M.; Thomas, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, in cooperation with the Mining and Minerals Division (MMD) of the State of New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a 4-year assessment of hydrologic conditions at the San Juan coal mine (SJCM), located about 14 miles west-northwest of the city of Farmington, San Juan County, New Mexico. The mine produces coal for power generation at the adjacent San Juan Generating Station (SJGS) and stores coal-combustion byproducts from the SJGS in mined-out surface-mining pits. The purpose of the hydrologic assessment is to identify groundwater flow paths away from SJCM coal-combustion-byproduct storage sites that might allow metals that may be leached from coal-combustion byproducts to eventually reach wells or streams after regional dewatering ceases and groundwater recovers to predevelopment levels. The hydrologic assessment, undertaken between 2010 and 2013, included compilation of existing data. The purpose of this report is to present data that were acquired and compiled by the USGS for the SJCM hydrologic assessment.

  5. CHARACTERIZING THE ORGANIC MATTER IN SURFACE SEDIMENTS FROM THE SAN JUAN BAY ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The San Juan Bay Estuary (SJBE) is located on the north coast of Puerto Rico and includes the San Juan Bay, San José Lagoon, La Torrecilla Lagoon and Piñones Lagoon, as well as the Martín Peña and the Suárez Canals. The SJBE watershed has the highest...

  6. 33 CFR 110.240 - San Juan Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Juan Harbor, P.R. 110.240 Section 110.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.240 San Juan Harbor, P.R. (a) The anchorage...

  7. 33 CFR 110.240 - San Juan Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false San Juan Harbor, P.R. 110.240 Section 110.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.240 San Juan Harbor, P.R. (a) The anchorage...

  8. 33 CFR 110.240 - San Juan Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false San Juan Harbor, P.R. 110.240 Section 110.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.240 San Juan Harbor, P.R. (a) The anchorage...

  9. 33 CFR 110.229 - Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash. 110.229 Section 110.229 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.229 Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash. (a)...

  10. 33 CFR 110.240 - San Juan Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Juan Harbor, P.R. 110.240 Section 110.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.240 San Juan Harbor, P.R. (a) The anchorage...

  11. 77 FR 52310 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 61, San Juan, Puerto Rico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... comment has been given in the Federal Register (76 FR 70703-70704, 11/15/2011) and the application has... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 61, San Juan, Puerto Rico Pursuant to its... FTZ 61 to include a site in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, adjacent to the San Juan U.S. Customs and...

  12. 33 CFR 110.240 - San Juan Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Juan Harbor, P.R. 110.240 Section 110.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.240 San Juan Harbor, P.R. (a) The anchorage...

  13. Tectonics and evolution of the Juan Fernandez microplate at the Pacific-Nazca-Antarctic triple junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson-Fontana, S.; Larson, R. L.; Engein, J. F.; Lundgren, P.; Stein, S.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic and bathymetric profiles derived from the R/V Endeavor survey and focal mechanism studies for earthquakes on two of the Juan Fernandez microplate boundaries are analyzed. It is observed that the Nazca-Juan Fernandez pole is in the northern end of the microplate since the magnetic lineation along the East Ridge of the microplate fans to the south. The calculation of the relative motion of the Juan Fernandez-Pacific-Nazca-Antarctic four-plate system using the algorithm of Minster et al. (1974) is described. The development of tectonic and evolutionary models of the region is examined. The tectonic model reveals that the northern boundary of the Juan Fernandez microplate is a zone of compression and that the West Ridge and southwestern boundary are spreading obliquely; the evolutionary model relates the formation of the Juan Fernandez microplate to differential spreading rates at the triple junction.

  14. The Fate of the Juan de Fuca Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, M.; Allen, R. M.

    2006-12-01

    The Juan de Fuca plate is subducting beneath the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada. Although the slab has been imaged to depths of at least ~{400} km beneath Washington and at least ~{200} to 300 km beneath northern Oregon with a dip of ~60° to the east, there is little evidence for a slab east of High Cascades deeper than ~150 km beneath central and ~200 km beneath southern Oregon. To image the slab beneath Oregon, we apply tomography technique using a dataset consisting of our own OATS deployment and all other available data. For the Vs inversion, a total of 95 events with clear S and SKS phases were recorded at 45 stations and a total number of 2148 rays were used. For the Vp inversion, a total of 74 events with clear direct P phase were recorded at 46 stations, and a total number of 2043 rays were used. Our tomographic images clearly show that the Juan de Fuca plate dives into the mantle beneath Oregon and continues east of the High Cascades with a dip of ~50° reaching a depth of ~400 km. The slab does not dip more vertically than its counterparts to north and south, which have a dip of ~60° and ~65° respectively. Resolution tests suggest there is little or no velocity anomaly associated with a slab below ~400 km.

  15. Mycobacterium lepromatosis Infections in Nuevo León, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy; Ocampo-Garza, Sonia S.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Avanzi, Charlotte; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of infection caused by the recently described pathogen Mycobacterium lepromatosis is unknown. Here, we describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapeutic outcomes of five lepromatous leprosy patients suffering from M. lepromatosis infection in Nuevo Léon, Mexico. Diagnosis was facilitated by a new highly specific PCR procedure. PMID:25809978

  16. The Mexican Meteorite Nuevo Mercurio (H5): Characteristics of Chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-de La Cruz, K. E.; Ortega-Gutiérrez, F.

    2006-03-01

    A study of the chondrules of Nuevo Mercurio (H5). There are some primary characteristics that can be observed, such as the relationship between chondrule size and their texture, and presence of opaque minerals (troilite and/or Fe-Ni alloys).

  17. Characterizing Dynamic Bedforms Using Multibeam Bathymetry in the Haro Strait and San Juan Channel Areas of British Columbia, Canada, and the San Juan Islands, Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, H. L.; Greene, H.

    2003-12-01

    The San Juan Islands in the U.S. and British Columbia, Canada, are an archipelago located in Northwestern Washington, between the Northern Cascades Mountain Range and the Olympic Peninsula and are the result of tectonic compressional processes. This region has experienced a complex tectonic history of convergence, thrust faulting, uplift, subsidence, glaciation, tidal scour and sediment transport (deposition and erosion) that in turn have produced diverse marine benthic habitats. There are a variety of habitats including dynamic bedforms, moraines, and glacially scoured fractured and faulted bedrock outcrops. Multibeam bathymetric and backscatter data image the bedforms in detail and show they are concentrated within the waterways of the San Juan Islands, including Haro Strait, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and San Juan Channel. These bedforms may provide habitat for marine species, including migrating salmon. An interpreted map will be presented that focuses on the characterization of marine benthic habitats based on high-resolution (Simrad EM 1002 95 kHz) multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data. This study will assist in a better understanding of the physical and biological characteristics of the San Juan Islands Archipelago, especially near established Marine Protected Areas and will benefit effective implementation of resource management objectives.

  18. Urban ecology of Triatoma infestans in San Juan, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Vallvé, S L; Rojo, H; Wisnivesky-Colli, C

    1996-01-01

    This study was performed in an urban neighborhood of the capital city of the province of San Juan, Argentina. Erected as a housing complex, the place consists of 768 flats distributed in buildings of three and seven floors each. A survey was carried out in 33% of the dwellings, enquiring about the number of Triatoma infestans found indoors, stage of the bug development-nymph or adult- and how these insects had entered their homes. Adult T.infestans were found on all floors; 163 people (64%) had found them at least once, and 130 (51%) several times. Dispersal flight seems to have been the main mechanism of infestation by adult bugs in this area, and a total of 51% of the surveyed inhabitants reported that the insects had flown into their flats. PMID:9070399

  19. Central San Juan caldera cluster: regional volcanic framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, Peter W.

    2000-01-01

    Eruption of at least 8800 km3 of dacitic-rhyolitic magma as 9 major ash-slow sheets (individually 150-5000 km3) was accompanied by recurrent caldera subsidence between 28.3 and about 26.5 Ma in the central San Juan Mountains, Colorado. Voluminous andesitic-decitic lavas and breccias were erupted from central volcanoes prior to the ash-flow eruptions, and similar lava eruptions continued within and adjacent to the calderas during the period of explosive volcanism, making the central San Juan caldera cluster an exceptional site for study of caldera-related volcanic processes. Exposed calderas vary in size from 10 to 75 km in maximum diameter, the largest calderas being associated with the most voluminous eruptions. After collapse of the giant La Garita caldera during eruption if the Fish Canyon Tuff at 17.6 Ma, seven additional explosive eruptions and calderas formed inside the La Garita depression within about 1 m.y. Because of the nested geometry, maximum loci of recurrently overlapping collapse events are inferred to have subsided as much as 10-17 km, far deeper than the roof of the composite subvolcanic batholith defined by gravity data, which represents solidified caldera-related magma bodies. Erosional dissection to depths of as much as 1.5 km, although insufficient to reach the subvolcanic batholith, has exposed diverse features of intracaldera ash-flow tuff and interleaved caldera-collapse landslide deposits that accumulated to multikilometer thickness within concurrently subsiding caldera structures. The calderas display a variety of postcollapse resurgent uplift structures, and caldera-forming events produced complex fault geometries that localized late mineralization, including the epithermal base- and precious-metal veins of the well-known Creede mining district. Most of the central San Juan calderas have been deeply eroded, and their identification is dependent on detailed geologic mapping. In contrast, the primary volcanic morphology of the

  20. Deglaciation and postglacial timberline in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrara, P.E.; Mode, W.N.; Rubin, M.; Robinson, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    Lake Emma, which no longer exists because of a mining accident, was a tarn in a south-facing cirque near the headwaters of the Animas River in the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado. During the Pinedale glaciation, this area was covered by a large transection glacier centered over the Lake Emma region. Three radiocarbon dates on basal organic sediment from Lake Emma indicate that by ca. 15,000 yr B.P. this glacier, one of the largest in the southern Rocky Mountains, no longer existed. Twenty-two radiocarbon dates on Picea and Abies krummholz fragments in the Lake Emma deposits indicate that from ca. 9600 to 7800 yr B.P., from 6700 to 5600 yr B.P., and at 3100 yr B.P. the krummholz limit was at least 70 m higher than present. These data, in conjunction with Picea:Pinus pollen ratios from both the Lake Emma site and the Hurricane Basin site of J. T. Andrews, P. E. Carrara, F. B. King, and R. Struckenrath (1975, Quaternary Research 5, 173-197) suggest than from ca. 9600 to 3000 yr B.P. timberline in the San Juan Mountains was higher than present. Cooling apparently began ca. 3000 yr B.P. as indicated by decreases in both the percentage of Picea pollen and Picea:Pinus pollen ratios at the Hurricane Basin site (Andrews et al., 1975). Cooling is also suggested by the lack of Picea or Abies fragments younger than 3000 yr B.P. at either the Lake Emma or the Hurricane Basin site. ?? 1984.

  1. Sea level Variability and Juan de Fuca Bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huybers, P. J.; Boulahanis, B.; Proistosescu, C.; Langmuir, C. H.; Carbotte, S. M.; Katz, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    That deglaciation influences mid-ocean ridge volcanism is well established for Iceland, where depressurization associated with melting a ~2 km ice cap led to order of magnitude increases in volcanism during the last deglaciation. The case was also made that the more subtle ~100 m changes in sea level that accompany glacial cycles have identifiable implications for undersea mid-ocean ridge systems using both models and data from the Australian-Antarctic Ridge (Crowley et al., 2015). Sea level rising at ~1 cm/year during deglaciation leads to an expectation of ~10% decreases in melt production at ridges, given mantle upwelling rates of ˜3 cm/yr at intermediate spreading ridges and mantle density being ~3 times that of seawater. The implications of variations in melt production for bathymetry, however, involve numerous considerations, including whether melt signals are cancelled within the melt column, appreciably alter accretionary or fault processes, and have identifiable surface expressions. Further empirical assessment of bathymetry is thus useful for purposes of confirming patterns and constraining processes. Here we report on spectral analyses of bathymetry recently acquired from the Juan de Fuca ridge between 44°30'N and 45°15'N during the SeaVOICE expedition. Multibeam swath sonar data were acquired with an EM122 sonar insonfiying seafloor to crustal ages of ˜2 ma with 35 m spatial resolution. We examine (1.) the statistical significance of concentrations of bathymetric variability at the 100 ky, 41 ky, and 23 ky periods characteristic of late-Pleistocene sea level variability; (2.) whether sea level responses are primarily at 41 ky periods in crust accreted during the early Pleistocene, when global sea level variations were primarily at this period; and (3.) if sea level responses are superimposed on bathymetry variations or, instead, align with fault features. We also note that Juan de Fuca's proximity to the Cordilleran Ice Sheet implies that regional

  2. Juan de Fuca plate: Aseismic subduction at 1. 8 cm/yr

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, H.

    1981-11-01

    Volcanic activity in the Cascades in historic times suggests that the Juan de Fuca plate is underthrusting aseismically at about 1.8 cm/yr. This rate of underthrusting is identical to the rate computed from sediment studies.

  3. Hydrologic data for the San Juan and Animas River valleys in the Farmington, Aztec, Bloomfield, and Cedar Hill areas, San Juan County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAda, D.P.; Shelton, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    In July 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a three-year study in San Juan County, New Mexico, to determine the concentrations of chemical constituents in the groundwater in the San Juan and Animas River valleys and to determine the direction and rate of groundwater flow and its relation to river stage. The study was conducted in cooperation with the San Juan County Commission and the New Mexico Oil Conservation Division. The data that was collected during the first 1-1/2 yr of the study is completed. The report includes well records for 51 wells and water levels from 23 wells, hydrographs from four observation wells and one river stage site, and available chemical analyses from 50 wells and 14 surface water sites. Water samples from six wells and one surface-water site were analyzed for purgeable organic chemicals; none were detected. (Lantz-PTT)

  4. San Juan basin faulting - More than meets eye

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, A.C. Jr.; Taylor, D.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Interpretation of approximately 1,000 mi of seismic lines throughout the San Juan basin, New Mexico, has revealed a rectilinear pattern of high-angle faults with dominant trends of N60-70{degree}W and N30-40{degree}E. Vertical fault separation in the plane of section is commonly 150-250 ft, measured at the top of the basement. Strike-slip movement on many faults is also indicated by the map pattern, but no reliable measurements have yet been made. The authors analysis of the movement history of several faults indicates three significant episodes of movement: Pennsylvanian to Permian, Jurassic to Cretaceous, and early to middle Tertiary. Sense of movement on many of the faults varied episodically so that the present basement offset is actually cumulative offset representing all previous periods of movement. Above Permian strata, actual offset on most faults is not detectable on seismic sections; however, drape and measurable differences in thickness across fault zones are commonly exhibited by Mesozoic rocks.

  5. Fruit and fertility in San Juan de la Manguana.

    PubMed

    Mckenna, N D

    1995-01-01

    Ana Irsa (Nisoris) Aquina, 39, a mother of seven, grandmother, wife, and voluntary community health facilitator, lives in the Dominican Republic. Nisoris counsels women and their partners about reproductive health, provides child survival information to new mothers, and dispenses common remedies for diarrhea and respiratory infections as well as contraceptives (mainly oral contraceptives and condoms). These supplies are financed by Fundacion para el Desarrollo Communitario (FUDECO), a nongovernmental agency which is a member of the Save the Children alliance. FUDECO's work includes the development of water systems, health services, schools, and soil conservation training. Widespread deforestation in the San Juan area has led to a reduction in self-sufficient farming and a lack of nutrition evidenced by an increase in infant blindness caused by Vitamin A deficiency. To combat this situation, FUDECO has taught the women's group led by Nisoris how to use solar power to dry fruits and vegetables to preserve them for consumption beyond their season. The pilot group has in turn taught six other women's groups and conducted informal product sampling and Vitamin A information sessions in the local market. FUDECO provides supplies and technical expertise. The program has been so successful that the women are exploring packaging options so that they can sell the dried produce. PMID:12290005

  6. Occurrence, quality, and use of ground water in Orcas, San Juan, Lopez, and Shaw Islands, San Juan County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whiteman, K.J.; Molenaar, Dee; Jacoby, J.M.; Bortleson, G.V.

    1983-01-01

    Ground water, which supplies most of San Juan County 's water needs, occurs in both bedrock and glacial drift. Water in the bedrock occurs in fractures in the otherwise dense, poorly permeable rock. Deposits of sand and gravel in the glacial drift provide the best yields to wells drilled into unconsolidated materials. Specific capacities of bedrock wells are typically low, and those of glacial-drift wells considerably higher. Ground water is high in dissolved solids and hardness; 29 of 56 wells sampled had water classified as very hard. Sixteen percent of the 171 ground-water sites tested for indicator bacteria had positive counts of one or more of these bacteria: total coliform , fecal coliform, fecal streptococcus. Nine percent of the 279 wells sampled for chloride in September 1981, appear to be affected by seawater intrusion. All of these wells are located within a mile of the coast; 60 percent of these wells are on Lopez Island. In 1980 an estimated total of 220 million gallons of ground water was withdrawn for all uses. Ninety percent of all ground-water use is for domestic and public supply purposes. Heavy pumpage on northern and southern Lopez Island correlates with areas having high chloride concentrations. (USGS)

  7. 75 FR 62112 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the San Juan Creek and Tributaries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... San Juan Creek and Tributaries Flood Risk Management Study, Orange County, CA AGENCY: Department of... channelized for flood risk management and erosion control within the City of San Juan Capistrano. The... will be documented in consideration of a range of potential flood risk management and...

  8. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  9. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  10. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  11. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  12. 33 CFR 162.260 - Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use, administration, and navigation. 162.260 Section 162.260 Navigation and Navigable... WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.260 Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use,...

  13. 33 CFR 162.260 - Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use, administration, and navigation. 162.260 Section 162.260 Navigation and Navigable... WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.260 Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use,...

  14. 33 CFR 162.260 - Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use, administration, and navigation. 162.260 Section 162.260 Navigation and Navigable... WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.260 Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use,...

  15. 78 FR 48185 - Notice of Intent To Contract for Hydroelectric Power Development on the San Juan-Chama Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Notice of Intent To Contract for Hydroelectric Power Development on the San Juan... proposals, select lessee, and contract for hydroelectric power development on the San Juan-Chama Project... Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration (Western), will consider proposals for...

  16. 78 FR 38359 - Approval of Record of Decision for Relocation of Cattle Point Road, San Juan Island National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... National Park Service Approval of Record of Decision for Relocation of Cattle Point Road, San Juan Island National Historical Park, San Juan County, Washington AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... Environmental Quality (40 CFR 1505.2), the Department of the Interior, National Park Service has prepared...

  17. 33 CFR 161.55 - Vessel Traffic Service Puget Sound and the Cooperative Vessel Traffic Service for the Juan de...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Island Archipelago, Rosario Strait, Guemes Channel, Bellingham Bay, the U.S. waters of the Strait of Juan... Archipelagos, Rosario Strait, Boundary Pass and Haro Strait, bounded on the northwest by 48°35′45″ N.; and on... Archipelago VTS Special Area consists of all waters of the eastern San Juan Island Archipelago...

  18. 46 CFR 7.145 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Haro Strait and Strait of Georgia WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Haro Strait and Strait of Georgia WA. 7.145 Section 7.145 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Pacific Coast § 7.145 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Haro Strait and...

  19. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  20. 33 CFR 162.260 - Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use, administration, and navigation. 162.260 Section 162.260 Navigation and Navigable... WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.260 Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use,...

  1. 33 CFR 162.260 - Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use, administration, and navigation. 162.260 Section 162.260 Navigation and Navigable... WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.260 Channel leading to San Juan Harbor, P.R.; use,...

  2. Juan de Fuca subducting plate geometry and intraslab seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medema, Guy Frederick

    The geometry of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Olympic Peninsula of Western Washington is modeled using wide-angle P mP reflections off the slab Moho. Active-source reflection data collected from the 1998 WET SHIPS project were augmented with earthquake-source reflections to increase the spatial distribution of reflection points over the Juan de Fuca arch structure. Approximately 1100 WET SHIPS and 500 earthquake-source reflections were used in our inversion. PmP travel-times from active sources and PmP--P differential times from earthquakes sources were simultaneously inverted for slab-Moho depth, using a combination of finite-difference and 3-D ray-tracing methods. Results show a tighter arch structure than in previous models with the shallowest dipping portion (˜ 10° dip) concentrated directly beneath the Olympic Mountains. Comparison of our slab model to intraslab earthquake hypocenters reveals a southwest-northeast trending lineament of seismicity situated just beneath the subducted Moho in the slab mantle. We interpret this seismicity as the manifestation of a subducting pseudofault along which high levels of upper mantle hydration occurred prior to subduction. Most of the remaining intraslab seismicity is concentrated on the northern and southern flanks of the arch and is likely due to increased strain rates in these regions from the combined effect of slab arch and subsequent steepening of slab dip. Earthquakes in the northern region appear to occur above the slab Moho in the crust of the oceanic plate, while uncertainties in earthquake locations and 3-D velocities in the southern region prevent an unambiguous interpretation at this time. The southern patch is especially important as it contains 3 large (magnitude 6.5 to 7.1) earthquakes during that past 60 years, including the 2001, Mw 6.8, Nisqually earthquake. Earthquakes occurring between 45 and 65 km depth in these two regions also systematically produce an anomalous low

  3. A jewel in the desert: BHP Billiton's San Juan underground mine

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-12-15

    The Navajo Nation is America's largest native American tribe by population and acreage, and is blessed with large tracks of good coal deposits. BHP Billiton's New Mexico Coal Co. is the largest in the Navajo regeneration area. The holdings comprise the San Juan underground mine, the La Plata surface mine, now in reclamation, and the expanding Navajo surface mine. The article recounts the recent history of the mines. It stresses the emphasis on sensitivity to and helping to sustain tribal culture, and also on safety. San Juan's longwall system is unique to the nation. It started up as an automated system from the outset. Problems caused by hydrogen sulfide are being tackled. San Juan has a bleederless ventilation system to minimise the risk of spontaneous combustion of methane and the atmospheric conditions in the mine are heavily monitored, especially within the gob areas. 3 photos.

  4. Meteorologically Driven Simulations of Dengue Epidemics in San Juan, PR

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Cory W.; Monaghan, Andrew J.; Hayden, Mary H.; Barrera, Roberto; Ernst, Kacey

    2015-01-01

    Meteorological factors influence dengue virus ecology by modulating vector mosquito population dynamics, viral replication, and transmission. Dynamic modeling techniques can be used to examine how interactions among meteorological variables, vectors and the dengue virus influence transmission. We developed a dengue fever simulation model by coupling a dynamic simulation model for Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito vector for dengue, with a basic epidemiological Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered (SEIR) model. Employing a Monte Carlo approach, we simulated dengue transmission during the period of 2010–2013 in San Juan, PR, where dengue fever is endemic. The results of 9600 simulations using varied model parameters were evaluated by statistical comparison (r2) with surveillance data of dengue cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To identify the most influential parameters associated with dengue virus transmission for each period the top 1% of best-fit model simulations were retained and compared. Using the top simulations, dengue cases were simulated well for 2010 (r2 = 0.90, p = 0.03), 2011 (r2 = 0.83, p = 0.05), and 2012 (r2 = 0.94, p = 0.01); however, simulations were weaker for 2013 (r2 = 0.25, p = 0.25) and the entire four-year period (r2 = 0.44, p = 0.002). Analysis of parameter values from retained simulations revealed that rain dependent container habitats were more prevalent in best-fitting simulations during the wetter 2010 and 2011 years, while human managed (i.e. manually filled) container habitats were more prevalent in best-fitting simulations during the drier 2012 and 2013 years. The simulations further indicate that rainfall strongly modulates the timing of dengue (e.g., epidemics occurred earlier during rainy years) while temperature modulates the annual number of dengue fever cases. Our results suggest that meteorological factors have a time-variable influence on dengue transmission relative to other important

  5. Estuarine versus transient flow regimes in Juan de Fuca Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Richard E.; MiháLy, Steven F.; Kulikov, Evgueni A.

    2007-09-01

    Residual currents in Juan de Fuca Strait are observed to switch between two fundamental states: estuarine and transient. The estuarine regime, which prevails roughly 90% of the time in summer and 55% of the time in winter, has a fortnightly modulated, three-layer structure characterized by strong (˜50 cm s-1) outflow above 60 ± 15 m depth, moderate (˜25 cm s-1) inflow between 60 and 125 m depth, and weak (˜10 cm s-1) inflow below 125 ± 10 m depth. Rotation increases the upper layer depth by 40 m on the northern side of the channel and upwelling-favorable coastal winds augment inflow in the bottom layer by as much as 5 cm s-1. Rotation, combined with modulation of the estuarine currents by tidal mixing in the eastern strait, leads to fortnightly variability in the along-channel velocity and cross-channel positioning of the core flow regions. Transient flows, which occur roughly 10% of the time in summer and 45% of the time in winter, are rapidly evolving, horizontally and vertically sheared "reversals" in the estuarine circulation generated during poleward wind events along the outer coast. Major events can persist for several weeks, force a net inward transport, and give rise to an O(10) km wide, surface-intensified, O(100) cm s-1 inflow along the southern (Olympic Peninsula) boundary of the strait. This "Olympic Peninsula Countercurrent" is typically accompanied by an abrupt decrease in salinity, indicating that it is a buoyancy flow originating with low-density water on the northern Washington shelf.

  6. Meteorologically Driven Simulations of Dengue Epidemics in San Juan, PR.

    PubMed

    Morin, Cory W; Monaghan, Andrew J; Hayden, Mary H; Barrera, Roberto; Ernst, Kacey

    2015-08-01

    Meteorological factors influence dengue virus ecology by modulating vector mosquito population dynamics, viral replication, and transmission. Dynamic modeling techniques can be used to examine how interactions among meteorological variables, vectors and the dengue virus influence transmission. We developed a dengue fever simulation model by coupling a dynamic simulation model for Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito vector for dengue, with a basic epidemiological Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered (SEIR) model. Employing a Monte Carlo approach, we simulated dengue transmission during the period of 2010-2013 in San Juan, PR, where dengue fever is endemic. The results of 9600 simulations using varied model parameters were evaluated by statistical comparison (r2) with surveillance data of dengue cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To identify the most influential parameters associated with dengue virus transmission for each period the top 1% of best-fit model simulations were retained and compared. Using the top simulations, dengue cases were simulated well for 2010 (r2 = 0.90, p = 0.03), 2011 (r2 = 0.83, p = 0.05), and 2012 (r2 = 0.94, p = 0.01); however, simulations were weaker for 2013 (r2 = 0.25, p = 0.25) and the entire four-year period (r2 = 0.44, p = 0.002). Analysis of parameter values from retained simulations revealed that rain dependent container habitats were more prevalent in best-fitting simulations during the wetter 2010 and 2011 years, while human managed (i.e. manually filled) container habitats were more prevalent in best-fitting simulations during the drier 2012 and 2013 years. The simulations further indicate that rainfall strongly modulates the timing of dengue (e.g., epidemics occurred earlier during rainy years) while temperature modulates the annual number of dengue fever cases. Our results suggest that meteorological factors have a time-variable influence on dengue transmission relative to other important

  7. Meteorologically Driven Simulations of Dengue Epidemics in San Juan, PR.

    PubMed

    Morin, Cory W; Monaghan, Andrew J; Hayden, Mary H; Barrera, Roberto; Ernst, Kacey

    2015-08-01

    Meteorological factors influence dengue virus ecology by modulating vector mosquito population dynamics, viral replication, and transmission. Dynamic modeling techniques can be used to examine how interactions among meteorological variables, vectors and the dengue virus influence transmission. We developed a dengue fever simulation model by coupling a dynamic simulation model for Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito vector for dengue, with a basic epidemiological Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered (SEIR) model. Employing a Monte Carlo approach, we simulated dengue transmission during the period of 2010-2013 in San Juan, PR, where dengue fever is endemic. The results of 9600 simulations using varied model parameters were evaluated by statistical comparison (r2) with surveillance data of dengue cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To identify the most influential parameters associated with dengue virus transmission for each period the top 1% of best-fit model simulations were retained and compared. Using the top simulations, dengue cases were simulated well for 2010 (r2 = 0.90, p = 0.03), 2011 (r2 = 0.83, p = 0.05), and 2012 (r2 = 0.94, p = 0.01); however, simulations were weaker for 2013 (r2 = 0.25, p = 0.25) and the entire four-year period (r2 = 0.44, p = 0.002). Analysis of parameter values from retained simulations revealed that rain dependent container habitats were more prevalent in best-fitting simulations during the wetter 2010 and 2011 years, while human managed (i.e. manually filled) container habitats were more prevalent in best-fitting simulations during the drier 2012 and 2013 years. The simulations further indicate that rainfall strongly modulates the timing of dengue (e.g., epidemics occurred earlier during rainy years) while temperature modulates the annual number of dengue fever cases. Our results suggest that meteorological factors have a time-variable influence on dengue transmission relative to other important

  8. Laramide tectonic evolution of San Juan sag, Colorado: Implications of Animas and Blanco basin formations

    SciTech Connect

    Brister, B.S. )

    1989-09-01

    The lower member of the Animas Formation (McDermott Member) is a volcaniclastic sequence derived from a north-northwest source (San Juan-La Plata area). It consists of purple andesitic debris flows, green fan-delta sandstones and mud rocks, and dark gray conglomerates with clast compositions indicating that the Precambrian core of the source uplift was exposed. The upper member is a sand-dominated alluvial plain sequence deposited by southwest-flowing braided streams. It includes green-gray-brown carbonaceous mudstones and pebbly sandstones containing clasts of mudstone, andesite, and detritus from Precambrian and Mesozoic sources in the Brazos-San Luis uplift to the east and northeast. by the end of Animas deposition, the San Juan sag (then a northeastern extension of the San Juan basin) was a broad, southwest-plunging synclinal downwarp bounded by hogback monoclines to the north and east. An erosional period followed Animas deposition; the greatest thickness of Animas was preserved along the axis of this synclinal feature. Bright-red sandy mudstones and yellow-gray pebbly sandstones and cobble conglomerates comprise the proximal alluvial-fan deposits of the Blanco Basin Formation. They unconformably overlie Precambrian through Paleocene rocks and clast compositions reflect these sources. Renewed uplift and segmentation of the Brazos-San Luis uplift resulted in the shedding of detritus southwestward into the San Juan sag and eastward into a narrow, asymmetrical, north-trending wrench basin within the uplift. Following Blanco Basin deposition, the last Laramide event is represented by the separation of the San Juan sag from the San Juan basin by uplift of the Archuleta anticlinorium.

  9. [The medical world of Juan Gil de Zamora's Historia Naturalis (ca. 1275-1296)].

    PubMed

    García Ballester, L; Domínguez, A

    1994-01-01

    The article describes the authors and works which were quoted by the Franciscan Juan Gil de Zamora in his Historia naturalis, a scientific encyclopaedia written between c. 1275 and before 1296, probably in the Franciscan monastery of Zamora (Kingdom of Castille). Juan Gil made wide use of the Avicenna's Canon, Gilbertus de Aquila (Anglicus)'s Compendium medicine, and Salernitan medical literature. His work contributed to the diffusion of these medical authors and works throughout the Christian intellectual milieu of late medieval Castille. This diffusion was not without problems.

  10. Hydrothermal circulation within the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. Paul; Tivey, Maurice A.; Bjorklund, Tor A.; Salmi, Marie S.

    2010-05-01

    Areas of the seafloor at mid-ocean ridges where hydrothermal vents discharge are easily recognized by the dramatic biological, physical, and chemical processes that characterize such sites. Locations where seawater flows into the seafloor to recharge hydrothermal cells within the crustal reservoir are by contrast almost invisible but can be indirectly identified by a systematic grid of conductive heat flow measurements. An array of conductive heat flow stations in the Endeavour axial valley of the Juan de Fuca Ridge has identified recharge zones that appear to represent a nested system of fluid circulation paths. At the scale of an axial rift valley, conductive heat flow data indicate a general cross-valley fluid flow, where seawater enters the shallow subsurface crustal reservoir at the eastern wall of the Endeavour axial valley and undergoes a kilometer of horizontal transit beneath the valley floor, finally exiting as warm hydrothermal fluid discharge on the western valley bounding wall. Recharge zones also have been identified as located within an annular ring of very cold seafloor around the large Main Endeavour Hydrothermal Field, with seawater inflow occurring within faults that surround the fluid discharge sites. These conductive heat flow data are consistent with previous models where high-temperature fluid circulation cells beneath large hydrothermal vent fields may be composed of narrow vertical cylinders. Subsurface fluid circulation on the Endeavour Segment occurs at various crustal depths in three distinct modes: (1) general east to west flow across the entire valley floor, (2) in narrow cylinders that penetrate deeply to high-temperature heat sources, and (3) supplying low-temperature diffuse vents where seawater is entrained into the shallow uppermost crust by the adjacent high-temperature cylindrical systems. The systematic array of conductive heat flow measurements over the axial valley floor averaged ˜150 mW/m2, suggesting that only about 3% of

  11. Water column hydrothermal plumes on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Lupton, J.E. )

    1990-08-10

    Hydrographic surveys on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) carried out from 1980 to 1987 show a complex pattern of {sup 3}He and Mn-rich water column plumes produced by venting from several submarine hot spring areas. In the vicinity of Axial Volcano at latitude 46{degree}N, distinct plumes were detected in 1980, 1982, and 1983 with {sup 3}He signatures up to {delta}({sup 3}He) = 64% at {approximately} 1,500 m depth at distances of {approximately} 10 km from the seamount summit. However, the same plumes had no detectable thermal signature, a paradox which is attributed to the high {sup 3}He/heat ratios and low salinities of the fluids venting within the caldera of Axial Volcano. Profiles directly over the seamount show hydrothermal {sup 3}He in the water column up to 300 m above the caldera floor, with the {sup 3}He signal increasing with depth to very high and uniform ratios of {delta}({sup 3}He) = 108-150% below the {approximately} 1,500-m caldera sill depth. Another apparent locus of hydrothermal input is Helium Basin, a depression on the northeast flank of Axial Volcano which had {delta}({sup 3}He) = 51% when first sampled in 1980. However, subsequent hydrocasts into Helium Basin in 1982 and 1983 yielded lower helium enrichments, suggesting either a decrease in hydrothermal input or flushing of the basin via a mixing event. To the south of Axial Volcano, high {delta}({sup 3}He) values of {approximately} 40% observed over the ridge axis at 45{degree}18{prime}N and 45{degree}39{prime}N indicate venting on this previously unexplored section of the ridge. The water column plumes over the US Geological Survey vent site at {approximately} 44{degree}40{prime}N on the southern JdFR have very high Mn/{sup 3}He ratios of 4,600 mol/cm{sup 3}, an apparently unique characteristic which can be used to distinguish these plumes from those originating at other JdFR vent fields.

  12. 77 FR 33239 - Prairie Stewardship Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, San Juan Island National Historical Park

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... National Park Service Prairie Stewardship Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, San Juan Island National Historical Park AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental... Park Service (NPS) is initiating the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for...

  13. Preliminary data report for the San Juan Basin-Crownpoint surveillance study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frenzel, Peter F.; Craigg, Steven D.; Padgett, Elizabeth T.

    1981-01-01

    Geohydrologic data that may be used to predict the effects of mining on Navajo water resources in the San Juan structural basin are reported as well as the current availability of data from other government agencies. Emphasis is on the vicinity of Crownpoint, New Mexico. (USGS)

  14. 75 FR 54377 - Cattle Point Road Relocation; Draft Environmental Impact Statement; San Juan Island National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... on the southeastern tip of San Juan Island is threatened by coastal erosion at the base of the slope... the slope in lieu of road realignment options). The Scoping Report included comments and agency.... Alternative B: Hybrid Mid-Slope Realignment--This alternative is the ``agency preferred'' alternative....

  15. Mediated Debate, Historical Framing, and Public Art: The Juan de Onate Controversy in El Paso

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Frank G.; Ortega, Carlos F.

    2008-01-01

    In 1988, the El Paso, Texas, city council accepted a proposal to build twelve statues of historically important individuals as part of a downtown revitalization initiative. Juan de Onate was selected as the centerpiece statue of the XII Travelers Memorial of the Southwest. The decision to honor the Spanish colonizer triggered a local controversy…

  16. 78 FR 18789 - Establishment of the San Juan Islands National Monument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... Sig.) Billing code 3295-F3 ] TD28MR13.011 [FR Doc. 2013-07408 Filed 3-27-13; 8:45 am] Billing code... Sound lies an archipelago of over 450 islands, rocks, and pinnacles known as the San Juan Islands....

  17. View of sand dunes in the San Juan Province of Western Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A near vertical view of sand dunes in the San Juan Province of Western Argentina, as photographed from the Apollo spacecraft in Earth orbit during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) mission. The picture was taken at an altitude of 220 kilometers (136 statute miles). The photograph was taken at an altitude of 228 kilometers (141 statute miles).

  18. Stratigraphic relationships of Cretaceous and early Tertiary rocks of a part of northwestern San Juan basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baltz, Elmer Harold

    1953-01-01

    The Bridge Timber Mountain area in south-central La Plata County, southwestern Colorado lies mostly in the northwestern part of the Central San Juan Basin but contains a segment of the bounding Hogback 'monocline' and Four-Corners platform. The area contains rocks of late Cretaceous through early Eocene age, as well as Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Recent terrace and pediment gravels. The Pictured Cliffs sandstone of late Montana age is the latest marine formation present. Retreat of the Cretaceous seas from the area marked the beginning of Laramide orogenic activity and the earliest stages of deformation which produced the modern San Juan Basin. The Fruitland formation and Kirtland shale were deposited in brackish water and on coastal plains left by the retreating Cretaceous sea. Beds of the Farmington sandstone member and upper shale member of the Kirtland shale show evidence of a new source of sediments to the north or northeast distinct from the southwestern source area of older Cretaceous rocks. The McDermott 'formation', composed mainly of volcanic debris, is considered to be a local lower member of the Animas formation. Beds of the upper member of the Animas formation of Cretaceous and Paleocene age are considered to extend entirely across the area and into New Mexico. Overstep of higher sandstone and shale beds of the upper member across lower conglomeratic beds shows that folding on the Hogback 'monocline' began during deposition of the upper member. Beds of the upper member of the Animas formation grade laterally southward into Paleocene beds of the Nacimiento formation, but upper Nacimiento beds overstep folded beds of the Animas formation on the Hogback 'monocline' at the north end of Bridge Timber Mountain. The San Jose formation of Paleocene and Eocene age is conformable with the Nacimiento formation except at the north end of Bridge Timber Mountain where upper San Jose beds overstep all older tilted beds down to the Fruitland formation. The heavy

  19. A blood pressure survey in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Caamano, A G; Cooper, R; Cedres, L; Barriero, L A; Dominquez, R C

    1982-01-01

    A blood pressure survey was carried out in 1976 in the city of Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, which involved 6,351 persons 30-69 years old. The study sample was recruited so as to represent an approximation of the overall distribution of occupational classes in the urban population. Members of the population sample were relatively young and of low educational attainment. To the extent that comparisons among surveys are feasible, mean blood pressure levels and hypertension rates were roughly comparable to those found in the white population of the United States. Although no firm conclusions can be drawn from the survey, a trend toward somewhat higher hypertension rates within the professional and managerial class was observed in some age groups in Laredo. PMID:7063591

  20. Marine bird populations of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Strait of Georgia and adjacent waters in 1978 and 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, T.R.; Speich, S.M.; Manuwal, D.A.; Hirsch, K.V.; Miller, C.

    1981-10-01

    The threat of oil pollution in the Strait of Juan de Fuca has prompted this study of marine birds in Washington State. The study was conducted from 1 January 1978 to 31 December 1979 in the Strait of Juan de Fuca north to the San Juan Islands and Point Roberts and west to Sidney, British Columbia. Major objectives were to determine the time of occurrence, distribution, abundance, and locations of important concentrations of marine birds. Data were obtained on breeding marine birds on 99 geographic units in American waters.

  1. 33 CFR 161.55 - Vessel Traffic Service Puget Sound and the Cooperative Vessel Traffic Service for the Juan de...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Island Archipelago, Rosario Strait, Guemes Channel, Bellingham Bay, the U.S. waters of the Strait of Juan... Archipelagos, Rosario Strait, Boundary Pass and Haro Strait, bounded on the northwest by 48°35′45″ N.; and...

  2. 33 CFR 161.55 - Vessel Traffic Service Puget Sound and the Cooperative Vessel Traffic Service for the Juan de...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Island Archipelago, Rosario Strait, Guemes Channel, Bellingham Bay, the U.S. waters of the Strait of Juan... Archipelagos, Rosario Strait, Boundary Pass and Haro Strait, bounded on the northwest by 48°35′45″ N.; and...

  3. 33 CFR 161.55 - Vessel Traffic Service Puget Sound and the Cooperative Vessel Traffic Service for the Juan de...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Island Archipelago, Rosario Strait, Guemes Channel, Bellingham Bay, the U.S. waters of the Strait of Juan... Archipelagos, Rosario Strait, Boundary Pass and Haro Strait, bounded on the northwest by 48°35′45″ N.; and...

  4. 33 CFR 161.55 - Vessel Traffic Service Puget Sound and the Cooperative Vessel Traffic Service for the Juan de...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Island Archipelago, Rosario Strait, Guemes Channel, Bellingham Bay, the U.S. waters of the Strait of Juan... Archipelagos, Rosario Strait, Boundary Pass and Haro Strait, bounded on the northwest by 48°35′45″ N.; and...

  5. Nuevos fenómenos en erupciones cometarias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A.

    Se discuten aquí tres procesos físicos novedosos encontrados en la actividad de cometas: 1) El rol de una distribución de granos de hielo como fuente extendida de H2O en la coma, 2) El efecto de una discontinuidad en el plasma cometario, llamada Cometopausa, sobre la excitación del radical OH , y 3) La actividad por erupciones a grandes distancias heliocéntricas (r > 5 AU). Con respecto a 1) y 2), se presentan modelos que ajustan bien con las observaciones. En cuanto a 3), se presentan explicaciones posibles al fenómeno, y se trata el interesante caso de Chirón 2060, basándose en observaciones propias tomadas desde el CASLEO y datos anteriores.

  6. Las características más fascinantes del nuevo Robot

    NASA Video Gallery

    impresionante es la palabra que describe perfectamente al nuevo robot Curiosity por su tamaño, sus instrumentos científicos y la manera en que la NASA planifica hacerlo aterrizar en Marte de forma ...

  7. ["Is it an animal inside? "Melanie Klein's unpublished Don Juan Paper (1939)].

    PubMed

    Frank, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Klein had been asked to contribute an article to the birthday number of the International Journal for Jones. The author outlines how she hurriedly wrote a text about Don Juan which, however, was rejected by the editor. Essential parts of it are presented in German translation. The manuscript is discussed in the context of Klein's published work as well as of the relevant contemporary literature. In Klein's view, Don Juan's genitality is determined by oral impulses and fears. By his manic acting out he attempts to ward off a depressive break-down. The paper ends with some reflections about why Klein--ontrary to her intention--failed to revise her manuscript for later publication.

  8. Ground water in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyford, Forest P.

    1979-01-01

    Principal aquifers in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico and Colorado are the Entrada Sandstone, Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation, Gallup Sandstone of the Mesaverde Group, several sandstones in the Mesaverde Group above the Gallup (Dalton Sandstone Member of the Crevasse Canyon Formation, Point Lookout Sandstone, Menefee Formation, Cliff House Sandstone), and sandstones of Tertiary age. Most ground water flows from topographically high outcrop areas toward the San Juan River and Rio Grande valley. Much of the water may move through confining layers to other aquifers or to the land surface rather than discharging directly to the streams. Transmissivities of the sandstones range from 50 to 300 square feet per day. Lowest dissolved-solids concentrations occur in or near outcrops of the sandstones and increase in the direction of groundwater flow. Concentrations range from less than 500 milligrams per liter to more than 30,000 milligrams per liter. (Kosco-USGS)

  9. ["Is it an animal inside? "Melanie Klein's unpublished Don Juan Paper (1939)].

    PubMed

    Frank, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Klein had been asked to contribute an article to the birthday number of the International Journal for Jones. The author outlines how she hurriedly wrote a text about Don Juan which, however, was rejected by the editor. Essential parts of it are presented in German translation. The manuscript is discussed in the context of Klein's published work as well as of the relevant contemporary literature. In Klein's view, Don Juan's genitality is determined by oral impulses and fears. By his manic acting out he attempts to ward off a depressive break-down. The paper ends with some reflections about why Klein--ontrary to her intention--failed to revise her manuscript for later publication. PMID:19230330

  10. Reflections on Don Juan and on the utility of the unhappy love affair.

    PubMed

    Bergel, Ernest

    2011-12-01

    Based on an unusual clinical experience of a teenage boy in child psychotherapy, two conclusions are proposed: (1) that the extremely unhappy, early love affairs that occur in most men's lives serve a valuable function in helping them separate from their mothers sufficiently to be able to realistically relate to appropriate marriage partners, and (2) that some Don Juans start new relationships in order to break them off, rather than the reverse.

  11. The paradigm of paraglacial megafans of the San Juan river basin, Central Andes, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvires, Graciela M.

    2014-11-01

    The spatial distribution and several morphometric characteristics of the Quaternary alluvial fans of the San Juan River, in the province of San Juan, at the Central and Western part of Argentina, have been studied to classify them as paraglacial megafans, as well to ratify its depositional environmental conditions. The high sedimentary load exported by San Juan river from the Central Andes to the foreland depressions is estimated about 3,682,200 hm3. The large alluvial fans of Ullum-Zonda and Tulum valleys were deposited into deep tectonic depressions, during the Upper Pleistocene deglaciation stages. The outcome of collecting remotely sensed data, map and DEM data, geophysical data and much fieldwork gave access to morphometric, morphographic and morphogenetic data of these alluvial fans. The main drainage network was mapped on processed images using QGis (vers.2.0.1). Several fan morphometric parameters were measured, such as the size, the shape, the thickness, the surface areas and the sedimentary volume of exported load. The analyzed fans were accumulated in deep tectonic depressions, where the alluvium fill reaches 700 to 1200 m thick. Such fans do not reach the large size that other world megafans have, and this is due to tectonic obstacles, although the sedimentary fill average volume surpasses 514,000 hm3. The author proposes to consider Ullum-Zonda and Tulum alluvial fans as paraglacial megafans. According to the stratigraphic relationships of the tropical South American Rivers, the author considers that the San Juan paraglacial megafans would have occurred in the period before 24 ka BP , possibly corresponding to Middle Pleniglacial (ca 65-24ka BP). They record colder and more humid conditions compared with the present arid and dry conditions.

  12. Transform push, oblique subduction resistance, and intraplate stress of the Juan de Fuca plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, K.; He, J.; Davis, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    The Juan de Fuca plate is a small oceanic plate between the Pacific and North America plates. In the southernmost region, referred to as the Gorda deformation zone, the maximum compressive stress a, constrained by earthquake focal mechanisms is N-S. Off Oregon, and possibly off Washington, NW trending left-lateral faults cutting the Juan de Fuca plate indicate a a, in a NE-SW to E-W direction. The magnitude of differential stress increases from north to south; this is inferred from the plastic yielding and distribution of earthquakes throughout the Gorda deformation zone. To understand how tectonic forces determine the stress field of the Juan de Fuca plate, we have modeled the intraplate stress using both elastic and elastic-perfectly plastic plane-stress finite element models. We conclude that the right-lateral shear motion of the Pacific and North America plates is primarily responsible for the stress pattern of the Juan de Fuca plate. The most important roles are played by a compressional force normal to the Mendocino transform fault, a result of the northward push by the Pacific plate and a horizontal resistance operating against the northward, or margin-parallel, component of oblique subduction. Margin-parallel subduction resistance results in large N-S compression in the Gorda deformation zone because the force is integrated over the full length of the Cascadia subduction zone. The Mendocino transform fault serves as a strong buttress that is very weak in shear but capable of transmitting large strike-normal compressive stresses. Internal failure of the Gorda deformation zone potentially places limits on the magnitude of the fault-normal stresses being transmitted and correspondingly on the magnitude of strike-parallel subduction resistance. Transform faults and oblique subduction zones in other parts of the world can be expected to transmit and create stresses in the same manner. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Juan Ruiz De Alarcón: Impairment as Empowerment in Early Modern Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Gloria Bodtorf

    2016-01-01

    Juan Ruiz de Alarcón, a seventeenth-century writer and native of New Spain, so excelled at the craft of writing "comedias" that he is recognized as one of the great writers of early modern Spain. In his personal life Ruiz de Alarcón struggled with a significant bodily impairment, a large hump on both his back and front, which made him…

  14. Temporal Geochemistry Data from Five Springs in the Cement Creek Watershed, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Wirt, Laurie; Leib, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    Temporal data from five springs in the Cement Creek watershed, San Juan County, Colorado provide seasonal geochemical data for further research in the formation of ferricretes. In addition, these data can be used to help understand the ground-water flow system. The resulting data demonstrate the difficulty in gathering reliable seasonal data from springs, show the unique geochemistry of each spring due to local geology, and provide seasonal trends in geochemistry for Tiger Iron Spring.

  15. Geologic and hydrologic characterization of coalbed-methane reservoirs in the San Juan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, W.R. ); Ayers, W.B. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    Fruitland coals are best developed in the north-central part of the San Juan basin. Coal distribution is controlled by shoreline and fluvial depositional settings. Hydraulic gradient, pressure regime, and hydrochemistry reflect regional permeability contrasts. The most productive (>1 MMcf/D) coalbed wells occur along a structural hinge line in association with a regional permeability barrier (no-flow boundary) at the basin center.

  16. Impacts of Urbanization in the Coastal Tropical City of San Juan, Puerto Rico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comarazamy, Daniel E.; Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglass

    2007-01-01

    Urban sprawl in tropical locations is rapidly accelerating and it is more evident in islands where a large percentage of the population resides along the coasts. This paper focuses on the analysis of the impacts of land use and land cover for urbanization in the tropical coastal city of San Juan, in the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico. A mesoscale numerical model, the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), is used to study the impacts of land use for urbanization in the environment including specific characteristics of the urban heat island in the San Juan Metropolitan Area (SJMA), one of the most noticeable urban cores of the Caribbean. The research also makes use of the observations obtained during the airborne San Juan Atlas Mission. Surface and raw insonde data from the mission are used to validate the atmospheric model yielding satisfactory results. Airborne high resolution remote sensing data are used to update the model's surface characteristics in order to obtain a more accurate and detailed configuration of the SJMA and perform a climate impact analysis based on land cover/land use (LCLU) changes. The impact analysis showed that the presence of the urban landscape of San Juan has an impact reflected in higher air temperatures over the area occupied by the city, with positive values of up to 2.5 degrees C, for the simulations that have specified urban LCLU indexes in the model's bottom boundary. One interesting result of the impact analysis was the finding of a precipitation disturbance shown as a difference in total accumulated rainfall between the present urban landscape and with a potential natural vegetation, apparently induced by the presence of the urban area. Results indicate that the urban-enhanced cloud formation and precipitation development occur mainly downwind of the city, including the accumulated precipitation. This spatial pattern can be explained by the presence of a larger urbanized area in the southwest sector of the city, and of

  17. Geologic map of the Cochetopa Park and North Pass Calderas, northeastern San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    The San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado have long been known as a site of exceptionally voluminous mid-Tertiary volcanism, including at least 22 major ignimbrite sheets (each 150-5,000 km3) and associated caldera structures active at 33-23 Ma. Recent volcanologic and petrologic studies in the San Juan region have focused mainly on several ignimbrite-caldera systems: the southeastern area (Platoro complex), western calderas (Uncompahgre-Silverton-Lake City), and the central cluster (La Garita-Creede calderas). Far less studied has been the northeastern San Juan region, which occupies a transition between earlier volcanism in central Colorado and large-volume younger ignimbrite-caldera foci farther south and west. The present map is based on new field coverage of volcanic rocks in seventeen 7.5' quadrangles in northeastern parts of the volcanic field, high-resolution age determinations for 120 new sites, and petrologic studies involving several hundred new chemical analyses. This mapping and the accompanying lab results (1) document volcanic evolution of the previously unrecognized North Pass caldera and the morphologically beautifully preserved but enigmatic Cochetopa basin, including unique features not previously described from ignimbrite calderas elsewhere; (2) provide evidence for a more rapid recurrence of large ignimbrite eruptions than previously known elsewhere; (3) quantify the regional time-space-volume progression from the earlier Sawatch magmatic trend southward into the San Juan region; and (4) permit more rigorous comparison between the broad mid-Tertiary magmatic belt in the western U.S. Cordillera and the type continental-margin arc volcanism in the central Andes.

  18. Ground-water-level monitoring network, Hollister and San Juan Valleys, San Benito County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    The addition of 17 wells to the existing 86-well network is proposed to improve the ground-water monitoring in the Hollister and San Juan Valleys in California. The new wells were selected on the basis of well-construction data, availability, location, accessibility, use, and condition, either to replace wells that are no longer accessible or to furnish needed additional data for planning artificial recharge, preparing water-level-contour maps, and digital ground-water modeling. (USGS)

  19. No spreading across the southern Juan de Fuca ridge axial cleft during 1994-1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwell, C.D.; Hildebrand, J.A.; Spiess, Fred N.; Morton, J.L.; Normark, W.R.; Reiss, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    Direct-path acoustic measurements between seafloor transponders observed no significant extension (-10 ?? 14 mm/yr) from August 1994 to September 1996 at the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (44??40' N and 130??20' W). The acoustic path for the measurement is a 691-m baseline straddling the axial cleft, which bounds the Pacific and Juan de Fuca plates. Given an expected full-spreading rate of 56 mm/yr, these data suggest that extension across this plate boundary occurs episodically within the narrow (~1 km) region of the axial valley floor, and that active deformation is occurring between the axial cleft and the plate interior. A cleft-parallel 714-m baseline located 300 m to the west of the cleft on the Pacific plate monitored system performance and, as expected, observed no motion (+5??7 mm/yr) between the 1994 and 1996 surveys.Direct-path acoustic measurements between seafloor transponders observed no significant extension (-10 ?? 14 mm/yr) from August 1994 to September 1996 at the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (44??40 minutes N and 130??20 minutes W). The acoustic path for the measurement is a 691-m baseline straddling the axial cleft, which bounds the Pacific and Juan de Fuca plates. Given an expected full-spreading rate of 56 mm/yr, these data suggest that extension across this plate boundary occurs episodically within the narrow (approx. 1 km) region of the axial valley floor, and that active deformation is occurring between the axial cleft and the plate interior. A cleft-parallel 714-m baseline located 300 m to the west of the cleft on the Pacific plate monitored system performance and, as expected, observed no motion (+5 ?? 7 mm/yr) between the 1994 and 1996 surveys.

  20. Contribución de la Estación San Juan SLR al Sistema Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podestá, R.; Actis, E.; Alonso, E.; Pacheco, A.; González, A.; Han, Yanben; Wang, Tanqiang; Zhao, Limin; Liu, Chengzhi; Alacoria, J.; Peñaloza, L.; Brizuela, D.; Flores, M.

    The new San Juan Satellite Laser Ranging Station integrates, with number 7406, the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) network, being one of the few stations located in the southern hemisphere. It works shooting powerful laser pulses towards satellites at different heights, measuring the time of flight and calculating distances. With this technology we can perform high precision astronomical, geophysical and geodesic studies. Within the full constellation of satellites observed with ILRS, we track the two European pioneer satellites (Giove-A and B) of the future Global Positioning System Galileo, the European competitive response to the currently well established American GPS, of worldwide use. The GPS Galileo will be aimed mostly to civil usage, especially to aerial and terrestrial navigation. The Giove-A satellite was launched out to space on December 28, 2005 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, on board of the Russian Soyuz rocket. Since mid 2006, 14 Laser Stations -San Juan station included- took part in a follow-up campaign of the Giove-A. Once the satellite orbital behavior was known, a second Giove-B orbiter was launched in April 2008. A constellation of 30 satellites will complete the Galileo system. Since Giove-A orbits the Earth at a height of 23916 kms, only shots from the best SLR world stations can reach it. San Juan station has tracked it, contributing to the study of its motion. As a new station, the San Juan Satellite Laser Ranging Telescope has become one of the best in the world, consequence of a decade of successful Chinese-Argentinean collaboration. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  1. Mantle flow geometry from ridge to trench beneath the Gorda-Juan de Fuca plate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Short, Robert; Allen, Richard M.; Bastow, Ian D.; Totten, Eoghan; Richards, Mark A.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic plates are underlain by a low-viscosity mantle layer, the asthenosphere. Asthenospheric flow may be induced by the overriding plate or by deeper mantle convection. Shear strain due to this flow can be inferred using the directional dependence of seismic wave speeds--seismic anisotropy. However, isolation of asthenospheric signals is challenging; most seismometers are located on continents, whose complex structure influences the seismic waves en route to the surface. The Cascadia Initiative, an offshore seismometer deployment in the US Pacific Northwest, offers the opportunity to analyse seismic data recorded on simpler oceanic lithosphere. Here we use measurements of seismic anisotropy across the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates to reconstruct patterns of asthenospheric mantle shear flow from the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge to the Cascadia subduction zone trench. We find that the direction of fastest seismic wave motion rotates with increasing distance from the mid-ocean ridge to become aligned with the direction of motion of the Juan de Fuca Plate, implying that this plate influences mantle flow. In contrast, asthenospheric mantle flow beneath the Gorda Plate does not align with Gorda Plate motion and instead aligns with the neighbouring Pacific Plate motion. These results show that asthenospheric flow beneath the small, slow-moving Gorda Plate is controlled largely by advection due to the much larger, faster-moving Pacific Plate.

  2. Geologic Map of the Central San Juan Caldera Cluster, Southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, Peter W.

    2006-01-01

    The San Juan Mountains are the largest erosional remnant of a composite volcanic field that covered much of the southern Rocky Mountains in middle Tertiary time. The San Juan field consists mainly of intermediate-composition lavas and breccias, erupted about 35-30 Ma from scattered central volcanoes (Conejos Formation) and overlain by voluminous ash-flow sheets erupted from caldera sources. In the central San Juan Mountains, eruption of at least 8,800 km3 of dacitic-rhyolitic magma as nine major ash flow sheets (individually 150-5,000 km3) was accompanied by recurrent caldera subsidence between 28.3 Ma and about 26.5 Ma. Voluminous andesitic-dacitic lavas and breccias erupted from central volcanoes prior to the ash-flow eruptions, and similar lava eruptions continued within and adjacent to the calderas during the period of more silicic explosive volcanism. Exposed calderas vary in size from 10 to 75 km in maximum dimension; the largest calderas are associated with the most voluminous eruptions.

  3. Fission-track dating of the tectonic development of the San Juan Islands, Washington.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Naeser, C.W.; Whetten, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    Previous geological studies have indicated that the major thrusting event in the San Juan Islands was of late-early to late Cretaceous age. Geochronological data are consistent with these prior inferences and confirm that thrusting occurred between approx 105 and 75 m.y. Reset zircon fission-track dates indicate the possible presence of a reversed geothermal gradient in the Decatur terrain, the uppermost preserved thrust plate. If present, this gradient was probably produced by conductive heating, and possibly by shear heating associated with a now-eroded overlying thrust plate and thrust fault. Thrusting in the southern San Juan Islands was accompanied by uplift and resetting of apatite dates. The Haro formation, the Spieden group, and their basement (probably the Wrangellia terrain) did not experience this uplift and probably acted as a 'backstop' to thrusting. Uplift of the southern San Juan Islands was, therefore, probably mainly accommodated on the Haro fault. The Nanaimo basin formed in the foreland of this advancing thrust system, probably as a response to thrust-related loading. Eastern exposures of the Nanaimo group were uplifted prior to deposition of the Middle and Upper Eocene Padden member of the Chucknaut formation, perhaps along a reactivated Haro fault system. -J.M.H.

  4. Assessing climate variability effects on dengue incidence in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Lázaro, Pablo; Muller-Karger, Frank E; Otis, Daniel; McCarthy, Matthew J; Peña-Orellana, Marisol

    2014-09-01

    We test the hypothesis that climate and environmental conditions are becoming favorable for dengue transmission in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Sea Level Pressure (SLP), Mean Sea Level (MSL), Wind, Sea Surface Temperature (SST), Air Surface Temperature (AST), Rainfall, and confirmed dengue cases were analyzed. We evaluated the dengue incidence and environmental data with Principal Component Analysis, Pearson correlation coefficient, Mann-Kendall trend test and logistic regressions. Results indicated that dry days are increasing and wet days are decreasing. MSL is increasing, posing higher risk of dengue as the perimeter of the San Juan Bay estuary expands and shorelines move inland. Warming is evident with both SST and AST. Maximum and minimum air surface temperature extremes have increased. Between 1992 and 2011, dengue transmission increased by a factor of 3.4 (95% CI: 1.9-6.1) for each 1 °C increase in SST. For the period 2007-2011 alone, dengue incidence reached a factor of 5.2 (95% CI: 1.9-13.9) for each 1 °C increase in SST. Teenagers are consistently the age group that suffers the most infections in San Juan. Results help understand possible impacts of different climate change scenarios in planning for social adaptation and public health interventions.

  5. Assessing Climate Variability Effects on Dengue Incidence in San Juan, Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Lázaro, Pablo; Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Otis, Daniel; McCarthy, Matthew J.; Peña-Orellana, Marisol

    2014-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that climate and environmental conditions are becoming favorable for dengue transmission in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Sea Level Pressure (SLP), Mean Sea Level (MSL), Wind, Sea Surface Temperature (SST), Air Surface Temperature (AST), Rainfall, and confirmed dengue cases were analyzed. We evaluated the dengue incidence and environmental data with Principal Component Analysis, Pearson correlation coefficient, Mann-Kendall trend test and logistic regressions. Results indicated that dry days are increasing and wet days are decreasing. MSL is increasing, posing higher risk of dengue as the perimeter of the San Juan Bay estuary expands and shorelines move inland. Warming is evident with both SST and AST. Maximum and minimum air surface temperature extremes have increased. Between 1992 and 2011, dengue transmission increased by a factor of 3.4 (95% CI: 1.9–6.1) for each 1 °C increase in SST. For the period 2007–2011 alone, dengue incidence reached a factor of 5.2 (95% CI: 1.9–13.9) for each 1 °C increase in SST. Teenagers are consistently the age group that suffers the most infections in San Juan. Results help understand possible impacts of different climate change scenarios in planning for social adaptation and public health interventions. PMID:25216253

  6. Juan de Fuca slab geometry and its relation to Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Blair, J. Luke; Waldhause, Felix; Oppenheimer, David H.

    2012-01-01

    A new model of the subducted Juan de Fuca plate beneath western North America allows first-order correlations between the occurrence of Wadati-Benioff zone earthquakes and slab geometry, temperature, and hydration state. The geo-referenced 3D model, constructed from weighted control points, integrates depth information from earthquake locations and regional seismic velocity studies. We use the model to separate earthquakes that occur in the Cascadia forearc from those that occur within the underlying Juan de Fuca plate and thereby reveal previously obscured details regarding the spatial distribution of earthquakes. Seismicity within the slab is most prevalent where the slab is warped beneath northwestern California and western Washington suggesting that slab flexure, in addition to expected metamorphic dehydration processes, promotes earthquake occurrence within the subducted oceanic plate. Earthquake patterns beneath western Vancouver Island are consistent with slab dehydration processes. Conversely, the lack of slab earthquakes beneath western Oregon is consistent with an anhydrous slab. Double-differenced relocated seismicity resolves a double seismic zone within the slab beneath northwestern California that strongly constrains the location of the plate interface and delineates a cluster of seismicity 10 km above the surface that includes the 1992 M7.1 Mendocino earthquake. We infer that this earthquake ruptured a surface within the Cascadia accretionary margin above the Juan de Fuca plate. We further speculate that this earthquake is associated with a detached fragment of former Farallon plate. Other subsurface tectonic elements within the forearc may have the potential to generate similar damaging earthquakes.

  7. Carbon Isotopic tests on the Origins of the Shuram Anomaly from the San Juan Fm., Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgin, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon isotope anomalies are associated with perturbations to the carbon cycle that offer insight into the geochemical evolution of the Earth. The largest Carbon isotope anomaly in earth history is the Shuram, which remains poorly understood in spite of being linked to the oxygenation of earth, the rise of metazoans, and a complete reorganization of the carbon cycle. From a basin transect of the carbonate-dominated San Juan Formation in southern Peru, we present evidence for the first clear example of the Shuram isotope anomaly in South America. Unique to this succession are ~140 meters of organic-rich black shale within the anomaly, containing as much as 4% TOC. Preliminary data from the organic-rich black shales of the San Juan Fm. confirm that δ13Corg is relatively invariant and does not covary with δ13Ccarb. These observations are consistent with other Shuram sections and support various models: an exogenous carbon source, an enlarged dissolved organic carbon pool, as well as authigenic carbonate production in organic-rich anoxic sediments. Critical tests of these models have been complicated by a paucity of organics in Shuram facies worldwide. Further analyses of the robust organics from the Shuram facies of the San Juan Fm. therefore hold promise in shedding light on the origin of the Shuram isotope anomaly and critical earth history events to which it has been linked.

  8. Divergent Ridge Features on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, M. E.; Sautter, L.; Steele, M.

    2014-12-01

    Multibeam data collected using a Kongsberg EM122 sonar system on the NOAA ship R/V Marcus G. Langseth led by chief scientist Douglas Toomey (University of Oregon) in 2009 and with a Simrad EM302 sonar system on two NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer cruises led by chief scientists James Gardner (University of New Hampshire) and Catalina Martinez (University of Rhode Island) in 2009 show the morphology of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges, as well as the Blanco and Mendocino Fracture Zones. These ridges and fracture zones comprise the divergent plate boundary of the eastern edge of the Pacific Plate and the western edges of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Plates. Both plates are being subducted beneath the western edge of the North American Plate. CARIS HIPS 8.1 software was used to process the multibeam data and create bathymetric images. The ridge axes, located off the coast of Washington and Oregon (USA) adjacent to the Cascadia Basin, indicate obvious signs of spreading, due to the series of faults and rocky ridges aligned parallel to the plate boundaries. Fault and ridge orientations are used to compare the direction of seafloor spreading, and indicate that both the Juan de Fuca Plate and Gorda Plate are spreading in a southeastern direction. Younger ridges from the Gorda Ridge system mapped in the study run parallel to the boundary, however older ridges do not show the same orientation, indicating a change in spreading direction. The presence of hydrothermal vents along the Juan de Fuca Ridge is also evidence of the active boundary, as the vent chimneys are composed of minerals and metals precipitated from the hot water heated by magma from beneath the spreading seafloor. In this study, the data are used to compare and contrast earthquake seismicity and ridge morphologies at a depth range of approximately 762 to 2134 meters. The diverging Pacific, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda Plates along with the San Andreas Fault have potential to increase seismic and volcanic activity around

  9. Amphibians and Reptiles of the state of Nuevo León, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Lemos-Espinal, Julio A.; Smith, Geoffrey R.; Cruz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We compiled a check list of the herpetofauna of Nuevo León. We documented 132 species (23 amphibians, 109 reptiles), representing 30 families (11 amphibians, 19 reptiles) and 73 genera (17 amphibians, 56 reptiles). Only two species are endemic to Nuevo León. Nuevo León contains a relatively high richness of lizards in the genus Sceloporus. Overlap in the herpetofauna of Nuevo León and states it borders is fairly extensive. Of 130 native species, 102 are considered species of Least Concern in the IUCN red list, four are listed as Vulnerable, five are listed as Near Threatened, and four are listed as Endangered. According to SEMARNAT, 78 species are not of conservation concern, 25 are subject to Special Protection, 27 are Threatened, and none are listed as in Danger of Extinction. Given current threats to the herpetofauna, additional efforts to understand the ecology and status of populations in Nuevo León are needed. PMID:27408562

  10. Amphibians and Reptiles of the state of Nuevo León, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Espinal, Julio A; Smith, Geoffrey R; Cruz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We compiled a check list of the herpetofauna of Nuevo León. We documented 132 species (23 amphibians, 109 reptiles), representing 30 families (11 amphibians, 19 reptiles) and 73 genera (17 amphibians, 56 reptiles). Only two species are endemic to Nuevo León. Nuevo León contains a relatively high richness of lizards in the genus Sceloporus. Overlap in the herpetofauna of Nuevo León and states it borders is fairly extensive. Of 130 native species, 102 are considered species of Least Concern in the IUCN red list, four are listed as Vulnerable, five are listed as Near Threatened, and four are listed as Endangered. According to SEMARNAT, 78 species are not of conservation concern, 25 are subject to Special Protection, 27 are Threatened, and none are listed as in Danger of Extinction. Given current threats to the herpetofauna, additional efforts to understand the ecology and status of populations in Nuevo León are needed. PMID:27408562

  11. Estimates of ground-water recharge from precipitation to glacial-deposit and bedrock aquifers on Lopez, San Juan, Orcas, and Shaw islands, San Juan County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Laura A.; Bauer, Henry H.; Wayenberg, Judith A.

    2002-01-01

    An important source of fresh water on Lopez, San Juan, Orcas, and Shaw Islands in San Juan County off the northwestern coast of Washington is glacial-deposit and bedrock aquifers. Two methods were used to estimate recharge from precipitation to the water tables on the islands. A daily near-surface water-balance method, the Deep Percolation Model (DPM), was used to simulate water budgets for the period October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1998 (water years 1997-98) for six small drainage basins?three on Lopez Island and one each on San Juan, Orcas, and Shaw Islands. The calibrated soil and subsoil parameters from the DPM for each small basin were then used in island-wide applications of the DPM where the direct runoff component (which is not available on an island-wide basis) was simulated, rather than input, and calibration was not required. A spatial distribution of annual recharge was simulated for each island, with island averages of: Lopez Island, 2.49 inches per year; San Juan Island, 1.99 inches per year; Orcas Island, 1.46 inches per year; and Shaw Island, 1.44 inches per year.A chloride mass-balance method that requires measurements of atmospheric chloride deposition, precipitation, streamflow, and chloride concentrations in ground water was used to estimate recharge to the glacial-deposit aquifers of Lopez Island. Only average recharge could be estimated using this method rather than area-specific recharge. Average recharge for Lopez Island estimated by this method was only 0.63 inch per year. The range of chloride concentrations in ground-water samples from selected wells indicates that the average recharge in areas of glacial deposits is between 0.29 and 1.95 inches per year. Recharge simulated using the DPM for two drainage basins on Lopez Island overlain by glacial deposits are 2.76 and 2.64 inches per year. Sources of chloride in ground water other than from the atmosphere would cause the recharge estimated by the chloride mass-balance method to be

  12. Longitudinal HIV Risk Behavior among the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Studies (DATOS) Adult Sample

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Debra A.; Brecht, Mary Lynn; Herbeck, Diane; Evans, Elizabeth; Huang, David; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2008-01-01

    Longitudinal trajectories for HIV risk were examined over five years following treatment among 1,393 patients who participated in the nationwide Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome studies (DATOS). Both injection drug use and sexual risk behavior declined over time, with most of the decline occurring between intake and the first year follow-up. However, results of the application of growth mixture models for both sets of trajectories indicated a subgroup of individuals reverted to a high-risk behavior over time, with a higher level of risk at the 5-year follow-up than their original risk level at intake. Of clients who were engaged in regular injection drug use at intake, 76% continued to inject drug at a Moderate/stable or Increased rate over the 5-year follow-up. PMID:18198171

  13. Geochronology and geology of late Oligocene through Miocene volcanism and mineralization in the western San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bove, Dana J.; Hon, Ken; Budding, Karin E.; Slack, John F.; Snee, Lawrence W.; Yeoman, Ross A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents 25 new 40Ar/39Ar dates from the main calc-alkaline ash-flow sheets and related younger plutons of the western San Juan volcanic field, the ash-flow sheets of the Lake City caldera cycle, and veins and other altered rocks in the Lake City region. The goal of the study was to produce similar quality 40Ar/39Ar ages to those currently published for the eastern and central San Juan Mountains. These new data provide a much more precise chronological framework for interpreting durations of events and their relationship to mineralization than do previously published conventional K-Ar dates for the western San Juan Mountains.

  14. Dengue Fever Trends and Climate Change in San Juan, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller-Karger, F. E.; Mendez-Lazaro, P.; Otis, D. B.; McCarthy, M.; Pena-Orellana, M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change has important implications for public health. We developed and tested the hypothesis that conditions for dengue fever transmission in San Juan (Puerto Rico, USA) are becoming favorable as a result of meteorological drivers being modified with climate change. Sea level pressure, mean sea level (MSL), wind, sea surface temperature (SST), air surface temperature (AST), rainfall, and confirmed dengue cases were variables examined over the past 30 years, or longer for some variables. Statistical tools used included Principal Component Analysis, Pearson correlation coefficient, Mann-Kendall trend tests, and logistic regressions. Results show that dry days are increasing and that wet days are decreasing. MSL is steadily increasing, which increases the risk of dengue cases along the coast, as the perimeter of the San Juan Bay estuary expands and the shoreline moves inland. Warming is evident in both SST and AST. Maximum and minimum air surface temperature extremes have also increased. Incidence of dengue is accelerating along with environmental change. For example, between 2000-2011, dengue transmission increased by a factor of 3.4 (95% CI: 1.9-6.1) for each 1ºC increase in SST. Between 2007 and 2011, this risk factor increased to 5.2 (95% CI: 1.9-13.9) for every 1ºC increase in SST. An important but difficult to examine problem is how social and economic factors affect such dengue fever transmission rates in light of environmental change. A concern is that the patterns observed in San Juan are representative of potential incidence of dengue virus in other parts of the island of Puerto Rico and in other Caribbean nations. These results help understand patterns of disease spreading, and allow public health officials to evaluate scenarios and interventions intended to mitigate the impacts of climate change.

  15. Quantification of Methane and Ethane Emissions from the San Juan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. L.; Kort, E. A.; Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Gvakharia, A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, and the primary component of natural gas, is emitted from areas of high fossil fuel production and processing. Recently, persistent and large methane emissions (~0.59 Tg yr-1) from the four corners area of the United States have been identified using satellite (SCIAMACHY) observations taken over the years 2003 to 2009. These emissions appear to be the largest CH4 anomaly (positive deviation above background values) in the contiguous U.S., and exceed bottom-up inventory estimates for the area by 1.8 to 3.5 times. The majority of emissions sources expected to contribute to this anomalous CH4 signal are located in the San Juan basin of New Mexico, and include harvesting and processing of natural gas, coal, and coalbed CH4. The magnitude of CH4 emissions from the San Juan basin have not yet been directly quantified using airborne measurements. Additionally, changing fossil fuel-related activities in the basin may have altered the magnitude of CH4 emissions compared to estimates derived from 2003-2009 satellite measurements. Here, we present in-situ airborne observations of CH4 over the San Juan basin, which allow tight quantification of CH4 fluxes using the mass balance method. Observations over the basin were taken for multiple wind directions on multiple days in April, 2015 to obtain a robust estimate of CH4 emissions. The flux of ethane (C2H6), the second most abundant component of natural gas and a tracer species indicative of fossil-derived CH4, was also quantified. Substantial C2H6 emissions may affect regional air quality and chemistry through its influence on tropospheric ozone production.

  16. Marine Biodiversity in Juan Fernández and Desventuradas Islands, Chile: Global Endemism Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Alan M; Ballesteros, Enric; Caselle, Jennifer E; Gaymer, Carlos F; Palma, Alvaro T; Petit, Ignacio; Varas, Eduardo; Muñoz Wilson, Alex; Sala, Enric

    2016-01-01

    The Juan Fernández and Desventuradas islands are among the few oceanic islands belonging to Chile. They possess a unique mix of tropical, subtropical, and temperate marine species, and although close to continental South America, elements of the biota have greater affinities with the central and south Pacific owing to the Humboldt Current, which creates a strong biogeographic barrier between these islands and the continent. The Juan Fernández Archipelago has ~700 people, with the major industry being the fishery for the endemic lobster, Jasus frontalis. The Desventuradas Islands are uninhabited except for a small Chilean military garrison on San Félix Island. We compared the marine biodiversity of these islands across multiple taxonomic groups. At San Ambrosio Island (SA), in Desventuradas, the laminarian kelp (Eisenia cokeri), which is limited to Desventuradas in Chile, accounted for >50% of the benthic cover at wave exposed areas, while more sheltered sites were dominated by sea urchin barrens. The benthos at Robinson Crusoe Island (RC), in the Juan Fernández Archipelago, comprised a diverse mix of macroalgae and invertebrates, a number of which are endemic to the region. The biomass of commercially targeted fishes was >2 times higher in remote sites around RC compared to sheltered locations closest to port, and overall biomass was 35% higher around SA compared to RC, likely reflecting fishing effects around RC. The number of endemic fish species was extremely high at both islands, with 87.5% of the species surveyed at RC and 72% at SA consisting of regional endemics. Remarkably, endemics accounted for 99% of the numerical abundance of fishes surveyed at RC and 96% at SA, which is the highest assemblage-level endemism known for any individual marine ecosystem on earth. Our results highlight the uniqueness and global significance of these biodiversity hotspots exposed to very different fishing pressures.

  17. Hydrothermal venting on the Juan de Fuca Ridge over the last 600,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, K.; McManus, J. F.; Winckler, G.; Huybers, P. J.; Langmuir, C. H.; Giosan, L.; Middleton, J. L.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges provide a unique chemical, physical, and biological environment on the seafloor. They are a significant source of dissolved Fe, a critical micronutrient in the ocean, and they are a primary source of CO2 from the mantle, Earth's largest carbon reservoir. Although more than a hundred modern hydrothermal systems have been discovered, few records of their variation through geological time have been obtained. Sediments near ocean ridges hold the potential to provide such records, and here we investigate sediments near the Juan de Fuca Ridge through continuous XRF scans coupled with oxygen isotope temporal constraints to explore hydrothermal activity over the past 600,000 years. These are the first records over multiple glacial-interglacial cycles and permit investigation of potential feedbacks between glacial-interglacial climate change and hydrothermal activity. Today, hydrothermal activity on the Juan de Fuca Ridge is characterized by hydrothermal particles with high concentrations of Fe, Cu, and Zn (Feely et. al., 1987). Over longer time scales, Fe concentrations are positively correlated with Ti (r2≥0.75), so that the dominant variability in Fe is due to the input of lithogenic material. Additional Fe inputs from hydrothermal activity increase the Fe/Ti ratio above the lithogenic value of 11.7 wt%/wt%. Intense hydrothermal activity (Fe/Ti > 25 wt%/wt%) is observed on the Juan de Fuca Ridge from ~375-430ka, and less intense but still elevated hydrothermal activity (Fe/Ti > 17 wt%/wt%) recurs at near 100kyr cyclicity, from 80-120ka, 180-220ka, 290-330ka, and 470-520ka. These time periods correspond to times of sea level fall owing to expanding ice volume, supporting a link between sea level changes and ridge crest activity

  18. Seafloor Geodetic Evidence of Episodic Spreading 25 km East of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, C. D.; Spiess, F. N.; Hildebrand, J. A.; Dragert, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Juan de Fuca plate is a small oceanic plate, with no exposed landmass, encompassed by the larger Pacific and North America plates. Over geologic time, the Pacific and Juan de Fuca (JdF) plates continuously diverge along the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR). GPS combined with acoustic ranging (GPS-A) provides a method to observe present-day seafloor positions with centimeter resolution. From 1994-1999, using an acoustic ranging system that straddled the JdFR Cleft Segment, we observed no spreading across a 700-m wide zone spanning the central cleft. However, seaward of the northern Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ), a GPS-A array was observed to move continuously between 1994 to 1996 at about the average geologic rate. These contrasting results suggest that a transition zone must exist between episodic spreading occurring at the JdFR and the continuous motion nearer the CSZ. In this zone the motion would be expected to lag behind that of the bulk of the JdF plate while the ridge crest is locked and then, subsequent to a spreading event at the ridge crest, the velocity in the transition zone would be greater than the plate average to compensate for the loss. To investigate the transition zone, we established a GPS-Acoustic reference site 25 km off-axis from the Cleft array on the east flank of the JdFR. Preliminary results from analyses of the GPS-A data collected in 2000 and 2002, while still characterized by large errors, show that this site may be lagging behind the bulk of the JdF plate. Analysis of additional data, and a scheduled 2003 return to the area, should refine these results. At this time they clearly suggest that the flank region is currently in the portion of the cycle preceding a spreading event. The work was supported by NSF-OCE-9907247.

  19. Marine Biodiversity in Juan Fernández and Desventuradas Islands, Chile: Global Endemism Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Alan M.; Ballesteros, Enric; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Gaymer, Carlos F.; Palma, Alvaro T.; Petit, Ignacio; Varas, Eduardo; Muñoz Wilson, Alex; Sala, Enric

    2016-01-01

    The Juan Fernández and Desventuradas islands are among the few oceanic islands belonging to Chile. They possess a unique mix of tropical, subtropical, and temperate marine species, and although close to continental South America, elements of the biota have greater affinities with the central and south Pacific owing to the Humboldt Current, which creates a strong biogeographic barrier between these islands and the continent. The Juan Fernández Archipelago has ~700 people, with the major industry being the fishery for the endemic lobster, Jasus frontalis. The Desventuradas Islands are uninhabited except for a small Chilean military garrison on San Félix Island. We compared the marine biodiversity of these islands across multiple taxonomic groups. At San Ambrosio Island (SA), in Desventuradas, the laminarian kelp (Eisenia cokeri), which is limited to Desventuradas in Chile, accounted for >50% of the benthic cover at wave exposed areas, while more sheltered sites were dominated by sea urchin barrens. The benthos at Robinson Crusoe Island (RC), in the Juan Fernández Archipelago, comprised a diverse mix of macroalgae and invertebrates, a number of which are endemic to the region. The biomass of commercially targeted fishes was >2 times higher in remote sites around RC compared to sheltered locations closest to port, and overall biomass was 35% higher around SA compared to RC, likely reflecting fishing effects around RC. The number of endemic fish species was extremely high at both islands, with 87.5% of the species surveyed at RC and 72% at SA consisting of regional endemics. Remarkably, endemics accounted for 99% of the numerical abundance of fishes surveyed at RC and 96% at SA, which is the highest assemblage-level endemism known for any individual marine ecosystem on earth. Our results highlight the uniqueness and global significance of these biodiversity hotspots exposed to very different fishing pressures. PMID:26734732

  20. Marine Biodiversity in Juan Fernández and Desventuradas Islands, Chile: Global Endemism Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Alan M; Ballesteros, Enric; Caselle, Jennifer E; Gaymer, Carlos F; Palma, Alvaro T; Petit, Ignacio; Varas, Eduardo; Muñoz Wilson, Alex; Sala, Enric

    2016-01-01

    The Juan Fernández and Desventuradas islands are among the few oceanic islands belonging to Chile. They possess a unique mix of tropical, subtropical, and temperate marine species, and although close to continental South America, elements of the biota have greater affinities with the central and south Pacific owing to the Humboldt Current, which creates a strong biogeographic barrier between these islands and the continent. The Juan Fernández Archipelago has ~700 people, with the major industry being the fishery for the endemic lobster, Jasus frontalis. The Desventuradas Islands are uninhabited except for a small Chilean military garrison on San Félix Island. We compared the marine biodiversity of these islands across multiple taxonomic groups. At San Ambrosio Island (SA), in Desventuradas, the laminarian kelp (Eisenia cokeri), which is limited to Desventuradas in Chile, accounted for >50% of the benthic cover at wave exposed areas, while more sheltered sites were dominated by sea urchin barrens. The benthos at Robinson Crusoe Island (RC), in the Juan Fernández Archipelago, comprised a diverse mix of macroalgae and invertebrates, a number of which are endemic to the region. The biomass of commercially targeted fishes was >2 times higher in remote sites around RC compared to sheltered locations closest to port, and overall biomass was 35% higher around SA compared to RC, likely reflecting fishing effects around RC. The number of endemic fish species was extremely high at both islands, with 87.5% of the species surveyed at RC and 72% at SA consisting of regional endemics. Remarkably, endemics accounted for 99% of the numerical abundance of fishes surveyed at RC and 96% at SA, which is the highest assemblage-level endemism known for any individual marine ecosystem on earth. Our results highlight the uniqueness and global significance of these biodiversity hotspots exposed to very different fishing pressures. PMID:26734732

  1. The fate of the Juan de Fuca plate: Implications for a Yellowstone plume head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Mei; Allen, Richard M.

    2007-12-01

    Beneath the Pacific Northwest the Juan de Fuca plate, a remnant of the Farallon plate, continues subducting beneath the North American continent. To the east of the Cascadia subduction zone lies the Yellowstone Hotspot Track. The origins of this track can be traced back to the voluminous basaltic outpourings in the Columbia Plateau around 17 Ma. If these basalts are the result of a large melting anomaly rising through the mantle to the base of the North American continent, such as a mantle plume head, the anomaly would need to punch through the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Here, we use teleseismic body-wave travel-time tomography to investigate the fate of the subducted slab and its possible interaction with a plume head. Our dataset is derived from the Oregon Array for Teleseismic Study (OATS) deployment in Oregon and all other available seismic data in this region during the same period. In our JdF07 models, we image the subducted Juan de Fuca plate in the mantle east of the Cascades beneath Oregon, where the slab has not been imaged before, to a depth of 400 km but no deeper. The slab dips ˜ 50°E and has a thickness of ˜ 75 km. Immediately beneath the slab, we image a low velocity layer with a similar geometry to the slab and extending down to at least ˜ 575 km depth in the V s model. The total length of the high velocity slab is ˜ 660 km, about 180 km longer than the estimated length of slab subducted since 17 Ma. Assuming similar slab geometry to today, this 180 km length of slab would reach ˜ 60 km depth, comparable to the thickness of continental lithosphere. We propose that the absence of the slab below 400 km today is due to the arrival of the Yellowstone plume head ˜ 17 Ma, which destroyed the Juan de Fuca slab at depths greater than the thickness of the continental lithosphere. Given this scenario, the low velocity anomaly beneath the slab is likely the remnant plume head material which has been pulled down by traction with the subducting plate

  2. Geochemical variability of natural soils and reclaimed minespoil soils in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gough, L.P.; Severson, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    An inventory of total-and extractable-element concentrations in soils was made for three areas of the San Juan Basin in New Mexico: (1) the broad area likely to be affected by energy-related development. (2) an area of soils considered to have potential for use as topsoil in mined-land reclamation. and (3) an area of the San Juan coal mine that has been regraded. topsoiled, and revegetated. Maps made of concentrations of 16 elements in area 1 soils show no gradational pattern across the region. Further. these maps do not correspond to those showing geology or soil types. Sodic or saline problems, and a possible but unproven deficiency of zinc available to plants. may make some of the soils in this area undesirable for use as topsoil in mined-land reclamation. Taxonomic great groups of soil in this area cannot be distinguished because each great group tends to have a large within-group variability if compared to the between-group variability. In area 2 the major soils sampled were of the Sheppard. Shiprock. and Doak association. These soils are quite uniform in chemical composition and are not greatly saline or sodic. As in area 1 soils. zinc deficiency may cause a problem in revegetating most of these soils. It is difficult to distinguish soil taxonomic families by using their respective chemical compositions. because of small between-family variability. Topsoil from a reclaimed area of the San Juan mine (area 3) most closely resembles the chemical composition of natural C horizons of soil from area 1. Spoil material that has not been topsoiled is likely to cause sodic-and saline-related problems in revegetation and may cause boron toxicity in plants. Topsoiling has apparently ameliorated these potential problems for plant growth on mine spoil. Total and extractable concentrations for elements and other parameters for each area of the San Juan Basin provide background information for the evaluation of the chemical quality of soils in each area.

  3. Impacts of Urbanization in the Coastal Tropical City of San Juan, Puerto Rico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comarazamy, Daniel E.; Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Mulero, Pedro J.

    2007-01-01

    Urban sprawl in tropical locations is rapidly accelerating and it is more evident in islands where a large percentage of the population resides along the coasts. This paper focuses on the analysis of the impacts of land use and land cover for urbanization in the tropical coastal city of San Juan, in the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico. A mesoscale numerical model, the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), is used to study the impacts of land use for urbanization in the environment including specific characteristics of the urban heat island in the San Juan Metropolitan Area (SJMA), one of the most noticeable urban cores of the Caribbean. The research also makes use of the observations obtained during the airborne San Juan Atlas Mission. Surface and rawinsonde data from the mission are used to validate the atmospheric model yielding satisfactory results. Airborne high resolution remote sensing data are used to update the model's surface characteristics in order to obtain a more accurate and detailed configuration of the SJMA and perform a climate impact analysis based on land cover/land use (LCLU) changes. The impact analysis showed that the presence of the urban landscape of San Juan has an impact reflected in higher air temperatures over the area occupied by the city, with positive values of up to 2.5 C, for the simulations that have specified urban LCLU indexes in the model's bottom boundary. One interesting result of the impact analysis was the finding of a precipitation disturbance shown as a difference in total accumulated rainfall between the present urban landscape and with a potential natural vegetation, apparently induced by the presence of the urban area. Results indicate that the urban enhanced cloud formation and precipitation development occur mainly downwind of the city, including the accumulated precipitation. This spatial pattern can be explained by the presence of a larger urbanized area in the southwest sector of the city, and of the

  4. Isotopic evidence of Holocene climatic change in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Carrara, P.; Gleason, J.

    1988-01-01

    The ??D of cellulose from 14C-dated wood, collected in the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado, decreased by about 45??? from 9600 to 3100 yr B.P. and an additional 25??? to the present. The wood samples are from trees that grew above present-day tree line and reflect a time of warmer average summer temperatures. These changes in ??D are interpreted to indicate a major change during the Holocene in the sources of moisture, in the seasonality of precipitation, or in both. ?? 1988.

  5. [Dr. Juan Ramon Beltran and his contribution to the School of Dentistry].

    PubMed

    Zarranz, A

    1999-01-01

    He was in charge of the course of Legal Dentistry at the School of Dentistry from 1929 through 1932. He prepared the study program for this subject, basing it on the experience he had gained as professor in Legal Medicine at the Faculty of Medical Sciences in Buenos Aires. He published the book "Medicina Legal para la ensenanza de la Odontologia Legal y Social" (1932), and its second edition included an important contribution made by Dr. Juan Ubaldo Carrea, Main Professor of Orthodontics with Legal Dentistry at this school

  6. Geology, thermal maturation, and source rock geochemistry in a volcanic covered basin: San Juan sag, south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gries, R.R.; Clayton, J.L.; Leonard, C.

    1997-01-01

    The San Juan sag, concealed by the vast San Juan volcanic field of south-central Colorado, has only recently benefited from oil and gas wildcat drilling and evaluations. Sound geochemical analyses and maturation modeling are essential elements for successful exploration and development. Oil has been produced in minor quantities from an Oligocene sill in the Mancos Shale within the sag, and major oil and gas production occurs from stratigraphically equivalent rocks in the San Juan basin to the south-west and in the Denver basin to the northeast. The objectives of this study were to identify potential source rocks, assess thermal maturity, and determine hydrocarbon-source bed relationships. Source rocks are present in the San Juan sag in the upper and lower Mancos Shale (including the Niobrara Member), which consists of about 666 m (2184 ft) of marine shale with from 0.5 to 3.1 wt. % organic carbon. Pyrolysis yields (S1 + S2 = 2000-6000 ppm) and solvent extraction yields (1000-4000 ppm) indicate that some intervals within the Mancos Shale are good potential source rocks for oil, containing type II organic matter, according to Rock-Eval pyrolysis assay. Oils produced from the San Juan sag and adjacent part of the San Juan basin are geochemically similar to rock extracts obtained from these potential source rock intervals. Based on reconstruction of the geologic history of the basin integrated with models of organic maturation, we conclude that most of the source rock maturation occurred in the Oligocene and Miocene. Little to no maturation took place during Laramide subsidence of the basin, when the Animas and Blanco Basin formations were deposited. The timing of maturation is unlike that of most Laramide basins in the Rocky Mountain region, where maturation occurred as a result of Paleocene and Eocene basin fill. The present geothermal gradient in the San Juan sag is slightly higher (average 3.5??C/100 m; 1.9??F/100 ft) than the regional average for southern Rocky

  7. Propagation as a mechanism of reorientation of the Juan de Fuca ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. S.; Hey, R. N.; Nishimura, C.

    1984-01-01

    A revised model is presented of the tectonic evolution of the Juan de Fuca ridge by propagating rifting. The new model has three different relative rotation poles, covering the time intervals 17.0-8.5 Ma, 8.5-5.0 Ma, and 5.0 Ma to the present. The rotation pole shifts at 8.5 and 5.0 Ma imply clockwise shifts in the direction of relative motion of 10 deg to 15 deg. At each of these shifts, the pattern of propagation reorganizes, and the new ridges formed by propagation are at an orientation closer to orthogonal to the new direction of motion than the orientation of the preexisting ridges. The model, containing a total of seven propagation sequences, shows excellent agreement with the isochrons inferred from the magnetic anomaly data, except in areas complicated by the separate Explorer and Gorda plates. The agreement between model and data near the Explorer plate breaks down abruptly at an age of about 5 Ma, indicating that the probable cause of the rotation pole shift at that time was the separation of the Explorer plate from the Juan de Fuca plate.

  8. History of dredging and filling of lagoons in the San Juan, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, S.R.

    1976-01-01

    Laguna La Torrecilla, Laguna de Pinones, Laguna San Jose, and Laguna del Condado, in the San Juan, Puerto Rico area, are located within a metropolitan area of more than 1 million people. Bathymetric maps made during the study, in 1973, showed that Lagunas La Torrecilla, San Jose, and del Condado have been modified by dredging and filling; whereas, Laguna de Pinones has remained in a near natural state. Laguna La Torrecilla has been dredged to a depth, in places, of about 18 meters, and Lagunas San Jose and del Condado, in places to about 11 meters. Dredging in the San Juan lagoons has been harmful, beneficial, and in a few instances has had little or no noticeable effect on the water quality. Usually, dredging in the connecting canals has been beneficial if the water entering the lagoons through the canals was of better quality than the water in the lagoon. Dredging in the mouths of lagoons has been beneficial; whereas, filling or blocking the mouths has been harmful. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. A Geo-referenced 3D model of the Juan de Fuca Slab and associated seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blair, J.L.; McCrory, P.A.; Oppenheimer, D.H.; Waldhauser, F.

    2011-01-01

    We present a Geographic Information System (GIS) of a new 3-dimensional (3D) model of the subducted Juan de Fuca Plate beneath western North America and associated seismicity of the Cascadia subduction system. The geo-referenced 3D model was constructed from weighted control points that integrate depth information from hypocenter locations and regional seismic velocity studies. We used the 3D model to differentiate earthquakes that occur above the Juan de Fuca Plate surface from earthquakes that occur below the plate surface. This GIS project of the Cascadia subduction system supersedes the one previously published by McCrory and others (2006). Our new slab model updates the model with new constraints. The most significant updates to the model include: (1) weighted control points to incorporate spatial uncertainty, (2) an additional gridded slab surface based on the Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) Surface program which constructs surfaces based on splines in tension (see expanded description below), (3) double-differenced hypocenter locations in northern California to better constrain slab location there, and (4) revised slab shape based on new hypocenter profiles that incorporate routine depth uncertainties as well as data from new seismic-reflection and seismic-refraction studies. We also provide a 3D fly-through animation of the model for use as a visualization tool.

  10. Vacuolate-attached filaments: highly productive Ridgeia piscesae epibionts at the Juan de Fuca hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Kalanetra, Karen M; Nelson, Douglas C

    2010-01-01

    Vacuolate sulfur bacteria with high morphological similarity to vacuolate-attached filaments previously described from shallow hydrothermal vents (White Point, CA) were found at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. These filamentous bacteria grow in dense mats that cover surfaces and potentially provide a significant source of organic carbon where they occur. Vacuolate-attached filaments were collected near vents at the Clam Bed site of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and from the sediment surface at Escanaba Trough on the Gorda Ridge. A phylogenetic analysis comparing their 16S rRNA gene sequences to those collected from the shallow White Point site showed that all vacuolate-attached filament sequences form a monophyletic group within the vacuolate sulfur-oxidizing bacteria clade in the gamma proteobacteria. Abundance of the attached filaments was quantified over the length of the exterior surface of the tubes of Ridgeia piscesae worms collected from the Clam Bed site at Juan de Fuca yielding a per worm average of 0.070 ± 0.018 cm(3) (n = 4). In agreement with previous results for White Point filaments, anion measurements by ion chromatography showed no detectable internal nitrate concentrations above ambient seawater (n = 9). For one R. piscesae tube worm "bush" at the Easter Island vent site, potential gross epibiont productivity is estimated to be 15 to 45× the net productivity of the worms. PMID:24391244

  11. Progressive migration and anagenesis in Drimys confertifolia of the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile.

    PubMed

    López-Sepúlveda, Patricio; Takayama, Koji; Greimler, Josef; Crawford, Daniel J; Peñailillo, Patricio; Baeza, Marcelo; Ruiz, Eduardo; Kohl, Gudrun; Tremetsberger, Karin; Gatica, Alejandro; Letelier, Luis; Novoa, Patricio; Novak, Johannes; Stuessy, Tod F

    2015-01-01

    A common mode of speciation in oceanic islands is by anagenesis, wherein an immigrant arrives and through time transforms by mutation, recombination, and drift into a morphologically and genetically distinct species, with the new species accumulating a high level of genetic diversity. We investigate speciation in Drimys confertifolia, endemic to the two major islands of the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile, to determine genetic consequences of anagenesis, to examine relationships among populations of D. confertifolia and the continental species D. winteri and D. andina, and to test probable migration routes between the major islands. Population genetic analyses were conducted using AFLPs and nuclear microsatellites of 421 individuals from 42 populations from the Juan Fernández islands and the continent. Drimys confertifolia shows a wide genetic variation within populations on both islands, and values of genetic diversity within populations are similar to those found within populations of the continental progenitor. The genetic results are compatible with the hypothesis of high levels of genetic variation accumulating within anagenetically derived species in oceanic islands, and with the concept of little or no geographical partitioning of this variation over the landscape. Analysis of the probability of migration within the archipelago confirms colonization from the older island, Robinson Crusoe, to the younger island Alejandro Selkirk. PMID:25292282

  12. Seasonal and habitat effects on dengue and West Nile virus vectors in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua; Amador, Manuel; Barrera, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    The presence of West Nile (WNV) and dengue viruses and the lack of recent mosquito surveys in Puerto Rico prompted an investigation on the distribution and abundance of potential arbovirus vectors in the San Juan Metropolitan Area, and their variation with seasons and habitats. We sampled mosquitoes in early and late 2005 in 58 sites from forests, nonforest vegetation, wetlands, and high- and low-density housing areas using ovijars, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention miniature light/CO2 traps, and gravid traps. A total of 28 mosquito species was found. San Juan had potential WNV enzooticvectors (Culex nigripalpus) within and around the city in wetlands and forests, but few were captured in residential areas. A potential WNV bridge vector (Cx. quinquefasciatus) was abundant in urbanized areas, and it was positively correlated with the main dengue vector, Aedes aegypti. High-density housing areas harbored more Ae. aegypti. Container mosquitoes, including Aedes mediovittatus, were more abundant during the climax of the rainy season when most dengue occurs in Puerto Rico. The greatest risk for contracting WNV would be visiting forests and swamps at night. Culex (Culex) and Culex (Melanoconion) mosquito species were more abundant during the transition dry-wet seasons (March-May). PMID:19432067

  13. Modelling aftershock migration and afterslip of the San Juan Bautista, California, earthquake of October 3, 1972

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wesson, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The San Juan Bautista earthquake of October 3, 1972 (ML = 4.8), located along the San Andreas fault in central California, initiated an aftershock sequence characterized by a subtle, but perceptible, tendency for aftershocks to spread to the northwest and southeast along the fault zone. The apparent dimension of the aftershock zone along strike increased from about 7-10 km within a few days of the earthquake, to about 20 km eight months later. In addition, the mainshock initiated a period of accelerated fault creep, which was observed at 2 creep meters situated astride the trace of the San Andreas fault within about 15 km of the epicenter of the mainshock. The creep rate gradually returned to the preearthquake rate after about 3 yrs. Both the spreading of the aftershocks and the rapid surface creep are interpreted as reflecting a period of rapid creep in the fault zone representing the readjustment of stress and displacement following the failure of a "stuck" patch or asperity during the San Juan Bautista earthquake. Numerical calculations suggest that the behavior of the fault zone is consistent with that of a material characterized by a viscosity of about 3.6??1014 P, although the real rheology is likely to be more complicated. In this model, the mainshock represents the failure of an asperity that slips only during earthquakes. Aftershocks represent the failure of second-order asperities which are dragged along by the creeping fault zone. ?? 1987.

  14. Sub-Seafloor Carbon Dioxide Storage Potential on the Juan de Fuca Plate, Western North America

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Fairley; Robert Podgorney

    2012-11-01

    The Juan de Fuca plate, off the western coast of North America, has been suggested as a site for geological sequestration of waste carbon dioxide because of its many attractive characteristics (high permeability, large storage capacity, reactive rock types). Here we model CO2 injection into fractured basalts comprising the upper several hundred meters of the sub-seafloor basalt reservoir, overlain with low-permeability sediments and a large saline water column, to examine the feasibility of this reservoir for CO2 storage. Our simulations indicate that the sub-seafloor basalts of the Juan de Fuca plate may be an excellent CO2 storage candidate, as multiple trapping mechanisms (hydrodynamic, density inversions, and mineralization) act to keep the CO2 isolated from terrestrial environments. Questions remain about the lateral extent and connectivity of the high permeability basalts; however, the lack of wells or boreholes and thick sediment cover maximize storage potential while minimizing potential leakage pathways. Although promising, more study is needed to determine the economic viability of this option.

  15. Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopes in basalts and sulfides from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Hegner, E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1987-10-10

    Pb, Sr, Nd isotopes of seven basalt glasses collected by the submersible Alvin from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (SJFR) are almost identical (/sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pbapprox.18.45, /sup 207/Pb//sup 204/Pbapprox.15.47, /sup 208/Pb//sup 204/Pbapprox.37.81, /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Srapprox.0.70249, /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Ndapprox.0.51315). Whereas all basalts appear cogenetic, four of the samples have uniform abundances of U, Th, Rb, Nd, Sm, Pb, and Sr, indicating that they are also comagmatic. Two basalt glasses dredged previously at the SJFR have similar isotopic compositions but higher concentrations of U, Th, and Pb. The /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb ratios are intermediate between generally less radiogenic ridge basalts from south of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR) and often more radiogenic basalts from the northern JFR and NE Pacific seamounts. Sr and Nd isotopic compositions closely resemble data of other ridge basalts from the northernmost East Pacific Rise and are intermediate between isotopically more diverse seamount basalts produced nearby.

  16. Progressive migration and anagenesis in Drimys confertifolia of the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile.

    PubMed

    López-Sepúlveda, Patricio; Takayama, Koji; Greimler, Josef; Crawford, Daniel J; Peñailillo, Patricio; Baeza, Marcelo; Ruiz, Eduardo; Kohl, Gudrun; Tremetsberger, Karin; Gatica, Alejandro; Letelier, Luis; Novoa, Patricio; Novak, Johannes; Stuessy, Tod F

    2015-01-01

    A common mode of speciation in oceanic islands is by anagenesis, wherein an immigrant arrives and through time transforms by mutation, recombination, and drift into a morphologically and genetically distinct species, with the new species accumulating a high level of genetic diversity. We investigate speciation in Drimys confertifolia, endemic to the two major islands of the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile, to determine genetic consequences of anagenesis, to examine relationships among populations of D. confertifolia and the continental species D. winteri and D. andina, and to test probable migration routes between the major islands. Population genetic analyses were conducted using AFLPs and nuclear microsatellites of 421 individuals from 42 populations from the Juan Fernández islands and the continent. Drimys confertifolia shows a wide genetic variation within populations on both islands, and values of genetic diversity within populations are similar to those found within populations of the continental progenitor. The genetic results are compatible with the hypothesis of high levels of genetic variation accumulating within anagenetically derived species in oceanic islands, and with the concept of little or no geographical partitioning of this variation over the landscape. Analysis of the probability of migration within the archipelago confirms colonization from the older island, Robinson Crusoe, to the younger island Alejandro Selkirk.

  17. Tomographic imaging of the Cascadia subduction zone: Constraints on the Juan de Fuca slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuanxu; Zhao, Dapeng; Wu, Shiguo

    2015-04-01

    We used 40,343 P-wave arrival times from 1883 local earthquakes and 105,455 P-wave arrivals from 6361 teleseismic events to study the detailed structure of the Cascadia subduction zone. We conducted tomographic inversions using a starting velocity model which includes the high-velocity subducting Juan de Fuca slab as a priori information. A number of such slab-constrained inversions are conducted by changing the slab thickness and the velocity contrast between the slab and the surrounding mantle. Our optimal 3-D velocity model fits the data much better than that determined by an inversion with a 1-D homogeneous starting model. Our results show that the subducting Juan de Fuca slab has a thickness of 30-50 km and a P-wave velocity of 1-3% higher than that of the surrounding mantle. Beneath the northern and southern parts of the Cascadia, P-wave velocity is lower in the slab and along the slab interface, which may reflect a more hydrated slab and more active slab dehydration there. The lateral velocity variations may indicate different degrees of slab dehydration and forearc mantle serpentinization. The segmentation in episodic tremor and slip (ETS) is also spatially coincident with the velocity heterogeneities, indicating that the ETS occurrence and recurrence interval are controlled by fluid activity in and around the mantle wedge corner.

  18. Comprehensive Education Bolivarian-Style: The Alternative School in Barrio Pueblo Nuevo, Venezuela

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Mike

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author traces revolutionary developments in an alternative school in Barrio Pueblo Nuevo, Mérida, in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, a school that caters for students between 4 and 14. He begins by recounting some fieldwork done at the school on his behalf by Edward Ellis in 2010. He goes on to discuss a video made at…

  19. Exploración del Nuevo Laboratorio Científico de Marte

    NASA Video Gallery

    Únase a Fernando Abilleira, un analista de trayectoria de la NASA para la Oficina de Exploración de Marte, y conozca las nuevas tecnologías que el nuevo robot Curiosity del Laboratorio Científico d...

  20. James Monroe High School Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, 1986-1987. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Ana L.; And Others

    In its second year of Title VII funding, James Monroe High Schools's Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes (Project New Horizons) served 344 limited-English-speaking recent arrivals from Latin America and the Caribbean, in grades 9 through 12. The program has built on the strengths of the high school's extensive computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program,…

  1. James Monroe High School Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, a 3-year Title VII-funded bilingual education program, serves 287 Spanish speaking students at James Monroe High School (Bronx, New York). This report evaluates the project's first year of operation, 1985-86. The report contains an introduction describing the school and project goals; information on student…

  2. Nuevos Horizontes, James Monroe High School, 1987-1988. Evaluation Section Report. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Tomi D.; Lista, Carlos

    Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes (Project New Horizons) at James Monroe High School (New York City) served 328 students of limited English proficiency (LEP) in grades 9-12 during the final year of a 3-year funding cycle. The project's purpose was to build on the strengths of the school's extensive computer-assisted instructional program in order to…

  3. 3 CFR 8947 - Proclamation 8947 of March 25, 2013. Establishment of the San Juan Islands National Monument

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Proclamation 8947 of March 25, 2013. Establishment of the San Juan Islands National Monument 8947 Proclamation 8947 Presidential Documents Proclamations... still in use. These early explorers led the way for 19th century European and American traders...

  4. AgRISTARS: Renewable resources inventory. Land information support system implementation plan and schedule. [San Juan National Forest pilot test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, S. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The planning and scheduling of the use of remote sensing and computer technology to support the land management planning effort at the national forests level are outlined. The task planning and system capability development were reviewed. A user evaluation is presented along with technological transfer methodology. A land management planning pilot test of the San Juan National Forest is discussed.

  5. Culturally Responsive Instruction Leaves No Child Behind: The Story of Juan, a Pacific Island Special Needs Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoicovy, Catherine Eileen; Fee, Richard; Fee, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study is to explore the use of retelling as a culturally responsive literacy strategy for Juan, a Pacific Island (Chamorro) special needs student on the island of Guam. Data were collected from the following sources: (1) participant-observation (2) fieldnotes (3) audiotaped recordings of students' oral…

  6. 77 FR 75145 - Foreign-Trade Zone 61-San Juan, Puerto Rico; Application for Subzone; Sea World, Inc.; Guaynabo, PR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 61--San Juan, Puerto Rico; Application for Subzone; Sea World... for the facility of Sea World, Inc., located in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico. The application was...

  7. 75 FR 24586 - Order Finding That the San Juan Financial Basis Contract Traded on the IntercontinentalExchange...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... the Western region of the United States, transports natural gas from the San Juan Basin production... Incorporated (``EI''), Natural Gas Supply Association (``NGSA''), ] Federal Energy Regulatory Commission... gas price indices from natural gas trade data submitted to Platts by energy marketers. Platts...

  8. Incorporating Ecosystem Services into Community-level Decision-Making: A San Juan, Puerto Rico Case Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s Office of Research and Development’s Sustainable and Healthy Communities Research Program is developing tools and approaches to incorporate ecosystem goods and services concepts into community-level decision-making. The San Juan Community Study is one of a serie...

  9. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization

    SciTech Connect

    Varney, Peter J.

    2002-04-23

    This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development.

  10. The Child Development Training Consortium. A Status Report on the San Juan College AACJC-Kellogg Beacon College Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, C. David; Ott, Richard W.

    The Child Development Training Consortium, a Beacon College Project directed by San Juan College (SJC) is a collaborative effort of colleges and universities in New Mexico and Arizona. The consortium's major objective is to create child development training materials for community college faculty who teach "at-risk" Native American and Hispanic…

  11. Variation in the mitochondrial control region in the Juan Fernández fur seal (Arctocephalus philippii).

    PubMed

    Goldsworthy, S; Francis, J; Boness, D; Fleischer, R

    2000-01-01

    The Juan Fernandez fur seal (Arctocephalus philippii was allegedly extremely abundant, numbering as many as 4 million prior to sealing which continued from the late 17th to the late 19th century. By the end of the sealing era the species was thought to be extinct until they were rediscovered at Alejandro Selkirk Island in 1965. Historic records would suggest that the species underwent a substantial population bottleneck as a result of commercial sealing, and from population genetic theory we predicted that the genetic variability in the species would be low. We compared the mtDNA control region sequence from 28 Juan Fernandez fur seals from two islands in the Juan Fernandez Archipelago (Chile). Contrary to expectation, we found that variation in the Juan Fernandez fur seals is not greatly reduced in comparison to other pinniped taxa, especially given the apparent severity of the bottleneck they underwent. We also determined minor, but significantly different haplotype frequencies among the populations on the two islands (Alejandro Selkirk and Robinson Crusoe Islands), but no difference in their levels of variability. Such differences may have arisen stochastically via a recent founder event from Alejandro Selkirk to Robinson Crusoe Island or subsequent genetic drift.

  12. Writing Virtue and Indigenous Rights: Juan Bautista De Pomar and the "Relación de Texcoco"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espericueta, José

    2015-01-01

    In his "Relación de Texcoco," Juan Bautista de Pomar (c. 1535-90) takes a political and moral stance against Spanish colonialism in Texcoco and the entire viceroyalty of New Spain. Responding to the "Instrucción y memoria's" (1577) request for information about the history and cultural practices of local populations, Pomar…

  13. Seismic and Acoustic Studies from a Seafloor Array on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Mark Armstrong

    This dissertation consists of two related but separate studies, one a refraction seismic study of the oceanic crust and the other an acoustic study of whale behavior in the presence of noise, both using seafloor array data. The goal of the first study was to measure the lateral thickness variability in the extrusive volcanic layer on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The Juan de Fuca Ridge is a medium rate (6 cm per year full rate), active spreading center, separating the Juan de Fuca and Pacific plates. It is a site of volcanic eruptions, associated with creation of new oceanic crust, and hydrothermal vents which are important in the chemical balance of the oceans. To better understand the mechanisms controlling hydrothermal venting and the creation of new crust, a seismic refraction survey was conducted over a 20 km by 30 km area of the ridge. This survey, conducted in August of 1990, used airguns as energy sources and ocean bottom seismometers as recorders. A 3-dimensional traveltime inversion was used to interpret extrusive volcanic layer thickness changes of 300 m, occurring over less than several kilometers laterally. These thickness changes are interpreted as lava accumulations on the low side of listric faults in an episodic spreading system. The traveltime inversion also reveals a large horizontal seismic velocity anisotropy which is confined to the upper 500 m of crust. Compressional velocities are 3.35 km/s in the ridge strike direction and 2.25 km/s across strike. This anisotropy is believed to be caused by oriented fractures within the extrusive layer. The second study involved the tracking and analysis of whale vocalizations which were recorded on the array 10 percent of the time. The goal was to determine if noises such as generated by the airguns, shipping or earthquakes affected the behavior of these fin and blue whales. The vocalization patterns allow analysis of swimming speed, direction, respiration cycle and call interaction. While no clear noise

  14. Submersible observations along the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge: 1984 Alvin program.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; Morton, J.L.; Ross, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    In September 1984, the research submersible Alvin provided direct observations of three major hydrothermal vent areas along the southernmost segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR). The submersible operations focuses on specific volcanologic, structural, and hydrothermal problems that had been identified during the preceding 4 years of photographic, dredging, acoustic imaging, and geophysical studies along a 12 km long section of the ridge. A continuously maintained (from 1981 to the present) net of seafloor-anchored acoustic transponders allowed the observations from Alvin to be directly tied to all previous USGS data sets and NOAA water column surveys from 1984 to the present. We review the dive program and present a brief synthesis of the geology of the vent sites together with sample and track line compilations.-from Authors

  15. Tomography reveals buoyant asthenosphere accumulating beneath the Juan de Fuca plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, William B.; Allen, Richard M.; Richards, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    The boundary between Earth’s strong lithospheric plates and the underlying mantle asthenosphere corresponds to an abrupt seismic velocity decrease and electrical conductivity increase with depth, perhaps indicating a thin, weak layer that may strongly influence plate motion dynamics. The behavior of such a layer at subduction zones remains unexplored. We present a tomographic model, derived from on- and offshore seismic experiments, that reveals a strong low-velocity feature beneath the subducting Juan de Fuca slab along the entire Cascadia subduction zone. Through simple geodynamic arguments, we propose that this low-velocity feature is the accumulation of material from a thin, weak, buoyant layer present beneath the entire oceanic lithosphere. The presence of this feature could have major implications for our understanding of the asthenosphere and subduction zone dynamics.

  16. U, Th, and Pb isotopes in hot springs on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    Concentrations and isotopic compositions of U, Th, and Pb in three hydrothermal fluids from the Juan de Fuca Ridge were determined from samples obtained by the Alvin submersible. The samples were enriched in Pb and Th relative to deep-sea water, and were deficient in U. No clear relationship with Mg was found, suggesting nonideal mixing between the hot hydrothermal fluids and the cold ambient seawater. Values for U-234/U-238 have a seawater signature, and show a U-234 enrichment relative to the equilibrium value. The Pb isotopic composition has a uniform midocean ridge basalt signature, and it is suggested that Pb in these fluids may represent the best average value of the local oceanic crust.

  17. Effects of uranium development on erosion and associated sedimentation in southern San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, Maurice E.

    1979-01-01

    A reconnaissance was made of some of the effects of uranium development on erosion and associated sedimentation in the southern San Juan Basin, where uranium development is concentrated. In general, the effects of exploration on erosion are minor, although erosion may be accelerated by the building of access roads, by activities at the drilling sites, and by close concentration of drilling sites. Areas where the greatest effects on erosion and sedimentation from mining and milling operations have occurred are: (1) in the immediate vicinity of mines and mills, (2) near waste piles, and (3) in stream channels where modifications, such as changes in depth have been caused by discharge of excess mine and mill water. Collapse of tailings piles could result in localized but excessive erosion and sedimentation.

  18. San Juan National Forest Land Management Planning Support System (LMPSS) requirements definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werth, L. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The role of remote sensing data as it relates to a three-component land management planning system (geographic information, data base management, and planning model) can be understood only when user requirements are known. Personnel at the San Juan National Forest in southwestern Colorado were interviewed to determine data needs for managing and monitoring timber, rangelands, wildlife, fisheries, soils, water, geology and recreation facilities. While all the information required for land management planning cannot be obtained using remote sensing techniques, valuable information can be provided for the geographic information system. A wide range of sensors such as small and large format cameras, synthetic aperture radar, and LANDSAT data should be utilized. Because of the detail and accuracy required, high altitude color infrared photography should serve as the baseline data base and be supplemented and updated with data from the other sensors.

  19. Analysis of The Surface Radiative Budget Using ATLAS Data for San Juan, Puerto Rico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, D. L.; Gonzalez, J.; Comarazamy, Daniel; Picon, Ana

    2007-01-01

    The additional beating of the air over the city is the result of the replacement of naturally vegetated surfaces with those composed of asphalt, concrete, rooftops and other man-made materials. The temperatures of these artificial surfaces can be 20 to 40 C higher than vegetated surfaces. This produces a dome of elevated air temperatures 5 to 8 C greater over the city, compared to the air temperatures over adjacent rural areas. Urban landscapes are a complex mixture of vegetated and nonvegetated surfaces. It is difficult to take enough temperature measurements over a large city area to characterize the complexity of urban radiant surface temperature variability. The NASA Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) operates in the visual and IR bands was used in February 2004 to collect data from San Juan, Puerto Rico with the main objective of investigating the Urban Heat Island (UHI) in tropical cities.

  20. Thermal maturity patterns of Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks, San Juan Basin, Colorado and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.

    1992-01-01

    Horizontal and vertical thermal maturity patterns and time-temperature modeling indicate that the high levels of thermal maturity in the northern part of the basin are due to either: 1) convective heat transfer associated with a deeply buried heat source located directly below the northern part of the basin or 2) the circulation of relatively hot fluids into the basin from a heat source north of the basin located near the San Juan Mountains. Time-temperature and kinetic modeling of nonlinear Rm profiles indicates that present-day heat flow is insufficient to account for the measured levels of thermal maturity. Furthermore, in order to match nonlinear Rm profiles, it is necessary to assign artifically high thermal-conductivity values to some of the stratigraphic units. These unrealistically high thermal conductivities are interpreted as evidence of convective heat transfer. -from Author

  1. Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopes in basalts and sulfides from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegner, E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1987-01-01

    Isotopic Pb, Sr, and Nd data were collected by the Alvin submersible from seven basalt glasses in the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR), giving similar ratios for Pb-206/Pb-204 of about 18.45, for Pb-207/Pb-204 of about 15.47, for Pb-208/Pb-204 of about 37.81, for Sr-87/Sr-86 of about 0.70249, and for Nd-143/Nd-144 of about 0.51315. Data suggest that the basalts are all cogenetic, and that four of the samples are also comagmatic. It is concluded that isotopic data for the JFR and seamount basalts provide additional support for the mantle blob cluster model (Allegre et al., 1984), suggesting the involvement of multiple components in the genesis of ridge basalts, and including an unusual end-member that has nonradiogenic Sr and variable Pb-206/Pb-204 isotopic compositions.

  2. Henry Sigerist and the history of medicine in Latin America: his correspondence with Juan R. Beltran.

    PubMed

    de Asúa, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    During the years of World War II, the American Association for the History of Medicine fostered a Pan-American policy aimed at establishing relationships with Latin American historians of medicine. Juan R. Beltrán, professor of history of medicine at the University of Buenos Aires, also pursued an energetic program of academic diplomacy. The correspondence between Henry Sigerist and Beltrán makes manifest that by 1941 good channels of communication were established between Baltimore and Buenos Aires, but the friendly links did not last long. The motives for this can be found in the competing aims of the AAHM and Beltrán, and the pattern of international relationships during the war years.

  3. Botanical and geological significance of potassium-argon dates from the juan fernandez islands.

    PubMed

    Stuessy, T F; Foland, K A; Sutter, J F; Sanders, R W; O, M S

    1984-07-01

    Potassium-argon dating of five basalts from the three main islands of the Juan Fernández (or Robinson Crusoe) Islands of Chile in the southeastern Pacific gives ages of 1.01 +/- 0.12 and 2.44 +/- 0.14 million years for Masafuera, 3.79 +/- 0.20 and 4.23 +/- 0.16 for Masatierra, and 5.8 +/- 2.1 for Santa Clara. These ages are much younger than that of the underlying oceanic plate and are consistent with the origin of the island-seamount chain from a mantle hot spot beneath the eastward moving Nazca plate. The young age for the archipelago suggests that speciation within endemic genera has occurred within the past 4 to 5 million years. Endemic genera of apparently more ancient origins, such as Lactoris and Thyrsopteris, have apparently dispersed to the islands and survive refugially.

  4. Botanical and Geological Significance of Potassium-Argon Dates from the Juan Fernandez Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuessy, Tod F.; Foland, K. A.; Sutter, John F.; Sanders, Roger W.; Silva O., Mario

    1984-07-01

    Potassium-argon dating of five basalts from the three main islands of the Juan Fernandez (or Robinson Crusoe) Islands of Chile in the southeastern Pacific gives ages of 1.01 ± 0.12 and 2.44 ± 0.14 million years for Masafuera 3.79 ± 0.20 and 4.23 ± 0.16 for Masatierra, and 5.8 ± 2.1 for Santa Clara. These ages are much younger than that of the underlying oceanic plate and are consistent with the origin of the island-seamount chain from a mantle hot spot beneath the eastward moving Nazca plate. The young age for the archipelago suggests that speciation within endemic genera has occurred within the past 4 to 5 million years. Endemic genera of apparently more ancient origins, such as Lactoris and Thyrsopteris, have apparently dispersed to the islands and survive refugially.

  5. Biogeochemical variability of plants at native and altered sites, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gough, L.P.; Severson, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    The San Juan Basin is becoming a major energy resource region. The anticipated increase in strip mining for coal can be expected to alter the geochemical and biogeochemical environment. because such activities destroy the native vegetation communities, rearrange the rock strata, and disrupt natural soil development. This study investigated the variability in the biogeochemistry of native plant species at both undisturbed and altered sites and assessed the importance of the observed differences. Three studies are involved in this investigation: Study 1, the biogeochemical variability of native species found at sites throughout that part of the basin underlain by economically recoverable coal; Study 2, the biogeochemical variability of native species growing on soils considered favorable for use in the topsoiling of spoil areas; and Study 3, the biogeochemical variability of native species on rehabilitated sites at the San Juan coal mine. Summary statistics for concentrations of 35 elements (and ash yield) are reported in Study 1 for galleta grass, broom snakeweed, and fourwing saltbush. The concentrations of manganese, molybdenum, nickel, and uranium (and possibly iron and selenium) in galleta show regional patterns, with the highest values generally found in the south-central region and western edge of the study area. Differences in the concentration of elements between species was generally subtle (less than a factor of two) except for the following: ash yield of saltbush was two times that of the other plants; boron in snakeweed and saltbush was four times greater than in galleta; iron in galleta was two times greater than in saltbush; and, calcium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, and sulfur were generally highest in saltbush. Summary statistics (including the 95-percent expected range) for concentrations of 35 elements (and ash yield) are reported from Study 2 for galleta and broom snakeweed growing on the Sheppard, Shiprock, and Doak soil association

  6. “Don Juan-Fracture” as a Hint to Aortic Isthmus Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Suksompong, Sirilak; von Bormann, Benno

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of thoracic aortic rupture after blunt trauma in a 23-year-old male patient. The initial investigation found no external injury or bleeding, only a slightly widened mediastinum and a broken left calcaneus. Abdominal lavage was negative, biochemistry was normal, and breathing and oxygenation were not compromised. When changing his position during diagnostics, the patient all of a sudden developed cardiac arrest and typical signs of hypovolemic shock. An immediate sternotomy was done without any further diagnostics on suspicion of aortic isthmus injury. A circular avulsion at the ligamentum arteriosum was found as assumed and repaired under cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient left the hospital for rehabilitation after 12 days in adequate health status. Biodynamics of blunt trauma after high-speed frontal impact and the relationship between calcaneus fracture, called “Don-Juan fracture,” and aortic rupture at the site of ligamentum arteriosum are discussed. PMID:25478249

  7. Structurally controlled and aligned tight gas reservoir compartmentalization in the San Juan and Piceance Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, A.D.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Klawitter, A.L.

    1995-10-01

    Recurrent basement faulting is the primary controlling mechanism for aligning and compartmentalizing upper Cretaceous aged tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan and Piceance Basins. Northwest trending structural lineaments that formed in conjunction with the Uncompahgre Highlands have profoundly influenced sedimentation trends and created boundaries for gas migration; sealing and compartmentalizing sedimentary packages in both basins. Fractures which formed over the structural lineaments provide permeability pathways which allowing gas recovery from otherwise tight gas reservoirs. Structural alignments and associated reservoir compartments have been accurately targeted by integrating advanced remote sensing imagery, high resolution aeromagnetics, seismic interpretation, stratigraphic mapping and dynamic structural modelling. This unifying methodology is a powerful tool for exploration geologists and is also a systematic approach to tight gas resource assessment in frontier basins.

  8. A magnetotelluric sounding across Vancouver Island detects the subducting Juan de Fuca plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, R. D.; Delaurier, J. M.; Gupta, J. C.

    1986-06-01

    Magnetotelluric1 (MT) and geomagnetic2 depth-sounding measurements have been made at 18 sites (7 with remote reference3) across Vancouver Island (Fig. 1), beneath which the Juan de Fuca plate is underthrusting4,5. Vancouver Island is part of the old accretionary Wrangellia terrane6 and is located in the central portion of a 350-km forearc region that extends from the sediment-filled trench7 to the Garibaldi volcanic belt8. Gravity9 and seismic refraction studies10 suggest that the descending plate has a shallow northeasterly dip of 8°-16° with perhaps higher dips beneath northeastern Vancouver Island. A high-resolution seismic reflection survey11 along lines 1 and 3 (Fig. 1) located a zone of strong acoustic reflections (the E-horizon11) near the top of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate at depths of 23-34 km. Our model of the broad-band MT data defines a sloping, highly conducting zone also near the top of the subducting plate at the same depths as the seismic E-horizon. The high electrical conductivity in this zone (the E-conductor) is the result of saline fluid within the pore spaces of sedimentary and mafic materials of the upper oceanic crust that have been subducted to those depths beneath Vancouver Island. These are the first data which clearly define a dipping conductive layer associated with the boundary region between converging plates; they have significant implications for thrust earthquakes and metamorphic reactions that occur in subduction zones.

  9. U, Th, and Pb isotopes in hot springs on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.

    1987-10-10

    The concentrations and isotopic compositions of U, Th, and Pb in three hydrothermal fluids from the Juan de Fuca Ridge were determined. The samples consisted of 10.2--57.6% of the pure hydrothermal end-members based on Mg contents. The Pb contents of the samples ranged from 34 to 87 ng/g, U from 1.3 to 3.0 ng/g, and Th from 0.2 to 7.7 pg/g. These samples showed large enrichments of Pb and Th relative to deep-sea water and some depletion of U. They did not show coherent relationships with Mg, however, indicating nonideal mixings between the hot hydrothermal fluids and cold ambient seawater. Particles filtered from these hydrothermal fluids contained significant amounts of Th and Pb which may effectively increase the concentration of these elements in the fluids when acidified. The /sup 234/U//sup 238/U values in all samples show a /sup 234/U enrichment relative to the equilibrium value and have a seawater signature. The Pb isotopic composition of the Juan de Fuca hydrothermal fluids resembles that of 21 /sup 0/N East Pacific Rise and has a uniform mid-ocean ridge basalt signature. The hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading ridges have circulated through a large volume of basalts. Therefore Pb in these fluids may represent the best average value of the local oceanic crust. From the effects of U deposition from seawater to the crust and Pb extraction from rock to the ocean, the U/Pb ratio in the hydrothermally altered oceanic crust may be increased significantly. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  10. Is the Juan Fernandez Ridge (nazca Plate) a Deep-Mantle Hot SPOT Trail?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, L. E.; Selles, D.; Díaz, A.; Piña-Gauthier, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Juan Fernández Ridge on the oceanic Nazca plate is thought to be a classic hot spot trail because of the apparent westward rejuvenation of the eruptive ages. Geochronological data is still scarce to prove this is the case, and other hypothesis should be taken into account. There are a few constrains, like the ca. 9 Ma Ar-Ar age of the O'Higgins seamount (115 km from the Chile-Perú trench), published K-Ar ages of ca. 3-4 Ma in Robinson Crusoe island (580 km from the trench) and ca. 1 Ma in Alejandro Selkirk (180 km further west). New reconnaissance K-Ar ages in Robinson Crusoe yield ca. 1-3 Ma, which partially overlap with the age of Alejandro Selkirk, breaking the expected age progression given that the Nazca plate moves eastwards at ca. 6-8 cm/yr. New geological mapping also shows a sharp unconformity between the older, strongly altered sequences and more recent, post-erosional volcanic piles, where only the vent facies have disappeared. A fixed deep-mantle plume origin for Pacific hot spots has been widely debated and concurrent phenomena arose as a possible explanation for non-linear age progressions and/or long-lived volcanic activity. In fact, intraplate regional tectonics, plume displacement, and mantle heterogeneities could be the main factor of the ridge architecture or the mask for a first-order linear trend. An ongoing mapping and dating effort is aimed to understand the evolution of the Juan Fernández Ridge, testing the main hypothesis. Fondecyt grant 110966 is acknowledged for financial support.

  11. Juan Comas's summary history of the American association of physical anthropologists (1928-1968).

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Marta P; Little, Michael A

    2005-01-01

    This translation of Juan Comas's Summary History of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists was originally published in Spanish by the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico, in 1969 (Departamento de Investigaciones Antropológicas, Publication 22). Physical anthropologists from North America and members of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists owe Juan Comas a debt of gratitude for having labored to produce this Summary History of the AAPA. There is much useful and interesting material in this document: extensive endnotes that are helpful to the historian of the profession; an appendix of the Journal issues where the proceedings of annual meetings can be found; a detailed listing of contributors of papers to annual meetings from 1930-1968; a warm acknowledgment and history of the contributions of the Wenner-Gren Foundation to biological anthropology; a history of the Yearbook of Physical Anthropology; and comments on the short-lived PA Newsletter. In addition, there are appendices with the founding AAPA Constitution and By-Laws from 1930 and as they existed in 1968. All of this synoptic information saves the reader with interests in the history of the AAPA considerable effort, especially when few university and college libraries have the full (old and new) series of the AJPA on their shelves. We have tried to provide a translation of Comas's history that is faithful to the original Spanish-language publication. In a few cases, we shortened sentences and applied a slightly more modern usage than was popular in the late 1960s.

  12. Ordovidan K-bentonites in the Precordillera of San Juan and its tectomasmatic significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cingolani, C.A.; Huff, W.; Bergstrom, S.; Kolata, D.

    1997-01-01

    A succession of approximately 35 early Middle Ordovician K-bentonite beds are exposed in the Precordillera region near the town of Jachal, in San Juan Province (at Cerro Viejo and La Chilca sections). They occur in argillaceous limestone in the upper part of the San Juan Limestone and in the interbedded shales and mudstones at the base of the overlying Los Azules Formation. Total thickness of the K-bentonite-bearing interval is 23 m and individual beds range from 1 to 65 cm thick. An essentially Arenig-Llanvirn age for the K-bentonite succession is indicated by the presence of graptolites diagnostic of the Paraglossograptus tentaculatus Zone and conodonts indicating the Eoplacognathus suecicus Zone. The bentonites consist mainly of Rl ordered illite/smectite, characteristic of most of the lower Paleozoic K-bentonites, plus volcanogenic crystals. Similar to other K-bentonites, these probably represent the distal, glass-rich portion of fall-out ash beds derived from collision zone explosive volcanism. The geochemical data and preliminary plots on the magmatic discrimination diagram indicate the parental magma was of rhyolite to trachyandesite composition. Tectonic discrimination diagrams show the setting of Cerro Viejo ash layers as falling on the boundary between volcanic arc and within plate rocks, typical of collision margin felsic volcanic rocks. U-Pb isotope dating for two zircon fractions from one sample show a lower concordia intercept of 461, +7-10 Ma coincident with the biostratigraphic age. Thus, they have important implications for the origin and early history of the allochtonous Precordillera terrane and the Pacific margin of South America. Furthermore, they are potentially important in interpretations of the paleogeographic relations of Laurentia and Gondwana during Ordovician time. ?? 1997 Asociacio??n Geolo??gica Argentina.

  13. Hydrologic characteristics of lagoons at San Juan, Puerto Rico, during an October 1974 tidal cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gómez-Gómez, Fernando; Ellis, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    Flow and water-quality changes were studied during a period of intense rainfall in the San Juan Lagoon system. The study covered a 25-hour period beginning 0900 hours 22 October, 1974. Precipitation during the study period averaged 70 millimeters. Sampling stations were located at Boca de Cangrejos, the main ocean outlet; Canal Pinones between Laguna de Pinones and Laguna La Torrecilla; Canal Suarez between Laguna San Jose, connects to Laguna La Torrecilla; and Cano de Martin Pena between Laguna San Jose and Bahia de San Juan. In addition water-elevation recording gages were installed at each lagoon. Water samples from the canal stations were analyzed for organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus species, and suspended sediment. Specific-conductance measurements were used with the chemical data to estimate the runoff contributions of nutrients. Runoff into the lagoon, system during the study period was about 2.8 million cubic meters, or about 70 percent of the average precipitation. The runoff contributed chemical loadings to the lagoons of 95,000 kilograms total-organic carbon; 2,700 kilograms of total phosphorus; and 10,000 kilograms of total Khjeldhal nitrogen. A comparison with a prior study during which there was no significant rain, show that dry-period loadings are less than 10 percent of the wet-period loadings. At the end of the study period the system had not reached equilibrium, and the lagoons retained 80 percent of the water inflows from 50 to 90 percent of the chemical loads. Nearly 95 percent of the water outflows occurred at the Boca de Cangrejos sea outlet. The three lagoons and interconnecting canals form a very complex hydraulic system that is difficult to study using traditional techniques. A model of the system will facilitate management to improve the quality of water in the lagoons.

  14. Sediment and water chemistry of the San Juan River and Escalante River deltas of Lake Powell, Utah, 2010-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hornewer, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have documented the presence of trace elements, organic compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and radionuclides in sediment from the Colorado River delta and from sediment in some side canyons in Lake Powell, Utah and Arizona. The fate of many of these contaminants is of significant concern to the resource managers of the National Park Service Glen Canyon National Recreation Area because of potential health impacts to humans and aquatic and terrestrial species. In 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey began a sediment-core sampling and analysis program in the San Juan River and Escalante River deltas in Lake Powell, Utah, to help the National Park Service further document the presence or absence of contaminants in deltaic sediment. Three sediment cores were collected from the San Juan River delta in August 2010 and three sediment cores and an additional replicate core were collected from the Escalante River delta in September 2011. Sediment from the cores was subsampled and composited for analysis of major and trace elements. Fifty-five major and trace elements were analyzed in 116 subsamples and 7 composited samples for the San Juan River delta cores, and in 75 subsamples and 9 composited samples for the Escalante River delta cores. Six composited sediment samples from the San Juan River delta cores and eight from the Escalante River delta cores also were analyzed for 55 low-level organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls, 61 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, gross alpha and gross beta radionuclides, and sediment-particle size. Additionally, water samples were collected from the sediment-water interface overlying each of the three cores collected from the San Juan River and Escalante River deltas. Each water sample was analyzed for 57 major and trace elements. Most of the major and trace elements analyzed were detected at concentrations greater than reporting levels for the sediment-core subsamples and composited

  15. Ano Nuevo to Santa Cruz, California : a photographic tour of the coastline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chezar, Henry; Wong, Florence L.

    2000-01-01

    This interactive CD ROM contains over 500 overlapping photographic images of the California coastline from A?o Nuevo to Santa Cruz. The images were taken from the R/V David Johnston to illustrate the coastal geology adjacent to part of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The introductory home page starts a series of links to a regional map, more detailed area maps, and finally the individual photographic images.

  16. Arsenic contamination of natural waters in San Juan and La Pampa, Argentina.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, J; Watts, M J; Shaw, R A; Marcilla, A L; Ward, N I

    2010-12-01

    Arsenic (As) speciation in surface and groundwater from two provinces in Argentina (San Juan and La Pampa) was investigated using solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge methodology with comparison to total arsenic concentrations. A third province, Río Negro, was used as a control to the study. Strong cation exchange (SCX) and strong anion exchange (SAX) cartridges were utilised in series for the separation and preservation of arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MA(V)) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)). Samples were collected from a range of water outlets (rivers/streams, wells, untreated domestic taps, well water treatment works) to assess the relationship between total arsenic and arsenic species, water type and water parameters (pH, conductivity and total dissolved solids, TDS). Analysis of the waters for arsenic (total and species) was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in collision cell mode. Total arsenic concentrations in the surface and groundwater from Encon and the San José de Jáchal region of San Juan (north-west Argentina within the Cuyo region) ranged from 9 to 357 μg l(-1) As. Groundwater from Eduardo Castex (EC) and Ingeniero Luiggi (LU) in La Pampa (central Argentina within the Chaco-Pampean Plain) ranged from 3 to 1326 μg l(-1) As. The pH range for the provinces of San Juan (7.2-9.7) and La Pampa (7.0-9.9) are in agreement with other published literature. The highest total arsenic concentrations were found in La Pampa well waters (both rural farms and pre-treated urban sources), particularly where there was high pH (typically > 8.2), conductivity (>2,600 μS cm(-1)) and TDS (>1,400 mg l(-1)). Reverse osmosis (RO) treatment of well waters in La Pampa for domestic drinking water in EC and LU significantly reduced total arsenic concentrations from a range of 216-224 μg l(-1) As to 0.3-0.8 μg l(-1) As. Arsenic species for both provinces were predominantly As(III) and As(V). As

  17. Determining the Habitat Preference of Sand Lance (Ammodytes hexapterus) Using Multibeam Bathymetry in the San Juan Islands, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, E.; Greene, H.; Harmsen, F. J.

    2010-12-01

    Ammodytes hexapterus (Pacific Sand Lance or PSL) is an important forage fish supporting many marine populations, ranging from salmon, harbor seals, and whales. Previous studies have shown PSL to be highly substrate specific (Robards et al., 1999). Sand lance spend time buried in the substrate and come out into the water column to feed. This is due to the lack of swim bladders. If the sand particles are too fine their gills can be clogged (Wright et al., 2000). Little is known about the species sub-tidal habitat and new information regarding habitat preferences in deep water would be beneficial in determining their distribution and abundance. Preliminary examination undertaken in this investigation was limited to three sand wave fields: one, the central San Juan Channel (a known PSL sub-tidal habitat), and two previously un-sampled fields west of Sucia Island and southwest of Lopez Island in the waters surrounding the San Juan Islands, Washington. Multibeam bathymetric data, subsea video, and sediment analysis show that PSL have occupied the San Juan Channel, which is composed of well-sorted medium grained (~500 μm size) siliciclastic sand. Several sediment samples from in and around the fields were collected and analyzed to determine a grain size distribution of the sediments. The two un-sampled fields examined have an average grain size higher and lower respectively than the San Juan Channel field. The expected results of this study are to determine whether or not the two newly sampled sediment wave fields are potential sub-tidal habitats of PSL.

  18. Historical review of uranium-vanadium in the eastern Carrizo Mountains, San Juan County, New Mexico and Apache County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Chenoweth, W.L.

    1980-03-01

    This report is a brief review of the uranium and/or vanadium mining in the eastern Carrizo Mountains, San Juan County, New Mexico and Apache County, Arizona. It was prepared at the request of the Navajo Tribe, the New Mexico Energy and Minerals Department, and the Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology. This report deals only with historical production data. The locations of the mines and the production are presented in figures and tables.

  19. [Juan Valverde de Amusco c. 1525-1588 and his vocation for anatomy in the Hispano-Italian Renaissance].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Mansilla, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The XVIth century witnessed a glorious period in the progress of some of the basic medical sciences among which anatomy stands out. One of the well-known figures involved in the development of this subject was Juan Valverde de Amusco, a notable Spanish scientist. This research shows the most relevant data currently known on his life, sociocultural environment and his celebrated treaty on anatomy titled: "Historia de la composición del cuerpo humano". (History of the human body). PMID:26999984

  20. Geochemistry of Axial seamount lavas: Magmatic relationship between the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.M.; Morgan, C.; Lilas, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Axial seamount, located along the central portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and at the eastern end of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, is the current center of the Cobb hotspot. Lava chemistry and bathymetry indicate that Axial seamount is a discrete volcanic unit, with a more productive shallow magmatic plumbing system separate from the adjacent ridge segments. Despite this classic association of spreading center and hotspot volcanic activity, there is no evidence in the lavas for geochemical or isotopic enrichment typical of hotspot or mantle plume activity. The differences in composition between the Axial seamount lavas and the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas are attributed to melting processes rather than to any fundamental differences in their mantle source compositions. The higher magma production rates, higher Sr, and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas relative to the ridge lavas are thought to be a consequence of melt initiation at greater depths. The melting column producing the seamount lavas is thought to be initiated in the stability field of spinel peridotite, whereas the ridge lavas are produced from a melting column initiated at shallower levels, possibly within or close to the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. Implicit in this interpretation is the conclusion that the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas, and by analogy most MORB, are generated at shallow mantle levels, mostly within the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. This interpretation also requires that for the upwelling mantle to intersect the solidus at different depths, the mantle supplying Axial seamount must be hotter than the rest of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Axial seamount, therefore, reflects a thermal anomaly in the mantle, rather than a geochemically enriched ocean island basalt type mantle plume.

  1. Depth to the Juan De Fuca slab beneath the Cascadia subduction margin - a 3-D model for sorting earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Blair, J. Luke; Oppenheimer, David H.; Walter, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01

    We present an updated model of the Juan de Fuca slab beneath southern British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and northern California, and use this model to separate earthquakes occurring above and below the slab surface. The model is based on depth contours previously published by Fluck and others (1997). Our model attempts to rectify a number of shortcomings in the original model and update it with new work. The most significant improvements include (1) a gridded slab surface in geo-referenced (ArcGIS) format, (2) continuation of the slab surface to its full northern and southern edges, (3) extension of the slab surface from 50-km depth down to 110-km beneath the Cascade arc volcanoes, and (4) revision of the slab shape based on new seismic-reflection and seismic-refraction studies. We have used this surface to sort earthquakes and present some general observations and interpretations of seismicity patterns revealed by our analysis. For example, deep earthquakes within the Juan de Fuca Plate beneath western Washington define a linear trend that may mark a tear within the subducting plate Also earthquakes associated with the northern stands of the San Andreas Fault abruptly terminate at the inferred southern boundary of the Juan de Fuca slab. In addition, we provide files of earthquakes above and below the slab surface and a 3-D animation or fly-through showing a shaded-relief map with plate boundaries, the slab surface, and hypocenters for use as a visualization tool.

  2. Tectonic Setting and Characteristics of Natural Fractures in MesaVerde and Dakota Reservoirs of the San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect

    LORENZ,JOHN C.; COOPER,SCOTT P.

    2000-12-20

    The Cretaceous strata that fill the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado were shortened in a generally N-S to NN13-SSW direction during the Laramide orogeny. This shortening was the result of compression of the strata between southward indentation of the San Juan Uplift at the north edge of the basin and northward to northeastward indentation of the Zuni Uplift from the south. Right-lateral strike-slip motion was concentrated at the eastern and western basin margins of the basin to form the Hogback Monocline and the Nacimiento Uplift at the same time, and small amounts of shear may have been pervasive within the basin as well. Vertical extension fractures, striking N-S to NNE-SSW with local variations (parallel to the Laramide maximum horizontal compressive stress), formed in both Mesaverde and Dakota sandstones under this system, and are found in outcrops and in the subsurface of the San Juan Basin. The immature Mesaverde sandstones typically contain relatively long, irregular, vertical extension fractures, whereas the quartzitic Dakota sandstones contain more numerous, shorter, sub-parallel, closely spaced, extension fractures. Conjugate shear planes in several orientations are also present locally in the Dakota strata.

  3. Eruptive and noneruptive calderas, northeastern San Juan Mountains, Colorado: Where did the ignimbrites come from?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; McIntosh, W.C.

    2008-01-01

    The northeastern San Juan Mountains, the least studied portion of this well-known segment of the Southern Rocky Mountains Volcanic Field are the site of several newly identified and reinterpreted ignimbrite calderas. These calderas document some unique eruptive features not described before from large volcanic systems elsewhere, as based on recent mapping, petrologic data, and a large array of newly determined high-precision, laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar ages (140 samples). Tightly grouped sanidine ages document exceptionally brief durations of 50-100 k.y. or less for individual Oligocene caldera cycles; biotite ages are more variable and commonly as much as several hundred k.y. older than sanidine from the same volcanic unit. A previously unknown ignimbrite caldera at North Pass, along the Continental Divide in the Cochetopa Hills, was the source of the newly distinguished 32.25-Ma Saguache Creek Tuff (???400-500 km3). This regionally, distinctive crystal-poor alkalic rhyolite helps fill an apparent gap in the southwestward migration from older explosive activity, from calderas along the N-S Sawatch locus in central Colorado (youngest, Bonanza Tuff at 33.2 Ma), to the culmination of Tertiary volcanism in the San Juan region, where large-volume ignimbrite eruptions started at ca. 29.5 Ma and peaked with the enormous Fish Canyon Tuff (5000 km3) at 28.0 Ma. The entire North Pass cycle, including caldera-forming Saguache Creek Tuff, thick caldera-filling lavas, and a smaller volume late tuff sheet, is tightly bracketed at 32.25-32.17 Ma. No large ignimbrites were erupted in the interval 32-29 Ma, but a previously unmapped cluster of dacite-rhyolite lava flows and small tuffs, areally associated with a newly recognized intermediate-composition intrusion 5 ?? 10 km across (largest subvolcanic intrusion in San Juan region) centered 15 km north of the North Pass caldera, marks a near-caldera-size silicic system active at 29.8 Ma. In contrast to the completely filled North Pass

  4. On subinertial oscillations trapped by the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavelle, J. W.; Cannon, G. A.

    2001-12-01

    Spectra of currents measured along the 2100 m deep Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeast Pacific have prominent tidal, inertial, and weather-band (3-7 day period) spectral peaks. The weather-band peak, in particular, has a number of interesting features. It is strongest in close lateral proximity to the ridge and strongest near ridge depth; intensification near the ridge is characteristic of trapped motion. Spectral peak intensities vary seasonally, with largest amplitudes occurring in autumn and winter; seasonal variation suggests that surface weather is forcing flow at depth. Together, trapping and seasonality indicate opportunistic amplification of oscillatory motion at the ridge. At all frequencies, forcing, topography, and stratification together shape current and hydrographic distributions near the ridge. Effects of those interactions for subinertial motion are quantified here using a primitive equation numerical model. Forcing period (1-10 days) and friction are the principal dependencies examined. Results show that flow over the Juan de Fuca Ridge can be amplified by factors of 3-4 for diurnal and up to a factor of 7 for weather-band frequencies. Amplification is ridge trapped, with effects extending many hundreds of meters upward and extending 5-10 km laterally for 5-day-period flow; the strength and area of amplification increase with increasing period over the 1- to 10-day-period band. Oscillatory weather-band flow leads to vertical velocities on the order of 0.3 cm s-1 on ridge flanks, which in turn cause periodic temperature (T) and salinity (S) variations with amplitudes of as much as 0.05°C and 0.01 practical salinity units, respectively. The vertical motion and consequent vertical displacement (>100 m) lead to isotherms that plunge below the crest alternately each side of the ridge, a distribution observed in conductivity-temperature-depth transect data. Near the ridge crest, cross-ridge baroclinic pressure gradients caused by cyclically plunging

  5. A Long-Term Seismic Array on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, P. R.; Wilcock, W. S.; Stakes, D. S.; Barclay, A. H.; Ramirez, T. M.; Toomey, D. R.

    2003-12-01

    The Keck Foundation with additional support from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and the University of Washington has funded a five-year, five-million dollar program for archetypic experiments on the northern Juan de Fuca Plate. The goal of this program is to constrain the linkages between deformation (earthquakes), fluid flow and chemistry, and microbial response across the northern Juan de Fuca Plate in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. A key component of these studies is an array of ocean-bottom seismometers to record the temporal and spatial distribution of seismic activity in the region. The current network, deployed in August of 2003, is comprised of eight autonomous instruments: one broadband seismometer and seven short-period seismometers. The instruments are distributed within and around the axial valley at the center of the Endeavour segment and spaced about 4 km apart, composing an array about 7 km wide and 9 km long. The short-period instruments, sensitive over a frequency range of 1 to 32 Hz, utilize an MBARI/GEOSense BH1 three-axis corehole geophone connected to an MBARI/GEOSense LP1 data logger. For five of these instruments the corehole sensor is inserted into a 7 cm diameter hole drilled into the basaltic basement rock, thus providing excellent coupling. For the other two instruments where suitable drilling sites were not available, the sensors are inserted into 55 kg concrete blocks placed on the sediment. The broadband instrument is a Guralp CMG-1T three-axis seismometer, sensitive over a frequency range of 2.8 mHz (360 sec) to 50 Hz. The sensor is completely buried in sediment inside a 60 cm deep by 60 cm diameter caisson, thus reducing the effects of water currents on the recorded data. A 20 m cable connects the sensor to an LP1 data logger and a 30 kW-hr battery sitting on the sediment. A complete data set will be recovered from the array when the instruments are revisited during the summer of 2004. However, data from two events, an

  6. Composition and dissolution of black smoker particulates from active vents on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feely, Richard A.; Lewison, Maureen; Massoth, Gary J.; Robert-Baldo, Gillian; Lavelle, J. William; Byrne, Robert H.; Von Damm, Karen L.; Curl, Herbert C., Jr.

    1987-10-01

    During two Atlantis II/Alvin cruises to the Juan de Fuca Ridge in 1984 active high temperature (140°-284°C) vents were sampled for black smoker particulates using the Grassle Pump. Individual mineral phases were identified using standard X ray diffraction and petrographic procedures. In addition, elemental compositions and particle morphologies were determined by X ray energy spectrometry and scanning electron microscope/X ray energy spectrometry techniques. The vent particulates from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge vent sites were highly enriched in S, Si, Fe, Zn, and Cu and were primarily composed of sphalerite, wurtzite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, barite, chalcopyrite, cubanite, hydrous iron oxides, and elemental sulfur. Two additional unidentified phases which were prevalent in the samples included an Fe-Si phase and a Ca-Si phase. The grain sizes of the individual particle phases ranged from < 2 μm for the sphalerite and Fe oxide particles to > 100 μm for the Fe-Si particles. Grain size and current meter data were used in a deposition model of individual phase dispersal. For many of the larger sulfide and sulfate particles, the model predicts dispersal to occur over length scales of only several hundreds of meters. The high-temperature black smokers from the more northerly Endeavour Segment vents were highly enriched in Fe, S, Ca, Cu, and Zn and were primarily composed of anhydrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, barite, sulfur, pyrite, and other less abundant metal sulfide minerals. The grain sizes of the individual particles ranged from < 10 μm to slightly larger than 500 μm. The composition and size distributions of the mineral phases are highly suggestive of high-temperature mixing between vent fluids and seawater. A series of field and laboratory studies were conducted to determine the rates of dissolution of several sulfate and sulfide minerals. The dissolution rates ranged over more than 3 orders of magnitude, from 3.2 × 10-8 cm s-1 for anhydrite to 1.2

  7. Analysis of Upper Air, Ground and Remote Sensing Data for the Atlas Field Campaign in San Juan, Puerto Rico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Cruz, Jorge E.

    2005-01-01

    The general climate of the island of Puerto Rico is dominated by the easterly trade winds from the Atlantic Ocean, and during synoptically calm days by the topographic and local land surface characteristics [1]. The urban canopy of the metropolitan area of San Juan, capital city of the Island, may introduce a new microclimate that changes the characteristics of the low atmosphere and interacts with the other microclimates already present in the island. The primitive land cover and land use (LCLU) of the metropolitan area of San Juan was composed by broadleaf trees, moist soils, and very dense vegetation in general. The urban LCLU changes the balance for the mass, momentum and energy between the bottom boundary and the lower atmosphere, creating different climate conditions over urban and rural regions. Some of these differences are low relative humidity and high temperatures observed in urban areas when compared to rural areas. These in turn produces a convective circulation over the urban areas, a phenomenon compared to the sea and land breezes, commonly known as heat islands (UHI). Factors that contribute to the formation of the UHI are anthropogenic heat sources, aerosols from pollutants, fast water canalization due to the presence of buildings and streets, among others. The comparison between urban and rural climates is the most common approach to analyze the UHI. These contrasts are larger in clear and calm conditions and tend to disappear in cloudy and windy weather. The UHI was recognized in the early 1950 s as closed isotherms that separates the city from the general temperature field [2]. The impact of the urban LCLU in San Juan, Puerto Rico, was quantified calculating the difference between historical data sets for the air temperature over an identified urban area and a rural area dT(U-R). The analysis of the climatological data revealed that a UHI exists in the metropolitan area of San Juan, Puerto Rico. The data reveals a permanent urban heat island

  8. Deglaciation and postglacial treeline fluctuation in the northern San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrara, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    The San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado contain numerous lakes and bogs at and above treeline. In June 1978, Lake Emma, a tarn above present-day treeline, was suddenly drained by the collapse of underground mine workings. This study was initiated because the draining exposed a well-preserved archive of subfossil coniferous wood fragments that provided a unique opportunity to further our understanding of the paleoclimatic history of this region. These paleoclimatic studies-coniferous macrofossil identification in conjunction with radiocarbon dating, deuterium analysis of the dated conifer fragments, as well as pollen and fossil insect analyses-yielded new information regarding Holocene climate and accompanying treeline changes in the northern San Juan Mountains. This report synthesizes previously published reports by the author and other investigators, and unpublished information of the author bearing on late Pleistocene and Holocene treeline and climate in this region. Retreat of the glacier that occupied the upper Animas River valley from its Pinedale terminal position began about 19.4 + or - 1.5 10Be thousands of years ago and was essentially complete by about 12.3 + or - 1.0 10Be thousands of years ago. Two sets of late Pleistocene cirque moraines were identified in the northern San Juan Mountains. The older set is widespread and probably correlates with the Younger Dryas (11,000-10,000 radiocarbon years before present; 12,800-11,500 calendar years). The younger set is found only in the Grenadier Range and represents remnant glacier ice lying in well-shaded niches in a mountain range undergoing rapid deglaciation. A snowbank at the northern base of this range appears to be fronted by a Little Ice Age moraine. Soon after deglaciation the average July temperature is estimated to have been about 5°C cooler and timberline about 650 meters lower than at present. However, timberline (and treeline) responded rapidly to the postglacial warming and reached

  9. Profile of prospective bioengineering students at National University of San Juan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, N.; Puzzella, A.; Zabala, A.; Demartini, H.; Alborch, A.; Cabrera, L.

    2007-11-01

    The low percentage of students (43 % of applicants) that passed the entrance exams for the bioengineering career at the National University of San Juan in 2007, plus the historical situation of desertion in first year (about 50%), motivated the application of a diagnostic test to prospective students of this career. The aim of this test was to obtain information about the competences acquired by students to solve problems in different contexts using basic mathematical tools, reading comprehension skills to understand texts, graphs and tables. Although this test was sat by the entire population of applicants of the current school year, only the results belonging to bioengineering students are the ones presented for the purpose of this work. However, students of other disciplines of the school of engineering also have similar problems. From the analysis of the answers to the different items, it can be observed that there are serious difficulties in the development of basic capacities to successfully take the courses of this career.

  10. Mineralogy and chemistry of massive sulfide deposits from the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, R.A.; Clague, D.A.; Oudin, E.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of massive sulphide were dredged from one of the six vent sites located in the axial valley of the southern Juan de Fuca ridge. Type A samples are angular slabs of dark grey Zn-rich sulphide with interlayers and a thin, partly-oxidized crust of Fe-sulphide. These layered sulphide aggregates appear to be fragments of a sulphide wall enclosing an active hydrothermal vent. The outer sulphide wall is composed of colloform Fe sulphide and Fe-poor sphalerite deposited under low-T conditions when sea-water and hydrothermal fluid mix above the discharge point. Inside the wall the intensifying hydrothermal sytem deposits a higher-T assemblage of granular Fe-rich sphalerite, wurtzite, pyrite and minor Cu-Fe sulphide. Type B sulphide samples are sub-rounded, spongy-textured fragments composed almost entirely of dendritic aggregates of pale Fe-poor colloform sphalerite and opaline silica. This type of sulphide is deposited in settings peripheral to sites of focused discharge and in open spaces by moderate- to low-T fluid discharging at a slow but variable rate; the fluid becomes increasingly oxidizing, resulting in late-stage deposits of hematite, baryte and sulphur.-L.di H.

  11. Acoustic mapping of diffuse flow at a seafloor hydrothermal site: Monolith Vent, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, P. A.; Jackson, D. R.; Wen, T.; Jones, C.; Mitsuzawa, K.; Bemis, K. G.; Dworski, J. G.

    Diffuse flow of hydrothermal solutions commonly occurs in patchy areas up to tens of meters in diameter in seafloor hydrothermal fields. It is recognized as a quantitatively significant component of thermal and chemical fluxes, yet is elusive to map. We report a new acoustic method to detect and map areas of diffuse flow using phase-coherent correlation techniques. The sonar system was modified to record phase information and mounted on DSV SEA CLIFF. The submersible occupied a stationary position on the seafloor and the transducer scanned the seafloor surrounding Monolith Vent, a sulfide edifice venting black smokers, at a nominal range of 17 m at a depth of 2249 m on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Patchy areas of uncorrelated returns clearly stood out from a background of returns that exhibited ping-to-ping correlation. The areas of uncorrelated returns coincided with areas of diffuse flow as mapped by a video survey with the Navy's Advanced Tethered Vehicle (ATV). Correlated returns were backscattered from invariant seafloor. Uncorrelated returns were distorted by index of refraction inhomogeneities as they passed through diffuse flow between the seafloor and the transducer. The acoustic method presented can synoptically map areas of diffuse flow. When combined with standard in situ measurement and sampling methods the acoustic mapping will facilitate accurate determination of diffuse thermal and chemical fluxes in seafloor hydrothermal fields.

  12. Hydrological response to a seafloor spreading episode on the Juan de Fuca ridge.

    PubMed

    Davis, Earl; Becker, Keir; Dziak, Robert; Cassidy, John; Wang, Kelin; Lilley, Marvin

    2004-07-15

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems are known to respond to seismic and magmatic activity along mid-ocean ridges, often resulting in locally positive changes in hydrothermal discharge rate, temperature and microbial activity, and shifts in composition occurring at the time of earthquake swarms and axial crustal dike injections. Corresponding regional effects have also been observed. Here we present observations of a hydrological response to seafloor spreading activity, which resulted in a negative formation-fluid pressure transient during and after an earthquake swarm in the sediment-sealed igneous crust of the Middle Valley rift of the northernmost Juan de Fuca ridge. The observations were made with a borehole seal and hydrologic observatory originally established in 1991 to study the steady-state pressure and temperature conditions in this hydrothermally active area. The magnitude of the co-seismic response is consistent with the elastic strain that would be expected from the associated earthquakes, but the prolonged negative pressure transient after the swarm is surprising and suggests net co-seismic dilatation of the upper, permeable igneous crust. The rift valley was visited four weeks after the onset of the seismic activity, but no signature of increased hydrothermal activity was detected in the water column. It appears that water, not magma, filled the void left by this spreading episode.

  13. Preliminary geologic map of the Beautiful Mountain anticline, San Juan County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaumont, E.C.

    1954-01-01

    The Beautiful Mountain anticline is on the Navajo Indian Reservation in western San Juan County, N. Mex., near the Arizona-New Mexico State line; it lies along tbe western side of the Chuska Valley at the foot of the Chuska Mountains. Most of the area of this report is characterized by low, sharp relief. Beautiful Mountain, a buttelike outlier of the Chuska Mountains, contrasts strikingly with the otherwise low relief of the area--it rises above the western flank of the anticline to an alutude of nearly 9,000 feet. The general form of the partly breached anticlinal structure is expressed in the topography sharply delineated cuestas, mesas, buttes, and promontories, all capped by the resistant sandstone beds of the Tocito sandstone lentil of rhe Mancos shale. This report shows the distribution and thickness of the sedimentary rocks exposed in the area of the Beautiful Mountain anticline and the conformation of the anticline as represented by structure contours drawn on the top of the Dakota sandstone.

  14. Numerical modeling of phase separation at Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shreya; Lowell, Robert P.; Lewis, Kayla C.

    2013-10-01

    Before being disrupted by a magmatic event in 1999, the vent temperatures and salinities along the axis of the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge exhibited a quasi-steady spatial gradient in which the southern vent fluids were hotter and less saline than the northern vent fluids. We present 2-D numerical models of two phase flow in a NaCl-H2O system to understand these gradients. We consider homogenous permeability models with a range of bottom boundary temperature distributions and heterogeneous permeability models by imposing layer 2A extrusives with a constant bottom boundary temperature distribution. The aim is to understand the impact of both bottom boundary temperature and layer 2A permeability on hydrothermal fluids and to determine what combination of these controlling factors could cause the observed trend. We find that variations in bottom boundary temperature alone cannot explain the span of surface temperatures and salinities measured at the Main Endeavour Field. Heterogeneous permeability within layer 2A that has higher overall permeability in the northern part of the vent field than the southern part can reproduce the observed north to south temperature gradient, but such a permeability distribution cannot reproduce the observed salinity gradient. We conclude that both deep-seated heterogeneous permeability, perhaps localized by a fault zone, and a heterogeneous layer 2A are required to produce the trend of temperatures and salinities in vent fluids at the Main Endeavour Field prior to the 1999 event.

  15. A hydrographic transient above the Salty Dawg hydrothermal field, Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, J. P.; McDuff, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    During systematic repeat hydrography cruises to the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the summers of 2004, 2005, and 2006, we encountered a transient increase in the water column heat content above the Salty Dawg hydrothermal field. First observed in July 2005 and mapped in greater detail in August 2005, this feature was not a typical event or megaplume since potential temperature anomalies were continuously elevated from the plume top to the seafloor. During the summer of 2005, the heat content in the waters above Salty Dawg was elevated ˜30 TJ, and the plume top was over 150 m higher in the water column than the other years measured. Based on scaling analyses, an order of magnitude increase in the volume flux from Salty Dawg would be required to generate a neutrally buoyant plume of this size. This observation was unexpected because no substantial earthquakes were detected in the time frame of this increased heat flux. The duration of the transient suggests possible forcing mechanisms: advancement of a cracking front, a small-scale dike intrusion, aseismic crustal movement, fracture of a flow constriction to a previously unaccessible reservoir, an increase of heat in an underlying magma chamber, or movement of melt within the axial magma chamber. The transient disappeared before returning in August 2006, likely due to thermal expansion of shallow host rock, decreasing the permeability. Should such increases in seafloor heat flux prove to be common, the rate of hydrothermal cooling could be faster than previously thought.

  16. Sultan Mountain mine, western San Juan Mountains, Colorado: A fluid inclusion and stable isotope study

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrave, J.A. ); Thompson, T.B. . Dept. of Earth Resources)

    1991-01-01

    The Sultan Mountain (SM) mine, in the western San Juan Mountains of Colorado, has produced Cu-Pb-Zn-Ag-Au ores from the mid-1870s until the 1950s. Production was from veins filling faults and fissures along the southern margin of the Silverton caldera. The principal host rock to the veins is a quartz monzonite stock. Five periods of hypogene mineralization have been recognized: (1) early quartz-pyrite; (2) quartz-pyrite; (3) rhodochrosite-siderite; (4) main ore-stage chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite, galena, sphalerite, and gold; and (5) quartz-fluorite. Evidence of open-space filling (banding, crustification, vugs) is widespread. Heating studies of fluid inclusions in quartz, rhodochrosite-siderite, sphalerite, and fluorite indicate temperatures were approximately 200 C for stages 1 to 4 and 186 C for stage 5. Stages 1, 2, and 4 show evidence of boiling. Crushing studies indicate that high-pressure gas, probably CO[sub 2], is present in the fluid inclusions. Freezing point depression estimates of salinity, corrected for CO[sub 2], indicate a range of 13.6 to 1.3 wt percent NaCl equiv. These data together with P-V-T data for saline solutions and P[sub CO[sub 2

  17. Basement-cover interaction in post-Mississippian folds in the San Juan Mountains, southwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, W.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    In the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado, a Cambrian-Mississippian cratonic succession (generally <100 m thick) of clastic and carbonate rocks unconformably overlies a variety of Precambrian basement rocks and structures. Basement and cover strata are broken by steep faults that were reactivated episodically during Cambrian, Devonian-Mississippian and later. On the block between the Coal Bank Pass and Snowdon faults, folded Paleozoic strata overlies a vertically dipping Precambrian succession of alternate units of quartzite and metapelite (each [approximately]150 to 250 m thick); average angular discordance is [approximately]90[degree] at the sub-Cambrian unconformity. Gently plunging anticlines and synclines in Paleozoic strata are distributed systematically with respect to five successive lithologic contacts in the quartzite-metapelite succession; wavelength of the folds in Paleozoic rocks correspond to thickness of the quartzite and metapelite units. The systematic location of anticlines over metapelites and synclines over quartzites suggests that the structural relief of the anticlines was filled by vertical upward extension of metapelite parallel with foliation. A possible mechanism includes subhorizontal compression at a high angle to strike of the quartzite-metapelite, layer-perpendicular shortening and layer-parallel upward ductile extension of the metapelite, and folding of the Paleozoic strata. Folding of the Paleozoic strata probably reflects passive draping over the upward-extending metapelite, but a component of buckle folding with axes perpendicular to compression is also possible.

  18. Helium as a tracer for fluids released from Juan de Fuca lithosphere beneath the Cascadia forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, P. A.; Constantz, J. E.; Hunt, A. G.; Blair, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Helium isotopic ratios (3He/4He) observed in 25 mineral springs and wells above the Cascadia forearc provide a marker for fluids derived from Juan de Fuca lithosphere. This exploratory study documents a significant component of mantle-derived helium within forearc springs and wells, and in turn, documents variability in helium enrichment across the Cascadia forearc. Sample sites arcward of the forearc mantle corner generally yield significantly higher ratios (˜1.2-4.0 RA) than those seaward of the corner (˜0.03-0.7 RA). 3He detected above the inner forearc mantle wedge may represent a mixture of both oceanic lithosphere and forearc mantle sources, whereas 3He detected seaward of the forearc mantle corner likely has only an oceanic source. The highest ratios in the Cascadia forearc coincide with slab depths (˜40-45 km) where metamorphic dehydration of young oceanic lithosphere is expected to release significant fluid and where tectonic tremor occurs, whereas little fluid is expected to be released from the slab depths (˜25-30 km) beneath sites seaward of the corner. These observations provide independent evidence that tremor is associated with deep fluids, and further suggest that high pore pressures associated with tremor may serve to keep fractures open for 3He migration through the ductile upper mantle and lower crust.

  19. Geochemistry of some gases in hydrothermal fluids from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, William C.; White, L.D.; Rapp, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Five samples of hydrothermal fluids from two vent areas on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge were analyzed for dissolved gases. Concentrations in the end-member hydrothermal fluid of H2 (270-527 ??mol/kg), CH4 (82-118 ??mol/kg), and CO2 (3920-4460 ??mol/kg) are well above values in ambient seawater and are similar to concentrations reported for other ridge crest hydrothermal systems. The carbon isotopic ratios of the CH4(??13C=-17.8 to -20.8) and CO2(??13C=-3.6 to -4.7) suggest that at least some of the CH4 and CO2 in the fluids is basalt-derived. The range of ??13C values for the basalt-derived CO2 is -6.8 to -9.7, calculated by assuming conservation of recharge ??CO2 during hydrothermal circulation. Apparent temperatures of equilibration between the CH4 and the basalt-derived CO2 range from 640??C to 750??C. Small amounts of ethane (C2H6/CH4??? 0.9 ?? 10-3-2.2 ?? 10-3), propane, and butane detected in the samples may also have formed in the basalt. One sample of almost pure (95.5%) hydrothermal fluid contained a significant fraction, up to 63% and 74%, respectively, of the recharge Ar and N2. This suggests that the fluid has not undergone extensive vapor-liquid phase separation. -Authors

  20. Heat Flux From the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, W. J.; McDuff, R. E.; Stahr, F. R.; Yoerger, D. R.; Jakuba, M.

    2005-12-01

    The very essence of a hydrothermal system is transfer of heat by a convecting fluid, yet the flux of heat remains a poorly known quantity. Past studies of heat flux consisted primarily of point measurements of temperature and fluid flow at individual vent sites and inventories of the neutrally buoyant plume above the field. In 2000 the Flow Mow project used the Autonomous Benthic Explorer (ABE) to determine heat flux from Main Endeavour Field (MEF) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge by intersecting the stems of rising buoyant plumes. ABE carries instruments to measure conductivity, temperature and depth, and a MAVS current meter to determine the vertical velocity of the fluid, after correcting for vehicle motion. Complementary work on horizontal fluxes suggests that the vertical flux measured by ABE includes both the primary high buoyancy focused "smoker" sources and also entrained diffuse flow. In 2004, ABE was again used to determine heat flux not only from MEF, but also from the other four fields in the Endeavour Segment RIDGE 2000 Integrated Study Site. In this four year interval the flux of heat from MEF has declined by approximately a factor of two. The High Rise vent field has the greatest heat flux, followed by MEF, then Mothra, Salty Dawg and Sasquatch (of order 500, 300, 100, 50 MW respectively; heat flux at Sasquatch was below detection).

  1. Microbial community structure across fluid gradients in the Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal system.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rika E; Beltrán, Mónica Torres; Hallam, Steven J; Baross, John A

    2013-02-01

    Physical and chemical gradients are dominant factors in shaping hydrothermal vent microbial ecology, where archaeal and bacterial habitats encompass a range between hot, reduced hydrothermal fluid and cold, oxidized seawater. To determine the impact of these fluid gradients on microbial communities inhabiting these systems, we surveyed bacterial and archaeal community structure among and between hydrothermal plumes, diffuse flow fluids, and background seawater in several hydrothermal vent sites on the Juan de Fuca Ridge using 16S rRNA gene diversity screening (clone libraries and terminal restriction length polymorphisms) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods. Community structure was similar between hydrothermal plumes and background seawater, where a number of taxa usually associated with low-oxygen zones were observed, whereas high-temperature diffuse fluids exhibited a distinct phylogenetic profile. SUP05 and Arctic96BD-19 sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were prevalent in all three mixing regimes where they exhibited overlapping but not identical abundance patterns. Taken together, these results indicate conserved patterns of redox-driven niche partitioning between hydrothermal mixing regimes and microbial communities associated with sinking particles and oxygen-deficient waters. Moreover, the prevalence of SUP05 and Arctic96BD-19 in plume and diffuse flow fluids indicates a more cosmopolitan role for these groups in the ecology and biogeochemistry of the dark ocean.

  2. Hydrological response to a seafloor spreading episode on the Juan de Fuca ridge.

    PubMed

    Davis, Earl; Becker, Keir; Dziak, Robert; Cassidy, John; Wang, Kelin; Lilley, Marvin

    2004-07-15

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems are known to respond to seismic and magmatic activity along mid-ocean ridges, often resulting in locally positive changes in hydrothermal discharge rate, temperature and microbial activity, and shifts in composition occurring at the time of earthquake swarms and axial crustal dike injections. Corresponding regional effects have also been observed. Here we present observations of a hydrological response to seafloor spreading activity, which resulted in a negative formation-fluid pressure transient during and after an earthquake swarm in the sediment-sealed igneous crust of the Middle Valley rift of the northernmost Juan de Fuca ridge. The observations were made with a borehole seal and hydrologic observatory originally established in 1991 to study the steady-state pressure and temperature conditions in this hydrothermally active area. The magnitude of the co-seismic response is consistent with the elastic strain that would be expected from the associated earthquakes, but the prolonged negative pressure transient after the swarm is surprising and suggests net co-seismic dilatation of the upper, permeable igneous crust. The rift valley was visited four weeks after the onset of the seismic activity, but no signature of increased hydrothermal activity was detected in the water column. It appears that water, not magma, filled the void left by this spreading episode. PMID:15254534

  3. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and paleontology of lower Eocene San Jose formation, central San Juan basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, S.G.; Smith, L.N. )

    1989-09-01

    The lower Eocene San Jose Formation in the central portion of the San Juan basin (Gobernador-Vigas Canyon area) consists of the Cuba Mesa, Regina, Llaves, and Tapicitos Members. Well log data indicate that, from its 100-m thickness, the Cuba Mesa Member thins toward the basin center and pinches out to the northeast by lat. 36{degree}40'N, long. 107{degree}19'W. The Regina Member has the most extensive outcrops in the central basin, and it decreases in sandstone/mud rock ratio to the north. The Llaves and Tapicitos Members occur only at the highest elevations, are thin due to erosion, and are not mappable as separate units. Well log data and 1,275 m of measured stratigraphic section in the Regina, Llaves, and Tapicitos Members indicate these strata are composed of approximately 35% medium to coarse-grained sandstone and 65% fine-grained sandstone and mud rock. Sedimentology and sediment-dispersal patterns indicate deposition by generally south-flowing streams that had sources to the northwest, northeast, and east. Low-sinuosity, sand-bedded, braided( ) streams shifted laterally across about 1 km-wide channel belts to produce sheet sandstones that are prominent throughout the San Jose Formation. Subtle levees separated channel environments from floodplain and local lacustrine areas. Avulsion relocated channels periodically to areas on the floodplain, resulting in the typically disconnected sheet sandstones within muddy overbank deposits of the Regina Member.

  4. Near-axis crustal structure and thickness of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soule, Dax; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Weekly, Robert T.

    2016-06-01

    A model of crustal thickness and lower crustal velocities is obtained for crustal ages of 0.1-1.2 Ma on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge by inverting travel times of crustal paths and non-ridge-crossing wide-angle Moho reflections obtained from a three-dimensional tomographic experiment. The crust is thicker by 0.5-1 km beneath a 200 m high plateau that extends across the segment center. This feature is consistent with the influence of the proposed Heckle melt anomaly on the spreading center. The history of ridge propagation on the Cobb overlapping spreading center may also have influenced the formation of the plateau. The sharp boundaries of the plateau and crustal thickness anomaly suggest that melt transport is predominantly upward in the crust. Lower crustal velocities are lower at the ends of the segment, likely due to increased hydrothermal alteration in regions influenced by overlapping spreading centers, and possibly increased magmatic differentiation.

  5. From surfaces to magnetic properties: special section dedicated to Juan Rojo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascaraque, A.; Rodríguez de la Fuente, O.; González-Barrio, Miguel A.

    2013-12-01

    Surface physics and magnetism, in particular the connection between surface defects, reduced dimensionality or size, crystal structure, electronic density of states and the mechanical and magnetic properties of solids, were always at the core of Juan Rojo's scientific interest and output. Both fields seem to meet at the nanoscale, a privileged playing field which is ideal for testing theoretical concepts, exploring new physics or probing a wealth of new, stunning and unheard-of applications. Upon reducing size or dimensionality, either in bulk systems or in thin films, surfaces and surface effects are telling. Thus, for instance, an ultra-thin coating can make nanoparticles of non-magnetic materials exhibit magnetic behaviour; or atomic steps can modify the local mechanical properties of a metallic single crystal. In this special section there are eight invited papers by disciples and close collaborators of Juan Rojo, that cover an ample spectrum of the above mentioned topics. The first paper, by Palacio et al, investigates the temperature and oxygen partial pressure conditions for FeO mono- and bi-layer growth on Ru(0001). The following paper, by Cortés-Gil et al, reports on the dramatic change in the electric resistivity of the manganite perovskite (La0.5Ca0.5)z MnO3 as a function of Ca content, an effect related to the removal of a charge-ordered state and a magnetic transition. Baeza et al study biomaterials for bone cancer treatment and skeletal reinforcing, as well as targeted magnetic nanoparticles used for intracell hyperthermia in cancer therapies. In the following paper, Marcano et al, assisted by a multi-technique approach, revisit the extraordinarily rich magnetic phase diagram of the Kondo system CeNi1- x Cux down to 100 mK temperatures. The magnetic field dependence of the martensitic transition temperature of the meta-magnetic shape memory alloy Ni50Mn34.5In15.5 in a crystalline and amorphous phase, in fields up to 13 T, is the subject of the paper

  6. Ichthyophonus in Puget Sound rockfish from the San Juan Islands archipelago and Puget Sound, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halos, D.; Hart, S.A.; Hershberger, P.; Kocan, R.

    2005-01-01

    In vitro explant cultures identified Ichthyophonus in 10.9% of 302 Puget Sound rockfish Sebastes emphaeus sampled from five sites in the San Juan Islands archipelago and Puget Sound, Washington, in 2003. None of the infected fish exhibited visible lesions and only a single fish was histologically positive. Significantly more females were infected (12.4%) than males (6.8%), and while infected males were only detected at two of the five sites, infected females were identified at all sites, with no significant differences in infection prevalence. Genomic sequences of Ichthyophonus isolates obtained from Puget Sound rockfish, Pacific herring Clupea pallasii, and Yukon River Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were identical in both the A and B regions of the small subunit 18S ribosomal DNA but were different from Ichthyophonus sequences previously isolated from four different species of rockfish from the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Ichthyophonus in Puget Sound rockfish may not have been previously detected because the infection is subclinical in this species and earlier investigators did not utilize in vitro techniques for diagnosis of ichthyophoniasis. However, since clinical ichthyophoniasis has recently been identified in several other species of northeast Pacific rockfishes, it is hypothesized that this either is an emerging disease resulting from changing marine conditions or the result of introduction by infected southern species that appear during periodic El Nin??o events. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  7. Hydrogeologic characteristics of the Lee Acres Landfill Area, San Juan County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peter, K.D.; Williams, R.A.; King, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    Identification of the presence of volatile organic compounds in liquid-waste lagoons in New Mexico at the Lee Acres landfill, beneath a refinery south of the landfill, and in nearby residential wells has led to an hydrologic investigation of the area. The alluvium underlying an arroyo adjacent to the landfill mostly consists of fine to coarse quartz sand with some silt, gravel, and clay zones. Thickness of the alluvium measured in 12 drill holes ranged from 13.7 to 61.5 ft. A seismic survey indicates that buried channels are incised as much as 26 ft into the bedrock surface in some areas. The depth to water in seven piezometers ranged from 26.6 to 34.9 ft. The configuration of the water table in the alluvium indicates that groundwater flow is controlled by unidentified recharge north of the landfill, recharge from a pond southeast of the landfill, discharge to pumping wells, discharge to the alluvium of the San Juan River south of the study area, and hydraulic conductivity of the alluvial material. There also may be additional recharge to or discharge from the underlying Nacimiento Formation and recharge from runoff in the arroyo. Terrain-conductivity measurements indicate that the water in the alluvium southwest of the landfill may be more conductive than water in the underlying sandstone. (USGS)

  8. From surfaces to magnetic properties: special section dedicated to Juan Rojo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascaraque, A.; Rodríguez de la Fuente, O.; González-Barrio, Miguel A.

    2013-12-01

    Surface physics and magnetism, in particular the connection between surface defects, reduced dimensionality or size, crystal structure, electronic density of states and the mechanical and magnetic properties of solids, were always at the core of Juan Rojo's scientific interest and output. Both fields seem to meet at the nanoscale, a privileged playing field which is ideal for testing theoretical concepts, exploring new physics or probing a wealth of new, stunning and unheard-of applications. Upon reducing size or dimensionality, either in bulk systems or in thin films, surfaces and surface effects are telling. Thus, for instance, an ultra-thin coating can make nanoparticles of non-magnetic materials exhibit magnetic behaviour; or atomic steps can modify the local mechanical properties of a metallic single crystal. In this special section there are eight invited papers by disciples and close collaborators of Juan Rojo, that cover an ample spectrum of the above mentioned topics. The first paper, by Palacio et al, investigates the temperature and oxygen partial pressure conditions for FeO mono- and bi-layer growth on Ru(0001). The following paper, by Cortés-Gil et al, reports on the dramatic change in the electric resistivity of the manganite perovskite (La0.5Ca0.5)z MnO3 as a function of Ca content, an effect related to the removal of a charge-ordered state and a magnetic transition. Baeza et al study biomaterials for bone cancer treatment and skeletal reinforcing, as well as targeted magnetic nanoparticles used for intracell hyperthermia in cancer therapies. In the following paper, Marcano et al, assisted by a multi-technique approach, revisit the extraordinarily rich magnetic phase diagram of the Kondo system CeNi1- x Cux down to 100 mK temperatures. The magnetic field dependence of the martensitic transition temperature of the meta-magnetic shape memory alloy Ni50Mn34.5In15.5 in a crystalline and amorphous phase, in fields up to 13 T, is the subject of the paper

  9. Sound field near hydrothermal vents on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Little, S.A.; Stolzenbach, K.D.; Purdy, G.M.

    1990-08-10

    High-quality acoustic noise measurements were obtained by two hydrophones located 3 m and 40 m from an active hydrothermal vent on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an effort to determine the feasibility of monitoring hydrothermal vent activity through flow noise generation. Most of the measured noise field could be attributed to ambient ocean noise sources of microseisms, distant shipping, and weather, punctuated by local ships and biological sources. Long-period, low-velocity, water/rock interface waves were detected with high amplitudes which rapidly decayed with distance from the seafloor. Detection of vent signals was hampered by unexpected spatial nonstationarity due to the shadowing effects of the calders wall. No continuous vent signals were deemed significant based on a criterion of 90% probability of detection and 5% probability of false alarm. However, a small signal near 40 Hz, with a power level of 0.0001 Pa sq/Hz was noticed on two records taken within 3 m of the Inferno black smoker. The frequency of this signal is consistent with predictions, and the power level suggests the occurrence of jet noise amplification due to convected density inhomogeneities. Keywords: Seamounts; Flow noise; Underwater acoustics; Acoustic measurement; Geothermy/noise; Ocean ridges; Underwater sound signals; Reprints; North Pacific Ocean. (EDC).

  10. Chemistry of hydrothermal solutions from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Von Damm, K.L.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1987-10-10

    Fluids from three vent fields on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge were sampled in September 1984 using the DSRV Alvin. The fluids are uniquely high in both chloride, which ranges up to twice the seawater value, and in metal content. Simple vapor-liquid phase separation could not have produced both the high chlorinity and gas concentrations observed in these fluids. The cause of the elevated chlorinity can not be uniquely identified but may be the result of either or a combination of two processes: (1) subsurface formation of a degassed brine and subsequent mixing of a small amount of this brine with a hydrothermal seawater which has not undergone a phase separation and (2) dissolution of a chloride-rich phase combined with a possible small loss of gas during sampling procedures. Although measured temperatures were all less than 300 /sup 0/C, quartz geothermometry suggests that the fluids have equilibrated at greater than 340 /sup 0/C. Quartz geobarometry is also in agreement with geophysical estimates of depth to the local magma chamber. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  11. Hydrothermal fluid effects on sediment column in Middle Valley, Juan de Fuca Ridge (northeast Pacific)

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Aasm, I.S.; Blaise, B.

    1987-05-01

    Core PAR 85-34, located near a high heat flow area in Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, contains carbonate nodules of various sizes (less than or equal to 1-5 cm in length). Sedimentological, geochemical, and isotopic results allow us to understand the origin of these concretions and the effects of hydrothermal activity from nearby sulfide vents on the sediment column. The mineralogy of the olive-gray surface sediment (0-15 cm) is identical to unaffected hemipelagic sediments in the region except for a concentration of barite crystals (up to 1 cm) at the water-sediment interface. In the clay, mud fraction, and bulk sediment, the FeO, S, Ba, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and As are more enriched than in normal hemipelagic sediment in the area due to hydrothermal activity. Petrographic and SEM analysis of the nodules reveal iron calcite and barite minerals in cracks and on the outside part of the nodules with mineralogical and textural variations downcore. Stable isotope curves of these nodules appear to demonstrate the effects of both bacterial sulfate reduction and microbiological methane generation, with consequent extreme /sup 13/C-depletion in the precipitated carbonate. The curves also demonstrate that the hydrothermal fluid entering the system may have caused the negative shift in oxygen isotopes downcore, although this effect may have been of cyclic or episodic nature.

  12. Metals and isotopes in Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal fluids and their associated solid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkley, T.K.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1987-10-10

    The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratio of the hydrothermal solution (HTS) (0.7034) is larger than that of basalt (0.7025) at the southern vent field of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (SJFR). Both the Sr isotopic ratio for HTS and the water/rock interaction ratio lie between those at two sites farther south on the East Pacific Rise, 13 /sup 0/N and 21 /sup 0/N. These parameters may be closely related to subsurface temperatures and rates of magma ascent and to extent of faulting and surface areas of the frameworks of the hydrothermal systems. For these three Pacific Ocean sites there is no steady geographical progression of these measured parameters, nor of reported spreading rate, with increasing latitude northward. Pb and Nd isotopic measurements are uniform for all samples from the SJFR, ranging only from 18.43 to 18.58 for /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb (fluids and associated solids) and centering near 0.5131 for /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Nd (only fluids measured). Values for basalts and sulfides from the site have similar values. Relatively high /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb values at the SJFR suggest the potential for the existence of an anomalous radiogenic heat source in the underlying mantle material.

  13. Geochemical evaluation of upper cretaceous fruitland formation coals, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, G.E.; Anders, D.E.; Law, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    Geochemical analyses of coal samples from the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico and Colorado were used to determine thermal maturity, type of kerogen, and hydrocarbon generation potential. Mean random vitrinite reflectance (%Rm) of the Fruitland coal ranges from 0.42 to 1.54%. Rock-Eval pyrolysis data and saturated to aromatic hydrocarbon ratio indicate that the onset of thermal hydrocarbon generation begins at about 0.60% Rm and peak generation occurs at about 0.85% Rm. Several samples have hydrogen index values between 200 and 400, indicating some potential for liquid hydrocarbon generation and a mixed Type III and II kerogen. Pentacyclic and tricyclic terpanes, steranes, aromatic steroids and methylphenanthrene maturity parameters were observed through the complete range of thermal maturity in the Fruitland coals. Aromatic pentacyclic terpanes, similar to those found in brown coals of Australia, were observed in low maturity samples, but not found above 0.80% Rm. N-alkane depleted coal samples, which occur at a thermal maturity of approx. 0.90% Rm, paralleling peak hydrocarbon generation, are fairly widespread throughout the basin. Depletion of n-alkanes in these samples may be due to gas solution stripping and migration fromthe coal seams coincident with the development of pressure induced fracturing due to hydrocarbon generation; however, biodegradation may also effect these samples. ?? 1993.

  14. [Social thinking in health in Latin America: revisiting Juan César García].

    PubMed

    Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2013-09-01

    The article reconstitutes the social thinking in health by Argentine physician and sociologist Juan César García (1932-1984), analyzing the main publications approaching his work and activities. The article situates his thinking in the two fields that marked his production: social medicine and the social sciences from the 1960s to the late 1980s. The article highlights his work with the Pan American Health Organization and his perspective of analyzing social medicine and the social sciences by relating them not only to the Latin American historical, social, economic, and political context, but also to historical materialism: linking medicine to the social structure; the influence of the social structure on the production and distribution of diseases; internal analysis of the production of medical services; and the relationship between training of health personnel and the medical field. As demonstrated, even today his work can be a reference for the discussion of such themes as medical education, health personnel training, the role of science and technology, the social sciences in medical education, and historical aspects of public health. PMID:24068221

  15. High-resolution 40Ar 39Ar chronology of Oligocene volcanic rocks, San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The central San Juan caldera complex consists of seven calderas from which eight major ash-flow tuffs were erupted during a period of intense volcanic activity that lasted for approximately 2 m.y. about 26-28 Ma. The analytical precision of conventional K-Ar dating in this time interval is not sufficient to unambiguously resolve this complex history. However, 40Ar 39Ar incremental-heating experiments provide data for a high-resolution chronology that is consistent with stratigraphie relations. Weighted-mean age-spectrum plateau ages of biotite and sanidine are the most precise with standard deviations ranging from 0.08 to 0.21 m.y. The pooled estimate of standard deviation for the plateau ages of 12 minerals is about 0.5 percent or about 125,000 to 135,000 years. Age measurements on coexisting minerals from one tuff and on two samples of each of two other tuffs indicate that a precision in the age of a tuff of better than 100,000 years can be achieved at 27 Ma. New data indicate that the San Luis caldera is the youngest caldera in the central complex, not the Creede caldera as previously thought. ?? 1988.

  16. The nonopaque, detrital heavy mineralogy of the Morrison Formation near Crownpoint, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansley, Paula L.

    1983-01-01

    Description and quantification of the nonopaque, detrital heavy mineralogy of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the southwestern part of the San Juan Basin have helped to identify stratigraphic trends, source-area lithologies, and zones of post-depositional alteration possibly related to uranium mineralization. A synthesis of stratigraphic variations in mineral species and diversity in Morrison sandstones reveals an increasing upward igneous component, characterized by euhedral zircon and subhedral apatite. Complementing this trend, the predominantly well-rounded assemblage of the Recapture Member changes to a mixed assemblage of rounded and angular grains in the Westwater Canyon Member. Overall, the low diversity in mineral species indicates a sedimentary, low- to medium-grade-metamorphic, and acid igneous parentage for Morrison sediments; however, post-depositional processes have played a significant role in determining the present mineralogy. The roles that diagenesis and weathering have played in determining the present aspect of the assemblage, which is a mature garnet-zircon-apatite-tourmaline suite, cannot be overemphasized. For instance, the presence of authigenically etched to skeletal garnet and staurolite implies that entire grains have been destroyed. Comparison of cores with measured sections indicates that near-surface weathering has caused the destruction of some minerals, notably apatite, sensitive to acidic conditions. Therefore, in order to interpret the sedimentology, stratigraphic intervals in which post-depositional processes have affected the mineralogy were identified. These diagenetic zones may prove to be most useful in delineating the past movements and compositions of interstitial, possibly ore-forming, fluids.

  17. Progress in SLR-GPS co-location at San Juan (Argentina) station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luis, Hernan; Rojas, Alvis; Adarvez, Sonia; Quinteros, Johana; Cobos, Pablo; Aracena, Andrés; Pacheco, Ana M.; Podestá, Ricardo; Actis, Eloy V.; Li, Jinzeng; Yin, Zhiqiang; Wang, Rui; Huang, Dongping; Márquez, Raúl

    2012-08-01

    From February, 2006, performing a Cooperation Agreement with National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Observatorio Astronómico Félix Aguilar (OAFA) of Universidad Nacional de San Juan (UNSJ) is operating a SLR System (ILRS 7406 Station). From the beginning of 2012 a GPS Aztech - Micro Z CGRS is operative at the same place, which made the SLR - GPS co - location possible. The prior objective is to reach co - location between both techniques, so the Station became of 1st order in ITRF net. For that we study and adopt an appropriate strategy to select and place Survey Control Points that ensures higher precision in determination of 3D vectors between the selected reference point s. Afterwards we perform translocation tasks of receptor and antenna checking that the GPS verifies builder standards. Then we design and compensate survey control network, by means of software of our own draught. We expect to obtain definitive local ties with precision better than 3 mm, as suggested by IERS for co - located stations. There are very few stations with co - located spatial techniques in the Southern Hemisphere, so it is of great importance to have one in Argentina for improve our participation in IERS on the new realizations of ITRF from now on.

  18. Tidal Triggering and Statistical Patterns of Microseismicity at Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Dziak, R. P.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Haxel, J. H.; Mann, M. E.; Pennington, C.; Weis, J.; Womack, N.; Levy, S.

    2015-12-01

    Tidal stress changes are known to modulate the timing of microearthquakes within many mid-ocean ridge volcanic systems. At Axial Volcano, located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, earthquakes occur preferentially when volumetric extension peaks near times of low ocean tide. Autonomous ocean-bottom hydrophone (OBH, 2007-2011) and cabled ocean bottom seismometer (OBS, Nov. 2014-) data are used to quantify the strength of tidal triggering in time periods before the April 2011 and April 2015 eruptions at Axial Volcano. The mean percent excess at times of low ocean-tide is ~14% (16% std) in the four years prior to the 2011 eruption and ~18% (17% std) in the five months prior to the 2015 eruption. The sensitivity of earthquakes to tidal stress does not evolve systematically prior to either eruption; however, this pattern is disturbed by much larger stress changes associated with the onset of dike intrusion. Following dike injection and eruption, seismicity rates drop sharply. As seismicity rates continue to rise in the months following the 2015 eruption, real-time data available from the cabled OBS network will be used quantify temporal patterns in microearthquake activity as dike induced stresses are relaxed and the magma chamber inflates.

  19. Characterization of the dengue outbreak in Nuevo Leon state, Mexico, 2010.

    PubMed

    Leduc-Galindo, D; Gloria-Herrera, U; Rincón-Herrera, U; Ramos-Jiménez, J; Garcia-Luna, S; Arellanos-Soto, D; Mendoza-Tavera, N; Tavitas-Aguilar, I; Garcia-Garcia, E; Galindo-Galindo, E; Villarreal-Perez, J; Fernandez-Salas, I; Santiago, G A; Muñoz-Jordan, J; Rivas-Estilla, A M

    2015-04-01

    We studied serotypes circulating dengue virus (DENV) cases, entomological Breteau index, rain-fall index and epidemiology of groups affected during the 2010 outbreak in Nuevo Leon, Mexico. From 2,271 positive cases, 94% were dengue classic and 6% dengue hemorrhagic fever; DENV1 was mainly isolated (99%) (Central-American lineage of American-African-genotype). We found correlation between two environmental phenomena (Increment of rainfall and vector-indexes) (p ≤ 0.05) with epidemiological, clinical and risk of DENV-1 ongoing transmission.

  20. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  1. Rainfall thresholds for the initiation of shallow landslides in Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Castillo, L. R. M.; Kubota, T.; Cantu Silva, I.; Hasnawir, H.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of rainfall on the occurrence of landslides depends on many factors such as landslide dimensions, kinematics or material involved. It is widely recognized that shallow landslides are usually triggered by short intense storms. Nuevo Leon state located in northeast Mexico is highly prone to the occurrence of this kind of slope failures due to its geologic, geomorphologic, climatic attributes and location, being targeted by tropical cyclones during the Atlantic hurricane season. A database of rainfall events that have resulted in shallow landslides on the region was compiled; the data indicated that there is a coincidence between the occurrence of shallow landslides and extreme rainfall events. A threshold curve in the form of I= αD-β was established to describe the threshold in where I is the rainfall intensity by rainfall event in mm/day and D is the duration of rainfall event in days. Duration of the rainfall events that triggered shallow landslides ranged from 2 to 5 days, with maximum intensity of 236 mm/day and a minimum intensity of 57.7 mm/day. From the data analyzed we could obtain a regression value of I = 109.77D-1.76 and established a new minimum rainfall intensity-duration threshold for the initiation of rainfall-induced shallow landslides that can be used for the development of a early warning system in Nuevo Leon, Mexico

  2. Assessing biodiversity in Nuevo Leon, Mexico: Are nature reserves the answer?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cantu, C.; Wright, R.G.; Scott, J.M.; Strand, Espen

    2004-01-01

    The Mexican state of Nuevo Leon, located in the northeastern portion of the country, currently has 26 state and three federal nature reserves covering approximately 4.5% of its land area. These reserves were established for a variety of reasons not necessarily related to conservation purposes. In 2000 in response to a growing concern about the lack of organized conservation reserve planning to protect the important biological and physical features of Mexico, the Mexican Commission for Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity proposed 12 new terrestrial reserves for Nuevo Leon. The new reserves, if established, would increase the proportion of protected lands in the state to almost 24% of the state's land area. We compiled a Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis using digital thematic maps of physical and ecological features to examine how well the existing and proposed reserves incorporated the major biological and physical features of the state. The existing reserves are located primarily in regions with elevations > 1,000-1,500 m, on less productive soils, and are dominated by pine and oak forest cover types. As a result, the state's dominant biotic region - low elevation coastal plain with xeric scrub vegetation - is disproportionately under represented in the current reserve system. The new reserves would expand the protection of biophysical resources throughout the state. However, the inclusion of important resources in the low elevation coastal lands would still be limited.

  3. Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Robert Balch; Tom Engler; Roger Ruan; Shaojie Ma

    2008-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable

  4. Liquefaction during the 1977 San Juan Province, Argentina earthquake (Ms = 7.4)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Youd, T.L.; Keefer, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Liquefaction effects generated by the 1977 San Juan Province, Argentina, earthquake (Ms = 7.4) are described. The larger and more abundant effects were concentrated in the 60-km long band of the lowlands in the Valle del Bermejo and in an equally long band along the Rio San Juan in the Valle de Tulum. Fissures in the Valle del Bermejo were up to several hundred meters long and up to several meters wide. Sand deposits, from boils that erupted through the fissures, covered areas up to tens of square meters. Fissures generally parallelled nearby stream channels. Because the Valle del Bermejo is undeveloped, these large features caused no damage. Liquefaction in the Valle del Tulum caused important or unusual damage at several localities, including the following five sites: (1) At the Barrio Justo P. Castro, a subdivision of Caucete, liquefaction of subsurface sediments decoupled overlying, unliquefied stiff sediments, producing a form of ground failure called "ground oscillation". The associated differential ground movements pulled apart houses and pavements in extension, while shearing curbs and buckling canal linings in compression at the same locality. (2) At the Escuela Normal, in Caucete, the roof of a 30-m long single-story classroom building shifted westward relative to the foundation. That displacement fractured and tilted columns supporting the roof. The foundation was fractured at several places, leaving open cracks, as wide as 15 mm. The cumulative width of the open cracks was 48 mm, an amount roughly equivalent to the 63 mm of offset between the roof and foundation at the east end of the building. The ground and foundation beneath the building extended (or spread) laterally opening cracks and lengthening the foundation while the roof remained in place. (3) The most spectacular damage to structures at the community of San Martin was the tilting of a 6-m high water tower and the toppling of a nearby pump house into a 1-m deep crater. Similarly, a small

  5. Late Quaternary Faulting along the San Juan de los Planes Fault Zone, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, M. M.; Coyan, J. A.; Arrowsmith, J.; Maloney, S. J.; Gutierrez, G.; Umhoefer, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    As a result of continued distributed deformation in the Gulf Extensional Province along an oblique-divergent plate margin, active normal faulting is well manifest in southeastern Baja California. By characterizing normal-fault related deformation along the San Juan de los Planes fault zone (SJPFZ) southwest of La Paz, Baja California Sur we contribute to understanding the patterns and rates of faulting along the southwest gulf-margin fault system. The geometry, history, and rate of faulting provide constraints on the relative significance of gulf-margin deformation as compared to axial system deformation. The SJPFZ is a major north-trending structure in the southern Baja margin along which we focused our field efforts. These investigations included: a detailed strip map of the active fault zone, including delineation of active scarp traces and geomorphic surfaces on the hanging wall and footwall; fault scarp profiles; analysis of bedrock structures to better understand how the pattern and rate of strain varied during the development of this fault zone; and a gravity survey across the San Juan de los Planes basin to determine basin geometry and fault behavior. The map covers a N-S swath from the Gulf of California in the north to San Antonio in the south, an area ~45km long and ~1-4km wide. Bedrock along the SJPFZ varies from Cretaceous Las Cruces Granite in the north to Cretaceous Buena Mujer Tonalite in the south and is scarred by shear zones and brittle faults. The active scarp-forming fault juxtaposes bedrock in the footwall against Late Quaternary sandstone-conglomerate. This ~20m wide zone is highly fractured bedrock infused with carbonate. The northern ~12km of the SJPFZ, trending 200°, preserves discontinuous scarps 1-2km long and 1-3m high in Quaternary units. The scarps are separated by stretches of bedrock embayed by hundreds of meters-wide tongues of Quaternary sandstone-conglomerate, implying low Quaternary slip rate. Further south, ~2 km north of the

  6. Microbial diversity within basement fluids of the sediment-buried Juan de Fuca Ridge flank.

    PubMed

    Jungbluth, Sean P; Grote, Jana; Lin, Huei-Ting; Cowen, James P; Rappé, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Despite its immense size, logistical and methodological constraints have largely limited microbiological investigations of the subseafloor basement biosphere. In this study, a unique sampling system was used to collect fluids from the subseafloor basaltic crust via a Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit (CORK) observatory at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program borehole 1301A, located at a depth of 2667 m in the Pacific Ocean on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Here, a fluid delivery line directly accesses a 3.5 million years old basalt-hosted basement aquifer, overlaid by 262 m of sediment, which serves as a barrier to direct exchange with bottom seawater. At an average of 1.2 × 10(4) cells ml(-1), microorganisms in borehole fluids were nearly an order of magnitude less abundant than in surrounding bottom seawater. Ribosomal RNA genes were characterized from basement fluids, providing the first snapshots of microbial community structure using a high-integrity fluid delivery line. Interestingly, microbial communities retrieved from different CORKs (1026B and 1301A) nearly a decade apart shared major community members, consistent with hydrogeological connectivity. However, over three sampling years, the dominant gene clone lineage changed from relatives of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator within the bacterial phylum Firmicutes in 2008 to the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group in 2009 and a lineage within the JTB35 group of Gammaproteobacteria in 2010, and statistically significant variation in microbial community structure was observed. The enumeration of different phylogenetic groups of cells within borehole 1301A fluids supported our observation that the deep subsurface microbial community was temporally dynamic.

  7. Temperature and Redox Effect on Mineral Colonization in Juan de Fuca Ridge Flank Subsurface Crustal Fluids.

    PubMed

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul M; Ramírez, Gustavo A; Haddad, Amanda G; Toner, Brandy M; Hulme, Samuel; Wheat, Charles G; Edwards, Katrina J; Orcutt, Beth N

    2016-01-01

    To examine microbe-mineral interactions in subsurface oceanic crust, we evaluated microbial colonization on crustal minerals that were incubated in borehole fluids for 1 year at the seafloor wellhead of a crustal borehole observatory (IODP Hole U1301A, Juan de Fuca Ridge flank) as compared to an experiment that was not exposed to subsurface crustal fluids (at nearby IODP Hole U1301B). In comparison to previous studies at these same sites, this approach allowed assessment of the effects of temperature, fluid chemistry, and/or mineralogy on colonization patterns of different mineral substrates, and an opportunity to verify the approach of deploying colonization experiments at an observatory wellhead at the seafloor instead of within the borehole. The Hole U1301B deployment did not have biofilm growth, based on microscopy and DNA extraction, thereby confirming the integrity of the colonization design against bottom seawater intrusion. In contrast, the Hole U1301A deployment supported biofilms dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria (43.5% of 370 16S rRNA gene clone sequences) and Gammaproteobacteria (29.3%). Sequence analysis revealed overlap in microbial communities between different minerals incubated at the Hole U1301A wellhead, indicating that mineralogy did not separate biofilm structure within the 1-year colonization experiment. Differences in the Hole U1301A wellhead biofilm community composition relative to previous studies from within the borehole using similar mineral substrates suggest that temperature and the diffusion of dissolved oxygen through plastic components influenced the mineral colonization experiments positioned at the wellhead. This highlights the capacity of low abundance crustal fluid taxa to rapidly establish communities on diverse mineral substrates under changing environmental conditions such as from temperature and oxygen. PMID:27064928

  8. In situ observations of dissolved iron and manganese in hydrothermal vent plumes, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Carol S.; Coale, Kenneth H.; Elrod, Virginia A.; Johnson, Kenneth S.; Massoth, Gary J.; Baker, Edward T.

    1994-03-01

    In situ mesaurements of dissolved manganese and total dissolved iron were conducted in hydrothermal plumes over the Juan de Fuca Ridge using a submersible chemical analyzer (Scanner). The Scanner was deployed as part of a conductivity, temperature, depth (CTD)/transmissometer rosette instrument package on both tow-yos and vertical casts during the VENTS Leg I cruise in 1989. Dissolved manganese and total dissolved iron concentrations, along with temperature and light attenuation anomalies, were determined over the ridge crest every 5 s. Discrete samples for laboratory analyses of dissolved iron II, total dissolved iron II+III and manganese were also collected. Metal to heat ratios (Me:Q) measured in situ were extremely variable in one steady state plume, while an event plume had constant Me:Q. Uniform values of Mn:Q in the event plume demonstrate that Mn behaves conservatively in the near-field plume. Variability in the Mn:Q ratios in a steady state plume indicated the presence of at least two hydrothermal sources with distinct Me:Q values. A simple mixing model shows that the contribution of Mn from high Me:Q sources, with a composition characteristic of black smoker vents, varies between 1% and 99% within the core of the steady state plume with an average value of 55%. On average, over 50% of the excess heat within the plume originates from low Me:Q ratio sources, with a composition characteristic of low-temperature, diffuse flow vent fluids. Less than 4% of the volume of hydrothermal fluids in the plume originates from black smokers. The Fe II concentrations were used to provide an estimate of plume age on a transect across the ridge axis. Plume ages were about 2.5 days on axis and greater than 12 days off axis. These plume ages were modeled to provide estimates of plume transport and horizontal diffusion and show excellent agreement with ages determined using Rn-222.

  9. Temperature and Redox Effect on Mineral Colonization in Juan de Fuca Ridge Flank Subsurface Crustal Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul M.; Ramírez, Gustavo A.; Haddad, Amanda G.; Toner, Brandy M.; Hulme, Samuel; Wheat, Charles G.; Edwards, Katrina J.; Orcutt, Beth N.

    2016-01-01

    To examine microbe-mineral interactions in subsurface oceanic crust, we evaluated microbial colonization on crustal minerals that were incubated in borehole fluids for 1 year at the seafloor wellhead of a crustal borehole observatory (IODP Hole U1301A, Juan de Fuca Ridge flank) as compared to an experiment that was not exposed to subsurface crustal fluids (at nearby IODP Hole U1301B). In comparison to previous studies at these same sites, this approach allowed assessment of the effects of temperature, fluid chemistry, and/or mineralogy on colonization patterns of different mineral substrates, and an opportunity to verify the approach of deploying colonization experiments at an observatory wellhead at the seafloor instead of within the borehole. The Hole U1301B deployment did not have biofilm growth, based on microscopy and DNA extraction, thereby confirming the integrity of the colonization design against bottom seawater intrusion. In contrast, the Hole U1301A deployment supported biofilms dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria (43.5% of 370 16S rRNA gene clone sequences) and Gammaproteobacteria (29.3%). Sequence analysis revealed overlap in microbial communities between different minerals incubated at the Hole U1301A wellhead, indicating that mineralogy did not separate biofilm structure within the 1-year colonization experiment. Differences in the Hole U1301A wellhead biofilm community composition relative to previous studies from within the borehole using similar mineral substrates suggest that temperature and the diffusion of dissolved oxygen through plastic components influenced the mineral colonization experiments positioned at the wellhead. This highlights the capacity of low abundance crustal fluid taxa to rapidly establish communities on diverse mineral substrates under changing environmental conditions such as from temperature and oxygen. PMID:27064928

  10. Microbiological characterization of post-eruption "snowblower" vents at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Julie L; Akerman, Nancy H; Proskurowski, Giora; Huber, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial processes within the subseafloor can be examined during the ephemeral and uncommonly observed phenomena known as snowblower venting. Snowblowers are characterized by the large quantity of white floc that is expelled from the seafloor following mid-ocean ridge eruptions. During these eruptions, rapidly cooling lava entrains seawater and hydrothermal fluids enriched in geochemical reactants, creating a natural bioreactor that supports a subseafloor microbial "bloom." Previous studies hypothesized that the eruption-associated floc was made by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria; however, the microbes involved were never identified. Here we present the first molecular analysis combined with microscopy of microbial communities in snowblower vents from samples collected shortly after the 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount, an active volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We obtained fluid samples and white flocculent material from active snowblower vents as well as orange flocculent material found on top of newly formed lava flows. Both flocculent types revealed diverse cell types and particulates when examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distinct archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in each sample type through Illumina tag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and through sequencing of the sulfide oxidation gene, soxB. In fluids and white floc, the dominant bacteria were sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and the dominant archaea were thermophilic Methanococcales. In contrast, the dominant organisms in the orange floc were Gammaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I. In all samples, bacteria greatly outnumbered archaea. The presence of anaerobic methanogens and microaerobic Epsilonproteobacteria in snowblower communities provides evidence that these blooms are seeded by subseafloor microbes, rather than from microbes in bottom seawater. These eruptive events thus provide a unique opportunity to observe subseafloor microbial

  11. Surficial permeability of the axial valley seafloor: Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, Casey K.; Homola, Kira L.; Johnson, H. Paul

    2013-09-01

    Hydrothermal systems at mid-ocean spreading centers play a fundamental role in Earth's geothermal budget. One underexamined facet of marine hydrothermal systems is the role that permeability of the uppermost seafloor veneer plays in the distribution of hydrothermal fluid. As both the initial and final vertical gateway for subsurface fluid circulation, uppermost seafloor permeability may influence the local spatial distribution of hydrothermal flow. A method of deriving a photomosaic from seafloor video was developed and utilized to estimate relative surface permeability in an active hydrothermal area on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The mosaic resolves seafloor geology of the axial valley seafloor at submeter resolution over an area greater than 1 km2. Results indicate that the valley walls and basal talus slope are topographically rugged and unsedimented, providing minimal resistance to fluid transmission. Elsewhere, the axial valley floor is capped by an unbroken blanket of low-permeability sediment, resisting fluid exchange with the subsurface reservoir. Active fluid emission sites were restricted to the high-permeability zone at the base of the western wall. A series of inactive fossil hydrothermal structures form a linear trend along the western bounding wall, oriented orthogonal to the spreading axis. High-temperature vent locations appear to have migrated over 100 m along-ridge-strike over the decade between surveys. While initially an expression of subsurface faulting, this spatial pattern suggests that increases in seafloor permeability from sedimentation may be at least a secondary contributing factor in regulating fluid flow across the seafloor interface.

  12. Sulfide geochronology along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, John W.; Hannington, Mark D.; Clague, David A.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Delaney, John R.; Holden, James F.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Kimpe, Linda E.

    2013-07-01

    Forty-nine hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate rock samples from the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeastern Pacific Ocean, were dated by measuring the decay of 226Ra (half-life of 1600 years) in hydrothermal barite to provide a history of hydrothermal venting at the site over the past 6000 years. This dating method is effective for samples ranging in age from ˜200 to 20,000 years old and effectively bridges an age gap between shorter- and longer-lived U-series dating techniques for hydrothermal deposits. Results show that hydrothermal venting at the active High Rise, Sasquatch, and Main Endeavour fields began at least 850, 1450, and 2300 years ago, respectively. Barite ages of other inactive deposits on the axial valley floor are between ˜1200 and ˜2200 years old, indicating past widespread hydrothermal venting outside of the currently active vent fields. Samples from the half-graben on the eastern slope of the axial valley range in age from ˜1700 to ˜2925 years, and a single sample from outside the axial valley, near the westernmost valley fault scarp is ˜5850 ± 205 years old. The spatial relationship between hydrothermal venting and normal faulting suggests a temporal relationship, with progressive younging of sulfide deposits from the edges of the axial valley toward the center of the rift. These relationships are consistent with the inward migration of normal faulting toward the center of the valley over time and a minimum age of onset of hydrothermal activity in this region of 5850 years.

  13. Microbiological characterization of post-eruption "snowblower" vents at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Julie L; Akerman, Nancy H; Proskurowski, Giora; Huber, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial processes within the subseafloor can be examined during the ephemeral and uncommonly observed phenomena known as snowblower venting. Snowblowers are characterized by the large quantity of white floc that is expelled from the seafloor following mid-ocean ridge eruptions. During these eruptions, rapidly cooling lava entrains seawater and hydrothermal fluids enriched in geochemical reactants, creating a natural bioreactor that supports a subseafloor microbial "bloom." Previous studies hypothesized that the eruption-associated floc was made by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria; however, the microbes involved were never identified. Here we present the first molecular analysis combined with microscopy of microbial communities in snowblower vents from samples collected shortly after the 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount, an active volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We obtained fluid samples and white flocculent material from active snowblower vents as well as orange flocculent material found on top of newly formed lava flows. Both flocculent types revealed diverse cell types and particulates when examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distinct archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in each sample type through Illumina tag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and through sequencing of the sulfide oxidation gene, soxB. In fluids and white floc, the dominant bacteria were sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and the dominant archaea were thermophilic Methanococcales. In contrast, the dominant organisms in the orange floc were Gammaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I. In all samples, bacteria greatly outnumbered archaea. The presence of anaerobic methanogens and microaerobic Epsilonproteobacteria in snowblower communities provides evidence that these blooms are seeded by subseafloor microbes, rather than from microbes in bottom seawater. These eruptive events thus provide a unique opportunity to observe subseafloor microbial

  14. Geology and hydrothermal evolution of the Mothra Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickson, Deborah A.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Delaney, John R.

    2007-06-01

    Detailed characterization of the Mothra Hydrothermal Field, the most southern and spatially extensive field on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, provides new insights into its geologic and hydrothermal development. Meter-scale bathymetry, side-scan sonar imagery, and direct dive observations show that Mothra is composed of six actively venting sulfide clusters spaced 40-200 m apart. Chimneys within each cluster have similar morphology and venting characteristics, and all clusters host a combination of active and extinct sulfide structures. Black smoker chimneys venting fluids above 300°C are rare, while more common lower-temperature, diffusely venting chimneys support dense colonies of macrofauna and bacterial mat. Hydrothermal sediment and extinct sulfide debris cover 10-15 m of the seafloor surrounding each vent cluster, obscuring the underlying basaltic substrate of light to moderately sedimented pillow, lobate, sheet, and chaotic flows, basalt talus, and collapse terrain. Extinct sulfide chimneys and debris between the clusters indicate that hydrothermal flow was once more widespread and that it has shifted spatially over time. The most prominent structural features in the axial valley at Mothra are regional (020°) trending faults and fissures and north-south trending collapse basins. The location of actively venting clusters within the field is controlled by (1) localization of fluid upflow along the western boundary fault zone, and diversion of these fluids by antithetic faults to feed vent clusters near the western valley wall, and (2) tapping of residual magmatic heat in the central part of the axial valley, which drives flow beneath vent clusters directly adjacent to the collapse basins 70-90 m east of the western valley wall. These processes form the basis for a model of axial valley and hydrothermal system development at Mothra, in which the field is initiated by an eruptive-diking episode and sustained through intense microseismicity

  15. Lithofacies in Twowells tongue of Dakota sandstone, southern San Juan basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dillinger, J.K. )

    1989-09-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Twowells Tongue forms the uppermost part of the Dakota Sandstone in the southern San Juan basin and represents the last minor regressive pulse in the regional Cenomanian transgression of the Late Cretaceous seaway. This widespread marine sandstone ranges in thickness from less than 15 to 98 ft in the study area between Gallup and Laguna, New Mexico. In outcrop, four major lithofacies are distinguished on the basis of sedimentologic structures and ichnofossils: (1) very silty, (2) horizontally bedded, (3) bioturbated structureless, and (4) cross-bedded sandstone. The distribution of these lithofacies suggests that depositional environments varied significantly from west to east. The very silty sandstone facies is the lowest unit in the coarsening-upward sequence of the Twowells. To the east, this facies also occurs in the middle of the tongue, indicating fluctuating depositional conditions. The horizontally bedded sandstone and bioturbated structureless sandstone facies usually occur above the very silty sandstone but randomly alternate with each other. These two facies are thinner to the east and are replaced by the cross-bedded sandstone and very silty sandstone facies. The cross-bedded sandstone facies occurs at the top of the sequence. It is scarce in the west because of erosion or non-deposition. To the east, it occurs within, and at the top of, the tongue; at one locality it composes the entire tongue. These four lithofacies formed under a wide range of energy conditions, show similarities to deposits in both shoreface and offshore marine environments, and indicate a complex depositional history for the Twowells Tongue.

  16. Microbial diversity within basement fluids of the sediment-buried Juan de Fuca Ridge flank

    PubMed Central

    Jungbluth, Sean P; Grote, Jana; Lin, Huei-Ting; Cowen, James P; Rappé, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Despite its immense size, logistical and methodological constraints have largely limited microbiological investigations of the subseafloor basement biosphere. In this study, a unique sampling system was used to collect fluids from the subseafloor basaltic crust via a Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit (CORK) observatory at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program borehole 1301A, located at a depth of 2667 m in the Pacific Ocean on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Here, a fluid delivery line directly accesses a 3.5 million years old basalt-hosted basement aquifer, overlaid by 262 m of sediment, which serves as a barrier to direct exchange with bottom seawater. At an average of 1.2 × 104 cells ml−1, microorganisms in borehole fluids were nearly an order of magnitude less abundant than in surrounding bottom seawater. Ribosomal RNA genes were characterized from basement fluids, providing the first snapshots of microbial community structure using a high-integrity fluid delivery line. Interestingly, microbial communities retrieved from different CORKs (1026B and 1301A) nearly a decade apart shared major community members, consistent with hydrogeological connectivity. However, over three sampling years, the dominant gene clone lineage changed from relatives of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator within the bacterial phylum Firmicutes in 2008 to the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group in 2009 and a lineage within the JTB35 group of Gammaproteobacteria in 2010, and statistically significant variation in microbial community structure was observed. The enumeration of different phylogenetic groups of cells within borehole 1301A fluids supported our observation that the deep subsurface microbial community was temporally dynamic. PMID:22791235

  17. Modeled Forecasts of Dengue Fever in San Juan, Puerto Rico Using NASA Satellite Enhanced Weather Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, C.; Quattrochi, D. A.; Zavodsky, B.; Case, J.

    2015-12-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is an important mosquito transmitted disease that is strongly influenced by meteorological and environmental conditions. Recent research has focused on forecasting DF case numbers based on meteorological data. However, these forecasting tools have generally relied on empirical models that require long DF time series to train. Additionally, their accuracy has been tested retrospectively, using past meteorological data. Consequently, the operational utility of the forecasts are still in question because the error associated with weather and climate forecasts are not reflected in the results. Using up-to-date weekly dengue case numbers for model parameterization and weather forecast data as meteorological input, we produced weekly forecasts of DF cases in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Each week, the past weeks' case counts were used to re-parameterize a process-based DF model driven with updated weather forecast data to generate forecasts of DF case numbers. Real-time weather forecast data was produced using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction (NWP) system enhanced using additional high-resolution NASA satellite data. This methodology was conducted in a weekly iterative process with each DF forecast being evaluated using county-level DF cases reported by the Puerto Rico Department of Health. The one week DF forecasts were accurate especially considering the two sources of model error. First, weather forecasts were sometimes inaccurate and generally produced lower than observed temperatures. Second, the DF model was often overly influenced by the previous weeks DF case numbers, though this phenomenon could be lessened by increasing the number of simulations included in the forecast. Although these results are promising, we would like to develop a methodology to produce longer range forecasts so that public health workers can better prepare for dengue epidemics.

  18. Hydrothermal fluid composition at Middle Valley, Northern Juan de Fuca Ridge: Temporal and spatial variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, Anna M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Saccocia, Peter J.; Zierenberg, Robert

    Hydrothermal fluids were collected in July 2000 from the Dead Dog and Ore Drilling Program (ODP) Mound vent fields at Middle Valley, a sediment-covered spreading center on the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge. Measured fluid temperatures varied from 187° to 281°C in focused flow vents and 40°C in ODP Hole 1035F. Cl concentrations indicate that ODP Mound fluids undergo phase separation in the subsurface, whereas Dead Dog fluids do not. The lack of phase separation at Dead Dog is consistent with other geochemical indicators of lower subsurface temperatures. Cooling and equilibration with quartz after phase separation at the ODP Mound results in exit temperatures and silica concentrations that are indistinguishable from those at Dead Dog. The sulfur isotopic composition of aqueous ΣH2S indicates extensive reduction of seawater SO4 and leaching of basaltic sulfur at both areas. A new area of venting, which resulted from drilling operations during ODP Leg 169, was discovered on the eastern side of the ODP Mound. The fluids in the new area have compositions that are similar to those of Hole 1035H and Shiner Bock, except for lower H2 and higher H2S concentrations. These differences reflect the conversion of pyrite to pyrrhotite in the ODP Mound as fluids react with sulfide minerals during upflow. Fluid temperatures and compositions have remained constant between 1990 and 2000 indicating that subsurface reaction zone conditions did not change over this period. Near constant concentrations of sediment-derived mobile trace elements suggest that the residence time of fluids in a high-temperature reservoir exceeds 10 years.

  19. Bathymetry, substrate and circulation in Westcott Bay, San Juan Islands, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, Eric E.; Stevens, Andrew W.; Curran, Chris; Smith, Collin; Schwartz, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Nearshore bathymetry, substrate type, and circulation patterns in Westcott Bay, San Juan Islands, Washington, were mapped using two acoustic sonar systems, video and direct sampling of seafloor sediments. The goal of the project was to characterize nearshore habitat and conditions influencing eelgrass (Z. marina) where extensive loss has occurred since 1995. A principal hypothesis for the loss of eelgrass is a recent decrease in light availability for eelgrass growth due to increase in turbidity associated with either an increase in fine sedimentation or biological productivity within the bay. To explore sources for this fine sediment and turbidity, a dual-frequency Biosonics sonar operating at 200 and 430 kHz was used to map seafloor depth, morphology and vegetation along 69 linear kilometers of the bay. The higher frequency 430 kHz system also provided information on particulate concentrations in the water column. A boat-mounted 600 kHz RDI Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was used to map current velocity and direction and water column backscatter intensity along another 29 km, with select measurements made to characterize variations in circulation with tides. An underwater video camera was deployed to ground-truth acoustic data. Seventy one sediment samples were collected to quantify sediment grain size distributions across Westcott Bay. Sediment samples were analyzed for grain size at the Western Coastal and Marine Geology Team sediment laboratory in Menlo Park, Calif. These data reveal that the seafloor near the entrance to Westcott Bay is rocky with a complex morphology and covered with dense and diverse benthic vegetation. Current velocities were also measured to be highest at the entrance and along a deep channel extending 1 km into the bay. The substrate is increasingly comprised of finer sediments with distance into Westcott Bay where current velocities are lower. This report describes the data collected and preliminary findings of USGS Cruise B-6

  20. Geology of a vigorous hydrothermal system on the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, J.R.; Robigou, V.; McDuff, R.E. ); Tivey, M.K. )

    1992-12-10

    A high-precision, high-resolution geologic map explicitly documents relationships between tectonic features and large steep-sided, sulfide-sulfate-silica deposits in the vigorously venting Endeavour hydrothermal field near the northern end of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Location of the most massive sulfide structures appears to be controlled by intersections of ridge-parallel normal faults and other fracture-fissure sets that trend oblique to, and perpendicular to the overall structural fabric of the axial valley. As presently mapped, the field is about 200 by 400 m on a side and contains at least 15 large (> 1,000 m[sup 3]) sulfide edifices and many tens of smaller, commonly inactive, sulfide structures. The larger sulfide structures are also the most vigorously venting features in the field; they are commonly more than 30 m in diameter and up to 20 m in height. Maximum venting temperatures of 375[degrees]C are associated with the smaller structures in the northern portion of the field are consistently 20[degrees]-30[degrees]C lower. Hydrothermal output from individual active sulfide features varies from no flow in the lower third of the edifice to vigorous output from fracture-controlled black smoker activity near the top of the structures. Two types of diffuse venting in the Endeavour field include a lower temperature 8[degrees]-15[degrees]C output through colonies of large tubeworms and 25[degrees]-50[degrees]C vent fluid that seems to percolate through the tops of overhanging flanges. The large size and steep-walled nature of these structures evidently results from sustained venting in a mature hydrothermal system, coupled with dual mineral depositional mechanisms involving vertical growth by accumulation of chimney sulfide debris and lateral growth by means of flange development.

  1. Mass Movement Susceptibility in the Western San Juan Mountains, Colorado: A Preliminary 3-D Mapping Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, K. A.; Giardino, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Mass movement is a major activity that impacts lives of humans and their infrastructure. Human activity in steep, mountainous regions is especially at risk to this potential hazard. Thus, the identification and quantification of risk by mapping and determining mass movement susceptibility are fundamental in protecting lives, resources and ensuring proper land use regulation and planning. Specific mass-movement processes including debris flows, rock falls, snow avalanches and landslides continuously modify the landscape of the San Juan Mountains. Historically, large-magnitude slope failures have repeatedly occurred in the region. Common triggers include intense, long-duration precipitation, freeze-thaw processes, human activity and various volcanic lithologies overlying weaker sedimentary formations. Predicting mass movement is challenging because of its episodic and spatially, discontinuous occurrence. Landslides in mountain terrain are characterized as widespread, highly mobile and have a long duration of activity. We developed a 3-D model for landslide susceptibility using Geographic Information Systems Technology (GIST). The study area encompasses eight USGS quadrangles: Ridgway, Dallas, Mount Sneffels, Ouray, Telluride, Ironton, Ophir and Silverton. Fieldwork consisted of field reconnaissance mapping at 1:5,000 focusing on surficial geomorphology. Field mapping was used to identify potential locations, which then received additional onsite investigation and photographic documentation of features indicative of slope failure. A GIS module was created using seven terrain spatial databases: geology, surficial geomorphology (digitized), slope aspect, slope angle, vegetation, soils and distance to infrastructure to map risk. The GIS database will help determine risk zonation for the study area. Correlations between terrain parameters leading to slope failure were determined through the GIS module. This 3-D model will provide a spatial perspective of the landscape to

  2. Magmatic effects of the Cobb hot spot on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, J.; Perfit, M.; Ridley, I.; Jonasson, I.; Kamenov, G.; Chadwick, W.; Embley, R.; le, Roux P.; Smith, M.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the Juan de Fuca Ridge with the Cobb hot spot has had a considerable influence on the magmatism of the Axial Segment of the ridge, the second-order segment that overlies the hot spot. In addition to the construction of the large volcanic edifice of Axial Seamount, the Axial Segment has shallow bathymetry and a prevalence of constructional volcanic features along its 100-km length, suggesting that hot spot-derived magmas supplement and oversupply the ridge. Lavas are generally more primitive at Axial Seamount and more evolved in the Axial Segment rift zones, suggesting that fractional crystallization is enhanced with increasing distance from the hot spot because of a reduced magma supply and more rapid cooling. Although the Cobb hot spot is not an isotopically enriched plume, it produces lavas with some distinct geochemical characteristics relative to normal mid-ocean ridge basalt, such as enrichments in alkalis and highly incompatible trace elements, that can be used as tracers to identify the presence and prevalence of the hot spot influence along the ridge. These characteristics are most prominent at Axial Seamount and decline in gradients along the Axial Segment. The physical model that can best explain the geochemical observations is a scenario in which hot spot and mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) magmas mix to varying degrees, with the proportions controlled by the depth to the MORB source. Modeling of two-component mixing suggests that MORB is the dominant component in most Axial Segment basalts. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Nature and extent of electrogenic microbial communities recovered from Juan de Fuca hydrothermal sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girguis, P. R.; Nielsen, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    Microbes have evolved a variety of metabolic strategies to survive in anaerobic environments, including extracellular electron transfer (EET). Here we present laboratory and in situ experiments revealing that hydrothermal vent microbes employ and depend upon EET to access spatially remote oxidants via semi-conductive pyrite. To simulate the physical and electrochemical conditions in vent sulfides, we constructed a two-chamber flow-through bioelectrochemical reactor in which a pyrite electrode was enclosed in one chamber and subject to simulated hydrothermal conditions. Electroactive biofilms formed solely on pyrite in electrical continuity with oxygenated water. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses revealed a diversity of autotrophic and heterotrophic archaea and bacteria, markedly different in composition from the control (pyrite without electrical continuity). To further characterize this phenomenon, we deployed a bioelectrochemical experiment in situ at the hydrothermal vent sulfide "Roane" (2200 m water depth, at the Mothra hydrothermal field, Juan de Fuca ridge). A graphite anode was inserted into a borehole drilled into the base of a hydrothermal sulfide, and connected through a potentiostat to a carbon-fiber cathode on the outside of the vent structure. The in situ experiment produced sustained current and enriched for a distinct microbial community likely associated with EET. The data presented herein reveal the nature and extent of microbial communities that use conductive minerals such as pyrite, though fully reduced, to facilitate the reduction of spatially remote oxidants while maintaining chemical discontinuity. Thus EET, by enabling sustained access to terminal electron acceptors while maintaining the functioning of strictly anaerobic metabolisms, may alleviate the limitations commonly associated with anaerobic environs, namely the depletion of oxidants.

  4. New discoveries of early Paleocene (Torrejonian) primates from the Nacimiento Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Silcox, Mary T; Williamson, Thomas E

    2012-12-01

    Primates underwent a period of diversification following the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs. Although the Order first appeared near the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, it is not until the Torrejonian (the second North American Land Mammal Age of the Paleocene) that a diversity of families began to emerge. One of the lithological units critical to understanding this first primate adaptive radiation is the early Paleocene Nacimiento Formation of the San Juan Basin (SJB; New Mexico). Primates previously described from this formation comprise six species of palaechthonid and paromomyid plesiadapiforms, all known from very limited material. Collecting has increased the sample of primate specimens more than fivefold. Included in the new sample is the first specimen of a picrodontid plesiadapiform from the Torrejonian of the SJB, referable to Picrodus calgariensis, and the first paromomyid specimen complete enough to allow for a species level taxonomic assignment, representing a new species of Paromomys. With respect to the 'Palaechthonidae', the current report describes large collections of Torrejonia wilsoni and Palaechthon woodi, and the first new specimens attributed to Plesiolestes nacimienti and Anasazia williamsoni since 1972 and 1994, respectively. These collections demonstrate previously unknown morphological variants, including the presence of a metaconid on the p4 of some specimens of T. wilsoni, a discovery that supports previous inferences about a close relationship between Torrejonia and Plesiolestes problematicus. This new sample considerably improves our knowledge of the poorly understood 'Palaechthonidae', and about the biostratigraphy, biogeography, and early evolution of North American primates. In particular, the rarity of paromomyids, the continuing absence of plesiadapid and carpolestid plesiadapiforms, and the presence of a number of endemic palaechthonid species in the SJB contrast with plesiadapiform samples from contemporaneous deposits to the

  5. Microbial Primary Productivity in Hydrothermal Vent Chimneys at Middle Valley, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olins, H. C.; Rogers, D.; Frank, K. L.; Girguis, P. R.; Vidoudez, C.

    2012-12-01

    Chemosynthetic primary productivity supports hydrothermal vent ecosystems, but the extent of that productivity has not been well measured. To examine the role that environmental temperature plays in controlling carbon fixation rates, and to assess the degree to which microbial community composition, in situ geochemistry, and mineralogy influence carbon fixation, we conducted a series of shipboard incubations across a range of temperatures (4, 25, 50 and 90°C) and at environmentally relevant geochemical conditions using material recovered from three hydrothermal vent chimneys in the Middle Valley hydrothermal vent field (Juan de Fuca Ridge). Net rates of carbon fixation (CFX) were greatest at lower temperatures, and were similar among structures. Rates did not correlate with the mineralogy or the geochemical composition of the high temperature fluids at each chimney. No obvious patterns of association were observed between carbon fixation rates and microbial community composition. Abundance of selected functional genes related to different carbon fixation pathway exhibited striking differences among the three study sites, but did not correlate with rates. Natural carbon isotope ratios implicate the Calvin Benson Bassham Cycle as the dominant mechanism of primary production in these systems, despite the abundance of genes related to other pathways (and presumably some degree of activity). Together these data reveal that primary productivity by endolithic communities does not exhibit much variation among these chimneys, and further reveal that microbial activity cannot easily be related to mineralogical and geochemical assessments that are made at a coarser scale. Indeed, the relationships between carbon fixation rates and community composition/functional gene abundance were also likely obfuscated by differences in scale at which these measurements were made. Regardless, these data reveal the degree to which endolithic, anaerobic carbon fixation contributes to

  6. Arc-parallel extension and fluid flow in an ancient accretionary wedge: The San Juan Islands, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schermer, E.R.; Gillaspy, J.R.; Lamb, R.

    2007-01-01

    Structural analysis of the Lopez Structural Complex, a major Late Cretaceous terrane-bounding fault zone in the San Juan thrust system, reveals a sequence of events that provides insight into accretionary wedge mechanics and regional tectonics. After formation of regional ductile flattening and shear-related fabrics, the area was crosscut by brittle structures including: (1) southwest-vergent thrusts, (2) extension veins and normal faults related to northwest-southeast extension, and (3) conjugate strike-slip structures that record northwest-southeast extension and northeast-southwest shortening. Aragonite-bearing veins are associated with thrust and normal faults, but only rarely with strike-slip faults. High-pressure, low-temperature (HP-LT) minerals constrain the conditions for brittle deformation to ???20 km and <250 ??C. The presence of similar structures elsewhere indicates that the brittle structural sequence is typical of the San Juan nappes. Sustained HP-LT conditions are possible only if structures formed in an accretionary prism during active subduction, which suggests that these brittle structures record internal wedge deformation at depth and early during uplift of the San Juan nappes. The structures are consistent with orogen-normal shortening and vertical thickening followed by vertical thinning and along-strike extension. The kinematic evolution may be related initially to changes in wedge strength, followed by response to overthickening of the wedge in an unbuttressed, obliquely convergent setting. The change in vein mineralogy indicates that exhumation occurred prior to the strike-slip event. The pressure and temperature conditions and spatial and temporal extent of small faults associated with fluid flow suggest a link between these structures and the silent earthquake process. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  7. Surficial geology of the lower Comb Wash, San Juan County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longpré, Claire I.

    2001-01-01

    The surficial geologic map of lower Comb Wash was produced as part of a master’s thesis for Northern Arizona University Quaternary Sciences program. The map area includes the portion of the Comb Wash alluvial valley between Highway 163 and Highway 95 on the Colorado Plateau in southeastern Utah. The late Quaternary geology of this part of the Colorado Plateau had not previously been mapped in adequate detail. The geologic information in this report will be useful for biological studies, land management and range management for federal, state and private industries. Comb Wash is a south flowing ephemeral tributary of the San Juan River, flanked to the east by Comb Ridge and to the west by Cedar Mesa (Figure 1). The nearest settlement is Bluff, about 7 km to the east of the area. Elevations range from 1951 m where Highway 95 crosses Comb Wash to 1291 m at the confluence with the San Juan River. Primary vehicle access to lower Comb Wash is provided by a well-maintained dirt road that parallels the active channel of Comb Wash between Highway 163 and Highway 95. For much of the year this road can be traversed without the aid of four-wheel drive. However, during inclement weather such as rain or snow the road becomes treacherous even with four-wheel drive. The Comb Wash watershed is public land managed by the Bureau of Land management (BLM) office in Monticello, Utah. The semi-arid climate of Comb Wash and the surrounding area is typical of the Great Basin Desert. Temperature in Bluff, Utah ranges from a minimum of –8° C in January to a maximum of 35° C in July with a mean annual temperature of 9.8° C (U.S. Department of Commerce, 1999). The difference between day and nighttime temperatures is as great as 20° C. Between 1928 and 1998, annual rainfall in Bluff averaged 178 mm per year (U.S. Department of Commerce, 1999). Annual rainfall in Comb Wash averaged 240 mm per year from 1991 to 1999 while Bluff received an average of 193 mm for the same 8 year period

  8. Physical, chemical, and biological data for detailed study of irrigation drainage in the San Juan River area, New Mexico, 1993-94, with supplemental data, 1991-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, C.L.; Lusk, J.D.; Bristol, R.S.; Wilson, R.M.; Shineman, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    In response to increasing concern about the quality of irrigation drainage and its potential effects on fish, wildlife, and human health, the U.S. Department of the Interior formed an interbureau task group to prepare a plan for investigating water- quality problems on irrigation projects sponsored by the Department of the Interior. The San Juan River area in northwestern New Mexico was one of the areas designated for study. Investigators collected water, bottom-sediment, soil, and biological samples at more than 50 sites in the San Juan River area during 1993-94. Sample sites included (1) sites located within Department of the Interior irrigation project service areas, or areas that receive drainage from irrigation projects; (2) reference sites for comparison with irrigation project sites; and (3) sites located within the reach of the San Juan River from Navajo Dam to 10 miles downstream from the dam. The types of habitat sampled included the main stem of the San Juan River, backwater areas adjacent to the San Juan River, tributaries to the San Juan River, ponds, seeps, irrigation-delivery canals, irrigation-drainage canals, a stock tank, and shallow ground water. The types of media sampled included water, bottom sediment, soil, aquatic plants, aquatic invertebrates, amphibians, and fish. Semipermeable-membrane devices were used as a surrogate medium to sample both air and water in some instances. Sample measurements included concentrations of major ions, trace elements, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon compounds, and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. This report presents tables of physical, chemical, and biological data collected for the U.S. Department of the Interior National Irrigation Water-Quality Program. Additionally, supplemental physical, chemical, and biological data collected in association with the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project are presented.

  9. Geochemical data from waters in Prospect Gulch, San Juan County, Colorado, that span pre- and post-Lark Mine remediation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Yager, Douglas B.; Johnson, Hugh D.

    2011-01-01

    In San Juan County, Colorado, the effects of historical mining continue to contribute dissolved metals to groundwater and surface water. Water samples in Prospect Gulch near Silverton, Colorado, were collected at selected locations that span pre- and post-reclamation activities at the Lark Mine, located in the Prospect Gulch watershed. Geochemical results from those water samples are presented in this report. Water samples were analyzed for specific conductance, pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen with handheld field meters, and metals were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

  10. Late Neogene geohistory analysis of the Humboldt basin and its relationship to convergence of the Juan de Fuca plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Geohistory analysis of Neogene Humboldt basin strata provides important constraints for hypotheses of the tectonic evolution of the southern Cascadia subduction margin, leading up to the arrival of the Mendocino triple junction. This analysis suggests that the tectonic evolution of the Humboldt basin area was dominated by coupling between the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate and the continental margin. This coupling is reflected in the timing of major hiatuses within the basin sedimentary sequence and margin uplift and subsidence which occur during periods of tectonic plate adjustment. -from Author

  11. Contemporaneous trachyandesitic and calc-alkaline volcanism of the Huerto Andesite, San Juan Volcanic Field, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parat, F.; Dungan, M.A.; Lipman, P.W.

    2005-01-01

    Locally, voluminous andesitic volcanism both preceded and followed large eruptions of silicic ash-flow tuff from many calderas in the San Juan volcanic field. The most voluminous post-collapse lava suite of the central San Juan caldera cluster is the 28 Ma Huerto Andesite, a diverse assemblage erupted from at least 5-6 volcanic centres that were active around the southern margins of the La Garita caldera shortly after eruption of the Fish Canyon Tuff. These andesitic centres are inferred, in part, to represent eruptions of magma that ponded and differentiated within the crust below the La Garita caldera, thereby providing the thermal energy necessary for rejuvenation and remobilization of the Fish Canyon magma body. The multiple Huerto eruptive centres produced two magmatic series that differ in phenocryst mineralogy (hydrous vs anhydrous assemblages), whole-rock major and trace element chemistry and isotopic compositions. Hornblende-bearing lavas from three volcanic centres located close to the southeastern margin of the La Garita caldera (Eagle Mountain - Fourmile Creek, West Fork of the San Juan River, Table Mountain) define a high-K calc-alkaline series (57-65 wt % SiO2) that is oxidized, hydrous and sulphur rich. Trachyandesitic lavas from widely separated centres at Baldy Mountain-Red Lake (western margin), Sugarloaf Mountain (southern margin) and Ribbon Mesa (20 km east of the La Garita caldera) are mutually indistinguishable (55-61 wt % SiO2); they are characterized by higher and more variable concentrations of alkalis and many incompatible trace elements (e.g. Zr, Nb, heavy rare earth elements), and they contain anhydrous phenocryst assemblages (including olivine). These mildly alkaline magmas were less water rich and oxidized than the hornblende-bearing calc-alkaline suite. The same distinctions characterize the voluminous precaldera andesitic lavas of the Conejos Formation, indicating that these contrasting suites are long-term manifestations of San Juan

  12. Monitoring Change on Hydrothermal Edifices by Photogrammetric Time Series: Case Studies from the Endeavour Segment (Juan de Fuca Ridge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesemann, M.; Kwasnitschka, T.; Kelley, D. S.; Mihaly, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution photogrammetric surveys derived from ROV or AUV imagery yield seafloor geometry at centimeter resolution with full color texture while modeling overhangs and crevasses, generating vastly more detailed terrain models compared to most acoustic methods. The models furthermore serve as geographic reference frames for localized studies. Repetitive surveys consequently facilitate the precise, quantitative study of edifice buildup and erosion as well as the development of the biological habitat. We compare data gathered by the Ocean Networks Canada maintenance cruises with earlier surveys at two sites (Mothra, Main Endeavour Field) along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  13. [Detection of Leptospira organisms in Rattus rattus of two islands in the Mozambique Channel: Europa and Juan-de-Nova].

    PubMed

    Freulon, M; Aboubaker, M; Marié, J-L; Drancourt, M; Davoust, B

    2010-02-01

    Europa and Juan-de-Nova are two little coral islands in the Mozambique Channel. They are only occupied by a troop detachment of 15 men, who exercise the French sovereignty and maintain the island. During these activities, the men work in dampness and they can encounter rats. The aim of this survey is to show presence of leptospirosis in these islands by testing rat kidney by specific PCR. The results found a positive specimen on each island (2/52) indicating a previously unknown presence of Leptospira organisms in these islands.

  14. Distribution of trace elements in drilling chip samples around a roll-type uranium deposit, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, H.C.; Spirakis, C.S.; Zech, R.S.; Kirk, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Chip samples from rotary drilling in the vicinity of a roll-type uranium deposit in the southwestern San Juan Basin were split into a whole-washed fraction, a clay fraction, and a heavy mineral concentrate fraction. Analyses of these fractions determined that cutting samples could be used to identify geochemical halos associated with this ore deposit. In addition to showing a distribution of selenium, uranium, vanadium, and molybdenum similar to that described by Harshman (1974) in uranium roll-type deposits in Wyoming, South Dakota, and Texas, the chemical data indicate a previously unrecognized zinc anomaly in the clay fraction downdip of the uranium ore.

  15. Simulated changes in ground-water levels related to proposed development of Federal coal leases, San Juan Basin New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frenzel, P.F.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of coal-related ground-water withdrawals on potentiometric surfaces of aquifers in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, were estimated. A previously published steady-state finite-difference digital model was converted to a transient-state model by changing boundary conditions and adding storage coefficients. No calibration of the transient-state model was attempted. Predicted drawdowns with a minimum amount of coal development combined with other kinds of development were as great as 2,000 feet. As much as 300 feet of additional drawdown were simulated for the maximum amount of coal development. Drawdowns near pumping wells are not predicted. (USGS)

  16. Uniformity and diversity in the composition of mineralizing fluids from hydrothermal vents on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Philpotts, J.A.; Aruscavage, P. J.; Von Damm, K. L.

    1987-01-01

    Abundances of Li, Na, K, Rb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Fe, Zn, and Si have been determined in fluid samples from 7 vents located in three areas on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The hydrothermal component estimated from the Mg contents of the samples ranges from 7% to 76%. Concentrations of Fe and Si, among other elements, in acid-stabilized solutions appear to be generally representative of the parental hydrothermal fluids, but some Zn determinations and most Ba values appear to be too low.-from Authors

  17. Multiple resource evaluation of region 2 US forest service lands utilizing LANDSAT MSS data. [San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, P. V.; Hoffer, R. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. LANDSAT MSS imagery provided an excellent overview which put a geomorphic study into a regional perspective, using scale 1:250,000 or smaller. It was used for deriving a data base for land use planning for southern San Juan Mountains. Stereo pairing of adjacent images was the best method for all geomorphic mapping. Combining this with snow enhancement, seasonal enhancement, and reversal aided in interpretation of geomorphic features. Drainage patterns were mapped in much greater detail from LANDSAT than from a two deg quadrangle base.

  18. Learning Styles and Attitudes toward Online Education in Four Universities in the State of Nuevo Leon, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez de Monarrez, Patricia; Korniejczuk, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to find the relation-ship between the predominant learning styles among university online students and their attitude toward online education. Data were collected from 385 students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs from four universities in the state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Significant effects of…

  19. Late Neogene geohistory analysis of the Humboldt Basin and its relationship to convergence of the Juan de Fuca Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, Patricia A.

    1989-03-01

    Geohistory analysis of Neogene Humboldt basin strata provides important constraints for hypotheses of the tectonic evolution of the southern Cascadia subduction margin, leading up to the arrival of the Mendocino triple junction. This analysis suggests that the tectonic evolution of the Humboldt basin area was dominated by coupling between the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate and the continental margin. This coupling is reflected in the timing of major hiatuses within the basin sedimentary sequence and margin uplift and subsidence which occur during periods of tectonic plate adjustment. Stratigraphic evidence indicates that Humboldt basin originated at the base of the continental slope in early Miocene time. Syndepositional uplift of basin strata began in the late Pliocene and was both thermal isostatic and tectonic in origin. Isostatic uplift was a function of an increasingly more buoyant slab being subducted, whereas tectonic uplift was due to imbricated thrusting of the accretionary complex and underplating of offscraped sediment during subduction. A component of margin uplift is postulated to have been caused by a change in the rate of convergence between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates. Coeval with late Pliocene uplift documented onshore was a sharp decrease in covergence rate ˜3 Ma. A reduction in rate of tectonic uplift, observed in the Eel River section, in early Pleistocene time was coeval with a marked increase in relative motion parallel to the continental margin. This localized subsidence may have been caused by syndepositional folding.

  20. Permian marine sedimentation in northern Chile: new paleontological evidence from the Juan de Morales Formation, and regional paleogeographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Martínez, E.; Mamet, B.; Isaacson, P. E.; Grader, G. W.

    2000-11-01

    Permian marine sedimentary rocks that crop out in northern Chile are closely related to the development of a Late Paleozoic magmatic arc. A study of Upper Paleozoic units east of Iquique (20°S) identified three members within the Juan de Morales Formation, each of which were deposited in a different sedimentary environment. A coarse-grained terrigenous basal member represents alluvial sedimentation from a local volcanic source. A mixed carbonate-terrigenous middle member represents coastal and proximal shallow marine sedimentation during a relative sea-level rise related with a global transgression. Preliminary foraminifer biostratigraphy of this middle member identified a late Early Permian (late Artinskian-Kungurian) highly impoverished nodosarid-geinitzinid assemblage lacking fusulines and algae, which is characteristic of temperate cold waters and/or disphotic zone. The upper fine-grained terrigenous member represents shallow marine siliciclastic sedimentation under storm influence. The Juan de Morales Formation consists of continental, coastal and shallow marine sediments deposited at the active western margin of Gondwana at mid to low latitudes. A revised late Early Permian age and similar paleogeography and sedimentary environments are also proposed for the Huentelauquén Formation and related units of northern and central Chile, Arizaro Formation of northwestern Argentina, and equivalent units of southernmost Peru.

  1. Completion reports, core logs, and hydrogeologic data from wells and piezometers in Prospect Gulch, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Yager, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    In the late nineteenth century, San Juan County, Colorado, was the center of a metal mining boom in the San Juan Mountains. Although most mining activity ceased by the 1990s, the effects of historical mining continue to contribute metals to ground water and surface water. Previous research by the U.S. Geological Survey identified ground-water discharge as a significant pathway for the loading of metals to surface water from both acid-mine drainage and acid-rock drainage. In an effort to understand the ground-water flow system in the upper Animas River watershed, Prospect Gulch was selected for further study because of the amount of previous data provided in and around that particular watershed. In support of this ground-water research effort, wells and piezometers were installed to allow for coring during installation, subsurface hydrologic testing, and the monitoring of ground-water hydraulic heads and geochemistry. This report summarizes the data that were collected during and after the installation of these wells and piezometers and includes (1) subsurface completion details, (2) locations and elevations, (3) geologic logs and elemental data, (4) slug test data for the estimation of subsurface hydraulic conductives, and (5) hydraulic head data.

  2. Uniformity and diversity in the composition of mineralizing fluids from hydrothermal vents on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Philpotts, J.A.; Aruscavage, P.J.; Von Damm, K.L.

    1987-10-10

    Abundances of Li, Ni, K, Rb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Fe, Zn, and Si have been determined in fluid samples from seven vents located in three areas on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The hydrothermal component estimated from the Mg contents of the samples ranges from 7% to 76%. Concentrations of Fe and Si, among the other elements, in acid-stabilized solutions appear to be generally representative of the parental hydrothermal fluids, but some Zn determinations and most Ba values appear to be too low. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the acidified samples remain supersaturated with respect to silica, barite, and pyrite; unacidified samples are supersaturated, in addition with respect to ZnS, FeS, and many silicate phases. Within the constraints of limited sampling there appear to be differences in fluid compositions both within and between the three vent areas. Some uniform differences in the elemental abundances predicted for hydrothermal end-member fluids might be due to inmixing of fresh seawater at depth in the hydrothermal system. The Juan de Fuca hydrothermal fluids contain more Fe but otherwise have relative elemental abundances fairly similar to those in 13 /sup 0/N (East Pacific Rise) fluids, albeit at higher levels. In contrast, fluids from 21 /sup 0/N (East Pacific Rise) and Galapagos have lower K/Rb and much lower Sr and Na abundances; these compositional features probably result from interaction of these fluids with a different mineral assemblage, possibly more mature greenstone. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  3. Evolution of the western segment of Juan Fernández Ridge (Nazca Plate): plume vs. plate tectonic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Luis E.; Rodrigo, Cristián; Reyes, Javier; Orozco, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    The Juan Fernandez Ridge (Eastern Pacific, Nazca Plate) is thought to be a classic hot spot trail because of the apparent age progression observed in 40Ar-39Ar data. However, geological evidence and some thermochronological data suggest a more complex pattern with a rejuvenation stage in Robinson Crusoe Island, the most eroded of the Juan Fernandez Archipelago. In fact, a postshield stage at 900-700 ka separates the underlying shield-related pile from the post-erosional alkaline succession (Ba/Yb=38.15; La/Yb=15.66; Ba/Y=20.27; Ba/Zr=2.31). Shield volcanoes grew at high effusion rate at ca. 5-4 Ma erupting mostly tholeiitic to transitional magmas (Ba/Yb=18.07-8.32; La/Yb=4.59-9.84; Ba/Y=4.24-8.18; Ba/Zr=0.73-1.09). Taken together, shield volcanoes form a continuous plateau with a base at ca. 3900 mbsl. However, a more complex structural pattern can be inferred from geophysical data, which suggest some intracrustal magma storage and a more extended area of magma ascent. A role for the Challenger Fracture Zone is hypothesized fueling the controversy between pristine plume origin and the effect of plate tectonic processes in the origin of intraplate volcanism. This research is supported by FONDECYT Project 1110966.

  4. Distribution of Tubifex tubifex lineages and Myxobolus cerebralis infection in the tailwater of the San Juan River, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DuBey, R.; Caldwell, C.

    2004-01-01

    We chose a hypolimnetic-release tailwater of the San Juan River, New Mexico, to characterize the etiology of whirling disease, a parasitic infection of salmonids. We sampled a 2-km reach of the tailwater in August and December 2001 and June 2002 to characterize environmental factors influencing the distribution and density of Tubifex tubifex lineages and Myxobolus cerebralis infection rates. Shortly after the scouring flow, organic matter in sediments and T. tubifex densities increased within deep habitats. In contrast, no differences were observed in T. tubifex densities and organic matter collected from shallow habitats throughout the three sampling dates. Within this study area, we found three sympatric lineages of T. tubifex (lineages I, III, and VI). Lineage VI dominated riffle reaches, whereas lineages I, III, and VI were observed in pool habitats. Myxobolus cerebralis infection rates were higher in T. tubifex collected in pool habitats (3.01%) than in those collected in riffle habitats (0.51%). Only lineage III exhibited infection with M. cerebralis. We suggest that the habitat and genotype of T. tubifex are important in characterizing prevalence of disease within the San Juan River tailwater. Scouring flow may have a beneficial effect on disease severity in salmonid hosts by reducing organic loading and hence T. tubifex abundance in deep habitats.

  5. Multi-scale reservoir modeling as an integrated assessment tool for geo-sequestration in the San Juan Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, G.; Haerer, D.; Bromhal, G.; Reeves, S.

    2007-01-01

    The Southwestern Regional Partnership on CO2 Sequestration conducted an Enhanced Coalbed Methane (ECBM)/Carbon Storage Pilot in the San Juan Basin as part of the ongoing DOE/NETL Carbon Capture and Storage Program. The primary goal of this pilot is to demonstrate the efficacy of using CO2 to enhance coalbed methane recovery particularly near reservoir abandonment pressure while also evaluating the suitability of coal seams for longer-term carbon storage. Basic geologic models of the coal seams were developed from well logs in the area. Production histories from several surrounding CBM wells were shown. To monitor the injection of up to 75,000 ton of CO2 beginning September 2007, seismic surveys and tiltmeter arrays were utilized. Larger-scale geo-hydrodynamic simulations were used to develop a regional model for the fluid dynamics of the northern San Juan Basin. Smaller-scale reservoir simulations, incorporating available laboratory and field data, were used to develop an improved understanding of reservoir dynamics within the specific 640-acre pilot area. Both modeling scales were critical to assessing the suitability of deploying commercial carbon storage programs throughout the basin. Reservoir characterization results on the optimization of total CO2 injection volume, injection rate over time, and how CO2 is expected to disperse after injection are presented. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2007 AIChE Annual Meeting (Salt Lake City, UT 11/4-9/2007).

  6. Thermal response to the surface heat flux in a macrotidal coastal region (Nuevo Gulf, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, Andrés L.; Pisoni, Juan P.; Dellatorre, Fernando G.

    2016-07-01

    At mid-latitudes, sea water temperature shows a strong seasonal cycle forced by the incident surface heat flux. As depth decreases, the heat flux incidence is damped by the horizontal flux, which prevents the indefinite growth of the seasonal temperature range. In the present work, cross-shore transport in the west coast of Nuevo Gulf (Argentina) was analyzed. Processes tending to cool the coastal waters in summer and to warm the coastal waters in winter, were identified through temperature measurements, surface heat flux and tidal height. The simplified models proposed here provide a feedback mechanism that links changes in surface heat flux with changes in the horizontal heat flux during both seasons. On shorter time scales, tide produces significant variations in the height of the water column, therefore influencing temperature fluctuations and the direction of the horizontal flow.

  7. Depths of channels in the area of the San Juan Basin Regional Uranium Study, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, Maurice E.

    1979-01-01

    During December 1977 and January 1978 about 280 measurements were made of the depths of channels (arroyos) more than 6 feet deep in the San Juan Basin area. More than half of the measurements were made at sites where channel depths had been previously measured Between 1964 and 1969. Some channels in the western part of the basin had Been re-measured in 1969 and in 1971. The principal areas Being dissected by arroyos are near highlands along the margins of the Basin and in uplands in the northeastern part of the Basin. The most severe dissection by arroyos and the deepest arroyos--commonly Between 40 and 60 feet deep--are in the southeastern part of the Basin. Dissection By arroyos is least in the central part of the Basin near the Chaco River where most arroyos are less than 10 feet deep. Elsewhere, moderate dissection predominates with most arroyos Between 12 and 40 feet deep. Comparison of measurements made from 1964-71 with those made in 1977-78 shows that more channels in the western San Juan Basin were filling than were downcutting. Downcutting or filling was generally less than 2 feet. About two-fifths of the sites measured showed less than half a foot of downcutting or filling. Maximum downcutting was 4 feet along the Rio San Jose in the southeastern part of the basin. Maximum filling of 7 feet was along the Chaco River at the Chaco Canyon National Monument. Along ii other streams elsewhere in the western part of the basin, channels were filled 3 to 4.5 feet. The few measurements made in the southeastern San Juan Basin indicate that since 1964 downcutting has predominated over filling. Large floods during the summer of 1977 caused some change in channel depths in the southwestern part of the San Juan Basin. Some of the channels appeared to have been filled during the years prior to the cutting that occurred from the 1977 floods. At other places, flood flows aggraded (filled) channels. The rate of erosion and arroyo formation in the entire San Juan Basin is

  8. Analysis of Upper Air, Ground and Remote Sensing Data for the ATLAS Field Campaign in San Juan, Puerto Rico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Luvall, Jeff; Rickman, Douglas; Comarazamy, Daniel; Picon, Ana J.

    2005-01-01

    The Atlas San Juan Mission was conducted in February 2004 with the main objectives of observing the Urban Heat Island of San Juan, providing high resolution data of the land use for El Yunque Rain Forest and for calibrating remote sensors. The mission was coordinated with NASA staff members at Marsha& Stennis, Goddard, and Glenn. The Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) from NASA/Stennis, that operates in the visual and IR bands, was used as the main sensor and was flown over Puerto Rico in a Lear 23 jet plane. To support the data gathering effort by the ATLAS sensor, remote sensing observations and upper air soundings were conducted along with the deployment of a number of ground based weather stations and temperature sensors. This presentation focuses in the analysis of this complementary data for the Atlas San Juan Mission. Upper air data show that during the days of the mission the Caribbean mid and high atmospheres were relatively dry and highly stable reflecting positive surface lifted index, a necessary condition to conduct this suborbital campaign. Surface wind patterns at levels below 850mb were dominated by the easterly trades, while the jet stream at the edge of the troposphere dominated the westerly wind at levels above 500mb. The jet stream remained at high latitudes reducing the possibility of fronts. In consequence, only 8.4 mm of precipitation were reported during the entire mission. Observation of soundings located about 150 km apart reflected minimum variations of the boundary layer across the Island for levels below 850 meters and a uniform atmosphere for higher levels. The weather stations and the temperature sensors were placed at strategic locations to observe variations across the urban and rural landscapes. Time series plot of the stations' data show that heavily urbanized commercial areas have higher air temperatures than urban and suburban residential areas, and much higher temperatures than rural areas. Temperature

  9. Analysis of Upper Air, Ground and Remote Sensing Data For the ATLAS Field Campaign in San Juan, Puerto Rico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, J. E.; Luvall, J. C.; Rickman, D.; Comarazamy, D. E.; Picon, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Atlas San Juan Mission was conducted in February 2004 with the main objectives of observing the Urban Heat Island of San Juan, providing high resolution data of the land use for El Yunque Rain Forest and for calibrating remote sensors. The mission was coordinated with NASA staff members at Marshall, Stennis, Goddard, and Glenn. The Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) from NASA/Stennis, that operates in the visual and IR bands, was used as the main sensor and was flown over Puerto Rico in a Lear 23 jet plane. To support the data gathering effort by the ATLAS sensor, remote sensing observations and upper air soundings were conducted along with the deployment of a number of ground based weather stations and temperature sensors. This presentation focuses in the analysis of this complementary data for the Atlas San Juan Mission. Upper air data show that during the days of the mission the Caribbean mid and high atmospheres were relatively dry and highly stable reflecting positive surface lifted index, a necessary condition to conduct this suborbital campaign. Surface wind patterns at levels below 850mb were dominated by the easterly trades, while the jet stream at the edge of the troposphere dominated the westerly wind at levels above 500mb. The jet stream remained at high latitudes reducing the possibility of fronts. In consequence, only 8.4 mm of precipitation were reported during the entire mission. Observation of soundings located about 150 km apart reflected minimum variations of the boundary layer across the island for levels below 850 meters and a uniform atmosphere for higher levels. The weather stations and the temperature sensors were placed at strategic locations to observe variations across the urban and rural landscapes. Time series plot of the stations' data show that heavily urbanized commercial areas have higher air temperatures than urban and suburban residential areas, and much higher temperatures than rural areas. Temperature

  10. Imaging the Juan de Fuca subduction plate using 3D Kirchoff Prestack Depth Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.; Bodin, T.; Allen, R. M.; Tauzin, B.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new Receiver Function migration method to image the subducting plate in the western US that utilizes the US array and regional network data. While the well-developed CCP (common conversion point) poststack migration is commonly used for such imaging; our method applies a 3D prestack depth migration approach. The traditional CCP and post-stack depth mapping approaches implement the ray tracing and moveout correction for the incoming teleseismic plane wave based on a 1D earth reference model and the assumption of horizontal discontinuities. Although this works well in mapping the reflection position of relatively flat discontinuities (such as the Moho or the LAB), CCP is known to give poor results in the presence of lateral volumetric velocity variations and dipping layers. Instead of making the flat layer assumption and 1D moveout correction, seismic rays are traced in a 3D tomographic model with the Fast Marching Method. With travel time information stored, our Kirchoff migration is done where the amplitude of the receiver function at a given time is distributed over all possible conversion points (i.e. along a semi-elipse) on the output migrated depth section. The migrated reflectors will appear where the semicircles constructively interfere, whereas destructive interference will cancel out noise. Synthetic tests show that in the case of a horizontal discontinuity, the prestack Kirchoff migration gives similar results to CCP, but without spurious multiples as this energy is stacked destructively and cancels out. For 45 degree and 60 degree dipping discontinuities, it also performs better in terms of imaging at the right boundary and dip angle. This is especially useful in the Western US case, beneath which the Juan de Fuca plate subducted to ~450km with a dipping angle that may exceed 50 degree. While the traditional CCP method will underestimate the dipping angle, our proposed imaging method will provide an accurate 3D subducting plate image without

  11. Seismic Structure of the Shallow Mantle Beneath the Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderBeek, B. P.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Soule, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present tomographic images of the seismic structure of the shallow mantle beneath the intermediate-spreading Endeavor segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge. Our results provide insight into the relationship between magma supply from the mantle and overlying ridge crest processes. We use seismic energy refracted below the Moho (Pn), as recorded by the Endeavor tomography (ETOMO) experiment, to image the anisotropic and isotropic P wave velocity structure. The ETOMO experiment was an active source seismic study conducted in August 2009 as part of the RIDGE2000 science program. The experimental area extends 100 km along- and 60 km across-axis and encompasses active hydrothermal vent fields near the segment center, the eastern end of the Heck seamount chain, and two overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at either end of the segment. Previous tomographic analyses of seismic arrivals refracted through the crust (Pg), and reflected off the Moho (PmP), constrain a three-dimensional starting model of crustal velocity and thickness. These Pg and PmP arrivals are incorporated in our inversion of Pn travel-time data to further constrain the isotropic and anisotropic mantle velocity structure. Preliminary results reveal three distinct mantle low-velocity zones, inferred as regions of mantle melt delivery to the base of the crust, that are located: (i) off-axis near the segment center, (ii) beneath the Endeavor-West Valley OSC, and (iii) beneath the Cobb OSC near Split Seamount. The mantle anomalies are located at intervals of ~30 to 40 km along-axis and the low velocity anomalies beneath the OSCs are comparable in magnitude to the one located near the segment center. The direction of shallow mantle flow is inferred from azimuthal variations in Pn travel-time residuals relative to a homogeneous isotropic mantle. Continuing analysis will focus on constraining spatial variations in the orientation of azimuthal anisotropy. On the basis of our results, we will discuss the transport of

  12. Finite-Difference Seismic Modeling of Discrete Fractures in a San Juan Basin Gas Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, T. M.; Nihei, K. T.; Myer, L. R.; Majer, E. L.; Queen, J. H.; Fortuna, M. A.; Murphy, J. O.; Coates, R. T.

    2001-12-01

    As part of a Dept. of Energy sponsored program in fractured gas production, we are conducting numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation in fractured media. The current modeling algorithm is a 2-D, anisotropic, elastic, finite-difference implementation. Fractures are discrete (one grid point wide), vertical, and are described by two parameters, the normal and tangential fracture stiffness, which are converted to anisotropic, elastic constants and placed in an isotropic background. A five-layer, 2250 m2 model with 3 m grid point spacing is used study the effects of fracturing on two scales: long, compliant fractures (i.e. joints) at wide spacing (650 m) and short, stiff fractures at narrower spacing (21 m). The fracture spacing is approximately equal to bed thickness. The fracture stiffness value for the stiff, short fractures was derived from a conceptual model of regularly spaced, infinitely thin openings which are 30 % of the fracture length. The joints were arbitrarily assigned a stiffness 10 times lower (more compliant). The normal and tangential stiffness were assumed equal (for a model of gas-filled fractures). The layer properties (P- and S-velocity and density) and the model's scale are based on well information from the San Juan basin, focusing on the Mesa Verde unit and its Cliffhouse sandstone member. Surface seismic (including CMP gathers) and VSP geometries, as modeled, were based on field data acquired in the basin. The model results (including wavefield time snapshots, and two-component seismograms) show discrete P- and S-wave scattered events from the compliant joints which have large amplitude P-to-S converted phases. These converted waves can be observed in surface seismic acquisition geometry when they are reflected by the horizontal velocity interfaces. In VSP geometry the downgoing fracture-scattered phases can be directly observed. The closely spaced, stiffer fractures generate multiple scattering which is observed as lower amplitude

  13. High-Resolution Imaging of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    To date, seismic experiments have been key in our understanding of the internal structure of volcanic systems. However, most experiments, especially subaerial-based, are often restricted to refraction geometries with limited numbers of sources and receivers, and employ smoothing constraints required by tomographic inversions that produce smoothed and blurry images with spatial resolutions well below the length scale of important features that define these magmatic systems. Taking advantage of the high density of sources and receivers from multichannel seismic (MCS) data should, in principle, allow detailed images of velocity and reflectivity to be recovered. Unfortunately, the depth of mid-ocean ridges has the detrimental effect of concealing critical velocity information behind the seafloor reflection, preventing first arrival travel-time tomographic approaches from imaging the shallowest and most heterogeneous part of the crust. To overcome the limitations of the acquisition geometry, here we are using an innovative multistep approach. We combine a synthetic ocean bottom experiment (SOBE), 3-D traveltime tomography, 2D elastic full waveform and a reverse time migration (RTM) formalism, and present one of the most detailed imagery to date of a massive and complex magmatic system beneath Axial seamount, an active submarine volcano that lies at the intersection of the Juan de Fuca ridge and the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain. We present high-resolution images along 12 seismic lines that span the volcano. We refine the extent/volume of the main crustal magma reservoir that lies beneath the central caldera. We investigate the extent, volume and physical state of a secondary magma body present to the southwest and study its connections with the main magma reservoir. Additionally, we present a 3D tomographic model of the entire volcano that reveals a subsiding caldera floor that provides a near perfect trap for the ponding of lava flows, supporting a "trapdoor

  14. Variation of mudstone mechanical properties by lithofacies, Upper Mancos Shale, San Juan Basin, NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, A. J.; Broome, S. T.; Holcomb, D.; Dewers, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Predicting mechanical behavior of mudstones in the subsurface is a critical need for underground waste storage and resource extraction. To meet this need and to advance knowledge of the details of mudstone deformation, we are currently testing 6 muddy lithofacies from a traditional rock core in the Upper Mancos Shale, Gavilan Oil Pool, Eastern San Juan Basin, NM. The lithofacies include a laminated weakly bioturbated and a fully bioturbated muddy very fine sandstone, a weakly bioturbated thinly laminated and a fully bioturbated fossiliferous calcareous mudstone, and a weakly bioturbated thinly laminated and a fully bioturbated quartz-rich silty calcareous mudstone. For each lithofacies, we are performing a series of drained compression tests with the samples equilibrated and held at a constant relative humidity (76%). A compression test series includes an unconfined constant stress test, a hydrostatic compression test, and two constant mean stress tests, with an additional test in each series to confirm reproducibility. Each test includes measurements of axial and lateral displacement, axial force, confining pressure, and acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring (UM). The AE and UM monitoring occur on the same array of piezoelectric transducers, including 12 1-MHz PZT-5A compressional transducers arranged in 3 circumferential rings, and 4 1 MHz cross-cut quartz compressional transducers mounted in the sample end pieces. AE monitoring is continuous through each test, and UM monitoring occurs before and after each unload-load loop during the test. Pre- and post-test thin sections and a detailed lithologic description are being performed on each sample, as well as pre- and post-test medical grade x-ray CT scans. When the study is complete, we hope to provide the community with detailed understanding of mudstone deformation, as well as coupling classical lithofacies descriptions with rock tests to help predict the variation of mechanical properties in mudstones

  15. Estimating Heat Transfer from Grotto Mound, NEPTUNE Canada Cabled Observatory, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, P. A.; Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.

    2012-12-01

    Heat flux is a fundamental property of a seafloor hydrothermal system that relates to magnitude of sub-seafloor heat source and biosphere conditions, to distribution and style of seafloor venting and benthic biota, to chemical flux, plume formation, and dispersal of biological matter in the water column. We are working to estimate heat flux from Grotto mound, the site of the NEPTUNE Canada Cabled Observatory in the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The mound is formed of two sulfide edifices that lie between ~2190 and 2180 m isobaths: 1) an elliptical edifice with major NE-SW-trending axis ~30 m long and minor axis ~ 14 m wide (area ~ 330 m2); 2) a columnar edifice ~ 10 m in diameter and 10 m high (area ~80 m2) named the North Tower, situated across a narrow (~5 m wide) saddle (area ~40 m2) at the W end of the elliptical edifice. Several black smokers discharge relatively small plumes at the E end of the elliptical edifice. A cluster of vigorous black smokers discharge from the top of North Tower and merge to form a large plume. Patchy diffuse flow occurs in areas around all of the black smokers and in the saddle between the two edifices. We are in process of measuring heat flux from components of hydrothermal discharge on Grotto mound, as follows: 1) for smokers on the North Tower an integrated heat flux of 28-55 MW is calculated based on temperature measurements in the initial 20 m rise of the plume assuming that the highest temperatures measured are closest to those of the plume centerline ; 2) for smokers on the E end of the elliptical edifice based on measurements of flow rate from video and acoustic Doppler phase shift, video of vent diameters, and in situ temperature measurements; 3) for discharge from flanges on some chimneys based on video of flow and in situ temperature measurements; 4) for diffuse flow based on area measured by Acoustic Scintillation Thermography and direct measurements of temperature and flow rate. We are evaluating

  16. Precaldera lavas of the southeast San Juan Volcanic Field: Parent magmas and crustal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, M. T.; Dungan, M. A.; Ferguson, K. M.; Lipman, P. W.; Moorbath, S.

    1991-07-01

    Early intermediate composition volcanic rocks of the Oligocene (circa 34-29 Ma) southeast San Juan volcanic field, southern Colorado, comprise the Conejos Formation. Conejos lavas include both high-K calc-alkaline and alkaline magma series (54-69% SiO2) ranging in composition from basaltic andesite (basaltic trachyandesite) to dacite (trachydacite). The subsequent Platoro caldera complex (29-27 Ma) was superimposed on a cluster of broadly precursory Conejos stratocones. Precaldera volcanism occurred in three pulses corresponding to three time-stratigraphic members: (1) the Horseshoe Mountain member, (2) the Rock Creek member, and (3) the Willow Mountain member. Each member exhibits distinctive phenocryst modes and incompatible trace element contents. Horseshoe Mountain lavas (hornblende-phyric) have relatively low alkali and incompatible element abundances, Rock Creek lavas (anhydrous phenocrysts) and ash-flow tuffs have the highest abundances, and Willow Mountain lavas (diverse mineralogy) are intermediate. All Conejos lavas exhibit low ratios of lead (206Pb/204Pb = 17.5 to 18.2) and neodymium (ɛNd = -8 to -4) isotopes and high 87Sr/86Sr (0.7045 to 0.7056) compared to depleted asthenospheric mantle. These values lie between those of likely mantle compositions and the isotopic composition of Proterozoic crust of the southern Rocky Mountains. Mafic lavas of the Horseshoe Mountain member have the lowest Pb and Nd isotope ratios among Conejos members but trend toward higher isotopic values with increasing degrees of differentiation. Compositions within the Rock Creek series trend toward higher Pb and lower Nd isotope ratios with increasing SiO2. Willow mountain volcanic sequences define diverse chemical-isotopic correlations. We interpret the chemical and isotopic differences observed between mafic lavas of each member to reflect derivation from compositionally distinct mantle derived parent magmas that have experienced extensive deep level crustal contamination

  17. Lead Isotopic Compositions of the Endeavour Sulfides, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labonte, F.; Hannington, M. D.; Cousens, B. L.; Blenkinsop, J.; Gill, J. B.; Kelley, D. S.; Lilley, M. D.; Delaney, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    32 sulfide samples from the main structures of the Endeavour vent field, Juan de Fuca Ridge, were analyzed for their Pb isotope composition. The samples were collected from 6 main vent fields between 1985 and 2005 and encompass a strike length of more than 15 km along the ridge crest. The sulfides are typical of black smoker deposits on sediment-starved mid-ocean ridges. Pb isotope compositions of the massive sulfides within the six hydrothermal fields vary within narrow ranges, with 206Pb/204Pb = 18.58 18.75, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.45 15.53 and 208Pb/204Pb = 37.84 38.10. A geographic trend is observed, with the lower Pb ratios restricted mostly to the northern part of the segment (Salty Dawg, Sasquatch and High Rise fields), and the higher Pb ratios restricted mostly to the southern part of the segment (Main Endeavour, Clam Bed and Mothra fields). Variations within individual fields are much smaller than those between fields, and variation within individual sulfide structures is within the uncertainty of the measurements. Therefore, it is unlikely that the ranges of Pb isotope compositions along the length of the segment reflect remobilization, replacement, and recrystallization of sulfides, as suggested for the observed Pb isotope variability in some large seafloor sulfide deposits. Instead, the differences in isotopic compositions from north to south are interpreted to reflect differences in the source rocks exposed to hydrothermal circulation of fluids below the seafloor. Possible sources of the somewhat more radiogenic Pb may be small amounts of buried sediment, either from turbidites or from hemipelagic sediment. This possibility is supported by high concentrations of CH4 and NHC4 found in the high-temperature vent fluids at the Main Endeavour Field, which are interpreted to reflect subseafloor interaction between hydrothermal fluids and organic material in buried sediments. However, the majority of the samples fall below and are approximately parallel to the

  18. Geochemical and Morphological Characteristics of Metalliferous Deposits at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrischeva, E.; Scott, S.

    2005-12-01

    Metalliferous sediments of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge originating from fallout of particles from a hydrothermal plume and wasting of sulfide chimneys and their oxidation products, as well as deposits of primary Fe-Si-rich oxyhydroxides, were collected during Keck supported expeditions in 2003 and 2004. The analysis of sediment deposited within 35 m of an actively venting high-temperature chimney at the Main Endeavour Field and containing hydrothermal material derived from a plume fallout indicates that Fe, Cu and Zn settled as sulfides, constituting about 3% of the sediment, and as amorphous phases. The amorphous material is represented by Fe-Si-S phases and black aggregates of variable Fe-Mn-Si-S-P-Ca-Mg-Cu-Zn composition. The association of the amorphous material with biogenic debris and bacteria suggests that microorganisms have enhanced the scavenging of the metals and their settlement near the vents. Fine-grained sulfides, barite and other mineral particles may have been deposited near the vents as zooplankton fecal pellets. Barite and Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides are the hydrothermal phases in the sediments along 1.8 km of the axial valley. The sediments also contain Fe-rich montmorillonite of authigenic origin, illite, chlorite, quartz, feldspar and calcite. The study of a mound of old oxidized sulfides at the Main Endeavour Field shows that patchy accumulations of Fe oxyhydroxides are associated with increased concentrations of Si. It is suggested that the oxidation of sulfides was accompanied by precipitation of primary Fe-Si oxyhydroxides from diffuse low-temperature sources. At the Mothra Field, low-temperature solutions have deposited amorphous Fe-Si-Mn oxyhydroxides containing minor Ca, P, Mg, S, Zn and Cu as well as amorphous material of Fe-Mn-Si-S-P-Zn-Pb composition that are found as an external crust on the wall of an extinct chimney. In the oxyhydroxide deposits, the amorphous material is associated with a variety of mineralized

  19. Preliminary Report on the White Canyon Area, San Juan County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, William Edward Barnes; Trites, A.F.; Beroni, E.P.; Feeger, J.A.

    1952-01-01

    The White Canyon area in San Juan County, Utah, contains known deposits of copper-uranium ore and is currently being mapped and studied by the Geological Survey. To date, approximately 75 square miles, or about 20 percent of the area, has been mapped on a scale 1 inch=1 mile. The White Canyon area is underlain by more than 2,000 feet of sedimentary rocks, Carboniferous to Jurassic(?) in age. The area is on the flank of the Elk Ridge anticline, and the strata have a regional dip of 1 deg to 2 deg SW. The Shinarump conglomerate of Late Triassic age is the principal ore-bearing formation. The Shinarump consists of lenticular beds of sandstone, conglomeratic sandstone, clay, and siltstone, and ranges in thickness from a feather edge to as much as 75 feet. Locally the sandstones contain silicified and carbonized wood and fragments of charcoal. These vegetal remains are especially common in channel-fill deposits. Jointing is prominent in the western part of the area, and apparently affects all formations. Adjacent to the joints some of the redbeds in the sequence are bleached. Deposits of copper-uranium minerals have been found in the Moenkopi, Shinarump, and Chinle formations, but the only production of ore has been from the Shinarump conglomerate. The largest concentration of these minerals is in the lower third of the Shinarump, and the deposits seem to be controlled in part by ancient channel fills and in part by fractures. Locally precipitation of the copper and uranium minerals apparently has been aided by charcoal and clays. Visible uranium minerals include both hard and soft pitchblende and secondary hydrosulfates, phosphates, and silicates. In addition, unidentified uranium compounds are present in carbonized wood and charcoal, and in veinlets of hydrocarbons. Base-metal sulfides have been identified in all prospects that extend beyond the oxidized zone. Secondary copper minerals in the oxidized zone include the hydrous sulfates and carbonates, and possibly

  20. Low-Temperature Weathering of Hydrothermal Sulfide Minerals at Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, B. M.; Santelli, C. M.; Rogers, D. R.; Edwards, K. J.

    2005-12-01

    Phylogenetically and metabolically diverse microbial communities have been identified in several deep ocean settings, including the seafloor at mid-ocean ridge flanks. The microorganisms present in these environments appear to participate in geochemical processes, such as mineral dissolution and mineral precipitation, over geological time scales. The purpose of our study was to characterize the initial alteration products and geochemical signatures of hydrothermal sulfide minerals exposed at the seafloor near hydrothermal venting at the Juan de Fuca Ridge, and to identify those weathering products specific to microbial metabolism. Biominerals are notoriously difficult to characterize, often possessing structural defects and small particle size, and are commonly only one of many constituents within natural particles and biofilms. Given these challenges, focused beam X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) techniques provide important capabilities for identifying microbial weathering products by (1) effectively simplifying the chemistry of the sample through examination of chemically discrete areas, (2) identifying co-occurring elements of interest, (3) providing complementary structural information from co-occurring elements, and (4) examining samples at the natural micro- to millimeter spatial scale of mineralogical heterogeneity. We collected 2-dimensional X-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental maps of experimentally weathered sulfide minerals in cross section. For these experiments, fresh, unweathered sulfide minerals were incubated at low temperatures for a two month period and then collected for mineralogical and microbiological analysis. Previous work on these samples showed that abundant Fe oxide minerals (principally 2-line ferrihydrite) accumulated during weathering, and correlated with dense cell aggregates at the mineral surface. Additionally, a diverse collection of Fe oxidizing bacteria were cultured from these and other similar samples incubated or collected

  1. Direct Measurements of Hydrothermal Heat Output at Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, L. N.; di Iorio, D.; Genc, G.; Hurt, R. S.; Lowell, R. P.; Holden, J. F.; Butterfield, D. A.; Olson, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    Heat output and fluid flow are key parameters for characterizing seafloor hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers. In particular, they are essential for examining partition of heat and geochemical fluxes between discrete and diffuse flow components. Hydrothermal heat output also constrains permeability of young oceanic crust and thickness of the conductive boundary layer separating hydrothermal circulation from the underlying magmatic heat source. Over the past several years, we have deployed a number of relatively simple devices to make direct measurements of focused and diffuse flow. Most recently, we have used cup anemometer and turbine flow meters to measure fluid flow and heat flux at individual high-temperature vents and diffuse flow sites. The turbine flow meter (Figure 1) includes a titanium rotor assembly housed within a stainless steel tube and supported by sapphire bearings. The device can be used at different seafloor settings for measurements of both diffuse and focused flow. The spin of the rotor blades is videotaped to acquire the angular velocity, which is a function of the flow rate determined through calibration. We report data obtained during four cruises to the Main Endeavor and High Rise vent fields, Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), between 2007 and 2009. Overall more than 50 successful measurements of heat flow have been made on a variety of high-, medium-, and low-temperature hydrothermal sites on the Endeavor, Mothra, and High Rise structures. For example, the velocity of diffuse flow at Endeavor ranged from ~1 to ~10 cm/sec. The flow velocity from black smokers varied from ~10 cm/sec to ~1 m/sec, which appears to be similar to EPR 9°N. Typical measurements of heat flux obtained at JdFR ranged from ~1 kW for diffuse flow to ~1 MW for black smokers. Although it is difficult to extrapolate the data and obtain the integrated heat output for a vent field on JdFR, the data are used to characterize the heat fluxes from individual vent

  2. Microbial diversity within Juan de Fuca ridge basement fluids sampled from oceanic borehole observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungbluth, S.; Bowers, R.; Lin, H.; Hsieh, C.; Cowen, J. P.; Rappé, M.

    2012-12-01

    Three generations of sampling and instrumentation platforms known as Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit (CORK) observatories affixed to Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) boreholes are providing unrivaled access to fluids originating from 1.2-3.5 million-years (Myr) old basaltic crust of the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca ridge. Borehole fluid samples obtained via a custom seafloor fluid pumping and sampling system coupled to CORK continuous fluid delivery lines are yielding critical insights into the biogeochemistry and nature of microbial life inhabiting the sediment-covered basement environment. Direct microscopic enumeration revealed microbial cell abundances that are 2-41% of overlying bottom seawater. Snapshots of basement fluid microbial diversity and community structure have been obtained through small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene cloning and sequencing from five boreholes that access a range of basement ages and temperatures at the sediment-basement interface. SSU rRNA gene clones were derived from four different CORK installations (1026B, 1301A, 1362A, and 1362B) accessing relatively warmer (65°C) and older (3.5 Myr) ridge flank, and one location (1025C) accessing relatively cooler (39°C) and younger (1.2 Myr) ridge flank, revealing that warmer basement fluids had higher microbial diversity. A sampling time-series collected from borehole 1301A has revealed a microbial community that is temporally variable, with the dominant lineages changing between years. Each of the five boreholes sampled contained a unique microbial assemblage, however, common members are found from both cultivated and uncultivated lineages within the archaeal and bacterial domains, including meso- and thermophilic microbial lineages involved with sulfur cycling (e.g Thiomicrospira, Sulfurimonas, Desulfocapsa, Desulfobulbus). In addition, borehole fluid environmental gene clones were also closely related to uncultivated lineages

  3. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2009-01-01

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (μXRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μΕXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (μXRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe 1-xS, 0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe μEXAFS spectroscopy and μXRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O 6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O 6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  4. Progress report on the Happy Jack mine, Which Canyon area, San Juan county, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trites, Albert F.; Chew, Randall T.

    1954-01-01

    The Happy Jack mine is in the White Canyon area, San Juan county, Utah. Production is from high-grade uranium deposits in the Shinarump conglomerate of the Triassic age. In this area the Shinarump beds range from about 16 to 40 feet in thickness and the lower part of these beds fills an east-trending channel this is note than 750 feet wide and 10 feet deep. The Shinarump conglomerate consists of beds of coarse- to fine-grained quartzose sandstone, conglomerate, siltstone, and claystone. Carbonized wood is abundant in these beds, and in the field it was classified as mineral charcoal and coal. Intra-Shinarump channels, cross-stratification, current lineation, and slumping and compaction structures have been recognized in the mine. Steeply dipping fractures have dominant trends in four directions -- N 65°W, N 60°E, N 85°E, and due north. Uranium occurs as bedded deposits, as replacement bodies in accumulations of "trash", and as replacements of larger fragments of wood. An "ore shoot" is formed where the three types of uranium deposits occur together; these ore shoots appear to be elongate masses with sharp boundaries. Uranium minerals include uraninite, sooty pitchblende(?), and the sulfate--betazippeite, johannite, and uranopilite. Associated with the uraninite are the sulfide minerals covellite, bornite, chalcopyritw, and pyrite. Galena and sphalerite have been found in close association with uranium minerals. The gaunge minerals include: limonite and hematite present in most of the sandstone beds throughout the deposit, jarosite that impregnates much of the sandstone in the outer parts of the mine workings, gypsum that fills many of the fractures, and barite that impregnates the sandstone in at least one part of the mine. Secondary copper minerals, mainly copper sulfates, occur throughout the mine, but most abundant near the adits in the outermost 30 feet of the workings. The minerals comprising the bulk of the country rock include quartz, feldspar, and clay

  5. Biogeochemical Fluxes Across the Juan de Fuca Ridge-Flank: Minor and Trace Element Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulme, S. M.; Wheat, C. G.; Jannasch, H. W.

    2006-12-01

    Crustal ridge-flank hydrothermal convection of seawater profoundly affects; global geochemical fluxes and cycles, plate tectonics through crustal cooling, and the deep biosphere. Comprehensive assessment of chemical fluxes from this type of hydrothermal circulation has been obscured by sampling artifacts during sample retrieval and extraction from drilling and the lack of uncontaminated in situ samples. With the development of sealed borehole observatories (CORKs) it is now possible to obtainable uncontaminated crustal formation fluids. The Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge presented an ideal region for addressing the effects of ridge flank hydrothermal circulation on global processes because of direct access to basement fluids through six CORKs and the known composition of nearby spring fluids. We present data from fluids collected via osmotically-pumped continuous fluid samplers (OsmoSamplers) from within sealed boreholes. Methods using high-resolution ICP-MS were developed to allow analysis of trace elements (V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Y, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, and U) and the entire suite of rare-earth elements in 5ml of sample. Fluids from OsmoSamplers deployed at 3 drill sites (1024, 1026, and 1027) were analyzed along with borehole fluids collected at two additional sites (1025 and 1026). Pore fluids from multiple drilling legs were also compared for sampling artifacts associated with differing sediment core collection techniques. The results of this study determined which trace elements can be accurately determined from ocean drilling and pore water extraction from sediments and borehole sampling by comparison with the time-integrated samples obtained from within the sealed boreholes. Once the accurate composition of basement fluids was determined, it was possible to examine regional trends of the hydrothermal aquifer system both along and across strike of the ridge axis. These data of crustal fluids can then be compared to pore fluids collected during

  6. The Occurrence and Origin of Andesites and Dacites From the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotsonika, L. A.; Perfit, M. R.; Stakes, D.; Ridley, W. I.

    2005-05-01

    We have studied the geology of the Cleft segment of the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge and the ridge-transform intersection (RTI) during three cruises of MBARI's R/V Western Flyer beginning in 2000. A total of 53 rock cores and 276 precisely located rock or glass samples were collected during sixteen dives with the ROV Tiburon. These ROV dive samples and observations along with regional (EM300) and local-scale (side scan and video imaging) mapping, allow us to test models regarding the magmatic evolution of this segment and the relationships between specific tectonic and morphologic features and magmatic processes. An extremely wide range of N-type lavas were recovered which are, on average, more evolved (lower MgO) off-axis, away from the present neovolcanic zone (the cleft), and towards the RTI. During the fall of 2004, a ROV dive was specifically planned to investigate a region of unfaulted, curved volcanic ridges that overshoot the Blanco Transform. During the dive 39 samples were recovered that range from ferrobasalt to andesite and dacite (SiO2 = 50.3 to 66.4 wt.% ; Mg# = 41 to 7). The highly evolved lavas were recovered from two large constructional domes comprised of unusually large pillow flows, and extremely blocky, vesicular flows, similar to some terrestrial silicic domes. Some of the andesite-dacite hand samples are extremely vesicular with elongate vesicles (1-10 cm) in a glassy matrix. The andesitic and dacitic lavas also have elevated Cl- levels that range from 4000-6000 ppm. Mineral assemblages are dominated by microphenocrysts of ferroaugite and ferropigeonite, with lesser amounts of sodic plagioclase and FeTi oxides, and rare fayalite and zircon. A few of the more magnesian phenocrysts (xenocrysts?) exhibit normal zoning whereas more Fe-rich crystals are reversely zoned. In addition, there appear to be inclusions of quenched basaltic material within some of the evolved lavas. These samples represent an extensive and unique set of some of the most

  7. Helium as a Tracer for Fluids Released from Juan de Fuca Lithosphere Beneath the Cascadia Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, P. A.; Constantz, J. E.; Hunt, A. G.; Blair, J. L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Helium isotopic ratios (3He/4He) observed in mineral springs above the Cascadia forearc provide a marker for fluids derived from Juan de Fuca lithosphere. Sample sites arcward of the forearc mantle corner generally yield significantly higher ratios (~1.5-4.0 R/RA) than those seaward of the corner (~0.3-0.6 R/RA). 3He detected above the inner forearc mantle wedge may represent a mixture of both oceanic lithosphere and forearc mantle sources, whereas 3He detected seaward of the forearc mantle corner likely has only an oceanic source. The highest ratios in the forearc coincide with slab depths (~40-45 km) where metamorphic dehydration of young, warm oceanic lithosphere is expected to release significant fluid and where tectonic tremor occurs, whereas little fluid is expected to be released from the slab (~ 25-30 km depth) beneath sites seaward of the corner.High helium ratios are also observed in springs and wells in the Nankai and Hikurangi forearcs above the region where tremor and slow slip events are detected. This correlation provides independent evidence that tremor and slow slip are associated with deep fluids, and further suggests that high pore pressures associated with tremor may also serve to keep fractures open for 3He migration through the crust.Even though our preliminary results document mantle-derived helium in surface waters of the Cascadia forearc, these results are based on sparse data from sample locations that are not optimally distributed. We have recently identified additional sample sites to investigate whether specific crustal structures in the Cascadia forearc might serve as conduits to speed the ascent of mantle-derived helium. Finally, the possibility of a 3He source related to westward flow of arc-derived fluids through the forearc mantle cannot be ruled out for some of the sites, nonetheless, the highest ratio (4.0 R/RA) is found >130 km from the nearest Cascade Arc volcano making a magmatic source unlikely.

  8. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-05-22

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (mu XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu EXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (mu XRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe1-xS, 0<_ x<_ 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe mu EXAFS spectroscopy and mu XRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  9. Porosity estimates of the upper crust in the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Weekly, R. T.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate upper crustal porosity variations using the differential effective medium (DEM) theory to interpret the observed seismic velocity variations for the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, an intermediate spreading center [Weekly et al., 2014]. We use six P-wave vertical velocity profiles averaged within 5 km × 10 km areas to estimate the porosity at depths from 0.4 km to 2 km. The profile regions cover on-axis, east and west flanks of the central Endeavour segment and three regions of the segment ends including the Endeavour-West Valley (E-WV) and the Cobb overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) and the relict Middle Valley. At the segment center, our calculated porosities on-axis and on the east and west flanks agree well with the apparent bulk porosities measured in Hole 504B at intermediate-spreading Costa Rica Rift [Becker, 1990] and decrease from 5-15% to 2-7% from 0.5 km to 1 km depth and seal by 2 km depth. At all depths, our calculated porosities on the east and west flanks are lower than those on-axis by ~1.3-3%. This indicates the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation [Newman et al., 2011]. At the segment ends, upper crustal velocities are lower than those in the segment center at depths < 2 km. These lower velocities are attributed to higher porosities (10-20% at 0.4 km decreasing to 3-6% at 2 km depth). This may indicate that fracturing in the OSCs strongly affects porosity at shallow depths. Between 0.7 km and 1 km, porosities estimated in all regions using pore aspect ratios of 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 are higher than those from Hole 504B indicating that the aspect ratio of cracks may be smaller than 0.05. There also appears to be a spreading rate dependence to upper crustal porosity structure. On-axis at the Endeavour segment, the calculated porosities from 0.4 km to 2 km are higher than those at the Lucky Strike segment, a slow spreading center [Seher et al., 2010]. Specifically at 2

  10. Hydrothermal sulfide accumulation along the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Clague, D. A.; Hannington, M. D.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide deposits that form on the seafloor are often located by the detection of hydrothermal plumes in the water column, followed by exploration with deep-towed cameras, side-scan sonar imaging, and finally by visual surveys using remotely-operated vehicle or occupied submersible. Hydrothermal plume detection, however, is ineffective for finding hydrothermally-inactive sulfide deposits, which may represent a significant amount of the total sulfide accumulation on the seafloor, even in hydrothermally active settings. Here, we present results from recent high-resolution, autonomous underwater vehicle-based mapping of the hydrothermally-active Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Analysis of the ridge bathymetry resulted in the location of 581 individual sulfide deposits along 24 km of ridge length. Hydrothermal deposits were distinguished from volcanic and tectonic features based on the characteristics of their surface morphology, such as shape and slope angles. Volume calculations for each deposit results in a total volume of 372,500 m3 of hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate-silica material, for an equivalent mass of ∼1.2 Mt of hydrothermal material on the seafloor within the ridge's axial valley, assuming a density of 3.1 g/cm3. Much of this total volume is from previously undocumented inactive deposits outside the main active vent fields. Based on minimum ages of sulfide deposition, the deposits accumulated at a maximum rate of ∼400 t/yr, with a depositional efficiency (proportion of hydrothermal material that accumulates on the seafloor to the total amount hydrothermally mobilized and transported to the seafloor) of ∼5%. The calculated sulfide tonnage represents a four-fold increase over previous sulfide estimates for the Endeavour Segment that were based largely on accumulations from within the active fields. These results suggest that recent global seafloor sulfide resource estimates, which were based mostly

  11. Ethnobotany in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park, Nuevo León, México

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Eduardo; Villarreal, José A; Cantú, César; Cabral, Ismael; Scott, Laura; Yen, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    An ethnobotanical study in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park (CMNP), Nuevo Leon, Mexico was conducted. In spite of the large area (1,773.7 km2), heterogeneous physiography, contrasting plant communities and high species diversity of the CMNP, very little was previously known about its useful plants. Based on 95 interviews with inhabitants of the region who were 35 years or older, we recorded ethnobotanical data of 240 species (comprising 170 genera and 69 botanical families), and 146 different uses. Most of the cited uses (98) were found to be medicinal ones. Background An ethnobotanical study in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park (CMNP), Nuevo Leon, Mexico was conducted. In spite of the large area (1,773.7 km2), heterogeneous physiography, contrasting plant communities and high species diversity of the CMNP, very little was previously known about its useful plants. Based on 95 interviews with inhabitants of the region who were 35 years old or older, we recorded ethnobotanical data of 240 species (comprising 170 genera and 69 botanical families), and 146 different uses. Most of the cited uses (98) were found to be medicinal ones. Methods Ninety five inhabitants 35 years old and oldest were interviewed to know what are the main plant uses in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park. Results and discussion Two hundred and forty species, 170 genera, and 69 families of useful plants and 146 different uses were recorded. We found most of the uses to be medicinal (98), while the rest (48) represent various purposes. Herbaceous plants are the most used, followed by shrubs and trees. PMID:17263889

  12. Multimedia Technology in Language and Culture Restoration Efforts at San Juan Pueblo: A Brief History of the Development of the Tewa Language Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Sue-Ellen; Tuttle, Siri G.; Martinez, Esther

    1998-01-01

    The Tewa Language Project CD-ROM was developed at the University of Washington in collaboration with San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico, to restore the use of spoken and written Tewa and to repatriate cultural property. The CD-ROM contains an interactive multimedia dictionary, songs, stories, photographs, land and water data, and linguistic resources…

  13. 33 CFR 334.1200 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, eastern end; off the westerly shore of Whidbey Island; naval restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... end; off the westerly shore of Whidbey Island; naval restricted areas. 334.1200 Section 334.1200... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1200 Strait of Juan de Fuca, eastern end; off the westerly shore...°40′26″ W.; and thence along the shore line to the point of beginning. (b) Area No. 2. Bounded by...

  14. Analysis of the Transport and Fate of Metals Released From the Gold King Mine Into the Animas and San Juan Rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project’s objectives were to provide analysis of water quality following the release of acid mine drainage in the Animas and San Juan Rivers in a timely manner to 1) generate a comprehensive picture of the plume at the river system level, 2) help inform future monitoring eff...

  15. The geology and petrology of Volcán San Juan (Nayarit, México) and the compositionally zoned Tepic Pumice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhr, James F.

    2000-01-01

    Volcán San Juan is the westernmost Quaternary composite volcano in the Mexican Volcanic Belt. Its activity is divided into three stages of decreasing eruptive volume. During stage-1 activity, the main cone of San Juan and the adjacent Cerro Alto grew to a combined volume of ˜60 km 3 through eruption of hornblende-bearing andesites, dacites, and rhyodacites. Stage 1 included explosive eruptions of hornblende-dacite and an andesite dated at 33,750 a (years ago) and 23,010 a. Stage-2 activity involved a major Plinian eruption 14,770 a that produced the hypersthene-hornblende-bearing, compositionally zoned, rhyodacitic-andesitic Tepic Pumice and led to formation of an oval-shaped caldera 4×1 km in diameter. Tepic, the capital city of Nayarit State, with a population of ˜250,000, lies at the NE foot of Volcán San Juan. This location was buried under 2-9 m of rhyodacitic pumice-fall deposits from the Tepic Pumice eruption. Erosion has since removed virtually all exposures of Tepic Pumice >15 km from the caldera. The estimated volume of erupted tephra is 5.6 km 3, equivalent to 1.2 km 3 of magma. Modeling of the eruption dynamics indicates that as the eruption evolved the column height increased from ˜15 km to ˜24 km and maximum mass discharge rate increased from ˜3×10 6 kg/s to ˜6×10 7 kg/s. During stage-3 activity, a hornblende-andesitic lava dome partially filled the caldera and sent block lava flows down the north slope of the cone; total erupted volume was ˜0.55 km 3. Compared to other composite volcanoes of the western Mexican Volcanic Belt, the products from San Juan have the highest Sr contents and the lowest Rb, Y, Yb, and Lu contents, resulting in high La/Yb and Sr/Y, with low Rb/Sr. These observations indicate a strong slab-melt component at San Juan, consistent with its proximity to the Middle America Trench where young, hot lithosphere is subducting. The San Juan andesites, dacites, and rhyodacites also have relatively high 87Sr/ 86Sr, 206Pb/ 204

  16. Directionality of Ambient Noise on the Juan de Fuca Plate: Implications for Source Locations of the Primary and Secondary Microseism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Based on cross-correlations computed from 61 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) within the Juan de Fuca plate from the Cascadia Initiative experiment and 42 continental stations near the western US coast, we investigate the generation locations of the primary (11-20 sec period) and secondary (5-10 sec period) microseisms in the northern Pacific Ocean by analyzing the directionality of the microseism signals received in this region. (1) Ambient noise observed across the array is much different in the primary and secondary microseism bands, both in its azimuthal content and seasonal variation, indicating different source generation locations. (2) The principal secondary microseism signals propagate toward the east, consistent with source generation in deep water of the North Pacific, perhaps coincident with the region of body wave excitation observed by Gerstoft et al. [2008] and Landès et al. [2010]. (3) Local primary microseism sources within and near the Juan de Fuca plate are implied by observations of the azimuthal dependence of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave amplitudes as well as observations of precursory arrivals in cross-correlations of ambient noise. The strongest local generation region is observed northwest of the Juan de Fuca plate near the coast of British Columbia perhaps near Graham Island. Weaker local sources appear to be oceanward of Vancouver Island and southern Oregon. (4) High quality Green's functions are derived from cross-correlations between deep water OBSs and continental stations proving that deep water generated signals can efficiently propagate onto the continent and are well recorded by continental seismic stations, at least at periods longer than about 5 sec.In conclusion, the primary and secondary microseisms are generated at different locations, with the secondary microseism dominantly coming from deep-water sources and the source of primary microseism having a significant component in the shallow waters of the eastern Pacific

  17. Growth of large sulfide structures on the endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Margaret K.; Delaney, John R.

    1986-04-01

    Mapping and sampling with DSRV "Alvin" has established that sulfide blocks 0.5 m across, dredged from the axial valley of the Endeavour Segment at 47°57'N, are samples of unusually large sulfide structures. The steep-sided structures, up to 30 m in length, 20 m in height, and 10-15 m across, are localized by venting along normal faults at the base of the western axial valley wall, and are distributed for about 200 m along strike paralleling the 020 trend of the ridge crest. High-temperature fluids (350 to more than 400°C) pass through the massive sulfide structures and enter seawater through small, concentric "nozzle-like" features projecting from the top or the sides of the larger vent structures. Diffuse, low-temperature flow is pervasive in the vicinity of the active sulfide structures, exiting from basalt and sulfide surfaces alike. Evidence of recent volcanic activity is sparse. The two largest samples taken with the dredge would not have been recoverable using the submersible. These samples represent massive, complex portions of the sulfide structures which were not closely associated with rapid high-temperature fluid flow at the time of sampling; they contain textural evidence of sealed hydrothermal fluid exit channels. Mineralogy is dominated by Fe sulfides nnd amorphous silica. Pyrite, marcasite, wurtzite, chalcopyrite, and iss are the most common sulfide phases. Pyrrhotite, galena, and sphalerite are present in trace amounts. Barite, amorphous silica, and chalcedony are the only non-sulfide phases; anhydrite is not observed in any of the dredge samples, although it is common in the chimney-like samples recovered by "Alvin". Specific mineralogical-textural zones within the dredge samples are anaoogous to individual layers in East Pacific Rise at 21°N and southern Juan de Fuca Ridge samples, with two exceptions: a coarse-grained, highly porous Fe sulfide-rich interior containing sulfidized tubeworm casts, and a 2-5 cm thick zone near the outer margin of

  18. Pressures of Partial Crystallization of Magmas from the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for Crustal Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. L.; Barton, M.

    2010-12-01

    Plate spreading at the mid-ocean ridges is accompanied by intrusion of dikes and eruption of lava along the ridge axis. It has been suggested that the depth of magma chambers that feed the flows and dikes is related to the rate of spreading. As part of a larger effort to examine this hypothesis, we determined the depths of magma chambers beneath the intermediate spreading Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdF) which extends from the Blanco fracture zone at about 44.5 degrees North to the Triple junction of the JdF, Nootka Fault, and the Socanco fracture zone at 48.7 degrees North. Pressures of partial crystallization were determined by comparing the compositions of natural liquids (glasses) with those of experimental liquids in equilibrium with olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene at different pressures and temperatures using the method described by Kelley and Barton (2008). Chemical analyses mid-ocean ridge basalts glasses sampled from along the JdF were used as liquid compositions. Samples with anomalous chemical compositions and samples that yielded pressures associated with unrealistically large uncertainties were filtered out of the database. The calculated pressures for the remaining 533 samples were used to calculate the depths of partial crystallization and to identify the likely location of magma chambers. Preliminary results indicate that the pressure of partial crystallization decreases from 2 to 1±0.5 kbars from the Blanco fracture zone to the north along the Cleft segment of the ridge. Calculated pressures remain approximately constant at 0.87±0.53 kbars along ridge segments to the north of the Cleft. These low pressures for the remaining segments of the ridge are interpreted to indicate magma chambers at depths of 1.3-4.9 km and agree reasonably well with the depths of seismically imaged tops of axial magma chambers (2-3 km) (Canales et al 2009). The higher pressures obtained for lavas erupted along the Cleft segment of the JdF agree very well with recent

  19. Upper Crustal Seismic Velocity Structure of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, R. T.; Wilcock, W. S.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wells, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    We report preliminary results from an active-source seismic tomography experiment that was conducted along the intermediate-spreading Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in 2009. The overarching objective of the experiment is to test competing hypotheses for what governs the scale and intensity of magmatic and hydrothermal processes at mid-ocean ridges. Previous models of crustal accretion inferred that ridge-basin topography observed at the Endeavour results from alternating periods of enhanced or reduced magma supply from the mantle. Alternatively, a recent seismic reflection study has imaged a crustal magma chamber underlying the central portion of the Endeavour, which may indicate that variations in seafloor topography instead result from dike-induced faulting that occurs within the upper crust, adjacent to the axial magma chamber. The first model predicts a thicker high-porosity eruptive layer and lower velocities beneath topographic highs, while the second model is compatible with a uniform pattern of volcanic accretion. The experiment used 68 four-component ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) at 64 sites to record 5,567 airgun shots from the 6600 in3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. Three nested shooting grids were collected to image the three-dimensional crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the segment at multiple spatial scales. We use first-arriving crustal phases (Pg) recorded by the two grids with the densest shot-receiver spacing, the 24 x 8 km2 vent field grid and the 60 x 20 km2 crustal grid, to image the fine-scale (< 1 km) three-dimensional velocity structure of the upper few kilometers of crust at the segment scale. We employ a non-linear tomographic method that utilizes a shortest-path ray-tracing algorithm with columns of nodes sheared vertically to include effects of seafloor topography. To date, we have manually picked 13,000 Pg phases located within 10 km of 17 OBSs. The full analysis will include ~40,000 Pg travel

  20. Understanding Plume Bending at Grotto Vent on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.; Rabinowitz, J.; Rona, P. A.; Jackson, D. R.; Jones, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    Our improved understanding of black smoker plume bending derives from acoustic imaging of the plume at Grotto, a 30 m diameter vent cluster in the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. In July 2000, the VIP2000 cruise collected 15 acoustic images over 24 hours. In September 2010, the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) was connected to the NEPTUNE Canada Endeavour Observatory and acquired a 29 day time series capturing plume bending in 479 independent images. Inclination and declination are extracted for one or more plumes from the acoustic images using 2D Gaussian fitting. The bending of the large plume above the northwest end of Grotto is consistent with a dominant tidal sloshing and secondary rift valley inflow based a spectral analysis of the COVIS time series compared with a spectral analysis of current data from 2.9 km north of Grotto. The smaller plume above the eastern end of Grotto behaves in a more complicated fashion as it sometimes bends towards the larger plume. The overall shape of the larger plume is highly variable: sometimes the plume just leans in the direction of the presumed ambient current; other times, the plume bends-over and, in a few cases, the plume bends in two or more directions (forming a sinusoidal shape). Several factors influence bending direction, magnitude and shape. First, for a fluctuating plume, the instantaneous plume centerline wiggles around within the time-averaged plume boundaries; this will certainly produce a "sinusoidal" shape and may be the best explanation for the small scale multi-directional bending observed in individual acoustic images. Second, the transition from jet to plume could produce a change in bending magnitude (but not direction); however, this is unlikely to be visible on the acoustic images as the transition from jet to plume is anticipated to occur within the first 1 m of rise. Third, the ratio of rise velocity W to cross-flow velocity U controls the magnitude and direction of bending

  1. Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, Integrated Studies Site (ISS) Update and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, D.; Ridge Community

    2003-12-01

    The Ridge 2000 (R2K) Integrated Studies bull's eye on the Juan de Fuca Ridge is focused on the Main Endeavour hydrothermal field, located on the central portion of the Endeavour Segment. This vent field is one of the most vigorously venting systems along the global mid-ocean ridge spreading network, hosting at least 18 large sulfide structures that contains more than100 smokers. Prior to a magmatic event in 2000 some of the edifices had been venting 380C, volatile-rich fluids with extremely low chlorinities for a decade. In addition to the Main Endeavour Field there are four other known high temperature vent fields spaced approximately 2 kilometers apart along the segment (with hints of more) and abundant areas of diffuse flow, both nearby and distal to the high temperature venting. Diffuse flow from the structures and from a variety of basaltic-hosted sites provides rich habitats abundant with microbial and macrofaunal communities. There are well-developed gradients in volatile concentrations along axis that may reflect influence from a sedimentary source to the north, and high chlorinity fluids vent from the most southern (Mothra) and northern fields (Sasquatch). Twenty years of research have laid a firm base for the 5-year plans of R2K at this site, which include examining the response of this segment to perturbations induced by tectonic and magmatic events, identification of the reservoirs, fluxes, and feedbacks of mass and energy at this site, and predictive modeling coupled with field observations. Since designation as an IS site, high-resolution bathymetric mapping (EM300) and an extensive multi-channel seismic survey have been conducted along the entire segment. Smaller focused areas have also been mapped at meter resolution by SM2000 sonar. Intense field programs in 2003 established the first in-situ seismic array along a mid-ocean ridge, which includes installation of a buried broadband seismometer and 7 short-period seismometers emplaced within basaltic

  2. Vent Field Distribution and Evolution Along the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Lilley, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    Five major vent fields have now been discovered along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. From the north to the south they include Sasquatch, Salty Dawg, High Rise, Main Endeavour, and Mothra. Spacing between the distinct, high-temperature fields increases from the north to the south. For example Sasquatch is located 1.6 km north of Salty Dawg and Mothra is 2.7 km south of the Main Endeavour Field. In addition to changes in spacing of the vent fields along axis there are also dramatic changes in the style, intensity, and thermal-chemical characteristics of venting. The newly discovered Sasquatch field extends for >200 m in length, and venting is limited to a few isolated, small structures that reach 284° C. Active venting is confined to the northern portion of the field. In contrast, extinct, massive sulfide edifices and oxidized sulfide talus can be followed continuously for over 200 m along a 25-30 m wide, 020 trending ridge indicating that this field was very active in the past. In contrast to the delicate active structures, older extinct structures reach at least 25 m in height and the aspect ratios are similar to active pillars in the Mothra Field 7.5 km, to the south. It is unclear if venting at this site represents rejuvenation of the field, or whether it is in a waning stage. Within Salty Dawg, vent fluid temperatures reach 296° C and vigorous venting is constrained to a few, multi-flanged edifices that reach 25 m in height and 25 m in length. The field hosts over 25 structures, oxidized sulfide is abundant, and diffuse flow is dominant. Fluid compositions and temperatures are consistent with Salty Dawg being in a waning stage of evolution. Venting intensity and incidence of venting increase dramatically at High Rise where numerous multi-flanged structures are active; temperatures reach 343° C. The most intense and active of the fields is the Main Endeavour, with at least 21 actively venting, multi-flanged edifices that contain at least 100

  3. Preliminary report on the White Canyon area, San Juan county, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, William E.; Trites, Albert F.; Beroni, Ernest P.; Feeger, John A.

    1952-01-01

    The White Canyon area, in the central part of San Juan County, Utah, consists of approximately two 15-minute quadrangles. Approximately 75 square miles have been mapped by the Geological Survey on a scale of 1 inch equals 1 mile, using a combined aerial photography-plane table method. Structure contours were drawn on top of the Organ Rock member of the Cutler formation. Parts of the Gonway and North Point claims, 1/4 mile east of the Happy Jack mine, were mapped in detail. The principal objectives of the investigations were: (1) to establish ore guides; (2) to select areas favorable for exploration; and (3) to map the general geology and to determine the regional relationships of the uranium deposits. The White Canyon area is comprised of sedimentary rocks of Carboniferous to Jurassic age, more than 2,000 feet thick, having a regional dip of 1° to 2° SW. The nearest igneous rocks are in the Henry Mountains about 7 miles west of the northern part of the area; The Shinarump conglomerate of the late Triassic age, the principal ore horizon in the White Canyon area, consists of lenticular beds of sandstone, conglomeratic sandstone, conglomerate, clay, and siltstone. The Shinarump conglomerate, absent in places, is as much as 75 feet thick. The sandstones locally contain molds of logs and fragments of altered volcanic ash. Some of the logs have been replaced by copper and uranium minerals and iron oxides. The clay and siltstone underlie and are interbedded with the sandstone, and are most common in channels that cut into the underlying Moenkopi formation. The Shinarump conglomerate contains reworked Moenkopi siltstone fragments, clay balls, carbonized wood, and pebbles of quarts, quartzite, and chert. Jointing is prominent in the Western part of the mapped area. The three most prominent joint trends are due east, N. 65°-75° W., and N. 65°-75° E. All joints have vertical dips. The red beds are bleached along some joints, especially those that trend N. 65°-75° W

  4. Mineralogical studies of sulfide samples and volatile concentrations of basalt glasses from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brett, Robin; Evans, Howard T., Jr.; Wandless, M. V.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Hedenquist, Jeffrey W.

    1987-01-01

    Sulfide samples obtained from Alvin dives on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge were examined, showing the presence of two previously undiscovered minerals, both formed at low temperatures. The first detection of lizardite, starkeyite, and anatase in such an environment is also reported. Sulfide geothermometry involving the Cu-Fe-S system shows a vent temperature of less than 328 C for one sample. Ice-melting temperatures on inclusions from this sample are about -2.8 C, and fluid inclusion studies on crystals near this sample show pressure-corrected homogenization temperatures of 268 and 285 C. Volatile concentrations from vesicle-free basalt glass from the vent field are found to be about 0.0013 wt pct CO2 and 0.16 wt pct H2O.

  5. Direct U-Pb dating of Cretaceous and Paleocene dinosaur bones, San Juan Basin, New Mexico: COMMENT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koenig, Alan E.; Lucas, Spencer G.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Heckert, Andrew B.; Sullivan, Robert M.; Jasinski, Steven E.; Fowler, Denver W.

    2012-01-01

    Based on U-Pb dating of two dinosaur bones from the San Juan Basin of New Mexico (United States), Fassett et al. (2011) claim to provide the first successful direct dating of fossil bones and to establish the presence of Paleocene dinosaurs. Fassett et al. ignore previously published work that directly questions their stratigraphic interpretations (Lucas et al., 2009), and fail to provide sufficient descriptions of instrumental, geochronological, and statistical treatments of the data to allow evaluation of the potentially complex diagenetic and recrystallization history of bone. These shortcomings lead us to question the validity of the U-Pb dates published by Fassett et al. and their conclusions regarding the existence of Paleocene dinosaurs.

  6. Botanical and geological significance of potassium-argon dates from the Juan Fernández Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuessy, Tod F.; Foland, K.A.; Sutter, John F.; Sanders, Roger W.; Silva, O. Mario

    1984-01-01

    Potassium-argon dating of five basalts from the three main islands of the Juan Fernández (or Robinson Crusoe) Islands of Chile in the southeastern Pacific gives ages of 1.01 ± 0.12 and 2.44 ± 0.14 million years for Masafuera, 3.79 ± 0.20 and 4.23 ± 0.16 for Masatierra, and 5.8 ± 2.1 for Santa Clara. These ages are much younger than that of the underlying oceanic plate and are consistent with the origin of the island-seamount chain from a mantle hot spot beneath the eastward moving Nazca plate. The young age for the archipelago suggests that speciation within endemic genera has occurred within the past 4 to 5 million years. Endemic genera of apparently more ancient origins, such as Lactoris and Thyrsopteris, have apparently dispersed to the islands and survive refugially.

  7. Hydrogeology of the Cliff House Sandstone in the San Juan structural basin, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Conde R.; Levings, G.W.; Craigg, S.D.; Dam, W.L.; Kernodle, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report is one in a series resulting from the U.S. Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) study of the San Juan structural basin that began in October 1984. Previous reports in the series describe the hydrogeology of the Dakota Sandstone (Craigg and others, 1989), Point Lookout Sandstone (Craigg and others, 1990), Morrison Formation (Dam and others, 1990), Gallup Sandstone (Kernodle and others, 1989), and Menefee Formation (Levings and others, 1990) in the San Juan structural basin. The purposes of the RASA (Welder, 1986) are to: (1) Define and evaluate the aquifer system; (2) assess the effects of past, present, and potential ground-water use on aquifers and streams; and (3) determine the availability and quality of ground water. This report summarizes information on the geology and the occurrence and quality of water in the Cliff House Sandstone, one of the primary water-bearing units in the regional aquifer system. Data used in this report were collected during the study or were derived from existing records in the U.S. Geological Survey's computerized National Water Information System (NWIS) data base, the Petroleum Information Corporation's data base, and the Dwight's ENERGYDATA Inc. BRIN data base. Although all data available for the Cliff House Sandstone were considered in formulating the discussions in the text, not all those data could be plotted on the illustrations. The San Juan structural basin is in New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah and has an area of about 21,600 square miles (fig. 1). The structural basin is about 140 miles wide and about 200 miles long. The study area is that part of the structural basin that contains rocks of Triassic or younger age and, therefore, is less extensive than the structural basin. Triassic through Tertiary sedimentary rocks are emphasized in this study because the major aquifers in the basin are present in these rocks. The study area is about 140 miles wide (about the same as the

  8. Hydrogeology of the Point Lookout Sandstone in the San Juan structural basin, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craigg, Steven D.; Dam, W.L.; Kernodle, J.M.; Thorn, C.R.; Levings, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    This report is one in a series resulting from the U.S. Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) study of the San Juan structural basin that began in October 1984. Previous reports in the series describe the hydrogeology of the Dakota Sandstone (Craigg and others, 1989), Morrison Formation (Dam and others, 1990), Gallup Sandstone (Kernodle and others, 1989), Menefee Formation (Levings and others, 1990), and Cliff House Sandstone (Thorn and others, 1990), in the San Juan structural basin. The purposes of the RASA (Welder, 1986) are to: (1) Define and evaluate the aquifer system; (2) assess the effects of past, present, and potential ground-water use on aquifers and streams; and (3) determine the availability and quality of ground water. This report summarizes information on the geology and the occurrence and quality of water in the Point Lookout Sandstone, one of the primary water-bearing units in the regional aquifer system. Data used in this report were collected during the study or were derived from existing records in the U.S. Geological Survey's computerized National Water Information System (NWIS) data base, the Petroleum Information Corporation's database, and the Dwight's ENERGYDATA Inc. BRIN data base. Although all data available for the Point Lookout Sandstone were considered in formulating the discussions in the text, not all those data could be plotted on the illustrations. The San Juan structural basin is in New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah and has an area of about 21,600 square miles (fig. 1). The structural basin is about 140 miles wide and about 200 miles long. The study area is that part of the structural basin that contains rocks of Triassic or younger age and, therefore, is less areally extensive than the structural basin. Triassic through Tertiary sedimentary rocks are emphasized in this study because the major aquifers in the basin are present in these rocks. The study area is about 140 miles wide (about the same as the

  9. Biostratigraphic evidence of dramatic Holocene uplift of Robinson Crusoe Island, Juan Fernández Ridge, SE Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepúlveda, P.; Le Roux, J. P.; Lara, L. E.; Orozco, G.; Astudillo, V.

    2014-09-01

    A study of the biostratigraphy and sedimentology of Holocene deposits on Robinson Crusoe Island (RCI) on the Juan Fernández Ridge (JFR) indicates that a~dramatic but localized uplift occurred since 8000 BP, at a rate of about 8.5 mm yr-1. In fact, supratidal flats and sand layers with marine gastropods (mostly Nerita sp.) are now exposed ca. 70 m a.s.l., and covered by transitional dunes. The last volcanic activity on RCI occurred at ca. 0.8 Ma (active hotspot located 280 km further west) and there is no sign of a compensating bulge that explains this uplift, isobaths of the sea floor instead suggesting general subsidence. However, modeling indicates that large-scale landslides followed by isostatic rebound are a viable explanation, partially reflected in the low-resolution bathymetry of the area.

  10. Regional patterns of hydrothermal alteration of sediments as interpreted from seafloor reflection coefficients, Middle Valley, Juan De Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, Kristin M. M.; Schmidt, Ulrike; Groschel-Becker, Henrike

    1993-09-01

    Reflection coefficients of the seafloor have been calculated from three multi-channel seismic reflection profiles across Middle Valley of the Juan de Fuca ridge. Seafloor reflection coefficients in this sedimented rift valley are high over an active hydrothermal vent and adjacent to major offset faults. Comparison of our measurements to drilling results from Leg 139 shows that high reflection coefficients over an active vent mound are produced by cemented sediments. Large reflection coefficients adjacent to major faults may have a similar origin and indicate that ongoing faulting creates pathways for hydrothermal fluids which alter the sediments and result in higher densities and velocities. Since 30 Hz seismic energy responds to the top 50 m of sediments, we are looking at the integrated response of hydrothermal alteration over tens of thousands of years. This is the first time seafloor reflection coefficients have been used to identify highly altered sediments in a region of deep-water hydrothermal activity.

  11. [Effects of reforestation on tree pollen sensitization in inhabitants of Nuevo Leon, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Palma-Gómez, Samuel; González-Díaz, Sandra Nora; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Macías-Weinmann, Alejandra; Amaro-Vivian, Laura Elizabeth; Pérez-Vanzzini, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Mujica, José Julio; Yong-Rodríguez, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: el cambio climático tiene consecuencias en la salud, el medio ambiente y la sociedad. Las áreas verdes urbanas son importantes en la planeación de las ciudades para promover la interacción de los ciudadanos con el ambiente y la salud. La falta de planeación y diseño de estas áreas y la mala selección de árboles han contribuido a aumentar la incidencia de alergia al polen entre la población. Con frecuencia los programas de reforestación ambiental no toman en cuenta el potencial alergénico de algunas especies. El gobierno de Nuevo León en los últimos cuatro años ha plantado cerca de 18 mil árboles de la especie Quercus, además de un número indeterminado de árboles de la especie Fraxinus, cuyo polen es alergénico. Objetivo: identificar el cambio en la sensibilización al polen de árboles de acuerdo con los programas de reforestación ambiental. Material y método: estudio restrospectivo y descriptivo en el que se analizaron las pruebas cutáneas positivas para polen de árboles de los últimos cuatro años, correlacionando entre la especie de árbol utilizada para la reforestación y el aumento de la sensibilidad a ésta. Resultados: se encontró un incremento estadísticamente significativo en la sensibilización al polen de las especies con las que se reforestó Nuevo León, además de disminución en la sensibilización a las especies con las que no se reforesta. Conclusiones: la reforestación contribuye, en cierta medida, al cambio en el patrón de la positividad de las pruebas cutáneas y puede traer como consecuencia exacerbaciones más frecuentes de enfermedades respiratorias. Es una actividad que debe ser regulada y asesorada siempre por expertos.

  12. Ethnobotany in Rayones, Nuevo León, México

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trough collections of plants and interviews with 110 individuals, an ethnobotanical study was conducted in order to determine the knowledge and use plant species in Rayones, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. The aim of this study was to record all useful plants and their uses, to know whether differences exist in the knowledge about the number of species and uses between women and men, and to know if there is a correlation between the age of individuals and knowledge of species and their uses. Methods A total of 110 persons were interviewed (56 men, 56 women). Semistructured interviews were carried out. The data were analyzed by means of Student t test and the Pearson Correlation Coeficient. Results A total of 252 species, 228 genera and 91 families of vascular plants were recorded. Astraceae, Fabaceae and are the most important families with useful species and Agave and Opuntia are the genera with the highest number of useful species. One hundred and thirty six species are considered as medicinal. Agave, Acacia and Citrus are the genera with the highest number of medicinal species. Other uses includes edible, spiritual rituals, construction and ornamentals. There was a non-significant correlation between the person’s age and number of species, but a significant very low negative correlation between the person’s age and number of uses was found. Conclusions Knowing their medicinal uses is an important issue for the people of Rayones. Boiling and preparing infusions are the main ways of using plants by residents. The leaves, the branches, and the fruits are the most commonly used parts. Almost 18% of the flora is used for wood and construction purposes. Several uses such as cosmetic, shampoo, firming skin tonics and health hair products recorded in Rayones has not been reported for other areas in the state of Nuevo León. In Rayones, women have a greater knowledge about plants and their uses than men, particularly, medicinal plants, but, men have a greater

  13. The concentration and isotopic composition of carbon in basaltic glasses from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Blank, J G; Delaney, J R; Des Marais, D J

    1993-02-01

    The abundance and 13C/12C ratios of carbon were analyzed in basaltic glass from twenty locations along the Juan de Fuca Ridge using a 3-step combustion/extraction technique. Carbon released during the first two combustion steps at 400-500 degrees C and 600-650 degrees C is interpreted to be secondary, and only the carbon recovered during a final combustion step at approximately 1200 degrees C is thought to be indigenous to the samples. For carbon released at approximately 1200 degrees C, glasses analyzed as 1-2 mm chips contained 23-146 ppm C with delta 13C values of -4.8 to -9.3%, whereas samples crushed to 38-63 microns or 63-90 microns yielded 56-103 ppm C with delta 13C values of -6.1 to -9.2%. The concentrations and isotopic compositions of the primary carbon dissolved in the glasses and present in the vesicles are similar to those previously reported for other ocean-ridge basalts. The Juan de Fuca basaltic magmas were not in equilibrium with respect to carbon when they erupted and quenched on the sea floor. Evidence of disequilibrium includes (1) a large range of carbon contents among glasses collected at similar depths, (2) a highly variable calculated carbon isotopic fractionation between melt and vapor determined by comparing crushed and uncrushed splits of the same sample, and (3) a lack of correlation between vesicle abundance, carbon concentration, and depth of eruption. Variations in carbon concentration and delta 13C ratios along the ridge do not correlate with major element chemistry. The observed relationship between carbon concentrations and delta 13C values may be explained by late-stage, variable degrees of open-system (Rayleigh-like) degassing.

  14. The concentration and isotopic composition of carbon in basaltic glasses from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blank, Jennifer G.; Delaney, John R.; Des Marais, David J.

    1993-01-01

    The abundance and C-13/C-12 ratios of carbon were analyzed in basaltic glass from twenty locations along the Juan de Fuca Ridge using a 3-step combustion/extraction technique. Carbon released during the first two combustion steps at 400-500 C and 600-650 C is interpreted to be secondary, and only the carbon recovered during a final combustion step at about 1200 C is thought to be indigenous to the samples. For carbon released at about 1200 C, glasses analyzed as 1-2 mm chips contained 23-146 ppm C with delta C-13 values of -4.8 to -9.3 per mil, whereas samples crushed to 38-63 microns or 63-90 microns yielded 56-103 ppm C with delta C-13 values of -6.1 to -9.2 per mil. The concentrations and isotopic compositions of the primary carbon dissolved in the glasses and present in the vesicles are similar to those previously reported for other ocean-ridge basalts. The Juan de Fuca basaltic magmas were not in equilibrium with respect to carbon when they erupted and quenched on the sea floor. Evidence of disequilibrium includes (1) a large range of carbon contents among glasses collected at similar depths, (2) a highly variable calculated carbon isotopic fractionation between melt and vapor determined by comparing crushed and uncrushed splits of the same sample, and (3) a lack of correlation between vesicle abundance, carbon concentration, and depth of eruption. Variations in carbon concentration and delta C-13 ratios along the ridge do not correlate with major element chemistry. The observed relationship between carbon concentrations and delta C-13 values may be explained by late-stage, variable degrees of open-system (Rayleigh-like) degassing.

  15. Snowpack Variability and Trends across the San Juan Mountains of Southwestern Colorado from Snow Telemetry and Snowcourse Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derry, J. E.; Fassnacht, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The world's mountains provide a crucial water source for one-sixth of the world's population and in the Western United States (U.S.) 70- 80% of the annual discharge originates from snowmelt in the mountain watershed. Mountain snowpacks are recognized as a sensitive bellwether of global and regional change. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has been collecting snow data across the Western United States at manual (snowcourse) stations since the 1930s and at automated (snow telemetry) stations since the 1970s. These USDA data have been used to investigate change across the Western U.S., and many stations have seen significant decreases in their snowpack. Daily data from 34 SNOTEL stations and monthly data from 25 snowcourse stations across the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado were used to evaluate the variability and trends in snow water equivalent (SWE) for the selected periods to assess if there has been a systematic change in the San Juan snowpack. April 1st and peak SWE decreased at almost all of the stations, with a significant decrease being observed at about half of the stations. Decreases were over the entire period of record, with large declines in the 1980s through the year 2000, but there tended to be no decrease in the past 15 years (2001 to 2015). On average the snow accumulation has been less in recent years (2001 to 2015) than over previous periods; at stations with a deeper snowpack these decreases have been much greater and illustrate a possible shift in winter climate occurring in the early 2000s. The Center for Snow and Avalanche Studies (CSAS) in Silverton Colorado has been collecting comprehensive higher elevation meteorological and snowpack data since this possible climatic shift occurred. If the current snowpack regime represents a new normal, then existing and new data collected by CSAS will assist in interpreting changes within this regime.

  16. Stable isotope studies of vent fluids and chimney minerals, southern Juan de Fuca Ridge: Sodium metasomatism and seawater sulfate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks W.C. III; Seyfried W.E. Jr.

    1987-10-10

    Sulfur isotope values (delta/sup 34/S) or H/sub 2/S in vent fluids from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal sites range from 4.0 to 7.4% and are variably /sup 34/S-enriched with respect to coexisting inner wall chimney sulfides. Chimney sulfides range from 1.6 to 5.7%. The chimneys consist of Fe-sphalerite zoned to inner zinc sulfide and chalcopyrite ( +- isocubanite)-pyrrhotite lining channels. Sulfide from inner walls of type A chimneys have the lightest delta/sup 34/S values. Type B chimneys (porous, unzoned, low-Fe-sphalerite) have the isotopically heaviest chimney sulfides and occur at vent sites distal to the along-axis shallow point of the ridge crest, hence distal to the magma chamber. These variations are largely ascribed to sulfate reduction by ferrous iron in the hydrothermal fluid in chimneys of substrate mounds, probably due to transitory entrainment of ambient sulfate-bearing seawater. The delta/sup 18/O values of end-member hydrothermal fluids range from 0.6 to 0.8%, significantly lower than the delta/sup 18/O values at 21 /sup 0/N vent fluids. The deltaD values of the fluid samples range from -2.5 to 0.5%. Isotopic differences from the 21 /sup 0/N fluids may be due to slightly higher water/rock ratios, approximately 1.0, in the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal system. Admixture of a small amount of residual brine from an earlier phase separation even may have contributed water with low deltaD values.

  17. A geologic and anthropogenic journey from the Precambrian to the new energy economy through the San Juan volcanic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Burchell,; Johnson, Raymond H.

    2010-01-01

    The San Juan volcanic field comprises 25,000 km2 of intermediate composition mid-Tertiary volcanic rocks and dacitic to rhyolitic calderas including the San Juan–Uncompahgre and La Garita caldera-forming super-volcanoes. The region is famous for the geological, ecological, hydrological, archeological, and climatological diversity. These characteristics supported ancestral Puebloan populations. The area is also important for its mineral wealth that once fueled local economic vitality. Today, mitigating and/or investigating the impacts of mining and establishing the region as a climate base station are the focuses of ongoing research. Studies include advanced water treatment, the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of propylitic bedrock for use in mine-lands cleanup, and the use of soil amendments including biochar from beetle-kill pines. Biochar aids soil productivity and revegetation by incorporation into soils to improve moisture retention, reduce erosion, and support the natural terrestrial carbon sequestration (NTS) potential of volcanic soils to help offset atmospheric CO2 emissions. This field trip will examine the volcano-tectonic and cultural history of the San Juan volcanic field as well as its geologic structures, economic mineral deposits and impacts, recent mitigation measures, and associated climate research. Field trip stops will include a visit to (1) the Summitville Superfund site to explore quartz alunite-Au mineralization, and associated alteration and new water-quality mitigation strategies; (2) the historic Creede epithermal-polymetallic–vein district with remarkably preserved resurgent calderas, keystone-graben, and moat sediments; (3) the historic mining town of Silverton located in the nested San Juan–Silverton caldera complex that exhibits base-metal Au-Ag mineralization; and (4) the site of ANC and NTS studies. En route back to Denver, we will traverse Grand Mesa, a high NTS area with Neogene basalt-derived soils and will enjoy a soak

  18. Analysis of the dispersion of air pollutants from a factory Asphalt in Nuevo Vallarta, Nay., Mex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Gonzalez, F. M.; Gaitán-Rodríguez, M.; Cornejo-López, V. M.; Morales-Hernández, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    An asphalt factory has operated intermittently near the urban area of Nuevo Vallarta on Banderas Bay, Nayarit, Mex. This factory has emissions that can affect the health of people living in the colonies nearest are Valle Dorado and San Vicente. The dispersion of emissions depends on the wind (sea breeze-land breeze) and the roof of the inversion, these phenomena determined by the density and temperature of the lower layers of the atmosphere. Asphalts are dark colored binder materials, formed by a complex non-volatile hydrocarbon chains and high molecular weight. Asphalts are produced from petroleum, but by a process of evaporation of the volatiles, leaving the asphalt alone. Therefore, the material emitted by the fireplace are mainly low molecular weight hydrocarbons known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The Emergency Response Guide 2008 developed by various agencies in Canada, U.S. and Mexico mentions that the hydrocarbon gas can have health effects. Animal studies have shown that PAHs can cause harmful effects to the skin, body fluids and some PAHs are carcinogenic. An analysis of the wind field, monthly and seasonal averages for the years 2010 and 2011, recorded in AWS administered by the CEMCO and other stations located near the study area.

  19. [Diagnosis of health needs of the elderly population of a community of Puerto Nuevo].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Cordero, B M; Figueroa Negrón, C; Pérez Vigo, M C; Anadón Vázquez, D; Oliver Vázquez, M

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the health needs of the non-institutionalized population, 65 years and over, residing in a sector of the community of Puerto Nuevo. This was the first urbanization established in Puerto Rico in the early 50's. The "snowball" technique was use to identify all the residents 65 year and over of the mentioned sector. Eighty five elderly persons were interviewed to gather data of the following variables: demographics, health conditions, preventive measures, activities of daily living (ADLs, IADLs), health services utilization, psychosocial aspects and use of programs and services available for the elderly population. Statistical analysis included descriptive measures and chi-square. Results revealed a population with a higher education and economic level than the average for this age group in Puerto Rico. People over 75 years over reported more functional limitations than the 65-74 years interviewees did. In comparison with men, women were less educated and presented a higher percent of widows, persons living alone and functional limitations. In almost all the interviewees, help was available in case of need. The majority expressed satisfaction with their family and social lives. Very few utilized programs and services available for elderly persons. It is concluded that in order to improve their quality of life, this population needs to be managed in an holistic mode to address their biopsychosocial needs and to be educated in health promotion issues to prevent further functional limitations. They also need education about the available services for elderly persons.

  20. Instalación de un nuevo telescopio robótico en la estación de altura Cesco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, M. A. Perna, P.; Mauas, P.; Veltri, A.; Hereñú, H.

    In this paper we present the works done for the installation of a 16 inches reflector telescope at the Carlos U. Cesco high altitude station of the Observatorio Astronómico Félix Aguilar; San Juan; Argentina. We describe the implementation of the software and hardware needed for the remote control of the instrument and its future robotization. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  1. Plan of study for the regional aquifer-system analysis of the San Juan structural basin, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welder, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    The San Juan structural basin is an 18,000 sq mi area that contains several extensive aquifers. The basin includes three surface drainage basins and parts of New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah. Surface water in the area is fully appropriated, and the steadily increasing demand for groundwater has resulted in water supply concerns. Competition is great between mining and electric power companies, municipalities, and Indian communities for the limited groundwater supplies. This report outlines a 4-year plan for a study of the regional aquifer system in the San Juan structural basin. The purposes of the study are to define and understand the aquifer system; to assess the effects of groundwater use on the aquifers and streams; and to determine the availability and quality of groundwater in the basin. (Author 's abstract)

  2. Seismic velocity structure of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates revealed by a joint inversion of ambient noise and regional earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haiying

    2016-05-01

    The crust and upper mantle seismic structure, spanning from the Juan de Fuca and Gorda spreading centers to the Cascade back arc, is imaged with full-wave propagation simulation and a joint inversion of ambient noise and regional earthquake recordings. The spreading centers have anomalously low shear wave velocity beneath the oceanic lithosphere. Around the Cobb axial seamount, we observe a low-velocity anomaly underlying a relatively thin oceanic lithosphere, indicating its influence on the Juan de Fuca ridge. The oceanic Moho is clearly defined by a P velocity increase from 6.3 km/s to 7.5 km/s at about 6 km depth beneath the seafloor. The thickness of the oceanic plates is less than 40 km prior to subduction, and the structure of the oceanic lithosphere varies both along strike and along dip. Farther landward, very low velocity anomalies are observed above the plate interface along the Cascade fore arc, indicative of subducted sediments.

  3. Mesobathic chondrichthyes of the Juan Fernández seamounts: are they different from those of the central Chilean continental slope?

    PubMed

    Andrade, Isabel; Pequeño, Germán

    2008-03-01

    We compared the geographic distribution of groups of chondrychthid fishes of two physically proximal, although geographically different, regions that include the Juan Fernández seamounts and the central Chilean continental slope, both sampled at mesopelagic and mesobenthonic depths. The ridge is in the Nazca Plate, while the slope region in on the South American Plate, and is closer to the South American continent. We found six species of Chondrichthyes for the seamounts (four orders, four families). The slope sampling produced ten species of Chondrichthyes, of which Torpedo tremens De Buen 1959, was the only species in common with the Juan Fernandez area. There are clear differences between the Chondrichthyes of the two regions. These fisheries require adequate administrative modes.

  4. First inventory of the Crustacea (Decapoda, Stomatopoda) of Juan de Nova Island with ecological observations and comparison with nearby islands in the Mozambique channel (Europa, Glorieuses, Mayotte)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poupin, J.

    2016-04-01

    Crustacea Decapoda and Stomatopoda are inventoried for the first time in Juan de Nova Island, Iles Eparses, Mozambique channel. In total, 112 species are reported: 69 crabs, 28 anomurans, 11 shrimps, 3 mantis shrimps and 1 lobster. A comparison is made with nearby islands in the Mozambique channel: Glorieuses Islands (157 species), Europa Island (178 species), and Mayotte Island (505 species). The lower species richness at Juan de Nova is explained by the small size of the island and by the difficulties to collect the crustaceans on the reef flat hardly accessible at low tide. The crustaceans are listed by main habitats from land to outer reef (2-20 m). The presence of the coconut crab (Birgus latro), an endangered species vulnerable to human predation, is confirmed.

  5. Active tectonics of the Devils Mountain Fault and related structures, northern Puget Lowland and eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca region, Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Mosher, David C.; Blakely, Richard J.; Childs, Jonathan R.

    2001-01-01

    Information from marine high-resolution and conventional seismic-reflection surveys, aeromagnetic mapping, coastal exposures of Pleistocene strata, and lithologic logs of water wells is used to assess the active tectonics of the northern Puget Lowland and eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca region of the Pacific Northwest. These data indicate that the Devils Mountain Fault and the newly recognized Strawberry Point and Utsalady Point faults are active structures and represent potential earthquake sources.

  6. Application of Advanced Exploration Technologies for the Development of Mancos Formation Oil Reservoirs, Jicarilla Apache Indian Nation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Scott; Billingsley, Randy

    2002-09-09

    The objectives of this project are to: (1) develop an exploration rationale for the Mancos shale in the north-eastern San Juan basin; (2) assess the regional prospectivity of the Mancos in the northern Nation lands based on that rationale; (3) identify specific leads in the northern Nation as appropriate; (4) forecast pro-forma production, reserves and economics for any leads identified; and (5) package and disseminate the results to attract investment in Mancos development on the Nation lands.

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099 Isolated from the Hydrothermal Vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Zhanhui; Zhou, Zhi; Gao, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the draft genome sequences of two strains, Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099, which were isolated from hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The reads generated by an Ion Torrent PGM were assembled into contigs with total sizes of 4.4 Mb and 4.1 Mb for DSM 16098 and DSM 16099, respectively. PMID:27563045

  8. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAM JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-08-01

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps.

  9. Fluid rare earth element anlayses from geothermal wells located on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland and Middle Valley seafloor hydrothermal system on the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    DOE Data Explorer

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-05-01

    Results for fluid rare earth element analyses from four Reykjanes peninsula high-temperature geothermal fields. Data for fluids from hydrothermal vents located 2400 m below sea level from Middle Valley on the Juan de Fuca Ridge are also included. Data have been corrected for flashing. Samples preconcentrated using a chelating resin with IDA functional group (InertSep ME-1). Analyzed using an Element magnetic sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

  10. Application of techniques to identify coal-mine and power-generation effects on surface-water quality, San Juan River basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goetz, C.L.; Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Thomas, E.V.

    1987-01-01

    Numerous analytical techniques were applied to determine water quality changes in the San Juan River basin upstream of Shiprock , New Mexico. Eight techniques were used to analyze hydrologic data such as: precipitation, water quality, and streamflow. The eight methods used are: (1) Piper diagram, (2) time-series plot, (3) frequency distribution, (4) box-and-whisker plot, (5) seasonal Kendall test, (6) Wilcoxon rank-sum test, (7) SEASRS procedure, and (8) analysis of flow adjusted, specific conductance data and smoothing. Post-1963 changes in dissolved solids concentration, dissolved potassium concentration, specific conductance, suspended sediment concentration, or suspended sediment load in the San Juan River downstream from the surface coal mines were examined to determine if coal mining was having an effect on the quality of surface water. None of the analytical methods used to analyzed the data showed any increase in dissolved solids concentration, dissolved potassium concentration, or specific conductance in the river downstream from the mines; some of the analytical methods used showed a decrease in dissolved solids concentration and specific conductance. Chaco River, an ephemeral stream tributary to the San Juan River, undergoes changes in water quality due to effluent from a power generation facility. The discharge in the Chaco River contributes about 1.9% of the average annual discharge at the downstream station, San Juan River at Shiprock, NM. The changes in water quality detected at the Chaco River station were not detected at the downstream Shiprock station. It was not possible, with the available data, to identify any effects of the surface coal mines on water quality that were separable from those of urbanization, agriculture, and other cultural and natural changes. In order to determine the specific causes of changes in water quality, it would be necessary to collect additional data at strategically located stations. (Author 's abstract)

  11. A Numerical Study of the Urban Heat Island in the Coastal Tropical City of San Juan, Puerto Rico: Model Validation and Impacts of LCLU Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comarazamy, Daniel E.; Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Luvall, Jeff; Rickman, Douglas L.

    2007-01-01

    Urban sprawls in tropical locations are rapidly accelerating and it is more evident in islands where a large percentage of the population resides along the coasts. This paper focuses on the analysis of the impacts of land use and land cover for urbanization in the tropical coastal city of San Juan, in the tropical island of Puerto Rico. A mesoscale numerical model, the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), is used to study specific characteristics and patterns of the urban heat island in the San Juan Metropolitan Area (SJMA), the most noticeable urban core of the Caribbean. The research present in this paper makes use of the observations obtained during the airborne San Juan Atlas Mission in two ways. First, surface and rawinsonde data are used to validate the atmospheric model yielding satisfactory results. Second, airborne remote sensing information is used to update the model's surface characteristics to obtain a detailed configuration of the SJMA in order to perform the LCLU changes impact analysis. This analysis showed that the presence of San Juan has an impact reflected in higher air temperatures over the area occupied by the city, with positive values of up to 2.5 C, for the simulations that have specified urban LCLU indexes in the bottom boundary. One interesting result of the impact analysis was the finding of a precipitation disturbance shown as a difference in total accumulated rainfall between simulation with the city and with a potential natural vegetation induced by the presence of the urban area. Model results indicate that the urban-induced cloud formation and precipitation development occur mainly downwind of the city, including the accumulated precipitation. This spatial pattern can be explained by the presence of a-larger urbanized area in the southwest sector of the city, and of the approaching northeasterly trade winds.

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099 Isolated from the Hydrothermal Vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Zhanhui; Zhou, Zhi; Gao, Dahai; Wang, Lingling

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the draft genome sequences of two strains, Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099, which were isolated from hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The reads generated by an Ion Torrent PGM were assembled into contigs with total sizes of 4.4 Mb and 4.1 Mb for DSM 16098 and DSM 16099, respectively. PMID:27563045

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099 Isolated from the Hydrothermal Vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Zhanhui; Zhou, Zhi; Gao, Dahai; Wang, Lingling

    2016-08-25

    This report describes the draft genome sequences of two strains, Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099, which were isolated from hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The reads generated by an Ion Torrent PGM were assembled into contigs with total sizes of 4.4 Mb and 4.1 Mb for DSM 16098 and DSM 16099, respectively.

  14. Investigating Controls on Sedimentation Through Interpretation of the Syntectonic Cretaceous-Paleogene Sedimentary Record in the San Juan Basin (New Mexico, U.S.A.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, K.; Weissmann, G. S.; Fawcett, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary in the southwestern San Juan Basin is bracketed by the mudstone-dominated Cretaceous Kirtland Formation, the sandstone-dominated Paleocene Ojo Alamo Sandstone, and the mudstone-dominated Paleocene lower Nacimiento Formation. Geochemical trends of fluvial mudstones from these units indicate changing sedimentary source areas through time. While the Kirtland and Nacimiento Formations represent periods of high accommodation within the San Juan Basin, the Ojo Alamo Sandstone represents a period of low accommodation and general reworking and transport by southeast-flowing paleorivers. The Kirtland and Nacimiento Formations thin and fine away from their interpreted source area whereas the Ojo Alamo Sandstone thickens and fines away from the source area. Here we investigate the enigmatic sedimentary architecture of the Ojo Alamo Sandstone, geochemical evidence for a changing source area through this time period, and the complex relationships between sedimentation, source area, accommodation, and basin tectonic evolution. Incorporating new measured sections, petrographic analyses, geochemical trends, and stratigraphic relationships, we propose that the Ojo Alamo Sandstone represents an anomalous short period of low accommodation in the San Juan Basin during the early Laramide Orogeny and explore possible intra- and extra-basinal tectonic, climatic, and sedimentologic explanations as well as implications for understanding the evolution of the basin.

  15. Correlation of coal beds in the Fruitland Formation as interpreted from geophysical logs, east-central San Juan County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandberg, Dorothy T.

    1986-01-01

    Correlation of coal beds in the Fruitland Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in the subsurface, from interpretation of geophysical logs, is an outgrowth of unpublished studies of deep coal on the Navajo Reservation by the author in the Toadlena 30 x 60 minute quadrangle, New Mexico, and by W. J. Mapel in the Farmington 30 x 60 minute quadrangle, New Mexico.  The lines of sections of this report extend eastward from the reservation into east-central San Juan County, which is in the western part of the San Juan Basin.  In this area, the rocks dip gently northeast toward the central part of the basin.  The thick coal is less than 1,500 feet beneath the surface.  Of the 53 logs in the sections, 48 are from oil- and gas-test holes, and 5 are from coal-test holes (see table 1).  Stratigraphic relations of the Upper Cretaceous Lewis Shale, Pictured Cliffs Sandstone, and Fruitland Formation, shown on the cross sections and briefly reviewed below, have been previously described for this or other parts of the San Juan Basin by Hayes and Zapp (1955), Beaumont (1971), Fassett and hinds (1971), O;Sullivan and other (1972), and Molenaar (1983), among others.

  16. Geochronology and geology of late Oligocene through Miocene volcanism and mineralization in the western San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bove, D.J.; Hon, Ken; Budding, K.E.; Slack, J.F.; Snee, L.W.; Yeoman, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-five new 40Ar/39Ar ages from volcanic rocks and veins in the western San Juan Mountains clarify relationships between volcanism and mineralization in this classic area. Five calc-alkaline ash-flow sheets erupted from caldera sources (Ute Ridge, Blue Mesa, Dillon Mesa, Sapinero Mesa, and Crystal Lake Tuffs) from 28.6 to 27.6 Ma. This is a much more restricted time interval than previously thought and indicates that the underlying batholith rose and evolved very rapidly beneath the western San Juan Mountains. The new ages and geologic relations constrain the timing of joint resurgence of the Uncompahgre and San Juan calderas to between 28.2 and 27.6 Ma. The collapse of the Silverton caldera produced a set of strong ring fractures that intersected with graben faults on the earlier resurgent dome to produce the complex set of structures that localized the mid-Miocene epithermal gold veins. Later calc-alkaline monzonitic to quartz monzontic plutons solidified at 26.5-26.0 Ma as the underlying batholith rose through its volcanic cover. A new age from lavas near Uncompahgre Peak supports earlier interpretations that these lavas were fed by nearby 26 Ma monzonite intrusions. Nearly all of these intrusions are associated with subeconomic Mo and Cu mineralization and associated alteration, and new ages of 26.40 and 25.29 Ma from the Ute-Ulay and Lilly veins in the Lake City region show that some of the most important silver and base-metal veins were temporally and possibly genetically connected to these plutons. In addition, the Golden Fleece telluride vein cuts all of the post-Uncompahgre caldera volcanics in the area and is probably temporally related to this cycle, though its age of 27.5 ? 0.3 Ma was determined by less precise U/Pb methods. The 22.9 Ma Lake City caldera collapsed within the older Uncompahgre caldera structure but is petrologically unrelated to the older calc-alkaline activity. The distinctive suite of high-silica rhyolite tuff and alkaline

  17. Hydrogeology of the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone in the San Juan structural basin, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dam, William L.; Kernodle, J.M.; Thorn, C.R.; Levings, G.W.; Craigg, S.D.

    1990-01-01

    This report is one in a series resulting from the U.S. Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer System Analysis (RASA) study of the San Juan structural basin that began in October 1984. The purposes of the study (Welder, 1986) are to: (1) Define and evaluate the aquifer system; (2) assess the effects of past, present, and potential ground-water use on aquifers and streams, and (3) determine the availability and quality of ground water. Previous reports in this series describe the hydrogeology of the Dakota Sandstone (Craigg and others, 1989), Gallup Sandstone (Kernodle and others, 1989), Morrison Formation (Dam and others, 1990), Point Lookout Sandstone (Craigg and others, 1990), Kirtland Shale and Fruitland Formation (Kernodle and others, 1990), Menefee Formation (Levings and others, 1990), Cliff House Sandstone (Thorn and others, 1990), and Ojo Alamo Sandstone (Thorn and others, 1990) in the San Juan structural basin. This report summarizes information on the geology and the occurrence and quality of water in the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone, one of the primary water-bearing units in the regional aquifer system. Data used in this report were collected during the RASA study or derived from existing records in the U.S. Geological Survey's computerized National Water Information System (NWIS) data base, the Petroleum Information Corporation's data base, and the Dwight's ENERGYDATA Inc. BRIN database. Although all data available for the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone were considered in formulating the discussions in the text, not all those data could be plotted on the illustrations. The San Juan structural basin in New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah has an area of about 21,600 square miles (fig. 1). The structural basin is about 140 miles wide and about 200 miles long. The study area is that part of the structural basin that contains rocks of Triassic and younger age; therefore, the study area is less extensive than the structural basin. Triassic through Tertiary

  18. Pliocene and Quaternary Deposits in the Northern Part of the San Juan Basin in Southwestern Colorado and Northwestern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Glenn R.; Moore, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Unconsolidated late Cenozoic deposits in the northern part of the San Juan Basin range in age from late Pliocene to Holocene. Most of the deposits are alluvial gravel composed of resistant quartzite, sandstone, and igneous, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks derived from the uplifted central core of the San Juan Mountains 20-50 miles (32-80 kilometers) north of the basin. Alluvial deposits are most voluminous in the Animas Valley, but deposits of gravel of the same general age are present in the La Plata, Florida, Los Pinos, and Piedra River valleys as well. Alluvial gravel forms tabular deposits, generally about 20 feet (6 meters) thick, that are exposed beneath a sequence of terraces at many levels above the rivers. Gravel layers 360 feet (110 meters) or less above the Animas River are glacial outwash. The gravel layers begin at the south toes of end moraines and extend discontinuously downvalley at least 10-20 miles (16-32 kilometers). Farther south, distinction between outwash and nonglacial alluvium is problematical. Alluvial gravel beneath higher terraces does not grade to end moraines. Glacial till forms a series of end moraines at the north edge of the town of Durango. The oldest moraines are farthest downvalley, are higher above the river, and have more mature surficial soils than do moraines farther north. The two youngest moraines, the Animas City moraines, are interpreted to be Pinedale in age. They have narrow, ridgelike crests and form nearly unbroken arcs across the valley floor. Small segments of still more weathered moraines, the Spring Creek moraines, are 170-230 feet (52-70 meters) above the river and are 660-990 feet (200-300 meters) farther downvalley. The oldest moraines, the Durango moraines, are on the north end of the unnamed mesa on which Fort Lewis College is located. The base is about 180 feet (55 meters) above the river. These oldest moraines may be of Bull Lake age. Alluvial fans, pediment gravel, and landslides are scattered at several

  19. Estudio del comportamiento tribologico y de las interacciones de superficie de nuevos nanofluidos ionicos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa Rodriguez, Tulia

    tribocorrosion processes. The formation of a coating layer on magnesium alloys from phosphonate imidazolium ionic liquids by immersion and by chronoamperometry has been described. The new coatings reduce the abrasive wear in the magnesium-aluminium alloy but they are not effective in the magnesium-zinc alloy, which prevent the formation of continuous coatings. Los liquidos ionicos son sales liquidas a temperatura ambiente o bajas temperaturas que presentan excelentes propiedades fisico-quimicas. En el presente trabajo se estudian como lubricantes en problemas tribologicos complejos como la lubricacion de metales contra si mismos, el desarrollo de lubricantes base agua y de nuevas superficies autolubricadas. Cuando no es posible reducir la friccion y desgaste mediante lubricacion, como en las aleaciones de magnesio, los liquidos ionicos se han estudiado como precursores de recubrimientos protectores. Se han determinado las interacciones superficiales y los procesos de corrosion sobre cobre y sobre acero con diferentes liquidos ionicos proticos y aproticos para desarrollar nuevos lubricantes y aditivos. En el contacto cobre/cobre, excepto el liquido ionico protico derivado del oleato, todos los liquidos ionicos estudiados presentan mejor comportamiento tribologico que el lubricante comercial Polialfaolefina 6. En el contacto acero/zafiro, los nuevos liquidos ionicos proticos son buenos lubricantes cuando se utilizan en estado puro, y, como aditivos en agua, generan peliculas adsorbidas sobre la superficie del metal reduciendo la friccion y el desgaste tras la evaporacion del agua. Para evitar el periodo de alta friccion inicial en presencia de agua, se han generado peliculas superficiales de liquido ionico sobre el acero en condiciones estaticas. El mejor comportamiento lubricante tanto en el contacto cobre/cobre como en el contacto acero/zafiro se obtiene para el liquido ionico protico derivado del anion adipato, con dos grupos carboxilicos. Las interacciones de los grupos

  20. Recurrent eruption and subsidence at the Platoro caldera complex, southeastern San Juan volcanic field, Colorado: New tales from old tuffs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Dungan, M.A.; Brown, L.L.; Deino, A.

    1996-01-01

    Reinterpretation of a voluminous regional ash-flow sheet (Masonic Park Tuff) as two separate tuff sheets of similar phenocryst-rich dacite erupted from separate source calderas has important implications for evolution of the multicyclic Platoro caldera complex and for caldera-forming processes generally. Masonic Park Tuff in central parts of the San Juan field, including the type area, was erupted from a concealed source at 28.6 Ma, but widespread tuff previously mapped as Masonic Park Tuff in the southeastern San Juan Mountains is the product of the youngest large-volume eruption of the Platoro caldera complex at 28.4 Ma. This large unit, newly named the "Chiquito Peak Tuff," is the last-erupted tuff of the Treasure Mountain Group, which consists of at least 20 separate ash-flow sheets of dacite to low-silica rhyolite erupted from the Platoro complex during a 1 m.y. interval (29.5-28.4 Ma). Two Treasure Mountain tuff sheets have volumes in excess of 1000 km3 each, and five more have volumes of 50-150 km3. The total volume of ash-flow tuff exceeds 2500 km3, and caldera-related lavas of dominantly andesitic composition make up 250-500 km3 more. A much greater volume of intermediate-composition magma must have solidified in subcaldera magma chambers. Most preserved features of the Platoro complex - including postcollapse asymmetrical trap-door resurgent uplift of the ponded intracaldera tuff and concurrent infilling by andesitic lava flows - postdate eruption of the Chiquito Peak Tuff. The numerous large-volume pre-Chiquito Peak ash-flow tuffs document multiple eruptions accompanied by recurrent subsidence; early-formed caldera walls nearly coincide with margins of the later Chiquito Peak collapse. Repeated syneruptive collapse at the Platoro complex requires cumulative subsidence of at least 10 km. The rapid regeneration of silicic magmas requires the sustained presence of an andesitic subcaldera magma reservoir, or its rapid replenishment, during the 1 m.y. life

  1. Mixing of magmas from enriched and depleted mantle sources in the northeast Pacific: West Valley segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousens, Brian L.; Allan, James F.; Leybourne, Matthew I.; Chase, R. L.; van Wagoner, Nancy

    1995-07-01

    The 50 km-long West Valley segment of the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge is a young, extension-dominated spreading centre, with volcanic activity concentrated in its southern half. A suite of basalts dredged from the West Valley floor, the adjacent Heck Seamount chain, and a small near-axis cone here named Southwest Seamount, includes a spectrum of geochemical compositions ranging from highly depleted normal (N-) MORB to enriched (E-) MORB. Heck Seamount lavas have chondrite-normalized La/Smcn˜0.3, 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70235 0.70242, and 206Pb/204Pb = 18.22 18.44, requiring a source which is highly depleted in trace elements both at the time of melt generation and over geologic time. The E-MORB from Southwest Seamount have La/Smcn˜1.8, 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70245 0.70260, and 206Pb/204Pb = 18.73 19.15, indicating a more enriched source. Basalts from the West Valley floor have chemical compositions intermediate between these two end-members. As a group, West Valley basalts from a two-component mixing array in element-element and element-isotope plots which is best explained by magma mixing. Evidence for crustal-level magma mixing in some basalts includes mineral-melt chemical and isotopic disequilibrium, but mixing of melts at depth (within the mantle) may also occur. The mantle beneath the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge is modelled as a plum-pudding, with “plums” of enriched, amphibole-bearing peridotite floating in a depleted matrix (DM). Low degrees of melting preferentially melt the “plums”, initially removing only the amphibole component and producing alkaline to transitional E-MORB. Higher degrees of melting tap both the “plums” and the depleted matrix to yield N-MORB. The subtly different isotopic compositions of the E-MORBs compared to the N-MORBs require that any enriched component in the upper mantle was derived from a depleted source. If the enriched component crystallized from fluids with a DM source, the “plums” could evolve to their more evolved isotopic

  2. Melt anomalies and propagating ridge offsets: Insights from the East Pacific Rise and Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Marjanovic, M.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Canales, J.

    2010-12-01

    Recent observations of crustal structure associated with propagating ridge offsets at both the Endeavour and East Pacific Rise (EPR) ISS indicate local crustal thickness anomalies are associated with propagating ridge tips and renew the question of the role of melt anomalies in driving ridge propagation. Seismic and gravity data from the flanks of the Endeavour and adjoining segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge reveal a 10-20 km wide zone of thicker and possibly denser crust on the young crust side of pseudofaults left by former propagating offsets. A sequence of bright ridge-ward dipping sub-Moho seismic reflections underlie the region of thicker crust and are interpreted as frozen magma sills at the base of the crust emplaced behind the propagating ridge tips [Nedimovic et al., 2005]. Crust within the pseudofault zones is denser and the presence of iron-enriched compositions is inferred, with the sub-crust magma sills the presumed source magma bodies for these denser, iron-enriched crustal rocks. Comparisons with the well-studied overlapping spreading center discontinuity at the EPR 9°03’N reveals a similar suite of crustal anomalies. On the flanks of this southward propagating discontinuity, an ~20 km wide band of crust that is both thicker and denser is located behind the V-shaped discordant zone of the OSC [Canales et al., 2002; Toomey and Hooft, 2008]. A broad swath of higher crustal magnetizations encompasses the region of thicker and denser crust as well as the adjoining discordant zone of relict OSC ridge tips and overlap basins [Carbotte and Macdonald, 1992]. At the southern edge of the band of thick crust, Singh et al. [2008] find evidence for a large melt anomaly in the lower crust and anomalously thick crust at the propagating eastern ridge of the OSC. The presence of local melt accumulations inferred from these bands of thicker crust behind propagating ridge offsets at both EPR and Juan de Fuca, presumably contributes to the forces driving ridge

  3. Activity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria in the subsurface biosphere of diffuse hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, A.; Juniper, S. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Devol, A. H.; Kuypers, M. M. M.; Lavik, G.; Hallam, S. J.; Wenk, C. B.; Chang, B. X.; Murdock, S. A.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2012-11-01

    Little is known about fixed nitrogen (N) transformation and elimination at diffuse hydrothermal vents where anoxic fluids are mixed with oxygenated crustal seawater prior to discharge. Oceanic N sinks that remove bio-available N ultimately affect chemosynthetic primary productivity in these ecosystems. Using 15N paired isotope techniques, we determined potential rates of fixed N loss pathways (denitrification, anammox) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in sulfidic hydrothermal vent fluids discharging from the subsurface at several sites at Axial Volcano and the Endeavour Segment on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We also measured physico-chemical parameters (i.e., temperature, pH, nutrients, H2S and N2O concentrations) as well as the biodiversity and abundance of chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-reducing, sulfur-oxidizing γ-proteobacteria (SUP05 cluster) using sequence analysis of amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes in combination with taxon-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Denitrification was the dominant N loss pathway in the subsurface biosphere of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, with rates of up to ~1000 nmol N l-1 day-1. In comparison, anammox rates were always < 5 nmol N l-1 day-1 and below the detection limit at most of the sites. DNRA rates were up to ~150 nmol N l-1 day-1. These results suggest that bacterial denitrification out-competes anammox in sulfidic hydrothermal vent waters. Taxon-specific qPCR revealed that γ-proteobacteria of the SUP05 cluster sometimes dominated the microbial community (SUP05/total bacteria up to 38%). Significant correlations were found between fixed N loss (i.e., denitrification, anammox) rates and in situ nitrate and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) deficits in the fluids, indicating that DIN availability may ultimately regulate N loss in the subsurface. Based on our rate measurements, and on published data on hydrothermal fluid fluxes and residence times, we estimated

  4. Activity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria in the subsurface biosphere of diffuse hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, A.; Juniper, S. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Devol, A. H.; Kuypers, M. M. M.; Lavik, G.; Hallam, S. J.; Wenk, C. B.; Chang, B. X.; Murdock, S. A.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2012-04-01

    Little is known about nitrogen (N) transformations in general, and the elimination of N in particular, at diffuse vents where anoxic hydrothermal fluids have mixed with oxygenated crustal seawater prior to discharge. Oceanic N sinks that remove bio-available N ultimately affect chemosynthetic primary productivity in these ecosystems. Using 15N paired isotope techniques, we determined potential rates of fixed N-loss pathways (denitrification, anammox) and dissimilative nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in sulfidic hydrothermal vent fluids discharging from the subsurface at several sites at Axial Volcano and the Endeavour Segment on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We also measured physico-chemical parameters (i.e. temperature, pH, nutrients, H2S and N2O concentrations) as well as the biodiversity and abundance of chemolithotrophic nitrate-reducing, sulfur-oxidizing γ-proteobacteria (SUP05 cluster) using sequence analysis of amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes in combination with taxon-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Denitrification was the dominant N-loss pathway in the subsurface biosphere of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, with rates of up to ~1000 nmol N l-1 day-1. In comparison, anammox rates were always <5 nmol N l-1 day-1 and below the detection limit at most of the sites. DNRA rates were up to 152 nmol N l-1 day-1. These results suggest that bacterial denitrification out-competes anammox in sulfidic hydrothermal vent waters. Taxon-specific qPCR revealed that γ-proteobacteria of the SUP05 cluster sometimes dominated the microbial community (SUP05/total bacteria up to 38%). Significant correlation existed between fixed N-loss (i.e., denitrification, anammox) rates and in-situ nitrate and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) deficits in the fluids, indicating that DIN availability may ultimately regulate N-loss in the subsurface. Based on our rate measurements, and on published data on hydrothermal fluid fluxes and residence

  5. Geochemistry and petrology of andesites from the north rift zone of Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithka, I. N.; Perfit, M. R.; Clague, D. A.; Wanless, V. D.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the ROV Doc Ricketts onboard R/V Western Flyer explored ~4 km of an elongate pillow ridge up to ~300 m high along the eastern edge of the north rift zone of Axial Seamount. The steep-sided volcanic ridge is constructed of large pillow lavas up to 2-3 m in diameter and smaller elongated pillow tubes. Of the 27 samples collected during dive D526, all but one are andesites making it one of the largest confirmed high-silica exposures along a mid-ocean ridge (MOR). Based on radiocarbon ages of sediment on top of flows, the mounds are at least ~1390 years old. This minimum age is much younger than the 56 Ka age calculated based on distance from the rift axis, indicating eruption off-axis through older, colder crust and supporting the hypothesis and model calculations that extensive fractional crystallization (>85%) caused the high silica content. The andesitic lavas are primarily glassy, highly vesicular, crusty, and sparsely phyric with small (~1 mm) plagioclase crystals and olivine, clinopyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxide microphenocrysts. Microprobe analyses of glasses are similar to wax-core samples previously collected from this area but are more compositionally variable. Excluding one basalt (7.7 wt% MgO) sampled between mounds, the lavas are basaltic andesites and andesites (53-59 wt% SiO2) with <3 wt% MgO and 12.8-15.7 wt% FeO concentrations. Incompatible trace element abundances are ~4-6 times more enriched than in Axial Seamount T-MORB. Primitive mantle-normalized patterns are similar to those of high-silica lavas from other MORs (southern Juan de Fuca Ridge, 9N East Pacific Rise) with significant positive U anomalies, large negative Sr anomalies, small negative Eu anomalies, and slight positive Zr-Hf anomalies. The andesites are more enriched in light rare earth elements than basalts from Axial Seamount ((La/Yb)N 1.35-1.4 vs. 0.7-1.27) and N-MORB from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The andesites also have high Cl (~0.3-0.6 wt%) and H2O (~1.60-1.71 wt

  6. Holocene compression in the Acequión valley (Andes Precordillera, San Juan province, Argentina): Geomorphic, tectonic, and paleoseismic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard, M.; Franck, A.; Perucca, L.; Laura, P.; Pantano, Ana; Avila, Carlos R.; Onorato, M. Romina; Vargas, Horacio N.; Alvarado, Patricia; Viete, Hewart

    2016-04-01

    The Matagusanos-Maradona-Acequión Valley sits within the Andes Precordillera fold-thrust belt of western Argentina. It is an elongated topographic depression bounded by the roughly N-S trending Precordillera Central and Oriental in the San Juan Province. Moreover, it is not a piggy-back basin as we could have expected between two ranges belonging to a fold-thrust belt, but a very active tectonic corridor coinciding with a thick-skinned triangular zone, squeezed between two different tectonic domains. The two domains converge, where the Precordillera Oriental has been incorporated to the Sierras Pampeanas province, becoming the western leading edge of the west-verging broken foreland Sierras Pampeanas domain. This latter province has been in turn incorporated into the active deformation framework of the Andes back-arc at these latitudes as a result of enhanced coupling between the converging plates due to the subduction of the Juan Fernández ridge that flattens the Nazca slab under the South American continent. This study focuses on the neotectonics of the southern tip of this N-S elongated depression, known as Acequión (from the homonym river that crosses the area), between the Del Agua and Los Pozos rivers. This depression dies out against the transversely oriented Precordillera Sur, which exhibits a similar tectonic style as Precordillera Occidental and Central (east-verging fold-thrust belt). This contribution brings supporting evidence of the ongoing deformation during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene of the triangular zone bounded between the two leading and converging edges of Precordillera Central and Oriental thrust fronts, recorded in a multi-episodic lake sequence of the Acequión and Nikes rivers. The herein gathered evidence comprise Late Pleistocene-Holocene landforms of active thrusting, fault kinematics (micro-tectonic) data and outcrop-scale (meso-tectonic) faulting and folding of recent lake and alluvial sequences. In addition, seismically

  7. Juan Fernández Ridge (Nazca Plate): petrology and thermochronology of a rejuvenated hot spot trail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J.; Lara, L. E.

    2012-04-01

    The Juan Fernández Ridge on the oceanic Nazca plate is thought to be a classic hot spot trail because of the apparent westward rejuvenation of the eruptive ages. However, geochronological data is still scarce and there are a few constrains to support this hypothesis like the ca. 9 Ma Ar-Ar age of the O'Higgins seamount (115 km from the Chile-Perú trench), some published K-Ar ages of ca. 3-4 Ma in Robinson Crusoe island (580 km from the trench) and ca. 1 Ma in Alejandro Selkirk (180 km further west). New reconnaissance K-Ar ages and specially the ongoing Ar-Ar dating effort in Robinson Crusoe define a ca. 1-4 Ma time span, which partially overlap with the age of Alejandro Selkirk, breaking the expected age progression given that the Nazca plate moves eastwards at ca. 6-8 cm/yr. In addition, new geological mapping shows a sharp unconformity between the older (ca. 4 Ma), strongly altered sequences and the more recent (ca. 1 Ma), post-erosional volcanic piles, where the proximal facies are still preserved. Petrological evidence also supports this evolution pattern. In fact, the partially altered older sequence is tholeiitic (Ba/Yb=12.70; La/Yb=8.12; Ba/Y=6.51; Ba/Zr=0.89). The shield stage (ca. 1-3 Ma) is transicional from tholeiitic to alkaline (Ba/Yb=18.07-8.32; La/Yb=4.59-9.84; Ba/Y=4.24-8.18; Ba/Zr=0.73-1.09) and the younger (ca. 1 Ma) is mostly alkaline (Ba/Yb=38.15; La/Yb=15.66; Ba/Y=20.27; Ba/Zr=2.31). A fixed deep-mantle plume origin for Pacific hot spots has been widely debated and concurrent phenomena arose as a possible explanation for non-linear age progressions and/or long-lived volcanic activity. In fact, intraplate regional tectonics, plume displacement, and mantle heterogeneities could be the main factor of the ridge architecture or the mask for a first-order linear trend. An ongoing mapping and dating effort is aimed to understand the evolution of the Juan Fernández Ridge, testing the main hypothesis. This research is supported by FONDECYT Project

  8. 75 FR 15772 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ..., Mexico; Citizen Mexico; Nationality Mexico; (INDIVIDUAL) 4. VELASQUEZ CABALLERO, Ivan (a.k.a. VELAZQUEZ.... VELAZQUEZ CABALLERO, Juan Daniel); Colonia Infonavit, Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico; Colonia Buena...

  9. Vertical distribution and characterization of aerobic phototrophic bacteria at the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Rathgeber, Christopher; Lince, Michael T; Alric, Jean; Lang, Andrew S; Humphrey, Elaine; Blankenship, Robert E; Verméglio, André; Plumley, F Gerald; Van Dover, Cindy L; Beatty, J Thomas; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2008-09-01

    The vertical distribution of culturable anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria was investigated at five sites at or near the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean. Twelve similar strains of obligately aerobic phototrophic bacteria were isolated in pure culture, from depths ranging from 500 to 2,379 m below the surface. These strains appear morphologically, physiologically, biochemically, and phylogenetically similar to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum strain JF-1, a bacterium previously isolated from hydrothermal vent plume waters. Only one aerobic phototrophic strain was isolated from surface waters. This strain is morphologically and physiologically distinct from the strains isolated at deeper sampling locations, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is most closely related to the genus Erythrobacter. Phototrophs were cultivated from three water casts taken above vents but not from two casts taken away from active vent sites. No culturable anaerobic anoxygenic phototrophs were detected. The photosynthetic apparatus was investigated in strain JF-1 and contains light-harvesting I and reaction center complexes, which are functional under aerobic conditions.

  10. Amino acid abundances and stereochemistry in hydrothermally altered sediments from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Andersson, E; Simoneit, B R; Holm, N G

    2000-09-01

    The Juan de Fuca Ridge is a hydrothermally active, sediment covered, spreading ridge situated a few hundred kilometres off the west coast of North America in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Sediments from seven sites drilled during the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Legs 139 and 168 were analyzed for total hydrolyzable amino acids (THAA), individual amino acid distributions, total organic C (TOC) and total N (TN) contents. The aim was to evaluate the effects of hydrothermal stress on the decomposition and transformation of sedimentary amino acids. Hydrolyzable amino acids account for up to 3.3% of the total organic C content and up to 12% of the total N content of the upper sediments. The total amounts of amino acids decrease significantly with depth in all drilled holes. This trend is particularly pronounced in holes with a thermal gradient of around 0.6 degrees C/m or higher. The most abundant amino acids in shallow sediments are glycine, alanine, lysine, glutamic acid, valine and histidine. The changes in amino acid distributions in low temperature holes are characterized by increased relative abundances of non-protein beta-alanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid. In high temperature holes the amino acid compositions are characterized by high abundances of glycine, alanine, serine, ornithine and histidine at depth. D/L ratios of samples with amino acid distributions similar to those found in acid hydrolysates of kerogen, indicate that racemization rates of amino acids bound by condensation reactions may be diminished.

  11. Fin whale tracks recorded by a seismic network on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Northeast Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Soule, Dax C; Wilcock, William S D

    2013-03-01

    Fin whale calls recorded from 2003 to 2004 by a seafloor seismic network on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge were analyzed to determine tracks and calling patterns. Over 150 tracks were obtained with a total duration of ~800 h and swimming speeds from 1 to 12 km/h. The dominant inter-pulse interval (IPI) is 24 s and the IPI patterns define 4 categories: a 25 s single IPI and 24/30 s dual IPI produced by single calling whales, a 24/13 s dual IPI interpreted as two calling whales, and an irregular IPI interpreted as groups of calling whales. There are also tracks in which the IPI switches between categories. Call rates vary seasonally with all the tracks between August and April. From August to October tracks are dominated by the irregular IPI and are predominantly headed to the northwest, suggesting that a portion of the fin whale population does not migrate south in the fall. The other IPI categories occur primarily from November to March. These tracks have slower swimming speeds, tend to meander, and are predominantly to the south. The distribution of fin whales around the network is non-random with more calls near the network and to the east and north.

  12. The Use of ATLAS Data to Quantify Surface Radiative Budget Alteration Through Urbanization for San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Gonzalez, Jorge; Schiller, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The additional heating of the air over the city is the result of the replacement of naturally vegetated surfaces with those composed of asphalt, concrete, rooftops and other manmade materials. The temperatures of these artificial surfaces can be 20 to 40 0 C higher than vegetated surfaces. Materials such as asphalt store much of the sun s energy and remains hot long after sunset. This produces a dome of elevated air temperatures 5 to 8 C greater over the city, compared to the air temperatures over adjacent rural areas. This effect is called the "urban heat island". Urban landscapes are a complex mixture of vegetated and nonvegetated surfaces. It is difficult to take enough temperature measurements over a large city area to characterize the complexity of urban radiant surface temperature variability. However, the use of remotely sensed thermal data from airborne scanners are ideal for the task. The NASA Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) operates in the visual and IR bands was used in February 2004 to collect data from San Juan, Puerto Rico with the main objective of investigating the Urban Heat Island (UHI) in tropical cities. In this presentation we will examine the techniques of analyzing remotely sensed data for measuring the effect of various urban surfaces on their contribution to the urban heat island effect. Results from data collected from other US cities of Sacramento, Salt Lake City and Baton Rouge will be used to compare the "urban fabric" among the cities.

  13. Multi-mode conversion imaging of the subducted Gorda and Juan de Fuca plates below the North American continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauzin, Benoit; Bodin, Thomas; Debayle, Eric; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Reynard, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Receiver function analysis and seismic tomography show tectonic structures dipping eastward in the mantle below the Cascadia volcanic arc (western US) that have been related to the subduction of the Gorda and Juan de Fuca oceanic micro-plates. Inconsistencies in the dip angle and depth extent of the slab between the two methods undermine the interpretation of the structure and processes at work. Receiver function imaging is biased by multiple reflection phases that interfere with converted phases, and produce spurious discontinuities in images. Here, we correct the interference using a multiple mode conversion imaging technique that efficiently removes artifacts under dipping structures. The method has the advantage of being applicable to large aperture arrays, and can image large-scale structures down to the transition zone. With this approach, the interfaces between the subducting and overriding plates and the oceanic Moho are imaged at shallow depths (<120 km) with a dip angle of ∼20°, consistently with former studies. In addition, several important features are imaged with the present method. Faint converters located between 100 and 400 km depth in the mantle wedge, and strong sub-horizontal seismic scatterers near 160 km depth, may highlight dehydration and metasomatism processes in the Cascadia subduction zone. A discontinuity located at ∼15 km depth in the lithospheric mantle of the subducted plates and associated with a negative impedance contrast is interpreted as the fossil fabric of the plates acquired at the spreading ridges.

  14. Microbial diversity of a sulfide black smoker in main endeavour hydrothermal vent field, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huaiyang; Li, Jiangtao; Peng, Xiaotong; Meng, Jun; Wang, Fengping; Ai, Yuncan

    2009-06-01

    Submarine hydrothermal vents are among the least-understood habitats on Earth but have been the intense focus of research in the past 30 years. An active hydrothermal sulfide chimney collected from the Dudley site in the Main Endeavour vent Field (MEF) of Juan de Fuca Ridge was investigated using mineralogical and molecular approaches. Mineral analysis indicated that the chimney was composed mainly of Fe-, Zn-and Cu-rich sulfides. According to phylogenetic analysis, within the Crenarchaeota, clones of the order Desulfurococcales predominated, comprising nearly 50% of archaeal clones. Euryarchaeota were composed mainly of clones belonging to Thermococcales and deep-sea hydrothermal vent Euryarchaeota (DHVE), each of which accounted for about 20% of all clones. Thermophilic or hyperthermophilic physiologies were common to the predominant archaeal groups. More than half of bacterial clones belonged to epsilon-Proteobacteria, which confirmed their prevalence in hydrothermal vent environments. Clones of Proteobacteria (gamma-, delta-, beta-), Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (CFB) and Deinococcus-Thermus occurred as well. It was remarkable that methanogens and methanotrophs were not detected in our 16S rRNA gene library. Our results indicated that sulfur-related metabolism, which included sulfur-reducing activity carried out by thermophilic archaea and sulfur-oxidizing by mesophilic bacteria, was common and crucial to the vent ecosystem in Dudley hydrothermal site. PMID:19557339

  15. Preliminary investigation of the elemental variation and diagenesis of a tabular uranium deposit, La Sal Mine, San Juan County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, Robert A.; Campbell, John A.

    1976-01-01

    Ore in the La Sal mine, San Juan County, Utah, occurs as a typical tabular-type uranium deposit of the-Colorado Plateau. Uranium-vanadium occurs in the Salt Wash Member of the Jurassic Morrison Formation. Chemical and petrographic analyses were used to determine elemental variation and diagenetic aspects across the orebody. Vanadium is concentrated in the dark clay matrix, which constitutes visible ore. Uranium content is greater above the vanadium zone. Calcium, carbonate carbon, and lead show greater than fifty-fold increase across the ore zone, whereas copper and organic carbon show only a several-fold increase. Large molybdenum concentrations are present in and above the tabular layer, and large selenium concentrations occur below the uranium zone within the richest vanadium zone. Iron is enriched in the vanadium horizon. Chromium is depleted from above the ore and strongly enriched below. Elements that vary directly with the vanadium content include magnesium, iron, selenium, zirconium, strontium, titanium, lead, boron, yttrium, and scandium. The diagenetic sequence is as follows: (1) formation of secondary quartz overgrowths as cement; (2) infilling and lining of remaining pores with amber opaline material; (3) formation of vanadium-rich clay matrix, which has replaced overgrowths as well as quartz grains; (4) replacement of overgrowths and detrital grains by calcite; (5) infilling of pores with barite and the introduction of pyrite and marcasite.

  16. Time-series measurement of hydrothermal heat flux at the Grotto mound, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangyu; Jackson, Darrell R.; Bemis, Karen G.; Rona, Peter A.

    2014-10-01

    Continuous time-series observations are key to understanding the temporal evolution of a seafloor hydrothermal system and its interplay with thermal and chemical processes in the ocean and Earth interior. In this paper, we present a 26-month time series of the heat flux driving a hydrothermal plume on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge obtained using the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS). Since 2010, COVIS has been connected to the North East Pacific Time-series Underwater Networked Experiment (NEPTUNE) observatory that provides power and real-time data transmission. The heat flux time series has a mean value of 18.10 MW and a standard deviation of 6.44 MW. The time series has no significant global trend, suggesting the hydrothermal heat source remained steady during the observation period. The steadiness of the hydrothermal heat source coincides with reduced seismic activity at Endeavour observed in the seismic data recorded by an ocean bottom seismometer from 2011 to 2013. Furthermore, first-order estimation of heat flux based on the temperature measurements made by the Benthic and Resistivity Sensors (BARS) at a neighboring vent also supports the steadiness of the hydrothermal heat source.

  17. Post-glacial landscape response to climate variability in the southeastern San Juan Mountains of Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bradley G.; Eppes, Martha Cary; Diemer, John A.; Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo; Layzell, Anthony L.

    2011-11-01

    Geomorphic mapping in the upper Conejos River Valley of the San Juan Mountains has shown that three distinct periods of aggradation have occurred since the end of the last glacial maximum (LGM). The first occurred during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (~ 12.5-9.5 ka) and is interpreted as paraglacial landscape response to deglaciation after the LGM. Evidence of the second period of aggradation is limited but indicates a small pulse of sedimentation at ~ 5.5 ka. A third, more broadly identifiable period of sedimentation occurred in the late Holocene (~ 2.2-1 ka). The latest two periods of aggradation are concurrent with increases in the frequency of climate change in the region suggesting that Holocene alpine and sub-alpine landscapes respond more to rapid changes in climate than to large singular climatic swings. Soil development and radiocarbon dating indicate that hillslopes were stable during the Holocene even while aggradation was occurring in valley bottoms. Thus, we can conclude that erosion does not occur equally throughout the landscape but is focused upslope of headwater streams, along tributary channels, or on ridge tops. This is in contrast to some models which assume equal erosion in headwater basins.

  18. An interdisciplinary analysis of Colorado Rocky Mountain environments using ADP techniques. [San Juan Mts. and Indian Peaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, R. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Good ecological, classification accuracy (90-95%) can be achieved in areas of rugged relief on a regional basis for Level 1 cover types (coniferous forest, deciduous forest, grassland, cropland, bare rock and soil, and water) using computer-aided analysis techniques on ERTS/MSS data. Cost comparisons showed that a Level 1 cover type map and a table of areal estimates could be obtained for the 443,000 hectare San Juan Mt. test site for less than 0.1 cent per acre, whereas photointerpretation techniques would cost more than 0.4 cent per acre. Results of snow cover mapping have conclusively proven that the areal extent of snow in mountainous terrain can be rapidly and economically mapped by using ERTS/MSS data and computer-aided analysis techniques. A distinct relationship between elevation and time of freeze or thaw was observed, during mountain lake mapping. Basic lithologic units such as igneous, sedimentary, and unconsolidated rock materials were successfully identified. Geomorphic form, which is exhibited through spatial and textual data, can only be inferred from ERTS data. Data collection platform systems can be utilized to produce satisfactory data from extremely inaccessible locations that encounter very adverse weather conditions, as indicated by results obtained from a DCP located at 3,536 meters elevation that encountered minimum temperatures of -25.5 C and wind speeds of up to 40.9m/sec (91 mph), but which still performed very reliably.

  19. Paleoclimate cycles and tectonic controls on fluvial, lacustrine, and eolian strata in upper Triassic Chinle Formation, San Juan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, R.F. )

    1989-09-01

    Sedimentologic study of the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation in the San Juan basin (SJB) indicates that Late Triassic paleoclimate and tectonic movements influenced the distribution of continental lithofacies. The Shinarump, Monitor Butte, and Petrified Forest Members in the lower part of the Chinle consist of complexly interfingered fluvial, floodplain, marsh, and lacustrine rocks; the Owl Rock and Rock Point Members in the upper part consists of lacustrine-basin and eolian sandsheet strata. Facies analysis, vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, and paleoclimate models demonstrate that the Late Triassic was dominated by tropical monsoonal circulation, which provided abundant precipitation interspersed with seasonally dry periods. Owl Rock lacustrine strata comprise laminated limestones that reflect seasonal monsoonal precipitation and larger scale, interbedded carbonates and fine-grained clastics that represent longer term, alternating wet and dry climatic cycles. Overlying Rock Point eolian sand-sheet and dune deposits indicate persistent alternating but drier climatic cyclicity. Within the Chinle, upward succession of lacustrine, alternating lacustrine/eolian sand-sheet, and eolian sand-sheet/dune deposits reflects an overall decrease in precipitation due to the northward migration of Pangaea out of low latitudes dominated by monsoonal circulation.

  20. Ground-water hydrology of the Hollister and San Juan Valleys, San Benito County, California, 1913-68

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilburn, Chabot

    1973-01-01

    The Hollister and San Juan Valleys are within the Gilroy-Hollister ground-water basin. That part of the ground-water basin underlying the valleys consists of three subbasins each of which contains two or more ground-water subunits. The subbasin and subunit boundaries are formed by known or postulated faults, folded sedimentary rocks, and igneous rocks. The principal water-bearing units are lenticular beds of sand and gavel interbedded with clay, silt, sand, and gravel, or their locally consolidated equivalents, which range from Pliocene to Holocene, in age. Ground water occurs mainly under artesian or semiartesian conditions but also under unconfined (water-table) conditions in areas adjacent to most surface streams and, locally, under perched or semiperched conditions. In 1968 the depth to water in wells ranged from approximately 20 feet above land surface to more than 200 feet below land surface. Water-level differences in wells across the boundaries of adjacent subunits ranged from about 1 to more than 100 feet.

  1. A new species of Hemibrycon (Characiformes, Characidae) from the upper San Juan River drainage, Pacific versant, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Román-Valencia, César; Ruiz-C, Raquel I.; Taphorn, Donald C.; García-Alzate, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hemibrycon sanjuanensis, new species, is described from the upper San Juan River drainage, Pacific versant, Colombia. It is distinguished from Hemibrycon boquiae, Hemibrycon brevispini, Hemibrycon cairoense, Hemibrycon colombianus, Hemibrycon mikrostiktos, Hemibrycon metae, Hemibrycon palomae, Hemibrycon rafaelense and Hemibrycon tridens by the presence of a circular or oblong humeral spot that is located two scales posterior to the opercle (vs. 3–4 scales in Hemibrycon palomae, Hemibrycon rafaelense, Hemibrycon brevispini and Hemibrycon cairoense, and 0–1 scales, in Hemibrycon metae and Hemibrycon boquiae). It further differs from Hemibrycon colombianus in having a round or oblong humeral spot (vs. rectangular). It differs from Hemibrycon beni, Hemibrycon dariensis, Hemibrycon divisorensis, Hemibrycon helleri, Hemibrycon huambonicus, Hemibrycon inambari, Hemibrycon jabonero, Hemibrycon jelskii, Hemibrycon mikrostiktos, Hemibrycon polyodon, Hemibrycon quindos, Hemibrycon raqueliae, Hemibrycon santamartae, Hemibrycon surinamensis, Hemibrycon taeniurus, Hemibrycon tridens, and Hemibrycon yacopiae in having melanophores on the posterior margins of the scales along the sides of body (vs. lacking melanophores on margins of scales along entire length of the sides of body). The new species differs from all congeners mentioned above in having, among other features, six teeth in the outer premaxillary row arranged in a straight line (vs. five or fewer teeth not arranged in straight line except Hemibrycon cairoense with two to six teeth in the outer premaxillary row). PMID:25493068

  2. Spatial patterns of zooplankton and nekton in a hydrothermally active axial valley on Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skebo, Kristina; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Garcia Berdeal, Irene; Johnson, H. Paul

    2006-06-01

    Zooplankton and nekton at 2000 m depth in the axial valley of Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, show marked variability in abundances in a plane at 20 m above bottom. A remotely operated vehicle flew a gridded rectangle 3.2×0.5 km that included two large high-temperature and two small low-temperature vent fields. Numbers of zooplankton, jellyfish, shrimp and fish were recorded with a video camera, and the abundance patterns were examined with the program SADIE ©. Each organism group displayed a distinctive distribution pattern. Abundance gaps over the high-temperature fields were significant and, for the more abundant copepods, were related to the locations of individual smokers. Pelagic shrimp and macrourid fish abundances were correlated and concentrated around the northern high temperature field. Distinct aggregations of zooplankton and nekton were correlated with the fluid indicators from both the low temperature diffuse effluent and the focused high temperature vents. Patterns were likely established by organism choice that forms aggregations and gaps, and by physical processes that entrain passive particles near vigorous smoker plumes. While enhanced plankton and nekton numbers were not observed over the vent fields, overall abundances in the axial valley may be sustained by production transported from the vent fields on the seafloor.

  3. A new species of Hemibrycon (Characiformes, Characidae) from the upper San Juan River drainage, Pacific versant, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Román-Valencia, César; Ruiz-C, Raquel I; Taphorn, Donald C; García-Alzate, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    Hemibryconsanjuanensis, new species, is described from the upper San Juan River drainage, Pacific versant, Colombia. It is distinguished from Hemibryconboquiae, Hemibryconbrevispini, Hemibryconcairoense, Hemibryconcolombianus, Hemibryconmikrostiktos, Hemibryconmetae, Hemibryconpalomae, Hemibryconrafaelense and Hemibrycontridens by the presence of a circular or oblong humeral spot that is located two scales posterior to the opercle (vs. 3-4 scales in Hemibryconpalomae, Hemibryconrafaelense, Hemibryconbrevispini and Hemibryconcairoense, and 0-1 scales, in Hemibryconmetae and Hemibryconboquiae). It further differs from Hemibryconcolombianus in having a round or oblong humeral spot (vs. rectangular). It differs from Hemibryconbeni, Hemibrycondariensis, Hemibrycondivisorensis, Hemibryconhelleri, Hemibryconhuambonicus, Hemibryconinambari, Hemibryconjabonero, Hemibryconjelskii, Hemibryconmikrostiktos, Hemibryconpolyodon, Hemibryconquindos, Hemibryconraqueliae, Hemibryconsantamartae, Hemibryconsurinamensis, Hemibrycontaeniurus, Hemibrycontridens, and Hemibryconyacopiae in having melanophores on the posterior margins of the scales along the sides of body (vs. lacking melanophores on margins of scales along entire length of the sides of body). The new species differs from all congeners mentioned above in having, among other features, six teeth in the outer premaxillary row arranged in a straight line (vs. five or fewer teeth not arranged in straight line except Hemibryconcairoense with two to six teeth in the outer premaxillary row). PMID:25493068

  4. Submarine fissure eruptions and hydrothermal vents on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge: preliminary observations from the submersible Alvin.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The submersible Alvin was used to investigate 3 active hydrothermal discharge sites along the S Juan de Fuca Ridge in September 1984. The hydrothermal zones occur within a 10-30m-deep, 30-50m-wide cleft marking the center of the axial valley. This cleft is the eruptive locus for the axial valley. The hydrothermal vents coincide with the main eruptive vents along the cleft. Each hydrothermal zone has multiple discharge sites extending as much as 500m along the cleft. Sulfide deposits occur as clusters (15-100m2 area) of small chimneys (= or <2m high) and as individual and clustered fields of large, branched chimneys (= or <10m high). Recovered sulfide samples are predominantly the tops of chimneys and spires and typically contain more than 80% sphalerite and wurtzite with minor pyrrhotite, pyrite, marcasite, isocubanite, chalcopyrite, anhydrite, anhydrite, and amorphous silica. The associated hydrothermal fluids have the highest chlorinity of any reported to date.-Authors

  5. A new species of Hemibrycon (Characiformes, Characidae) from the upper San Juan River drainage, Pacific versant, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Román-Valencia, César; Ruiz-C, Raquel I; Taphorn, Donald C; García-Alzate, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    Hemibryconsanjuanensis, new species, is described from the upper San Juan River drainage, Pacific versant, Colombia. It is distinguished from Hemibryconboquiae, Hemibryconbrevispini, Hemibryconcairoense, Hemibryconcolombianus, Hemibryconmikrostiktos, Hemibryconmetae, Hemibryconpalomae, Hemibryconrafaelense and Hemibrycontridens by the presence of a circular or oblong humeral spot that is located two scales posterior to the opercle (vs. 3-4 scales in Hemibryconpalomae, Hemibryconrafaelense, Hemibryconbrevispini and Hemibryconcairoense, and 0-1 scales, in Hemibryconmetae and Hemibryconboquiae). It further differs from Hemibryconcolombianus in having a round or oblong humeral spot (vs. rectangular). It differs from Hemibryconbeni, Hemibrycondariensis, Hemibrycondivisorensis, Hemibryconhelleri, Hemibryconhuambonicus, Hemibryconinambari, Hemibryconjabonero, Hemibryconjelskii, Hemibryconmikrostiktos, Hemibryconpolyodon, Hemibryconquindos, Hemibryconraqueliae, Hemibryconsantamartae, Hemibryconsurinamensis, Hemibrycontaeniurus, Hemibrycontridens, and Hemibryconyacopiae in having melanophores on the posterior margins of the scales along the sides of body (vs. lacking melanophores on margins of scales along entire length of the sides of body). The new species differs from all congeners mentioned above in having, among other features, six teeth in the outer premaxillary row arranged in a straight line (vs. five or fewer teeth not arranged in straight line except Hemibryconcairoense with two to six teeth in the outer premaxillary row).

  6. Distribution and composition of hydrothermal plume particles from the ASHES Vent Field at Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feely, R. A.; Geiselman, T. L.; Baker, E. T.; Massoth, G. J.; Hammond, S. R.

    1990-08-01

    In 1986 and 1987, buoyant and neutrally buoyant hydrothermal plume particles from the ASHES vent field within Axial Volcano were sampled to study their variations in composition with height above the seafloor. Individual mineral phases were identified using standard X ray diffraction procedures. Elemental composition and particle morphologies were determined by X ray fluorescence spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy/X ray energy spectrometry techniques. The vent particles were primarily composed of sphalerite, anhydrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, barite, hydrous iron oxides, and amorphous silica. Grain size analyses of buoyant plume particles showed rapid particle growth in the first few centimeters above the vent orifice, followed by differential sedimentation of the larger sulfide and sulfate minerals out of the buoyant plume. The neutrally buoyant plume consisted of a lower plume, which was highly enriched in Fe, S, Zn, and Cu, and an upper plume, which was highly enriched in Fe and Mn. The upper plume was enriched in Fe and Mn oxyhydroxide particles, and the lower plume was enriched in suspended sulfide particles in addition to the Fe and Mn oxyhydroxide particles. The chemical data for the water column particles indicate that chemical scavenging and differential sedimentation processes are major factors controlling the composition of the dispersing hydrothermal particles. Short-term sediment trap experiments indicate that the fallout from the ASHES vent field is not as large as some of the other vent fields on the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  7. Oil-generating coals of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clayton, J.L.; Rice, D.D.; Michael, G.E.

    1991-01-01

    Coal beds of the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado have significant liquid hydrocarbon generation potential as indicated by typical Rock-Eval Hydrogen Indexes in the range of 200-400 mg hydrocarbon/g organic carbon (type II and III organic matter). Small, non-commercial quantities of oil have been produced from the coal beds at several locations. The oils are characterized by high pristane/phytane (ca 4) and pristane/n-C17 ratios (ca 1.2), abundant C21+ alkanes in the C10+ fraction with a slight predominance of odd carbon-numbered n-alkanes, abundant branched-chain alkanes in the C15+ region, and a predominance of methylcyclohexane in the C4-C10 fraction. The oils are indigenous to the Fruitland Formation coals and probably migrated at thermal maturities corresponding to vitrinite reflectance values in the range 0.7-0.8%. Although the oils found to date are not present in commercial amounts, these findings illustrate the potential of some coals to generate and expel oil under conditions of moderate thermal heating. ?? 1991.

  8. Interpretation of Schlumberger DC resistivity data from Gibson Dome-Lockhart Basin study area, San Juan County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    A Schlumberger dc resistivity survey of the Gibson Dome-Lockhart Basin area, San Juan County, Utah, has revealed the following electrical characteristics of the area: (1) the area between the northern part of Davis Canyon and Gibson Dome is electrically quite uniform and resistive at the depth of the Pennsylvanian evaporite deposits, (2) there is a deep conductive anomaly at Horsehead Rock, and (3) there are several shallow and deep electrical anomalies in the vicinity of the Lockhart fault system. No adverse indicators were found for nuclear waste repository siting south of Indian Creek, but additional soundings should be made to increase data density and to extend the survey area southward. The Lockhart fault system appears to have triggered salt dissolution or flow outside the limits of Lockhart Basin; further geophysical work and drilling will be required to understand the origin of the Lockhart Basin structure and its present state of activity. This problem is important because geologic processes that lead to enlargement of the Lockhart Basin structure or to development of similar structures would threaten the integrity of a repository in the Gibson Dome area.

  9. Population Dynamics of Aedes aegypti and Dengue as Influenced by Weather and Human Behavior in San Juan, Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Roberto; Amador, Manuel; MacKay, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies on the influence of weather on Aedes aegypti dynamics in Puerto Rico suggested that rainfall was a significant driver of immature mosquito populations and dengue incidence, but mostly in the drier areas of the island. We conducted a longitudinal study of Ae. aegypti in two neighborhoods of the metropolitan area of San Juan city, Puerto Rico where rainfall is more uniformly distributed throughout the year. We assessed the impacts of rainfall, temperature, and human activities on the temporal dynamics of adult Ae. aegypti and oviposition. Changes in adult mosquitoes were monitored with BG-Sentinel traps and oviposition activity with CDC enhanced ovitraps. Pupal surveys were conducted during the drier and wetter parts of the year in both neighborhoods to determine the contribution of humans and rains to mosquito production. Mosquito dynamics in each neighborhood was compared with dengue incidence in their respective municipalities during the study. Our results showed that: 1. Most pupae were produced in containers managed by people, which explains the prevalence of adult mosquitoes at times when rainfall was scant; 2. Water meters were documented for the first time as productive habitats for Ae. aegypti; 3. Even though Puerto Rico has a reliable supply of tap water and an active tire recycling program, water storage containers and discarded tires were important mosquito producers; 4. Peaks in mosquito density preceded maximum dengue incidence; and 5. Ae. aegypti dynamics were driven by weather and human activity and oviposition was significantly correlated with dengue incidence. PMID:22206021

  10. Tectonic and unroofing history of Neogene Manantiales foreland basin deposits, Cordillera Frontal (32°30'S), San Juan Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Daniel J.

    2001-12-01

    The Miocene Manantiales foreland basin is located in Cordillera Frontal of San Juan, between 32°30' and 33°S. The unroofing study of the synorogenic Miocene deposits provides information about the structural evolution of Cordón de La Ramada fold-and-thrust belt. These Tertiary deposits are represented by the Chinches Formation and comprise seven members (Tc0-Tc6). They are the result of the uplift of Mesozoic sequences that crop out in La Ramada fold-and-thrust belt of the Cordillera Principal. Quaternary deposits unconformably overlying the Chinches Formation are composed of granitic and rhyolitic blocks, and represent the final uplift of the Cordón del Espinacito and a series of out-of-sequence thrusts. The unroofing studies also provide sufficient information to establish the out-of-sequence timing of the deformation at this latitude. Initial deposition of the Tertiary deposits can be dated at about 20 Ma, or early Miocene. Andesitic lavas dated in 9.2±0.3, 10.7±0.7, and 12.7±0.7 Ma unconformably overlie the structure of La Ramada fold-and-thrust belt. These facts constrain the uplift of the High Andes between 20 and 10 Ma at this latitude. The unconformity between Tertiary and Quaternary deposits suggests final uplift during Pliocene-Pleistocene times.

  11. Earthquake-induced changes in a hydrothermal system on the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge

    PubMed

    Johnson; Hutnak; Dziak; Fox; Urcuyo; Cowen; Nabelek; Fisher

    2000-09-14

    Hydrothermal vents on mid-ocean ridges of the northeast Pacific Ocean are known to respond to seismic disturbances, with observed changes in vent temperature. But these disturbances resulted from submarine volcanic activity; until now, there have been no observations of the response of a vent system to non-magmatic, tectonic events. Here we report measurements of hydrothermal vent temperature from several vents on the Juan de Fuca ridge in June 1999, before, during and after an earthquake swarm of apparent tectonic origin. Vent fluid temperatures began to rise 4-11 days after the first earthquake. Following this initial increase, the vent temperatures oscillated for about a month before settling down to higher values. We also observed a tenfold increase in fluid output from the hydrothermal system over a period of at least 80 days, extending along the entire ridge segment. Such a large, segment-wide thermal response to relatively modest tectonic activity is surprising, and raises questions about the sources of excess heat and fluid, and the possible effect on vent biological communities.

  12. Surface water environment in the area of the San Juan Basin regional uranium study, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busby, Mark William

    1979-01-01

    Streamflows in the lowland areas of the San Juan Basin are highly variable, responding to short-duration, high-intensity thunderstorms occurring in the late spring and summer. The thunderstorms can cause floods of large magnitude, but of localized extent. Most streams of the lowlands are ephemeral or intermittent. Streams of the high mountain areas are much less variable. Most of their flow is from snowmelt, which results in low-intensity flood peaks with long, gradual recessions. Most large mountain streams are perennial. Small ephemeral lakes and ponds in the low-lying areas have little effect on flood flows. Larger reservoirs in the basin have varying effects on flows of rivers, ranging from complete flow control to minor regulation. The streams of the low-lying areas are high in dissolved solids content. Sodium, bicarbonate, and sulfate are the predominant ions. The quality of the water varies during a single-flow event and season-ally. Streams in the mountains are low in dissolved solids content. Radiochemical constituents are fairly low in most of the natural streamflow, but concentrations are higher than in streams outside of the basin.

  13. Genetic structure of the populations migrating from San Luis Potosi and Zacatecas to Nuevo León in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Flores, R M; Kshatriya, G K; Barton, S A; Leal-Garza, C H; Garza-Chapa, R; Schull, W J; Chakraborty, R

    1991-06-01

    The Mexicans residing in the Monterrey metropolitan area in Nuevo León, Mexico, were grouped by generation and birthplace [Monterrey Metropolitan Area (MMA), San Luis Potosi (SLP), and Zacatecas (ZAC)] of the four grandparents to determine the extent of genetic variation within this population and the genetic differences, if any, between the natives living in the MMA and the immigrant populations from SLP and ZAC. Nine genetic marker systems were analyzed. The genetic distance analysis indicates that SLP and ZAC are similar to the MMA, irrespective of birthplace and generation. Gene diversity analysis (GST) suggests that more than 96% of the total gene diversity (HT) can be attributed to individual variation within the population. The genetic admixture analysis suggests that the Mexicans of the MMA, SLP, and ZAC, stratified by birthplace and generation, have received a predominantly Spanish contribution (78.5%), followed by a Mexican Indian contribution (21.5%). Similarly, admixture analysis, conducted on the population of Nuevo León and stratified by generation, indicates a substantial contribution from the MMA (64.6%), followed by ZAC (22.1%) and SLP (13.3%). Finally, we demonstrate that there is no nonrandom association of alleles among the genetic marker systems (i.e., no evidence of gametic disequilibrium) despite the Mestizo origin of this population.

  14. Window into Sediment-Buried Basement Biosphere: Fluid Sampling from CORK Observatory Seafloor Platforms, Juan de Fuca Ridge Flanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, J. P.; Lin, H.; Rappe, M.; Jungbluth, S.; Glazer, B. T.; Matzinger, M.; Amend, J. P.; Boettger, J.

    2010-12-01

    Studies of the deep basement biosphere are technologically challenging, requiring complementary approaches to provide sufficient access to allow precision analyses and experimentation. Our NSF-funded ‘Microbial Observatory’ has focused on IODP Circulation Obviating Retrofit Kit (CORK) observatories to obtain pristine samples of fluids from sediment-buried basement environments. We have developed instruments and samplers to interface with CORK fluid delivery lines, including a ROV/HOV-borne Mobile Pumping System and autonomous (e.g., GeoMICROBE) instrument sensor/sampler systems. These systems are providing high quality (e.g., depleted Mg++, <6 mM) samples of basement fluids from 3.5 mA old upper basement, on the flanks of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, for geochemical and microbial studies. Relative to bottom seawater, these fluids are also depleted in O2, SO42-, PO43-, NO3- and NO2-, while enriched in NH4+, H2S, Mn and Fe. In situ voltammetric analyses obtained during sample collection, revealed the presence of micromolar levels of sulfide (0.5 µm) in the fluids. Dissolved organic carbon in basement fluids is about half that of local bottom seawater, low molecular weight organic acids are below detection limits, while total amino acids are also low in concentration, but the relative abundance of specific amino acids varies from that of bottom seawater. Overall, the sediment-buried basement environments appears to be organic-carbon depleted and low energy, yet still dynamic. The microbial communities from CORK 1301A (47deg 45N, 127deg 45W) in consecutive years are heterogeneous, but share common groups. Different CORKs sampled a decade apart share major lineages, consistent with hydrogeologic connectivity. Samples collected from a new CORK installation at borehole 1026B contain a subset of members found a decade previously from an older style CORK at the same site. Communities retrieved from the CORK at 1025C (47deg 53N, 128deg 39W), in 1.4 My ridge flank basement

  15. Summary of the San Juan structural basin regional aquifer-system analysis, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levings, G.W.; Kernodle, J.M.; Thorn, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water resources are the only source of water in most of the San Juan structural basin and are mainly used for municipal, industrial, domestic, and stock purposes. Industrial use increased dramatically during the late 1970's and early 1980's because of increased exploration and development of uranium and coal resources. The San Juan structural basin is a northwest-trending, asymmetric structural depression at the eastern edge of the Colorado Plateau. The basin contains as much as 14,000 feet of sedimentary rocks overlying a Precambrian basement complex. The sedimentary rocks dip basinward from the basin margins toward the troughlike structural center, or deepest part of the basin. Rocks of Triassic age were selected as the lower boundary for the study. The basin is well defined by structural boundaries in many places with structural relief of as much as 20,000 feet reported. Faulting is prevalent in parts of the basin with displacement of several thousand feet along major faults. The regional aquifers in the basin generally are coincident with the geologic units that have been mapped. Data on the hydrologic properties of the regional aquifers are minimal. Most data were collected on those aquifers associated with uranium and coal resource production. These data are summarized in table format in the report. The regional flow system throughout most of the basin has been affected by the production of oil or gas and subsequent disposal of produced brine. To date more than 26,000 oil- or gas- test holes have been drilled in the basin, the majority penetrating no deeper than the bottom of the Cretaceous rocks. The general water chemistry of the regional aquifers is based on available data. The depositional environments are the major factor controlling the quality of water in the units. The dominant ions are generally sodium, bicarbonate, and sulfate. A detailed geochemical study of three sandstone aquifers--Morrison, Dakota, and Gallup--was undertaken in the

  16. Consideraciones acerca del método de los arcos de reducción de datos VLBI astrométricos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Biasi, M. S.; Arias, E. F.

    Con el propósito de construir un marco de referencia cuasi-inercial, desarrollamos un sistema de coordenadas inercial introduciendo un nuevo observable: el arco entre un par de radiofuentes. Este método proveerá una mejor herramienta para el análisis y reducción de observaciones VLBI. También conducirá a una solución en donde se determinarán independientemente los parámetros astrométricos y geodésicos. En este trabajo analizamos el caso ideal de observaciones simultáneas de un par de radiofuentes y el caso más realista de observaciones cuasisimultáneas.

  17. Linkages between mineralogy, fluid chemistry, and microbial communities within hydrothermal chimneys from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. J.; Ver Eecke, H. C.; Breves, E. A.; Dyar, M. D.; Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Dahle, H.; Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.; Kelley, D. S.; Lilley, M. D.; Baross, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Rock and fluid samples were collected from three hydrothermal chimneys at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge to evaluate linkages among mineralogy, fluid chemistry, and microbial community composition within the chimneys. Mössbauer, midinfrared thermal emission, and visible-near infrared spectroscopies were utilized for the first time to characterize vent mineralogy, in addition to thin-section petrography, X-ray diffraction, and elemental analyses. A 282°C venting chimney from the Bastille edifice was composed primarily of sulfide minerals such as chalcopyrite, marcasite, and sphalerite. In contrast, samples from a 300°C venting chimney from the Dante edifice and a 321°C venting chimney from the Hot Harold edifice contained a high abundance of the sulfate mineral anhydrite. Geochemical modeling of mixed vent fluids suggested the oxic-anoxic transition zone was above 100°C at all three vents, and that the thermodynamic energy available for autotrophic microbial redox reactions favored aerobic sulfide and methane oxidation. As predicted, microbes within the Dante and Hot Harold chimneys were most closely related to mesophilic and thermophilic aerobes of the Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria and sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria. However, most of the microbes within the Bastille chimney were most closely related to mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobes of the Deltaproteobacteria, especially sulfate reducers, and anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaea. The predominance of anaerobes in the Bastille chimney indicated that other environmental factors promote anoxic conditions. Possibilities include the maturity or fluid flow characteristics of the chimney, abiotic Fe2+ and S2- oxidation in the vent fluids, or O2 depletion by aerobic respiration on the chimney outer wall.

  18. Crustal Thickness and Lower Crustal Velocity Structure Beneath the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R.; Soule, D. C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Weekly, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    In 2009, a multi-scale seismic tomography experiment was conducted on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge aboard the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. Ocean bottom seismometers were deployed at 64 sites and recorded 5567 shots of a 36-element, 6600 in.3 airgun array. The experiment extended 100 km along-axis and 60 km cross-axis. Two crustal tomographic analyses have previously been completed using data from the experiment. First, 93,000 manually picked crustal refraction arrivals (Pg) were used to develop a three-dimensional model of crustal velocity and thickness in the upper crust (Weekly et al. 2014). Second, this model was used as the starting model in an analysis that incorporated ~19,000 Moho reflection arrivals (PmP) for non-ridge crossing paths to image lower crustal velocity structure and crustal thickness off-axis. A key feature of this model is a ~0.5-1 km increase in crustal thickness beneath a bathymetric plateau that extends to either side of the central portion of the Endeavour segment. We present a tomographic inversions that incorporates ridge-crossing paths to examine spatial variations in lower crustal velocity and crustal thickness beneath the ridge axis. The preliminary results from an inversion that incorporates ~8700 manually picked ridge-crossing PmP arrival times reveals a ~10-km-wide low velocity zone extending throughout the lower crust with a velocity anomaly of -0.3 to -0.5 km/s at ≥4 km depth. This low velocity zone extends both to the north and south of the axial magma chamber reflector imaged previously beneath the central Endeavour. The inversion also shows significant variations in apparent crustal thickness along axis but additional analysis is required to understand whether these variations are well resolved.

  19. Dissolved Carbon Species in Diffuse and Focused Flow Hydrothermal Vents at the Main Endeavour Field, Northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foustoukos, D. I.; Seyfried, W. E.; Ding, K.; Pester, N. J.

    2006-12-01

    The magmatic and tectonic event of 1999 had a significant impact on the chemical composition of vent fluids issuing from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF), Juan de Fuca Ridge. Here, we report dissolved concentrations of H2, CO2, CO and C1-C3 alkanes measured in low and high-temperature hydrothermal fluids collected in August 2005 during an RV Atlantis/DSV Alvin expedition at MEF. In comparison with time series data, temperatures of the 2005 vent fluids were slightly lower than those recorded in the aftermaths of the tectonic event of 1999. The possible cooling of the hydrothermal subseafloor reaction zone is consistent with the observed increase in dissolved Cl to pre-1999 values. Converging compositional trends to pre-1999 conditions are also suggested for dissolved CO2 concentrations (~20 mmol/kg) in Puffer, Sully, Bastille and S&M vent fluids. In these focused flow and high-temperature vent fluids, dissolved CO2 is in thermodynamic equilibrium with CO(aq). The systematics of organic species in diffuse flow fluids, however, appears to be closely related to processes occurring within the near-seafloor environment. For example, excess CO(aq) observed in the diffuse flow fluids at Easter Island is attributed to sluggish CO- CO2(aq) equilibria at low temperatures, suggesting hydrothermal circulation of short-residence times. Short-lived hydrothermal circulation is further supported by the nearly identical C1/(C2+C3) ratios between focused and diffuse flow fluids. Furthermore, alkane distribution in the MEF diffuse flow fluids suggests direct mixing between seawater and hydrothermal fluid with minimal biological inputs, in contrast with the greater effect of microbial methanogenesis proposed in other ridge-crest hydrothermal environments. Thus, the coupling of CO2(aq)-CO(aq) redox equilibrium with dissolved carbon species in low- temperature vent fluids could provide a better understanding of the effect of subsurface microbial communities upon the composition of mid

  20. Microbiological characterization of post-eruption “snowblower” vents at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Julie L.; Akerman, Nancy H.; Proskurowski, Giora; Huber, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial processes within the subseafloor can be examined during the ephemeral and uncommonly observed phenomena known as snowblower venting. Snowblowers are characterized by the large quantity of white floc that is expelled from the seafloor following mid-ocean ridge eruptions. During these eruptions, rapidly cooling lava entrains seawater and hydrothermal fluids enriched in geochemical reactants, creating a natural bioreactor that supports a subseafloor microbial “bloom.” Previous studies hypothesized that the eruption-associated floc was made by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria; however, the microbes involved were never identified. Here we present the first molecular analysis combined with microscopy of microbial communities in snowblower vents from samples collected shortly after the 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount, an active volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We obtained fluid samples and white flocculent material from active snowblower vents as well as orange flocculent material found on top of newly formed lava flows. Both flocculent types revealed diverse cell types and particulates when examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distinct archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in each sample type through Illumina tag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and through sequencing of the sulfide oxidation gene, soxB. In fluids and white floc, the dominant bacteria were sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and the dominant archaea were thermophilic Methanococcales. In contrast, the dominant organisms in the orange floc were Gammaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I. In all samples, bacteria greatly outnumbered archaea. The presence of anaerobic methanogens and microaerobic Epsilonproteobacteria in snowblower communities provides evidence that these blooms are seeded by subseafloor microbes, rather than from microbes in bottom seawater. These eruptive events thus provide a unique opportunity to observe subseafloor microbial

  1. SURVEY FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE IN THE SOUTH AMERICAN FUR SEAL (ARCTOCEPHALUS AUSTRALIS) POPULATION AT PUNTA SAN JUAN, PERU.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Gwen; Adkesson, Michael J; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Cárdenas-Alayza, Susana; Majluf, Patricia

    2015-06-01

    The Peruvian population of the South American fur seal ( Arctocephalus australis ) is a distinct evolutionarily significant unit that is endangered. One of the largest rookeries for this species in Peru is located within the Punta San Juan marine protected area (15°22'S, 75°12'W). To better understand the current health status of this population, exposure to 10 pinniped pathogens was evaluated in adult female fur seals (n=29) via serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques in November 2010. The results suggest this population is naïve to canine and phocine distemper viruses (serum neutralization test), five Leptospira interrogans serovars (microscopic agglutination test), and Brucella canis (card test). Indirect fluorescent antibody testing for Toxoplasma gondii , Neospora caninum , and Sarcocystis neurona was also uniformly negative. PCR testing of nasal swabs using previously described Mycoplasma spp. primers was positive in 37.9% (11/29) of samples. One animal was positive via card test for Brucella abortus , whereas 53.7% (15/28) were positive or suspect using a marine Brucella competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody to phocine herpesvirus-1 (PHV-1) was identified in 85.7% (24/28) of the sampled population by serum neutralization testing. Overall, exposure to Mycoplasma spp., Brucella spp., and PHV-1 was observed, but results demonstrated low to no exposure to many key pinniped pathogens. The expansion of human populations, agriculture, and industry along the Peruvian coast may lead to increased pathogen exposure from human, domestic, and wild animal sources. The naïve nature of this key population of South American fur seals raises concerns about potential risk for disease outbreaks.

  2. Upper crustal seismic structure of the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge from traveltime tomography: Implications for oceanic crustal accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, Robert T.; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-04-01

    isotropic and anisotropic P wave velocity structure of the upper oceanic crust on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is studied using refracted traveltime data collected by an active-source, three-dimensional tomography experiment. The isotropic velocity structure is characterized by low crustal velocities in the overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at the segment ends. These low velocities are indicative of pervasive tectonic fracturing and persist off axis, recording the history of ridge propagation. Near the segment center, velocities within the upper 1 km show ridge-parallel bands with low velocities on the outer flanks of topographic highs. These features are consistent with localized thickening of the volcanic extrusive layer from eruptions extending outside of the axial valley that flow down the fault-tilted blocks that form the abyssal hill topography. On-axis velocities are generally relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields likely due to the infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed beneath the most vigorous vent fields in a seismically active region above the axial magma chamber and may reflect increased fracturing and higher temperatures. Seismic anisotropy is high on-axis but decreases substantially off axis over 5-10 km (0.2-0.4 Ma). This decrease coincides with an increase in seismic velocities resolved at depths ≥1 km and is attributed to the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation. The orientation of the fast-axis of anisotropy is ridge-parallel near the segment center but curves near the segment ends reflecting the tectonic fabric within the OSCs.

  3. Heat flux measured acoustically at Grotto Vent, a hydrothermal vent cluster on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past several decades, quantifying the heat output has been a unanimous focus of studies at hydrothermal vent fields discovered around the global ocean. Despite their importance, direct measurements of hydrothermal heat flux are very limited due to the remoteness of most vent sites and the complexity of hydrothermal venting. Moreover, almost all the heat flux measurements made to date are snapshots and provide little information on the temporal variation that is expected from the dynamic nature of a hydrothermal system. The Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS, https://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/covis/) is currently connected to the Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory network (http://www.neptunecanada.ca) to monitor the hydrothermal plumes issuing from a vent cluster (Grotto) on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. COVIS is acquiring a long-term (20-months to date) time series of the vertical flow rate and volume flux of the hydrothermal plume above Grotto through the Doppler analysis of the acoustic backscatter data (Xu et al., 2013). We then estimate the plume heat flux from vertical flow rate and volume flux using our newly developed inverse method. In this presentation, we will briefly summarize the derivation of the inverse method and present the heat-flux time series obtained consequently with uncertainty quantification. In addition, we compare our heat-flux estimates with the one estimated from the plume in-situ temperatures measured using a Remotely Operative Vehicle (ROV) in 2012. Such comparison sheds light on the uncertainty of our heat flux estimation. Xu, G., Jackson, D., Bemis, K., and Rona, P., 2013, Observations of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar, Geochemistry, Geophysics Geosystems, 2013 (in press).

  4. High-resolution near-bottom vector magnetic anomalies over Raven Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; Johnson, H. Paul; Salmi, Marie S.; Hutnak, Michael

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution, near-bottom vector magnetic data were collected by remotely operated vehicle Jason over the Raven hydrothermal vent field (47°57.3'N 129°5.75'W) located north of Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The survey was part of a comprehensive heat flow study of the Raven site using innovative thermal blanket technology to map the heat flux and crustal fluid pathways around a solitary hydrothermal vent field. Raven hydrothermal activity is presently located along the western axial valley wall, while additional inactive hydrothermal deposits are found to the NW on the upper rift valley wall. Magnetic inversion results show discrete areas of reduced magnetization associated with both active and inactive hydrothermal vent deposits that also show high conductive heat flow. Higher spatial variability in the heat flow patterns compared to the magnetization is consistent with the heat flow reflecting the currently active but ephemeral thermal environment of fluid flow, while crustal magnetization is representative of the static time-averaged effect of hydrothermal alteration. A general NW to SE trend in reduced magnetization across the Raven area correlates closely with the distribution of hydrothermal deposits and heat flux patterns and suggests that the fluid circulation system at depth is likely controlled by local crustal structure and magma chamber geometry. Magnetic gradient tensor components computed from vector magnetic data improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly source and indicate that the hydrothermally altered zone directly beneath the Raven site is approximately 15 × 106 m3 in volume.

  5. Denitrification in diffuse hydrothermal vent fluids of Axial Volcano and the Endeavour Segment on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, A.; Lehmann, M. F.; Butterfield, D. A.; Devol, A.; Chang, B. X.; Juniper, K.

    2009-12-01

    Denitrification is a major and well-investigated sink of bio-available nitrogen (N) in the ocean. However, little is known about the removal of N in diffuse hydrothermal vents. Hydrothermal vent fluids are known to harbor diverse bacterial populations, and the use of nitrate as an electron acceptor for the microbially mediated oxidation of hydrogen sulphide has previously been documented in these extreme environments, but no direct measurements of denitrification rates have been reported. We present the first denitrification rate estimates (i.e. the conversion of nitrate to nitrogen gas) derived from 15N-label incubations at 7 diffuse hydrothermal vent sites along the Juan de Fuca Ridge (North-East Pacific). Incubation samples (in-situ temperatures between 6.8 and 40.8οC) were collected during research cruises in June and August 2008. We also measured the isotopic composition of nitrate and ammonium from low-T sites collected during several cruises from 2006 to 2009. Mixing between ambient seawater and sub-seafloor hydrothermal reservoirs is the dominant process that modulates DIN concentration and isotope dynamics. However, clear signs of isotope fractionation of the N (and O of nitrate) isotopes at some sites suggests the presence of nitrate consuming processes, likely denitrification and/or the assimilation by vent microorganisms. 15N incubation-based denitrification rates ranged from 0 to 0.6 μM N/day, with no consistent relationship with the in-situ temperature of the vent fluids. With only one exception, detectable denitrification rates were determined at all sites, suggesting that denitrification is an important N-elimination process in diffuse vent fluids. Ongoing work that aims at studying the environmental factors that potentially control rates of denitrification (e.g. temperature, flow rate, fluid chemistry), as well as other possible N removal pathways (e.g. anammox and DNRA coupled to anammox), will also be discussed.

  6. Mineralogical studies of sulfide samples and volatile concentrations of basalt glasses from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Brett, R; Evans, H T; Gibson, E K; Hedenquist, J W; Wandless, M V; Sommer, M A

    1987-10-10

    Sulfide samples obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey's DSRV Alvin dives on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge closely resemble those from the same area described by Koski et al. (1984). Major minerals include sphalerite, wurtzite, pyrite, marcasite, isocubanite, anhydrite, and chalcopyrite. Equilibrium, if attained at all, during deposition of most sulfides was a transient event over a few tens of micrometers at most and was perturbed by rapid temperature and compositional changes of the circulating fluid. Two new minerals were found: one, a hydrated Zn, Fe hydroxy-chlorosulfate, and the other, a (Mn, Mg, Fe) hydroxide or hydroxy-hydrate. Both were formed at relatively low temperatures. Lizardite, starkeyite, and anatase were found for the first time in such an environment. Sulfide geothermometry involving the system Cu-Fe-S indicates a vent temperature of <328 degrees C for one sample. Fluid inclusion studies on crystals from the same vicinity of the same sample give pressure-corrected homogenization temperatures of 268 degrees and 285 degrees C. Ice-melting temperatures on inclusions from the same sample are about -2.8 degrees C, indicating that the equivalent salinity of the trapped fluid is about 50% greater than that of seawater. Volatile concentrations from vesicle-free basalt glass from the vent field are about 0.013 wt% CO2 and 0.16 wt% H2O, CO2 contents in these samples yield an entrapment depth of 2200 m of seawater, which is the depth from which the samples were collected.

  7. GeoChip-based analysis of metabolic diversity of microbial communities at the Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal vent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengping; Zhou, Huaiyang; Meng, Jun; Peng, Xiaotong; Jiang, Lijing; Sun, Ping; Zhang, Chuanlun; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong; Xiao, Xiang

    2009-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are one of the most unique and fascinating ecosystems on Earth. Although phylogenetic diversity of vent communities has been extensively examined, their physiological diversity is poorly understood. In this study, a GeoChip-based, high-throughput metagenomics technology revealed dramatic differences in microbial metabolic functions in a newly grown protochimney (inner section, Proto-I; outer section, Proto-O) and the outer section of a mature chimney (4143-1) at the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Very limited numbers of functional genes were detected in Proto-I (113 genes), whereas much higher numbers of genes were detected in Proto-O (504 genes) and 4143-1 (5,414 genes). Microbial functional genes/populations in Proto-O and Proto-I were substantially different (around 1% common genes), suggesting a rapid change in the microbial community composition during the growth of the chimney. Previously retrieved cbbL and cbbM genes involved in the Calvin Benson Bassham (CBB) cycle from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were predominant in Proto-O and 4143-1, whereas photosynthetic green-like cbbL genes were the major components in Proto-I. In addition, genes involved in methanogenesis, aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation (e.g., ANME1 and ANME2), nitrification, denitrification, sulfate reduction, degradation of complex carbon substrates, and metal resistance were also detected. Clone libraries supported the GeoChip results but were less effective than the microarray in delineating microbial populations of low biomass. Overall, these results suggest that the hydrothermal microbial communities are metabolically and physiologically highly diverse, and the communities appear to be undergoing rapid dynamic succession and adaptation in response to the steep temperature and chemical gradients across the chimney. PMID:19273854

  8. Carbonate mound reservoirs in the paradox formation: An outcrop analogue along the San Juan River, Southeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T. C. Jr.; Morgan, C.D.; Eby, D.E.

    1996-06-01

    Carbonate mound reservoirs within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation are major producers of oil and gas in the Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona. Outcrops of the Paradox Formation along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah provide small-scale analogues of reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, lithofacies, and geometry. These characteristics can be used in reservoir simulation models for secondary/tertiary recovery of oil from small fields in the basin. Exposures of the Paradox Formation Ismay zone in the Wild Horse Canyon area display lateral facies changes from phylloid algal mounds to off-mound detrital wedges or fans bounded at the top by a flooding surface. The phylloid mounds are composed of bafflestone, skeletal grainstone, packstone, and cementstone. Algal plates, brachiopods, bryozoans, and rugose corals are commonly found in the phylloid mounds. The mound wall is composed of rudstone, lumpstone, and cementstone. The detrital fan consists of transported algal material, grainstone, and mudstone with open-marine fossils. Within the mound complex is an inter-mound trough tentatively interpreted to be a tidal channel. The geometry and composition of the rocks in the trough significantly add to the overall heterogeneity of the mound. Reservoir models are being developed for possible water- and carbon-dioxide floods of small Paradox basin fields to determine the most effective secondary/tertiary recovery method. The models will include lithologic fabrics, flooding surfaces, and inter-mound troughs, based on the mound complex exposed at Wild Horse Canyon. This project may also provide reservoir information for simulation models in small Paleozoic carbonate mound fields in other basins worldwide.

  9. Variations in fluvial style in the Westwater Canyon Member, Morrison formation (Jurassic), San Juan basin, Colorado plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miall, A.D.; Turner-Peterson, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques of architectural element analysis and lateral profiling have been applied to the fluvial Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic) in southern San Juan Basin. On a large scale, the sandstone-body architecture consists mainly of a series of tabular sandstone sheets 5-15 m thick and hundreds of meters wide, separated by thin fine-grained units. Internally these sheets contain lateral accretion surfaces and are cut by channels 10-20 m deep and at least 250 m wide. On a more detailed scale, interpretations made from large-scale photomosaics show a complex of architectural elements and bounding surfaces. Typical indicators of moderate- to high-sinuosity channels (lateral accretion deposits) coexist in the same outcrop with downstream-accreted macroform deposits that are typical of sand flats of low-sinuosity, multiple-channel rivers. Broad, deep channels with gently to steeply dipping margins were mapped in several of the outcrops by carefully tracing major bounding surfaces. Locally thick accumulations of plane-laminated and low-angle cross-laminated sandstone lithofacies suggest rapid flow, probably transitional to upper flow regime conditions. Such a depositional style is most typical of ephemeral rivers or those periodically undergoing major seasonal (or more erratic) stage fluctuations, an interpretation consistent with independent mineralogical evidence of aridity. Fining-upward sequences are rare in the project area, contrary to the descriptions of Campbell (1976). The humid alluvial fan model of Galloway (1978) cannot be substantiated and, similarly, the architectural model of Campbell (1976) requires major revision. Comparisons with the depositional architecture of the large Indian rivers, such as the Ganges and Brahmaputra, still seem reasonable, as originally proposed by Campbell (1976), although there is now convincing evidence for aridity and for major stage fluctuations, which differs both from those modern rivers and Campbell

  10. Aerobic and anaerobic enzymatic activity of orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus) and alfonsino (Beryx splendens) from the Juan Fernandez seamounts area.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, L M; Quiñones, R A; Gonzalez-Saldía, R R; Niklitschek, E J

    2016-06-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic enzymatic activity of two important commercial bathypelagic species living in the Juan Fernández seamounts was analyzed: alfonsino (Beryx splendens) and orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus). These seamounts are influenced by the presence of an oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) located between 160 and 250 m depth. Both species have vertical segregation; alfonsino is able to stay in the OMZ, while orange roughy remains at greater depths. In this study, we compare the aerobic and anaerobic capacity of these species, measuring the activity of key metabolic enzymes in different body tissues (muscle, heart, brain and liver). Alfonsino has higher anaerobic potential in its white muscle due to greater lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity (190.2 μmol NADH min(-1) g ww(-1)), which is related to its smaller body size, but it is also a feature shared with species that migrate through OMZs. This potential and the higher muscle citrate synthase and electron transport system activities indicate that alfonsino has greater swimming activity level than orange roughy. This species has also a high MDH/LDH ratio in its heart, brain and liver, revealing a potential capacity to conduct aerobic metabolism in these organs under prolonged periods of environmental low oxygen conditions, preventing lactic acid accumulation. With these metabolic characteristics, alfonsino may have increased swimming activity to migrate and also could stay for a period of time in the OMZ. The observed differences between alfonsino and orange roughy with respect to their aerobic and anaerobic enzymatic activity are consistent with their characteristic vertical distributions and feeding behaviors. PMID:26687132

  11. SURVEY FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE IN THE SOUTH AMERICAN FUR SEAL (ARCTOCEPHALUS AUSTRALIS) POPULATION AT PUNTA SAN JUAN, PERU.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Gwen; Adkesson, Michael J; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Cárdenas-Alayza, Susana; Majluf, Patricia

    2015-06-01

    The Peruvian population of the South American fur seal ( Arctocephalus australis ) is a distinct evolutionarily significant unit that is endangered. One of the largest rookeries for this species in Peru is located within the Punta San Juan marine protected area (15°22'S, 75°12'W). To better understand the current health status of this population, exposure to 10 pinniped pathogens was evaluated in adult female fur seals (n=29) via serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques in November 2010. The results suggest this population is naïve to canine and phocine distemper viruses (serum neutralization test), five Leptospira interrogans serovars (microscopic agglutination test), and Brucella canis (card test). Indirect fluorescent antibody testing for Toxoplasma gondii , Neospora caninum , and Sarcocystis neurona was also uniformly negative. PCR testing of nasal swabs using previously described Mycoplasma spp. primers was positive in 37.9% (11/29) of samples. One animal was positive via card test for Brucella abortus , whereas 53.7% (15/28) were positive or suspect using a marine Brucella competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody to phocine herpesvirus-1 (PHV-1) was identified in 85.7% (24/28) of the sampled population by serum neutralization testing. Overall, exposure to Mycoplasma spp., Brucella spp., and PHV-1 was observed, but results demonstrated low to no exposure to many key pinniped pathogens. The expansion of human populations, agriculture, and industry along the Peruvian coast may lead to increased pathogen exposure from human, domestic, and wild animal sources. The naïve nature of this key population of South American fur seals raises concerns about potential risk for disease outbreaks. PMID:26056875

  12. Characteristics of hydrothermal plumes from two vent fields on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward T.; Massoth, Gary J.

    1987-09-01

    Deep CTD/transmissometer tows and water bottle sampling were used during 1985 to map the regional distribution of the neutrally-buoyant plumes emanating from each of two major vent fields on the Southern Symmetrical Segment (SSS) and Endeavour Segment (ES) of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. At both vent fields, emissions from point and diffuse hydrothermal sources coalesced into a single 200-m-thick plume elongated in the direction of current flow and with characteristic temperature anomalies of 0.02-0.05°C and light-attenuation anomalies of 0.01-0.08 m -1 (10-80 μg/l above background). Temperature anomalies in the core of each plume were uniform as far downcurrent as the plumes were mapped (10-15 km). Downcurrent light-attenuation trends were non-uniform and differed between plumes, apparently because different vent fluid chemistries at each field cause significant differences in the settling characteristics of the hydrothermal precipitates. Vent fluids from the SSS are metal-dominated and mostly precipitate very fine-grained hydrous Fe-oxides that remain suspended in the plume. Vent fluids from the ES are sulfur-dominated and precipitate a high proportion of coarser-grained Fe-sulfides that rapidly settle from the plume. The integrated flux of each vent field was estimated from measurements of the advective transport of each plume. Heat flux was 1700 ± 1100 MW from the ES and 580 ± 351 MW from the SSS. Particle flux varied from 546 ± 312 g/s to 204 ± 116 g/s at the ES depending on distance from the vent field, and was 92 ± 48 g/s from the SSS.

  13. Hydrogeology of the Point Lookout Sandstone in the San Juan structural basin, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Craigg, S.D.; Dam, W.L.; Kernodle, J.M.; Thorn, C.R.; Levings, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    This report is one in a series resulting from the US Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) study of the San Juan structural basin that began in October 1984. Summarized is information on the geology, occurrence and quality of water in the Point Lookout Sandstone, one of the primary water-bearing units in the regional aquifer system. Water in the Point Lookout Sandstone occurs under both water table and artesian conditions. Potential recharge to the aquifer is from infiltration of precipitation and streamflow and from vertical leakage of water through confining beds. The average hydraulic conductivity calculated from oil and gas wells in the deeper parts of the basin is 0.0058 ft/d. The reported or measured discharge from 17 water wells completed in the Point Lookout Sandstone ranges from 1 to 75 gallons per minute and the median is 10 gpm/ft of drawdown and the median is 0.25 gpm/ft of drawdown. From a total of 37 samples for pH, 22 exceeded the standard. Out of a total of 43 samples for sulfate, 16 samples exceeded the secondary drinking water standard. Only 1 sample for chloride out of 49 samples exceeded the standard. From 44 samples for fluoride, 9 samples exceeded the secondary drinking water standard of 4 mg/L. Twenty-nine samples from a total of 42 samples for dissolved solids concentration exceeded the secondary drinking water standard. No samples for nitrate exceeded the primary drinking water standard of 10mg/L.

  14. Aerobic and anaerobic enzymatic activity of orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus) and alfonsino (Beryx splendens) from the Juan Fernandez seamounts area.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, L M; Quiñones, R A; Gonzalez-Saldía, R R; Niklitschek, E J

    2016-06-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic enzymatic activity of two important commercial bathypelagic species living in the Juan Fernández seamounts was analyzed: alfonsino (Beryx splendens) and orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus). These seamounts are influenced by the presence of an oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) located between 160 and 250 m depth. Both species have vertical segregation; alfonsino is able to stay in the OMZ, while orange roughy remains at greater depths. In this study, we compare the aerobic and anaerobic capacity of these species, measuring the activity of key metabolic enzymes in different body tissues (muscle, heart, brain and liver). Alfonsino has higher anaerobic potential in its white muscle due to greater lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity (190.2 μmol NADH min(-1) g ww(-1)), which is related to its smaller body size, but it is also a feature shared with species that migrate through OMZs. This potential and the higher muscle citrate synthase and electron transport system activities indicate that alfonsino has greater swimming activity level than orange roughy. This species has also a high MDH/LDH ratio in its heart, brain and liver, revealing a potential capacity to conduct aerobic metabolism in these organs under prolonged periods of environmental low oxygen conditions, preventing lactic acid accumulation. With these metabolic characteristics, alfonsino may have increased swimming activity to migrate and also could stay for a period of time in the OMZ. The observed differences between alfonsino and orange roughy with respect to their aerobic and anaerobic enzymatic activity are consistent with their characteristic vertical distributions and feeding behaviors.

  15. Applying Fishers' ecological knowledge to construct past and future lobster stocks in the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Tyler D; Gardner, Jonathan P A; Pérez-Matus, Alejandro

    2010-11-05

    Over-exploited fisheries are a common feature of the modern world and a range of solutions including area closures (marine reserves; MRs), effort reduction, gear changes, ecosystem-based management, incentives and co-management have been suggested as techniques to rebuild over-fished populations. Historic accounts of lobster (Jasus frontalis) on the Chilean Juan Fernández Archipelago indicate a high abundance at all depths (intertidal to approximately 165 m), but presently lobsters are found almost exclusively in deeper regions of their natural distribution. Fishers' ecological knowledge (FEK) tells a story of serial depletion in lobster abundance at fishing grounds located closest to the fishing port with an associated decline in catch per unit effort (CPUE) throughout recent history. We have re-constructed baselines of lobster biomass throughout human history on the archipelago using historic data, the fishery catch record and FEK to permit examination of the potential effects of MRs, effort reduction and co-management (stewardship of catch) to restore stocks. We employed a bioeconomic model using FEK, fishery catch and effort data, underwater survey information, predicted population growth and response to MR protection (no-take) to explore different management strategies and their trade-offs to restore stocks and improve catches. Our findings indicate that increased stewardship of catch coupled with 30% area closure (MR) provides the best option to reconstruct historic baselines. Based on model predictions, continued exploitation under the current management scheme is highly influenced by annual fluctuations and unsustainable. We propose a community-based co-management program to implement a MR in order to rebuild the lobster population while also providing conservation protection for marine species endemic to the Archipelago.

  16. Space-time relations of hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate-silica deposits at the northern Cleft Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, R.A.; Smith, V.K. ); Embley, R.W. ); Jonasson, I.R. ); Kadko, D.C. . Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science)

    1993-04-01

    Submersible investigations along the northern Cleft Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge indicate that a newly erupted sheet flow and two recent megaplume events are spatially related to a NNE-trending fissure system that is now the locus for active hydrothermal venting and deposition of massive sulfide mounds and chimneys. Samples from active high-temperature vent sites located east and north of the sheet flow terrain include zoned Cu-sulfide-rich chimneys (Type 1), bulbous anhydrite-rich chimneys (Type 2), and columnar Zn-sulfide-rich chimneys (Type 3). Type 1 chimneys with large open channelways result from the focused discharge of fluid at temperatures between 310 and 328 C from the Monolith sulfide mound. Type 2 chimneys are constructed on the Monolith and Fountain mounds where discharge of fluid at temperatures between 293 and 315 C is diffuse and sluggish. Type 3 chimneys, characterized by twisting narrow channelways, are deposited from focused and relatively low-temperature fluid discharging directly from basalt substrate. Inactive sulfide chimneys (Type 4) located within 100 m of the fissure system have bulk compositions, mineral assemblages, colloform and bacteroidal textures, and oxygen isotope characteristics consistent with low-temperature (< 250 C ) deposition from less robust vents. Field relations and [sup 210]Pb ages (> 100 years) indicate that the Type 4 chimneys formed prior to the sheet flow eruption. The sulfide mounds and Type 1 and Type 2 chimneys at the Monolith and Fountain vents, however, are an expression of the same magmatic event that caused the sheet flow eruption and megaplume events.

  17. Biostratigraphic evidence for dramatic Holocene uplift of Robinson Crusoe Island, Juan Fernández Ridge, SE Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepúlveda, P.; Le Roux, J. P.; Lara, L. E.; Orozco, G.; Astudillo, V.

    2015-03-01

    Hotspot oceanic islands typically experience subsidence due to several processes related to migration of the oceanic plate away from the mantle plume and surface flexural loading. However, many other processes can interrupt subsidence, some of which may be associated with catastrophic events. A study of the biostratigraphy and sedimentology of Holocene deposits on Robinson Crusoe Island (RCI) on the Juan Fernández Ridge (JFR) indicated that dramatic uplift has occurred since 8000 years BP, at a rate of about 8.5mm yr-1. This is evidenced by supratidal flats with tepee structures and sand layers containing marine gastropods (mostly Nerita sp.) that are now exposed ca. 70 m a.s.l. The active hotspot is located 280 km further west and the last volcanic activity on RCI occurred at ca. 800 000 years BP. Long-term subsidence is evidenced by deep submerged marine abrasion terraces at RCI. As no direct evidence was found for the existence of a compensating bulge generated by the present hotspot upon which RCI would be situated, it must be concluded that subsidence in the wake of the mantle plume beneath the migrating plate was interrupted by very rapid uplift, but on a scale that did not fully compensate for the previous subsidence. This can be attributed to large-scale landslides followed by isostatic rebound, although this is only vaguely reflected in the low-resolution bathymetry of the area. To determine if this mechanism produced the uplift, a detailed bathymetric survey of the area will be required. If such a survey confirms this hypothesis, it may have implications for the short-term dynamics of vertical variations of oceanic edifices and their related effects on ecosystems and human population.

  18. Applying Fishers' Ecological Knowledge to Construct Past and Future Lobster Stocks in the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Tyler D.; Gardner, Jonathan P. A.; Pérez-Matus, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Over-exploited fisheries are a common feature of the modern world and a range of solutions including area closures (marine reserves; MRs), effort reduction, gear changes, ecosystem-based management, incentives and co-management have been suggested as techniques to rebuild over-fished populations. Historic accounts of lobster (Jasus frontalis) on the Chilean Juan Fernández Archipelago indicate a high abundance at all depths (intertidal to approximately 165 m), but presently lobsters are found almost exclusively in deeper regions of their natural distribution. Fishers' ecological knowledge (FEK) tells a story of serial depletion in lobster abundance at fishing grounds located closest to the fishing port with an associated decline in catch per unit effort (CPUE) throughout recent history. We have re-constructed baselines of lobster biomass throughout human history on the archipelago using historic data, the fishery catch record and FEK to permit examination of the potential effects of MRs, effort reduction and co-management (stewardship of catch) to restore stocks. We employed a bioeconomic model using FEK, fishery catch and effort data, underwater survey information, predicted population growth and response to MR protection (no-take) to explore different management strategies and their trade-offs to restore stocks and improve catches. Our findings indicate that increased stewardship of catch coupled with 30% area closure (MR) provides the best option to reconstruct historic baselines. Based on model predictions, continued exploitation under the current management scheme is highly influenced by annual fluctuations and unsustainable. We propose a community-based co-management program to implement a MR in order to rebuild the lobster population while also providing conservation protection for marine species endemic to the Archipelago. PMID:21079761

  19. Directionality of ambient noise on the Juan de Fuca plate: implications for source locations of the primary and secondary microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Ritzwoller, Michael H.

    2015-04-01

    Based on cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise computed using 61 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) within the Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate from the Cascadia Initiative experiment and 42 continental stations near the coast of the western United States, we investigate the locations of generation of the primary (11-20 s period) and secondary (5-10 s period) microseisms in the northern Pacific Ocean by analysing the directionality and seasonality of the microseism (Rayleigh wave) signals received in this region. We conclude that (1) the ambient noise observed across the array is much different in the primary and secondary microseism bands, both in its azimuthal content and seasonal variation. (2) The principal secondary microseism signals propagate towards the east, consistent with their generation in deep waters of the North Pacific, perhaps coincident both with the region of observed body wave excitation and the predicted wave-wave interaction region from recent studies. (3) The primary microseism, as indicated by observations of the azimuthal dependence of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave as well as observations of precursory arrivals, derives significantly from the shallow waters of the eastern Pacific near to the JdF plate but also has a component generated at greater distance of unknown origin. (4) These observations suggest different physical mechanisms for generating the two microseisms: the secondary microseisms are likely to be generated by non-linear wave-wave interaction over the deep Pacific Ocean, while the primary microseism may couple directly into the solid earth locally in shallow waters from ocean gravity waves. (5) Above 5 s period, high quality empirical Green's functions are observed from cross-correlations between deep water OBSs and continental stations, which illustrates that microseisms propagate efficiently from either deep or shallow water source regions onto the continent and are well recorded by continental seismic stations.

  20. Compressional and Shear Wave Structure of the Upper Crust Beneath the Endeavour Segment, Juan De Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Weekly, R. T.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We present tomographic images of the compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocity structure of the upper crust beneath the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This ridge segment is bounded by the Endeavour and Cobb overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) to the north and south, respectively. Near the segment center an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector underlies 5 hydrothermal vent fields. Our analysis uses data from the Endeavour tomography (ETOMO) experiment. A prior study of the Vp structure indicates that the shallow crust of the Endeavour segment is strongly heterogeneous [Weekly et al., 2014]. Beneath the OSCs Vp is anomalously low, indicating tectonic fracturing. Near the segment center, upper crustal Vp is relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields, likely due to infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed immediately above the AMC, reflecting increased fracturing or higher temperatures. Anisotropic tomography reveals large amplitude ridge-parallel seismic anisotropy on-axis (>10%), but decreases in the off-axis direction over 5-10 km. Here we use crustal S-wave phases (Sg) — generated by P-to-S conversions near the seafloor — to better constrain crustal properties. Over half the OBSs in the ETOMO experiment recorded horizontal data on two channels that are of sufficiently high quality that we can orient the geophones using the polarizations of water waves from shots within 12 km. For these OBSs, crustal Sg phases are commonly visible out to ranges of ~20-25 km. We invert the Sg data separately for Vs structure, and also jointly invert Pg and Sg data to constrain the Vp/Vs ratio. Preliminary inversions indicate that Vs and Vp/Vs varies both laterally and vertically. These results imply strong lateral variations in both the physical (e.g., crack density and aspect ratio) and chemical (e.g., hydration) properties of oceanic crust.

  1. Chemical Speciation and Oxidation Kinetics of Iron and Sulfur in Subseafloor Basement Fluids on the Juan de Fuca Ridge Flanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, B. T.; Matzinger, M.; Cowen, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Redox reactive chemical species circulate throughout the upper oceanic crust, and are involved in a variety of abiotic and microbially-mediated reactions. Through exchange with bottom seawater, fluids circulating in the upper basement have the potential to influence scales ranging from global-scale biogeochemical cycling to micro-scale microbe-mineral interactions. Understanding fundamental chemical speciation, distribution, bioavailability, and rates of transformations for key chemical redox species is crucial to understanding processes in the subsurface. In-situ electrochemical analyses were conducted in real-time at CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories affixed to Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) boreholes in Cascadia Basin on the Juan de Fuca Ridge Flanks. Voltammetric electrodes were mounted into a flow cell to allow for simultaneous detection of redox species (O2, H_{2}O2, HS^{-}, S(0), Sx^{2-}, S2O_{3}2-, S_{4}O6^{2-}, Fe(II), Fe(III), FeS$_{(aq)}) concurrent to sample filtering or fluid collection. During real-time voltammetric scanning, qualitative assessment of the integrity of fluids delivered through the Fluid Delivery Lines could be made, allowing for comparisons between CORK sites and various sampling strategies. Newly installed CORKs at IODP sites 1362A and 1362B are producing the highest-integrity basement fluids collected to date, deplete in oxygen (<3uM) and enriched in iron (>1uM). Here, we report results of in situ electrochemical measurements at multiple borehole observatories, including the newly installed 1362A & 1362B sites, and present results of speciation analyses and kinetics of oxidation for iron and sulfur in discrete samples.

  2. Analysis of past and future dam formation and failure in the Santa Cruz River (San Juan province, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penna, Ivanna M.; Derron, Marc-Henri; Volpi, Michele; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2013-03-01

    Around 11.5 ∗ 106 m3 of rock detached from the eastern slope of the Santa Cruz valley (San Juan province, Argentina) in the first fortnight of January 2005. The rockslide-debris avalanche blocked the course, resulting in the development of a lake with maximum length of around 3.5 km. The increase in the inflow rate from 47,000-74,000 m3/d between April and October to 304,000 m3/d between late October and the first fortnight of November, accelerated the growing rate of the lake. On 12 November 2005 the dam failed, releasing 24.6 ∗ 106 m3 of water. The resulting outburst flood caused damages mainly on infrastructure, and affected the facilities of a hydropower dam which was under construction 250 km downstream from the source area. In this work we describe causes and consequences of the natural dam formation and failure, and we dynamically model the 2005 rockslide-debris avalanche with DAN3D. Additionally, as a volume ~ 24 ∗ 106 m3of rocks still remain unstable in the slope, we use the results of the back analysis to forecast the formation of a future natural dam. We analyzed two potential scenarios: a partial slope failure of 6.5 ∗ 106 m3 and a worst case where all the unstable volume remaining in the slope fails. The spreading of those potential events shows that a new blockage of the Santa Cruz River is likely to occur. According to their modeled morphometry and the contributing watershed upstream the blockage area, as the one of 2005, the dams would also be unstable. This study shows the importance of back and forward analysis that can be carried out to obtain critical information for land use planning, hazards mitigation, and emergency management.

  3. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the San Juan Basin for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre's patented tool

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, P.D.; Tischer, S.P.; Biezugbe, G.

    1993-05-01

    Most of the completed wells produce methane and wastewater (brine). The produced water is usually treated and released to a surface body of water in conformance with a NPDES permit. Treatment facilities are expensive to construct and operation and maintenance costs can be high. Also, environmental regulations pertaining to the release of wastewater to surface waters of the United States is presently under governmental investigation. A new process patented by Jack W. McIntyre has both economic and environmental advantages over the conventional surface treatment and disposal. This process has been tested in the Michigan Basin and reported to be successful. The process is based on utilizing a single well for both production and water disposal. During production, fluids enter the wellbore, gas rises to the surface and water moves down into the disposal zone either by gravity or mechanical pumping. This method allows separation of gas with simultaneous disposal of the water without the economic and environmental obstacles of bringing the water to the surface. A description and discussion of Jack W. McIntyre's tool is summarized in the compendium of the seven basins studied under this contract. Geraghty Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre's patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coal bed/sand formations in the San Juan Basin through literature surveys. Limited information exists on the hydrology and water quality of the immediate strata above and below the Fruitland formation. Because of the limited information on the baseline geochemistry of the coal/sand bed waters and the potential disposal zone, minimum effort was put on these zones' compatibility characterization. The study also indicates that water is produced along with gas production from the Fruitland formation. This makes the Basin a potential candidate for Jack McIntyre's patented tool.

  4. Seismic reflection images of a near-axis melt sill within the lower crust at the Juan de Fuca ridge.

    PubMed

    Canales, J Pablo; Nedimović, Mladen R; Kent, Graham M; Carbotte, Suzanne M; Detrick, Robert S

    2009-07-01

    The oceanic crust extends over two-thirds of the Earth's solid surface, and is generated along mid-ocean ridges from melts derived from the upwelling mantle. The upper and middle crust are constructed by dyking and sea-floor eruptions originating from magma accumulated in mid-crustal lenses at the spreading axis, but the style of accretion of the lower oceanic crust is actively debated. Models based on geological and petrological data from ophiolites propose that the lower oceanic crust is accreted from melt sills intruded at multiple levels between the Moho transition zone (MTZ) and the mid-crustal lens, consistent with geophysical studies that suggest the presence of melt within the lower crust. However, seismic images of molten sills within the lower crust have been elusive. Until now, only seismic reflections from mid-crustal melt lenses and sills within the MTZ have been described, suggesting that melt is efficiently transported through the lower crust. Here we report deep crustal seismic reflections off the southern Juan de Fuca ridge that we interpret as originating from a molten sill at present accreting the lower oceanic crust. The sill sits 5-6 km beneath the sea floor and 850-900 m above the MTZ, and is located 1.4-3.2 km off the spreading axis. Our results provide evidence for the existence of low-permeability barriers to melt migration within the lower section of modern oceanic crust forming at intermediate-to-fast spreading rates, as inferred from ophiolite studies.

  5. Prevalence of Vitamin D Insufficiency and Deficiency among Young Physicians at University District Hospital in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Vick, Margarita; Hernández-Dávila, Leticia; Rodríguez-Rivera, Nixzaliz; López-Valentín, Mariel; Haddock, Lillian; Rodríguez-Martínez, Renil; González-Bossolo, Alex

    2015-06-01

    Vitamin D has been attracting increased attention because of higher prevalences of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency than expected in areas with sufficient sun exposure. Even though sunlight exposure and diet are the main determinants of vitamin D status, other factors, such as age, race, the use (or not) of sunscreen, medications, and malabsorptive conditions, also affect vitamin D levels. Recent studies have found high prevalences of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in different populations. However, there are limited data regarding the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in Puerto Rico. To shed more light on the subject, we evaluated a sample of 51 internal medicine residents and research fellows, aged from 25 to 39 years at the University District Hospital in San Juan, Puerto Rico, doing so by means of a questionnaire that explored basic socio demographic and lifestyle characteristics and collected anthropometric data; in addition, we obtained blood samples in order to determine 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. The median 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was 21 ng/mL (range, 7-38 ng/mL). Forty-five participants (88.2%) had 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations of lower than 30 ng/mL. We found vitamin D deficiencies in 43.1% of the population and insufficiencies in 45.1%. Contributory factors to our findings include limited exposure to sunlight during periods of high sun intensity, increased body mass index, and a limited area of the body being exposed to sunlight. A relationship between reduced physical activity levels and hypovitaminosis D was also found. Both calcium intake and vitamin D intake, which were markedly below recommended daily allowances, were positively correlated with 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels, but with a weak association. PMID:26061058

  6. P-wave tomography of the western United States: Insight into the Yellowstone hotspot and the Juan de Fuca slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, You; Zhao, Dapeng

    2012-06-01

    We used 190,947 high-quality P-wave arrival times from 8421 local earthquakes and 1,098,022 precise travel-time residuals from 6470 teleseismic events recorded by the EarthScope/USArray transportable array to determine a detailed three-dimensional P-wave velocity model of the crust and mantle down to 1000 km depth under the western United States (US). Our tomography revealed strong heterogeneities in the crust and upper mantle under the western US. Prominent high-velocity anomalies are imaged beneath Idaho Batholith, central Colorado Plateau, Cascadian subduction zone, stable North American Craton, Transverse Ranges, and Southern Sierra Nevada. Prominent low-velocity anomalies are imaged at depths of 0-200 km beneath Snake River Plain, which may represent a small-scale convection beneath the western US. The low-velocity structure deviates variably from a narrow vertical plume conduit extending down to ˜1000 km depth, suggesting that the Yellowstone hotspot may have a lower-mantle origin. The Juan de Fuca slab is imaged as a dipping high-velocity anomaly under the western US. The slab geometry and its subducted depth vary in the north-south direction. In the southern parts the slab may have subducted down to >600 km depth. A "slab hole" is revealed beneath Oregon, which shows up as a low-velocity anomaly at depths of ˜100 to 300 km. The formation of the slab hole may be related to the Newberry magmatism. The removal of flat subducted Farallon slab may have triggered the vigorous magmatism in the Basin and Range and southern part of Rocky Mountains and also resulted in the uplift of the Colorado Plateau and Rocky Mountains.

  7. Small theropod teeth from the Late Cretaceous of the San Juan Basin, northwestern New Mexico and their implications for understanding latest Cretaceous dinosaur evolution.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Thomas E; Brusatte, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    Studying the evolution and biogeographic distribution of dinosaurs during the latest Cretaceous is critical for better understanding the end-Cretaceous extinction event that killed off all non-avian dinosaurs. Western North America contains among the best records of Late Cretaceous terrestrial vertebrates in the world, but is biased against small-bodied dinosaurs. Isolated teeth are the primary evidence for understanding the diversity and evolution of small-bodied theropod dinosaurs during the Late Cretaceous, but few such specimens have been well documented from outside of the northern Rockies, making it difficult to assess Late Cretaceous dinosaur diversity and biogeographic patterns. We describe small theropod teeth from the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. These specimens were collected from strata spanning Santonian - Maastrichtian. We grouped isolated theropod teeth into several morphotypes, which we assigned to higher-level theropod clades based on possession of phylogenetic synapomorphies. We then used principal components analysis and discriminant function analyses to gauge whether the San Juan Basin teeth overlap with, or are quantitatively distinct from, similar tooth morphotypes from other geographic areas. The San Juan Basin contains a diverse record of small theropods. Late Campanian assemblages differ from approximately coeval assemblages of the northern Rockies in being less diverse with only rare representatives of troodontids and a Dromaeosaurus-like taxon. We also provide evidence that erect and recurved morphs of a Richardoestesia-like taxon represent a single heterodont species. A late Maastrichtian assemblage is dominated by a distinct troodontid. The differences between northern and southern faunas based on isolated theropod teeth provide evidence for provinciality in the late Campanian and the late Maastrichtian of North America. However, there is no indication that major components of small-bodied theropod diversity were lost

  8. Small Theropod Teeth from the Late Cretaceous of the San Juan Basin, Northwestern New Mexico and Their Implications for Understanding Latest Cretaceous Dinosaur Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Thomas E.; Brusatte, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Studying the evolution and biogeographic distribution of dinosaurs during the latest Cretaceous is critical for better understanding the end-Cretaceous extinction event that killed off all non-avian dinosaurs. Western North America contains among the best records of Late Cretaceous terrestrial vertebrates in the world, but is biased against small-bodied dinosaurs. Isolated teeth are the primary evidence for understanding the diversity and evolution of small-bodied theropod dinosaurs during the Late Cretaceous, but few such specimens have been well documented from outside of the northern Rockies, making it difficult to assess Late Cretaceous dinosaur diversity and biogeographic patterns. We describe small theropod teeth from the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. These specimens were collected from strata spanning Santonian – Maastrichtian. We grouped isolated theropod teeth into several morphotypes, which we assigned to higher-level theropod clades based on possession of phylogenetic synapomorphies. We then used principal components analysis and discriminant function analyses to gauge whether the San Juan Basin teeth overlap with, or are quantitatively distinct from, similar tooth morphotypes from other geographic areas. The San Juan Basin contains a diverse record of small theropods. Late Campanian assemblages differ from approximately co-eval assemblages of the northern Rockies in being less diverse with only rare representatives of troodontids and a Dromaeosaurus-like taxon. We also provide evidence that erect and recurved morphs of a Richardoestesia-like taxon represent a single heterodont species. A late Maastrichtian assemblage is dominated by a distinct troodontid. The differences between northern and southern faunas based on isolated theropod teeth provide evidence for provinciality in the late Campanian and the late Maastrichtian of North America. However, there is no indication that major components of small-bodied theropod diversity were lost

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus sp. Strain ST04, Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimney on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Holden, James F.; Seo, Dong-Ho; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Wooki; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-01-01

    Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and heterotrophic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. To further understand the distinct characteristics of this archaeon at the genome level (polysaccharide utilization at high temperature and ATP generation by a Na+ gradient), the genome of strain ST04 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Here, we present the complete genome sequence analysis results of Pyrococcus sp. ST04 and report the major findings from the genome annotation, with a focus on its saccharolytic and metabolite production potential. PMID:22843576

  10. Complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Holden, James F; Seo, Dong-Ho; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Wooki; Ryu, Sangryeol; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2012-08-01

    Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and heterotrophic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. To further understand the distinct characteristics of this archaeon at the genome level (polysaccharide utilization at high temperature and ATP generation by a Na(+) gradient), the genome of strain ST04 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Here, we present the complete genome sequence analysis results of Pyrococcus sp. ST04 and report the major findings from the genome annotation, with a focus on its saccharolytic and metabolite production potential.

  11. Complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Holden, James F; Seo, Dong-Ho; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Wooki; Ryu, Sangryeol; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2012-08-01

    Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and heterotrophic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. To further understand the distinct characteristics of this archaeon at the genome level (polysaccharide utilization at high temperature and ATP generation by a Na(+) gradient), the genome of strain ST04 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Here, we present the complete genome sequence analysis results of Pyrococcus sp. ST04 and report the major findings from the genome annotation, with a focus on its saccharolytic and metabolite production potential. PMID:22843576

  12. [Juan Marin Rojas M.D., First Professor of History of Medicine at Universidad de Chile and his "Essay about the origin of syphilis"].

    PubMed

    Laval, Enrique

    2014-06-01

    Dr. Juan Marín Rojas, M.D., was the first Professor of History of Medicine at Universidad de Chile, navy doctor, diplomat, writer and literary critic. Member of the International Society of History of Medicine, and Correspondent Member for Chile of the "Office de Documentation de Médecine et Pharmacie Militaire", Liege, Belgium, from which his "Essay about the origin of syphilis" is transcribed with interesting historical facts and little known arguments that affirm the non-american origin of syphilis, but "aspire to leave a doubt, given not a contrary conviction".

  13. Fine-scale heat flow, shallow heat sources, and decoupled circulation systems at two sea-floor hydrothermal sites, Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.S.; Fisher, A.T.; Langseth, M.; Jin, W.; Iturrino, G.; Davis, E.

    1998-12-01

    Fine-scale heat-flow patterns at two areas of active venting in Middle Valley, a sedimented rift on the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, provide thermal evidence of shallow hydrothermal reservoirs beneath the vent fields. The extreme variability of heat flow is explained by conductive heating immediately adjacent to vents and shallow circulation within sediments above the reservoir. This secondary circulation is hydrologically separated from the deeper system feeding the vents by a shallow conductive lid within the sediments. A similar separation of shallow and deep circulation may also occur at sediment-free ridge-crest hydrothermal environments.

  14. First Harvestman Record for the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile, with Morphological Notes on Acropsopilio chilensis (Opiliones: Caddidae: Acroposopilioninae).

    PubMed

    Pérez-González, Abel; Ramírez, Martín J; Soto, Eduardo M; Pizarro-Araya, Jaime

    2014-08-15

    Acropsopilio chilensis Silvestri, 1904 (Eupnoi: Caddidae: Acropsopilioninae), is recorded for Robinson Crusoe Island, Chile. This is the first harvestman species recorded for the Juan Fernández Archipelago and also the first extra-continental record for this species. During the comparison with continental co-specific specimens, some previously unknown, remarkable morphological characteristics were discovered, among them: the absence of ovipositor seminal receptacles and tracheal system, small and probably imperforate spiracles and the presence of a subdistal spiny structure, maybe a stylus, in the major branch of the penis. 

  15. Medicinal plants in the southern region of the State of Nuevo León, México

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the flora of the State of Nuevo León is well known, there are few records of ethnobotancial information. An ethnobotanical study was undertaken in order to know the medicinal plants used by people living at the scrublands and oak-pine forest areas in the southern Nuevo León. Collection of plants specimens and interviews were carried out among the people of the municipalities of Aramberri, Galeana, and Zaragoza. Since former studies in the region are scarce, the aim of this work was to record the medicinal species and their uses in the scrublands and oak-pine forest areas, of southern Nuevo León, Mexico, and also to know if there are differences in the number of species and number of uses knowledge by people. Methods Field work was carried out over a 2 years period; useful plants were collected and a total of 105 people from 46 different villages were interviewed. A database was compiled using data collected by means of semi structured interviews. The data were analyzed by means of non-parametric statistics, using goodness-of-fit test (Chi-squared) (number of species known by people of each municipality, number of uses known by people of each municipality), Chi-squared modified to incorporate the Yates Correction (number of species known by people living at scrublands and oak-pine forest); the Kruskall-Wallis test (number of species known by women and men of the three municipalities), and the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (age and number of species known, and age and number of uses). Results A total of 163 medicinal plant species were recorded in the study area, comprising 108 wild and 55 cultivated plants. A total of 117 species were recorded in the oak-pine forest, and 111 in the scrublands area, a total of 68 were recorded in both areas; 68 medicinal species are used in all three municipalities, 40 wild and 28 cultivated. We documented 235 different medicinal uses. The most common plant parts used for medicinal purposes were

  16. Persistent Organic Pollutants and Heavy Metal Concentrations in Soil from the Metropolitan Area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Orta-García, Sandra Teresa; Ochoa-Martinez, Angeles Catalina; Carrizalez-Yáñez, Leticia; Varela-Silva, José Antonio; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Pruneda-Álvarez, Lucia Guadalupe; Torres-Dosal, Arturo; Guzmán-Mar, Jorge Luis; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE), and four heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, and lead) in outdoor surface soils (50 samples) collected from the metropolitan area of Monterrey in Mexico. Total PBDEs levels ranged from 1.80 to 127 µg/kg, with mean total PBDEs level of 14.2 ± 21.5 µg/kg (geometric mean ± standard deviation). For PCBs, the mean total level in the studied soils was 23.5 ± 20.2 µg/kg (range 4.0-65.5 µg/kg). An important finding in our study was that all soil samples (100%) had detectable levels of the metabolite p,p'-DDE. Moreover, the mean total DDT level (∑p'p-DDT and p'p-DDE) was approximately 132 ± 175 µg/kg. The mean levels for arsenic, cadmium, and lead in soil were 5.30 ± 1.35 (range 1.55-7.85) mg/kg, 2.20 ± 1.20 (range 0.65-6.40) mg/kg, and 455 ± 204 (range 224-1230) mg/kg, respectively. Our study has several limitations, the most notable of which is the small sample of soils evaluated. However, this screening study provided concentration data for the occurrence of POPs and four heavy metals in soil from the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, and taking into consideration that soil is an important pathway of exposure for people, a biomonitoring program for the surveillance of the general population in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon is deemed necessary. PMID:26577448

  17. Persistent Organic Pollutants and Heavy Metal Concentrations in Soil from the Metropolitan Area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Orta-García, Sandra Teresa; Ochoa-Martinez, Angeles Catalina; Carrizalez-Yáñez, Leticia; Varela-Silva, José Antonio; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Pruneda-Álvarez, Lucia Guadalupe; Torres-Dosal, Arturo; Guzmán-Mar, Jorge Luis; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE), and four heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, and lead) in outdoor surface soils (50 samples) collected from the metropolitan area of Monterrey in Mexico. Total PBDEs levels ranged from 1.80 to 127 µg/kg, with mean total PBDEs level of 14.2 ± 21.5 µg/kg (geometric mean ± standard deviation). For PCBs, the mean total level in the studied soils was 23.5 ± 20.2 µg/kg (range 4.0-65.5 µg/kg). An important finding in our study was that all soil samples (100%) had detectable levels of the metabolite p,p'-DDE. Moreover, the mean total DDT level (∑p'p-DDT and p'p-DDE) was approximately 132 ± 175 µg/kg. The mean levels for arsenic, cadmium, and lead in soil were 5.30 ± 1.35 (range 1.55-7.85) mg/kg, 2.20 ± 1.20 (range 0.65-6.40) mg/kg, and 455 ± 204 (range 224-1230) mg/kg, respectively. Our study has several limitations, the most notable of which is the small sample of soils evaluated. However, this screening study provided concentration data for the occurrence of POPs and four heavy metals in soil from the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, and taking into consideration that soil is an important pathway of exposure for people, a biomonitoring program for the surveillance of the general population in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon is deemed necessary.

  18. Estimation of nonpaternity in the Mexican population of Nuevo Leon: a validation study with blood group markers.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Flores, R M; Barton, S A; Marty-Gonzalez, L F; Rivas, F; Chakraborty, R

    1999-07-01

    A method for estimating the general rate of nonpaternity in a population was validated using phenotype data on seven blood groups (A1A2BO, MNSs, Rh, Duffy, Lutheran, Kidd, and P) on 396 mother, child, and legal father trios from Nuevo León, Mexico. In all, 32 legal fathers were excluded as the possible father based on genetic exclusions at one or more loci (combined average exclusion probability of 0.694 for specific mother-child phenotype pairs). The maximum likelihood estimate of the general nonpaternity rate in the population was 0.118 +/- 0.020. The nonpaternity rates in Nuevo León were also seen to be inversely related with the socioeconomic status of the families, i.e., the highest in the low and the lowest in the high socioeconomic class. We further argue that with the moderately low (69.4%) power of exclusion for these seven blood group systems, the traditional critical values of paternity index (PI > or = 19) were not good indicators of true paternity, since a considerable fraction (307/364) of nonexcluded legal fathers had a paternity index below 19 based on the seven markers. Implications of these results in the context of genetic-epidemiological studies as well as for detection of true fathers for child-support adjudications are discussed, implying the need to employ a battery of genetic markers (possibly DNA-based tests) that yield a higher power of exclusion. We conclude that even though DNA markers are more informative, the probabilistic approach developed here would still be needed to estimate the true rate of nonpaternity in a population or to evaluate the precision of detecting true fathers. PMID:10407460

  19. A 14-year-long Measurement of the Convergence Rate of the Juan de Fuca and North America Plates Offshore Central Oregon using GPS-Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, C. D.; Webb, S. C.; Nooner, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The motion of the sea floor was measured at a 3000-m-deep site approximately 120 km offshore Central Oregon using the GPS-Acoustic technique in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2014. The GPS-Acoustic derived motion relative to the interior of North America agrees with the geomagnetically-derived value within their measurement uncertainties. The time series from the early 2000's was resurrected using two new innovations. The first innovation, a permanent benchmark that has locating channels and mating pins, allows reoccupation of an established benchmark at any later date using an ROV to replace the transponder on the benchmark. The second innovation: an autonomous platform based on a Waveglider that carries a GPS navigated acoustic transponder interrogation system that is wave and solar powered. This enables measurements to be obtained over a GPSA site without requiring a large ship, greatly reducing the cost of a GPSA measurement. Combining data at this site with data from two other GPS-Acoustic seafloor sites on the Juan de Fuca plate, makes it possible to determine a present-day Euler Pole for the Juan de Fuca - North America plates using GPS-Acoustics seafloor geodesy.

  20. Precise age of C33N-C32R magnetic-polarity reversal, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fassett, James E.; Steiner, Maureen B.

    1997-01-01

    Polarity-chron boundary C33n-C32r has been identified in the Upper Cretaceous continental Farmington Sandstone Member of the Kirtland Shale in Hunter Wash in the southwest part of the San Juan Basin of New Mexico, and in the marine Lewis Shale at Chimney Rock, Colorado, in the northeast part of the basin. Single- and multiple-crystal laser fusion 40Ar/39Ar ages of sanidine crystals from volcanic ash beds bracketing the C33n-C32r polarity reversal at Hunter Wash establish its age as 73.50 ± 0.18 Ma. The reversal apparently occurs within the Baculites compressus Western Interior ammonite zone and within the Edmontonian land-vertebrate faunal zone. An 8 Ma hiatus separates Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks in the southern San Juan Basin. These findings provide a precise new interpolated Late Cretaceous tie point for geologic time scales, provide the basis for the direct correlation of Western Interior ammonite zones to European open-ocean faunal zones, and establish the first direct tie between continental and marine fossil zones within the Western Interior of North America.

  1. NREL Response to the Report 'Study of the Effects on Employment of Public Aid to Renewable Energy Sources' from King Juan Carlos University (Spain) (White Paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2009-08-01

    Job generation has been a part of the national dialogue surrounding energy policy and renewable energy (RE) for many years. RE advocates tout the ability of renewable energy to support new job opportunities in rural America and the manufacturing sector. Others argue that spending on renewable energy is an inefficient allocation of resources and can result in job losses in the broader economy. The report, Study of the Effects on Employment of Public Aid to Renewable Energy Sources, from King Juan Carlos University in Spain, is one recent addition to this debate. This report asserts that, on average, every renewable energy job in Spain 'destroyed' 2.2 jobs in the broader Spanish economy. The authors also apply this ratio to the U.S. context to estimate expected job loss from renewable energy development and policy in the United States. This memo discusses fundamental and technical limitations of the analysis by King Juan Carlos University and notes critical assumptions implicit in the ultimate conclusions of their work. The memo also includes a review of traditional employment impact analyses that rely on accepted, peer-reviewed methodologies, and it highlights specific variables that can significantly influence the results of traditional employment impact analysis.

  2. Total petroleum systems and geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated undiscovered oil and gas resources that have the potential for additions to reserves in the San Juan Basin Province, New Mexico and Colorado. Paleozoic rocks were not appraised. The last oil and gas assessment for the province was in 1995. There are several important differences between the 1995 and 2002 assessments. The area assessed is smaller than that in the 1995 assessment. This assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the San Juan Basin Province also used a slightly different approach in the assessment, and hence a number of the plays defined in the 1995 assessment are addressed differently in this report. After 1995, the USGS has applied a total petroleum system (TPS) concept to oil and gas basin assessments. The TPS approach incorporates knowledge of the source rocks, reservoir rocks, migration pathways, and time of generation and expulsion of hydrocarbons; thus the assessments are geologically based. Each TPS is subdivided into one or more assessment units, usually defined by a unique set of reservoir rocks, but which have in common the same source rock. Four TPSs and 14 assessment units were geologically evaluated, and for 13 units, the undiscovered oil and gas resources were quantitatively assessed.

  3. Estimates of vertical hydraulic conductivity and regional ground-water flow rates in rocks of Jurassic and Cretaceous age, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frenzel, P.F.; Lyford, F.P.

    1982-01-01

    The San Juan structural basin northwestern New Mexico was modeled in three dimensions using a finite-difference, steady-state model. The modeled space was divided into seven layers of square prisms that were 6 miles on a side in the horizontal directions. In the vertical direction, the layers of prisms ranged in thickness from 300 to 1,500 feet. The model included the geologic section between the base of the Entrada Sandstone and the top of Mesaverde Group. Principal aquifers in this section are mostly confined and include the Entrada Sandstone, the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation , and the Gallup Sandstone. Values for vertical hydraulic conductivities from 10 to the minus 12th power to 10 to the minus 11th power feet per second for the confining layers gave a good simulation of head differences between layers, but a sensitivity analysis indicated that these values could be between 10 and 100 times greater. The model-derived steady-state flow was about 30 cubic feet per second. About one-half of the flow was in the San Juan River drainage basin about one-third in the Rio Grande drainage basin, and one-sixth in the Puerco River drainage basin. (USGS)

  4. Perspectives of San Juan healthcare practitioners on the detection deficit in oral premalignant and early cancers in Puerto Rico: a qualitative research study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In Puerto Rico, relative to the United States, a disparity exists in detecting oral precancers and early cancers. To identify factors leading to the deficit in early detection, we obtained the perspectives of San Juan healthcare practitioners whose practice could be involved in the detection of such oral lesions. Methods Key informant (KI) interviews were conducted with ten clinicians practicing in or around San Juan, Puerto Rico. We then triangulated our KI interview findings with other data sources, including recent literature on oral cancer detection from various geographic areas, current curricula at the University of Puerto Rico Schools of Medicine and Dental Medicine, as well as local health insurance regulations. Results Key informant-identified factors that likely contribute to the detection deficit include: many practitioners are deficient in knowledge regarding oral cancer and precancer; oral cancer screening examinations are limited regarding which patients receive them and the elements included. In Puerto Rico, specialists generally perform oral biopsies, and patient referral can be delayed by various factors, including government-subsidized health insurance, often referred to as Reforma. Reforma-based issues include often inadequate clinician knowledge regarding Reforma requirements/provisions, diagnostic delays related to Reforma bureaucracy, and among primary physicians, a perceived financial disincentive in referring Reforma patients. Conclusions Addressing these issues may be useful in reducing the deficit in detecting oral precancers and early oral cancer in Puerto Rico. PMID:21612663

  5. A Comparative Study of the 2011 and 2015 Eruptions of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge, From Seafloor Hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Dziak, R. P.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Chadwick, W.; Lau, T. K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Axial volcano, on the Juan de Fuca ridge, erupted in April 2011, and again in April 2015. Both eruptions were captured on ocean bottom hydrophones (OBHs). The 2011 eruption was recorded by three OBHs deployed near or within the caldera, although one instrument was overrun by lava and its data could not be recovered. The 2015 eruption was captured in real time by a network of ocean bottom seismometers and hydrophones deployed as part of the Ocean Observatories Initiative Cabled Array. Intense seismicity preceded and accompanied both eruptions. Earthquakes are recognizable in the hydroacoustic record by the timing of surface reflections: secondary and tertiary pulses are consistent with arrivals coming from below the hydrophone and reflecting off of the sea surface. The 2015 eruption also produced signals that initiate in the water column, interpreted as water-lava interactions. Surface reflections for these water column events are consistent with a more distant source, and the relative polarity of arrivals on the co-located OBH and OBSs are consistent with a signal traveling through the water rather than the subsurface. Comparisons of arrivals on the hydroacoustic and seismic channels show that there is little energy on the EW seismic channel, consistent with an impulsive signal arriving from the north. These water column events are absent from the 2011 eruption, despite the fact that preliminary estimates suggest that the eruptions were of comparable volume. Also observed during the 2015 event were a number of a diffuse broadband (10-100 Hz) signals that last from several minutes to over an hour. These events appear similar to hydroacoustic signals recorded in association with explosive degassing at other submarine volcanoes including NW Rota-1 (Marianas) and West Mata (Lau Basin). A comparison of hydroacoustic data recorded in the two events indicates that the 2015 eruption was more vigorous than the 2011 event and resulted in more explosive lava

  6. Evolution of seismic layer 2B across the Juan de Fuca Ridge from hydrophone streamer 2-D traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kori R.; Nedimović, Mladen R.; Canales, J. Pablo; Carbotte, Suzanne M.

    2011-05-01

    How oceanic crust evolves has important implications for understanding both subduction earthquake hazards and energy and mass exchange between the Earth's interior and the oceans. Although considerable work has been done characterizing the evolution of seismic layer 2A, there has been little analysis of the processes that affect layer 2B after formation. Here we present high-resolution 2-D tomographic models of seismic layer 2B along ˜300 km long multichannel seismic transects crossing the Endeavour, Northern Symmetric, and Cleft segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. These models show that seismic layer 2B evolves rapidly following a different course than layer 2A. The upper layer 2B velocities increase on average by 0.8 km/s and reach a generally constant velocity of 5.2 ± 0.3 km/s within the first 0.5 Myr after crustal formation. This suggests that the strongest impact on layer 2B evolution may be that of mineral precipitation due to "active" hydrothermal circulation centered about the ridge crest and driven by the heat from the axial magma chamber. Variations in upper layer 2B velocity with age at time scales ≥0.5 Ma show correlation about the ridge axis indicating that in the long term, crustal accretion processes affect both sides of the ridge axis in a similar way. Below the 0.5 Ma threshold, differences in 2B velocity are likely imprinted during crustal formation or early crustal evolution. Layer 2B velocities at propagator wakes (5.0 ± 0.2 km/s), where enhanced faulting and cracking are expected, and at areas that coincide with extensional or transtensional faulting are on average slightly slower than in normal mature upper layer 2B. Analysis of the layer 2B velocities from areas where the hydrothermal patterns are known shows that the locations of current and paleohydrothermal discharge and recharge zones are marked by reduced and increased upper layer 2B velocities, respectively. Additionally, the distance between present up-flow and down-flow zones is

  7. The Modern Gorda-Juan de Fuca Subduction System and the Inherited Stratification of the Transition Zone below Western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauzin, B.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Wittlinger, G.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2012-12-01

    We provide insights on the deep geodynamic processes that have shaped western North America (NA) during the past 100 Myr. We use data of P-to-S converted waves recorded at seismic stations of the US Transportable Array to image main discontinuities in shear-wave velocity within the transition zone (TZ). We measure the topography and the reflectance (i.e. the amplitude of conversion) of the `410' and `660' interfaces. We image also minor seismic discontinuities around 350, 590 and 630 km depths. Idaho is the location of strong structural anomalies with a sharp topography of the `660', a thick TZ, a reduced reflectance of the `410' and a positive interface at 630 km depth. The thick TZ and the `630' discontinuity suggest low temperatures and a possible garnet to ilmenite transition. Water could also reduce locally the `410' Vs contrast. A remnant of the Farallon plate, anchored 55 Myr ago in the mantle below Idaho [Schmandt and Humphreys, 2011] and providing cool temperatures and water to the TZ, is a possible explanation. At the same location, a layer with 4% shear-wave speed reduction (the `350') and 70 km thickness is present atop the `410' discontinuity. In addition, an almost continuous interface, marking shear wave velocity reductions, spreads at 590 km depth roughly from southern Idaho to southeastern western US. Dehydration induced partial melting [Bercovici and Karato, 2003] can explain a melt layer atop the `410'. However, it does not explain a widespread negative `590' discontinuity within the TZ. It is possible that eclogitic material has progressively accumulated at the base of the TZ due to crustal delamination from the subducted Farallon oceanic lithosphere. With low Vs, the top of a garnetite layer could produce sharp negative velocity gradients around 590 km depth. The geometry of the Gorda-Juan de Fuca subduction system is also subject to debate. Tomography has shown the plate to subduct in the mantle along the whole western margin of NA except

  8. Aqueous volatiles in hydrothermal fluids from the Main Endeavour Field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge: temporal variability following earthquake activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seewald, Jeffrey; Cruse, Anna; Saccocia, Peter

    2003-12-01

    The Main Endeavour Field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, experienced intense seismic activity in June 1999. Hydrothermal vent fluids were collected from sulfide structures in September 1999 and July 2000 and analyzed for the abundance of H2, H2S, CH4, CO2, NH3, Mg and Cl to document temporal and spatial changes following the earthquakes. Dissolved concentrations of CO2, H2, and H2S increased dramatically in the September 1999 samples relative to pre-earthquake abundances, and subsequently decreased during the following year. In contrast, dissolved NH3 and CH4 concentrations in 1999 and 2000 were similar to or less than pre-earthquake values. Aqueous Cl abundances showed large decreases immediately following the earthquakes followed by increases to near pre-earthquake values. The abundances of volatile species at the Main Endeavour Field were characterized by strong inverse correlations with chlorinity. Phase separation can account for 20-50% enrichments of CO2, CH4, and NH3 in low-chlorinity fluids, while temperature- and pressure-dependent fluid-mineral equilibria at near-critical conditions are responsible for order of magnitude greater enrichments in dissolved H2S and H2. The systematic variation of dissolved gas concentrations with chlorinity likely reflects mixing of a low-chlorinity volatile-enriched vapor generated by supercritical phase separation with a cooler gas-poor hydrothermal fluid of seawater chlorinity. Decreased abundances of sediment-derived NH3 and CH4 in 1999 indicate an earthquake-induced change in subsurface hydrology. Elevated CO2 abundances in vent fluids collected in September 1999 provide evidence that supports a magmatic origin for the earthquakes. Temperature-salinity relationships are consistent with intrusion of a shallow dike and suggest that the earthquakes were associated with movement of magma beneath the ridge crest. These data demonstrate the large and rapid response of chemical fluxes at mid-ocean ridges to magmatic activity and

  9. Geochemistry of low-molecular weight hydrocarbons in hydrothermal fluids from Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, Anna M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2006-04-01

    Hydrothermal vent fluids from Middle Valley, a sediment-covered vent field located on the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, were sampled in July, 2000. Eight different vents with exit temperatures of 186-281 °C were sampled from two areas of venting: the Dead Dog and ODP Mound fields. Fluids from the Dead Dog field are characterized by higher concentrations of ΣNH 3 and organic compounds (C 1-C 4 alkanes, ethene, propene, benzene and toluene) compared with fluids from the ODP Mound field. The ODP Mound fluids, however, are characterized by higher C 1/(C 2 + C 3) and benzene:toluene ratios than those from the Dead Dog field. The aqueous organic compounds in these fluids have been derived from both bacterial processes (methanogenesis in low temperature regions during recharge) as well as from thermogenic processes in higher temperature portions of the subsurface reaction zone. As the sediments undergo hydrothermal alteration, carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons are released to solution as organic matter degrades via a stepwise oxidation process. Compositional and isotopic differences in the aqueous hydrocarbons indicate that maximum subsurface temperatures at the ODP Mound are greater than those at the Dead Dog field. Maximum subsurface temperatures were calculated assuming that thermodynamic equilibrium is attained between alkenes and alkanes, benzene and toluene, and carbon dioxide and methane. The calculated temperatures for alkene-alkane equilibrium are consistent with differences in the dissolved Cl concentrations in fluids from the two fields, and confirm that subsurface temperatures at the ODP Mound are hotter than those at the Dead Dog field. Temperatures calculated assuming benzene-toluene equilibrium and carbon dioxide-methane equilibrium are similar to observed exit temperatures, and do not record the hottest subsurface conditions. The difference in subsurface temperatures estimated using organic geochemical thermometers reflects subsurface cooling processes via

  10. Precipitation and growth of barite within hydrothermal vent deposits from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, John William; Hannington, Mark D.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Hansteen, Thor; Williamson, Nicole M.-B.; Stewart, Margaret; Fietzke, Jan; Butterfield, David; Frische, Matthias; Allen, Leigh; Cousens, Brian; Langer, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal vent deposits form on the seafloor as a result of cooling and mixing of hot hydrothermal fluids with cold seawater. Amongst the major sulfide and sulfate minerals that are preserved at vent sites, barite (BaSO4) is unique because it requires the direct mixing of Ba-rich hydrothermal fluid with sulfate-rich seawater in order for precipitation to occur. Because of its extremely low solubility, barite crystals preserve geochemical fingerprints associated with conditions of formation. Here, we present data from petrographic and geochemical analyses of hydrothermal barite from the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean, in order to determine the physical and chemical conditions under which barite precipitates within seafloor hydrothermal vent systems. Petrographic analyses of 22 barite-rich samples show a range of barite crystal morphologies: dendritic and acicular barite forms near the exterior vent walls, whereas larger bladed and tabular crystals occur within the interior of chimneys. A two component mixing model based on Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr of both seawater and hydrothermal fluid, combined with 87Sr/86Sr data from whole rock and laser-ablation ICP-MS analyses of barite crystals indicate that barite precipitates from mixtures containing as low as 17% and as high as 88% hydrothermal fluid component, relative to seawater. Geochemical modelling of the relationship between aqueous species concentrations and degree of fluid mixing indicates that Ba2+ availability is the dominant control on mineral saturation. Observations combined with model results support that dendritic barite forms from fluids of less than 40% hydrothermal component and with a saturation index greater than ∼0.6, whereas more euhedral crystals form at lower levels of supersaturation associated with greater contributions of hydrothermal fluid. Fluid inclusions within barite indicate formation temperatures of between ∼120 °C and 240 °C during

  11. Island mass effect in the Juan Fernández Archipelago (33°S), Southeastern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Isabel; Sangrà, Pablo; Hormazabal, Samuel; Correa-Ramirez, Marco

    2014-02-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of the island mass effect (IME; defined as local increases of phytoplankton associated with the presence of islands) at the Juan Fernández Archipelago (JFA) is analyzed using chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) satellite data, altimetry, sea surface temperature, wind, geostrophic currents and net heat flux over a ten year period (2002-2012). The the JFA islands (Robinson Crusoe-Santa Clara (RC-SC) and Alejandro Selkirk (AS)) present wakes with significant Chl-a increases, mainly during spring time. These wakes can reach Chl-a values of one order of magnitude higher (~1 mg m-3) than the surrounding oligotrophic waters (<0.1 mg m-3). The wakes are similar to von Kármán vortex streets which have been used to explain the impact of IME on Chl-a increases in numerical models. The wakes are formed from a high productivity area in the lee of the island, extending to the oceanic region as high Chl-a patches associated with submesoscale eddies that are detached from the islands and connected by less-productive zones. This pattern coincides with previous models that predict the effects of island-generated flow perturbations on biological production variability. The IME is a recurrent feature of islands that has even been observed in decadal average fields. In such average fields, the Chl-a values in RC-SC and AS islands can exceed values found in a Control Zone (a zone without islands) by ~50% and 30%, respectively. Seasonal and interannual variability reveals that, as a consequence of the IME, the winter Chl-a maximum associated with the development of winter convection and mesoscale eddies that propagate from the continental zone, promote that the Chl-a maximum extends towards spring. The IME has an impact on the island on both a local as well as a more regional scale that affects an area of ~40,000 km2 (1°Latitude×4°Longitude) centered on the islands. The transport of high productivity patches associated with submesoscale eddies may be responsible

  12. Elastic Full Waveform Inversion reveals the fine-scale structure of Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G.

    2012-12-01

    Axial volcano (sometimes referred to as "Axial seamount" or "Axial") is located at 46N, 130W at the intersection of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain. It is the most recent eruptive center of the Cobb hotspot, which last erupted in 2011. The volcano rises ~700 m above the adjacent ridge axis and its summit features a U-shaped caldera open to the southeast, which hosts an active hydrothermal field and very young lava flows. Located at the junction of a mid-ocean ridge and a volcanic hotspot, Axial volcano is atypical and its internal structure remains poorly understood. Here, we present results from an elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) along multiple seismic lines that span the whole volcano. We have used a multi-stage FWI, inverting successively wide-angle reflections and refractions arrivals from downward extrapolated streamer data, then windowed short offset reflections from the underlying magma chamber. Our final models show fine scale velocity structures with spatial resolutions of tens of meters. Our results indicate that Layer 2A thickness is extremely heterogeneous (350-900 m) within the volcano with abrupt vertical throws of >300 m beneath the caldera walls that suggests the tectonic thinning of a geologically defined Layer 2A. Interestingly, Layer 2A appears to be extremely thin beneath the active hydrothermal field and the most recent lava flows, on the southeast end of the caldera, where sheeted dikes might lay <100 m beneath the seafloor. On the other hand, the nearby caldera center is filled by successive lava sequences (~450 m thick) that further appear to be micro faulted, suggesting a constant interplay between magmatic and tectonic processes. Surface velocities show limited variation over the whole volcano and may suggest relative recent formation, considering the rapid increase in layer 2A velocity with age. Finally, our velocity structures image a wide and complex magma chamber system beneath the volcano at depth

  13. Microbially-Mediated Sulfur Oxidation in Diffuse Hydrothermal Vent Fluids at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, N. H.; Butterfield, D. A.; Huber, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Diffusely venting hydrothermal fluids can act as a window to the subseafloor microbial environment, where chemically-reduced hydrothermal fluids mixing with oxygenated seawater in the shallow crust creates chemical disequilibria that chemotrophic microorganisms can exploit for energy gain. At Axial Seamount, an active deep-sea volcano located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, sulfide concentrations have been measured as high as 5770 μM, and sulfide oxidation is quantitatively the most important chemical energy source for microbial metabolism. In addition, studies of microbial population structure indicate that diffuse fluids at Axial are dominated by putative sulfur- and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the Epsilonproteobacteria. To further study this important microbial process, we surveyed diffuse vent samples from Axial over a range of temperature, pH, and sulfide concentrations for the presence and expression of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria using a functional gene approach. Dissolved oxygen concentrations decrease exponentially above 40°C and lower the potential for sulfide oxidation, so we identified six sites of different temperatures, two each in the low (< 30°C), medium (~30°C), and high temperature (30 - 50°C) range. The low temperature sites had sulfide-to-temperature ratios of 1 - 26, the medium from 15 - 29, and the high from 26 - 36. PCR primers were designed to target the sulfur oxidation gene soxB specifically from Epsilonproteobacteria and five of the six sites were positive for soxB in the DNA fraction. Bulk RNA was also extracted from the same sites to examine in situ expression of soxB. Data from these analyses, along with quantification of the soxB gene abundance and expression using quantitative PCR, are currently being carried out. Together, this data set of soxB gene diversity, expression, and abundance along with geochemical data will allow us to quantitatively determine the functional dynamics of sulfide oxidation in the subseafloor at

  14. Effects of reservoir installation, San Juan-Chama Project water, and reservoir operations on streamflow and water quality in the Rio Chama and Rio Grande, northern and central New Mexico, 1938-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langman, Jeff B.; Anderholm, Scott K.

    2004-01-01

    The coordinated operation of Heron, El Vado, and Abiquiu Dams on the Rio Chama and Cochiti Dam on the Rio Grande and the importation of Colorado River Basin water by the San Juan-Chama Project have altered streamflow and water quality of the Rio Chama and Rio Grande in northern and central New Mexico. The coordinated retention of streamflow in the four reservoirs increased median streamflows, decreased extreme flows, and decreased periods of small streamflow; inflow of San Juan-Chama Project water increased overall streamflow in the Rio Chama and Rio Grande. These changes to streamflow decreased specific conductance and suspended-sediment concentration and increased pH in the Rio Chama and the Rio Grande. Following construction of Heron and Cochiti Dams and integration of reservoir operations on the Rio Chama and the Rio Grande, the inflow of San Juan-Chama Project water and retention of snowmelt runoff influenced water quality. These influences varied by season because reservoir releases fluctuated according to downstream user needs and annual streamflow variation. The influences of San Juan-Chama Project water and retained snowmelt on water quality diminished with downstream flow as the Rio Grande was subjected to various natural and anthropogenic inflows. Because of the variability and type of seasonal influences, streamflow did not have a strong annual correlation with water quality in the Rio Chama or the Rio Grande.

  15. Response to critique by lucas et al. (2009) of paper by Fassett (2009) documenting Paleocene dinosaurs in the San Juan Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fassett, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    In this issue of Palaeontologia Electronica Lucas, et al. (2009) question the validity f the Fassett (2009) paper that presented evidence for Paleocene dinosaurs in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico and Colorado. Their challenges focus primarily on the lithostratigraphy, palynology, and paleomagnetism of the dinosaur-bearing Ojo Alamo Sandstone, shown by Fassett to be of Paleocene age. The lithostratigraphy of the Ojo Alamo is addressed by Lucas et al. (2009) based on detailed studies of outcrops of this formation in two relatively small areas in the southern San Juan Basin where Ojo Alamo dinosaur fossils have been found. When viewed over its 13,000 km2 extent, the Ojo Alamo is seen to be a much more complex formation than these authors recognize, thus their perception and description of the lithostratigraphy of this rock unit is limited and provincial. Fassett (2009) presented a detailed discussion of the palynology of the rocks adjacent to the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) interface in the San Juan Basin, including a 67-page appendix and 25 tables listing the 244 palynomorph species identified from these strata. The Ojo Alamo Sandstone produced 103 palynomorphs from five principal localities including one especially prolific sample set from drill core through K-T strata. Without exception, all samples collected from the Ojo Alamo Sandstone for palynologic analysis were found to contain Paleocene palynomorph assemblages. Lucas et al. challenge only one Ojo Alamo palynomorph assemblage from one of the five areas studied, stating that they were unable to find palynomorph-productive samples at that locality. They submit no new palynologic data that refutes the Paleocene palynologic age of the Ojo Alamo Sandstone. In addressing the paleomagnetism of the Ojo Alamo, these authors dismiss the presence of a critical normal-polarity magnetochron discovered in the lower part of the Ojo Alamo - magnetochron C29n.2n of Fassett (2009) with no evidence to justify this dismissal

  16. Parasitological examination for presence of hookworms (Uncinaria spp.) in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) at Año Nuevo State Reserve, California (2012).

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Kuzmina, T A; Spraker, T R; Jaggi, N; Costa, D P; Crocker, D E; Tolliver, S C; Tift, M S

    2012-10-01

    Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris Gill, 1866), inhabiting rookeries on the mainland of Año Nuevo State Reserve in central California, were investigated in 2012 for presence of hookworms (Uncinaria spp.). Material collected and examined for hookworms included: blubber (n = 15), stomach and intestines (n = 21) from dead pups; feces from the rectum of weaned pups (n = 23); sand containing apparent feces in areas of weaned pups (n = 28) and sand without apparent feces in areas of weaned pups (n = 54); milk from females (n =23) at 5 days and about 23 to 26 days postpartum; and placenta from one female. Evidence of hookworm presence was not detected in any of the samples examined. Possible reasons why hookworms were not found in northern elephant seals on the mainland of Año Nuevo State Reserve are discussed.

  17. Swath Bathymetry Surveys of the Monterey Bay Area from Point Ano Nuevo to Moss Landing, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Logan, Joshua B.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes swath bathymetry and backscatter data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey on the continental shelf within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary between Point A?o Nuevo and Moss Landing, in San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, Calif. The survey was done for the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), in field activities S-7-09-MB and S-10-09-MB, by the Western Coastal and Marine Geology (WCMG) Team of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The data were aquired in two seperate surveys: (1) between August 13, 2009 and September 3, 2009, personnel from WCMG completed field activity S-7-09-MB, from Point A?o Nuevo south to Table Rock, as well as a block west of Soquel Canyon; (2) between October 12 and December 16, 2009, WCMG conducted field activity S-10-09-MB, surveying between Table Rock and Moss Landing.

  18. Geochronology and petrogenesis of MORB from the Juan de Fuca and Gorda ridges by 238U230Th disequilibrium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, S.J.; Murrell, M.T.; Janecky, D.R.; Delaney, J.R.; Clague, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    A highly precise mass spectrometric method of analysis was used to determine 238U234U230Th232Th in axial and off-axis basalt glasses from Juan de Fuca (JDF) and Gorda ridges. Initial 230Th activity excesses in the axial samples range from 3 to 38%, but generally lie within a narrow range of 12 to 15%. Secondary alteration effects were evaluated using ??234U and appear to be negligible; hence the 230Th excesses are magmatic in origin. Direct dating of MORB was accomplished by measuring the decrease in excess 230Th in off-axis samples. 238U230Th ages progressively increase with distance from axis. Uncertainties in age range from 10 to 25 ka for UTh ages of 50 to 200 ka. The full spreading rate based on UTh ages for Endeavour segment of JDF is 5.9 ?? 1/2 cm/yr, with asymmetry in spreading between the Pacific (4.0 ?? 0.6 cm/yr) and JDF (1.9 ?? 0.6 cm/yr) plates. For northern Gorda ridge, the half spreading rate for the JDF plate is found to be 3.0 ?? 0.4 cm/yr. These rates are in agreement with paleomagnetic spreading rates and topographic constraints. This suggests that assumptions used to determine ages, including constancy of initial 230Th 232Th ratio over time, are generally valid for the areas studied. Samples located near the axis of spreading are typically younger than predicted by these spreading rates, which most likely reflects recent volcanism within a 1-3 km wide zone of crustal accretion. Initial 230Th/232Th ratios and 230Th activity were also used to examine the recent Th/U evolution and extent of melting of mantle sources beneath these ridges. A negative anomaly in 230Th 232Th for Axial seamount lavas provides the first geochemical evidence of a mantle plume source for Axial seamount and the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain and indicates recent depletion of other JDF segment sources. Large 230Th activity excesses for lavas from northern Gorda ridge and Endeavour segment indicate formation from a lower degree of partial melting than other segments. An

  19. Analog Modeling of the Juan Fernández Ridge, Central Chile, and Implications for Flat-Slab Subduction Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodell, D.; Anderson, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    This study compares the strain experienced by the subducting lithosphere in analog models to the strain recorded by earthquakes in the subduction zone that includes the Juan Fernández Ridge (JFR), near 33 S, 73 W, off the coast of central Chile. The JFR is an aseismic hot spot ridge that has a thickened oceanic crust. The overthickened crust reduces the total density of the slab when compared to the surrounding slab areas, and thus increases the buoyancy of the subducting Nazca plate at this particular location. It is hypothesized that the Nazca plate experiences “flat-slab” subduction at the JFR subduction zone due to this buoyancy. Brudzinski and Chen (2005) argue that, due to the poorly aligned direction of maximum extension (T axes) for earthquakes in the subducting slab in flat-slab subduction zones, the theory of “slab pull” may not be valid for flat-slab subduction zones, and there must be other forces at work. However, Anderson et al. (2007) develop new, more precise slab contours from newly determined earthquake locations and use these contours to qualitatively compare the earthquake data to slab dip directions and thus expected slab-pull directions. They conclude that T axes are parallel to slab dip, and thus slab pull is the only force necessary for explaining the T axis direction. In this study, we quantitatively compare extension produced in analog "flat-slab" models in the laboratory to T axes from the Anderson et al. (2007) study, extending and further testing their idea. Several materials comprise the analog models. Light corn syrup represents the asthenosphere, while silicon putty represents the lithosphere. Recreating the dynamics of the buoyant JFR necessitates two different densities of silly putty: a denser one for the bulk of the slab, and a less dense one for the buoyant ridge. Shallow circular indentations (strain ellipses) on the slab facilitate recording of the strain in the subducting slab. Video and still pictures record each

  20. Temporal Changes in the Strength of Tidal Triggering Linked to Volcanic Swarms on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    A number of studies on mid-ocean ridges have documented a clear tidal triggering signal for volcanic/hydrothermal microearthquakes with earthquake rates increasing during intervals when the volumetric tidal stresses are least compressive. Tidal triggering has been demonstrated for the Endeavour segment in 1995, Axial Volcano in 1994, and the East Pacific Rise near 9°50’N in 2003-4. The results from the East Pacific Rise show a particularly strong tidal triggering signal that was interpreted as indicating that the crust was critically stressed in the lead up to a volcanic eruption in 2005-6. Observations in several subduction zones also show an increasing tidal triggering signal prior to large earthquakes and no clear evidence for triggering immediately afterwards. We present results from a tidal triggering study on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge using a three-year catalog of seismicity for a local network deployed around the vent fields from 2003-2006. The catalog spans two complex regional swarms in January and February 2005 that we interpret as non-eruptive volcanic events on the southern extension of the West Valley propagating ridge and the northern Endeavour segment, respectively. These swarms were followed by a substantial drop in seismicity rates along the entire Endeavour segment and by a drop in b-values in the areas of the swarms. The swarms appear to mark the end of a 6-year spreading event that began with a swarm in 1999 and cumulatively ruptured the whole Endeavour segment. We analyze both the tidal phase and height at the times of earthquakes for triggering. Preliminary results show that prior to the swarms there is a strong triggering signal. For example, for earthquakes near the vent fields the rates of seismicity during times when the tidal phase is closer to low tide than high tide is 50% higher than when the phase is closer to high tide. The rate of earthquakes is 130% higher when tide heights are in the lowest tenth

  1. Linking Microearthquakes and Seismic Tomography on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for Hydrothermal Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Kim, E.

    2013-12-01

    We report on a remarkable correlation between the patterns of microearthquakes and three-dimensional upper crustal velocity anomalies on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Microearthquakes were monitored from 2003-2006 by a small seismic network deployed on the central part of the segment. The velocity model was obtained from a tomography experiment comprising over 5500 shots from a large airgun array that were recorded by ocean bottom seismometers deployed at 64 sites along the Endeavour segment and the adjacent overlapping spreading centers (OSCs). On the segment scale, upper crustal velocities are low in the OSCs indicating that the crust is highly fractured. These low velocities persist off-axis and record the history of ridge propagation. In 2005, two swarm sequences that were interpreted in terms of magmatic intrusions on the limbs of the Endeavour-West Valley OSC were accompanied by extensive seismicity within the overlap basin. Throughout the microearthquake experiment earthquakes were concentrated in a region surrounding the southern tip of the West Valley propagator that coincides closely with the southern limit of the low velocities imaged around the OSC. Beneath the hydrothermal vent fields in the center of the Endeavour segment, the earthquakes were mostly located in a 500-m-thick band immediately above the axial magma chamber. There was a close correlation between the rates of seismicity beneath each vent field and their thermal output. The highest rates of seismicity were observed beneath the High Rise and Main Endeavour fields that each have power outputs of several hundred megawatts. Seismic velocities are generally high beneath the vent fields relative to velocities along the ridge axis immediately to the north and south. However, the High Rise and Main Endeavour fields are underlain by a low velocity region at 2 km depth that coincides with the seismically active region. This is consistent with a region of increased fracturing and

  2. In-situ Chemistry of Hydrothermal Fluids from Black Smokers in Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E.; Zhang, Z.; Foustoukos, D.; Pester, N. J.

    2005-12-01

    After an off-axis earthquake swarm in 1999, dramatic changes were observed in vent fluids of Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Three month latter, we also recorded this sudden variation using a high temperature in-situ chemical sensor. The results at that time indicated some of the vent temperatures as high as 374°C. This change was also characterized by relatively high in-situ pH, high dissolved H2, and H2S concentrations in the fluids that were in excess of 5, 0.7 mmol/kg and 20 mmol/kg respectively. In order to further track time dependent changes over the past 6 years, we revisited Main Endeavour Field during the recent AT 11-31 cruise in Aug.~Sept. 2005. The high temperature chemical sensor was again used on selected dives with DSV Alvin to conduct in-situ measurements of pH, dissolved H2 and H2S concentrations along with temperatures. The data were obtained in a real time mode of 3 seconds per-reading from a series of measurements at high temperature conditions in the depth of 2200 m. Conventional gas-tight samples were also collected for verification and further study. In this study, Puffer, Sully and Bastille black smoker vent sites were specifically investigated owing to the high fluid temperatures that characterize these vents in comparison with other vents in the area. The measured temperatures for these vents were 362°C, 358°C, and 361°C respectively, which were generally about 20~30°C higher than the others currently in the area, but approximately 10°C lower than the highest temperatures measured in the aftermath of the 1999 seismic-magmatic event. Although the drops in vent temperatures were not substantial, the measured in-situ chemistry showed large departures from previous reported data. The in-situ pH values in these vents ranged from 4.43 to 4.89, in comparison with values above 5 in 1999. This difference may be linked directly to the decrease in temperature. The measured in-situ dissolved H2 and H2S concentrations were 0

  3. Geological and hydrothermal controls on the distribution of megafauna in Ashes Vent Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arquit, Anne M.

    1990-08-01

    A computerized data base was constructed to aid in the interpretation of biological and geological observations recorded from 7662 photographs taken of Ashes vent field (located along the SW wall of the summit caldera of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge) during 1985-1986 using the Pisces IV submersible and a towed camera system. The transition region between the locus of high-temperature vents in Ashes vent field (i.e., Inferno, 326°C; Hell, 301°C; and Virgin Mound, 298°C) and more typical environmental conditions for the summit caldera of Axial Volcano as a whole is zoned spatially with respect to sediment type and organism assemblage. Three general ecological zones are identified within the vent field: (1) the central vent zone (within 100 m of a high-temperature vent), dominated by vent-associated organisms (vestimentiferan tube worms, clams, bacterial mats) and sedimentation (high-temperature, plume-derived and low-temperature, in situ deposits); (2) the distal vent zone (100-725 m from any high-temperature vent), characterized by extensive fields of iron oxide, iron silicate and silica chimneys and sediment (nontronite assemblage material), as well as maximum densities of most nonvent fauna; and (3) the nonvent impact zone (725-1300 m), indicated by elevated densities of nonvent organisms relative to regional (i.e., caldera-wide) values and maximum Bathydorus sp. sponge densities. The distribution of vestimentiferan tube worms is limited to within 90 m of known high-temperature venting (central vent zone); and anemones were observed only between 30 and 40 m from hot vents. Clams and microbial mats are concentrated in the central vent zone, as well, but occur sporadically up to 1250 m from the hot vents in association with hydrothermal nontronite that is probably precipitating in situ from <60°C vent fluid; thus megafaunal distributions are a useful indicator of poorly defined, often diffuse low-temperature hydrothermal activity on the seafloor. Maximum

  4. Chlorine stable isotopic composition of basement fluids of the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (ODP Leg 168)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacie, Magali; Monnin, Christophe; Jendrzejewski, Nathalie; Agrinier, Pierre; Javoy, Marc

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents chlorine stable isotope compositions (δ 37Cl) of sediment pore waters collected by squeezing sediment cores from the sediment-basement interface along an East-West transect through the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (ODP Leg 168). These "near basement fluids" (NBF) are generally thought to be representative of low-temperature fluids circulating in the off-axis basaltic crust. The δ 37Cl value of the fluid directly sampled from a flow at the base of Site 1026 (WSTP1026) is also reported. NBF display δ 37Cl values between - 2.09‰ and - 0.12‰ relative to the Standard Mean Ocean Chloride (SMOC defined as 0‰) and small variations in chlorinity (˜ 4%). These data contrast with the homogeneity of δ 37Cl values associated with highly variable chlorinities observed in high-temperature on-axis fluids [M. Bonifacie, J.L. Charlou, N. Jendrzejewski, P. Agrinier, J.P. Donval, Chlorine isotopic compositions of ridge axis high temperature hydrothermal vent fluids, Chem. Geol. 221(2005) 279-288.]. The NBF δ 37Cl values show a general decreasing trend with distance from the ridge-axis except for two fluids. When plotted against δ 18O values, the δ 37Cl of the NBF show two different trends. This paper discusses the possible contributions on NBF δ 37Cl values of fluid-mixing, water-rock interactions and transport processes (diffusion, ion membrane filtration) that can occur in the igneous basement. However, as none of these processes can fully explain the observed δ 37Cl variations, the potential effect of the sediment cover is also investigated. At site 1026, the interstitial pore fluid displays a δ 37Cl signature significantly lower than that of the fluid discharge sample (- 1.90‰ and - 0.28‰, respectively). This difference, demonstrated here cannot be an artifact of the sampling method, rather indicates the influence of the sediment cover on NBF δ 37Cl values. The potential contributions of physical processes associated with

  5. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-01-01

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for this first phase of the agreement was $386,385.00 as detailed in Phase I Authorization For Expenditure (AFE). This report describes the tasks performed, the results, and conclusions for the first phase (Phase I) of the cooperative agreement.

  6. [Military, sailors and the sick poor: contribution to the history of the San Juan de Dios Hospital in Cartagena de Indias (18th century)].

    PubMed

    Echeverri, Adriana María Alzate

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the history of the San Juan de Dios Hospital in Cartagena de Indias, at the end of the 18th century. Its activities and evolution cannot be understood unless they are analyzed within the context of the Bourbon sanitary reforms. it was precisely at that time when these reforms were being implemented in Nueva Granada. One of the goals of the reforms was to improve the health of the population in order to discipline the vassals, to promote the growth of the workforce and to increase the Crown's wealth. The text reviews different aspects of the institution, and how it operated. It examines the budget, its expenses, and the dynamics of the hospital population and of its employees. In doing so, it intends to explain what the hospital offered to the city's various social groups. PMID:19856530

  7. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: near-surface CaCl(2)-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake and implications for Mars.

    PubMed

    Dickson, James L; Head, James W; Levy, Joseph S; Marchant, David R

    2013-01-01

    The discovery on Mars of recurring slope lineae (RSL), thought to represent seasonal brines, has sparked interest in analogous environments on Earth. We report on new studies of Don Juan Pond (DJP), which exists at the upper limit of ephemeral water in the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) of Antarctica, and is adjacent to several steep-sloped water tracks, the closest analog for RSL. The source of DJP has been interpreted to be deep groundwater. We present time-lapse data and meteorological measurements that confirm deliquescence within the DJP watershed and show that this, together with small amounts of meltwater, are capable of generating brines that control summertime water levels. Groundwater input was not observed. In addition to providing an analog for RSL formation, CaCl(2) brines and chloride deposits in basins may provide clues to the origin of ancient chloride deposits on Mars dating from the transition period from "warm/wet" to "cold/dry" climates.

  8. Crustal magnetization and the subseafloor structure of the ASHES vent field, Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for the investigation of hydrothermal sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratori Tontini, Fabio; Crone, Timothy J.; Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Kinsey, James C.; Mittelstaedt, Eric; Tivey, Maurice

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution geophysical data have been collected using the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Sentry over the ASHES (Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emission Study) high-temperature (~348°C) vent field at Axial Seamount, on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Multiple surveys were performed on a 3-D grid at different altitudes above the seafloor, providing an unprecedented view of magnetic data resolution as a function of altitude above the seafloor. Magnetic data derived near the seafloor show that the ASHES field is characterized by a zone of low magnetization, which can be explained by hydrothermal alteration of the host volcanic rocks. Surface manifestations of hydrothermal activity at the ASHES vent field are likely controlled by a combination of local faults and fractures and different lava morphologies near the seafloor. Three-dimensional inversion of the magnetic data provides evidence of a vertical, pipe-like upflow zone of the hydrothermal fluids with a vertical extent of ~100 m.

  9. Selected hydrologic and physical properties of Mesozoic formations in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Arizona, Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming; excluding the San Juan Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weigel, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Data for hydrologic and physical properties of Mesozoic formations in the Upper Colorado River Basin, excluding the San Juan Basin, have been collected by government agencies, private industry, property owners, and other sources. These data were compiled and analyzed so that they would be available for use by hydrologists, earth scientists, planners, and others. Five methods of data analysis are discussed. The results of these five methods are not directly comparable because of differences in the volume of an aquifer represented by each method. Aquifer tests represent the largest volume of an aquifer, specific capacity and drill-stem tests represent a smaller volume, slug-injection tests represent a still smaller volume, and laboratory tests represent the smallest volume. Because they represent large volumes of an aquifer, aquifer tests were considered to give the best estimates of hydrologic characteristics. Laboratory data for permeability to air and hydraulic conductivity were determined to be related by a simple power function. (Author 's abstract)

  10. [Military, sailors and the sick poor: contribution to the history of the San Juan de Dios Hospital in Cartagena de Indias (18th century)].

    PubMed

    Echeverri, Adriana María Alzate

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the history of the San Juan de Dios Hospital in Cartagena de Indias, at the end of the 18th century. Its activities and evolution cannot be understood unless they are analyzed within the context of the Bourbon sanitary reforms. it was precisely at that time when these reforms were being implemented in Nueva Granada. One of the goals of the reforms was to improve the health of the population in order to discipline the vassals, to promote the growth of the workforce and to increase the Crown's wealth. The text reviews different aspects of the institution, and how it operated. It examines the budget, its expenses, and the dynamics of the hospital population and of its employees. In doing so, it intends to explain what the hospital offered to the city's various social groups.

  11. Stratigraphic framework and coal correlation of the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation, Bisti-Ah-Shi-Sle-Pah area, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Romeo M.; Erpenbeck, Michael F.

    1982-01-01

    This report illustrates and describes the detailed stratigraphic framework and coal correlation of the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation exposed in isolated badlands and along washes within a 20-mile outcrop belt in the Bisti-Ah-Shi-Sle-Pah area, southwestern San Juan Basin, Nex Mexico (see index). The stratigraphic framework showing the vertical and lateral distributions of rock types and the lateral continuity of coal beds is illustrated in cross sections. The cross sections were constructed from 112 stratigraphic sections measured at an average distance of 0.4 mi apart. Each section contained key marker beds (sandstone, coal, and tonstein) that were physically traced to adjacent sections. Each measured section was "hung" on multiple marker beds arranged in a geometric best-fit method that accounts for the differential compaction and facies associations of the deposits. 

  12. A geologic assessment of natural gas from tight gas sandstones in the San Juan Basin. Final report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, M.R.; Lombardi, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    The authors conducted a detailed geologic appraisal, estimated gas in place and recoverable volumes, and evaluated the impact of technology improvements on potential Cretaceous (Pictured Cliffs, Chacra, Cliff House, Point Lookout and Dakota intervals) tight gas reserves of the San Juan Basin. This report summarizes the results of a disaggregated appraisal of the undeveloped San Juan tight gas resource in the context of current and near-term technology, project economics and market potential. A geologic data base was constructed based on location reservoir properties, and typical well recoveries were modeled on a township-specific basis. Project costing and cash flow economics were analyzed to derive potential reserves for various technology specifications and wellhead prices. These data provide a foundation for operators and pipelines to more closely examine these tight formations for development in the near future. Gas in place for the undeveloped tight portion of the five intervals studied was estimated at 17.2 Tcf, with the Dakota Formation accounting for two thirds of this volume. Using current technology, potential ultimate recovery for all intervals is 7.2 Tcf. Potential reserve additions are 1.1 Tcf at $1.50/Mcf, 2.3 Tcf at $2.00/Mcf, and 5.9 Tcf at $5.00/Mcf. The availability of the Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit for eligible wells drilled in 1991 and 1992 could improve project economics by an after tax equivalent of $0.66/Mcf at the wellhead. Over 300 geophysical logs were evaluated to construct depth, overburden and isopach maps and a location-specific resource database. The database was analyzed using TGAS-PC{reg_sign}, an integrated engineering and economics model for tight sands that has the capability to do rapid sensitivity analysis of geological, technology and economic assumptions.

  13. Southwestern Regional Partnership For Carbon Sequestration (Phase 2) Pump Canyon CO2- ECBM/Sequestration Demonstration, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Resources International

    2010-01-31

    Within the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP), three demonstrations of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration are being performed -- one in an oilfield (the SACROC Unit in the Permian basin of west Texas), one in a deep, unmineable coalbed (the Pump Canyon site in the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico), and one in a deep, saline reservoir (underlying the Aneth oilfield in the Paradox basin of southeast Utah). The Pump Canyon CO{sub 2}-enhanced coalbed methane (CO{sub 2}/ECBM) sequestration demonstration project plans to demonstrate the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coal seams via a small-scale geologic sequestration project. The site is located in San Juan County, northern New Mexico, just within the limits of the high-permeability fairway of prolific coalbed methane production. The study area for the SWP project consists of 31 coalbed methane production wells located in a nine section area. CO{sub 2} was injected continuously for a year and different monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques were implemented to track the CO{sub 2} movement inside and outside the reservoir. Some of the MVA methods include continuous measurement of injection volumes, pressures and temperatures within the injection well, coalbed methane production rates, pressures and gas compositions collected at the offset production wells, and tracers in the injected CO{sub 2}. In addition, time-lapse vertical seismic profiling (VSP), surface tiltmeter arrays, a series of shallow monitoring wells with a regular fluid sampling program, surface measurements of soil composition, CO{sub 2} fluxes, and tracers were used to help in tracking the injected CO{sub 2}. Finally, a detailed reservoir model was constructed to help reproduce and understand the behavior of the reservoir under production and injection operation. This report summarizes the different phases of the project, from permitting through site closure, and gives the

  14. Preliminary Results from Downhole Osmotic Samplers in a Gas Tracer Injection Experiment in the Upper Oceanic Crust on the Eastern Flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, M. T.; Clark, J. F.; Neira, N. M.; Fisher, A. T.; Wheat, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a gas tracer injection experiment in the ocean crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an area of hydrothermal circulation. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer was injected in Hole 1362B in 2010, during IODP Expedition 327. Fluid samples were subsequently collected from a borehole observatory (CORK) installed in this hole and similar CORKs in three additional holes (1026B, 1362A, and 1301A), located 300 to 500 m away. This array of holes is located on 3.5 My old seafloor, as an array oriented subparallel to the Endeavor Segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge. Borehole fluid samples were collected in copper coils using osmotic pumps. In addition to pumps at seafloor wellheads, downhole sampling pumps were installed in the perforated casing in the upper ocean crust. These downhole samplers were intended to produce a high-resolution continuous record of tracer concentrations, including records from the first year after tracer injection in Holes 1362A and 1362B. In contrast, wellhead samplers were not installed on these CORKs holes until 2011, and wellhead records from all CORKs have a record gap of up to one year, because of a delayed expedition in 2012. The downhole samples were recovered with the submersible Alvin in August 2014. SF6 concentrations in downhole samples recovered in 2014 are generally consistent with data obtained from wellhead samples. Of particular interest are the results from Hole 1362B, where a seafloor valve was opened and closed during various recovery expeditions. High resolution tracer curves produced from the 1362B downhole samples confirm that these operations produced an SF6 breakthrough curve corresponding to a classic push-pull test used to evaluate contaminant field locations in terrestrial setting. Complete analyses of downhole samples from these CORKs are expected to produce high-resolution breakthrough curves that will allow more precise analysis and modeling of hydrothermal flow in the study area.

  15. Hydrogeology and steady-state simulation of ground-water flow in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kernodle, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary regional aquifer-system analysis, a three-dimensional steady-state ground-water-flow model was constructed for the San Juan Basin in parts of New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah. The model simulated ground- water flow in 12 hydrostratigraphic units representing all of the major sources of ground water from aquifers of Jurassic and younger age. Ten map reports in the U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Investigations Atlas 720 series were prepared in conjunction with this investigation. The units that were described in the atlases were the San Jose, Nacimiento, and Animas Formations; Ojo Alamo Sandstone; Kirtland Shale and Fruitland Formation; Pictured Cliffs Sandstone; Cliff House Sandstone; Menefee Formation; Point Lookout Sandstone; Gallup Sandstone; Dakota Sandstone; and Morrison Formation. Additional descriptions of the alluvial and landslide deposits, Chuska and Crevasse Canyon Sandstones, Lewis and Mancos Shales, Wanakah Formation, and Entrada Sandstone are included in this report. Much of the information in the HA-720 series was generated from digital computer data bases that were directly usable by the computer for compilation of input data for the model. In essence, the major components of the ground-water- flow model were described and documented in the series of hydrologic atlases. The primary finding resulting from the ground-water-flow simulation was that boundary conditions and internal geometry of the aquifers are the major controls of steady-state ground-water flow and hydraulic heads in the San Juan Basin. Another significant finding was that the computed steady-state ground- water flux is a very minor component (about 1 percent) of the total water budget of the basin.

  16. The Problem of Longitude in the 18th Century: Jorge Juan, Antonio de Ulloa and the Expedition of the Paris Academy of Sciences to the Kingdom of Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Manuel Pérez

    2015-05-01

    Jorge Juan and Antonio de Ulloa, naval officers of the Spanish Navy in the Midshipmen's Royal Academy were appointed to take part in one of the most important scientific expeditions of the 18th century. The question of the shape of the Earth, of vital importance for navigation, was solved by the Paris Academy of Sciences by request of Louis XV of France in 1735. The aim was to determine the form of the ellipsoid that Newton had described in the 17th century for any spherical and homogeneous body in rotation about an axis. Two expeditions were prepared for the geodetic measures of meridian arc both in high latitudes (Lapland, Finland) and in the equatorial zone (the Kingdom of Peru); Pierre Louis Maupertuis took charge of the northern expedition whereas the second one was charged to La Condamine, along with Jorge Juan and Antonio de Ulloa. The results obtained by the Spaniards were gathered in a publication: Observaciones astronómicas y físicas hechas en los Reinos del Perú. In it, they dedicate a chapter to the determination of astronomic longitude with the only technology that was providing certain precision at the moment: the simultaneous observation of the same astronomic phenomenon in two different places. Specifically, they explain in detail in Book III: Las Observaciones de la Inmersiones y Emersiones de los satélites de Júpiter, como asimismo de los eclipses de Luna; de las cuales de deduce la Longitud de los Lugares, incluyendo las correcciones a efectuar por la variación de la declinación diaria del Sol.

  17. Adequacy of Nasqan data to describe areal and temporal variability of water quality of the San Juan River Drainage basin upstream from Shiprock New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goetz, C.L.; Abeyta, Cynthia G.

    1987-01-01

    Analyses indicate that water quality in the San Juan River drainage basin upstream from Shiprock, New Mexico, is quite variable from station to station. Analyses are based on water quality data from the U.S. Geological Survey WATSTORE files and the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Division 's files. In the northeastern part of the basin, most streams are calcium-bicarbonate waters. In the northwestern and southern part of the basin, the streams are calcium-sulfate and sodium-sulfate waters. Geology, climate, and land use and water use affect the water quality. Statistical analysis shows that streamflow, suspended-sediment, dissolved-iron, dissolved-orthophosphate-phosphorus, dissolved-sodium, dissolved-sulfate, and dissolved-manganese concentrations, specific conductance, and pH are highly variable among most stations. Dissolved-radium-226 concentration is the least variable among stations. A trend in one or more water quality constituents for the time period, October 1, 1973, through September 30, 1981, was detected at 15 out of 36 stations tested. The NASQAN stations Animas River at Farmington and San Juan River at Shiprock, New Mexico, record large volumes of flow that represent an integration of the flow from many upstream tributaries. The data collected do not represent what is occurring at specific points upstream in the basin, but do provide accurate information on how water quality is changing over time at the station location. A water quality, streamflow model would be necessary to predict accurately what is occurring simultaneously in the entire basin. (USGS)

  18. Interferon Gamma-Based Detection of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Border States of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Eyal; Alatorre-Izaguirre, Gabriela; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Moreno-Treviño, Maria Guadalupe; Garcialuna-Martinez, Javier; Gonzalez-Salazar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world’s population is infected with latent tuberculosis (LTBI). Tuberculosis (TB) rates in the border states are higher than national rates in both the US and Mexico, with the border accounting for 30% of total registered TB cases in both countries. However, LTBI rates in the general population in Mexican border states are unknown. In this region, LTBI is diagnosed using the tuberculin skin test (TST). New methods of detection more specific than TST have been developed, although there is currently no gold standard for LTBI detection. Our objective is to demonstrate utility of the Quantiferon TB gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test compared with the TST to detect LTBI among border populations. This is an observational, cross-sectional study carried out in border areas of the states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico. Participants (n = 210) provided a TST and blood sample for the QFT-GIT. Kappa coefficients assessed the agreement between TST and QFT-GIT. Participant characteristics were compared using Fisher exact tests. Thirty-eight percent of participants were diagnosed with LTBI by QFT-GIT. The proportion of LTBI detected using QFT-GIT was almost double [38% (79/210)] that found by TST [19% (39/210)] (P < 0.001). Concordance between TST and QFT-GIT was low (kappa = 0.37). We recommend further studies utilizing the QFT-GIT test to detect LTBI among border populations. PMID:26484340

  19. The Ni, Fe and CO contents of metal phases in the Allende, Holbrook and Nuevo Mercurio chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.; Smith, D. G. W.; Launspach, S.

    1983-12-01

    The Ni, Fe and Co contents of metal phases in the Allende, Holbrook and Nuevo Mercurio chondrites have been obtained using an automated electron microprobe fitted with both wavelength and energy dispersive spectrometers. Co contents of kamacite in these chondrites are inconsistent with those reported previously, but the general tendency of Co to increase in the kamacite in chondrites from H, L to LL groups, is supported by the study. Although the variation patterns of Ni-Co observed so far for L4, H5 and CV3 chondrites are simple, six L6 chondrites, including those reported previously, show significant difference in Co contents and the concentration and abundance charcateristics of Ni-Fe-Co patterns of the metal phases. The great similarity of composition of each region of these patterns obtained from two samples of Holbrook and two samples of Allende which came from different collections, indicate that the variation patterns of Ni-Co in the metal phases provide a means of characterizing or 'fingerprinting', as do the great differences in the variation patterns of Fe-Ni-Co which occur from one chondrite to another or even within the same group and petrologic type.

  20. Executive summary--2002 assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks, New Mexico and Colorado: Chapter 1 in Total petroleum systems and geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated undiscovered oil and gas resources that have the potential for additions to reserves in the San Juan Basin Province (5022), New Mexico and Colorado (fig. 1). Paleozoic rocks were not appraised. The last oil and gas assessment for the province was in 1995 (Gautier and others, 1996). There are several important differences between the 1995 and 2002 assessments. The area assessed is smaller than that in the 1995 assessment. This assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the San Juan Basin Province also used a slightly different approach in the assessment, and hence a number of the plays defined in the 1995 assessment are addressed differently in this report. After 1995, the USGS has applied a total petroleum system (TPS) concept to oil and gas basin assessments. The TPS approach incorporates knowledge of the source rocks, reservoir rocks, migration pathways, and time of generation and expulsion of hydrocarbons; thus the assessments are geologically based. Each TPS is subdivided into one or more assessment units, usually defined by a unique set of reservoir rocks, but which have in common the same source rock. Four TPSs and 14 assessment units were geologically evaluated, and for 13 units, the undiscovered oil and gas resources were quantitatively assessed.

  1. Analysis of the Nuevo Leon magnetic anomaly and its possible relation to the Cerro Prieto magmatic-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.E.; Wilt, M.J.; Corrigan, D.J.

    1982-10-01

    The broad dipolar magnetic anomaly whose positive peak is centered near Ejido Nuevo Leon, some 5 km east of the Cerro Prieto I Power Plant, has long been suspected to have a genetic relationship to the thermal source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system. This suspicion was reinforced after several deep geothermal wells, drilled to depths of 3 to 3.5 km over the anomaly, intersected an apparent dike-sill complex consisting mainly of diabase but with minor rhyodacite. A detailed fit of the observed magnetic field to a computer model indicates that the source may be approximated by a tabular block 4 by 6 km in area, 3.7 km in depth, 2.3 km thick, and dipping slightly to the north. Mafic dike chips from one well, NL-1, were analyzed by means of electron microprobe analyses which showed tham to contain a titanomagnetite that is paramagnetic at in-situ temperature conditions. As the dike mineralogy does not account for the magnetic anomaly, the magnetic source is believed to be a deeper, magnetite-rich assemblage of peridotite-gabbro plutons. the suite of igneous rocks was probably passively emplaced at a shallow depth in response to crustal extension and thinning brought on by strike-slip faulting. The bottom of the magnetic source body, at an estimated depth of 6 km, is presumed to be at or near that of the Curie isotherm (575/sup 0/C) for magnetite, the principal ferromagnetic mineral in peridotitic-gabbroic rocks. The geological model derived from the magnetic study is generally supported by other geophysical data. In particular, earthquake data suggest dike injection is occurring at depths of 6 to 11 km in an area beneath the magnetic source. Thus, it is possible that heat for the geothermal field is being maintained by continuing crustal extension and magmatic activity.

  2. Analysis of the Nuevo Leon Magnetic Anomaly and its possible relation to the Cerro Prieto magmatic-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.E.; Corrigan, D.J.; Wilt, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The broad dipolar magnetic anomaly whose positive peak is centered near Ejido Nuevo Leon, some 5 km east of the Cerro Prieto I power plant, has long been suspected to have a genetic relationship to the thermal source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system. This suspicion was reinforced after several deep geothermal wells, drilled to depths of 3-3.5 km over the anomaly, intersected an apparent dike-sill complex consisting mainly of diabase but with minor rhyodacite. A detailed fit of the observed magnetic field to a computer model indicates that the source may be approximated by a tabular block 4 x 6 km in area, 3.7 km in depth, 2.3 km thick, and dipping slightly to the north. Mafic dike chips from one well, NL-1, were analysed by means of electron microprobe analyses which showed them to contain a titanomagnetite that is paramagnetic at in situ temperature conditions. As the dike mineralogy does not account for the magnetic anomaly, the magnetic source is believed to be a deeper, magnetite-rich assemblage of peridotite-gabbro plutons. The suite of igneous rocks was probably emplaced at a shallow depth in response to crustal extension and thinning brought on by en echelon strike-slip faulting. The bottom of the magnetic source body, at an estimated depth of 6 km, is presumed to be at or near that of the Curie isotherm (575/sup 0/C) for magnetite, the principal ferromagnetic mineral in peridotiticgabbroic rocks. The geological model derived from the magnetic study is generally supported by other geophysical data. In particular, earthquake data suggest dike injection is occurring at depths of 6-11 km in an area beneath the magnetic source. Thus, it is possible that heat for the geothermal field is being maintained by continuing crustal extension and magmatic activity.

  3. A Participatory Modeling Application of a Distributed Hydrologic Model in Nuevo Leon, Mexico for the 2010 Hurricane Alex Flood Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baish, A. S.; Vivoni, E. R.; Payan, J. G.; Robles-Morua, A.; Basile, G. M.

    2011-12-01

    A distributed hydrologic model can help bring consensus among diverse stakeholders in regional flood planning by producing quantifiable sets of alternative futures. This value is acute in areas with high uncertainties in hydrologic conditions and sparse observations. In this study, we conduct an application of the Triangulated Irregular Network (TIN)-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) in the Santa Catarina basin of Nuevo Leon, Mexico, where Hurricane Alex in July 2010 led to catastrophic flooding of the capital city of Monterrey. Distributed model simulations utilize best-available information on the regional topography, land cover, and soils obtained from Mexican government agencies or analysis of remotely-sensed imagery from MODIS and ASTER. Furthermore, we developed meteorological forcing for the flood event based on multiple data sources, including three local gauge networks, satellite-based estimates from TRMM and PERSIANN, and the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). Remotely-sensed data allowed us to quantify rainfall distributions in the upland, rural portions of the Santa Catarina that are sparsely populated and ungauged. Rural areas had significant contributions to the flood event and as a result were considered by stakeholders for flood control measures, including new reservoirs and upland vegetation management. Participatory modeling workshops with the stakeholders revealed a disconnect between urban and rural populations in regard to understanding the hydrologic conditions of the flood event and the effectiveness of existing and potential flood control measures. Despite these challenges, the use of the distributed flood forecasts developed within this participatory framework facilitated building consensus among diverse stakeholders and exploring alternative futures in the basin.

  4. Awareness of Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) and Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Is Low but Interest Is High Among Men Engaging in Condomless Anal Sex With Men in Boston, Pittsburgh, and San Juan.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, Curtis; Frasca, Timothy; Giguere, Rebecca; Ibitoye, Mobolaji; Cranston, Ross D; Febo, Irma; Mayer, Kenneth H; McGowan, Ian; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex

    2015-08-01

    This study examines awareness of and experiences with post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among 228 men recruited in Boston, Pittsburgh, and San Juan between 12/2010 and 6/2012. All of them reported having condomless anal sex with a man in the prior year. Overall, 41% had heard of PEP, ranging from 16% in San Juan to 64% in Boston. Only 21% had heard of PrEP, ranging from 8% in San Juan to 36% in Boston. Three had used PEP, and none had used PrEP. After the methods were described to participants, interest in both was high, with intentions to use PEP and PrEP respectively at 9.1 and 7.7 (10-point scale). Increased public education is needed to raise awareness of these HIV prevention methods, especially among MSM who acknowledge potential risk behavior. It also seems likely that many such men would use these methods once they become aware of them.

  5. Towards a National Hazard Map of Landslides: Juan de Grijalva, Chiapas, and Mitlatongo, Oaxaca, two catastrophic landslides on southeastern of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez-M, L.; Castañeda, A.; Ramirez, A.; González, A. E.

    2013-05-01

    One of the most catastrophic events, with economical losses and deaths, in Mexico and Latin America, is the landslide event. The Juan de Grijalva landslide, which blocked one of the largest rivers in the Chiapas state of Mexico, on November 4, 2007, is considered one of the greatest that have occurred in the world in the last 100 years (Dominguez, 2008) and it could be the one with the largest economic impact in the history of Mexico. This landslide occurred four days after a period of very heavy rains that caused, in the peak of the emergency, flooding in almost 62% of the area of the state of Tabasco (CENAPRED, 2009) and is also one of the most serious disasters that were faced by the Mexican government in the past 10 years. The Juan de Grijalva landslide mobilized the entire government apparatus and required an investment of just over 0.1 billions of US Dollars (CENAPRED, 2009) for the rehabilitation of the river runway and additional works in order to prevent further damages if another landslide occurs in the vicinity. A similar case of interest for Mexican researchers and specialists in earth sciences is the big landslide occurred in the communities of Santa Cruz Mitlatongo, municipality of Magdalena Jaltepec, and Santiago Mitlatongo, municipality of Nochixtlan, both in the state of Oaxaca (Dominguez, 2011). This landslide has dimensions of just over 2,500 m long and 900 m wide, and it remains active from September 2011. Since then, the landslide has moved just over 230 m in length and has destroyed about 850 houses. Given the geological and geotechnical characteristics of these landslides and the economic and social impact caused, the National Center for Disaster Prevention (CENAPRED) has initiated a research project in order to learn the main factors (constraints and triggers) that influenced both landslides. In relation with the National Hazard Landslide Map, developed by CENAPRED, these events are an important task of the National Inventory of Landslides

  6. Introduction to the 2002 geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks: Chapter 2 in Total petroleum systems and geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The U.S Geological Survey (USGS) periodically conducts assessments of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the United States. The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geologically based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States. The last major USGS assessment of oil and gas of the most important oil and gas provinces in the United States was in 1995 (Gautier and others, 1996). Since then a number of individual assessment provinces have been reappraised using new methodology. This was done particularly for those provinces where new information has become available, where new methodology was expected to reveal more insight to provide a better estimate, where additional geologic investigation was needed, or where continuous accumulations were deemed important. The San Juan Basin was reevaluated because of industry exploitation of new hydrocarbon accumulations that were not previously assessed and because of a change in application of assessment methodology to potential undiscovered hydrocarbon accumulations. Several changes have been made in this study. The methodology is different from that used in 1995 (Schmoker, 2003; Schmoker and Klett, 2003). In this study the total petroleum system (TPS) approach (Magoon and Dow, 1994) is used rather than the play approach. The Chama Basin is not included. The team of scientists studying the basin is different. The 1995 study focused on conventional accumulations, whereas in this 2002 assessment, it was a priority to assess continuous-type accumulations, including coal-bed gas. Consequently we are presenting here an entirely new study and results for the San Juan Basin Province. The results of this 2002 assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province (5022) are presented in this report within the geologic context of individual TPSs and their assessment units (AU) (table 1). Results

  7. Origin of rhyolite by crustal melting and the nature of parental magmas in the Oligocene Conejos Formation, San Juan Mountains, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. F.; Ghosh, A.; Price, C. W.; Rinard, B. D.; Cullers, R. L.; Ren, M.

    2005-01-01

    Four closely spaced volcanoes (Summer Coon; Twin Mountains; Del Norte; Carnero Creek) form the east-central cluster of Conejos volcanic centers. These Conejos rocks range from high-K basaltic andesite to rhyolite, with andesite volumetrically the most abundant. Summer Coon and Twin Mountains are composite volcanoes. The Del Norte and Carnero Creek volcanoes are deeply eroded dacite shields. Rhyolite (10% of our Conejos analyses but a much smaller percentage by volume) is only known from Summer Coon and Twin Mountains volcanoes, although high-SiO 2 dacite occurs in the Del Norte volcano. The younger Hinsdale Formation contains a related series ranging from transitional basalt to high-K andesite; we use Hinsdale Formation analyses to represent Conejos parental magmas. Conejos and Hinsdale magmas evolved through AFC processes: Basalt, after interacting with lower crust, assimilated low K/Rb crust, similar in some ways to Taylor and McLennan (Taylor, S.R., and McLennan, S.M., 1985, The continental crust: its composition and evolution. Oxford, Blackwell Scientific.) model upper crust; main series basaltic andesite fractionated to high-K andesite; rhyolite was produced by melting of high K/Ba upper crustal rocks similar to granite gneiss known from inclusions and basement outcrops. Some rhyolite may have been back-mixed into fractionating andesite and dacite. Field evidence for assimilation includes sanidinite-facies, partially melted, gneiss blocks up to 1 m in diameter. Temperature estimates (1100-900 ° C) from two-pyroxene equilibria are consistent with this interpretation, as are the sparsely porphyritic nature of the most-evolved rhyolites and the absence of phenocrystic alkali feldspar. Our study supports the conclusions of previous workers on AFC processes in similar, but generally more mafic, Conejos magmas of the southeastern San Juan Mountains. Our results, however, emphasize the importance of crustal melting in the generation of Conejos rhyolite. We further

  8. Oroclinal bending of the Juan Fernández Ridge suggested by geohistory analysis of the Bahía Inglesa Formation, north-central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Jacobus P.; Achurra, Luciano; Henríquez, Álvaro; Carreño, Catalina; Rivera, Huber; Suárez, Mario E.; Ishman, Scott E.; Pyenson, Nicholas D.; Gutstein, Carolina S.

    2016-03-01

    The stratigraphy of the Bahía Inglesa Formation in the Caldera Basin west of Copiapó, (north-central Chile) is revised, based on hitherto unpublished stratigraphic sections and 87Sr/86Sr dating. The depositional environment varied from a rocky shoreline to the upper continental slope, with sea-level oscillations and tectonic movements causing numerous local unconformities as well as lateral and vertical facies changes. Geohistory and sedimentological analyses show that the area was close to the concurrent sea level at about 15.3 Ma, but at the same time being elevated about 100 m above the present sea level. Although the basin then subsided at least 350 m until around 6 Ma, marine deposition was only recorded after 10.4 Ma. This suggests that the sea level initially dropped faster than the rate of subsidence so that subaerial erosion occurred. The period of subaerial exposure before 10.4 Ma can be attributed to the presence of a NE-trending branch of the Juan Fernández Ridge below the continental crust at this time, whereas the ensuing subsidence was due to subduction erosion and crustal accommodation in its wake as it migrated south along the South American coastline. The subsequent uplift of at least 250 m can be explained by an acceleration in plate expansion and isostatic rebound of the continental crust after being partially submerged in the upper mantle. The uplift-subsidence-uplift pattern mirrors those recorded around the Nazca Ridge in Peru, as well as in similar basins to the south of Caldera. However, a higher southward migration rate of the Juan Fernández Ridge against the edge of the South American Plate and less intense uplift-subsidence-uplift cycles are recorded in the latter basins. This can possibly be attributed to oroclinal bending of the ridge due to friction with the overlying continental plate, which diminished the angle of incidence and the intensity of the stress field, but increased the migration velocity of the ridge relative to the

  9. An assessment of The Effects of Elevation and Aspect on Deposition of Airborne Pollution and Water Quality in an Alpine Critical Zone: San Juan Mountains, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A.; Giardino, J. R.; Marcantonio, F.

    2015-12-01

    The alpine critical zone is affected by various inputs, storages, pathways, and outputs. Unfortunately, many of these processes distribute the pollutants beyond the immediate area and into the surrounding biological and anthropogenic communities. Years of mining and improper disposal of the tailings and acid-mine drainage have degraded the quality of surface water within the San Juan Mountains. However, mining may not be the only factor significantly affecting the surface water quality in this high-elevation environment. As a high elevation system, this area is a fragile ecosystem with inputs ranging from local mining to atmospheric transport and deposition. Studies from around the world have shown atmospheric transport and deposition affect high-elevation systems. Thus, a significant question arises: does elevation or aspect affect the volume and rate of atmospheric deposition of pollutants? We assume atmospheric deposition occurs on the slopes in addition to in streams, lakes, and ponds. Deposition on slopes can be transported to nearby surface waters and increase the impact of the atmospheric pollutants along with residence time. Atmospheric deposition data were collected for aluminum, iron, manganese, nitrate, phosphate, and sulfate. Water chemistry data were collected for the same constituents as the atmospheric deposition with the addition of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance. Deposition samples were collected on a five-day sampling regime during two summers. Water quality samples were collected in-stream adjacent to the deposition-ample collectors. Collection sites were located on opposite sides of Red Mountain at five equal elevations providing two different aspects. The north side is drained by Red Mountain Creek and the south side is drained by Mineral Creek. Differences in atmospheric deposition and water quality at different elevations and aspects suggest there is a relationship between aspect and elevation on atmospheric

  10. URJC GB dataset: Community-based seed bank of Mediterranean high-mountain and semi-arid plant species at Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Patricia; Iriondo, José María

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Germplasm Bank of Universidad Rey Juan Carlos was created in 2008 and currently holds 235 accessions and 96 species. This bank focuses on the conservation of wild-plant communities and aims to conserve ex situ a representative sample of the plant biodiversity present in a habitat, emphasizing priority ecosystems identified by the Habitats Directive. It is also used to store plant material for research and teaching purposes. The collection consists of three subcollections, two representative of typical habitats in the center of the Iberian Peninsula: high-mountain pastures (psicroxerophylous pastures) and semi-arid habitats (gypsophylic steppes), and a third representative of the genus Lupinus. The high-mountain subcollection currently holds 153 accessions (63 species), the semi-arid subcollection has 76 accessions (29 species,) and the Lupinus subcollection has 6 accessions (4 species). All accessions are stored in a freezer at -18 °C in Kilner jars with silica gel. The Germplasm Bank of Universidad Rey Juan Carlos follows a quality control protocol which describes the workflow performed with seeds from seed collection to storage. All collectors are members of research groups with great experience in species identification. Herbarium specimens associated with seed accessions are preserved and 63% of the records have been georreferenced with GPS and radio points. The dataset provides unique information concerning the location of populations of plant species that form part of the psicroxerophylous pastures and gypsophylic steppes of Central Spain as well as populations of genus Lupinus in the Iberian Peninsula. It also provides relevant information concerning mean seed weight and seed germination values under specific incubation conditions. This dataset has already been used by researchers of the Area of Biodiversity and Conservation of URJC as a source of information for the design and implementation of experimental designs in these plant communities

  11. URJC GB dataset: Community-based seed bank of Mediterranean high-mountain and semi-arid plant species at Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (Spain).

    PubMed

    Alonso, Patricia; Iriondo, José María

    2014-01-01

    The Germplasm Bank of Universidad Rey Juan Carlos was created in 2008 and currently holds 235 accessions and 96 species. This bank focuses on the conservation of wild-plant communities and aims to conserve ex situ a representative sample of the plant biodiversity present in a habitat, emphasizing priority ecosystems identified by the Habitats Directive. It is also used to store plant material for research and teaching purposes. The collection consists of three subcollections, two representative of typical habitats in the center of the Iberian Peninsula: high-mountain pastures (psicroxerophylous pastures) and semi-arid habitats (gypsophylic steppes), and a third representative of the genus Lupinus. The high-mountain subcollection currently holds 153 accessions (63 species), the semi-arid subcollection has 76 accessions (29 species,) and the Lupinus subcollection has 6 accessions (4 species). All accessions are stored in a freezer at -18 °C in Kilner jars with silica gel. The Germplasm Bank of Universidad Rey Juan Carlos follows a quality control protocol which describes the workflow performed with seeds from seed collection to storage. All collectors are members of research groups with great experience in species identification. Herbarium specimens associated with seed accessions are preserved and 63% of the records have been georreferenced with GPS and radio points. The dataset provides unique information concerning the location of populations of plant species that form part of the psicroxerophylous pastures and gypsophylic steppes of Central Spain as well as populations of genus Lupinus in the Iberian Peninsula. It also provides relevant information concerning mean seed weight and seed germination values under specific incubation conditions. This dataset has already been used by researchers of the Area of Biodiversity and Conservation of URJC as a source of information for the design and implementation of experimental designs in these plant communities. Since

  12. Preliminary Results from a Gas Tracer Injection Experiment in the Upper Oceanic Crust on the Eastern Flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neira, N. M.; Clark, J. F.; Fisher, A. T.; Wheat, C. G.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first results from a gas tracer injection experiment in the ocean crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an area of vigorous hydrothermal circulation. A mixture of tracers was injected in Hole 1362B in 2010, during IODP Expedition 327, as part of a 24-hour pumping experiment. Fluid samples were subsequently collected from this hole and three additional holes (1026B, 1362A, and 1301A), located 300 to 500 m away. The array of holes is located on 3.5 M.y. old seafloor, and oriented N20°E, subparallel to the Endeavor Segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge, 100 km to the west. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was injected at a concentration of 0.0192 mol/min, with fluid pumping rate of 6.7 L/s for 20.2 h, resulting in a mean concentration of 47.6 μM and 23.3 mol of SF6 being added to crustal fluids. Borehole fluid samples were collected in copper coils using osmotic pumps attached to the wellheads of several long-term, subseafloor observatories (CORKs). These samples were recovered from the seafloor using a remotely-operated vehicle in 2011 and 2013. Analyses of SF6 concentrations in samples recovered in 2011 indicate the first arrival of SF6 in Hole 1301A, 550 m south of the injection Hole 1362B, ~265 days after injection. This suggests that the most rapid lateral transport of gas (at the leading edge of the plume) occurred at ~2 m/day. Samples recovered in 2013 should provide a more complete breakthrough curve, allowing assessment of the mean lateral transport rate. Additional insights will come from analysis of metal salts and particle tracers injected contemporaneously with the SF6, the cross-hole pressure response to injection and a two-year fluid discharge experiment. Additional wellhead samples will be collected in Summer 2014, as will downhole osmosamplers deployed in perforated casing within the upper ocean crust in Holes 1362A and 1362B.

  13. Population data of 24 STRs in Mexican-Mestizo population from Monterrey, Nuevo Leon (Northeast, Mexico) based on Powerplex(®) Fusion and GlobalFiler(®) kits.

    PubMed

    Ramos-González, Benito; Aguilar-Velázquez, José Alonso; Chávez-Briones, María de Lourdes; Delgado-Chavarría, Juan Ramón; Alfaro-Lopez, Elizabeth; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor

    2016-03-01

    The STR loci included into new commercial human identification kits compels geneticists estimating forensic parameters for interpretation purposes in forensic casework. Therefore, we studied for the first time in Mexico the GlobalFiler(®) and Powerplex(®) Fusion systems in 326 and 682 unrelated individuals, respectively. These individuals are resident of the Monterrey City of the Nuevo Leon state (Northeast, Mexico). Population data from 23 autosomal STRs and the Y-STR locus DYS391 are reported and compared against available STR data from American ethnic groups and the unique Mexican population studied with Powerplex(®) Fusion.

  14. Population data of 24 STRs in Mexican-Mestizo population from Monterrey, Nuevo Leon (Northeast, Mexico) based on Powerplex(®) Fusion and GlobalFiler(®) kits.

    PubMed

    Ramos-González, Benito; Aguilar-Velázquez, José Alonso; Chávez-Briones, María de Lourdes; Delgado-Chavarría, Juan Ramón; Alfaro-Lopez, Elizabeth; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor

    2016-03-01

    The STR loci included into new commercial human identification kits compels geneticists estimating forensic parameters for interpretation purposes in forensic casework. Therefore, we studied for the first time in Mexico the GlobalFiler(®) and Powerplex(®) Fusion systems in 326 and 682 unrelated individuals, respectively. These individuals are resident of the Monterrey City of the Nuevo Leon state (Northeast, Mexico). Population data from 23 autosomal STRs and the Y-STR locus DYS391 are reported and compared against available STR data from American ethnic groups and the unique Mexican population studied with Powerplex(®) Fusion. PMID:26747399

  15. Geology, sequence stratigraphy, and oil and gas assessment of the Lewis Shale Total Petroleum System, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado: Chapter 5 in Total petroleum systems and geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dubiel, R.F.

    2013-01-01

    The Lewis Shale Total Petroleum System (TPS) in the San Juan Basin Province contains a continuous gas accumulation in three distinct stratigraphic units deposited in genetically related depositional environments: offshore-marine shales, mudstones, siltstones, and sandstones of the Lewis Shale, and marginal-marine shoreface sandstones and siltstones of both the La Ventana Tongue and the Chacra Tongue of the Cliff House Sandstone. The Lewis Shale was not a completion target in the San Juan Basin (SJB) in early drilling from about the 1950s through 1990. During that time, only 16 wells were completed in the Lewis from natural fracture systems encountered while drilling for deeper reservoir objectives. In 1991, existing wells that penetrated the Lewis Shale were re-entered by petroleum industry operators in order to fracture-stimulate the Lewis and to add Lewis gas production onto preexisting, and presumably often declining, Mesaverde Group production stratigraphically lower in the section. By 1997, approximately 101 Lewis completions had been made, both as re-entries into existing wells and as add-ons to Mesaverde production in new wells. Based on recent industry drilling and completion practices leading to successful gas production from the Lewis and because new geologic models indicate that the Lewis Shale contains both source rocks and reservoir rocks, the Lewis Shale TPS was defined and evaluated as part of this U.S. Geological Survey oil and gas assessment of the San Juan Basin. Gas in the Lewis Shale Total Petroleum System is produced from shoreface sandstones and siltstones in the La Ventana and Chacra Tongues and from distal facies of these prograding clastic units that extend into marine rocks of the Lewis Shale in the central part of the San Juan Basin. Reservoirs are in shoreface sandstone parasequences of the La Ventana and Chacra and their correlative distal parasequences in the Lewis Shale where both natural and artificially enhanced fractures produce

  16. [Profile of sensitization to allergens in children with atopic dermatitis assisting to Allergology Service of University Hospital, Nuevo Leon, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Yong-Rodríguez, Adrián; Macías-Weinmann, Alejandra; Palma-Gómez, Samuel; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Pérez-Vanzzini, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Mujica, José Julio; González-Díaz, Sandra Nora

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes: la sensibilización a alergenos observada en la dermatitis atópica aumenta el riesgo del niño a padecer rinitis alérgica y asma. Los estudios recientes indican que entre mayor actividad de proteasas haya en los alergenos a los que se está sensibilizado, hay mayor defecto en la barrera cutánea y mayor gravedad de la enfermedad. Objetivos: conocer el patrón de sensibilización a los alergenos en niños con dermatitis atópica atendidos en el Servicio de Alergología del Hospital Universitario de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León y conocer si estos niños tienen mayor sensibilización a los antígenos con actividad proteolítica. Material y método: estudio retrospectivo en el que revisamos los reportes de las pruebas cutáneas por punción realizadas en nuestro servicio a niños de 5 meses a 16 años de edad, con diagnóstico de dermatitis atópica, de enero de 2012 a enero de 2014. Evaluamos la frecuencia de sensibilización a aeroalergenos y alimentos, así como el tamaño de la roncha en la respuesta cutánea para cada alergeno en particular. Resultados: se incluyeron los reportes de pruebas cutáneas de 66 niños, 30 hombres y 36 mujeres. Cuarenta y seis pacientes estaban sensibilizados a aeroalergenos y 38 a alimentos. Los ácaros del polvo de casa (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus/Dermatophagoides farinae) fueron los alergenos con mayor frecuencia de respuesta positiva en las pruebas cutáneas. De los niños con sensibilización a alimentos, sólo los niños sensibilizados a la leche de vaca, al huevo y al pescado tuvieron una roncha mayor de 6 mm de diámetro. CONCLUSIÓN: en los niños con dermatitis atópica es común la sensibilización a aeroalergenos con alta actividad de proteasas y la polisensibilización es muy común. La sensibilización a alimentos es común en estos pacientes, pero sólo un pequeño porcentaje de ellos muestra respuestas cutáneas lo suficientemente grandes para relacionarlas con gravedad de la enfermedad.

  17. Free-living bacterial communities associated with tubeworm (Ridgeia piscesae) aggregations in contrasting diffuse flow hydrothermal vent habitats at the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Forget, Nathalie L; Kim Juniper, S

    2013-04-01

    We systematically studied free-living bacterial diversity within aggregations of the vestimentiferan tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae sampled from two contrasting flow regimes (High Flow and Low Flow) in the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area (MPA) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Northeast Pacific). Eight samples of particulate detritus were recovered from paired tubeworm grabs from four vent sites. Most sequences (454 tag and Sanger methods) were affiliated to the Epsilonproteobacteria, and the sulfur-oxidizing genus Sulfurovum was dominant in all samples. Gammaproteobacteria were also detected, mainly in Low Flow sequence libraries, and were affiliated with known methanotrophs and decomposers. The cooccurrence of sulfur reducers from the Deltaproteobacteria and the Epsilonproteobacteria suggests internal sulfur cycling within these habitats. Other phyla detected included Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Deinococcus-Thermus. Statistically significant relationships between sequence library composition and habitat type suggest a predictable pattern for High Flow and Low Flow environments. Most sequences significantly more represented in High Flow libraries were related to sulfur and hydrogen oxidizers, while mainly heterotrophic groups were more represented in Low Flow libraries. Differences in temperature, available energy for metabolism, and stability between High Flow and Low Flow habitats potentially explain their distinct bacterial communities.

  18. A Diverse Community of Metal(loid) Oxide Respiring Bacteria Is Associated with Tube Worms in the Vicinity of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Black Smoker Field.

    PubMed

    Maltman, Chris; Walter, Graham; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Epibiotic bacteria associated with tube worms living in the vicinity of deep sea hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean were investigated for the ability to respire anaerobically on tellurite, tellurate, selenite, selenate, metavanadate and orthovanadate as terminal electron acceptors. Out of 107 isolates tested, 106 were capable of respiration on one or more of these oxides, indicating that metal(loid) oxide based respiration is not only much more prevalent in nature than is generally believed, but also is an important mode of energy generation in the habitat. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed the bacterial community to be rich and highly diverse, containing many potentially new species. Furthermore, it appears that the worms not only possess a close symbiotic relationship with chemolithotrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, but also with the metal(loid) oxide transformers. Possibly they protect the worms through reduction of the toxic compounds that would otherwise be harmful to the host.

  19. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake and implications for Mars

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, James L.; Head, James W.; Levy, Joseph S.; Marchant, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery on Mars of recurring slope lineae (RSL), thought to represent seasonal brines, has sparked interest in analogous environments on Earth. We report on new studies of Don Juan Pond (DJP), which exists at the upper limit of ephemeral water in the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) of Antarctica, and is adjacent to several steep-sloped water tracks, the closest analog for RSL. The source of DJP has been interpreted to be deep groundwater. We present time-lapse data and meteorological measurements that confirm deliquescence within the DJP watershed and show that this, together with small amounts of meltwater, are capable of generating brines that control summertime water levels. Groundwater input was not observed. In addition to providing an analog for RSL formation, CaCl2 brines and chloride deposits in basins may provide clues to the origin of ancient chloride deposits on Mars dating from the transition period from “warm/wet” to “cold/dry” climates. PMID:23378901

  20. Origin of minor and trace element compositional diversity in anorthitic feldspar phenocrysts and melt inclusions from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, David T.; Nielsen, Roger L.; Kent, Adam J.R.; Tepley, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Melt inclusions trapped in phenocryst phases are important primarily due to their potential of preserving a significant proportion of the diversity of magma composition prior to modification of the parent magma array during transport through the crust. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the impact of formational and post-entrapment processes on the composition of melt inclusions hosted in high anorthite plagioclase in MORB. Our observations from three plagioclase ultra-phyric lavas from the Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge document a narrow range of major elements and a dramatically greater range of minor and trace elements within most host plagioclase crystals. Observed host/inclusion partition coefficients for Ti are consistent with experimental determinations. In addition, observed values of DTi are independent of inclusion size and inclusion TiO2 content of the melt inclusion. These observations preclude significant effects from the re-homogenization process, entrapment of incompatible element boundary layers or dissolution/precipitation. The observed wide range of TiO2 contents in the host feldspar, and between bands of melt inclusions within individual crystals rule out modification of TiO contents by diffusion, either pre-eruption or due to re-homogenization. However, we do observe comparatively small ranges for values of K2O and Sr compared to P2O5 and TiO2 in both inclusions and crystals that can be attributed to diffusive processes that occurred prior to eruption.