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Sample records for judy meier penn

  1. Talking with Judy Blume

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Judy

    2005-01-01

    The believable voices of Judy Blume's characters--such as the troublemaking Fudge from "Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing" and freckle-less Andrew from "Freckle Juice"--have charmed readers since Blume published her first book, "The One in the Middle Is the Green Kangaroo," in 1969. This article presents an interview with author Judy Blume. In this…

  2. Judy Blume and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauck, Philomena

    An English instructor examined 9 Judy Blume adolescent novels and interviewed 12 students (grades 6, 7, and 8) who had read the novels to look at the world as it was presented in the books and to compare the instructor's own perceptions with those of the adolescent readers. The study revealed that the books did in fact dwell on the problems of…

  3. Interview with Deborah Meier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Techniques: Making Education and Career Connections, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Deborah Meier, renowned educator in the forefront of education reform, discusses her vision for education and describes the Central Park East Elementary and Secondary Schools in New York, which she founded. She discusses work-based learning, career exploration, liberal arts, vocational education, and curriculum integration among other topics. (JOW)

  4. ASK Talks With Judy Stokley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokley, Judy

    2002-01-01

    In the summer of 1997, Judy Stokley took over as Program Director of the Air-to-Air Joint System Project Office (JSPO) at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida. As the JSPO Program Director, she directed much of her attention to reforming the Advanced Medium Range Air to Air Missile (AMRAAM) program, which had been operational since 1991 and was presently being produced for the Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and many international customers. Upon careful analysis of the program, she found it rife with problems. Two of the most pressing included a bloated Average Unit Procurement Cost and an Air Force mandated draw down plan that had not been met. In this interview, following her presentation at the Fourth NASA Masters Forum of Program and Project Managers in Dallas last February, Stokley discusses some of the difficulties she experienced in carrying out the AMRAAM reforms. Stokley is presently Air Force Program Executive Officer for Weapons in Washington, D.C. She is responsible for the cost, schedule, and technical performance of a portfolio of air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons programs. These programs represent the leading edge of weapons technology, including developing the next generation of precision-guided munitions -- 'smart' bombs -- and air superiority missiles.

  5. Meier-Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Munnik, Sonja A; Hoefsloot, Elisabeth H; Roukema, Jolt; Schoots, Jeroen; Knoers, Nine V A M; Brunner, Han G; Jackson, Andrew P; Bongers, Ernie M H F

    2015-09-17

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism disorder, characterized by microtia, patellar applasia/hypoplasia, and a proportionate short stature. Associated clinical features encompass feeding problems, congenital pulmonary emphysema, mammary hypoplasia in females and urogenital anomalies, such as cryptorchidism and hypoplastic labia minora and majora. Typical facial characteristics during childhood comprise a small mouth with full lips and micro-retrognathia. During ageing, a narrow, convex nose becomes more prominent. The diagnosis MGS should be considered in patients with at least two of the three features of the clinical triad of microtia, patellar anomalies, and pre- and postnatal growth retardation. In patients with short stature and/or microtia, the patellae should be assessed with care by ultrasonography before age 6 or radiography thereafter. Mutations in one of five genes (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6) of the pre-replication complex, involved in DNA-replication, are detected in approximately 67-78% of patients with MGS. Patients with ORC1 and ORC4 mutations appear to have the most severe short stature and microcephaly. Management should be directed towards in-depth investigation, treatment and prevention of associated problems, such as growth retardation, feeding problems, hearing loss, luxating patellae, knee pain, gonarthrosis, and possible pulmonary complications due to congenital pulmonary emphysema with or without broncho- or laryngomalacia. Growth hormone treatment is ineffective in most patients with MGS, but may be effective in patients in whom growth continues to decrease after the first year of life (usually growth velocity normalizes after the first year) and with low levels of IGF1. At present, few data is available about reproduction of females with MGS, but the risk of premature labor might be increased. Here, we propose experience-based guidelines for the regular care and treatment of MGS patients.

  6. Judy Collins sings at the IMAX Theater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the piano, singer-songwriter Judy Collins performs her original song, 'Beyond the Sky,' at the KSC Visitor Complex's Imax Theater for an audience waiting for the launch of STS-93. The song, commissioned by NASA through the Nasa Art Program, honored Eileen Collins, the first woman to command a Space Shuttle. The attendees are planning to view the launch at the Banana Creek viewing sight. Liftoff is scheduled for July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT.

  7. The Kaplan-Meier Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerds, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Survival is difficult to estimate when observation periods of individuals differ in length. Students imagine sailing the Titanic and then recording whether they "live" or "die." A clever algorithm is performed which results in the Kaplan-Meier estimate of survival.

  8. The Kaplan-Meier Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerds, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Survival is difficult to estimate when observation periods of individuals differ in length. Students imagine sailing the Titanic and then recording whether they "live" or "die." A clever algorithm is performed which results in the Kaplan-Meier estimate of survival.

  9. The Association between Judy Center Services and Kindergarten Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Judith P. Hoyer Family Learning Centers, also known as Judy Centers, serve all children birth through kindergarten who live in designated Title I school zones. There are twenty-seven Judy Centers and three satellites throughout Maryland serving forty-four elementary school zones. The Kindergarten Readiness Assessment (KRA) is conducted in the…

  10. Judy Estes Hall (1940-2015).

    PubMed

    Sammons, Morgan T; Boucher, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Presents an obituary for Judy Estes Hall, who passed away on November 24, 2015. Hall served as the Executive Officer of the National Register of Health Service Psychologists until her retirement in 2013. She is a recognized expert in the development of education and training standards for the profession of psychology, she also made significant contributions in the field of international psychology, where she was a renowned expert in cross-national credentialing and an advocate for commonality in licensing standards. She was the coauthor of one edited volume and author of more than 60 journal articles, book chapters, and professional publications. A passionate advocate for the advancement of women in psychology, a devoted mother and grandmother, a connoisseur of wine and international traveler extraordinaire, she touched the personal and professional lives of many. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Astronaut Judy Resnik Visits Lewis Research Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-07-21

    Astronaut Judy Resnik visits the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center on July 18, 1979, the tenth anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission. The event, sponsored by the center’s Public Information Office, was attended by Lewis staff, Cleveland-area media and personalities, and the public. During her time in Cleveland, Resnik appeared on a local television program, gave a press conference, lunched with NASA officials, addressed employees at Lewis, and then met the public at the center’s Visitors Information Center. Resnik related her recent experiences as one of the first US female astronauts and her duties as a mission specialist. The Akron, Ohio native earned a Bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1970 and a doctorate in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland in 1977. Resnik served as a biomedic engineer and staff fellow in the Laboratory of Neurophysiology at the National Institutes of Health from 1974 to 1977, where she performed biological research experiments on visual systems. She served as a senior systems engineer in private industry prior to her selection as an astronaut. Resnik first flew as a mission specialist on STS 41-D, Discovery’s maiden flight, in 1984. Resnik was killed in the January 28, 1986 Challenger accident.

  12. Judy Collins shares a laugh with First Lady Hillary Clinton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Singer Judy Collins (left) shares a laugh with First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton in the Apollo/Saturn V Facility. Both women are at KSC to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93 scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. Judy Collins has honored the commander with a song, 'Beyond the Sky,' which was commissioned by NASA through the NASA Art Program.

  13. Judy Collins shares a laugh with First Lady Hillary Clinton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Singer Judy Collins (left) shares a laugh with First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton in the Apollo/Saturn V Facility. Both women are at KSC to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93 scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. Judy Collins has honored the commander with a song, 'Beyond the Sky,' which was commissioned by NASA through the NASA Art Program.

  14. Penn State DOE GATE Program

    SciTech Connect

    Anstrom, Joel

    2012-08-31

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) was established in October 1998 pursuant to an award from the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). The focus area of the Penn State GATE Program is advanced energy storage systems for electric and hybrid vehicles.

  15. Native Plants, Native Knowledge: Insights from Judy Bluehorse Skelton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Bracken

    2003-01-01

    Judy Bluehorse Skelton is an herbalist of Native American descent who conducts field trips to identify plants and classroom activities to demonstrate their uses. She also works with Portland (Oregon) schools developing culturally appropriate strategies for presenting Native American content. She encourages students to look at events such as the…

  16. The Vitality of Folklore: An Interview with Judy P. Byers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Stephen

    1993-01-01

    Judy P. Byers talks about the work of the late folklorist Ruth Ann Musick and her own work as a folklorist. She describes the gathering of Appalachian folklore, particularly ghost stories, and her task completing Musick's unfinished work. Byers advocates the importance of folklore as a bridge between one's personal history and the great stories of…

  17. Judy Creek: Successful use of offset VSP to find porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.; Pearcy, R.; Lee, H.; Hemingson, P.

    1994-12-31

    In March of 1993, Imperial Oil Resources Ltd. drilled the Judy Creek 14-7-64-10w5 well. The target was porosity on the front of the Judy Creek ``A`` reef. The well encountered poor porosity development. Available surface seismic was of low resolution, so an alternative method was sought to locate better porosity. An offset VSP was acquired, and an anomaly was observed on the P-wave data at a distance of 125 meters form the well. A short radius horizontal radial was drilled from the existing wellbore and encountered porosity development at 125 meters from the well bore. Subsequently, S-wave processing was carried out. Once again, an anomaly was observed at 125 meters form the well bore. The S-waves had the additional advantage of providing better resolution of the porous zone than the P-wave image.

  18. 2014 Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Golbeck, John

    2015-10-01

    The 3rd Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop took place in early June 2014 and was combined with the 3rd Penn State Frontiers in Metallobiochemistry Symposium. The workshop was even larger than the 2nd Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop we offered in 2012. It had even more participants (162 rather than 123 in 2012). Like the 2012 workshop, the 2014 workshop had three parts. The first part consisted of 16 90-minute lectures presented by faculty experts on the topic of their expertise (see below). Based on the suggestions from the 2012 workshop, we have recorded all 16 lectures professionally and make them available to the entire bioinorganic community via online streaming. In addition, hard copies of the recordings are available as backup.

  19. Penn classification in acute aortic dissection patients.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Calogera; Balistreri, Carmela Rita; Torretta, Federico; Capuccio, Veronica; Allegra, Alberto; Argano, Vincenzo; Ruvolo, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Penn classification in predicting in-hospital mortality after surgery in acute type A aortic dissection patients. We evaluated 58 patients (42 men and 16 women; mean age 62.17 ± 10.6 years) who underwent emergency surgery for acute type A aortic dissection between September 2003 and June 2010 in our department. We investigated the correlation between the pre-operative malperfusion and in-hospital outcome after surgery. Twenty-eight patients (48%) were Penn class Aa (absence of branch vessel malperfusion or circulatory collapse), 11 (19%) were Penn class Ab (branch vessel malperfusion with ischaemia), 5 (9%) were Penn class Ac (circulatory collapse with or without cardiac involvement) and 14 (24%) were Penn class Abc (both branch vessel malperfusion and circulatory collapse). The number of patients with localized or generalized ischaemia or both, Penn class non-Aa, was 30 (52%). In-hospital mortality was 24%. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in Penn class Abc and Penn class non-Aa. Intensive unit care stay, hospital ward stay and overall hospital stay was longer in Penn class non-Aa vs Penn class Aa. De Bakey type I dissection and type II diabetes mellitus were associated with in-hospital mortality. Preoperative malperfusion is important for the evaluation of patients with acute aortic type A dissection. The Penn classification is a simple and quick method to apply and predict in-hospital mortality and outcomes.

  20. Understanding survival analysis: Kaplan-Meier estimate

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Manish Kumar; Khanna, Pardeep; Kishore, Jugal

    2010-01-01

    Kaplan-Meier estimate is one of the best options to be used to measure the fraction of subjects living for a certain amount of time after treatment. In clinical trials or community trials, the effect of an intervention is assessed by measuring the number of subjects survived or saved after that intervention over a period of time. The time starting from a defined point to the occurrence of a given event, for example death is called as survival time and the analysis of group data as survival analysis. This can be affected by subjects under study that are uncooperative and refused to be remained in the study or when some of the subjects may not experience the event or death before the end of the study, although they would have experienced or died if observation continued, or we lose touch with them midway in the study. We label these situations as censored observations. The Kaplan-Meier estimate is the simplest way of computing the survival over time in spite of all these difficulties associated with subjects or situations. The survival curve can be created assuming various situations. It involves computing of probabilities of occurrence of event at a certain point of time and multiplying these successive probabilities by any earlier computed probabilities to get the final estimate. This can be calculated for two groups of subjects and also their statistical difference in the survivals. This can be used in Ayurveda research when they are comparing two drugs and looking for survival of subjects. PMID:21455458

  1. 3. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, Altoona, Pennsylvania) ADVERTISEMENT TO SELL STOCK IN PENN ALTO HOTEL - Penn Alto Hotel, 1120-1130 Thirteenth Avenue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  2. 4. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, Altoona, Pennsylvania) ADVERTISEMENT TO SELL STOCK IN PENN ALTO HOTEL - Penn Alto Hotel, 1120-1130 Thirteenth Avenue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  3. Allowing Boys and Girls to Become More Fully Human: An Interview with Judy Logan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarterly of the National Writing Project and the Center for the Study of Writing and Literacy, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Presents an interview with middle-school teacher Judy Logan. Discusses how this teacher, who is particularly knowledgeable about gender issues, responds to research reported in this journal regarding gender differences in students' choices of writing topics. (SR)

  4. A TRIBUTE TO DR. WILLIAM PENN WATKINSON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. William Penn Watkinson (known to colleagues as "Penn") of EPA¿s health research lab (National Health and Environmental Research Laboratory) of Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, died Wednesday, December 13 after a battle with lung cancer. He was a member of the Pulmonar...

  5. Judy Collins and First Lady Hillary Clinton await the launch of STS-93

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Singer Judy Collins (left) and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton await the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93 in the Apollo/Saturn V Facility. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. Judy Collins has honored the commander with a song, 'Beyond the Sky,' which was commissioned by NASA through the NASA Art Program.

  6. Judy Collins and First Lady Hillary Clinton await the launch of STS-93

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Singer Judy Collins (left) and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton await the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93 in the Apollo/Saturn V Facility. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. Judy Collins has honored the commander with a song, 'Beyond the Sky,' which was commissioned by NASA through the NASA Art Program.

  7. William Penn and the peace of Europe.

    PubMed

    Russell, W M S

    2004-01-01

    The Quaker William Penn proposed a European Union to ensure peace in the continent in 1693. Penn was unusual among Quakers in being of the landed upper classes. When converted, he became a leader of the Quakers and other Dissenters. He had the two related ideals of peace and religious toleration, and dreamed of realizing both ideals in the New World. A practical idealist, he took advantage of four factors: friends at Court made through his social position; King Charles II's gratitude for services rendered by his father, Admiral Sir William Penn; the King's desire to conciliate the City merchants, who were ready to invest in Penn's scheme; and above all the King's concern to get North America settled by British colonists. Penn received a charter to found Pennsylvania in 1681. In England he worked hard, especially in collaboration with James II, for toleration for the cruelly persecuted Quakers and other Dissenters. In Pennsylvania he was able to establish complete toleration and his fair and friendly treatment gave the colony 70 years of peaceful co-existence with the Indians. In his essay on the peace of Europe, he virtually invented collective security and with amazing foresight planned in detail something very like the present European Union.

  8. Life Writing Lite: Judy Garland and Reparative Rhetorics of Celebrity Life Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janangelo, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    This essay offers a rhetorical reading of entertainer Judy Garland's early life writing projects. The author focuses on two open letters Garland published in 1950, in which she talks to the public and press to let them know "the truth" ("Open") about her life and how much her audience means to her. As a troubled celebrity, Garland had for years…

  9. Reform and Change in Inclusive Education: A Tribute to Judy Lupart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deppeler, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Founding Editor of the journal "Exceptionality Education Canada," Judy Lupart's research, publication, and teaching interests have included an important focus on inclusive education and school transformation. Two of her papers relevant to this work were published in "Exceptionality Education Canada" a decade apart: "Toward…

  10. Look What They've Done to Judy Blume!: The "Basalization" of Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Kenneth S.

    1988-01-01

    Uses one basalized revision of Judy Blume's "The One in the Middle is the Green Kangaroo" to illustrate how publishers change literature to fit their self-imposed constraints. Criticizes publishers' emphasis on learning words and skills, which causes them to fracture and narrow language, and results in adapted and synthetic texts instead…

  11. Part of the Solution: Judy Nelson--Pierce County Library System, Tacoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Judy Nelson thinks it's important to understand what the community wants for its young people, "which means lots of listening." We need to give taxpayers more good reasons to support libraries, she says, and the community's problems and unmet needs are opportunities for libraries to be an integral part of the solution. One problem Nelson…

  12. The Great Unknown: Daniel Handler Interviews National Book Award-Winner Judy Blundell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handler, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with National Book Award-winner Judy Blundell. For nearly 20 years, Blundell has toiled in anonymity, turning out more than 100 mysteries, romances, and media tie-ins under various pen names, such as Jude Watson. But in mid-November, the writer-for-hire was suddenly shoved into the spotlight. That's when "What I…

  13. Life Writing Lite: Judy Garland and Reparative Rhetorics of Celebrity Life Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janangelo, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    This essay offers a rhetorical reading of entertainer Judy Garland's early life writing projects. The author focuses on two open letters Garland published in 1950, in which she talks to the public and press to let them know "the truth" ("Open") about her life and how much her audience means to her. As a troubled celebrity, Garland had for years…

  14. Part of the Solution: Judy Nelson--Pierce County Library System, Tacoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Judy Nelson thinks it's important to understand what the community wants for its young people, "which means lots of listening." We need to give taxpayers more good reasons to support libraries, she says, and the community's problems and unmet needs are opportunities for libraries to be an integral part of the solution. One problem Nelson…

  15. The Great Unknown: Daniel Handler Interviews National Book Award-Winner Judy Blundell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handler, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with National Book Award-winner Judy Blundell. For nearly 20 years, Blundell has toiled in anonymity, turning out more than 100 mysteries, romances, and media tie-ins under various pen names, such as Jude Watson. But in mid-November, the writer-for-hire was suddenly shoved into the spotlight. That's when "What I…

  16. Women in History--Judy Heumann: Giving Voice and Creating Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Sarah A.

    2008-01-01

    This article profiles Judy Heumann, who has spent her life as an advocate for the rights of people with disabilities. She advocates for the full appropriate implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and other related antidiscrimination legislation. Her ultimate goal is for people with disabilities "not to be seen as…

  17. Look What They've Done to Judy Blume!: The "Basalization" of Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Kenneth S.

    1988-01-01

    Uses one basalized revision of Judy Blume's "The One in the Middle is the Green Kangaroo" to illustrate how publishers change literature to fit their self-imposed constraints. Criticizes publishers' emphasis on learning words and skills, which causes them to fracture and narrow language, and results in adapted and synthetic texts instead…

  18. VIEW WEST, SOUTH PENN POWERHOUSE, (FROM LEFT) BLEEDER SHED, ENGINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW WEST, SOUTH PENN POWERHOUSE, (FROM LEFT) BLEEDER SHED, ENGINE HOUSE, BELT SHED, ECCENTRIC HOUSE. - South Penn Oil Company, G. M. Mead Lot 492 Lease, Morrison Run Field, Clarendon, Warren County, PA

  19. Penn State's Visual Image User Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisciotta, Henry A.; Dooris, Michael J.; Frost, James; Halm, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Visual Image User Study (VIUS), an extensive needs assessment project at Penn State University, describes academic users of pictures and their perceptions. These findings outline the potential market for digital images and list the likely determinates of whether or not a system will be used. They also explain some key user requirements for…

  20. Penn State's Visual Image User Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisciotta, Henry A.; Dooris, Michael J.; Frost, James; Halm, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Visual Image User Study (VIUS), an extensive needs assessment project at Penn State University, describes academic users of pictures and their perceptions. These findings outline the potential market for digital images and list the likely determinates of whether or not a system will be used. They also explain some key user requirements for…

  1. Searching for Judy: How small mysteries affect narrative processes and memory

    PubMed Central

    Love, Jessica; McKoon, Gail; Gerrig, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Current theories of text processing say little about how author’s narrative choices, including the introduction of small mysteries, can affect readers’ narrative experiences. Gerrig, Love, and McKoon (2009) provided evidence that one type of small mystery—a character introduced without information linking him or her to the story—affects readers’ moment-by-moment processing. For that project, participants read stories that introduced characters by proper name alone (e.g., Judy) or with information connecting the character to the rest of the story (e.g., our principal Judy). In an on-line recognition probe task, responses to the character’s name three lines after his or her introduction were faster when the character had not been introduced with connecting information, suggesting that the character remained accessible awaiting resolution. In the four experiments in this paper, we extended our theoretical analysis of small mysteries. In Experiments 1 and 2, we found evidence that trait information (e.g., daredevil Judy) is not sufficient to connect a character to a text. In Experiments 3 and 4, we provide evidence that the moment-by-moment processing effects of such small mysteries also affect readers’ memory for the stories. We interpret the results in terms of Kintsch’s Construction-Integration model (1988) of discourse processing. PMID:20438273

  2. The Penn State Doppler network progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. R.; Peters, R.

    1986-01-01

    The software and hardware implementation for the Penn State University network were discussed. Delayed delivery of radio frequency equipment and signal processing components resulted in modification of the original timetables. It was determined that the best approach for implementing the second very high frequency (VHF) would be when the VHF radar was in reliable and unattended operation. A short summary of the specifications for the three radars is presented.

  3. The Advanced Design Program at Penn State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Roger C.; Melton, Robert G.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program (ADP) instituted by Penn State for students in space-related fields. ADP class instruction is structured in such a way as to simulate the working environment in which design engineers from different disciplines must interact, at various levels, in the course of defining a spacecraft-related system. Student groups are assigned a mission objective, for which they are to complete a preliminary design encompassing all aspects of the mission from launch to recovery. Two major writen reports are required from each group.

  4. Voicing Gay Women's Liberation: Judy Grahn and the Shaping of Lesbian Feminism.

    PubMed

    Rio, Chelsea Del

    2015-01-01

    A closer look at the rich world of California feminisms demonstrates how Judy Grahn served as a central figure in bay area feminism, working to establish and support lesbian activist organizations, feminist publications, women's cultural events, and more. Two of Grahn's early political writings consider how lesbians sat at the nexus of homophobia and sexism. These writings demonstrate the formative role played by San Francisco lesbians in reframing ideas about "women-loving women" and the intersections of gender and sexuality in creating the oppressions faced by all women.

  5. Foil bearing research at Penn State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpino, Marc

    1993-01-01

    Foil journal bearings consist of a compliant metal shell or foil which supports a rigid journal by means of a fluid film. Foil bearings are considered to be a potential alternative to rolling element or traditional rigid surface bearings in cryogenic turbomachinery applications. The prediction of foil bearing performance requires the coupled solution of the foil deflection and the fluid flow in the bearing clearance between the rotor and the foil. The investigations being conducted in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Penn State are focused in three areas: theoretical prediction of steady state bearing performance, modeling of the dynamic bearing characteristics to determine performance in rotor systems, and experimental verification of analysis codes. The current status and results from these efforts will be discussed.

  6. Penn State Radar Systems: Implementation and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, J. V.; Seal, R.; Sorbello, R.; Kuyeng, K.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Software Defined Radio/Radar (SDR) platforms have become increasingly popular as researchers, hobbyists, and military seek more efficient and cost-effective means for radar construction and operation. SDR platforms, by definition, utilize a software-based interface for configuration in contrast to traditional, hard-wired platforms. In an effort to provide new and improved radar sensing capabilities, Penn State has been developing advanced instruments and technologies for future radars, with primary objectives of making such instruments more capable, portable, and more cost effective. This paper will describe the design and implementation of two low-cost radar systems and their deployment in ionospheric research at both low and mid-latitudes. One radar has been installed near Penn State campus, University Park, Pennsylvania (77.97°W, 40.70°N), to make continuous meteor observations and mid-latitude plasma irregularities. The second radar is being installed in Huancayo (12.05°S, -75.33°E), Peru, which is capable of detecting E and F region plasma irregularities as well as meteor reflections. In this paper, we examine and compare the diurnal and seasonal variability of specular, non- specular, and head-echoes collected with these two new radar systems and discuss sampling biases of each meteor observation technique. We report our current efforts to validate and calibrate these radar systems with other VHF radars such as Jicamarca and SOUSY. We also present the general characteristics of continuous measurements of E-region and F-region coherent echoes using these modern radar systems and compare them with coherent radar events observed at other geographic mid-latitude radar stations.

  7. How To Be a Young Member of the Middle Class: Socialization in the Novels of Judy Blume.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litton, Joyce A.

    The widespread popularity of the young adult novels of Judy Blume makes them important factors in the socialization process. Almost all of the characters in her books are members of the middle or upper-middle class, and with the exception of some of the characters in 4 of her 15 novels, all are white. Thus, Blume is teaching youth how to be…

  8. How To Be a Young Member of the Middle Class: Socialization in the Novels of Judy Blume.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litton, Joyce A.

    The widespread popularity of the young adult novels of Judy Blume makes them important factors in the socialization process. Almost all of the characters in her books are members of the middle or upper-middle class, and with the exception of some of the characters in 4 of her 15 novels, all are white. Thus, Blume is teaching youth how to be…

  9. Judi Dench's age-inappropriateness and the role of M: challenging normative temporality.

    PubMed

    Krainitzki, Eva

    2014-04-01

    This article approaches Judi Dench's role as M in the long-running James Bond series from a gender and ageing studies' perspective and explores this character's subversion of normative concepts of gender and temporality. Based on the assumption that cultural narratives shape our understanding of ageing, it examines how M disrupts prescribed age- and gender roles, presenting an alternative within films which otherwise perpetuate normative notions of a sexualised, youthful femininity. It focusses on Dench's return as M in Casino Royale (2006), as an instance of anachronism (Russo, 1999), subverting viewers' expectation of linear timelines and examines M's challenge of normative age-appropriateness in Skyfall (2012). Despite M's portrayal as a more vulnerable female character in the latter, this article presents her character as an alternative to traditional portrayals of older women on screen.

  10. Simulation of variables controlling carbonate geometry and facies: Judy Creek Reef, west Canada - an example

    SciTech Connect

    Scaturo, D.M.; Kendall, C.G.S.C.; Wendte, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    Two of them (D.M.S. and C.G.St.C.K.) have been simulating parameters which control evolution of carbonate facies and their geometry. They tested their simulation with a three-dimensional, sequence-facies model of Judy Creek reef complex provided by the third author (J.C.W.). This complex consists of repeated shoaling-upward sequences. Facies of all but the final cycle consist of a marginal reef and interior lagoon with smaller order, subtidal to tidal-flat cycles. The commonly sharp bases of major cycles mark abrupt shifts in facies belts and, with the exception of the final cycle, lack evidence of widespread subaerial exposure, arguing that reef development was strongly governed by episodic increases in rate of relative sea level rise. Five major cycles of reef growth occur. The first has a marginal reef facies that prograded and then aggraded. In cycles two through four, the disposition of the reef margin facies vary from upbuilding to backstepping to stacked prograding cycles, depending on position in the reef complex. The fourth cycle was terminated by a lowering of relative sea level and subaerial exposure of the shallow-water reef. The fifth and last phase of growth occurred as sea level rose and formed up to 30 m of backstepping, ramp-bounded shoal sequences. Their simulation of the Judy Creek complex modeled sediment geometry as a function of eustasy, tectonic subsidence, and carbonate production (as controlled by water depth and reef position). Iterative testing of input variables reproduced the reef history.

  11. Death Threats and a Sit-In Divide Penn State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Describes how death threats against black students at Penn State prompted an extended sit-in and a debate over whether the university was doing enough to protect black students and promote diversity. (EV)

  12. The Penn State ``Cyber Wind Facility''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, James; Vijayakumar, Ganesh; Lavely, Adam; Nandi, Tarak; Jayaraman, Balaji; Jha, Pankaj; Dunbar, Alex; Motta-Mena, Javier; Haupt, Sue; Craven, Brent; Campbell, Robert; Schmitz, Sven; Paterson, Eric

    2012-11-01

    We describe development and results from a first generation Penn State ``Cyber Wind Facility'' (CWF). The aim of the CWF program is to develop and validate a computational ``facility'' that, in the most powerful HPC environments, will be basis for the design and implementation of cyber ``experiments'' at a level of complexity, fidelity and resolution to be treated similarly to field experiments on wind turbines operating in true atmospheric environments. We see cyber experiments as complimentary to field experiments in the sense that, whereas field data can record over ranges of events not representable in the cyber environment, with sufficient resolution, numerical accuracy, and HPC power, it is theoretically possible to collect cyber data from more true, albeit canonical, atmospheric environments can produce data from extraordinary numbers of sensors impossible to obtain in the field. I will describe our first generation CWF, from which we have quantified and analyzed useful details of the interactions between atmospheric turbulence and wind turbine loadings for an infinitely stiff commercial-scale turbine rotor in a canonical convective daytime atmospheric boundary layer over horizontally homogeneous rough flat terrain. Supported by the DOE Offshore Initiative and the National Science Foundation.

  13. A comparison between Kaplan-Meier and weighted Kaplan-Meier methods of five-year survival estimation of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zare, Ali; Mahmoodi, Mahmood; Mohammad, Kazem; Zeraati, Hojjat; Hosseini, Mostafa; Holakouie Naieni, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    The 5-year survival rate is a good prognostic indicator for patients with Gastric cancer that is usually estimated based on Kaplan-Meier. In situations where censored observations are too many, this method produces biased estimations. This study aimed to compare estimations of Kaplan-Meier and Weighted Kaplan-Meier as an alternative method to deal with the problem of heavy-censoring. Data from 330 patients with Gastric cancer who had undergone surgery at Iran Cancer Institute from 1995- 1999 were analyzed. The Survival Time of these patients was determined after surgery, and the 5-year survival rate for these patients was evaluated based on Kaplan-Meier and Weighted Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 239 (72.4%) patients passed away by the end of the study and 91(27.6%) patients were censored. The mean and median of survival time for these patients were 24.86±23.73 and 16.33 months, respectively. The one-year, two-year, three-year, four-year, and five-year survival rates of these patients with standard error estimation based on Kaplan-Meier were 0.66 (0.0264), 0.42 (0.0284), 0.31 (0.0274), 0.26 (0.0264) and 0.21 (0.0256) months, respectively. The estimations of Weighted Kaplan-Meier for these patients were 0.62 (0.0251), 0.35 (0.0237), 0.24 (0.0211), 0.17 (0.0172), and 0.10 (0.0125) months, consecutively. In cases where censoring assumption is not made, and the study has many censored observations, estimations obtained from the Kaplan-Meier are biased and are estimated higher than its real amount. But Weighted Kaplan-Meier decreases bias of survival probabilities by providing appropriate weights and presents more accurate understanding.

  14. 75 FR 54215 - East Penn Railroad, LLC-Abandonment Exemption-in Montgomery County, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... (Sub-No. 1X)] East Penn Railroad, LLC--Abandonment Exemption--in Montgomery County, PA East Penn... Bridgeport, and milepost 2.14 at Henderson Road in Upper Merion Township, in Montgomery County, Pa. The...

  15. 75 FR 45108 - UGI Central Penn Gas, Inc.; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission UGI Central Penn Gas, Inc.; Notice of Compliance Filing July 23, 2010. Take notice that on July 14, 2010, UGI Central Penn Gas, Inc. (Central Penn) filed its Statement Operating...

  16. Capitalizing on Children's Curiosity: The William Penn Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Andrew Lerner

    1983-01-01

    Fourth-grade students, wishing to expand upon what they learned about William Penn in their textbooks, sent in questions to the director of social studies in the Reading (Pennsylvania) schools. The director referred the students to sources (some primary) that would answer their questions. (KC)

  17. Science Documentaries at Your Library: Two Penn State Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimland, Emily; Butkovich, Nancy J.; Musser, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Two science branch libraries at Penn State's University Park campus hosted film series centered on scientific documentary films. Although the reasons for starting the series differ, both have been successful in meeting their goals. Patron responses have been favorable, and the series have focused attention on the collections and services offered…

  18. Acorn size effects seedling size at the Penn Nursery

    Treesearch

    Robert P. Karrfalt

    2005-01-01

    The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Penn Nursery, located in Spring Mills, PA, was 1 of 4 nurseries participating in a study to determine the effect of acorn sizing on production of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) and white oak (Q. alba L.). It is hypothesized that larger acorns would produce...

  19. Economic Development in Challenging Times: The Penn State Outreach Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smutz, Wayne; Weidemann, Craig D.

    2008-01-01

    From its inception, Penn State has played a role in Pennsylvania's economy. As a land-grant university, it has functioned as a change agent, transferring research and knowledge to increase farm yields, encouraging business and "the mechanic arts," and transmitting technology to the general population. While the university still does…

  20. 78 FR 53184 - Land Release for Penn Yan Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Land Release for Penn Yan Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... consists of 0.069 +/- acres of land and it is currently vacant. The requested release is for the purpose of... boat storage and maintenance facility to be constructed by Land and Sea Properties on airports lands...

  1. 77 FR 12905 - Land Release for Penn Yan Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Land Release for Penn Yan Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... consists of 10.00 +/- acres of land and it is currently vacant. The requested release is for the purpose of... and maintenance facility by Land and Sea Properties. Documents reflecting the Sponsor's request are...

  2. Penn Inventory for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Psychometric Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammarberg, Melvyn

    1992-01-01

    A three-phase study was conducted to develop and validate the Penn Inventory for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), a 26-item self-report measure. Results with 83 and 98 combat veterans and with 76 general population patients and disaster survivors support usefulness of the measure. (SLD)

  3. PENN neurodegenerative disease research - in the spirit of Benjamin Franklin.

    PubMed

    Trojanowski, John Q

    2008-01-01

    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) was entrepreneur, statesman, supporter of the public good as well as inventor, and his most significant invention was the University of Pennsylvania (PENN). Franklin outlined his plans for a college providing practical and classical instruction to prepare youth for real-world pursuits in his 'Proposals Relating to the Education of Youth in Pensilvania' (1749), and Franklin's spirit of learning to serve society guides PENN to the present day. This is evidenced by the series of articles in this special issue of Neurosignals, describing research conducted by seasoned and newly recruited PENN faculty, addressing consequences of the longevity revolution which defines our epoch at the dawn of this millennium. While aging affects all organ systems, the nervous system is most critical to successful aging. Thus, the articles in this special issue of Neurosignals focus on research at PENN that is designed to prevent or ameliorate aging-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This research could enhance our chances of aging successfully in the continuing longevity revolution, and the essay here provides context and background on this research.

  4. An overview of the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center is presented. The following subject areas are covered: research objectives and long term perspective of the Center; current status and operational philosophy; and brief description of Center projects (combustion, fluid mechanics and heat transfer, materials compatibility, turbomachinery, and advanced propulsion concepts).

  5. Competing risk bias was common in Kaplan-Meier risk estimates published in prominent medical journals.

    PubMed

    van Walraven, Carl; McAlister, Finlay A

    2016-01-01

    Risk estimates from Kaplan-Meier curves are well known to medical researchers, reviewers, and editors. In this study, we determined the proportion of Kaplan-Meier analyses published in prominent medical journals that are potentially biased because of competing events ("competing risk bias"). We randomly selected 100 studies that had at least one Kaplan-Meier analysis and were recently published in prominent medical journals. Susceptibility to competing risk bias was determined by examining the outcome and potential competing events. In susceptible studies, bias was quantified using a previously validated prediction model when the number of outcomes and competing events were given. Forty-six studies (46%) contained Kaplan-Meier analyses susceptible to competing risk bias. Sixteen studies (34.8%) susceptible to competing risk cited the number of outcomes and competing events; in six of these studies (6/16, 37.5%), the outcome risk from the Kaplan-Meier estimate (relative to the true risk) was biased upward by 10% or more. Almost half of Kaplan-Meier analyses published in medical journals are susceptible to competing risk bias and may overestimate event risk. This bias was found to be quantitatively important in a third of such studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Building a Large Annotated Corpus of English: The Penn Treebank

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-30

    Brill 1991]) or the skeletally parsed corpus ([Weischedel et al 1991], [Pereira and Schabes 1992]). The POS-tagged corpus has also been used to train a...Niv 1991] Niv, Michael, 1991. Syntactic disambiguation. In The Penn Review of Linguistics 14, pages 120-126. [Pereira and Schabes 1992] Pereira...Fernando and Schabes , Yves. 1992. Inside-outside reestimation from partially bracketed corpora. In Proceedings of the 30th Annual Meeting of the

  7. Literacy, the American Revolution, and "The Three R's of Our Fight for Freedom": An Interview with Judy McAllister and Erica Lussos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Bridget, Ed.; Strangman, Nicole, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an interview with fourth grade teachers Judy McAllister and Erica Lussos. Discusses the teachers' thoughts on literacy and technology. Explores their ideas on integrating technology in the classroom in innovative ways that motivate and challenge young learners. (PM)

  8. Status Report on the Penn State RBCC Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, J.; Lehman, M.; Pal, S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Santoro, R.; Turner, Jim E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The status of the RBCC ejector mode research program at Penn State is reviewed. Recent hardware modifications and measurement system improvements are discussed, including the motivation for these changes. Results from a series of tests with a single thruster configuration at a chamber pressure of 200 psia and with an area ratio 3.3 nozzle are presented. These results indicate that the primary (rocket exhaust) and secondary (entrained air) flow streams mix much more rapidly than a previous test series with an area ratio of 6.0 nozzle. Finally, the plans for a test series with a twin thruster configuration are discussed.

  9. Measurement of Trigeminal Neuralgia Pain: Penn Facial Pain Scale.

    PubMed

    Lee, John Y K

    2016-07-01

    Pain is a subjective experience that cannot be directly measured. Therefore, patient-reported outcome is one of the currently accepted methods to capture pain intensity and its impact on activities of daily living. This article focuses on five patient-reported outcomes that have been used to measure trigeminal neuralgia pain-Visual Analog Scale, numeric rating scale, Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity Score, McGill Pain Questionnaire, and Penn Facial Pain Scale. Each scale is evaluated for its practicality, applicability, comprehensiveness, reliability, validity, and sensitivity to measuring trigeminal neuralgia pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Competing events influence estimated survival probability: when is Kaplan-Meier analysis appropriate?

    PubMed

    Biau, David Jean; Latouche, Aurélien; Porcher, Raphaël

    2007-09-01

    The Kaplan-Meier estimator is the current method for estimating the probability of an event to occur with time in orthopaedics. However, the Kaplan-Meier estimator was designed to estimate the probability of an event that eventually will occur for all patients, ie, death, and this does not hold for other outcomes. For example, not all patients will experience hip arthroplasty loosening because some may die first, and some may have their implant removed to treat infection or recurrent hip dislocation. Such events that preclude the observation of the event of interest are called competing events. We suggest the Kaplan-Meier estimator is inappropriate in the presence of competing events and show that it overestimates the probability of the event of interest to occur with time. The cumulative incidence estimator is an alternative approach to Kaplan-Meier in situations where competing risks are likely. Three common situations include revision for implant loosening in the long-term followup of arthroplasties or implant failure in the context of limb-salvage surgery or femoral neck fracture.

  11. On Schools Where Students Want to Be: A Conversation with Deborah Meier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Marge

    1995-01-01

    Deborah Meier, coprincipal of Central Park East Secondary School in New York City, never uses "alternative" to describe her school, because that term implies that traditional schooling is acceptable. Creating smaller schools, granting parental choice, hiring intellectually curious teachers, and discussing what it means to be educated are…

  12. The Evolution of the Penn State University Astronomy Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, C.; Charlton, J. C.

    2008-06-01

    The Penn State Dept. of Astronomy & Astrophysics has a long tradition of outreach. Faculty, students, and staff all participate as volunteers to create and deliver a variety of outreach programming to diverse audiences, including for example K-12 students, K-12 teachers, and senior citizens, in addition to open events that invite all members of the general public to attend. In the past four years, the University and the Department have provided institutional support for science outreach efforts. Many of our programs also receive financial support through NASA Education and Public outreach awards and through NSF awards to PSU Astronomy faculty. We actively collaborate with the NASA Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium, the Penn State Center for Science and the Schools, four local school districts, and our colleagues from other science disciplines at the University. With this set of partners we are able to continue to innovate and offer new outreach programming annually. In this poster, we present an overview of the variety of outreach programs offered recently and those in the development stages. We describe how each program fits into the Department and University structure. In this way we provide a case study of a large, dynamic, university-based astronomy outreach venture.

  13. 77 FR 35850 - Safety Zone; F/V Deep Sea, Penn Cove, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; F/V Deep Sea, Penn Cove, WA AGENCY: Coast... the Fishing Vessel (F/V) Deep Sea, located in Penn Cove, WA. This action is necessary to ensure the... materials associated with the sunken F/V Deep Sea. B. Basis and Purpose On the evening of May 13, 2012,...

  14. Recycling at Penn State's Beaver Stadium. "Recycle on the Go" Success Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2009

    2009-01-01

    With a 13-year-old recycling program, The Pennsylvania State University's (Penn State) Beaver Stadium in the past diverted nearly 30 tons of recyclables per year from local landfills. A new initiative to promote recycling in the stadium's tailgating area has helped Penn State more than triple its old recycling record, collecting 112 tons in 2008.…

  15. Researching Distance Education: Penn State's Online Adult Education MEd Degree on the World Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askov, Eunice; Simpson, Mary

    The possibility of creating an appropriate online learning environment for distance adult students was examined in a study of 22 Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) students' attitudes regarding the online version of a course offered as part of Penn State's masters of education program. The students completed surveys before, during, and…

  16. Kaplan-Meier Survival Analysis Overestimates the Risk of Revision Arthroplasty: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lacny, Sarah; Wilson, Todd; Clement, Fiona; Roberts, Derek J; Faris, Peter D; Ghali, William A; Marshall, Deborah A

    2015-11-01

    Although Kaplan-Meier survival analysis is commonly used to estimate the cumulative incidence of revision after joint arthroplasty, it theoretically overestimates the risk of revision in the presence of competing risks (such as death). Because the magnitude of overestimation is not well documented, the potential associated impact on clinical and policy decision-making remains unknown. We performed a meta-analysis to answer the following questions: (1) To what extent does the Kaplan-Meier method overestimate the cumulative incidence of revision after joint replacement compared with alternative competing-risks methods? (2) Is the extent of overestimation influenced by followup time or rate of competing risks? We searched Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS Previews, and Web of Science (1946, 1980, 1980, and 1899, respectively, to October 26, 2013) and included article bibliographies for studies comparing estimated cumulative incidence of revision after hip or knee arthroplasty obtained using both Kaplan-Meier and competing-risks methods. We excluded conference abstracts, unpublished studies, or studies using simulated data sets. Two reviewers independently extracted data and evaluated the quality of reporting of the included studies. Among 1160 abstracts identified, six studies were included in our meta-analysis. The principal reason for the steep attrition (1160 to six) was that the initial search was for studies in any clinical area that compared the cumulative incidence estimated using the Kaplan-Meier versus competing-risks methods for any event (not just the cumulative incidence of hip or knee revision); we did this to minimize the likelihood of missing any relevant studies. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) comparing the cumulative incidence estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method with the competing-risks method for each study and used DerSimonian and Laird random effects models to pool these RRs. Heterogeneity was explored using stratified meta-analyses and

  17. 77 FR 44310 - Penn-Ohio Transportation, LLC-Acquisition Exemption-Eastern States Railroad, LLC and Columbiana...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... Surface Transportation Board Penn-Ohio Transportation, LLC--Acquisition Exemption--Eastern States Railroad, LLC and Columbiana County Port Authority Penn-Ohio Transportation, LLC (Penn-Ohio), a noncarrier, has... Youngstown-Darlington Line, extending between milepost 0.0 in Youngstown, Ohio, and milepost 35.7...

  18. Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutations disrupt an Orc1 CDK inhibitory domain and cause centrosome reduplication.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Manzar; Stillman, Bruce

    2012-08-15

    Like DNA replication, centrosomes are licensed to duplicate once per cell division cycle to ensure genetic stability. In addition to regulating DNA replication, the Orc1 subunit of the human origin recognition complex controls centriole and centrosome copy number. Here we report that Orc1 harbors a PACT centrosome-targeting domain and a separate domain that differentially inhibits the protein kinase activities of Cyclin E-CDK2 and Cyclin A-CDK2. A cyclin-binding motif (Cy motif) is required for Orc1 to bind Cyclin A and inhibit Cyclin A-CDK2 kinase activity but has no effect on Cyclin E-CDK2 kinase activity. In contrast, Orc1 inhibition of Cyclin E-CDK2 kinase activity occurs by a different mechanism that is affected by Orc1 mutations identified in Meier-Gorlin syndrome patients. The cyclin/CDK2 kinase inhibitory domain of Orc1, when tethered to the PACT domain, localizes to centrosomes and blocks centrosome reduplication. Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutations that disrupt Cyclin E-CDK2 kinase inhibition also allow centrosome reduplication. Thus, Orc1 contains distinct domains that control centrosome copy number and DNA replication. We suggest that the Orc1 mutations present in some Meier-Gorlin syndrome patients contribute to the pronounced microcephaly and dwarfism observed in these individuals by altering centrosome duplication in addition to DNA replication defects.

  19. Penn/VA center for studies of addiction.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Charles P; McLellan, A Thomas; Childress, Anna Rose; Woody, George E

    2009-01-01

    The Penn/VA Center was founded in 1971 because of great concern over the number of Vietnam veterans returning home addicted to heroin. At that time little was known about the science of addiction, so our program from the very beginning was designed to gather data about the nature of addiction and measure the effects of available treatments. In other words, the goals were always a combination of treatment and research. This combination has continued to the present day. A human laboratory for the study of addiction phenomena such as conditioned responses was also founded in 1971. The key clinician investigators in this group have remained in the Center since the 1970s with most of the research staff continuing to work together. Important new investigators have been added over the years. Treatment was empirically based with randomized, controlled clinical trials as the gold standard for determining evidence-based treatment. The patients coming to treatment do not distinguish between abuse of alcohol and other drugs, so the treatment and research programs have always focused on all drugs including ethyl alcohol and the combination of ethyl alcohol with other drugs such as cocaine and opioids. Most of the patients coming for treatment also suffered from additional psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Thus, the addiction treatment program in 1980 absorbed the rest of the VA Psychiatry Service into the Substance Abuse Program forming a new Behavioral Health Service with responsibility for over 9000 patients. The integration of substance abuse treatment with overall mental health care was the most efficient way to handle patients with complicated combinations of disorders. While this continues to be the best way to treat patients, it has proven difficult in practice. The main reason for this difficulty is that most mental health therapists whether they are psychiatrists, psychologists or social workers feel very inadequate

  20. BRIE: The Penn State Biogeochemical Research Initiative for Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Brantley, S. L.; Brenchley, J.

    2003-12-01

    Few scientists are prepared to address the interdisciplinary challenges of biogeochemical research due to disciplinary differences in vocabulary, technique, and scientific paradigm. Thus scientists and engineers trained in traditional disciplines bring a restricted view to the study of environmental systems, which can limit their ability to exploit new techniques and opportunities for scientific advancement. Although the literature is effusive with enthusiasm for interdisciplinary approaches to biogeochemistry, there remains the basic difficulty of cross-training geological and biological scientists. The NSF-IGERT funded Biogeochemical Research Initiative for Education (BRIE) program at Penn State is specifically designed to break down both disciplinary and institutional barriers and it has fostered cross-disciplinary collaboration and training since 1999. Students and faculty are drawn from environmental engineering, geochemistry, soil science, chemistry and microbiology, and the program is regarded on the Penn State campus as a successful example of how interdisciplinary science can best be promoted. There are currently 23 Ph.D. students funded by the program, with an additional 7 affiliated students. At present, a total of 6 students have completed doctoral degrees, and they have done so within normal timeframes. The program is "discipline-plus," whereby students enroll in traditional disciplinary degree programs, and undertake broad training via 12 credits of graduate coursework in other departments. Students are co-advised by faculty from different disciplines, and engage in interdisciplinary research facilitated by research "credit cards." Funding is available for international research experiences, travel to meetings, and other opportunities for professional development. Students help institutionalize interdisciplinary training by designing and conducting a teaching module that shares their expertise with a class in another department or discipline

  1. 76 FR 29744 - Monongahela Power Company, West Penn Power Company, The Potomac Edison Company, PJM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... Edison Company, PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on May 13, 2011, Monongahela Power Company, West Penn Power Company, The Potomac Edison Company (collectively, the...

  2. Pennsylvania: Penn State University Integrated Pest Management Project (A Former EPA CARE Project)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Penn State University (PSU) is the recipient of a Level II CARE cooperative agreement targeting environmental risks in Philadelphia communities. PSU is involved in developing IPM management practices recommendations and policies.

  3. Optimization Evaluation, North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site, Lansdale, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site (NPA6 Site) addresses multiple sources of contamination and a broad contaminant plume that underlies a large portion of Lansdale, Pennsylvania. Tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and associated....

  4. Developing a blueprint for cultural competence education at Penn.

    PubMed

    Watts, Rosalyn J; Cuellar, Norma G; O'Sullivan, Ann L

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the structure, process, and outcomes of developing a blueprint for integration of cultural competence education into the curriculum at the University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing. The overarching framework of Kotter (1995) on leading change and organizational transformation was used as a guide for evaluation of faculty efforts. Within the setting of a research-intensive university, the process consisted of implementing a series of action steps which included appointment of a Director of Diversity Affairs, selection of a Master Teachers Taskforce on Cultural Diversity as catalysts for change; conduction of intensive faculty development programs, dissemination of information about cultural competence education, and use of innovative teaching approaches and student participation in curriculum activities. In addition, a Blueprint for Integration of Cultural Competence in the Curriculum (BICCC) was developed and used as the instrument for faculty surveys for 2 consecutive academic years. Faculty survey findings showed a substantial increase in the number of courses integrating cultural competence content in the programs of study. Successful outcomes of the Penn initiative were due to administrative and faculty support, utilization of a Director of Diversity Affairs, innovative work of the Master Teachers Taskforce on Cultural Diversity, faculty development initiatives, and development of the BICCC as a guiding framework for identifying areas of needed curricular change.

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Tyler M.; Reise, Steven P.; Gur, Raquel E.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Ruben C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (CNB) was designed to measure performance accuracy and speed on specific neurobehavioral domains using tests that were previously validated with functional neuroimaging. A crucial step in determining whether the CNB has attained its objective is to assess its factor structure. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the neuropsychological theory used to construct the CNB by confirming the factor structure of the tests composing it. Method In a large community sample (N = 9138; age range 8-21), we performed a correlated-traits confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and multiple exploratory factor analyses (EFA’s) on the twelve CNB measures of Efficiency (which combine Accuracy and Speed). To further explore the measures contributing to Efficiency, we then performed EFA’s of the Accuracy and Speed measures separately. Finally, we performed a confirmatory bifactor analysis of the Efficiency scores. All analyses were performed with Mplus using maximum likelihood estimation. Results Results strongly support the a priori theory used to construct the CNB, showing that tests designed to measure executive, episodic memory, complex cognition and social cognition aggregate their loadings within these domains. When Accuracy and Speed were analyzed separately, Accuracy produced three reliable factors: executive and complex cognition, episodic memory and social cognition, while speed produced two factors: tests that require fast responses and those where each item requires deliberation. The interpretability and statistical “Fit” of almost all models described above was acceptable (usually excellent). Conclusions Based on the well powered analysis from these large scale data, the CNB offers an effective means for measuring the integrity of intended neurocognitive domains in about one hour of testing and is thus suitable for large-scale clinical and genomic studies. PMID:25180981

  6. Innovating in health delivery: The Penn medicine innovation tournament.

    PubMed

    Terwiesch, Christian; Mehta, Shivan J; Volpp, Kevin G

    2013-06-01

    Innovation tournaments can drive engagement and value generation by shifting problem-solving towards the end user. In health care, where the frontline workers have the most intimate understanding of patients' experience and the delivery process, encouraging them to generate and develop new approaches is critical to improving health care delivery. In many health care organizations, senior managers and clinicians retain control of innovation. Frontline workers need to be engaged in the innovation process. Penn Medicine launched a system-wide innovation tournament with the goal of improving the patient experience. We set a quantitative goal of receiving 500 ideas and getting at least 1000 employees to participate in the tournament. A secondary goal was to involve various groups of the care process (doctors, nurses, clerical staff, transporters). The tournament was broken up into three phases. During Phase 1, employees were encouraged to submit ideas. Submissions were judged by an expert panel and crowd sourcing based on their potential to improve patient experience and ability to be implemented within 6 months. During Phase 2, the best 200 ideas were pitched during a series of 5 workshops and ten finalists were selected. During Phase 3, the best 10 ideas were presented to and judged by an audience of about 200 interested employees and a judging panel of 15 administrators. Two winners were selected. A total of 1739 ideas were submitted and over 5000 employees participated in the innovation tournament. Patient convenience/amenities (21%) was the top category of submission, with other popular areas including technology optimization (11%), assistance with navigation within UPHS (10%), and improving patient/family centered care (9%) and care delivery models/transitions (9%). A combination of winning and submitted ideas were implemented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Perceptual elements in Penn & Teller's "Cups and Balls" magic trick.

    PubMed

    Rieiro, Hector; Martinez-Conde, Susana; Macknik, Stephen L

    2013-01-01

    Magic illusions provide the perceptual and cognitive scientist with a toolbox of experimental manipulations and testable hypotheses about the building blocks of conscious experience. Here we studied several sleight-of-hand manipulations in the performance of the classic "Cups and Balls" magic trick (where balls appear and disappear inside upside-down opaque cups). We examined a version inspired by the entertainment duo Penn & Teller, conducted with three opaque and subsequently with three transparent cups. Magician Teller used his right hand to load (i.e. introduce surreptitiously) a small ball inside each of two upside-down cups, one at a time, while using his left hand to remove a different ball from the upside-down bottom of the cup. The sleight at the third cup involved one of six manipulations: (a) standard maneuver, (b) standard maneuver without a third ball, (c) ball placed on the table, (d) ball lifted, (e) ball dropped to the floor, and (f) ball stuck to the cup. Seven subjects watched the videos of the performances while reporting, via button press, whenever balls were removed from the cups/table (button "1") or placed inside the cups/on the table (button "2"). Subjects' perception was more accurate with transparent than with opaque cups. Perceptual performance was worse for the conditions where the ball was placed on the table, or stuck to the cup, than for the standard maneuver. The condition in which the ball was lifted displaced the subjects' gaze position the most, whereas the condition in which there was no ball caused the smallest gaze displacement. Training improved the subjects' perceptual performance. Occlusion of the magician's face did not affect the subjects' perception, suggesting that gaze misdirection does not play a strong role in the Cups and Balls illusion. Our results have implications for how to optimize the performance of this classic magic trick, and for the types of hand and object motion that maximize magic misdirection.

  8. Competing risk bias in Kaplan-Meier risk estimates can be corrected.

    PubMed

    van Walraven, Carl; Hawken, Steven

    2016-02-01

    Kaplan-Meier (KM) analyses are frequently used to measure outcome risk over time. These analyses overestimate risk whenever competing events are present. Many published KM analyses are susceptible to such competing risk bias. This study derived and validated a model that predicted true outcome risk based on the biased KM risk. We simulated survival data sets having a broad range of 1-year true outcome and competing event risk. Unbiased true outcome risk estimates were calculated using the cumulative incidence function (CIF). Multiple linear regression was used to determine the independent association of CIF-based true outcome risk with the biased KM risk and the proportion of all outcomes that were competing events. The final model found that both the biased KM-based risk and the proportion of all outcomes that were competing events were strongly associated with CIF-based risk. In validation populations that used a variety of distinct survival hazard functions, the model accurately predicted the CIF (R(2) = 1). True outcome risk can be accurately predicted from KM estimates susceptible to competing risk bias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutation impairs the ORC1-nucleosome association.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Sankaran, Saumya; Gozani, Or; Song, Jikui

    2015-05-15

    Recent studies have identified several genetic mutations within the BAH domain of human Origin Recognition Complex subunit 1 (hORC1BAH), including the R105Q mutation, implicated in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome (MGS). However, the pathological role of the hORC1 R105Q mutation remains unclear. In this study, we have investigated the interactions of the hORC1BAH domain with histone H4K20me2, DNA, and the nucleosome core particle labeled with H4Kc20me2, a chemical analog of H4K20me2. Our study revealed a nucleosomal DNA binding site for hORC1BAH. The R105Q mutation reduces the hORC1BAH-DNA binding affinity, leading to impaired hORC1BAH-nucleosome interaction, which likely influences DNA replication initiation and MGS pathogenesis. This study provides an etiologic link between the hORC1 R105Q mutation and MGS.

  10. Further insight into the phenotype associated with a mutation in the ORC6 gene, causing Meier-Gorlin syndrome 3.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Stavit Allon; Khayat, Morad; Etty, Daniel-Spiegl; Elpeleg, Orly

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in genes encoding the origin recognition complex subunits cause Meier-Gorlin syndrome. The disease manifests a triad of short stature, small ears, and small and/or absent patellae with variable expressivity. We report on the identification of a homozygous deleterious mutation in the ORC6 gene in previously described fetuses at the severe end of the Meier-Gorlin spectrum. The phenotype included severe intrauterine growth retardation, dislocation of knees, gracile bones, clubfeet, and small mandible and chest. To date, the clinical presentation of ORC6-associated Meier-Gorlin syndrome has been mild compared to other the phenotype associated with other loci. The present report expands the clinical phenotype associated with ORC6 mutations to include severely abnormal embryological development suggesting a possible genotype-phenotype correlation.

  11. 75 FR 38127 - Visteon Systems, LLC North Penn Plant Electronics Products Group Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... Employment and Training Administration Visteon Systems, LLC North Penn Plant Electronics Products Group Including On-Site Leased Workers From Ryder Integrated Logistics and Including On-Site Workers From Span... Systems, LLC, North Penn Plant, Electronics Products Group, including on-site leased workers from...

  12. Educational Linguistics as a Field: A View from Penn's Program on the Occasion of Its 25th Anniversary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornberger, Nancy H.

    2001-01-01

    Educational linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania's (Penn) Graduate School of Education traces its beginnings to 1976 and the deanship of Dell Hymes. This paper takes up various aspects of the practice of educational linguistics at Penn, discussing them in relation to issues that have been raised in the literature about the definition,…

  13. 76 FR 42163 - East Penn Railroad, L.L.C.; Lease and Operation Exemption; Norfolk Southern Railway Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board East Penn Railroad, L.L.C.; Lease and Operation Exemption; Norfolk Southern.... East Penn Railroad, L.L.C. (ESPN), a Class III rail carrier, has filed a verified notice of...

  14. The Penn State Mini Medical School: A Prescription for Community Engagement in Health Care Issues and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorndyke, Luanne E.; Bixler, Bonnie J.; Carubia, Josephine M.

    2004-01-01

    The Penn State Mini Medical School is a high-impact community engagement program created and led by the Office of Continuing Education at the Penn State College of Medicine. The broad goals of the program are to respond to the general public's intense desire for health and medical information, to educate the community about biomedical science and…

  15. Kaplan-Meier analysis on seizure outcome after epilepsy surgery: do gender and race influence it?

    PubMed

    Burneo, Jorge G; Villanueva, Vicente; Knowlton, Robert C; Faught, R Edward; Kuzniecky, Ruben I

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate seizure outcome following epilepsy surgery for patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and evaluate is gender and race/ethnicity influence it. Data were obtained from the discharge database of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Epilepsy Center, between 1985 and 2001. The sample consisted of all patients with a primary diagnosis of medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy. Seizure recurrence was tabulated at 7 days, 2 months, 6 months, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 years following surgery. Logistic regression analysis was used to model the presence of seizure recurrence after anterior temporal lobectomy for all patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis was done to obtain estimates and 95% CIs of seizure freedom from baseline. Baseline variables--age at surgery, age at seizure onset, sex, side of resection, immediate postoperative seizures, and pathology results--were assessed as potential predictors of each outcome by comparing the survival curves within each variable with a log rank test. Three hundred sixty-eight patients underwent surgical treatment for TLE, mean age of 30.2 years. Thirty-five patients were African American, 43% were men. Immediate postoperative seizures were seen in 23 patients, while seizure recurrence occurred in 27.3% patients within a year after surgery, and in 33.6% within 6 years. Logistic regression results showed no differences between African Americans and whites, between males and females. The occurrence of immediate postoperative seizures was a strong predictor of late seizure recurrence only at 1 year after surgery. The occurrence of seizures in the immediate postoperative period is a strong predictor of later seizure recurrence. Sex and race/ethnicity do not appear to be predictors of long-term outcome following surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy.

  16. De Novo GMNN Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Primordial Dwarfism Associated with Meier-Gorlin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burrage, Lindsay C; Charng, Wu-Lin; Eldomery, Mohammad K; Willer, Jason R; Davis, Erica E; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zhu, Wenmiao; Leduc, Magalie S; Akdemir, Zeynep C; Azamian, Mahshid; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P; Schoots, Jeroen; de Munnik, Sonja A; Roepman, Ronald; Pearring, Jillian N; Jhangiani, Shalini; Katsanis, Nicholas; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Brunner, Han G; Beaudet, Arthur L; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Xia, Fan; Lalani, Seema R; Lupski, James R; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Yang, Yaping

    2015-12-03

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a genetically heterogeneous primordial dwarfism syndrome known to be caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in one of five genes encoding pre-replication complex proteins: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6. Mutations in these genes cause disruption of the origin of DNA replication initiation. To date, only an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern has been described in individuals with this disorder, with a molecular etiology established in about three-fourths of cases. Here, we report three subjects with MGS and de novo heterozygous mutations in the 5' end of GMNN, encoding the DNA replication inhibitor geminin. We identified two truncating mutations in exon 2 (the 1(st) coding exon), c.16A>T (p.Lys6(∗)) and c.35_38delTCAA (p.Ile12Lysfs(∗)4), and one missense mutation, c.50A>G (p.Lys17Arg), affecting the second-to-last nucleotide of exon 2 and possibly RNA splicing. Geminin is present during the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and is degraded during the metaphase-anaphase transition by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which recognizes the destruction box sequence near the 5' end of the geminin protein. All three GMNN mutations identified alter sites 5' to residue Met28 of the protein, which is located within the destruction box. We present data supporting a gain-of-function mechanism, in which the GMNN mutations result in proteins lacking the destruction box and hence increased protein stability and prolonged inhibition of replication leading to autosomal-dominant MGS. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. De Novo GMNN Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Primordial Dwarfism Associated with Meier-Gorlin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burrage, Lindsay C.; Charng, Wu-Lin; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Willer, Jason R.; Davis, Erica E.; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zhu, Wenmiao; Leduc, Magalie S.; Akdemir, Zeynep C.; Azamian, Mahshid; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P.; Schoots, Jeroen; de Munnik, Sonja A.; Roepman, Ronald; Pearring, Jillian N.; Jhangiani, Shalini; Katsanis, Nicholas; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Brunner, Han G.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Xia, Fan; Lalani, Seema R.; Lupski, James R.; Bongers, Ernie M.H.F.; Yang, Yaping

    2015-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a genetically heterogeneous primordial dwarfism syndrome known to be caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in one of five genes encoding pre-replication complex proteins: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6. Mutations in these genes cause disruption of the origin of DNA replication initiation. To date, only an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern has been described in individuals with this disorder, with a molecular etiology established in about three-fourths of cases. Here, we report three subjects with MGS and de novo heterozygous mutations in the 5′ end of GMNN, encoding the DNA replication inhibitor geminin. We identified two truncating mutations in exon 2 (the 1st coding exon), c.16A>T (p.Lys6∗) and c.35_38delTCAA (p.Ile12Lysfs∗4), and one missense mutation, c.50A>G (p.Lys17Arg), affecting the second-to-last nucleotide of exon 2 and possibly RNA splicing. Geminin is present during the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and is degraded during the metaphase-anaphase transition by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which recognizes the destruction box sequence near the 5′ end of the geminin protein. All three GMNN mutations identified alter sites 5′ to residue Met28 of the protein, which is located within the destruction box. We present data supporting a gain-of-function mechanism, in which the GMNN mutations result in proteins lacking the destruction box and hence increased protein stability and prolonged inhibition of replication leading to autosomal-dominant MGS. PMID:26637980

  18. MCM5: a new actor in the link between DNA replication and Meier-Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vetro, Annalisa; Savasta, Salvatore; Russo Raucci, Annalisa; Cerqua, Cristina; Sartori, Geppo; Limongelli, Ivan; Forlino, Antonella; Maruelli, Silvia; Perucca, Paola; Vergani, Debora; Mazzini, Giuliano; Mattevi, Andrea; Stivala, Lucia Anna; Salviati, Leonardo; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2017-02-15

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGORS) is a rare disorder characterized by primordial dwarfism, microtia, and patellar aplasia/hypoplasia. Recessive mutations in ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, CDC6, and CDC45, encoding members of the pre-replication (pre-RC) and pre-initiation (pre-IC) complexes, and heterozygous mutations in GMNN, a regulator of cell-cycle progression and DNA replication, have already been associated with this condition. We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in a patient with a clinical diagnosis of MGORS and identified biallelic variants in MCM5. This gene encodes a subunit of the replicative helicase complex, which represents a component of the pre-RC. Both variants, a missense substitution within a conserved domain critical for the helicase activity, and a single base deletion causing a frameshift and a premature stop codon, were predicted to be detrimental for the MCM5 function. Although variants of MCM5 have never been reported in specific human diseases, defect of this gene in zebrafish causes a phenotype of growth restriction overlapping the one associated with orc1 depletion. Complementation experiments in yeast showed that the plasmid carrying the missense variant was unable to rescue the lethal phenotype caused by mcm5 deletion. Moreover cell-cycle progression was delayed in patient's cells, as already shown for mutations in the ORC1 gene. Altogether our findings support the role of MCM5 as a novel gene involved in MGORS, further emphasizing that this condition is caused by impaired DNA replication.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 15 February 2017; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2017.5.

  19. William Penn's Peaceable Kingdom: A Unit of Study for Grades 5-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Jim; Ingersoll, Tom

    Using primary sources, this unit explores the founding of the 12th and most successful of the English colonies in North America, Pennsylvania. Established by the Quaker civil libertarian William Penn, Pennsylvania was intended to demonstrate that a society founded on mutual respect, tolerance, and individual responsibility could flourish. The…

  20. More Psychologists Discover the Wheel: A Reaction to Views by Penn et al. on Ethnic Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Janet E.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that little of what Michael L. Penn, Stanley O. Gaines, and Layli Phillips (1993) have to say in their article "On the Desirability of Own-Group Preference" about ethnic own-group preference is new and that it is distorted and naive interpretation of social history to carry on the tradition of blaming African Americans for the…

  1. 76 FR 55903 - UGI Central Penn Gas, Inc.; Notice of Rate Election

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... on August 31, 2011, UGI Central Penn Gas, Inc. (CPG) filed a Rate Election pursuant to section 284.123(b)(1) of the Commission's regulations. CPG proposes to utilize the applicable interruptible component of CPG's currently effective Extending Large Firm Delivery Service rate contained in Rate XD...

  2. A Meta-Analytic Review of the Penn Resiliency Program's Effect on Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunwasser, Steven M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Kim, Eric S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate whether the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP), a group cognitive-behavioral intervention, is effective in targeting depressive symptoms in youths. We identified 17 controlled evaluations of PRP (N = 2,498) in which depressive symptoms had been measured via an online search of PsycInfo, Medline, ERIC, and…

  3. Preventing Adolescents' Externalizing and Internalizing Symptoms: Effects of the Penn Resiliency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutuli, J. J.; Gillham, Jane E.; Chaplin, Tara M.; Reivich, Karen J.; Seligman, Martin E. P.; Gallop, Robert J.; Abenavoli, Rachel M.; Freres, Derek R.

    2013-01-01

    This study reports secondary outcome analyses from a past study of the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP), a cognitive-behavioral depression prevention program for middle-school aged children. Middle school students (N = 697) were randomly assigned to PRP, PEP (an alternate intervention), or control conditions. Gillham et al., (2007) reported analyses…

  4. More Psychologists Discover the Wheel: A Reaction to Views by Penn et al. on Ethnic Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Janet E.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that little of what Michael L. Penn, Stanley O. Gaines, and Layli Phillips (1993) have to say in their article "On the Desirability of Own-Group Preference" about ethnic own-group preference is new and that it is distorted and naive interpretation of social history to carry on the tradition of blaming African Americans for the…

  5. A Meta-Analytic Review of the Penn Resiliency Program's Effect on Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunwasser, Steven M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Kim, Eric S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate whether the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP), a group cognitive-behavioral intervention, is effective in targeting depressive symptoms in youths. We identified 17 controlled evaluations of PRP (N = 2,498) in which depressive symptoms had been measured via an online search of PsycInfo, Medline, ERIC, and…

  6. EVIDENCE FOR METAL ATTENUATION IN ACID MINE WATER BY SULFATE REDUCTION, PENN MINE, CALAVERAS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Penn Mine in Calaveras County, California, produced Cu from massive sulfide ores from 1861 to 1953. Mine wastes were removed to a landfill during the late 1990s, improving surface-water quality, but deep mine workings were not remediated and contain metalliferous water with p...

  7. William Penn's Peaceable Kingdom: A Unit of Study for Grades 5-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Jim; Ingersoll, Tom

    Using primary sources, this unit explores the founding of the 12th and most successful of the English colonies in North America, Pennsylvania. Established by the Quaker civil libertarian William Penn, Pennsylvania was intended to demonstrate that a society founded on mutual respect, tolerance, and individual responsibility could flourish. The…

  8. Evaluation of the Penn Macy Initiative To Advance Academic Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Lois K.; Swan, Beth Ann; Lang, Norma E.

    2003-01-01

    In the Penn Macy Initiative, 21 nursing schools participated in summer institutes and follow-up consultations to refine practice. Evaluation data from participants' daily and postinstitute feedback, institutional self-evaluations, and comparison of school accomplishments identified critical indicators of progress in academic practice. A key…

  9. Psychometric Properties of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children in a Large Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pestle, Sarah L.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Schiffman, Jason

    2008-01-01

    The Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children (PSWQ-C; Chorpita, Tracey, Brown, Collica, & Barlow, 1997) is a 14-item self-report measure of worry in children and adolescents. Although the PSWQ-C has demonstrated favorable psychometric properties in small clinical and large community samples, this study represents the first psychometric…

  10. The sharing of the Penn State Breazeale Reactor with other educational institutions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Penn State Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) integrates the Breazeale Reactor and its affiliated laboratories and facilities on the University Park Campus. Penn State has the only nuclear reactor in Pennsylvania dedicated to research and education. Its faculty have pioneered industrial and research applications of radiation and radioisotopes. In addition, the center and its affiliated faculty have access to the multidisciplinary resources and expertise available within Penn State, one of the nation`s leading research universities. The goals of the Penn State Radiation Science and Engineering Center are to: incorporate radiation science and engineering services and facilities into a cohesive infrastructure; provide state-of-the-art academic instruction and laboratory experiences; provide facilities and assistance for academic research; provide technical, engineering, and other support services to RSEC users; generate new techniques, applications, and services for researchers in diverse disciplines; and serve the needs of academia and industry through RSEC services, faculty affiliations, and facilities that are not readily available elsewhere.

  11. EVIDENCE FOR METAL ATTENUATION IN ACID MINE WATER BY SULFATE REDUCTION, PENN MINE, CALAVERAS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Penn Mine in Calaveras County, California, produced Cu from massive sulfide ores from 1861 to 1953. Mine wastes were removed to a landfill during the late 1990s, improving surface-water quality, but deep mine workings were not remediated and contain metalliferous water with p...

  12. Psychometric Properties of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children in a Large Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pestle, Sarah L.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Schiffman, Jason

    2008-01-01

    The Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children (PSWQ-C; Chorpita, Tracey, Brown, Collica, & Barlow, 1997) is a 14-item self-report measure of worry in children and adolescents. Although the PSWQ-C has demonstrated favorable psychometric properties in small clinical and large community samples, this study represents the first psychometric…

  13. Suspended-sediment yields and stream-channel processes on Judy's Branch watershed in the St. Louis Metro East region in Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Straub, Timothy D.; Johnson, Gary P.; Roseboom, Donald P.; Sierra, Carlos R.

    2006-01-01

    Judy's Branch watershed, a small basin (8.64 square miles) in the St. Louis Metro East region in Illinois, was selected as a pilot site to determine suspended-sediment yields and stream-channel processes in the bluffs and American Bottoms (expansive low-lying valley floor in the region). Suspended-sediment and stream-chan-nel data collected and analyzed for Judy's Branch watershed are presented in this report to establish a baseline of data for water-resource managers to evaluate future stream rehabilitation and manage-ment alternatives. The sediment yield analysis determines the amount of sediment being delivered from the watershed and two subwatersheds: an urban tributary and an undeveloped headwater (pri-marily agricultural). The analysis of the subwater-sheds is used to compare the effects of urbanization on sediment yield to the river. The stream-channel contribution to sediment yield was determined by evaluation of the stream-channel processes operat-ing on the streambed and banks of Judy's Branch watershed. Bank stability was related to hydrologic events, bank stratigraphy, and channel geometry through model development and simulation. The average suspended-sediment yield from two upland subwatersheds (drainage areas of 0.23 and 0.40 sq.mi. was 1,163 tons per square mile per year (tons/sq.mi.-year) between July 2000 and June 2004. The suspended-sediment yield at the Route 157 station was 2,523 tons/sq.mi.-year, near the outlet of Judy's Branch watershed (drainage area = 8.33 sq.mi.). This is approximately 1,360 tons/sq.mi.-year greater than the average at the upland stations for the same time period. This result is unexpected in that, generally, the suspended-sediment yield decreases as the watershed area increases because of sediment stored in the channel and flood plain. The difference indicates a possible increase in yield from a source, such as bank retreat, and supports the concept that land-use changes increase stream-flows that may in turn result in

  14. Total Ankle Replacement Survival Rates Based on Kaplan-Meier Survival Analysis of National Joint Registry Data.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Annette F P; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    National joint registry data provides unique information about primary total ankle replacement (TAR) survival. We sought to recreate survival curves among published national joint registry data sets using the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Overall, 5152 primary and 591 TAR revisions were included over a 2- to 13-year period with prosthesis survival for all national joint registries of 0.94 at 2-years, 0.87 at 5-years and 0.81 at 10-years. National joint registry datasets should strive for completion of data presentation including revision definitions, modes and time of failure, and patients lost to follow-up or death for complete accuracy of the Kaplan-Meier estimator.

  15. The Penn state lunar lion: A university mission to explore the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Michael V.; Spencer, David B.; Lego, Sara E.; Muncks, John P.

    2014-03-01

    The Penn State Lunar Lion Team plans to send a robotic explorer to the surface of the Moon and, by applying 30 years of technological advancements, win the Google Lunar X Prize. The Google Lunar X Prize aims to showcase the ability of the growing private space industry by having teams pursue the goal of becoming the first private entity to land a spacecraft on another body in the solar system. Through the Team's pursuit of this Prize, Penn State will establish itself as a leader in space exploration. The Lunar Lion Team will win this Prize through the collaboration of faculty and students from multiple disciplines, and the engineering and technical staff at the Penn State Applied Research Lab, as well as strategic collaborations with industry partners. The diversity of technical disciplines required to build a system that can land on the Moon can be found at Penn State. This multidisciplinary project will be not only a means for bringing together personnel from around the University, but also a way to attract faculty and students to these fields. The baseline concept for the Lunar Lion will strictly follow the requirements of the Grand Prize and the Grand Prize only, leading to the simplest possible system for the mission. By achieving the Grand Prize, Penn State will have accomplished what once took the large-scale effort of NASA's early robotic lunar landers or the USSR's space program. While the Bonus Prizes are noteworthy, ensuring their accomplishment will add development and operational risk to the flight system that could jeopardize the Team's ability to win the Grand Prize. The Team will build the simplest spacecraft, with the fewest number of systems and components. This philosophy will shorten the development timeline and result in a robust flight system that is of minimum cost. Wherever possible, the Team will use commercially available products to satisfy the needs of the system. The work of the Team will be efficient systems integration, careful

  16. The Penn State Nodal Expansion Transient Analysis Technique with thermal-hydraulic feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, J.; Bandini, B.; Baratta, A. )

    1989-11-01

    The nuclear engineering department of the Pennsylvania State University has under development a nodal neutron kinetics code. The PEnn State Nodal Expansion TRansient Analysis TEchnique (PENETRATE) performs two-group, three-dimensional nodal kinetics calculations using the nodal expansion method (NEM). The focus of this discussion is its performance in the solution of the Langenbuch-Maurer-Werner light water rector (LMW LWR) problem. This transient requires an accurate model of both control rod motion and coupled thermal-hydraulic feedback.

  17. Field study and stimulation approach - Conger (PENN) Field, Sterling County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.; Kamp, B.

    1981-01-01

    With existing demands for oil and gas at continued higher prices, there has become a greater interest in previously uneconomical reservoirs. The Cisco Canyon Formations in Sterling County, Texas, fall into this category. In particular, the Conger (PENN) area has enjoyed rapid and continuous development since 1977. Hydraulic fracturing has been required to stimulate for commercial production. Stimulation practices have been reviewed and a more efficient approach developed to provide maximum productivity at an optimum cost.

  18. Penn model and Wemple-DiDomenico single oscillator analysis of cobalt sulfide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, J. H.; Khunti, D. D.; Joshi, M. J.; Parikh, K. D.

    2017-05-01

    Cobalt sulfide (CoS) is a semiconductor material from group II-IV. It is widely used for different applications, viz., as supercapacitors, as counter electrode in dye sensitized solar cells, etc. The CoS nanoparticles were synthesized by using microwave assisted route. The synthesized nanoparticles possessed major phase of Co3S4 (face centered cubic) and minor phase of CoS (primitive hexagonal). The Penn model was used for Co3S4 phase and Plasma energy, Penn gap, Fermi energy and electronic polarizibilities were obtained. The electronic polarizibility was found to be 6.36 × 10-23cm3 using Penn model and the same was found to be 6.38 × 10-23cm3 and 4.48 × 10-23 cm3 using Clausius-Mossotti equation and energy band-gap equation, respectively. The optical study was carried out using UV-Visible spectroscopy. The absorption spectrum exhibited peaks in near IR regions. The energy band gap was found to be 1.69eV indicating the semiconducting nature of nanoparticles. The refractive index was found to be 2.88. The wavelength dependence refractive index was fitted to Wemple-DiDomenico single oscillator model and the parameters like single oscillator energy, dispersion energy, average oscillator wavelength and oscillator length strength were also determined. The results are discussed.

  19. Concentration and dispersal of a Pseudo-nitzschia bloom in Penn Cove, Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Trainer, V L; Adams, N G; Bill, B D; Anulacion, B F; Wekell, J C

    1998-01-01

    A bloom of the pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia, several species of which are associated with the production of the potent excitotoxin domoic acid, was observed in a Puget Sound, Washington embayment in July and August of 1997. Penn Cove, which receives nutrients from the nearby Skagit River and abundant sunshine during summer months due to its location in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains, is the home of a commercial mussel farm which supplies shellfish to many coastal areas of the USA. Levels of domoic acid in mussels increased to 3 ppm on 6 and 10 July, corresponding to the observation of a brown algal bloom in Penn Cove. Four species of Pseudo-nitzschia (P. pungens, P. multiseries, P. australis, and P. pseudodelicatissima) were present in our samples from the cove, corresponding to levels of domoic acid in seawater ranging from 0.1-0.8 mirog l(-1) as measured by a receptor binding assay. The highest Pseudo-nitzschia concentration during the time of our sampling was 13 million cells per liter on 28 July. The bloom of Pseudo-nitzschia occurred after a period of strong discharge from the Skagit River and rain accompanied by elevated south and southeasterly winds. Stratification of the cove, providing optimal bloom conditions, was facilitated by weak winds, sunshine, and a freshwater lens at the mouth of the cove. The position of the Pseudo-nitzschia bloom was influenced by buoyancy fronts caused by exchange of water within the cove with that of Saratoga Passage. The decay of this bloom in Penn Cove was accompanied by decreasing nitrate levels at all measured depths. These and future observations aid in the development of a model for prediction of toxic bloom events in the shallow embayments of Puget Sound.

  20. Development and Initial Testing of the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Laura; Siderowf, Andrew; Rubright, Jonathan D.; Rick, Jacqueline; Dahodwala, Nabila; Duda, John E.; Hurtig, Howard; Stern, Matthew; Xie, Sharon X.; Rennert, Lior; Karlawish, Jason; Shea, Judy A.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Weintraub, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to describe the development and psychometric analysis of the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire. The questionnaire is an item response theory-based tool for rating cognitive instrumental activities of daily living in PD. Methods Candidate items for the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire were developed through literature review and focus groups of patients and knowledgeable informants. Item selection and calibration of item-response theory parameters were performed using responses from a cohort of PD patients and knowledgeable informants (n = 388). In independent cohorts of PD patients and knowledgeable informants, assessments of test-retest reliability (n = 50), and construct validity (n = 68) of the questionnaire were subsequently performed. Construct validity was assessed by correlating questionnaire scores with measures of motor function, cognition, an existing activities of daily living measure, and directly observed daily function. Results Fifty items were retained in the final questionnaire item bank. Items were excluded owing to redundancy, difficult reading level, and when item-response theory parameters could not be calculated. Test-retest reliability was high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.97; P < 0.001). The questionnaire correlated strongly with cognition (r = 0.68; P < 0.001) and directly observed daily function (r = 0.87; P < 0.001), but not with motor impairment (r = 0.08; P = 0.53). The questionnaire score accurately discriminated between PD patients with and without dementia (receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.91; 95% confidence interval: 0.85–0.97). Conclusions The Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire shows strong evidence of reliability and validity. Item response theory-based psychometric analysis suggests that this questionnaire can discriminate across a range of daily functions. PMID:26249849

  1. Penn State Multi-Discipline Tribology Group and Energy Institute Studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Joseph

    2001-08-05

    This presentation is a summary of the current research activities on fuels and lubricants in the Multi-discipline Tribology group and the engine test group in the Combustion Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University. The progress areas discussed in this summary include those found in Table 1. Table 1. RESEARCH AREAS: Diesel Engine Emission Reduction; Oxygenated Fuels; Improved Friction Fuels; Vegetable Oil Lubricants; Extended Drain Lubricants; Effect of Chemical Structure on Friction and Wear. The research is of interest either directly or indirectly to the goal of this workshop, diesel engine emissions reduction. The current projects at Penn State in the areas listed above will be discussed.

  2. Viewgraph description of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center: Activity highlights and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented that describe the progress and status of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center. The Center was established in Jul. 1988 by a grant from NASA's University Space Engineering Research Centers Program. After two and one-half years of operation, some 16 faculty are participating, and the Center is supporting 39 graduate students plus 18 undergraduates. In reviewing the Center's status, long-term plans and goals are reviewed and then the present status of the Center and the highlights and accomplishments of the past year are summarized. An overview of plans for the upcoming year are presented.

  3. KMWin – A Convenient Tool for Graphical Presentation of Results from Kaplan-Meier Survival Time Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Arnd; Ziepert, Marita; Scholz, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Background Analysis of clinical studies often necessitates multiple graphical representations of the results. Many professional software packages are available for this purpose. Most packages are either only commercially available or hard to use especially if one aims to generate or customize a huge number of similar graphical outputs. We developed a new, freely available software tool called KMWin (Kaplan-Meier for Windows) facilitating Kaplan-Meier survival time analysis. KMWin is based on the statistical software environment R and provides an easy to use graphical interface. Survival time data can be supplied as SPSS (sav), SAS export (xpt) or text file (dat), which is also a common export format of other applications such as Excel. Figures can directly be exported in any graphical file format supported by R. Results On the basis of a working example, we demonstrate how to use KMWin and present its main functions. We show how to control the interface, customize the graphical output, and analyse survival time data. A number of comparisons are performed between KMWin and SPSS regarding graphical output, statistical output, data management and development. Although the general functionality of SPSS is larger, KMWin comprises a number of features useful for survival time analysis in clinical trials and other applications. These are for example number of cases and number of cases under risk within the figure or provision of a queue system for repetitive analyses of updated data sets. Moreover, major adjustments of graphical settings can be performed easily on a single window. Conclusions We conclude that our tool is well suited and convenient for repetitive analyses of survival time data. It can be used by non-statisticians and provides often used functions as well as functions which are not supplied by standard software packages. The software is routinely applied in several clinical study groups. PMID:22723912

  4. Results From Penn State's Interactive, On-line, Scifi Version Of Astro 001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, Christopher; Charlton, J. C.; Herrmann, K.; Narayanan, A.; Tr'Ehnl, N.

    2007-12-01

    We present results from a new, fully on-line astronomy course for undergraduate non-science majors at Penn State that was offered for the first time in Spring 2007 to 422 enrolled students. The entire course content is conveyed through an interactive story, capitalizing on the many multimedia astronomy resources publicly available on the Internet. The four units of the course (Basic Astronomy and the Nighttime Sky, Our Solar System, Stars and the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology) deliver the same content as a traditional Astro 001 course. Each unit follows the educational adventure of a different fictional Astro 001 student who has been "abducted" by aliens. The four units are united by a character, the Riddler, who poses riddles about various aspects of astronomy, and whose identity and purpose is revealed gradually as a reward for completion of various subtopics. The initial Spring offering of the course was entirely web-based except for traditional evening in-class exams. We were very successful: it was popular with the students, the exam grades were about 10% higher than usual, and enrollments in Fall 2007 (more than 700 students) and Spring 2008 (almost 200 pre-enrolled to date) are strong. Future plans are underway to broaden the audience to students attending other Penn State campuses and perhaps to adapt the course for presentation as an astronomy unit to middle or high school students. We gratefully acknowledge funding from STScI IDEAS grant HST-ED-90284-01-A

  5. Analytical analysis of the Pennes bioheat transfer equation with sinusoidal heat flux condition on skin surface.

    PubMed

    Shih, Tzu-Ching; Yuan, Ping; Lin, Win-Li; Kou, Hong-Sen

    2007-11-01

    This study focuses on the effect of the temperature response of a semi-infinite biological tissue due to a sinusoidal heat flux at the skin. The Pennes bioheat transfer equation such as rho(t)c(t)( partial differentialT/ partial differentialt)+W(b)c(b)(T-T(a))=k partial differential(2)T/ partial differentialx(2) with the oscillatory heat flux boundary condition such as q(0,t)=q(0)e(iomegat) was investigated. By using the Laplace transform, the analytical solution of the Pennes bioheat transfer equation with surface sinusoidal heating condition is found. This analytical expression is suitable for describing the transient temperature response of tissue for the whole time domain from the starting periodic oscillation to the final steady periodic oscillation. The results show that the temperature oscillation due to the sinusoidal heating on the skin surface is unstable in the initial period. Further, it is unavailable to predict the blood perfusion rate via the phase shifting between the surface heat flux and the surface temperature. Moreover, the lower frequency of sinusoidal heat flux on the skin surface induces a more sensitive phase shift response to the blood perfusion rate change, but extends the beginning time of sampling because of the avoidance of the unavailable first cyclic oscillation.

  6. School-Based Prevention of Depressive Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Study of the Effectiveness and Specificity of the Penn Resiliency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillham, Jane E.; Reivich, Karen J.; Freres, Derek R.; Chaplin, Tara M.; Shatte, Andrew J.; Samuels, Barbra; Elkon, Andrea G. L.; Litzinger, Samantha; Lascher, Marisa; Gallop, Robert; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the effectiveness and specificity of the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP; J. E. Gillham, L. H. Jaycox, K. J. Reivich, M. E. P. Seligman, & T. Silver, 1990), a cognitive-behavioral depression prevention program. Children (N = 697) from 3 middle schools were randomly assigned to PRP, Control (CON), or the Penn Enhancement …

  7. The simultaneous use of weighted logrank and weighted Kaplan-Meier statistics with clustered right-censored data.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yunchan; Su, Pei-Fang

    2010-01-15

    Clustered right-censored data often arise from tumorigenicity experiments and clinical trials. For testing the equality of two survival functions, Jung and Jeong extended weighted logrank (WLR) tests to two independent samples of clustered right-censored data, while the weighted Kaplan-Meier (WKM) test can be derived from the work of O'Gorman and Akritas. The weight functions in both classes of tests (WLR and WKM) can be selected to be more sensitive to detect a certain alternative; however, since the exact alternative is unknown, it is difficult to specify the selected weights in advance. Since WLR is rank-based, it is not sensitive to the magnitude of the difference in survival times. Although WKM is constructed to be more sensitive to the magnitude of the difference in survival times, it is not sensitive to late hazard differences. Therefore, in order to combine the advantages of these two classes of tests, this paper developed a class of versatile tests based on simultaneously using WLR and WKM for two independent samples of clustered right-censored data. The comparative results from a simulation study are presented and the implementation of the versatile tests to two real data sets is illustrated.

  8. Preventing Depression among Early Adolescents in the Primary Care Setting: A Randomized Controlled Study of the Penn Resiliency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillham, Jane E.; Hamilton, John; Freres, Derek R.; Patton, Ken; Gallop, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the Penn Resiliency Program's effectiveness in preventing depression when delivered by therapists in a primary care setting. Two-hundred and seventy-one 11- and 12-year-olds, with elevated depressive symptoms, were randomized to PRP or usual care. Over the 2-year follow-up, PRP improved explanatory style for positive events.…

  9. Preventing Depression among Early Adolescents in the Primary Care Setting: A Randomized Controlled Study of the Penn Resiliency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillham, Jane E.; Hamilton, John; Freres, Derek R.; Patton, Ken; Gallop, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the Penn Resiliency Program's effectiveness in preventing depression when delivered by therapists in a primary care setting. Two-hundred and seventy-one 11- and 12-year-olds, with elevated depressive symptoms, were randomized to PRP or usual care. Over the 2-year follow-up, PRP improved explanatory style for positive events.…

  10. Validation of the Penn Interactive Peer Play Scale with Preschool Children in Low-Income Families in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Chi-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Play is a primary context for fostering young children's positive peer interactions. Through play, children develop the social, emotional, cognitive and language skills that contribute to the ability to establish effective relationships with peers. The Penn Interactive Peer Play Scale (PIPPS) was first developed by Fantuzzo to assess the quality…

  11. Seed storage and testing at Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Penn Nursery and Wood Shop

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey J. Kozar

    2008-01-01

    Planting tree seeds at the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Penn Nursery, Spring Mills, Pennsylvania occurs in spring and fall. Seeds acquired for these plantings come from 3 sources. The first source is our own orchards, which were developed to provide “improved” seeds. Improved seeds are produced from scion material collected from trees...

  12. Psychometric properties of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for children in a large clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Pestle, Sarah L; Chorpita, Bruce F; Schiffman, Jason

    2008-04-01

    The Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children (PSWQ-C; Chorpita, Tracey, Brown, Collica, & Barlow, 1997) is a 14-item self-report measure of worry in children and adolescents. Although the PSWQ-C has demonstrated favorable psychometric properties in small clinical and large community samples, this study represents the first psychometric evaluation of the PSWQ-C in a large clinical sample (N = 491). Factor analysis indicated a two-factor structure, in contrast to all previously published findings on the measure. The PSWQ-C demonstrated favorable psychometric properties in this sample, including high internal consistency, high convergent validity with related constructs, and acceptable discriminative validity between diagnostic categories. The performance of the 3 reverse-scored items was closely examined, and results indicated retaining all 14 items.

  13. User's guide to the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, David O.

    1992-10-01

    An updated version of the Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU/NCAR) Mesoscale Modeling system (the MM4 system) is presented. The standard MM4 modeling package employs a Cressman multi-scan isobaric and surface analysis, with a hydrostatic predictive component using a leap frog integration of the flux form of the primitive equations on sigma coordinates. An experimental version has expanded the data ingest routines to allow hybrid isentropic-isobaric + surface analyses. Experimental versions of the model allow split-explicit time integration, several cumulus parameterizations coupled with an explicit moisture scheme, multiple levels of movable nests, relaxation of the hydrostatic assumptions, additional planetary boundary layer schemes, and microphysical packages. Due to the developmental nature of the modeling system, periodic upgrades in documentation are required to keep the manuals in accord with the programs. The document supersedes Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model User's Manual--Ver 8.

  14. Deficiency in Origin Licensing Proteins Impairs Cilia Formation: Implications for the Aetiology of Meier-Gorlin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alcantara, Diana; Outwin, Emily; Brunner, Han G.; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.; O'Driscoll, Mark; Jeggo, Penny A.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6, which encode proteins required for DNA replication origin licensing, cause Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS), a disorder conferring microcephaly, primordial dwarfism, underdeveloped ears, and skeletal abnormalities. Mutations in ATR, which also functions during replication, can cause Seckel syndrome, a clinically related disorder. These findings suggest that impaired DNA replication could underlie the developmental defects characteristic of these disorders. Here, we show that although origin licensing capacity is impaired in all patient cells with mutations in origin licensing component proteins, this does not correlate with the rate of progression through S phase. Thus, the replicative capacity in MGS patient cells does not correlate with clinical manifestation. However, ORC1-deficient cells from MGS patients and siRNA–mediated depletion of origin licensing proteins also have impaired centrosome and centriole copy number. As a novel and unexpected finding, we show that they also display a striking defect in the rate of formation of primary cilia. We demonstrate that this impacts sonic hedgehog signalling in ORC1-deficient primary fibroblasts. Additionally, reduced growth factor-dependent signaling via primary cilia affects the kinetics of cell cycle progression following cell cycle exit and re-entry, highlighting an unexpected mechanism whereby origin licensing components can influence cell cycle progression. Finally, using a cell-based model, we show that defects in cilia function impair chondroinduction. Our findings raise the possibility that a reduced efficiency in forming cilia could contribute to the clinical features of MGS, particularly the bone development abnormalities, and could provide a new dimension for considering developmental impacts of licensing deficiency. PMID:23516378

  15. A New Coherent Science Content Storyline Astronomy Course for Pre-Service Teachers at Penn State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, Christopher; Plummer, Julia; Earth and Space Science Partnership

    2016-01-01

    The Earth and Space Science Partnership (ESSP) is a collaboration among Penn State scientists, science educators and seven school districts across Pennsylvania. One of the ESSP goals has been to provide pre-service teachers with new or improved science course offerings at Penn State in the Earth and Space Science domains. In particular, we aim to provide students with opportunities to learn astronomy content knowledge through teaching methods that engage them in investigations where they experience the practices used by astronomers. We have designed a new course that builds on our research into students' ideas about Solar System astronomy (Plummer et al. 2015) and the curriculum our team created for a professional development workshop for in-service teachers (Palma et al. 2013) with this same theme. The course was offered for the first time in the spring 2015 semester. We designed the course using a coherent science content storyline approach (see, e.g., Palma et al. 2014), which requires all of the student investigations to build towards a big idea in science; in this case, we chose the model for formation of our Solar System. The course led pre-service teachers through a series of investigations that model the type of instruction we hope they will adopt in their own classrooms. They were presented with a series of research questions that all tie in to the big idea of Solar System formation, and they were responsible for collecting and interpreting their own data to draw evidence-based conclusions about one aspect of this model. Students in the course were assessed on their astronomy content knowledge, but also on their ability to construct arguments using scientific reasoning to answer astronomy questions. In this poster, we will present descriptions of the investigations, the assessments used, and our preliminary results about how the course led this group of pre-service teachers to improved understanding of astronomy content and the practices astronomers use in

  16. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Tom Steitz

    2002-10-14

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives. During this reporting period, the final technical design and cost estimate were submitted to Penn State by Foster Wheeler. In addition, Penn State initiated the internal site selection process to finalize the site for the boiler plant.

  17. Proportions - Disposition Relationship Analysis of a Historical Truss in a Rural House in Vápenná Village, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krušinský, Peter; Capková, Eva; Augustinková, Lucie; Korenková, Renáta

    2016-12-01

    We have analysed historical trusses based on previous building-historical researches, particularly focusing on sacral buildings, in chosen regions of Slovakia, with one of the primary goals to examine geometric concepts and proportional relationships used for their construction. The knowledge of proportional principles and relationships used in various historical sacral trusses, additionally supported by contemporary literature, was applied to a village house truss from 1774 in Vápenná, Jeseníky district of the Czech Republic.

  18. Review of PennDOT Publication 408 for the use of recycled co-product materials: Summary recommendations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Tassel, E.L.; Tikalsky, P.J.; Christensen, D.W.

    1999-04-30

    The purpose of this project is to decrease the institutional or perceived institutional barriers for the use of recycled and co-product materials including glass, steel slag, foundry sand, fly ash, shingle tabs, reclaimed Portland cement concrete, and scrap tires in the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation`s (PennDOT) Publications 408, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Specifications. This report reviews potential uses of each material, identifies the project that used these materials, and provides direction for future specification development.

  19. Preventing adolescents’ externalizing and internalizing symptoms: Effects of the Penn Resiliency Program

    PubMed Central

    Cutuli, J. J.; Gillham, Jane E.; Chaplin, Tara M.; Reivich, Karen J.; Seligman, Martin E. P.; Gallop, Robert J.; Abenavoli, Rachel M.; Freres, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports secondary outcome analyses from a past study of the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP), a cognitive-behavioral depression prevention program for middle-school aged children. Middle school students (N = 697) were randomly assigned to PRP, PEP (an alternate intervention), or control conditions. Gillham et al., (2007) reported analyses examining PRP’s effects on average and clinical levels of depression symptoms. We examine PRP’s effects on parent-, teacher-, and self-reports of adolescents’ externalizing and broader internalizing (depression/anxiety, somatic complaints, and social withdrawal) symptoms over three years of follow-up. Relative to no intervention control, PRP reduced parent-reports of adolescents’ internalizing symptoms beginning at the first assessment after the intervention and persisting for most of the follow-up assessments. PRP also reduced parent-reported conduct problems relative to no-intervention. There was no evidence that the PRP program produced an effect on teacher- or self-report of adolescents’ symptoms. Overall, PRP did not reduce symptoms relative to the alternate intervention, although there is a suggestion of a delayed effect for conduct problems. These findings are discussed with attention to developmental trajectories and the importance of interventions that address common risk factors for diverse forms of negative outcomes. PMID:24634897

  20. Resiliency training in Indian children: a pilot investigation of the Penn Resiliency Program.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Aruna; Cycil, Chandrika

    2014-04-15

    This paper examines the effectiveness of the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP) in an urban Indian setting. The PRP is a program to prevent depression in early adolescence and has proved successful in changing children's attributional style of life events. While the program has been successful in preventing symptoms of depression in Western populations, the current study explored whether this program could be effective with an Indian sample. The aim of the current study was twofold; first, to study the attributional style of early adolescents in India and identify negative effects (if any) and second, to gain insights in using the PRP as a tool to change explanatory styles in Indian children. A total of 58 children participated in the study (Intervention group n = 29 and Control group n = 29). An Analysis of Covariance comparing post-test scores on Children's Attributional Style Questionnaire (CASQ) while controlling for baseline scores indicated that children in the intervention group exhibited a significant reduction in pessimistic explanatory style and an increase in optimistic orientation compared to children in the control group. This indicates that the program was effective in changing negative attribution styles among upper-class Indian school children. Future work may look into the longer impact of the program as well as further considerations into adapting the program for a middle class population.

  1. Analytical solution of the Pennes equation for burn-depth determination from infrared thermographs.

    PubMed

    Romero-Méndez, Ricardo; Jiménez-Lozano, Joel N; Sen, Mihir; González, F Javier

    2010-03-01

    A serious problem in emergency medicine is the correct evaluation of skin burn depth to make the appropriate choice of treatment. In clinical practice, there is no difficulty in classifying first- and third-degree burns correctly. However, differentiation between the IIa (superficial dermal) and IIb (deep dermal) wounds is problematic even for experienced practitioners. In this work, the use of surface skin temperature for the determination of the depth of second-degree burns is explored. An analytical solution of the 3D Pennes steady-state equation is obtained assuming that the ratio between burn depth and the burn size is small. The inverse problem is posed in a search space consisting of geometrical parameters associated with the burned region. This space is searched to minimize the error between the analytical and experimental skin surface temperatures. The technique is greatly improved by using local one-dimensionality to provide the shape of the burned region. The feasibility of using this technique and thermography to determine skin burn depth is discussed.

  2. Preliminary Normative Data on the Penn State University Symbol Cancellation Task With Nonconcussed Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Conder, Robert L; Conder, Alanna A; Register-Mihalik, Johna; Conder, Lauren H; Newton, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Visual concentration impairment after neurologic injury is frequent, making its identification a critical component of neurocognitive concussion assessment. Visual target cancellation tests such as the Penn State University Symbol Cancellation Task (PSUSCT) have been widely used in assessing professional and collegiate athletes. To date, there are no normative studies using the PSUSCT with an adolescent population. Given that 38 million children and adolescents participate in sports and an estimated 5% to 10% are concussed annually, adolescent normative data are critically needed to evaluate concussions in this vulnerable population. The purpose of this study was to provide adolescent normative data on the PSUSCT. Participants included 40 healthy, nonconcussed high school students aged 14 to 19 years old (20 men, 20 women). Participants were administered Forms A and C of the PSUSCT within a 4-day period. Data analysis examined hits, omission errors, and commission errors, with descriptive statistics calculated for the total sample and for subgroups by gender and age. Study 1 provided normative adolescent data on Form A. Study 2 examined practice effects and established reliable change indexes (RCIs) by comparing results on Forms A and C. Neither Study 1 nor Study 2 demonstrated significant group differences for gender or age. In conclusion, this study presents adolescent normative data, apparent practice effects, and RCIs on the PSUSCT. These norms provide data needed to appropriately include the PSUSCT in baseline and postinjury concussion evaluation batteries with adolescent student-athletes. Findings should be replicated with a larger, more heterogeneous sample.

  3. The New Meteor Radar at Penn State: Design and First Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urbina, J.; Seal, R.; Dyrud, L.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to provide new and improved meteor radar sensing capabilities, Penn State has been developing advanced instruments and technologies for future meteor radars, with primary objectives of making such instruments more capable and more cost effective in order to study the basic properties of the global meteor flux, such as average mass, velocity, and chemical composition. Using low-cost field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), combined with open source software tools, we describe a design methodology enabling one to develop state-of-the art radar instrumentation, by developing a generalized instrumentation core that can be customized using specialized output stage hardware. Furthermore, using object-oriented programming (OOP) techniques and open-source tools, we illustrate a technique to provide a cost-effective, generalized software framework to uniquely define an instrument s functionality through a customizable interface, implemented by the designer. The new instrument is intended to provide instantaneous profiles of atmospheric parameters and climatology on a daily basis throughout the year. An overview of the instrument design concepts and some of the emerging technologies developed for this meteor radar are presented.

  4. Chronic In Vivo Testing of the Penn State Infant Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, William J.; Carney, Elizabeth L.; Clark, J. Brian; Peterson, Rebecca; Cooper, Timothy K.; Nifong, Thomas P.; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Hicks, Dennis; Doxtater, Bradley; Lukic, Branka; Yeager, Eric; Reibson, John; Cysyk, Joshua; Rosenberg, Gerson; Pierce, William S.

    2011-01-01

    The Penn State Infant Ventricular Assist Device is a 12-14 ml stroke volume pneumatically actuated pump, with custom Björk-Shiley monostrut valves, developed under the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Pediatric Circulatory Support program. In this report we describe the 7 most recent chronic animal studies of the Infant VAD in the juvenile ovine model, with a mean body weight of 23.5 +/- 4.1 kg. The goal of 4-6 weeks survival was achieved in 5 of 7 studies, with support duration ranging from 5 to 41 days; mean 26.1 days. Anticoagulation was accomplished using unfractionated heparin, and study animals were divided into 2 protocol groups: the first based on a target activated partial thromboplastin time of 1.5 to 2 times normal, and a second group using a target thromboelastography R-time of 2 times normal. The second group required significantly less heparin, which was verified by barely detectable heparin activity (anti-Xa). In both groups, there was no evidence of thromboembolism except in one animal with a chronic infection and fever. Device thrombi were minimal, and were further reduced by introduction of the custom valve. These results are consistent with results of adult VAD testing in animals, and are encouraging given the extremely low levels of anticoagulation in the second group. PMID:22157073

  5. Resiliency Training in Indian Children: A Pilot Investigation of the Penn Resiliency Program

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanan, Aruna; Cycil, Chandrika

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP) in an urban Indian setting. The PRP is a program to prevent depression in early adolescence and has proved successful in changing children’s attributional style of life events. While the program has been successful in preventing symptoms of depression in Western populations, the current study explored whether this program could be effective with an Indian sample. The aim of the current study was twofold; first, to study the attributional style of early adolescents in India and identify negative effects (if any) and second, to gain insights in using the PRP as a tool to change explanatory styles in Indian children. A total of 58 children participated in the study (Intervention group n = 29 and Control group n = 29). An Analysis of Covariance comparing post-test scores on Children’s Attributional Style Questionnaire (CASQ) while controlling for baseline scores indicated that children in the intervention group exhibited a significant reduction in pessimistic explanatory style and an increase in optimistic orientation compared to children in the control group. This indicates that the program was effective in changing negative attribution styles among upper-class Indian school children. Future work may look into the longer impact of the program as well as further considerations into adapting the program for a middle class population. PMID:24739766

  6. Sensing for directed energy deposition and powder bed fusion additive manufacturing at Penn State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Abdalla R.; Reutzel, Edward W.; Brown, Stephen W.; Morgan, John P.; Morgan, Jacob P.; Natale, Donald J.; Tutwiler, Rick L.; Feck, David P.; Banks, Jeffery C.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing of metal components through directed energy deposition or powder bed fusion is a complex undertaking, often involving hundreds or thousands of individual laser deposits. During processing, conditions may fluctuate, e.g. material feed rate, beam power, surrounding gas composition, local and global temperature, build geometry, etc., leading to unintended variations in final part geometry, microstructure and properties. To assess or control as-deposited quality, researchers have used a variety of methods, including those based on sensing of melt pool and plume emission characteristics, characteristics of powder application, and layer-wise imaging. Here, a summary of ongoing process monitoring activities at Penn State is provided, along with a discussion of recent advancements in the area of layer-wise image acquisition and analysis during powder bed fusion processing. Specifically, methods that enable direct comparisons of CAD model, build images, and 3D micro-tomographic scan data will be covered, along with thoughts on how such analyses can be related to overall process quality.

  7. Organizational design consistency: the PennCARE and Henry Ford Health System experiences.

    PubMed

    Dubbs, Nicole L; Mailman, Joseph L

    2002-01-01

    There has been much discussion of the appropriateness of various organizational strategies for today's healthcare industry. This article presents case studies of two healthcare organizations that have pursued very different configurations. PennCARE uses a virtually integrated, loose contract-based arrangement, while Henry Ford Health System employs a vertically integrated, tight ownership model. Despite these different approaches, their overall designs are strikingly similar. In essence both systems demonstrate a property called organizational design consistency; they simply approach it from different ends of the spectrum. This article presents the notion of organizational design consistency and defines it as the steady pursuit of a single preferred configuration strategy across key elements of organizational design. To illustrate the framework the case studies target four key elements of organizational design (governance structure, organizational culture, strategic planning processes, and decision-making procedures) and explain how consistency across these components adds value to both of these differently configured healthcare systems. There is room enough for diverse configurations of organizations in the current healthcare environment. Consistency does not mandate conformity; value can be derived from both tight and loose models. Furthermore, when fashioning organizational design consistency strategies, healthcare systems should carefully choose tightly or loosely modeled configurations to appropriately suit their aims, their markets, and the capabilities and resources available to them.

  8. Development of Abbreviated Eight-Item Form of the Penn Verbal Reasoning Test

    PubMed Central

    Bilker, Warren B.; Wierzbicki, Michael R.; Brensinger, Colleen M.; Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to reason with language is a highly valued cognitive capacity that correlates with IQ measures and is sensitive to damage in language areas. The Penn Verbal Reasoning Test (PVRT) is a 29-item computerized test for measuring abstract analogical reasoning abilities using language. The full test can take over half an hour to administer, which limits its applicability in large-scale studies. We previously described a procedure for abbreviating a clinical rating scale and a modified procedure for reducing tests with a large number of items. Here we describe the application of the modified method to reducing the number of items in the PVRT to a parsimonious subset of items that accurately predicts the total score. As in our previous reduction studies, a split sample is used for model fitting and validation, with cross-validation to verify results. We find that an 8-item scale predicts the total 29-item score well, achieving a correlation of .9145 for the reduced form for the model fitting sample and .8952 for the validation sample. The results indicate that a drastically abbreviated version, which cuts administration time by more than 70%, can be safely administered as a predictor of PVRT performance. PMID:24577310

  9. Final report to DOE: Matching Grant Program for the Penn State University Nuclear Engineering Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jack S. Brenizer, Jr.

    2003-01-17

    The DOE/Industry Matching Grant Program is designed to encourage collaborative support for nuclear engineering education as well as research between the nation's nuclear industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Despite a serious decline in student enrollments in the 1980s and 1990s, the discipline of nuclear engineering remained important to the advancement of the mission goals of DOE. The program is designed to ensure that academic programs in nuclear engineering are maintained and enhanced in universities throughout the U.S. At Penn State, the Matching Grant Program played a critical role in the survival of the Nuclear Engineering degree programs. Funds were used in a variety of ways to support both undergraduate and graduate students directly. Some of these included providing seed funding for new graduate research initiatives, funding the development of new course materials, supporting new teaching facilities, maintenance and purchase of teaching laboratory equipment, and providing undergraduate scholarships, graduate fellowships, and wage payroll positions for students.

  10. LateNight Penn State alcohol-free programming: students drink less on days they participate.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Megan E; Maggs, Jennifer L; Osgood, D Wayne

    2010-06-01

    Despite the public health importance of alcohol-free social programs for college students, the majority of existing campus strategies have not been empirically evaluated. This study utilized repeated daily reports to examine the association between attendance at campus-led alcohol-free programming and alcohol use on specific days while controlling for individuals' typical rates of use. The current study assessed students' participation in the LateNight Penn State (LNPS) alcohol-free programming and amount of alcohol use at a daily level, in order to determine whether students consumed less alcohol on days they attended LNPS compared to weekend days they did not attend. First-year college students reported their daily social activity involvement and alcohol use via 14 consecutive daily web-based surveys. Multilevel regression analyses modeled variation in alcohol use on weekend days (N = 3,350) nested within people (N = 689 people, 51% women). Analyses focused on within-individual differences between nights attending and not attending LNPS, thereby controlling for stable individual differences, measured and unmeasured. Results indicated that students drank less on days they attended LNPS and on days they stayed in (rather than going to bars/parties, other campus events, or entertainment), both especially among women. These results suggest that alcohol-free social programs may be an effective strategy for decreasing alcohol use on days when students attend alcohol-free events rather than going to other events or gatherings.

  11. Digital Humanitarians: How Big Data Is Changing the Face of Humanitarian Response : Patrick Meier, 2015, CRC Press (Boca Raton, FL, 978-1-4822-4839-5, 259 pp.).

    PubMed

    Dave, Anushree

    2017-10-05

    This is a review of Patrick Meier's 2015 book, Digital Humanitarians: How Big Data Is Changing the Face of Humanitarian Response. The book explores the role of technologies such as high-resolution satellite imagery, online social media, drones, and artificial intelligence in humanitarian responses during disasters such as the 2010 Haiti earthquake. In this analysis, the book is examined using a humanitarian health ethics perspective.

  12. Design and Performance of a Versatile Penn State near IR Imager and Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Debes, John H.; Ren, Deqing; Friedman, Jerry

    2003-03-01

    A versatile near IR instrument called Penn State near IR Imager and Spectrograph (PIRIS) with a 256 x 256 PICNIC IR array has been developed at Penn State and saw its first light at the Mt. Wilson 100 inch in October 2001. The optical design consists of five optical subsystems including (1) the slit aperture wheel, (2) an achromat collimator optic, (3) a grism/filter and pupil assembly, (4) a pupil imaging optic, and (5) achromat camera optics. This instrument has imaging, spectroscopy and coronagraph modes. It is being updated to have an integral field 3-D imaging spectroscopy mode and a very high IR spectroscopy mode (R ~ 150,000) with an anamorphic silicon immersion grating in 2003. The instrument is designed to take full advantage of high Strehl ratio images delivered by high order adaptive optics systems. Its imaging mode has f/37 and f/51 optics to allow diffraction-limited imaging in H and K bands, respectively. Its spectroscopy mode has R = 20, 180, 400, 2000, and 5000. The lowest resolution is obtained with a non-deviation prism. The medium resolution spectroscopy mode is conducted with three commercial fused-silica grisms. They can be either used in long slit spectroscopy mode with a blocking filter or used as a cross-disperser for a high resolution silicon grism. High resolution spectroscopy is done with silicon grisms and cross-disperser grisms, which are designed to work on high orders (~ 80) to completely cover H and K bands for R = 5000 separately, or simultaneously cover H and K bands for R = 2000. Coronagraphy is done by inserting an apodizing mask, held in the slit aperture wheel, in the focal plane and a Lyot stop (pupil mask) at a reimaged pupil inside the dewar. Image contrast can be enhanced by using different combinations of the apodizing mask and pupil mask. Several of Gaussian pupil masks have also been installed in the pupil wheel for high contrast imaging. We have successfully detected two substellar companions during our first light at

  13. Development and validation of the Penn Arthralgia Aging Scale among breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Brier, Moriah J; Chambless, Dianne L; Lee, Laura; Mao, Jun J

    2015-08-15

    Breast cancer survivors on aromatase inhibitors often experience joint pain as a side effect of their treatment; qualitative investigations suggest that this arthralgia may cause women to feel that they are aging faster than they should be. To facilitate further study of this experience, the Penn Arthralgia Aging Scale (PAAS) was developed. This report describes the development and validation of the PAAS in a racially diverse sample of breast cancer survivors suffering from joint pain. The items of the scale were developed from a content analysis of interviews with patients. The scale was pilot-tested, and modifications were made on the basis of patient feedback. Subsequently, 596 breast cancer survivors who endorsed joint pain completed the 8-item PAAS. The factor structure (with exploratory factor analysis), the internal consistency, and the convergent, divergent, and incremental validity were examined. The resulting scale had a 1-factor structure with strong internal consistency (Cronbach's α = .94) and demonstrated both convergent and divergent validity: the PAAS was significantly correlated with joint pain severity (rs = 0.55, P < .01) and had a small and nonsignificant correlation with actual age (rs  = -0.07, P = .10). The PAAS was also found to explain incremental variance in anxiety, depression, and pain interference outcomes. These findings suggest that the PAAS produces reliable and valid scores that capture perceptions of aging due to arthralgia among breast cancer survivors. With further research, the PAAS may advance our understanding of how perceptions of aging may affect breast cancer survivors' emotional, behavioral, and clinical outcomes. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  14. Abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome burden in adolescents--Penn State Children Cohort study.

    PubMed

    He, Fan; Rodriguez-Colon, Sol; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Bixler, Edward O; Berg, Arthur; Imamura Kawasawa, Yuka; Sawyer, Marjorie D; Liao, Duanping

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) burden in a population-based sample of adolescents, we used data from 421 adolescents who completed the follow-up examination in the Penn State Children Cohort study. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to assess abdominal obesity, as measured by android/gynoid fat ratio (A/G ratio), android/whole body fat proportion (A/W proportion), visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous fat (SAT) areas. Continuous metabolic syndrome score (cMetS), calculated as the sum of the age and sex-adjusted standardized residual (Z-score) of five established MetS components, was used to assess the MetS burden. Linear regression models were used to analyze the impact of DXA measures on cMetS components. All models were adjusted for age, race, sex, and general obesity. We found abdominal obesity is significantly associated with increased cMetS. With 1 standard deviation (SD) increase in A/G ratio, A/W proportion, VAT area, and SAT area, cMetS increased by 1.34 (SE=0.17), 1.25 (SE=0.19), 1.67 (SE=0.17), and 1.84 (SE=0.20) units, respectively. At individual component level, strongest association was observed between abdominal obesity and insulin resistance (IR) than lipid-based or blood pressure-based components. VAT and SAT had a stronger impact on IR than android ratio-based DXA measurements. In conclusion, abdominal obesity is associated with higher MetS burden in adolescent population. The association between abdominal obesity and IR measure is the strongest, suggesting the key impact of abdominal obesity on IR in adolescents MetS burden.

  15. Abdominal Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome Burden in Adolescents-Penn State Children Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    He, Fan; Rodriguez-Colon, Sol; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Bixler, Edward O.; Berg, Arthur; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Sawyer, Marjorie D.; Liao, Duanping

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION To investigate the association between abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) burden in a population-based sample of adolescents. METHODS We used the data from 421 adolescents who completed the follow-up examination in the Penn State Children Cohort study. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to assess abdominal obesity, as measured by android/gynoid fat ratio (A/G ratio), android/whole body fat proportion (A/W proportion), visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous fat (SAT) areas. Continuous metabolic syndrome score (cMetS), calculated as the sum of the age and sex-adjusted standardized residual (Z-score) of five established MetS components, was used to assess the MetS burden. Linear regression models were used to analyze the impact of DXA measures on cMetS and individual cMetS components. All models were adjusted for age, race, sex, and general obesity. RESULTS Abdominal obesity is significantly associated with increased cMetS. With 1 standard deviation (SD) increase in A/G ratio, A/W proportion, VAT area, and SAT area, cMetS increased by 1.34 (SE=0.17), 1.25 (SE=0.19), 1.67 (SE=0.17), and 1.84 (SE=0.20) units, respectively. At individual component level, strongest association was observed between abdominal obesity and insulin resistance than lipid-based or blood pressure-based components. VAT and SAT had a stronger impact on insulin resistance than android ratio-based DXA measurements. CONCLUSIONS Abdominal obesity is associated with higher MetS burden in adolescent population. The association between abdominal obesity and insulin resistance measure is the strongest, suggesting the key impact of abdominal obesity on insulin resistance in adolescents Mets burden. PMID:25220887

  16. Sleep variability and cardiac autonomic modulation in adolescents – Penn State Child Cohort (PSCC) study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Colón, Sol M.; He, Fan; Bixler, Edward O.; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Calhoun, Susan; Zheng, Zhi-Jie; Liao, Duanping

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of objectively measured habitual sleep patterns on cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM) in a population-based sample of adolescents. Methods We used data from 421 adolescents who completed the follow-up examination in the Penn State Children Cohort study. CAM was assessed by heart rate (HR) variability (HRV) analysis of beat-to-beat normal R-R intervals from a 39-h electrocardiogram, on a 30-min basis. The HRV indices included frequency domain (HF, LF, and LF/HF ratio), and time domain (SDNN, RMSSD, and heart rate or HR) variables. Actigraphy was used for seven consecutive nights to estimate nightly sleep duration and time in bed. The seven-night mean (SD) of sleep duration and sleep efficiency were used to represent sleep duration, duration variability, sleep efficiency, and efficiency variability, respectively. HF and LF were log-transformed for statistical analysis. Linear mixed-effect models were used to analyze the association between sleep patterns and CAM. Results After adjusting for major confounders, increased sleep duration variability and efficiency variability were significantly associated with lower HRV and higher HR during the 39-h, as well as separated by daytime and nighttime. For instance, a 1-h increase in sleep duration variability is associated with −0.14(0.04), −0.12(0.06), and −0.16(0.05) ms2 decrease in total, daytime, and nighttime HF, respectively. No associations were found between sleep duration, or sleep efficiency and HRV. Conclusion Higher habitual sleep duration variability and efficiency variability are associated with lower HRV and higher HR, suggesting that an irregular sleep pattern has an adverse impact on CAM, even in healthy adolescents. PMID:25555635

  17. Insomnia with objective short sleep duration and incident hypertension: the Penn State Cohort.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Liao, Duanping; Shaffer, Michele L; Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Basta, Maria; Bixler, Edward O

    2012-10-01

    Insomnia with objective short sleep duration appears to be a biologically more severe phenotype of the disorder. No longitudinal study to date has examined the association of this type of insomnia with incident hypertension using polysomnography. From a random, general population sample of 1741 adults of the Penn State Cohort, 1395 were followed-up after 7.5 years, and 786 did not have hypertension at baseline. Hypertension was determined by a self-report of receiving treatment for high blood pressure. Chronic insomnia was defined as a complaint of insomnia lasting ≥1 year, whereas poor sleep was defined as moderate-to-severe sleep difficulties. All of the subjects underwent 8-hour polysomnography. Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) was defined as an obstructive apnea/hypopnea index≥5. We used the median polysomnographic percentage of sleep time to define short sleep duration (ie, <6 hours). We controlled for sex, race, age, caffeine, cigarettes and alcohol consumption, depression, sleep-disordered breathing, diabetes mellitus, obesity, and blood pressure in our analyses. Compared with normal sleepers who slept≥6 hours, the highest risk for incident hypertension was in chronic insomniacs with short sleep duration (odds ratio, 3.8 [95% CI, 1.6-9.0]). The risk for incident hypertension in poor sleepers with short sleep duration was significantly increased but became marginally significant after controlling for obesity (odds ratio, 1.6 [95% CI, 0.9-2.8]). Chronic insomnia with short sleep duration is associated with an increased risk for incident hypertension in a degree comparable to sleep-disordered breathing. Objective short sleep duration in insomnia may serve as a useful predictor of the biological severity of the disorder.

  18. Sleep variability and cardiac autonomic modulation in adolescents - Penn State Child Cohort (PSCC) study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Colón, Sol M; He, Fan; Bixler, Edward O; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Calhoun, Susan; Zheng, Zhi-Jie; Liao, Duanping

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of objectively measured habitual sleep patterns on cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM) in a population-based sample of adolescents. We used data from 421 adolescents who completed the follow-up examination in the Penn State Children Cohort study. CAM was assessed by heart rate (HR) variability (HRV) analysis of beat-to-beat normal R-R intervals from a 39-h electrocardiogram, on a 30-min basis. The HRV indices included frequency domain (HF, LF, and LF/HF ratio), and time domain (SDNN, RMSSD, and heart rate or HR) variables. Actigraphy was used for seven consecutive nights to estimate nightly sleep duration and time in bed. The seven-night mean (SD) of sleep duration and sleep efficiency were used to represent sleep duration, duration variability, sleep efficiency, and efficiency variability, respectively. HF and LF were log-transformed for statistical analysis. Linear mixed-effect models were used to analyze the association between sleep patterns and CAM. After adjusting for major confounders, increased sleep duration variability and efficiency variability were significantly associated with lower HRV and higher HR during the 39-h, as well as separated by daytime and nighttime. For instance, a 1-h increase in sleep duration variability is associated with -0.14(0.04), -0.12(0.06), and -0.16(0.05) ms(2) decrease in total, daytime, and nighttime HF, respectively. No associations were found between sleep duration, or sleep efficiency and HRV. Higher habitual sleep duration variability and efficiency variability are associated with lower HRV and higher HR, suggesting that an irregular sleep pattern has an adverse impact on CAM, even in healthy adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Extra-solar planet searches with a Penn State optical/IR dispersive interferometer at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDavitt, D.; Ge, J.; DeWitt, C.; Bernecker, J.; Mellon, R.; Mahadevan, S.; Ramsey, L.; Wolszczan, A.; Rushford, M.

    2000-12-01

    An optical/infrared dispersive interferometer is being developed at Penn State for extra-solar planet searches at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). This instrument is a combination of a wide angle Michelson type interferometer and an intermediate resolution spectrograph (R ≈ 15000). It is designed to provide very low instrument noise for sensitive Doppler radial velocity measurements aimed at detecting extra-solar planets with a velocity perturbation amplitude of a few m/s around nearby F, G, K and M dwarfs. It is a modified version of a prototype, developed by Jian Ge and his collaborators earlier at LLNL, with a much improved detection efficiency to allow observation of faint stars (V ≈ 11 mag.) in the both optical and near-IR wavelengths. The prototype with R = 5600 has demonstrated a radial velocity precision of 7 m/s at the Lick 1 m telescope in 1999. New instrument components including an imaging slicer and an interferometer cavity control system are being developed and tested at Penn State. The image slicer is used to convert the telescope's circular beams to rectangular ones in order to increase the detection efficiency and also allow convenient placement of an interferometer fringe comb on stellar absorption lines for precision fringe phase measurements. The interferometer cavity control system is used to reduce systematic errors and also control phase shifts. Reference sources other than iodine absorption are being studied for calibrating the new instrument at red and near-IR wavelengths. The instrument's first light at the HET will be spring 2001. Simulations of the instrument's performance show that a Doppler radial velocity precision of 1 m/s can be achieved for a late type star with a S/N of 200, a wavelength coverage of 500 Å at 1.55 μ m and R = 15000. The development of the instrument is supported by the Penn State Eberly College of Sciences.

  20. Sea-Level Static Testing of the Penn State Two-Dimensional Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, J. M.; Marshall, W. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Twin thruster tests have been conducted with the Penn State RBCC test article operating at sea- level static conditions. Significant differences were observed in the performance characteristics for two different thruster centerline spacings. Changing the thruster spacing from 2.50 to 1.75 in. reduced the entrained air velocity (-17%) and the thrust (-7%) for tests at a thruster chamber pressure of 200 psia and MR = 8. In addition, significant differences were seen in the static pressure profiles, the Raman spectroscopy profiles, and the acoustic power spectrum for these two configurations.

  1. Perceptual elements in Penn & Teller’s “Cups and Balls” magic trick

    PubMed Central

    Rieiro, Hector; Martinez-Conde, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Magic illusions provide the perceptual and cognitive scientist with a toolbox of experimental manipulations and testable hypotheses about the building blocks of conscious experience. Here we studied several sleight-of-hand manipulations in the performance of the classic “Cups and Balls” magic trick (where balls appear and disappear inside upside-down opaque cups). We examined a version inspired by the entertainment duo Penn & Teller, conducted with three opaque and subsequently with three transparent cups. Magician Teller used his right hand to load (i.e. introduce surreptitiously) a small ball inside each of two upside-down cups, one at a time, while using his left hand to remove a different ball from the upside-down bottom of the cup. The sleight at the third cup involved one of six manipulations: (a) standard maneuver, (b) standard maneuver without a third ball, (c) ball placed on the table, (d) ball lifted, (e) ball dropped to the floor, and (f) ball stuck to the cup. Seven subjects watched the videos of the performances while reporting, via button press, whenever balls were removed from the cups/table (button “1”) or placed inside the cups/on the table (button “2”). Subjects’ perception was more accurate with transparent than with opaque cups. Perceptual performance was worse for the conditions where the ball was placed on the table, or stuck to the cup, than for the standard maneuver. The condition in which the ball was lifted displaced the subjects’ gaze position the most, whereas the condition in which there was no ball caused the smallest gaze displacement. Training improved the subjects’ perceptual performance. Occlusion of the magician’s face did not affect the subjects’ perception, suggesting that gaze misdirection does not play a strong role in the Cups and Balls illusion. Our results have implications for how to optimize the performance of this classic magic trick, and for the types of hand and object motion that maximize magic

  2. Analysis of geophysical logs, at North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site, Lansdale, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conger, Randall W.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of technical assistance to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), collected borehole geophysical log data in 34 industrial, commercial, and public supply wells and 28 monitor wells at the North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site, in Lansdale, Pa., from August 22, 1995, through August 29, 1997. The wells range in depth from 50 to 1,027 feet below land surface and are drilled in Triassic-age shales and siltstones of the Brunswick Group and Lockatong Formation. The geophysical log data were collected to help describe the hydrogeologic framework in the area and to provide guidance in the reconstruction of the 28 monitor wells drilled during summer 1997. At the time of logging, all wells had open-hole construction. The geophysical logs, caliper, fluid-resistivity, and fluid-temperature, and borehole video logs were used to determine the vertical distribution of water-bearing fractures. Heatpulse-flowmeter measurements were used to determine vertical borehole flow under pumping and nonpumping conditions. The most productive fractures generally could be determined from heatpulse-flowmeter measurements under pumping conditions. Vertical borehole flow was measured under nonpumping conditions in most wells that had more than one water-bearing fracture. Upward flow was measured in 35 wells and probably is a result of natural head differences between fractures in the local ground-water-flow system. Downward flow was measured in 11 wells and commonly indicated differences in hydraulic heads of the fractures caused by nearby pumping. Both upward and downward flow was measured in three wells. No flow was detected in eight wells. Natural-gamma-ray logs were used to estimate the attitude of bedding. Thin shale marker beds, shown as spikes of elevated radioactivity in the natural-gamma logs of some wells throughout the area, enable the determination of bedding-plane orientation from three-point correlations. Generally, the marker beds in

  3. Penn State geoPebble system: Design,Implementation, and Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, J. V.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Bilen, S. G.; Fleishman, A.; Burkett, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Penn State geoPebble system is a new network of wirelessly interconnected seismic and GPS sensor nodes with flexible architecture. This network will be used for studies of ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland, as well as to investigate mountain glaciers. The network will consist of ˜150 geoPebbles that can be deployed in a user-defined spatial geometry. We present our design methodology, which has enabled us to develop these state-of- the art sensors using commercial-off-the-shelf hardware combined with custom-designed hardware and software. Each geoPebble is a self- contained, wirelessly connected sensor for collecting seismic measurements and position information. Key elements of each node encompasses a three-component seismic recorder, which includes an amplifier, filter, and 24- bit analog-to-digital converter that can sample up to 10 kHz. Each unit also includes a microphone channel to record the ground-coupled airwave. The timing for each node is available from GPS measurements and a local precision oscillator that is conditioned by the GPS timing pulses. In addition, we record the carrier-phase measurement of the L1 GPS signal in order to determine location at sub-decimeter accuracy (relative to other geoPebbles within a few kilometers radius). Each geoPebble includes 16 GB of solid-state storage, wireless communications capability to a central supervisory unit, and auxiliary measurements capability (including tilt from accelerometers, absolute orientation from magnetometers and temperature). A novel aspect of the geoPebble is a wireless charging system for the internal battery (using inductive coupling techniques). The geoPebbles include all the sensors (geophones, GPS, microphone), communications (WiFi), and power (battery and charging) internally, so the geoPebble system can operate without any cabling connections (though we do provide an external connector so that different geophones can be used). We report initial field-deployment results and

  4. Three-dimensional imaging characteristics of the HEAD PENN-PET scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, J.S.; Freifelder, R.; Geagan, M.J.

    1997-04-01

    A volume-imaging PET scanner, without interplane septa, for brain imaging has been designed and built to achieve high performance, specifically in spatial resolution and sensitivity. The scanner is unique in its use of a single annular crystal of Na(Tl), which allows a field of view (FOV) of 25.6 cm in both the transverse and axial directions. Data are reconstructed into an image matrix of 128{sup 3} with (2mm){sup 3} voxels, using three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithms. Point-source measurements are performed to determine spatial resolution over the scanner FOV, and cylindrical phantom distributions are used to determine the sensitivity, scatter fraction and counting rate performance of the system a three-dimensional reconstruction algorithms. The system spatial resolution is measured to be 3.5mm in both the transverse and axial directions, in the center of the FOV. The true sensitivity, using the standard NEMA phantom (6 liter), is 660 kcps/{mu}Ci/ml, after subtracting a scatter fraction of 34%. Due to deadtime effects, we measure a peak true counting rate, after scatter and randoms subtraction, of 100 kcps at 0.7 mCi for a smaller brain-sized (1.1 liter) phantom, and 70 kcps for a head-sized (2.5 liter) phantom at the same activity. A typical {sup 18}F-FDG clinical brain study requires only 2 mCi to achieve high statistics (100 million true events) with a scan time of 30 min. The HEAD PENN-PET scanner is based on a cost-effective design using Nal(Tl) and has been shown to achieve high performance for brain studies and pediatric whole-body studies. As a full-time three-dimensional imaging scanner with a very large axial acceptance angle, high sensitivity is achieved. The system becomes counting-rate limited as the activity is increased, but we achieve high image quality with a small injected dose. This is a significant advantage for clinical imaging, particularly for pediatric patients. 38 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Evaluation of hydrologic data collected at the North Penn Area 12 Superfund Site, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Grazul, Kevin E.; Wood, Charles R.

    1998-01-01

    The North Penn Area 12 Superfund Site is underlain by the Lockatong Formation, which consists of interbedded gray to black siltstone and shale. The beds of the Lockatong Formation strike northeast and dip about 10d to 20d to the northwest in the vicinity of the site. Ground water moves through fractures that are nearly vertical and horizontal in the shale and siltstone. Permeability and storage are very low. Borehole-geophysical logs were obtained from eight wells to determine the location of fractures, water-producing and water-receiving intervals, and intervals of borehole flow. The logs also were used to quantify fluid movement in the borehole, to characterize the lithology, and to obtain data on well construction. The logs indicate fractures at depths less than 100 feet are more frequent and generally are more productive than fractures at depths greater than 100 feet. The fluid resistivity of water in shallow intervals usually was greater than that in deeper intervals. The rate and direction of fluid movement under nonpumping conditions differs in the boreholes logged. In the northwest part of the site, no vertical flow was detected in three wells and very small amounts of flow were measured in two wells. In the southwest part of the site, downward flow was measured in two wells. Aquifer-isolation tests in three wells provided information on hydraulic heads and specific capacities in discrete vertical intervals and allowed collection of water samples form discrete water-bearing intervals. Natural annual fluctuations of water levels in 11 wells ranged form 11.4 to 28.3 feet. Seven of the 11 wells gave very similar water-level hydrographs. The four southernmost wells on the site show rises in water levels after precipitation much sooner than the other seven wells. Two other wells show daily fluctuations caused by pumping. A potentiometric-surface map of the site and vicinity was prepared from water-level measurements made in late July 1995. The map can be used to

  6. Steady state hemodynamic and energetic characterization of the Penn State/3M Health Care Total Artificial Heart.

    PubMed

    Weiss, W J; Rosenberg, G; Snyder, A J; Pierce, W S; Pae, W E; Kuroda, H; Rawhouser, M A; Felder, G; Reibson, J D; Cleary, T J; Ford, S K; Marlotte, J A; Nazarian, R A; Hicks, D L

    1999-01-01

    Total Artificial Heart (TAH) development at Penn State University and 3M Health Care has progressed from design improvements and manufacturing documentation to in vitro and in vivo testing to characterize the system's hemodynamic response and energetic performance. The TAH system is completely implantable and intended for use as an alternative to transplantation. It includes a dual pusher plate pump and rollerscrew actuator, welded electronics and battery assembly, transcutaneous energy transmission system, telemetry, and a compliance chamber. In vitro testing was conducted on a Penn State mock circulatory loop with glycerol/water solution at body temperature. Tests were performed to characterize the preload and afterload response, left atrial pressure control, and power consumption. A sensitive preload response was demonstrated with left atrial pressure safely maintained at less than 15 mm Hg for flow rates up to 7.5 L/min. Variations in aortic pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance were found to have minimal effects on the preload sensitivity and left atrial pressure control. In vivo testing of the completely implanted system in its final configuration was carried out in two acute studies using implanted temperature sensors mounted on the electronics, motor, and energy transmission coil in contact with adjacent tissue. The mean temperature at the device-tissue interface was less than 4 degrees C above core temperature.

  7. Acute hamstring strain injury in track-and-field athletes: A 3-year observational study at the Penn Relay Carnival.

    PubMed

    Opar, D A; Drezner, J; Shield, A; Williams, M; Webner, D; Sennett, B; Kapur, R; Cohen, M; Ulager, J; Cafengiu, A; Cronholm, P F

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to observe the incidence rates of hamstring strain injuries (HSIs) across different competition levels and ages during the Penn Relays Carnival. Over a 3-year period, all injuries treated by the medical staff were recorded. The type of injury, anatomic location, event in which the injury occurred, competition level, and demographic data were documented. Absolute and relative HSI (per 1000 participants) were determined, and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated between sexes, competition levels, and events. Throughout the study period 48,473 athletes registered to participate in the Penn Relays Carnival, with 118 HSIs treated by the medical team. High school girls displayed lesser risk of HSI than high school boys (OR = 0.55, P = 0.021), and masters athletes were more likely than high school- (OR = 4.26, P < 0.001) and college-level (OR = 3.55, P = 0.001) athletes to suffer HSI. The 4 × 400-m relay displayed a greater likelihood of HSI compared with the 4 × 100-m relay (OR = 1.77, P = 0.008). High school boys and masters-level athletes are most likely to suffer HSI, and there is higher risk in 400-m events compared with 100-m events. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutation in a conserved C-terminal helix of Orc6 impedes origin recognition complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Bleichert, Franziska; Balasov, Maxim; Chesnokov, Igor; Nogales, Eva; Botchan, Michael R; Berger, James M

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA replication requires the origin recognition complex (ORC), a six-subunit assembly that promotes replisome formation on chromosomal origins. Despite extant homology between certain subunits, the degree of structural and organizational overlap between budding yeast and metazoan ORC has been unclear. Using 3D electron microscopy, we determined the subunit organization of metazoan ORC, revealing that it adopts a global architecture very similar to the budding yeast complex. Bioinformatic analysis extends this conservation to Orc6, a subunit of somewhat enigmatic function. Unexpectedly, a mutation in the Orc6 C-terminus linked to Meier-Gorlin syndrome, a dwarfism disorder, impedes proper recruitment of Orc6 into ORC; biochemical studies reveal that this region of Orc6 associates with a previously uncharacterized domain of Orc3 and is required for ORC function and MCM2–7 loading in vivo. Together, our results suggest that Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutations in Orc6 impair the formation of ORC hexamers, interfering with appropriate ORC functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00882.001 PMID:24137536

  9. A Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutation in a conserved C-terminal helix of Orc6 impedes origin recognition complex formation.

    PubMed

    Bleichert, Franziska; Balasov, Maxim; Chesnokov, Igor; Nogales, Eva; Botchan, Michael R; Berger, James M

    2013-10-08

    In eukaryotes, DNA replication requires the origin recognition complex (ORC), a six-subunit assembly that promotes replisome formation on chromosomal origins. Despite extant homology between certain subunits, the degree of structural and organizational overlap between budding yeast and metazoan ORC has been unclear. Using 3D electron microscopy, we determined the subunit organization of metazoan ORC, revealing that it adopts a global architecture very similar to the budding yeast complex. Bioinformatic analysis extends this conservation to Orc6, a subunit of somewhat enigmatic function. Unexpectedly, a mutation in the Orc6 C-terminus linked to Meier-Gorlin syndrome, a dwarfism disorder, impedes proper recruitment of Orc6 into ORC; biochemical studies reveal that this region of Orc6 associates with a previously uncharacterized domain of Orc3 and is required for ORC function and MCM2-7 loading in vivo. Together, our results suggest that Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutations in Orc6 impair the formation of ORC hexamers, interfering with appropriate ORC functions. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00882.001.

  10. Hydrogeology and geochemistry of acid mine drainage in ground water in the vicinity of Penn Mine and Camanche Reservoir, Calaveras County, California. Summary report, 1993--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Alpers, C.N.; Hamlin, S.N.; Hunerlach, M.P.

    1999-06-01

    The report presents results from the ground-water investigation at the Penn Mine by the US Geological Survey from October 1991 to April 1995. The specific objectives of the investigation were to evaluate (1) the quantity and quality of ground water flowing toward Camanche Reservoir from the Penn Mine area; (2) the ground-water transport of metals, sulfate, and acidity between Mine Run and Camanche Reservoirs; and (3) the hydrologic interactions between the flooded mine workings and other ground water and surface water in the vicinity.

  11. Penn Center for Community Health Workers: Step-by-Step Approach to Sustain an Evidence-Based Community Health Worker Intervention at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Anna U; Grande, David T; Carter, Tamala; Long, Judith A; Kangovi, Shreya

    2016-11-01

    Community-engaged researchers who work with low-income communities can be reliant on grant funding. We use the illustrative case of the Penn Center for Community Health Workers (PCCHW) to describe a step-by-step framework for achieving financial sustainability for community-engaged research interventions. PCCHW began as a small grant-funded research project but followed an 8-step framework to engage both low-income patients and funders, determine outcomes, and calculate return on investment. PCCHW is now fully funded by Penn Medicine and delivers the Individualized Management for Patient-Centered Targets (IMPaCT) community health worker intervention to 2000 patients annually.

  12. The Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, A.; Deka-Szymankiewicz, B.; Adamczyk, M.; Adamów, M.; Nowak, G.; Wolszczan, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We present the complete spectroscopic analysis of 455 stars observed within the Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search (PTPS) with the High Resolution Spectrograph of the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. We also present the total sample of 744 evolved stars of the PTPS and discuss masses of stellar hosts in our and other surveys devoted to evolved planetary systems. Methods: Stellar atmospheric parameters were determined through a strictly spectroscopic LTE analysis of equivalent widths of Fe I and Fe II lines. Rotational velocities were obtained from fitting synthetic spectra. Radial velocities were obtained from fitting a Gaussian function to the cross-correlation function. We determined stellar masses, ages, and luminosities with a Bayesian analysis of theoretical isochrones. The radii were calculated either from derived masses and log g or from Teff and luminosities. Results: We present basic atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, vt and [Fe/H]), rotation velocities, and absolute radial velocities as well as luminosities, masses, ages and radii for 402 stars (including 11 single-line spectroscopic binaries) that are mostly subgiants and giants. For 272 of them we present parameters for the first time. For another 53 stars we present estimates of Teff and log g based on photometric calibrations. More than half of the objects were found to be subgiants, but there is also a large group of giants, and a few stars appear to be dwarfs. The results show that the sample is composed of stars with masses ranging from 0.52 to 3.21 M⊙, 17 of which have masses ≥2.0 M⊙. The stellar radii range from 0.66 to 36.04 R⊙, with the vast majority having radii between 2.0 and 4.0 R⊙. They are generally less metal abundant than the Sun with a median [ Fe/H ] = -0.07. For 62 stars that we have in common with other planet searches, the stellar atmospheric parameters we found agree very well. We also present basic properties of the complete list of 744 stars

  13. 28. Fern Canyon (Meier 1979)

    Treesearch

    Sheauchi Cheng

    2004-01-01

    This established RNA is on the San Dimas Experimental Forest, within the Angeles National Forest. It is approximately 6 miles (10 km) N. of the city of Claremont. It occupies portions of seven sects. in T1N, R8W SBBM (34°12'N., 117°43'W.), USGS Mt. Baldy quad (fig. 58). Ecological subsection – San Gabriel Mountains (M261Bd).

  14. Mutations in CDC45, Encoding an Essential Component of the Pre-initiation Complex, Cause Meier-Gorlin Syndrome and Craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Aimee L; Kliszczak, Maciej; Cooper, Fay; Murray, Jennie; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Twigg, Stephen R F; Goriely, Anne; McGowan, Simon J; Miller, Kerry A; Taylor, Indira B; Logan, Clare; Bozdogan, Sevcan; Danda, Sumita; Dixon, Joanne; Elsayed, Solaf M; Elsobky, Ezzat; Gardham, Alice; Hoffer, Mariette J V; Koopmans, Marije; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Santen, Gijs W E; Savarirayan, Ravi; de Silva, Deepthi; Vanakker, Olivier; Wall, Steven A; Wilson, Louise C; Yuregir, Ozge Ozalp; Zackai, Elaine H; Ponting, Chris P; Jackson, Andrew P; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech; Bicknell, Louise S

    2016-07-07

    DNA replication precisely duplicates the genome to ensure stable inheritance of genetic information. Impaired licensing of origins of replication during the G1 phase of the cell cycle has been implicated in Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS), a disorder defined by the triad of short stature, microtia, and a/hypoplastic patellae. Biallelic partial loss-of-function mutations in multiple components of the pre-replication complex (preRC; ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, or CDC6) as well as de novo stabilizing mutations in the licensing inhibitor, GMNN, cause MGS. Here we report the identification of mutations in CDC45 in 15 affected individuals from 12 families with MGS and/or craniosynostosis. CDC45 encodes a component of both the pre-initiation (preIC) and CMG helicase complexes, required for initiation of DNA replication origin firing and ongoing DNA synthesis during S-phase itself, respectively, and hence is functionally distinct from previously identified MGS-associated genes. The phenotypes of affected individuals range from syndromic coronal craniosynostosis to severe growth restriction, fulfilling diagnostic criteria for Meier-Gorlin syndrome. All mutations identified were biallelic and included synonymous mutations altering splicing of physiological CDC45 transcripts, as well as amino acid substitutions expected to result in partial loss of function. Functionally, mutations reduce levels of full-length transcripts and protein in subject cells, consistent with partial loss of CDC45 function and a predicted limited rate of DNA replication and cell proliferation. Our findings therefore implicate the preIC as an additional protein complex involved in the etiology of MGS and connect the core cellular machinery of genome replication with growth, chondrogenesis, and cranial suture homeostasis.

  15. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke; Joseph J. Battista

    2001-03-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute and the Office of Physical Plant, Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc., and Cofiring Alternatives.

  16. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Tom Steitz

    2002-07-12

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives.

  17. An African-Centered Analysis of Penn et al.'s Critique of the Own-Race Preference Assumption Underlying Africentric Models of Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kambon, Kobi K. K.; Hopkins, Reginald

    1993-01-01

    In "On the Desirability of Own-Group Preference" (1993), Michael L. Penn, Stanley O. Gaines, and Layli Phillips argue that misguided and mythical ideal of racial-social integration in America is the only reasonable and effective foundation for real African empowerment in American society. Serious intellectual battle will be required to…

  18. Health assessment for Red Penn Sanitation Co. Inc. , Landfill Peewee Valley, Kentucky, Region 4. CERCLIS No. KYD981469794. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-14

    The Red Penn Sanitation Co., Inc., Landfill, located in Oldham County, Kentucky, near the town of Peewee Valley, was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as an Update 7 site. The site covers 150 acres. A site investigation, conducted in 1986 as part of the NPL nomination protocol, identified heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in the wastes, soils, sediments, groundwater, and surface water. On the basis of the information reviewed, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry has concluded that this site is of potential health concern because humans may be exposed to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects.

  19. The Influence of Device Position on the Flow within the Penn State 12 cc Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Schönberger, Markus; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B.

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices are a commonly used heart failure therapy for adult patients as bridge-to-transplant or bridge-to-recovery tool. The application of adult ventricular assist devices in pediatric patients has led to increased thrombotic events. Therefore, we have been developing a pediatric ventricular assist device, the Penn State 12 cc PVAD. It is designed for patients with a body weight of 5 to 15 kg and has a stroke volume of 12 cc. Clot formation is the major concern. It is correlated to the coagulability of blood, the blood contacting materials and the fluid dynamics within the system. The intent is for the PVAD to be a long term therapy. Therefore, the system may be oriented in different positions according to the patient’s behavior. This study evaluates for the first time the impact of position on the flow patterns within the Penn State 12 cc PVAD, which may help to improve the PVAD design concerning chamber and ports geometries. The fluid dynamics are visualized by particle image velocimetry. The evaluation is based on inlet jet behavior and calculated wall shear rates. Vertical and horizontal model orientations are compared, both with a beat rate of 75, outlet pressures of 90/60 mmHg and a flow rate of 1.3 l/min. The results show a significant change of the inlet jet behavior and the development of a rotational flow pattern. Vertically, the inlet jet is strong along the wall. It initiates a rotational flow pattern with a wandering axis of rotation. In contrast, the horizontal model orientation results show a weaker inlet jet along the wall with a nearly constant center of rotation location, which can be correlated to a higher risk of thrombotic events. In addition high speed videography illustrates differences in the diaphragm motion during diastole. Diaphragm opening trajectories measurements determine no significant impact of the density of the blood analog fluids. Hence, the results correlate to human blood. PMID:22929894

  20. Investigations of groundwater system and simulation of regional groundwater flow for North Penn Area 7 Superfund site, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Goode, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater in the vicinity of several industrial facilities in Upper Gwynedd Township and vicinity, Montgomery County, in southeast Pennsylvania has been shown to be contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the most common of which is the solvent trichloroethylene (TCE). The 2-square-mile area was placed on the National Priorities List as the North Penn Area 7 Superfund site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1989. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical logging, aquifer testing, and water-level monitoring, and measured streamflows in and near North Penn Area 7 from fall 2000 through fall 2006 in a technical assistance study for the USEPA to develop an understanding of the hydrogeologic framework in the area as part of the USEPA Remedial Investigation. In addition, the USGS developed a groundwater-flow computer model based on the hydrogeologic framework to simulate regional groundwater flow and to estimate directions of groundwater flow and pathways of groundwater contaminants. The study area is underlain by Triassic- and Jurassic-age sandstones and shales of the Lockatong Formation and Brunswick Group in the Mesozoic Newark Basin. Regionally, these rocks strike northeast and dip to the northwest. The sequence of rocks form a fractured-sedimentary-rock aquifer that acts as a set of confined to partially confined layers of differing permeabilities. Depth to competent bedrock typically is less than 20 ft below land surface. The aquifer layers are recharged locally by precipitation and discharge locally to streams. The general configuration of the potentiometric surface in the aquifer is similar to topography, except in areas affected by pumping. The headwaters of Wissahickon Creek are nearby, and the stream flows southwest, parallel to strike, to bisect North Penn Area 7. Groundwater is pumped in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 for industrial use, public supply, and residential supply. Results of field investigations

  1. Mutations in ORC1, encoding the largest subunit of the origin recognition complex, cause microcephalic primordial dwarfism resembling Meier-Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bicknell, Louise S; Walker, Sarah; Klingseisen, Anna; Stiff, Tom; Leitch, Andrea; Kerzendorfer, Claudia; Martin, Carol-Anne; Yeyati, Patricia; Al Sanna, Nouriya; Bober, Michael; Johnson, Diana; Wise, Carol; Jackson, Andrew P; O'Driscoll, Mark; Jeggo, Penny A

    2011-02-27

    Studies into disorders of extreme growth failure (for example, Seckel syndrome and Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II) have implicated fundamental cellular processes of DNA damage response signaling and centrosome function in the regulation of human growth. Here we report that mutations in ORC1, encoding a subunit of the origin recognition complex, cause microcephalic primordial dwarfism resembling Meier-Gorlin syndrome. We establish that these mutations disrupt known ORC1 functions including pre-replicative complex formation and origin activation. ORC1 deficiency perturbs S-phase entry and S-phase progression. Additionally, we show that Orc1 depletion in zebrafish is sufficient to markedly reduce body size during rapid embryonic growth. Our data suggest a model in which ORC1 mutations impair replication licensing, slowing cell cycle progression and consequently impeding growth during development, particularly at times of rapid proliferation. These findings establish a novel mechanism for the pathogenesis of microcephalic dwarfism and show a surprising but important developmental impact of impaired origin licensing.

  2. Drosophila model of Meier-Gorlin syndrome based on the mutation in a conserved C-Terminal domain of Orc6.

    PubMed

    Balasov, Maxim; Akhmetova, Katarina; Chesnokov, Igor

    2015-11-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by microtia, primordial dwarfism, small ears, and skeletal abnormalities. Patients with MGS often carry mutations in the genes encoding the components of the pre-replicative complex such as Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) subunits Orc1, Orc4, Orc6, and helicase loaders Cdt1 and Cdc6. Orc6 is an important component of ORC and has functions in both DNA replication and cytokinesis. Mutation in conserved C-terminal motif of Orc6 associated with MGS impedes the interaction of Orc6 with core ORC. In order to study the effects of MGS mutation in an animal model system we introduced MGS mutation in Orc6 and established Drosophila model of MGS. Mutant flies die at third instar larval stage with abnormal chromosomes and DNA replication defects. The lethality can be rescued by elevated expression of mutant Orc6 protein. Rescued MGS flies are unable to fly and display multiple planar cell polarity defects. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. School-Based Prevention of Depressive Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Study of the Effectiveness and Specificity of the Penn Resiliency Program

    PubMed Central

    Gillham, Jane E.; Reivich, Karen J.; Freres, Derek R.; Chaplin, Tara M.; Shatté, Andrew J.; Samuels, Barbra; Elkon, Andrea G. L.; Litzinger, Samantha; Lascher, Marisa; Gallop, Robert; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2015-01-01

    The authors investigated the effectiveness and specificity of the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP; J. E. Gillham, L. H. Jaycox, K. J. Reivich, M. E. P. Seligman, & T. Silver, 1990), a cognitive–behavioral depression prevention program. Children (N = 697) from 3 middle schools were randomly assigned to PRP, Control (CON), or the Penn Enhancement Program (PEP; K. J. Reivich, 1996; A. J. Shatté, 1997), an alternate intervention that controls for nonspecific intervention ingredients. Children’s depressive symptoms were assessed through 3 years of follow-up. There was no intervention effect on average levels of depressive symptoms in the full sample. Findings varied by school. In 2 schools, PRP significantly reduced depressive symptoms across the follow-up relative to both CON and PEP. In the 3rd school, PRP did not prevent depressive symptoms. The authors discuss the findings in relation to previous research on PRP and the dissemination of prevention programs. PMID:17295559

  4. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Curtis Jawdy

    2000-10-09

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal or coal refuse, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute and the Office of Physical Plant, Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, and Cofiring Alternatives. The major emphasis of work during this reporting period was to assess the types and quantities of potential feedstocks and collect samples of them for analysis. Approximately twenty different biomass, animal waste, and other wastes were collected and analyzed.

  5. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits

    2001-01-18

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives. During this reporting period, work focused on performing the design of the conceptual fluidized bed system and determining the system economics.

  6. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke

    2001-07-13

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences, Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc., Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc., and Cofiring Alternatives. During this reporting period, work focused on completing the biofuel characterization and the design of the conceptual fluidized bed system.

  7. The BAH domain of ORC1 links H4K20me2 to DNA replication licensing and Meier-Gorlin syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Alex J; Song, Jikui; Cheung, Peggie; Ishibe-Murakami, Satoko; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K; Patel, Dinshaw J; Gozani, Or

    2012-07-11

    The recognition of distinctly modified histones by specialized 'effector' proteins constitutes a key mechanism for transducing molecular events at chromatin to biological outcomes. Effector proteins influence DNA-templated processes, including transcription, DNA recombination and DNA repair; however, no effector functions have yet been identified within the mammalian machinery that regulate DNA replication. Here we show that ORC1 - a component of ORC (origin of replication complex), which mediates pre-DNA replication licensing - contains a bromo adjacent homology (BAH) domain that specifically recognizes histone H4 dimethylated at lysine 20 (H4K20me2). Recognition of H4K20me2 is a property common to BAH domains present within diverse metazoan ORC1 proteins. Structural studies reveal that the specificity of the BAH domain for H4K20me2 is mediated by a dynamic aromatic dimethyl-lysine-binding cage and multiple intermolecular contacts involving the bound peptide. H4K20me2 is enriched at replication origins, and abrogating ORC1 recognition of H4K20me2 in cells impairs ORC1 occupancy at replication origins, ORC chromatin loading and cell-cycle progression. Mutation of the ORC1 BAH domain has been implicated in the aetiology of Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS), a form of primordial dwarfism, and ORC1 depletion in zebrafish results in an MGS-like phenotype. We find that wild-type human ORC1, but not ORC1-H4K20me2-binding mutants, rescues the growth retardation of orc1 morphants. Moreover, zebrafish depleted of H4K20me2 have diminished body size, mirroring the phenotype of orc1 morphants. Together, our results identify the BAH domain as a novel methyl-lysine-binding module, thereby establishing the first direct link between histone methylation and the metazoan DNA replication machinery, and defining a pivotal aetiological role for the canonical H4K20me2 mark, via ORC1, in primordial dwarfism.

  8. A longitudinal study of caries onset in initially caries-free children and baseline salivary mutans streptococci levels: a Kaplan-Meier survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Kopycka-Kedzierawski, Dorota T; Billings, Ronald J

    2004-06-01

    To apply survival analysis to a longitudinal study of the relationship between salivary mutans streptococci (MS) levels at baseline in initially caries-free children and caries onset in deciduous, mixed, and permanent dentition. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis method was used to compare survival times to caries onset for initially caries-free children with low levels of MS at baseline with survival times to caries onset for initially caries-free children with high levels of MS at baseline. Data from a 6-year longitudinal study of caries risk in initially caries-free children in Rochester and the Finger Lakes Region of western New York were utilized for this study. Of 464 children analyzed, 327 had a low level of MS and 137 had a high level of MS at baseline. Survival analyses showed that children with a low level of MS at baseline remained caries-free for a longer period than children with a high level of MS at baseline. Statistically significant relationships [hazard ratios (HR)] with onset of caries in deciduous, mixed and permanent teeth were found with high and low levels of salivary MS. Based on our analysis, we concluded that children who were caries-free at baseline and who had high salivary MS levels at baseline would be at greater risk, i.e. more susceptible to caries onset, at any given time than caries-free children who had low salivary MS levels at baseline. Survival functions for deciduous, mixed and permanent dentitions with their 95% confidence limits have been calculated. Survival analysis for the exploration of longitudinal caries studies has an advantage over traditional statistical methods, as it takes into account censored observations and incorporates the concept of risk over time. Hence, survival analysis is well suited for studying transitions from one health state to another, in this case, from a caries-free state to a caries-active state. Copyright Blackwell Munksgaard, 2004

  9. Mining expression and prognosis of topoisomerase isoforms in non-small-cell lung cancer by using Oncomine and Kaplan–Meier plotter

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guo-Xin; Liu, Panpan; Yang, Jing; Wen, Shijun

    2017-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are essential to modulate DNA topology during various cellular genetic processes. The expression and distinct prognostic value of topoisomerase isoforms in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is not well established. In the current study, we have examined the mRNA expression of topoisomerase isoforms by using Oncomine analysis and investigated their prognostic value via the Kaplan–Meier plotter database in NSCLC patients. Our analysis indicated that the expression level of topoisomerases in lung cancer was higher compared with normal tissues. Especially, high expression of two topoisomerase isoforms, TOP2A and TOP3A, was found to be correlated to worse overall survival (OS) in all NSCLC and lung adenocarcinoma (Ade) patients, but not in lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) patients. In a contrast, high expression of isoforms TOP1 and TOP2B indicated better OS in all NSCLC and Ade, but not in SCC patients. Meanwhile, high expression of TOP1MT and TOP3B was not correlated with OS in NSCLC patients. Furthermore, we also demonstrated a relationship between topoisomerase isoforms and the clinicopathological features for the NSCLC patients, such as grades, clinical stages, lymph node status, smoking status, gender, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These results support that TOP2A and TOP3A are associated with worse prognosis in NSCLC patients. In addition, our study also shows that TOP1 and TOP2B contribute to favorable prognosis in NSCLC patients. The exact prognostic significance of TOP1MT and TOP3B need to be further elucidated. Comprehensive evaluation of expression and prognosis of topoisomerase isoforms will be a benefit for the better understanding of heterogeneity and complexity in the molecular biology of NSCLC, paving a way for more accurate prediction of prognosis and discovery of potential drug targets for NSCLC patients. PMID:28355294

  10. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke

    2001-10-12

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels.

  11. Validation of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life Scale (PANQOL) for Spanish-Speaking Patients.

    PubMed

    Medina, Maria Del Mar; Carrillo, Alvaro; Polo, Ruben; Fernandez, Borja; Alonso, Daniel; Vaca, Miguel; Cordero, Adela; Perez, Cecilia; Muriel, Alfonso; Cobeta, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    Objective To perform translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and validation of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life Scale (PANQOL) to the Spanish language. Study Design Prospective study. Setting Tertiary neurotologic referral center. Subjects and Methods PANQOL was translated and translated back, and a pretest trial was performed. The study included 27 individuals diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma. Inclusion criteria were adults with untreated vestibular schwannoma, diagnosed in the past 12 months. Feasibility, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and ceiling and floor effects were assessed for the present study. Results The mean overall score of the PANQOL was 69.21 (0-100 scale, lowest to highest quality of life). Cronbach's α was 0.87. Intraclass correlation coefficient was performed for each item, with an overall score of 0.92. The κ coefficient scores were between moderate and almost perfect in more than 92% of patients. Anxiety and energy domains of the PANQOL were correlated with both physical and mental components of the SF-12. Hearing, balance, and pain domains were correlated with the SF-12 physical component. Facial and general domains were not significantly correlated with any component of the SF-12. Furthermore, the overall score of the PANQOL was correlated with the physical component of the SF-12. Conclusion Feasibility, internal consistency, reliability, and construct validity outcomes in the current study support the validity of the Spanish version of the PANQOL.

  12. Validation of the facial dysfunction domain of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life (PANQOL) Scale.

    PubMed

    Lodder, Wouter L; Adan, Guleed H; Chean, Chung S; Lesser, Tristram H; Leong, Samuel C

    2017-04-08

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the strength of content validity within the facial dysfunction domain of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life (PANQOL) Scale and to compare how it correlates with a facial dysfunction-specific QOL instrument (Facial Clinimetric Evaluation, FaCE). The study design is online questionnaire survey. Members of the British Acoustic Neuroma Association received both PANQOL questionnaires and the FaCE scale. 158 respondents with self-identified facial paralysis or dysfunction had completed PANQOL and FaCE data sets for analysis. The mean composite PANQOL score was 53.5 (range 19.2-93.5), whilst the mean total FaCE score was 50.9 (range 10-95). The total scores of the PANQOL and FaCE correlated moderate (r = 0.48). Strong correlation (r = 0.63) was observed between the PANQOL's facial dysfunction domain and the FaCE total score. Of all the FaCE domains, social function was strongly correlated with the PANQOL facial dysfunction domain (r = 0.66), whilst there was very weak-to-moderate correlation (range 0.01-0.43) to the other FaCE domains. The current study has demonstrated a strong correlation between the facial dysfunction domains of PANQOL with a facial paralysis-specific QOL instrument.

  13. In-depth survey report: Control technology for metal reclamation industries at East Penn Manufacturing Company Inc., Lyon Station, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.M.; Earnest, G.S.; Jensen, P.A.; Zimmer, A.T.

    1996-06-03

    In an effort to identify effective hazard control methods and work practices, an in depth evaluation was conducted at the East Penn Manufacturing Company Inc. (SIC-3341), Lyon Station, Pennsylvania, which had previously been identified as having the lowest air lead (7439921) concentrations in lead smelter areas during a previous survey. This facility was primarily involved in lead reclamation from recycled automobile and industrial batteries. Control methods employed included automation, local exhaust ventilation, partial enclosures, and enclosed ventilation systems in the reverberatory and blast furnaces, and in casting and refinery areas. Employees in production areas also wore filtered half mask respirators, adhered to strict company policies on personal hygiene, and participated in incentive programs designed to reduce blood lead levels and encourage good personal hygiene and work practices. The authors noted that there was a potential for significant lead exposure in the blast furnace area, reverberatory furnace area, refinery area, and front end load operations. The authors recommend that efforts be made to improve controls in these areas.

  14. Flow Visualization of Three-Dimensionality Inside the 12 cc Penn State Pulsatile Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Roszelle, Breigh N.; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B.

    2010-01-01

    In order to aid the ongoing concern of limited organ availability for pediatric heart transplants, Penn State has continued development of a pulsatile Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device (PVAD). Initial studies of the PVAD observed an increase in thrombus formation due to differences in flow field physics when compared to adult sized devices, which included a higher degree of three-dimensionality. This unique flow field brings into question the use of 2D planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) as a flow visualization technique, however the small size and high curvature of the PVAD make other tools such as stereoscopic PIV impractical. In order to test the reliability of the 2D results, we perform a pseudo-3D PIV study using planes both parallel and normal to the diaphragm employing a mock circulatory loop containing a viscoelastic fluid that mimics 40% hematocrit blood. We find that while the third component of velocity is extremely helpful to a physical understanding of the flow, particularly of the diastolic jet and the development of a desired rotational pattern, the flow data taken parallel to the diaphragm is sufficient to describe the wall shear rates, a critical aspect to the study of thrombosis and design of such pumps. PMID:19936926

  15. Psychometric characteristics of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire in an Argentinean sample: a cross-cultural contribution.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Biglieri, Ricardo; Vetere, Giselle Lorena

    2011-05-01

    Although studies in several populations have provided support for Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSQW) reliability and validity, factor analysis studies carried out on different populations show divergent results. The aim of this article is to contribute with the cross-cultural literature on PSWQ. This report describes two studies examining the psychometric characteristics of a revised Argentinean version of the PSWQ. In the first study, items of original PSWQ were translated into Spanish and then back-translated into English. Then, in order to examine its reliability and factorial structure, the instrument was completed by 400 community participants. The second study included two groups of participants as follows: patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and patients with other anxiety disorders (AC). Results revealed appropriated test-retest reliability over a four-week period, high internal consistency, and good convergent and discriminant validity for PSWQ. In concordance with some results reported in previous studies, a single factorial structure was confirmed for the Argentinean version of PSWQ. By the other hand, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was made to evaluate the ability of PSWQ to discriminate GAD from individuals with others anxiety disorders. A total score of 63 simultaneously optimized sensitivity and specificity in discriminating GAD patients from patients with others anxiety disorders.

  16. Multistep translation and cultural adaptation of the Penn acoustic neuroma quality-of-life scale for German-speaking patients.

    PubMed

    Kristin, Julia; Glaas, Marcel Fabian; Stenin, Igor; Albrecht, Angelika; Klenzner, Thomas; Schipper, Jörg; Eysel-Gosepath, Katrin

    2017-08-31

    Monitoring the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) has garnered increasing interest. In German-speaking countries, there is no disease-specific questionnaire available similar to the "Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-life Scale" (PANQOL). We translated the PANQOL for German-speaking patients based on a multistep protocol that included not only a forward-backward translation but also linguistic and sociocultural adaptations. The process consists of translation, synthesis, back translation, review by an expert committee, administration of the prefinal version to our patients, submission and appraisal of all written documents by our research team. The required multidisciplinary team for translation comprised head and neck surgeons, language professionals (German and English), a professional translator, and bilingual participants. A total of 123 patients with VS underwent microsurgical procedures via different approaches at our clinic between January 2007 and January 2017. Among these, 72 patients who underwent the translabyrinthine approach participated in the testing of the German-translated PANQOL. The first German version of the PANQOL questionnaire was created by a multistep translation process. The responses indicate that the questionnaire is simple to administer and applicable to our patients. The use of a multistep process to translate quality-of-life questionnaires is complex and time-consuming. However, this process was performed properly and resulted in a version of the PANQOL for assessing the quality of life of German-speaking patients with VS.

  17. Use of social media in graduate-level medical humanities education: two pilot studies from Penn State College of Medicine.

    PubMed

    George, Daniel R; Dellasega, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Social media strategies in education have gained attention for undergraduate students, but there has been relatively little application with graduate populations in medicine. To use and evaluate the integration of new social media tools into the curricula of two graduate-level medical humanities electives offered to 4th-year students at Penn State College of Medicine. Instructors selected five social media tools--Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, blogging and Skype--to promote student learning. At the conclusion of each course, students provided quantitative and qualitative course evaluation. Students gave high favourability ratings to both courses, and expressed that the integration of social media into coursework augmented learning and collaboration. Others identified challenges including: demands on time, concerns about privacy and lack of facility with technology. Integrating social media tools into class activities appeared to offer manifold benefits over traditional classroom methods, including real-time communication outside of the classroom, connecting with medical experts, collaborative opportunities and enhanced creativity. Social media can augment learning opportunities within humanities curriculum in medical schools, and help students acquire tools and skill-sets for problem solving, networking, and collaboration. Command of technologies will be increasingly important to the practice of medicine in the twenty-first century.

  18. Short communication: Further validation of the fat sub-model in the Cornell-Penn-Miner Dairy model.

    PubMed

    Moate, P J; Boston, R C; Lean, I J; Chalupa, W

    2006-03-01

    Recently, a fat sub-model was introduced into the Cornell-Penn-Miner Dairy model (CPM-Dairy; Moate et al., 2004). The principal aim of the work reported here was to validate this fat sub-model in terms of its accuracy in predicting the apparent absorption (intake - feces) of total long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) in lactating dairy cows. The fat sub-model in CPM-Dairy was used to predict the amounts (g/d) of total LCFA apparently absorbed from 63 diets described in 14 published experiments. These predicted amounts (PLCFA) were regressed against the amounts reported to be apparently absorbed (RLCFA). The regression equation was: PLCFA = - 24.8 +/- 25.2 + 1.011 x 0.029 x RLCFA; R2 = 0.95, RMSE = 55.2 g/d. The results show that for a diverse range of diets, the fat model in CPM-Dairy can accurately predict apparent absorption of dietary total LCFA.

  19. Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Bypass Circuits: A Review of Studies Conducted at the Penn State Pediatric Cardiac Research Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Akemi; Lu, Chiajung Karen; Wang, Shigang; Umstead, Todd M.; Freeman, Willard M.; Vrana, Kent; Yang, Sung; Myers, John L.; Phelps, David S.; Zahn, Jeffrey D.; Ündar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuits are frequently necessary in the repair of congenital heart defects in infants and children. Although advances in technology and operative technique have decreased the mortality associated with cardiac procedures requiring CPB, post-operative neuro-cognitive outcome and the role of the CPB circuit in post-operative morbidity remains a significant concern. There are several factors that have been suggested to play a significant role in general post-operative outcome, including intraoperative inflammatory responses caused by the interaction of blood with circuit component surfaces, selection of appropriate perfusion mode to optimize organ function during CPB, and the introduction of gaseous microemboli into the patient’s systemic circulation through circuit manipulations and modifications. These factors are the subject of continuing research at the Penn State Hershey Children’s Hospital Pediatric Cardiac Research Laboratories, and this review will focus on the results of studies aimed at identifying circuit elements that affect the delivery of gaseous microemboli to the patient during CPB procedures, the role of anti-factor D monoclonal antibody in reducing systemic inflammation during CPB, and the results of preliminary plasma proteomics studies conducted on infants undergoing CPB. PMID:19361042

  20. Geochemical and mineralogical controls on trace element release from the Penn Mine base-metal slag dump, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, M.B.; Bird, D.K.; Einaudi, M.T.; Alpers, C.N.

    2001-01-01

    Base-metal slag deposits at the Penn Mine in Calaveras County, California, are a source of environmental contamination through leaching of potentially toxic elements. Historical Cu smelting at Penn Mine (1865-1919) generated approximately 200,000 m3 of slag. The slag deposits, which are flooded annually by a reservoir used for drinking water and irrigation, also may be in contact with acidic ground waters (pH < 4) from the adjacent mine area. Slags vary from grey to black, are glassy to crystalline, and range in size from coarse sand to large (0.6 ?? 0.7 ?? 1.5 m), tub-shaped casts. Metals are hosted by a variety of minerals and two glass phases. On the basis of mineralogy, slags are characterized by 4 main types: fayalite-rich, glassy, willemite-rich, and sulfide-rich. The ranges in metal and metalloid concentrations of 17 slag samples are: As, 0.0004-0.92; Ba, 0.13-2.9; Cd, 0.0014-1.4; Cu, 0.18-6.4; Pb, 0.02-11; and Zn, 3.2-28 wt.%. Leachates from Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure tests (acetic acid buffered at pH 4.93) on two wiltemite-rich slags contained Cd and Pb concentrations (up to 2.5 and 30 mg/l, respectively) in excess of US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) regulatory limits. Analyses of filtered (0.45 ??m) water, collected within the flooded slag dump during reservoir drawdown, reveal concentrations of Cd (1.7 ??g/l), Cu (35 ??g/l), and Zn (250 ??g/l) that exceed USEPA chronic toxicity guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Data from field and laboratory studies were used to develop geochemical models with the program EQ3/6 that simulate irreversible mass-transfer between slag deposits and reservoir waters. These models include kinetic rate laws for abiotic sulfide oxidation and surface-controlled dissolution of silicates, oxides, and glass. Calculations demonstrate that the main processes controlling dissolved metal concentrations are (1) dissolution of fayalite, willemite, and glass; (2) sulfide oxidation; and (3) secondary

  1. Development and assessment of brief versions of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire and the Ruminative Response Scale.

    PubMed

    Topper, Maurice; Emmelkamp, Paul M G; Watkins, Ed; Ehring, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Worry and depressive rumination have been found to be involved in the onset and maintenance of a range of psychological disorders. The development of brief screening measures for excessive worry and depressive rumination is therefore desirable to facilitate the assessment of worry and rumination in prevention and treatment settings where routine administration of full questionnaires is not practical due to time-related constraints. Using the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) and the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS) as gold standard starting points, brief versions of these measures were developed in a large sample of adolescents (N = 1,952) and results were cross-validated in two independent samples (N = 1,954; N = 457). The brief versions demonstrated acceptable to high internal consistency (brief PSWQ: α = .84-.91; brief RRS: α = .78-.81) and correlated highly with the full questionnaires (brief PSWQ: r = .91-.94; brief RRS: r = .88-.91). In addition, they showed high sensitivity (brief PSWQ: .90-.92; brief RRS: .90-.93), and high specificity (brief PSWQ: .88-.90; brief RRS: .80-.87) to detect excessive worry and rumination. The validity of the brief measures was further supported by demonstrating that the brief measures showed similar differences in scores between males and females as the full measures as well as substantial relationships to other measures of repetitive negative thinking and symptom measures of anxiety and depression. Finally, the brief measures predicted future symptoms of anxiety and depression. The brief versions of the PSWQ and RRS are time-efficient and valid instruments for the screening of worry and depressive rumination. Their use in clinical practice is recommended to inform treatment and/or to select individuals at risk for development of psychological disorders who may benefit from preventive interventions. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  2. The identification, characterization and optimization of small molecule probes of cysteine proteases: experiences of the Penn Center for Molecular Discovery with cathepsin B and cathepsin L.

    PubMed

    Huryn, Donna M; Smith, Amos B

    2009-01-01

    During the pilot phase of the NIH Molecular Library Screening Network, the Penn Center for Molecular Discovery focused on a series of projects aimed at high throughput screening and the development of probes of a variety of protease targets. This review provides our medicinal chemistry experience with two such targets--cathepsin B and cathepsin L. We describe our approach for hit validation, characterization and triage that led to a critical understanding of the nature of hits from the cathepsin B project. In addition, we detail our experience at hit identification and optimization that led to the development of a novel thiocarbazate probe of cathepsin L.

  3. Metabolic syndrome burden in apparently healthy adolescents are adversely associated with cardiac autonomic modulation- Penn State Children Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Colón, Sol M.; He, Fan; Bixler, Edward O.; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Calhoun, Susan; Zheng, Zhi-Jie; Liao, Duanping

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM) has been associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) in adults. However, the association between MetS component cluster and CAM has not been examined in adolescents. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using data from the Penn State Child Cohort follow-up examination. CAM was assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) analysis of 39-hour RR intervals, including frequency (high frequency, HF; low frequency, LF; and LF/HF ratio) and time (SDNN, standard deviation of all RR intervals; RMSSD, square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent RR intervals; and HR, heart rate) domain variables. To assess the MetS burden, we used continuous MetS score (cMetS)–sum of the age and sex-adjusted standardized residual (Z-score) of five established MetS components. Linear mixed-effect models were used to analyze the association between cMetS and CAM in the entire population and stratified by gender. Results After adjusting for age, sex, and race, cMetS was significantly associated with reduced HRV and higher HR. With 1 standard deviation increase in cMetS, there was a significant decrease in HF(−0.10(SE=0.02)), LF(−0.07(SE=0.01)), SDNN(−1.97(SE=0.50)), and RMSSD(−1.70(SE=0.72)), and increase in LF/HF(0.08(SE=0.02)) and HR(1.40(SE=0.26)). All cMetS components, with the exception of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), were associated with significantly decreased HRV and increased HR. High blood pressure (MAP) and triglyceride (TG) levels were also associated with an increase in LF/HF and decrease in RMSSD. An increase in high-density lipoprotein was only associated with higher LF and SDNN. Moreover, cMetS and HRV associations were more pronounced in males than in females. The associations between HRV and. MAP, TG, and HDL were more pronounced in females. Conclusions cMetS score is associated with lower HRV, suggesting an adverse impact on CAM, even in apparently healthy adolescents

  4. 'PACS at Penn'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenson, Ronald L.; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Kundel, Harold L.; DeSimone, Debra

    1989-05-01

    History: Our experience with Medical Image Management Systems (MIMS, also called PACS) began in 1982 with the creation of a digital subtraction angiography (DSA) unit. This DSA system was built utilizing a DeAnza image array processor with boards fabricated by our staff to interface with a Siemens angiography room. Because of the need to transmit and eventually store very large image files on a remote computer, we designed and fabricated a point-to-point fiber-optic link [82-ARENA. This device was later marketed by Canoga Systems and was an important contribution to the design of commercial fiber-optic networks. Recognizing the importance of a versatile Radiology Information System (RIS) and its critical inter-relationship to a MIMS, some very early work on RIS design was carried out [79-ARENA, [79.B-AREN ], [84-AREN ].

  5. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; Rhett McLaren; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Tom Steitz; Joseph J. Battista

    2003-03-26

    The Pennsylvania State University, utilizing funds furnished by the U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Power Program, investigated the installation of a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The study was performed using a team that included personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives. The activities included assessing potential feedstocks at the University Park campus and surrounding region with an emphasis on biomass materials, collecting and analyzing potential feedstocks, assessing agglomeration, deposition, and corrosion tendencies, identifying the optimum location for the boiler system through an internal site selection process, performing a three circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler design and a 15-year boiler plant transition plan, determining the costs associated with installing the boiler system, developing a preliminary test program, determining the associated costs for the test program, and exploring potential emissions credits when using the biomass CFB boiler.

  6. PennCNV: An integrated hidden Markov model designed for high-resolution copy number variation detection in whole-genome SNP genotyping data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Li, Mingyao; Hadley, Dexter; Liu, Rui; Glessner, Joseph; Grant, Struan F.A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Bucan, Maja

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive identification and cataloging of copy number variations (CNVs) is required to provide a complete view of human genetic variation. The resolution of CNV detection in previous experimental designs has been limited to tens or hundreds of kilobases. Here we present PennCNV, a hidden Markov model (HMM) based approach, for kilobase-resolution detection of CNVs from Illumina high-density SNP genotyping data. This algorithm incorporates multiple sources of information, including total signal intensity and allelic intensity ratio at each SNP marker, the distance between neighboring SNPs, the allele frequency of SNPs, and the pedigree information where available. We applied PennCNV to genotyping data generated for 112 HapMap individuals; on average, we detected ∼27 CNVs for each individual with a median size of ∼12 kb. Excluding common rearrangements in lymphoblastoid cell lines, the fraction of CNVs in offspring not detected in parents (CNV-NDPs) was 3.3%. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of whole-genome fine-mapping of CNVs via high-density SNP genotyping. PMID:17921354

  7. The Penn State-Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search stars. I. Spectroscopic analysis of 348 red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieliński, P.; Niedzielski, A.; Wolszczan, A.; Adamów, M.; Nowak, G.

    2012-11-01

    Aims: We present basic atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, vt, and [Fe/H]) as well as luminosities, masses, radii, and absolute radial velocities for 348 stars, presumably giants, from the ~1000 star sample observed within the Penn State-Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search with the High Resolution Spectrograph of the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The stellar parameters (luminosities, masses, radii) are key to properly interpreting newly discovered low-mass companions, while a systematic study of the complete sample will create a basis for future statistical considerations concerning the appearance of low-mass companions around evolved low- and intermediate-mass stars. Methods: The atmospheric parameters were derived using a strictly spectroscopic method based on the LTE analysis of equivalent widths of Fe I and Fe II lines. With existing photometric data and the Hipparcos parallaxes, we estimated stellar masses and ages via evolutionary tracks fitting. The stellar radii were calculated from either estimated masses and the spectroscopic log g or from the spectroscopic Teff and estimated luminosities. The absolute radial velocities were obtained by cross-correlating spectra with a numerical template. Results: We completed the spectroscopic analysis for 332 stars, 327 of which were found to be giants. A simplified analysis was applied to the remaining 16 stars, which had incomplete data. The results show that our sample is composed of stars with effective temperatures ranging from 4055 K to 6239 K, with log g between 1.39 and 4.78 (5 dwarfs were identified). The estimated luminosities are between log L/L⊙ = -1.0 and 3 and lead to masses ranging from 0.6 to 3.4 M⊙. Only 63 stars with masses larger than 2 M⊙ were found. The radii of our stars range from 0.6 to 52 R⊙ with the vast majority between 9-11 R⊙. The stars in our sample are generally less metal-abundant than the Sun with median [Fe/H] = -0.15. The estimated uncertainties in the atmospheric

  8. Public health assessment for north Penn-area 1, Souderton, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. Cerclis No. PAD096834494. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-12

    The North Penn Area 1 site, a National Priorities List (NPL) site, is located in the Borough of Souderton, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. Gentle, Cleaners, Inc., one of the parties potentially responsible for the site contamination, has been in business since 1953 and used tetrachloroethene (PCE) from 1953 to 1983 in dry cleaning operations. At present, groundwater is the only medium that is known to be contaminated. Enviromental data for surface soil, surface water, sediment, and air do not exist. Past, present, and future completed exposure pathways for volatile organic compounds such as PCE and TCE in groundwater exist for nearby residents. The site is considered an indeterminate public health hazard because limited data are available; however, data that are available do not indicate that humans are being or have been exposed to levels of contaminants that would be expected to cause any adverse health effects.

  9. Geophysical Logs, Aquifer Tests, and Water Levels in Wells in and Near the North Penn Area 7 Superfund Site, Upper Gwynedd Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, 2002-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Conger, Randall W.; Bird, Philip H.

    2008-01-01

    Ground water in the vicinity of several industrial facilities in Upper Gwynedd Township and Lansdale Borough, Montgomery County, Pa., is contaminated with several volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The 2-square-mile area was placed on the National Priorities List as the North Penn Area 7 Superfund Site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1989. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical logging, aquifer testing, water-level monitoring, and streamflow measurements in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 from October 2002 through December 2006. This followed work that began in 2000 to assist the USEPA in developing an understanding of the hydrogeologic framework in the area as part of the USEPA Remedial Investigation. The study area is underlain by Triassic- and Jurassic-age sandstones, siltstones, and shales of the Lockatong Formation and the Brunswick Group. Regionally, these rocks strike northeast and dip to the northwest. The sequence of rocks form fractured-rock aquifers that act as a set of confined to semi-confined layered aquifers of differing permeabilities. The aquifers are recharged by precipitation and discharge to streams and wells. The Wissahickon Creek headwaters are less than 1 mile northeast of the study area. This stream flows southwest approximately parallel to strike and bisects North Penn Area 7. Ground water is pumped in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 for industrial use and public supply. The USGS collected geophysical logs for 42 wells that ranged in depth from 40 to 477 ft. Aquifer-interval-isolation testing was done in 17 of the 42 wells, for a total of 122 zones tested. A multiple-well aquifer test was conducted by monitoring the response of 14 wells to pumping and shutdown of a 600-ft deep production well in November-December 2004. In addition, water levels were monitored continuously in four wells in the area from October 2002 through September 2006, and streamflow was measured quarterly at two sites on

  10. The Guatemala-Penn Partners: An Innovative Inter-Institutional Model for Scientific Capacity-Building, Healthcare Education, and Public Health.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Avila, Maria Alejandra; Messenger, Elizabeth; Nelson, Caroline A; Calgua, Erwin; Barg, Frances K; Bream, Kent W; Compher, Charlene; Dean, Anthony J; Martinez-Siekavizza, Sergio; Puac-Polanco, Victor; Richmond, Therese S; Roth, Rudolf R; Branas, Charles C

    2017-01-01

    Population health outcomes are directly related to robust public health programs, access to basic health services, and a well-trained health-care workforce. Effective health services need to systematically identify solutions, scientifically test these solutions, and share generated knowledge. The World Health Organization (WHO)'s Global Healthcare Workforce Alliance states that the capacity to perform research is an essential factor for well-functioning public health systems. Low- and middle-income countries have greater health-care worker shortages and lower research capacity than higher-income countries. International global health partnerships between higher-income countries and low-middle-income countries aim to directly address such inequalities through capacity building, a process by which human and institutional resources are strengthened and developed, allowing them to perform high-level functions, solve complex problems, and achieve important objectives. The Guatemala-Penn Partners (GPP) is a collaboration among academic centers in Guatemala and the University of Pennsylvania (Penn), in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that echoes the vision of the WHO's Global Healthcare Workforce Alliance. This article describes the historical development and present organization of the GPP according to its three guiding principles: university-to-university connections, dual autonomies with locally led capacity building, and mutually beneficial exchanges. It describes the GPP activities within the domains of science, health-care education, and public health, emphasizing implementation factors, such as sustainability and scalability, in relation to the guiding principles. Successes and limitations of this innovative model are also analyzed in the hope that the lessons learned may be applied to similar partnerships across the globe.

  11. The contribution of skin blood flow in warming the skin after the application of local heat; the duality of the Pennes heat equation.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Paluso, Dominic; Anderson, Devyn; Swan, Kristin; Yim, Jong Eun; Murugesan, Vengatesh; Chindam, Tirupathi; Goraksh, Neha; Alshammari, Faris; Lee, Haneul; Trivedi, Moxi; Hudlikar, Akshay N; Katrak, Vahishta

    2011-04-01

    As predicted by the Pennes equation, skin blood flow is a major contributor to the removal of heat from an external heat source. This protects the skin from erythema and burns. But, for a person in a thermally neutral room, the skin is normally much cooler than arterial blood. Therefore, if skin blood flow (BF) increases, it should initially warm the skin paradoxically. To examine this phenomenon, 10 young male and female subjects participated in a series of experiments to examine the contribution of skin blood flow in the initial warming the skin after the application of local heat. Heat flow was measured by the use of a thermode above the brachioradialis muscle. The thermode was warmed by constant temperature water at 44°C entering the thermode at a water flow rate of 100 cm(3)/min. Skin temperature was measured by a thermistor and blood flow in the underlying skin was measured by a laser Doppler imager in single point mode. The results of the experiments showed that, when skin temperature is cool (31-32°C), the number of calories being transferred to the skin from the thermode cannot account for the rise in skin temperature alone. A significant portion of the rise in skin temperature is due to the warm arterialized blood traversing the skin from the core areas of the body. However, as skin temperature approaches central core temperature, it becomes less of a heat source and more of a heat sync such that when skin temperature is at or above core temperature, the blood flow to the skin, as predicted by Pennes, becomes a heat sync pulling heat from the thermode. Copyright © 2010 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydrogeology and geochemistry of acid mine drainage in ground water in the vicinity of Penn Mine and Camanche Reservoir, Calaveras County, California; first-year summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamlin, S.N.; Alpers, C.N.

    1995-01-01

    Acid drainage from the Penn Mine in Calaveras County, California, has caused contamination of ground water between Mine Run Dam and Camanche Reservoir. The Penn Mine was first developed in the 1860's primarily for copper and later produced lesser amounts of zinc, lead, silver, and gold from steeply dipping massive sulfide lenses in metamorphic rocks. Surface disposal of sulfidic waste rock and tailings from mine operations has produced acidic drainage with pH values between 2.3 and 2.7 and elevated concentrations of sulfate and metals, including copper, zinc, cadmium, iron, and aluminum. During the mine's operation and after its subsequent abandonment in the late 1950's, acid mine drainage flowed down Mine Run into the Mokelumne River. Construction of Camanche Dam in 1963 flooded part of the Mokelumne River adjacent to Penn Mine. Surface-water diversions and unlined impoundments were constructed at Penn Mine in 1979 to reduce runoff from the mine, collect contaminated surface water, and enhance evaporation. Some of the contaminated surface water infiltrates the ground water and flows toward Camanche Reservoir. Ground- water flow in the study area is controlled by the local hydraulic gradient and the hydraulic characteristics of two principal rock types, a Jurassic metavolcanic unit and the underlying Salt Spring slate. The hydraulic gradient is west from Mine Run impoundment toward Camanche Reservoir. The median hydraulic conductivity was about 10 to 50 times higher in the metavolcanic rock (0.1 foot per day) than in the slate (0.002 to 0.01 foot per day); most flow occurs in the metavolcanic rock where hydraulic conductivity is as high as 50 feet per day in two locations. The contact between the two rock units is a fault plane that strikes N20?W, dips 20?NE, and is a likely conduit for ground-water flow, based on down-hole measurements with a heatpulse flowmeter. Analyses of water samples collected during April 1992 provide a comprehensive characterization of

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Meier-Gorlin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... ensure that DNA replication occurs only once per cell division and is required for cells to divide. Mutations ... Researchers speculate that such a reduction delays the cell division process, which impairs growth of the bones and ...

  14. Optimal QT interval correction formula in sinus tachycardia for identifying cardiovascular and mortality risk: Findings from the Penn Atrial Fibrillation Free study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Parin J; Borovskiy, Yuliya; Killian, Anthony; Verdino, Ralph J; Epstein, Andrew E; Callans, David J; Marchlinski, Francis E; Deo, Rajat

    2016-02-01

    The QT interval measures cardiac repolarization, and prolongation is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes and death. The exponential Bazett correction formula overestimates the QT interval during tachycardia. We evaluated 4 formulas of QT interval correction in individuals with sinus tachycardia for the identification of coronary artery disease, heart failure, and mortality. The Penn Atrial Fibrillation Free study is a large cohort study of patients without atrial fibrillation. The present study examined 6723 Penn Atrial Fibrillation Free study patients without a history of heart failure and with baseline sinus rate ≥100 beats/min. Medical records were queried for index clinical parameters, incident cardiovascular events, and all-cause mortality. The QT interval was corrected by using Bazett (QT/RR(0.5)), Fridericia (QT/RR(0.33)), Framingham [QT + 0.154 * (1000 - RR)], and Hodges (QT + 105 * (1/RR - 1)) formulas. In 6723 patients with a median follow-up of 4.5 years (interquartile range 1.9-6.4 years), the annualized cardiovascular event rate was 2.3% and the annualized mortality rate was 2.2%. QT prolongation was diagnosed in 39% of the cohort using the Bazett formula, 6.2% using the Fridericia formula, 3.7% using the Framingham formula, and 8.7% using the Hodges formula. Only the Hodges formula was an independent risk marker for death across the range of QT values (highest tertile: hazard ratio 1.26; 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.55). Although all correction formulas demonstrated an association between QTc values and cardiovascular events, only the Hodges formula identified one-third of individuals with tachycardia that are at higher risk of all-cause mortality. Furthermore, the Bazett correction formula overestimates the number of patients with a prolonged QT interval and was not associated with mortality. Future work may validate these findings and result in changes to automated algorithms for QT interval assessment. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm

  15. Acute injuries in track and field athletes: a 3-year observational study at the Penn Relays Carnival with epidemiology and medical coverage implications.

    PubMed

    Opar, David; Drezner, Jonathan; Shield, Anthony; Williams, Morgan; Webner, David; Sennett, Brian; Kapur, Rahul; Cohen, Marc; Ulager, James; Cafengiu, Anna; Cronholm, Peter F

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have examined acute injuries in track and field in both elite and subelite athletes. To observe the absolute number and relative rates of injury in track and field athletes across a wide range of competition levels and ages during 3 years of the Penn Relays Carnival to assist with future medical coverage planning and injury prevention strategies. Descriptive epidemiology study. Over a 3-year period, all injuries treated by the medical staff were recorded on a standardized injury report form. Absolute number of injuries and relative injury rates (number of injuries per 1000 competing athletes) were determined and odds ratios (ORs) of injury rates were calculated between sexes, competition levels, and events. Injuries were also broken down into major or minor medical or orthopaedic injuries. Throughout the study period, 48,473 competing athletes participated in the Penn Relays Carnival, and 436 injuries were sustained. For medical coverage purposes, the relative rate of injury subtypes was greatest for minor orthopaedic injuries (5.71 injuries per 1000 participants), followed by minor medical injuries (3.42 injuries per 1000 participants), major medical injuries (0.69 injuries per 1000 participants), and major orthopaedic injuries (0.18 injuries per 1000 participants). College/elite athletes displayed the lowest relative injury rate (7.99 injuries per 1000 participants), which was significantly less than that of high school (9.87 injuries per 1000 participants) and masters athletes (16.33 injuries per 1000 participants). Male athletes displayed a greater likelihood of having a minor orthopaedic injury compared with female athletes (OR, 1.36 [95% CI, 1.06-1.75]; χ2 = 5.73; P = .017) but were less likely to sustain a major medical injury (OR, 0.33 [95% CI, 0.15-0.75]; χ2 = 7.75; P = .005). Of the 3 most heavily participated in events, the 4 × 400-m relay displayed the greatest relative injury rate (13.6 injuries per 1000 participants) compared with the 4

  16. National Dam Inspection Program. Lake Jean Dam. (NDI I.D. Number PA-00570 PennDER I.D. Number 40-16) Susquehanna River Basin, Branch of Kitchen Creek, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    is formally inspected on an annual basis by state representatives of the PennDER, Division of Com - pleted Projects. Results of past inspections...ftfts dSA 5t- .l 7.dll -, -v * W6D6 S4~ J - ~ SI-, b%~MobUmeeftf. m =Ara~ .j WSJ ~j~7 fara’ - - A6 WsM .fSW cft =M1=1 -I-. 5Tf4M

  17. Geophysical Logs, Specific Capacity, and Water Quality of Four Wells at Rogers Mechanical (former Tate Andale) Property, North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site, Lansdale, Pennsylvania, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Bird, Philip H.

    2010-01-01

    As part of technical assistance to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in the remediation of properties on the North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site in Lansdale, Pa., the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2006-07 collected data in four monitor wells at the Rogers Mechanical (former Tate Andale) property. During this period, USGS collected and analyzed borehole geophysical and video logs of three new monitor wells (Rogers 4, Rogers 5, and Rogers 6) ranging in depth from 80 to 180 feet, a borehole video log and additional heatpulse-flowmeter measurements (to quantify vertical borehole flow) in one existing 100-foot deep well (Rogers 3S), and water-level data during development of two wells (Rogers 5 and Rogers 6) to determine specific capacity. USGS also summarized results of passive-diffusion bag sampling for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the four wells. These data were intended to help understand the groundwater system and the distribution of VOC contaminants in groundwater at the property.

  18. Factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire: differences between African-American and White-American college students.

    PubMed

    Carter, Michele M; Sbrocco, Tracy; Miller, Oscar; Suchday, Sonia; Lewis, Evelyn L; Freedman, Rachel E K

    2005-01-01

    This study examined differences in the factor structure of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) between African-American (n=181) and White-American (n=180) college students. Results from a confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the traditional single-factor solution did not provide the best fit for the data from either ethnic group. A multiple-group factor analysis indicated that underlying structure of Factor 1 was roughly equivalent between ethnic groups. Structure of Factor 2, however, differed between groups. Specifically, item 10 loaded on different factors for each group. In support of these analyses, an exploratory factor analyses (EFA) among White-American participants indicated the presence of a two-factor model while an EFA among African-Americans indicated the presence of three factors. Despite some overlap in the overall factor structure between ethnic groups, African-Americans scored significantly lower on the PSWQ than the White-American group. Furthermore, among African-Americans level of ethnic identity was negatively related to state and trait measures of anxiety, but unrelated to measures of depression and worry.

  19. Psychometric comparison of the generalized anxiety disorder scale-7 and the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for measuring response during treatment of generalised anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Dear, Blake F; Titov, Nickolai; Sunderland, Matthew; McMillan, Dean; Anderson, Tracy; Lorian, Carolyn; Robinson, Emma

    2011-01-01

    The Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) is a widely used measure of the worry characteristic of generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). The 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) is a new brief screening tool for GAD, which is being increasingly used in research and clinical practice. The present study sought to provide comparison data on the relative psychometric properties of these two scales. The data of 195 adults who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria for GAD and who participated in two randomised treatment controlled trials were used. Factor analyses, internal consistency, correlational analyses, responsiveness to change, and agreement between the scales based on indentified clinical cutoffs were conducted. Factor analyses confirmed a one-factor structure for the GAD-7 and a three-factor structure involving two method factors for the PSWQ. Both the GAD-7 and the PSWQ demonstrated adequate internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha: .79-.91 and .86-.91, respectively), and moderate correlations (r = .51-.71) were observed between the scales across the treatment time points. The scales exhibited small correlations with the Sheehan Disability Scale at pretreatment (GAD-7 r = .38; PSWQ r = .26), but moderate correlations at posttreatment and follow-up (r = .59-.79). Agreement between the scales was limited using various clinical cutoffs identified within the literature. Both measures were sensitive to change, although the GAD-7 appeared to be more sensitive and may, therefore, confer some advantages in clinical work.

  20. A new mock circulatory loop and its application to the study of chemical additive and aortic pressure effects on hemolysis in the Penn State electric ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Garrison, L A; Frangos, J A; Geselowitz, D B; Lamson, T C; Tarbell, J M

    1994-05-01

    A new mock circulatory loop was developed for hemolysis studies associated with the Penn State electric ventricular assist device (EVAD). This flow loop has several advantages over previously designed loops. It is small enough to accommodate experiments in which only single units of blood are available, it is made out of biocompatible materials, it incorporates good geometry, and it provides normal physiological pressures and flows to both the aortic outlet and the venous inlet of the pumping device. Experiments with reduced aortic pressure but normal cardiac output showed that hemolysis in a loop with normal aortic blood pressure was significantly higher than that in a loop with lowered aortic pressure, thereby illustrating the importance of maintaining loop pressures as close as possible to those found in vivo. This data also imply that blood traveling through the left ventricle in an artificial heart may be subject to higher hemolysis rates than that traversing the right ventricle. Another set of experiments to determine the effects of 4 hemolysis or drag-reducing agents (Pluronic F-68, Dextran-40, Polyox WSR-301, and Praestol 2273TR) on blood trauma due to the EVAD and associated valves was performed. Results indicated that none of the additives significantly reduced hemolysis under the conditions found in the mock loop. Finally, a compilation of data gathered in these experiments showed that the index of hemolysis (IH) is dependent on hematocrit (HCT), which suggests that another parameter, IH/HCT, may be more suited to the quantification of hemolysis.

  1. Parallel psychometric and cognitive modeling analyses of the Penn Face Memory Test in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael L; Brown, Gregory G; Gur, Ruben C; Hansen, John A; Nock, Matthew K; Heeringa, Steven; Ursano, Robert J; Stein, Murray B

    2013-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Penn Face Memory Test (PFMT) were investigated in a large sample (4,236 participants) of U.S. Army Soldiers undergoing computerized neurocognitive testing. Data were drawn from the initial phase of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS), a large-scale study directed towards identifying risk and resilience factors for suicidal behavior and other stress-related disorders in Army Soldiers. In this paper, we report parallel psychometric and cognitive modeling analyses of the PFMT to determine whether ability estimates derived from the measure are precise and valid indicators of memory in the Army STARRS sample. Single-sample cross-validation methodology combined with exploratory factor and multidimensional item response theory techniques were used to explore the latent structure of the PFMT. To help resolve rotational indeterminacy of the exploratory solution, latent constructs were aligned with parameter estimates derived from an unequal-variance signal detection model. Analyses suggest that the PFMT measures two distinct latent constructs, one associated with memory strength and one associated with response bias, and that test scores are generally precise indicators of ability for the majority of Army STARRS participants. These findings support the use of the PFMT as a measure of major constructs related to recognition memory and have implications for further cognitive-psychometric model development.

  2. Parallel Psychometric and Cognitive Modeling Analyses of the Penn Face Memory Test in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Service Members

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Michael L.; Brown, Gregory G.; Gur, Ruben C.; Hansen, John A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Heeringa, Steven; Ursano, Robert J.; Stein, Murray B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The psychometric properties of the Penn Face Memory Test (PFMT; Gur et al., 1997) were investigated in a large sample (4,236 participants) of U.S. Army Soldiers undergoing computerized neurocognitive testing. Data were drawn from the initial phase of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS), a large-scale study directed towards identifying risk and resilience factors for suicidal behavior and other stress-related disorders in Army Soldiers. In this paper we report parallel psychometric and cognitive modeling analyses of the PFMT to determine whether ability estimates derived from the measure are precise and valid indicators of memory in the Army STARRS sample. Method Single-sample cross-validation methodology combined with exploratory factor and multidimensional item response theory techniques were used to explore the latent structure of the PFMT. To help resolve rotational indeterminacy of the exploratory solution, latent constructs were aligned with parameter estimates derived from an unequal-variance signal detection model. Results Analyses suggest that the PFMT measures two distinct latent constructs, one associated with memory strength and one associated with response bias, and that test scores are generally precise indicators of ability for the majority of Army STARRS participants. Conclusions These findings support the use of the PFMT as a measure of major constructs related to recognition memory and have implications for further cognitive-psychometric model development. PMID:23383967

  3. Acetabular revision with impaction bone grafting and a cemented polyethylene acetabular component: comparison of the Kaplan-Meier analysis to the competing risk analysis in 62 revisions with 25 to 30 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Te Stroet, M A J; Keurentjes, J C; Rijnen, W H C; Gardeniers, J W M; Verdonschot, N; Slooff, T J J H; Schreurs, B W

    2015-10-01

    We present the results of 62 consecutive acetabular revisions using impaction bone grafting and a cemented polyethylene acetabular component in 58 patients (13 men and 45 women) after a mean follow-up of 27 years (25 to 30). All patients were prospectively followed. The mean age at revision was 59.2 years (23 to 82). We performed Kaplan-Meier (KM) analysis and also a Competing Risk (CR) analysis because with long-term follow-up, the presence of a competing event (i.e. death) prevents the occurrence of the endpoint of re-revision. A total of 48 patients (52 hips) had died or had been re-revised at final review in March 2011. None of the deaths were related to the surgery. The mean Harris hip score of the ten surviving hips in ten patients was 76 points (45 to 99). The KM survivorship at 25 years for the endpoint 're-revision for any reason' was 58.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 38 to 73) and for 're-revision for aseptic loosening' 72.1% (95% CI 51 to 85). With the CR analysis we calculated the KM analysis overestimates the failure rate with respectively 74% and 93% for these endpoints. The current study shows that acetabular impaction bone grafting revisions provide good clinical results at over 25 years.

  4. National Dam Inspection Program. Crabapple Dam (NDI Number PA 00907, PennDER Number 26-32) Ohio River Basin, Crabapple Run, Fayette County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    7 D-A091 529 ACKENHEIL AND ASSOCIATES INC PITTSBURGH PA F/6 13/13 NATIONAL DAM INSPECTION PROGRAM. CRABAPPLE DAM (NDI NUMBER PA 0-ETC(U) JUL B8 J P...HANNAN, J E BARRICK DAC 31- BOC-0026 UNCLASSIFIE NLE2IIIIIIIhIIIl EIIIIIIIIIIIII 0OHI0 RIVER BASIN CRABAPPLE RUN FAYETTE COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA NDI No. PA...00907 :E- 1rŘ PENN DER No. 26-32 me CRABAPPLE DAM STEPHEN VINCINSKI and GEORGE THOMAS PHASE I INSPECTION REPORT NATIONAL DAM INSPECTION PROGRAM J 1

  5. Effects of changes in pumping on regional groundwater-flow paths, 2005 and 2010, and areas contributing recharge to discharging wells, 1990–2010, in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 Superfund site, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Goode, Daniel J.

    2017-06-06

    A previously developed regional groundwater flow model was used to simulate the effects of changes in pumping rates on groundwater-flow paths and extent of recharge discharging to wells for a contaminated fractured bedrock aquifer in southeastern Pennsylvania. Groundwater in the vicinity of the North Penn Area 7 Superfund site, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, was found to be contaminated with organic compounds, such as trichloroethylene (TCE), in 1979. At the time contamination was discovered, groundwater from the underlying fractured bedrock (shale) aquifer was the main source of supply for public drinking water and industrial use. As part of technical support to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) during the Remedial Investigation of the North Penn Area 7 Superfund site from 2000 to 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a model of regional groundwater flow to describe changes in groundwater flow and contaminant directions as a result of changes in pumping. Subsequently, large decreases in TCE concentrations (as much as 400 micrograms per liter) were measured in groundwater samples collected by the EPA from selected wells in 2010 compared to 2005‒06 concentrations.To provide insight on the fate of potentially contaminated groundwater during the period of generally decreasing pumping rates from 1990 to 2010, steady-state simulations were run using the previously developed groundwater-flow model for two conditions prior to extensive remediation, 1990 and 2000, two conditions subsequent to some remediation 2005 and 2010, and a No Pumping case, representing pre-development or cessation of pumping conditions. The model was used to (1) quantify the amount of recharge, including potentially contaminated recharge from sources near the land surface, that discharged to wells or streams and (2) delineate the areas contributing recharge that discharged to wells or streams for the five conditions.In all simulations, groundwater divides differed from

  6. Stanley N. Cohen - an interview by Judy Peng.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Stanley N

    2012-12-01

    Biotechnology Journal talks to Prof. Stanley Cohen after his plenary lecture at the International Biotechnology Symposium, Sept 2012, in Daegu, Korea. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Interpretation of geophysical logs, aquifer tests, and water levels in wells in and near the North Penn Area 7 Superfund site, Upper Gwynedd Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, 2000-02

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Cinotto, Peter J.; Conger, Randall W.; Bird, Philip H.; Pracht, Karl A.

    2005-01-01

    Ground water in the vicinity of various industrial facilities in Upper Gwynedd Township and Lansdale Borough, Montgomery County, Pa., is contaminated with various volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The 2-square-mile area was placed on the National Priorities List as the North Penn Area 7 Superfund site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1989. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical logging, aquifer testing, water-level monitoring, and streamflow measurements in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 beginning autumn 2000 to assist the USEPA in developing an understanding of the hydrogeologic framework in the area as part of the USEPA Remedial Investigation. The study area is underlain by Triassic and Jurassic-age sandstones, siltstones, and shales of the Lockatong Formation and the Brunswick Group. Regionally, these rocks strike northeast and dip to the northwest. The sequence of rocks form a fractured-sedimentary-rock aquifer that acts as a set of confined to partially confined layered aquifers of differing permeabilities. The aquifers are recharged by precipitation and discharge to streams and wells. The Wissahickon Creek headwaters are less than 1 mile northeast of the study area, and this stream flows southwest to bisect North Penn Area 7. Ground water is pumped in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 for industrial use and public supply. The USGS collected geophysical logs for 16 wells that ranged in depth from 50 to 623 feet. Aquifer-interval-isolation testing was done in 9 of the 16 wells, for a total of 30 zones tested. A multiple-well aquifer test was conducted by monitoring the response of 14 wells to pumping a 600-ft deep production well in February and March 2002. In addition, water levels were monitored continuously in three wells in the area and streamflow was measured quarterly at two sites on Wissahickon Creek from December 2000 through September 2002. Geophysical logging identified water-bearing zones associated with

  8. The Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search stars. II. Lithium abundance analysis of the red giant clump sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamów, M.; Niedzielski, A.; Villaver, E.; Wolszczan, A.; Nowak, G.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Standard stellar evolution theory does not predict existence of Li-rich giant stars. Several mechanisms for Li-enrichment have been proposed to operate at certain locations inside some stars. The actual mechanism operating in real stars is still unknown. Aims: Using the sample of 348 stars from the Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search, for which uniformly determined atmospheric parameters are available, with chemical abundances and rotational velocities presented here, we investigate various channels of Li enrichment in giants. We also study Li-overabundant giants in more detail in search for origin of their peculiarities. Methods: Our work is based on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope spectra obtained with the High Resolution Spectrograph, which we use for determination of abundances and rotational velocities. The Li abundance was determined from the 7Li λ670.8 nm line, while we use a more extended set of lines for α-elements abundances. In a series of Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, we compare Li-overabundant giants with other stars in the sample. We also use available IR photometric and kinematical data in search for evidence of mass-loss. We investigate properties of the most Li-abundant giants in more detail by using multi-epoch precise radial velocities. Results: We present Li and α-elements abundances, as well as rotational velocities for 348 stars. We detected Li in 92 stars, of which 82 are giants. Eleven of them show significant Li abundance A(Li)NLTE> 1.4 and seven of them are Li-overabundant objects, according to common criterion of A(Li) > 1.5 and their location on HR diagram, including TYC 0684-00553-1 and TYC 3105-00152-1, which are two giants with Li abundances close to meteoritic level. For another 271 stars, upper limits of Li abundance are presented. We confirmed three objects with increased stellar rotation. We show that Li-overabundant giants are among the most massive stars from our sample and show larger than average

  9. Borehole geophysical logging and aquifer-isolation tests conducted in well MG-1693 at North Penn Area 5 Superfund Site near Colmar, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, Philip H.

    2006-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logging and aquifer-isolation (packer) tests were conducted in well MG-1693 (NP-87) at the North Penn Area 5 Superfund Site near Colmar, Montgomery County, Pa. Objectives of the study were to identify the depth and yield of water-bearing zones, occurrence of vertical borehole flow, and effects of pumping on water levels in nearby wells. Caliper, natural-gamma, single-point-resistance, fluid-temperature, fluid-resistivity, heatpulse-flowmeter, and borehole-video logs were collected. Vertical borehole-fluid movement direction and rate were measured under nonpumping conditions. The suite of logs was used to locate water-bearing fractures, determine zones of vertical borehole-fluid movement, and select depths to set packers. Aquifer-isolation tests were conducted to sample discrete intervals and to determine specific capacities of water-bearing zones and effects of pumping individual zones on water levels in two nearby monitor wells. Specific capacities of isolated zones during aquifer-isolation tests ranged from 0.03 to 3.09 (gal/min)/ft (gallons per minute per foot). Fractures identified by borehole geophysical methods as water-producing or water-receiving zones produced water when isolated and pumped. Water enters the borehole primarily through high-angle fractures at 416 to 435 ft bls (feet below land surface) and 129 to 136 ft bls. Water exits the borehole through a high-angle fracture at 104 to 107 ft bls, a broken casing joint at 82 ft bls, and sometimes as artesian flow through the top of the well. Thirteen intervals were selected for aquifer-isolation testing, using a straddle-packer assembly. The specific capacity of interval 1 was 2.09 (gal/min)/ft. The specific capacities of intervals 2, 3, and 4 were similar: 0.27, 0.30, and 0.29 (gal/min)/ft,respectively. The specific capacities of intervals 5, 6, 7, 8, and 10 were similar: 0.03, 0.04, 0.09, 0.09, and 0.04 (gal/min)/ft,respectively. Intervals 9, 11, and 12 each showed a strong

  10. Modeling and design of a new core-moderator assembly and neutron beam ports for the Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Dundar

    This study is for modeling and designing a new reactor core-moderator assembly and new neutron beam ports that aimed to expand utilization of a new beam hall of the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR). The PSBR is a part of the Radiation Science and Engineering Facility (RSEC) and is a TRIGA MARK III type research reactor with a movable core placed in a large pool and is capable to produce 1MW output. This reactor is a pool-type reactor with pulsing capability up to 2000 MW for 10-20 msec. There are seven beam ports currently installed to the reactor. The PSBR's existing core design limits the experimental capability of the facility, as only two of the seven available neutron beam ports are usable. The finalized design features an optimized result in light of the data obtained from neutronic and thermal-hydraulics analyses as well as geometrical constraints. A new core-moderator assembly was introduced to overcome the limitations of the existing PSBR design, specifically maximizing number of available neutron beam ports and mitigating the hydrogen gamma contamination of the neutron beam channeled in the beam ports. A crescent-shaped moderator is favored in the new PSBR design since it enables simultaneous use of five new neutron beam ports in the facility. Furthermore, the crescent shape sanctions a coupling of the core and moderator, which reduces the hydrogen gamma contamination significantly in the new beam ports. A coupled MURE and MCNP5 code optimization analysis was performed to calculate the optimum design parameters for the new PSBR. Thermal-hydraulics analysis of the new design was achieved using ANSYS Fluent CFD code. In the current form, the PSBR is cooled by natural convection of the pool water. The driving force for the natural circulation of the fluid is the heat generation within the fuel rods. The convective heat data was generated at the reactor's different operating powers by using TRIGSIMS, the fuel management code of the PSBR core. In the CFD

  11. Evaluation of borehole geophysical logging, aquifer-isolation tests, distribution of contaminants, and water-level measurements at the North Penn Area 5 Superfund Site, Bucks and Montgomery counties, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, Philip H.; Conger, Randall W.

    2002-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logging and aquiferisolation (packer) tests were conducted at the North Penn Area 5 Superfund site in Bucks and Montgomery Counties, Pa. Caliper, naturalgamma, single-point-resistance, fluid-temperature, fluid-resistivity, heatpulse-flowmeter, and digital acoustic-televiewer logs and borehole television surveys were collected in 32 new and previously drilled wells that ranged in depth from 68 to 302 feet. Vertical borehole-fluid movement direction and rate were measured with a high-resolution heatpulse flowmeter under nonpumping conditions. The suite of logs was used to locate water-bearing fractures, determine zones of vertical borehole- fluid movement, select depths to set packers, and locate appropriate screen intervals for reconstructing new wells as monitoring wells. Aquifer-isolation tests were conducted in four wells to sample discrete intervals and to determine specific capacities of discrete water-bearing zones. Specific capacities of isolated zones during packer testing ranged from 0.12 to 15.30 gallons per minute per foot. Most fractures identified by borehole geophysical methods as water-producing or water-receiving zones produced water when isolated and pumped. The acoustic-televiewer logs define two basic fracture sets, bedding-plane partings with a mean strike of N. 62? E. and a mean dip of 27? NW., and high-angle fractures with a mean strike of N. 58? E. and a mean dip of 72? SE. Correlation of heatpulse-flowmeter data and acoustic-televiewer logs showed 83 percent of identified water-bearing fractures were high-angle fractures.

  12. Characterization of waste rock associated with acid drainage at the Penn Mine, California, by ground-based visible to short-wave infrared reflectance spectroscopy assisted by digital mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montero, S.I.C.; Brimhall, G.H.; Alpers, C.N.; Swayze, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Prior to remediation at the abandoned Cu-Zn Penn Mine in the Foothills massive sulfide belt of the Sierra Nevada, CA, acid mine drainage (AMD) was created, in part, by the subaerial oxidation of sulfides exposed on several waste piles. To support remediation efforts, a mineralogical study of the waste piles was undertaken by acquiring reflectance spectra (measured in the visible to short-wave infrared range of light (0.35-2.5 ??m) using a portable, digitally integrated pen tablet PC mapping system with differential global positioning system and laser rangefinder support. Analysis of the spectral data made use of a continuum removal and band-shape comparison method, and of reference spectral libraries of end-member minerals and mineral mixtures. Identification of secondary Fe-bearing minerals focused on band matching in the region between 0.43 and 1.3 ??m. Identification of sheet and other silicates was based on band-shape analysis in the region between 1.9 and 2.4 ??m. Analysis of reflectance spectra of characterized rock samples from the mine helped in gauging the spectral response to particle size and mixtures. The resulting mineral maps delineated a pattern of accumulation of secondary Fe minerals, wherein centers of copiapite and jarosite that formed at low pH (<3) were surrounded successively by goethite and hematite, which mark progressive increases in pH. This pattern represents the evolution of acid solutions discharged from the pyritic waste piles and the subsequent accumulation of secondary precipitates by hydrolysis reactions. The results highlight the high capacity of the pyritic waste to release further acid mine drainage into the environment, as well as the effectiveness of the mapping method to detect subtle changes in surface mineralogy and to produce maps useful to agencies responsible for remediating the site. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Tenure and Promotion after Penn vs. EEOC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galle, William P., Jr.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Two views of the future of peer review for college and university faculty promotion are presented. One proposes that open files will mean less candid peer reviews and that evaluators may be called on to defend their evaluations in court. The second argues that openness has not led to increased litigation. (MSE)

  14. Penn State Scandal Encompasses Professors, Too

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2012-01-01

    While most of the national focus following charges of child sex abuse at Pennsylvania State University has centered on its coaches and administrators, the scandal has reached deep into the professoriate as well. Responding to constant questions has taken an emotional toll on the university's faculty members, who have been asked by neighbors,…

  15. USDA Agricultural Research at Penn State

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The building directly across from the Creamery, the one you've probably never been in or even thought about much? That federal building has been there since 1936, when this part of campus was all agricultural fields and not much else. Back then it held the U.S. Regional Pasture Research Laboratory, ...

  16. Penn State Scandal Encompasses Professors, Too

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2012-01-01

    While most of the national focus following charges of child sex abuse at Pennsylvania State University has centered on its coaches and administrators, the scandal has reached deep into the professoriate as well. Responding to constant questions has taken an emotional toll on the university's faculty members, who have been asked by neighbors,…

  17. "Shake me up, Judy!": on Dickens, medicine and spinal cord disorders.

    PubMed

    Ohry, Avi

    2012-01-01

    Charles Dickens' ( 1812- 1870) works, were for a long time, a solid background for social, historical, psychological, literary and medical 19th century studies. In this article , some light is casted on Dickens, medicine and disabled people in his works, especially on paraplegics.

  18. Stress, Neural Systems, and Genetic Code: An Interview with Neuroscientist Judy Cameron. Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Research indicates some early life stresses can have a profound impact, resulting in changes in brain function and behavior, and even differences in the ways some genes express their particular genetic code signature. At various times during early development, different neural systems appear to have an increased sensitivity to stress and can…

  19. Searching for Judy: How Small Mysteries Affect Narrative Processes and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Jessica; McKoon, Gail; Gerrig, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Current theories of text processing say little about how authors' narrative choices, including the introduction of small mysteries, can affect readers' narrative experiences. Gerrig, Love, and McKoon (2009) provided evidence that 1 type of small mystery--a character introduced without information linking him or her to the story--affects readers'…

  20. Searching for Judy: How Small Mysteries Affect Narrative Processes and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Jessica; McKoon, Gail; Gerrig, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Current theories of text processing say little about how authors' narrative choices, including the introduction of small mysteries, can affect readers' narrative experiences. Gerrig, Love, and McKoon (2009) provided evidence that 1 type of small mystery--a character introduced without information linking him or her to the story--affects readers'…

  1. Altitude and Configuration of the Potentiometric Surface in the Upper White Clay Creek and Lower West Branch Brandywine Creek Basins including Portions of Penn, London Grove, New Garden, Londonderry, West Marlborough, Highland, and East Fallowfield Townships and West Grove, Avondale, Modena, and South Coatesville boroughs, Chester County, Pennsylvania, May through July 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hale, Lindsay B.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Since 1984, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been mapping the altitude and configuration of the potentiometric surface in Chester County as part of an ongoing cooperative program to measure and describe the water resources of the county. These maps can be used to determine the general direction of ground-water flow and are frequently referenced by municipalities and developers to evaluate ground-water conditions for water supply and resource-protection requirements. For this study, the potentiometric surface was mapped for an area in south-central Chester County. The northern part of the map includes portions of Highland, East Fallowfield, Londonderry, and West Marlborough Townships and South Coatesville and Modena Boroughs. The southern part of the map includes portions of Londonderry, West Marlborough, Penn, London Grove, and New Garden Townships and West Grove and Avondale Boroughs. The study area is mostly underlain by metamorphic rocks of the Glenarm Supergroup including Peters Creek Schist, Octoraro Phyllite, Wissahickon Schist, Cockeysville Mrable, and Setters Quartzite; and by pegmatite, mafic gneiss, felsic gneiss, and diabase. Ground water is obtained from these bedrock formations by wells that intercept fractures. The altitude and configuration of the potentiometric surface was contoured from water levels measured on different dates in available wells during May through July 2006 and from the altitude of springs and perennial streams. Topography was used as a guide for contouring so that the altitude of the potentiometric surface was inferred nowhere to be higher than the land surface. The potentiometric surface shown on this map is an approximation of the water table. The altitude of the actual potentiometric surface may differ from the water table, especially in areas where wells are completed in a semi-confined zone or have long open intervals that reflect the composite hydraulic head of multiple water-yielding fractures. A composite

  2. Hazard Rate Estimation for Censored Data via Strong Representation of the Kaplan-Meier Estimator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    of bounded variation (condition (k4).) The process( /n 1 has mean zero and covariance SA t (26) r(s,t) E E[C(s) C(t)] - F(s) F(t) f [(u)]- 2 d Lj(u...continuous with density f(x) > 0 at x. Suppose k is of bounded variation and is continuous. Then fn(x) admits the strong approximation on the interval [0,T

  3. Penn Working Papers in Educational Linguistics, Volume 6, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Joel, Ed.; And Others

    The working papers contained in this volume include the following: "Intercultural Communication and the Analysis of Conversation" (Nessa Wolfson); "Methods of Inquiry into Cultural Expression in Speech Behavior" (Ruth Benander); "'I Really Like Your Lifestyle': ESL Learners Learning How to Compliment" (Kristine…

  4. Building Resilience in Youth: The Penn Resiliency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reivich, Karen; Gillham, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Psychologists have been studying resilience since the 1970s to understand what enables individual to meet developmental milestones despite serious risk factors. Although early research used terms like "invincible" and "invulnerable" to describe youth who showed resilience, the current understanding is that resilience is enabled through ordinary…

  5. PENN PASS: a program for graduates of foreign dental schools.

    PubMed

    Berthold, P; Lopez, N

    1994-01-01

    An increasing number of graduates of foreign dental schools who enroll in advanced standing programs to qualify for licensure calls for dental schools to be prepared to handle not only the curricular demands but also the growing cultural diversity among its student population. The "reeducation" of this student group not only meets the need of foreign dentists for an American degree but may also provide health professionals to service various ethnic populations whose language and culture they are able to understand and identify with. A survey of students and graduates of a two-year Program for Advanced Standing Students (PASS) for graduates of foreign dental schools representing 34 countries aimed to arrive at an understanding of this student group through characterization of the foreign dentists and identification of their attitudes and feelings toward various aspects of the program, the school and faculty and their experience of stress. This report includes description of the distinctive features of the program which cater to specific needs and concerns of this non-traditional group of dental students. PASS students are accepted on the basis of their grades in dental school in home country, scores in the National Dental Board Examination Part I, Test of English as Foreign Language (TOEFL), and ratings in personal interviews. They complete an intensive summer program consisting of didactic and laboratory courses which prepares them for integration with four-year students for the last two years of didactic and clinical curriculum. Cultural diversity seminars, a special English class, PASS class meetings and seminars are unique additions to their program and aim to assist them adjust to the educational, social and cultural systems in an American school. Results of the survey show a majority of the PASS students feel that they are part of the school and that there is someone in the school whom they can approach for problems. An understanding of their ethnic and educational background is seen as a significant factor in their second basic dental education. Implications for education of foreign dental graduates amidst increasing diversification of the student body are discussed.

  6. Creating a Culture of Innovation at Penn State Outreach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidemann, Craig D.

    2009-01-01

    From all sides, academia is being prodded to be ever more innovative. Not only are faculty expected to create knowledge from which solutions for our social, physical, and economic ills will spring, but all segments of the university must deal with new modes of communication, new business models, and even new ways of processing thought. This…

  7. Reference Anytime Anywhere: Towards Virtual Reference Services at Penn State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyo, Lesley M.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines the service rationale, software and technology considerations taken by the Pennsylvania State University library in planning towards online, real-time reference services and provides an overview of the planned pilot project. Discusses recent trends in academic electronic libraries, including providing value-added services to support…

  8. Penn Working Papers in Educational Linguistics, Volume 5, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Kathryn, Ed.

    The working papers contained in this volume include the following: "Research on Language Learning; How Can It Respond to Classroom Concerns?" (Teresa Pica); "Building Rapport Through Indirect Complaints: Implications for Language Learning" (Diana Boxer); "(Bi)literacy and Empowerment: Education for Indigenous Groups in…

  9. PENN PASS: A Program for Graduates of Foreign Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthold, Peter; Lopez, Naty

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the University of Pennsylvania's School of Dental Medicine's Program for Advanced Standing Students (PASS) which provides graduates of foreign dental schools with an intensive summer program to prepare them for integration with four-year students for the last two years of didactic and clinical curriculum. A survey of 72 PASS…

  10. FCS Educators Benefit from Summer Program at Penn State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsey, Joanne; Sovich, Cynthia Rossi; Stanton, Jane; Sowers, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    The foundation and impetus for a sustained professional development program offering 44 graduate courses serving 641 FCS educators (approximately 50% returning participants) in Pennsylvania and the surrounding area were the six assumptions of Knowles related to the motivation of adult learners. Education researcher Malcolm Knowles asserts that…

  11. From "Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education" by F. Clark Power, Ann Higgins, and Lawrence Kohlberg, with Judy Codding (1989)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schools: Studies in Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article is an excerpt from "Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education." It refers several times to Kohlberg's "six stages of moral development." Stages 3 and 4 belong to the second level of moral development, which Kohlberg calls "conventional." At stage 3, one becomes aware of conventions as one sees what is right in terms of living up…

  12. From "Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education" by F. Clark Power, Ann Higgins, and Lawrence Kohlberg, with Judy Codding (1989)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schools: Studies in Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article is an excerpt from "Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education." It refers several times to Kohlberg's "six stages of moral development." Stages 3 and 4 belong to the second level of moral development, which Kohlberg calls "conventional." At stage 3, one becomes aware of conventions as one sees what is right in terms of living up…

  13. Modified Rapid AChE Method (MRAM) for Hirschsprung Disease Diagnosis: A Journey from Meier-Ruge Until Now.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Mina M; Robinson, Haynes; Shoffeitt, Carla; Howe, Helena; Metry, Diana; Shehata, Bahig M

    2016-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) can be diagnosed using a variety of histological and immunohistochemical methods and stains. Because of the nature of the condition and the need for a rapid diagnostic confirmation, those methods with high accuracy and fast turnaround times are preferred. The authors of this paper have used rapid acetylcholinesterase (AChE) immunohistochemistry in conjunction with standard H&E in order to optimize diagnostic accuracy, and present a modified rapid AChE method (MRAM) that has been successfully utilized for over 20 years. The authors also present a list of over 30 different methods and stains that have been proposed for Hirschsprung disease diagnosis.

  14. A resolution congratulating the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2013-03-06

    03/06/2013 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1237) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Congratulating the Penn State women's volleyball team on winning the 2009 NCAA Division I National Championship.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Thompson, Glenn [R-PA-5

    2010-01-19

    02/23/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Higher Education, Lifelong Learning, and Competitiveness. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Teaching Medical Ethics in its Contexts: Penn State College of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, David; Clouser, K. Danner

    1989-01-01

    The medical school's ethics program evolved through cooperation with the humanities department. Key aspects of the program include the teaching of medical ethics in the context of other issues of value and meaning in medicine, and involvement of humanities faculty in the medical center. (Author/MSE)

  17. Articulation Agreement Between William Penn College and Indian Hills Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    William Penn Coll., Oskaloosa, IA.

    Interinstitutional cooperation must assume a higher planning priority as competition for students and scarce resources becomes greater. It is perhaps of greatest benefit to students recognizing the purpose of both private and public institutions and wishing to partake of selected educational opportunities from both. Further, upper division…

  18. The Penn State ORSER system for processing and analyzing ERTS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Borden, F. Y.; Weeden, H. A.; Petersen, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    The Office for Remote Sensing of Earth Resources (ORSER) of the Space Science and Engineering Laboratory (SSEL) at The Pennsylvania State University has developed an extensive operational system for processing and analyzing ERTS-1 and similar multispectral data. Specific results obtained by using this system include a study of land use, discrimination between types of forest resources and vegetation, detection of previously unknown geologic faults and correlation of these with known mineral deposits and ground water, mapping of mine spoils in the anthracite region of eastern Pennsylvania, mapping of strip mines and acid mine drainage in Central Pennsylvania, agricultural land use mapping, and detection of gypsy moth infestation.

  19. Creating a Community of Teachers: The Penn State Course in College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enerson, Diane M.; And Others

    In the early 1990s, Pennsylvania State University's IDP (Instructional Development Program) Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching provided separate programs for training teaching assistants (TAs) and faculty development. Neither program appeared to meet the needs of its intended audience. In the fll of 1992, the Center began offering the…

  20. RISK OF LONG TERM HOT FLASHES AFTER NATURAL MENOPAUSE: EVIDENCE FROM THE PENN OVARIAN AGING COHORT

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Ellen W.; Sammel, Mary D.; Sanders, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the risk of hot flashes relative to natural menopause and evaluate associations of hormone levels, behavioral and demographic variables with the risk of hot flashes following menopause. Methods Annual assessments of 255 women who were premenopausal at baseline and reached natural menopause during 16 years of follow-up. Results The prevalence of moderate/severe hot flashes increased in each premenopausal year, reaching a peak of 46% in the first two years after the final menstrual period (FMP). Hot flashes decreased slowly following menopause and did not return to premenopausal levels until 9 years after FMP. The mean duration of moderate/severe hot flashes after FMP was 4.6 (SD2.9) years (4.9, SD3.1 years for any hot flashes). One-third of women at 10 or more years following menopause continued to experience moderate/severe hot flashes. African American women (obese and non-obese) and obese white women had significantly greater risk of hot flashes compared to non-obese white women (interaction P=0.01). In multivariable analysis, increasing FSH levels before FMP (P<0.001), decreasing estradiol (OR 0.87, 95% CI: 0.78–0.96, P=0.008), and increasing anxiety (OR 1.05, 95% CI: 1.03–1.06, P<0.001) were significant risk factors for hot flashes, while higher education levels were protective (OR 0.66, 95% CI: 0.47–0.91, P=0.011). Conclusions Moderate/severe hot flashes continued on average for nearly 5 years following menopause; more than one- third of women observed for 10 or more years following menopause had moderate/severe hot flashes. Continuation of hot flashes for more than 5 years following menopause underscores the importance of determining individual risk/benefit when selecting hormone or non-hormonal therapy for menopausal symptoms. PMID:24473530

  1. ANXIETY AS A RISK FACTOR FOR MENOPAUSAL HOT FLASHES: EVIDENCE FROM THE PENN OVARIAN AGING COHORT

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Ellen W.; Sammel, Mary D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify temporal associations of anxiety dimensions with menopausal hot flashes in women progressing through the menopause transition. We hypothesized that associations of both somatic and affective dimensions of anxiety with hot flashes increased in the menopause transition, and that somatic anxiety was an independent risk factor for menopausal hot flashes. Methods Hot flashes, anxiety symptoms, hormone levels and other psychosocial variables were assessed annually for 14 years of follow-up. The 233 women were premenopausal at baseline and continued through one year or more after the final menstrual period. Anxiety dimensions were assessed with the Zung Anxiety Scale (ZAS), a validated measure of affective anxiety and somatic anxiety. Summed item scores were divided by the number of items rated, so that ranges of the two dimensions were comparable. Results Seventy-two percent of the sample reported moderate/severe hot flashes during the 14-year interval. There was no significant interaction between anxiety dimensions and menopausal stages. However, when adjusted for menopausal stage, the magnitude of association between somatic anxiety and hot flashes dramatically increased (OR 3.03, 95% CI: 2.12, 4.32, P<0.001), while the association between affective anxiety and hot flashes increased to a lesser extent (OR 1.27, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.57, P=0.024). Women with high levels of somatic anxiety (top third of the sample) had the greatest risk of hot flashes (P<0.001). When the anxiety dimensions were considered in combination, the additive effect of high affective anxiety symptoms was minimal, with no significant difference between the group with high affective/low somatic symptoms and the low symptom group in incident hot flashes at each menopausal stage (P=0.54). In multivariable analysis, somatic anxiety increased the risk of hot flashes more than 3 times (OR 3.13, 95% CI: 2.16, 4.53, P<0.001), but affective anxiety was not significantly associated with hot flashes after adjustment for other study variables (OR 1.19, 95% CI: 0.96, 1.48, P=0.117). Time-lagged somatic anxiety scores significantly predicted hot flashes, with a 71% increase in risk (OR 1.71, 95% CI: 1.21, 2.41, P=0.002). Time-lagged affective anxiety scores did not predict hot flashes, (OR 1.06, 95% CI: 0.87, 1.31, P=0.58). Conclusions This study showed a strong predictive association of somatic anxiety with the risk of menopausal hot flashes. The temporal associations suggest that somatic anxiety is not simply a redundant measure of hot flashes but predicts the risk of menopausal hot flashes and may be a potential target in clinical management of perimenopausal women. PMID:27433864

  2. Penn State axial flow turbine facility: Performance and nozzle flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Zaccaria, M.; Itoh, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to gain a thorough understanding of the flow field in a turbine stage including three-dimensional inviscid and viscid effects, unsteady flow field, rotor-stator interaction effects, unsteady blade pressures, shear stress, and velocity field in rotor passages. The performance of the turbine facility at the design condition is measured and compared with the design distribution. The data on the nozzle vane static pressure and wake characteristics are presented and interpreted. The wakes are found to be highly three-dimensional, with substantial radial inward velocity at most spanwise locations.

  3. 75 FR 81331 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination-Penn Millers Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... of the Treasury, Financial Management Service, Financial Accounting and Services Division, Surety.... Laura Carrico, Director, Financial Accounting and Services Division, Financial Management Service... AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY...

  4. A New Concurrent Master's Program in French Studies and Public Administration at Penn State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frautschi, Richard L.

    Pennsylvania State University's Department of French and Institute of Public Administration have responded to the need for language-trained civil servants by developing a dual master's degree program in French and public administration. Degree requirements include the full requirements for each program, with six credits from each curriculum…

  5. PENN Biomarker Core of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Leslie M.

    2009-01-01

    There is a pressing need to develop effective prevention and disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a dreaded affliction whose incidence increases almost logarithmically with age starting at about 65 years. A key need in the field of AD research is the validation of imaging and biochemical biomarkers. Biomarker tests that are shown to reliably predict the disease before it is clinically expressed would permit testing of new therapeutics at the earliest time point possible in order to give the best chance for delaying the onset of dementia in these patients. In this review the current state of AD biochemical biomarker research is discussed. A new set of guidelines for the diagnosis of AD in the research setting places emphasis on the inclusion of selected imaging and biochemical biomarkers, in addition to neuropsychological behavioral testing. Importantly, the revised guidelines were developed to identify patients at the earliest stages prior to full-blown dementia as well as patients with the full spectrum of the disease. The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative is a multicenter consortium study that includes as one of its primary goals the development of standardized neuroimaging and biochemical biomarker methods for AD clinical trials, as well as using these to measure changes over time in mildly cognitively impaired patients who convert to AD as compared to the natural variability of these in control subjects and their further change over time in AD patients. Validation of the biomarker results by correlation analyses with neuropsychological and neurobehavioral test data is one of the primary outcomes of this study. This validation data will hopefully provide biomarker test performance needed for effective measurement of the efficacy of new treatment and prevention therapeutic agents. PMID:18097156

  6. Congratulating the Penn State women's volleyball team on winning the 2009 NCAA Division I National Championship.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Thompson, Glenn [R-PA-5

    2010-01-19

    House - 02/23/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Higher Education, Lifelong Learning, and Competitiveness. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Changing Perceptions of the University as a Community of Learning: The Case of Penn State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willits, Fern K.; Brennan, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Writing in 1990 for the Carnegie Foundation and the American Council on Education, Ernest Boyer described the importance of strengthening the colleges and universities as vital communities of learning by emphasizing six critical dimensions or characteristics of campus life: educationally purposeful, open, just, disciplined, caring, and…

  8. Teaching Medical Ethics in its Contexts: Penn State College of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, David; Clouser, K. Danner

    1989-01-01

    The medical school's ethics program evolved through cooperation with the humanities department. Key aspects of the program include the teaching of medical ethics in the context of other issues of value and meaning in medicine, and involvement of humanities faculty in the medical center. (Author/MSE)

  9. The Penn State-State College Elementary Professional Development School Collaborative: A Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Jim; Badiali, Bernard; Zembal-Saul, Carla; Burns, Rebecca; Edmondson, Jacqueline; Bauer, Deirdre; Queeney, Donna; Wheland, Marion

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 Professional Development Schools National Conference recognized the professional development school partnership between Pennsylvania State University and State College Area School District for its meritorious partnership work over time and so named it one of the three recipients of the first-ever National Association for Professional…

  10. Greene/Feizi - U of Penn; Imperial College | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Principal Investigator: Mark Greene, MD, PhDInstitution: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Subcontract Principal Investigator: Ten Feizi, MD, FmedSciInstitution: Imperial College London Former Principal Investigator: Minoru Fukuda, PhD (retired)Institution: Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute, La Jolla, CA |

  11. PENN Working Papers in Educational Linguistics. Volume 7, Number 2/Fall 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLorme, R. Stuart; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This issue presents works in progress by students and professors at the University of Pennsylvania. Papers are generally based on research conducted for courses offered in the Language in Education Division of the Graduate School of Education. This issue contains the following papers: "Do Second Language Learners Need Negotiation?"…

  12. A Vice-President from the Business World Brings a New Bottom Line to Penn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Werf, Martin

    1999-01-01

    The executive vice-president of the University of Pennsylvania is credited with making significant changes in both the administration and the campus, using cost-cutting and change strategies from his business experience. Outsourcing, training for employees who might be terminated, substantial savings and new revenue, and gentrification of…

  13. Penn Working Papers in Educational Linguistics. Volume 7, Number 1, Spring 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Joel, Ed.; And Others

    Five working papers in linguistics and education are presented. "The Mediators: Providing Access To Texts in English in a Semi-Urban Maharashtrian College Community" (Grace Plamthodathil Jacob) examines the teacher's role in mediating cultural awareness as part of English second language education in a multilingual, non-western society.…

  14. The Penn State ORSER system for processing and analyzing ERTS and other MSS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Borden, F. Y.; Weeden, H. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The office for Remote Sensing of Earth Resources (ORSER) of the Space Science and Engineering Laboratory at the Pennsylvania State University has developed an extensive operational system for processing and analyzing ERTS-1 and similar multispectral data. The ORSER system was developed for use by a wide variety of researchers working in remote sensing. Both photointerpretive techniques and automatic computer processing methods have been developed and used, separately and in a combined approach. A remote Job Entry system permits use of an IBM 370/168 computer from any compatible remote terminal, including equipment tied in by long distance telephone connections. An elementary cost analysis has been prepared for the processing of ERTS data.

  15. Mesospheric water vapor measurements from Penn State - Monthly mean observations (1984-1987)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevilacqua, Richard M.; Olivero, John J.; Croskey, Charles L.

    1989-01-01

    Mesospheric water vapor measurements obtained by ground-based microwave spectroscopy between November 1984 and July 1987 are examined. Monthly mean water vapor profiles are used to establish annual and interannual variability. The results suggest that the seasonal variation of upper mesospheric water vapor is dominated by an annual component with low mixing ratios in winter and high mixing ratios in summer. The results are compared with those reported by Bevilacqua et al. (1987).

  16. The PennBMBI: Design of a General Purpose Wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Subei, Basheer; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy H; Van der Spiegel, Jan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a general purpose wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface (BMBI) system is presented. The system integrates four battery-powered wireless devices for the implementation of a closed-loop sensorimotor neural interface, including a neural signal analyzer, a neural stimulator, a body-area sensor node and a graphic user interface implemented on the PC end. The neural signal analyzer features a four channel analog front-end with configurable bandpass filter, gain stage, digitization resolution, and sampling rate. The target frequency band is configurable from EEG to single unit activity. A noise floor of 4.69 μVrms is achieved over a bandwidth from 0.05 Hz to 6 kHz. Digital filtering, neural feature extraction, spike detection, sensing-stimulating modulation, and compressed sensing measurement are realized in a central processing unit integrated in the analyzer. A flash memory card is also integrated in the analyzer. A 2-channel neural stimulator with a compliance voltage up to ± 12 V is included. The stimulator is capable of delivering unipolar or bipolar, charge-balanced current pulses with programmable pulse shape, amplitude, width, pulse train frequency and latency. A multi-functional sensor node, including an accelerometer, a temperature sensor, a flexiforce sensor and a general sensor extension port has been designed. A computer interface is designed to monitor, control and configure all aforementioned devices via a wireless link, according to a custom designed communication protocol. Wireless closed-loop operation between the sensory devices, neural stimulator, and neural signal analyzer can be configured. The proposed system was designed to link two sites in the brain, bridging the brain and external hardware, as well as creating new sensory and motor pathways for clinical practice. Bench test and in vivo experiments are performed to verify the functions and performances of the system.

  17. Congratulating the Penn State women's volleyball team on winning the 2009 NCAA Division I National Championship.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Thompson, Glenn [R-PA-5

    2010-01-19

    02/23/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Higher Education, Lifelong Learning, and Competitiveness. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. The Penn State ORSER system for processing and analyzing ERTS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Borden, F. Y.; Weeden, H. A.; Petersen, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    The Office for Remote Sensing of Earth Resources (ORSER) of the Space Science and Engineering Laboratory (SSEL) at The Pennsylvania State University has developed an extensive operational system for processing and analyzing ERTS-1 and similar multispectral data. Specific results obtained by using this system include a study of land use, discrimination between types of forest resources and vegetation, detection of previously unknown geologic faults and correlation of these with known mineral deposits and ground water, mapping of mine spoils in the anthracite region of eastern Pennsylvania, mapping of strip mines and acid mine drainage in Central Pennsylvania, agricultural land use mapping, and detection of gypsy moth infestation.

  19. Meier associates and Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff exchange: Transfer of corrosion monitoring expertise to assess and develop in-line inspection tools for corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, N.J.; Meier, T.E.

    1995-04-01

    Staff exchanges, such as the one described in this report, are intended to facilitate communication and collaboration among scientists and engineers at DOE laboratories, in US industry, and academia. During the past 5 years, PNL has developed prototype instrumentation to automate the data collection required for electrochemical determination of corrosion rates and behavior of materials in various electrically conductive environments. The last version is labeled the Sentry 100 prototype corrosion data scanner. Applications include these in the pulp and paper industry and at hazardous waste sites.

  20. A Review and Comparison of Methods for Recreating Individual Patient Data from Published Kaplan-Meier Survival Curves for Economic Evaluations: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiaomin; Peng, Liubao; Li, Yuanjian

    2015-01-01

    Background In general, the individual patient-level data (IPD) collected in clinical trials are not available to independent researchers to conduct economic evaluations; researchers only have access to published survival curves and summary statistics. Thus, methods that use published survival curves and summary statistics to reproduce statistics for economic evaluations are essential. Four methods have been identified: two traditional methods 1) least squares method, 2) graphical method; and two recently proposed methods by 3) Hoyle and Henley, 4) Guyot et al. The four methods were first individually reviewed and subsequently assessed regarding their abilities to estimate mean survival through a simulation study. Methods A number of different scenarios were developed that comprised combinations of various sample sizes, censoring rates and parametric survival distributions. One thousand simulated survival datasets were generated for each scenario, and all methods were applied to actual IPD. The uncertainty in the estimate of mean survival time was also captured. Results All methods provided accurate estimates of the mean survival time when the sample size was 500 and a Weibull distribution was used. When the sample size was 100 and the Weibull distribution was used, the Guyot et al. method was almost as accurate as the Hoyle and Henley method; however, more biases were identified in the traditional methods. When a lognormal distribution was used, the Guyot et al. method generated noticeably less bias and a more accurate uncertainty compared with the Hoyle and Henley method. Conclusions The traditional methods should not be preferred because of their remarkable overestimation. When the Weibull distribution was used for a fitted model, the Guyot et al. method was almost as accurate as the Hoyle and Henley method. However, if the lognormal distribution was used, the Guyot et al. method was less biased compared with the Hoyle and Henley method. PMID:25803659

  1. A review and comparison of methods for recreating individual patient data from published Kaplan-Meier survival curves for economic evaluations: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaomin; Peng, Liubao; Li, Yuanjian

    2015-01-01

    In general, the individual patient-level data (IPD) collected in clinical trials are not available to independent researchers to conduct economic evaluations; researchers only have access to published survival curves and summary statistics. Thus, methods that use published survival curves and summary statistics to reproduce statistics for economic evaluations are essential. Four methods have been identified: two traditional methods 1) least squares method, 2) graphical method; and two recently proposed methods by 3) Hoyle and Henley, 4) Guyot et al. The four methods were first individually reviewed and subsequently assessed regarding their abilities to estimate mean survival through a simulation study. A number of different scenarios were developed that comprised combinations of various sample sizes, censoring rates and parametric survival distributions. One thousand simulated survival datasets were generated for each scenario, and all methods were applied to actual IPD. The uncertainty in the estimate of mean survival time was also captured. All methods provided accurate estimates of the mean survival time when the sample size was 500 and a Weibull distribution was used. When the sample size was 100 and the Weibull distribution was used, the Guyot et al. method was almost as accurate as the Hoyle and Henley method; however, more biases were identified in the traditional methods. When a lognormal distribution was used, the Guyot et al. method generated noticeably less bias and a more accurate uncertainty compared with the Hoyle and Henley method. The traditional methods should not be preferred because of their remarkable overestimation. When the Weibull distribution was used for a fitted model, the Guyot et al. method was almost as accurate as the Hoyle and Henley method. However, if the lognormal distribution was used, the Guyot et al. method was less biased compared with the Hoyle and Henley method.

  2. National Dam Safety Program. Penn Nursery Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA-00470, Penn DER I.D. Number 14-117), Susquehanna River Basin, Potter Run, Centre County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    surveillance of the facility during periods of unusually heavy precipitation. GAI Consultants, Inc. Approved by: Bernard M. mih Ixin, . tMW.FC \\JColonel...essentially self-regulating with excess inflows being automatically discharged over the emergency spillway. During periods of low flow in the dry summer...emergency warning system that provides for around-the-clock surveil- lance of the facility during periods of unusually heavy precipitation. 10j SECTION

  3. Promoting Diversity in the Atmospheric Sciences through the Penn State Weather Camps for Middle/High School Students and Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, G. S.; Kowalski, E. C.

    2002-12-01

    Two one-week resident summer camps have been organized that provide student and teachers with hands-on instruction, demonstrations, and classroom interaction. Students entering the 8th through 10th grades are selected from a pool of applicants, with special efforts made in having traditionally underrepresented ethnic groups (African-American, Hispanic, and Native American) and women participate in the Weather Camp. Although the 2001 session included 8 out of 33 students from traditionally underrepresented ethnic groups, the 2002 session included only 1 such student. During the first year approximately 1/2 of the students were female but in the second year only 1/4 were female. The Weather Camp for Teachers was launched during the summer of 2002 with 24 teachers participating in the course. Three educators were from school districts with high populations of underrepresented students and a fourth was from a district serving mentally disabled students. Surveys completed by the teachers and students indicate the participants' educational/career goals and interests, access to technological resources, and teaching methods. Survey results, camp highlights, and strategies for attracting more students and teachers from traditionally underrepresented groups in 2003 will be presented.

  4. Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Penn Linguistics Colloquium. University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 6, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jim, Ed.; Han, Na-Rae, Ed.; Fox, Michelle Minnick, Ed.

    This issue includes the following articles: "Assimilation to the Unmarked" (Eric Bakovic); "On the Non-Universality of Functional Projections and the Effects on Parametrized Variation: Evidence from Creoles" (Marlyse Baptista); "What Turkish Acquisition Tells Us about Underlying Word Order and Scrambling" (Natalie Batman-Ratyosyan, Karin…

  5. Proceedings of the Annual Penn State Microcomputer Information Exchange Conference (2nd, University Park, Pennsylvania, March 11-12, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streibel, Michael J., Comp.

    This collection of 17 conference presentations includes (1) "Project LOGO: A Study in Cognitive Enhancement Using Microcomputers," Henry Dobson; (2) "Tender Loving Care for Your Terrific Little Computer (TLC for your TLC)," Carol Dwyer and Karl Kelly; (3) "Teaching Micro-Literacy to Kids," Robert Gillingham; (5)…

  6. Geographic List of Prime Contract Awards. Oct 91 - Sep 92. FY92. (Dell City Oklahoma - Wayne (County) Penn)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    0󈧰I~N Nl Nl4! 00 N- WO(0i (A 1I 10,000 " tEsI E. E E. E E E E E E 1O0C000 of . , 00 _0.I 00 " 0N ON 0)4.* 00> 00 01000* 010n II � II.C00 CQ m0) co0...IN NJN" N N N ~ NJ U C, 8)* 10144 ᝾ 2N.4 2222 m~ 22 2o < IINO-l <I < N NN 0) 004 0 ’If ) 0 00 ) 4" 44 el QDO 00U II 0011i m C 𔃾 I 00H. 04 N -4 04 0...4 I ;i-r " 3: 0) 0) M"cq " -4 ca"IN!"Coo -t it o r- fl- CF) Im 0) 10 CO ou : 1 C13 C> -4 it om 00 0 C> 00 -4 4-4--4 r- -i o to * ý* -1 I-1 It w I QDo

  7. Humanities mini-course curricula for midcareer health professionals at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kimberly R; George, Daniel R

    2012-08-01

    The field of medical humanities has traditionally focused on medical students and, more recently, on premedical undergraduates. Comparatively little formal humanities pedagogy has been dedicated to midcareer health professionals. To address this lack, the Department of Humanities at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center designed eight annual humanities mini-courses for faculty and staff throughout the college and medical center.These mini-courses fell into four categories: reading, reflection, and discussion; creative expression; technology; and ethics. They were geared toward midcareer health professionals who were seeking new intellectual and creative stimulation and variety in daily routine. They also provided humanities faculty the opportunity to devote attention to topics that capitalize on their professional training and that interest them personally.Participants indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the mini-courses for four principal reasons: (1) learning the tools and methodologies of a new discipline or domain other than biomedicine, (2) using their minds and training in uncustomary ways, (3) forming new alliances with colleagues (which served to lessen the sense of professional isolation), and (4) enjoying a respite from the stressful flow of the workday. Humanities faculty facilitators provided more mixed responses but agreed that conducting the mini-courses had been a positive overall experience.Although this article provides a foundational framework for the development of a humanities mini-course series, the authors encourage others to replicate these curricula in other medical settings as an important step toward a robust pedagogy designed for midcareer health care professionals.

  8. Presence of Marteilia sp. (Paramyxea) in the razor clam Solen marginatus (Pennántt, 1777) in Galicia (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    López, Carmen; Darriba, Susana

    2006-06-01

    Protistan parasites of the genus Marteilia, phylum Paramyxea, cause the molluscs disease named Marteiliosis. Histological observations and transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of life cycle stages of a Marteilia sp. in the bivalve mollusc Solen marginatus (Solenidae). Parasites occurred in epithelial cells of the digestive ducts and tubules. Early stages (primary cells) presented one or several nuclei while advances stages formed a complex of cells-within-cells (secondary and tertiary cells) culminating in spores. Refringent bodies were present inside the presporangia. This is the first report of a Marteilia sp. in S. marginatus.

  9. The Center for Environmental Kinetics Analysis: an NSF- and DOE-funded Environmental Molecular Science Institute (EMSI) at Penn State

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Brantley; William D. Burgos; Brian A. Dempsey; Peter J. Heaney; James D. Kubicki; Peter C. Lichtner; Bruce E. Logan; Carmen E. Martinez; Karl T. Mueller; Kwadwo A. Osseo-Asare; Ming Tien; Carl I. Steefel, Glenn A. Waychunas; and John M. Zachara

    2007-04-19

    Physicochemical and microbiological processes taking place at environmental interfaces influence natural processes as well as the transport and fate of environmental contaminants, the remediation of toxic chemicals, and the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. A team of scientists and engineers has been assembled to develop and apply new experimental and computational techniques to expand our knowledge of environmental kinetics. We are also training a cohort of talented and diverse students to work on these complex problems at multiple length scales and to compile and synthesize the kinetic data. Development of the human resources capable of translating molecular-scale information into parameters that are applicable in real world, field-scale problems of environmental kinetics is a major and relatively unique objective of the Institute's efforts. The EMSI team is a partnership among 10 faculty at The Pennsylvania State University (funded by the National Science Foundation Divisions of Chemistry and Earth Sciences), one faculty member at Juniata College, one faculty member at the University of Florida, and four researchers drawn from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (funded by the Department of Energy Division of Environmental Remediation Sciences). Interactions among the applied and academic scientists drives research approaches aimed toward solving important problems of national interest. The Institute is organized into three interest groups (IGs) focusing on the processes of dissolution (DIG), precipitation (PIG), and microbial reactions at surfaces (BIG). Some of the research activity from each IG is highlighted to the right. The IGs interact with each other as each interest group studies reactions across the molecular, microscopic, mesoscopic and, in most cases, field scales. For example, abiotic dissolution and precipitation reactions of Fe oxides as studied in the Dissolution IG provides the baseline for kinetic behavior as the BIG researches the interaction of microorganisms with these same minerals. The attachment of bacteria and redox chemistry that occurs between microorganisms and minerals are critical factors in maintaining groundwater quality and remediation of many toxic waste sites and is one of the main thrusts of research within our EMSI. The IGs also participate in using visualization tools to promote greater understanding of complex environmental data. As a whole, CEKA is also working to compile environmental kinetics data into a cyberinfrastructure and database. The database can be accessed at: http://keystone.ist.psu.edu/.

  10. A resolution congratulating the Penn State University wrestling team for winning the 2014 National Collegiate Athletic Association Wrestling Championships.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2014-04-02

    04/02/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. 76 FR 24472 - UGI Central Penn Gas, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on April 8...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Large Volume Daily Delivery Service rate contained in Rate Schedule L on file with the Pennsylvania...)(1)(ii) of the Commission's regulations a rate election for interruptible transportation service. CPG... subscribed docket(s). For assistance with any FERC Online service, please e-mail...

  12. A resolution congratulating the Penn State Nittany Lions for their 400th win under head football coach Joe Paterno.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2010-11-17

    11/17/2010 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S7978) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Geographic List of Prime Contract Awards. Oct 92-Sep 93. FY 93. (Ada, Ohio-York County, Penn). Part 10

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    Ii cc0( -t 00000 (7). a)LA4( N) a)(O (700 cmL v u-CO 0 Ni ED0(0 ii 000000, olA . it4!0 Cl 0Cl a)OL ClmOn) V* r- 1 i 1 CID (000 It I 11ii 1 co00 io N1 00...CA)4 o 3qm("mCj C~jN ’At It D: NCJ fNr4)(4)O- lI. 10I 00- 114<- wo =N W’LL C) NV o~cm o OONNC4n X)00 OLA Cv (D0 qW(DLr) It to ’ I caO.-4 I- - -. 0 -0O...0 ~ (0.’- 0NNj jCrI()mc) D 00- OLA LA x zzI.- xI -wL NU r% .tc a() a) - L)0 n WWW In W a, ra) 11 0-40 0 I 11 I o0 r 114< <«m u ɜu 4 u 40 4 44 0 4

  14. Effects of Tailored Risk Communications for Skin Cancer Prevention and Detection: The PennSCAPE Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Glanz, Karen; Volpicelli, Kathryn; Jepson, Christopher; Ming, Michael E.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Armstrong, Katrina

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevention and early detection measures for melanoma, such as sun avoidance and skin examinations, are important, but are practiced inconsistently. In this replication of the Project SCAPE trial, we sought to determine whether tailored print materials were more effective at improving adherence than generic print materials for patients at increased-risk of skin cancer. Methods Participants were randomized to receive personalized mailed communications about their skin cancer risk and recommended sun protection, or generic mailings. Participants were Caucasian adults, at moderate or high risk for skin cancer, recruited in outpatient primary care. The main outcomes were overall sun protection behaviors and specific protective behaviors including use of sunscreen, shirt, hat, sunglasses, shade and sun avoidance; recent sunburns; and skin self-examination and provider skin examination. Results One hundred ninety-two (93.2%) subjects completed the study. Six outcome variables showed significant intervention condition effects in mixed effects models: overall sun protection behavior (p = .025); sunscreen use (p = .026); use of sunglasses (p = .011); sunburns in the past three months (p = .033); recency of last skin self-exam (p = .017); and frequency of skin exams by health care provider (p = .016). Conclusions Relative to generic communications, tailored risk communications resulted in improved adherence to six skin cancer protective behaviors, including a composite sun protection behavior measure, sunburns, and health care provider skin examinations. Impact Tailored interventions can be more effective in improving patient prevention behaviors than non-tailored, generic information for patients at moderate to high risk of skin cancer. PMID:25432953

  15. Another Look at College Student's Ratings of Course Quality: Data from Penn State Student Surveys in Three Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willits, Fern; Brennan, Mark

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed the relationships of student attributes, course characteristics and course outcomes to college students' ratings of course quality in three types of settings. The analysis utilised data from online surveys of samples of college students conducted in 2011 and 2012 at the Pennsylvania State University. Included in the analysis…

  16. Bringing atmospheric sciences to middle/high school students and teachers through the Penn State Weather Camp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, G. S.; Syrett, W.; Knight, P.

    2002-05-01

    A one-week resident camp during the summer has been developed that provides students and teachers with hands-on instruction and classroom lessons. Students entering 8th through 10th grades are selected for the camp and special efforts are made in having traditionally underrepresented groups participate in the Weather Camp. The contents of the camp include: balloon launches, contouring exercises, simple forecasting techniques, understanding past and future climatic conditions, a climate change debate, tours of private and government weather organizations. One special highlight of the camp is the making of a weather forecast in the TV studio that is taped and given to the weather camper. The weather camp for teachers is being launched in the summer of 2002 with the goal of hosting 15-24 teachers. Teachers can receive two credits during the weather camp assuming that 60 hours of in-class and out of class work is completed. Efforts and strategies are being made to bring teachers from rural and urban settings in order to take their experiences back to their classrooms. Highlights of the first year of the weather camp are presented along with second year and future efforts.

  17. Risk of long-term hot flashes after natural menopause: evidence from the Penn Ovarian Aging Study cohort.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Ellen W; Sammel, Mary D; Sanders, Richard J

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to estimate the risk of hot flashes relative to natural menopause and to evaluate the associations of hormone levels, behavioral variables, and demographic variables with the risk of hot flashes after menopause. We performed annual assessment of 255 women who were premenopausal at baseline and reached natural menopause within 16 years of follow-up. The prevalence of moderate/severe hot flashes increased in each premenopausal year, reaching a peak of 46% in the first 2 years after the final menstrual period (FMP). Hot flashes decreased slowly after menopause and did not return to premenopausal levels until 9 years after the FMP. The mean (SD) duration of moderate/severe hot flashes after the FMP was 4.6 (2.9) years (for any hot flashes, 4.9 [3.1] y). One third of women at 10 years or more after menopause continued to experience moderate/severe hot flashes. African-American women (obese and nonobese) and obese white women had significantly greater risks of hot flashes compared with nonobese white women (interaction, P = 0.01). In multivariable analysis, increasing follicle-stimulating hormone levels before the FMP (P < 0.001), decreasing estradiol (odds ratio, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.96; P = 0.008), and increasing anxiety (odds ratio, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.03-1.06; P < 0.001) were significant risk factors for hot flashes, whereas higher education levels were protective (odds ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.47-0.91; P = 0.011). Moderate/severe hot flashes continue, on average, for nearly 5 years after menopause; more than one third of women observed for 10 years or more after menopause have moderate/severe hot flashes. Continuation of hot flashes for more than 5 years after menopause underscores the importance of determining individual risks/benefits when selecting hormone or nonhormone therapy for menopausal symptoms.

  18. The Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search stars (Corrigendum). III. The sample of evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, A.; Deka-Szymankiewicz, B.; Adamczyk, M.; Adamów, M.; Nowak, G.; Wolszczan, A.

    2016-05-01

    Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  19. A resolution congratulating the Penn State University wrestling team for winning the 2014 National Collegiate Athletic Association Wrestling Championships.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2014-04-02

    Senate - 04/02/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. Oil and gas impacts on forest ecosystems: findings gleaned from the 2012 Goddard Forum at Penn State University

    Treesearch

    Patrick J. Drohan; James C. Finley; Paul Roth; Thomas M. Schuler; Susan L. Stout; Margaret C. Brittingham; Nels C. Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Energy production presents numerous challenges to both industry and land managers across the globe. The recent development of unconventional (shale gas) plays around the world [US Energy Information Administration (USEIA), 2011] has brought attention to the potential for rapid change in affected landscapes and associated ecosystem services. While shale-gas development...

  1. Descriptive Case Study of the University of Pennsylvania Partnership with the Penn Alexander School: Understanding Success and Its Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreidle, Ann

    2016-01-01

    With more than half of all higher education institutions in the United States located in or near urban areas, higher education institutions are particularly vulnerable to challenges faced today by cities, such as underperforming public schools, poverty, crime, economic disinvestment and residential abandonment in areas that surround their campuses…

  2. Development of a Comprehensive Recruitment Program Targeted at the Penn State Student Market. AIR Forum 1979 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiro, Louis M.; McCallus, Joseph L.

    A time sequence of recruitment activities was developed using high school data to represent the total, potential, and actual student markets for Pennsylvania State University. High schools with similar characteristics were grouped according to potential recruitment yields. Under the assumption that college decision-making behavior approximated the…

  3. Does the Penn State Reticence Program Work?: A Comparison of Special and Regular Options of a Basic Speech Communication Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Lynne; Keaten, James

    A study assessed the effectiveness of the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Reticence Program as a treatment for individuals with communication difficulties, such as communication apprehension, reticence, and shyness. Several standardized tests of social communication problems were used in a pretest-posttest design with a control group and two…

  4. Vadose zone transport of natural and synthetic estrogen hormones at Penn State's "Living Filter" wastewater irrigation site

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The increase in endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the environment has generated new research focused on the behavior of these compounds in natural soil and water ecosystems. To understand how estrogens behave in the soil environment as a result of 25+ years of wastewater irrigation, soils fro...

  5. Another Look at College Student's Ratings of Course Quality: Data from Penn State Student Surveys in Three Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willits, Fern; Brennan, Mark

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed the relationships of student attributes, course characteristics and course outcomes to college students' ratings of course quality in three types of settings. The analysis utilised data from online surveys of samples of college students conducted in 2011 and 2012 at the Pennsylvania State University. Included in the analysis…

  6. Descriptive Case Study of the University of Pennsylvania Partnership with the Penn Alexander School: Understanding Success and Its Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreidle, Ann

    2016-01-01

    With more than half of all higher education institutions in the United States located in or near urban areas, higher education institutions are particularly vulnerable to challenges faced today by cities, such as underperforming public schools, poverty, crime, economic disinvestment and residential abandonment in areas that surround their campuses…

  7. Sea-Level Static Testing of the Penn State Two-Dimensional Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, J. M.; Pal, S.; Marshall, W. M.; Santoro, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The present results indicated that: 1.Significant RBCC ejector mode database has been generated for single and twin thruster configuration and for global and local measurements. 2. Ongoing analysis and correlation effort for MSFC CFD modeling and turbulent shear layer analysis was completed. 3. The potential follow-on activities are: detailed measurements of air flow static pressure and velocity profiles; investigation other thruster spacing configurations; performing fundamental shear layer mixing study; and demonstrating single-shot Raman measurements.

  8. A resolution congratulating the Penn State University wrestling team for winning the 2014 National Collegiate Athletic Association Wrestling Championships.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2014-04-02

    04/02/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S2134; text as passed Senate: CR S2096-2097) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Development of microsatellite markers for Manilkara maxima T.D. Penn. (Sapotaceae) and their use in conservation genetics.

    PubMed

    Silva-Junior, José Audenor; de Souza França, Daniele; Moraes, Ramiris César Souza; Gaiotto, Fernanda Amato

    2016-06-01

    Manilkara maxima is an endemic tree species of the Atlantic Forest in southern Bahia, Brazil. It is considered important for forest conservation due to its mutualistic interactions with endemic and endangered animals. Our aim was to develop microsatellite markers to estimate genetic diversity in order to provide information for effectiveness of future conservation programs. We used next generation sequencing technology to develop the first specific microsatellite markers for M. maxima. Seventeen new microsatellite loci were applied in 72 individuals sampled in three natural populations. On average, the number of alleles per loci was 8.8. The expected heterozygosity varied between 0.72 and 0.77, indicating that the developed set of molecular markers is useful for genetic diversity studies. Additionally, the estimated value for the combined probability of exclusion (Q) was greater than 0.999, which indicates the powerful of these molecular tools for paternity and kinship analysis. Our results demonstrate that the set of microsatellites developed in this work is a powerful tool for population genetics, molecular ecology and conservation biology purposes.

  10. Proceedings of the Annual Penn Linguistics Colloquium (22nd, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, February 28-March 1, 1998). University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 5, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Alexis, Ed.; Lee, Hikyoung, Ed.; Moisset, Christine, Ed.; Williams, Alexander, Ed.

    This issue includes the following articles: "Detaching Discourse Functions from Functional Projections" (Dora Alexopoulou); "Interface Conditions on Child Language: A Crosslinguistic Look at Genitives" (Sharon Armon-Lotem, Stephen Crain); "Formal Features and Movement at PF" (Ralph C. Blight); "Semantic Features…

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Penn Linguistics Colloquium (21st, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, February 22-23, 1997). University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 4, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Alexis, Ed.; Siegel, Laura, Ed.; Surek-Clark, Clarissa, Ed.; Williams, Alexander, Ed.

    This issue contains the following articles: "The Pragmatics of Wh-Question Intonation in English" (Christine Bartels); "The Nature of Object Agreement in Hungarian" (Huba Bartos); "Voah Mei Daett Sei Deitsh: Developments in the Vowel System of Pennsylvania German" (David Bowie); "Event Time Properties"…

  12. Public health potential of farmers' markets on medical center campuses: a case study from Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

    PubMed

    George, Daniel R; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Rovniak, Liza S

    2011-12-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers' markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces.

  13. Congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon (THON) on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Thompson, Glenn [R-PA-5

    2010-02-25

    03/22/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Higher Education, Lifelong Learning, and Competitiveness. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. National Dam Inspection Program. Group Camp Dam. (NDI Number PA 00259, PennDER Number 4-31), Ohio River Basin, Traverse Run, Phase 1 Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    dam is on the low side of the "Small" size category.) The spillway is-therefore’con- sidered "adequate." -The dam was found to be in good overall...ENGINEERS AMS W. PECK olonel, Corps of Engineers istrict Engineer Date: A ,I7 S- iiiF • .. .| -•j GROUP CAMP DAM IMI* 4 View of Upstream Side of Dam...from the Right Abutment ’ i II , X. View of Downstream Side of Dam from the Right Abutment iv -L-LL TABLE OF CONTENTS P age Section 1 - Project

  15. Research Camping and Environmental Education. Proceedings from the National Research Workshop (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, December 3-6, 1975). Penn State HPER Series No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Smissen, Betty, Comp.

    Attended by 250 persons, the workshop was directed toward assessing participant outcomes of resident outdoor experiences, effectiveness of camping and environmental education programs, and leadership strategies related to quality outdoor experiences. Its keynote theme was "The Dynamics of Research". Focus was on the utilization of research and the…

  16. Family Literacy: A Research Agenda to Build the Future. Report from Penn State's Goodling Institute for Research in Family Literacy Think Tank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askov, Eunice N.

    A think tank on researching family literacy was held to brainstorm a national research agenda for family literacy. The think tank brought together 12 researchers, policymakers, and practitioners involved in family literacy. Key themes emerging during the think tank were as follows: (1) family literacy is difficult to research because it is…

  17. Congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon (THON) on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Thompson, Glenn [R-PA-5

    2010-02-25

    03/22/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Higher Education, Lifelong Learning, and Competitiveness. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. A resolution congratulating the Penn State University women's volleyball team for winning the 2013 National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Volleyball Championship.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Toomey, Pat [R-PA

    2014-02-04

    Senate - 02/04/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Working to Educate Global Citizens and Create Neighborly Communities Locally and Globally: Penn's Partnerships in West Philadelphia as a Democratic Experiment in Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkavy, Ira; Hartley, Matthew; Hodges, Rita Axelroth; Weeks, Joann

    2016-01-01

    In the rapidly accelerating global era in which we now live, human beings must solve a vast array of unprecedently complex problems. Given their proclaimed dedication to critical intelligence, and their unique constellation of formidable resources to develop it, institutions of higher education have a unique responsibility to help solve these…

  20. Congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon (THON) on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Thompson, Glenn [R-PA-5

    2010-02-25

    House - 03/22/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Higher Education, Lifelong Learning, and Competitiveness. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. How Billion-Dollar Endowments May Change 2 Institutions: Swarthmore Hopes To Preserve Its Elite Status; Penn State Wants To Finance Its Ambitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulley, John L.

    2001-01-01

    Contrasts the reactions of Swarthmore College and Pennsylvania State University as the endowments at both institutions topped the billion dollar mark in 2000. Swarthmore uses its endowment to assure that financial need is never considered in admissions decisions, but does not touch the principal. At Pennsylvania State, tuition is more affordable,…

  2. Microseismic Monitoring of CO2 Injection at the Penn West Enhanced Oil Recovery Pilot Project, Canada: Implications for Detection of Wellbore Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Garzón, Patricia; Bohnhoff, Marco; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Zambrano-Narváez, Gonzalo; Chalaturnyk, Rick

    2013-01-01

    A passive seismic monitoring campaign was carried out in the frame of a CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) pilot project in Alberta, Canada. Our analysis focuses on a two-week period during which prominent downhole pressure fluctuations in the reservoir were accompanied by a leakage of CO2 and CH4 along the monitoring well equipped with an array of short-period borehole geophones. We applied state of the art seismological processing schemes to the continuous seismic waveform recordings. During the analyzed time period we did not find evidence of induced micro-seismicity associated with CO2 injection. Instead, we identified signals related to the leakage of CO2 and CH4, in that seven out of the eight geophones show a clearly elevated noise level framing the onset time of leakage along the monitoring well. Our results confirm that micro-seismic monitoring of reservoir treatment can contribute towards improved reservoir monitoring and leakage detection. PMID:24002229

  3. Microseismic monitoring of CO2 injection at the Penn West Enhanced Oil Recovery pilot project, Canada: implications for detection of wellbore leakage.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Garzón, Patricia; Bohnhoff, Marco; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Zambrano-Narváez, Gonzalo; Chalaturnyk, Rick

    2013-09-02

    A passive seismic monitoring campaign was carried out in the frame of a CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) pilot project in Alberta, Canada. Our analysis focuses on a two-week period during which prominent downhole pressure fluctuations in the reservoir were accompanied by a leakage of CO2 and CH4 along the monitoring well equipped with an array of short-period borehole geophones. We applied state of the art seismological processing schemes to the continuous seismic waveform recordings. During the analyzed time period we did not find evidence of induced micro-seismicity associated with CO2 injection. Instead, we identified signals related to the leakage of CO2 and CH4, in that seven out of the eight geophones show a clearly elevated noise level framing the onset time of leakage along the monitoring well. Our results confirm that micro-seismic monitoring of reservoir treatment can contribute towards improved reservoir monitoring and leakage detection.

  4. A resolution congratulating the Penn State University women's volleyball team for winning the 2013 National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Volleyball Championship.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Toomey, Pat [R-PA

    2014-02-04

    02/04/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S773-774; text as passed Senate: CR S767-768) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Morphology, ultrastructure and mineral uptake is affected by copper toxicity in young plants of Inga subnuda subs. luschnathiana (Benth.) T.D. Penn.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Tielle Abreu; França, Marcel Giovanni Costa; de Almeida, Alex-Alan Furtado; de Oliveira, Sérgio José Ribeiro; de Jesus, Raildo Mota; Souza, Vânia Lima; Dos Santos Silva, José Victor; Mangabeira, Pedro Antônio

    2015-10-01

    Toxic effects of copper (Cu) were analyzed in young plants of Inga subnuda subs. luschnathiana, a species that is highly tolerant to flooding and found in Brazil in wetlands contaminated with Cu. Plants were cultivated in fully nutritive solution, containing different concentrations of Cu (from 0.08 μmol to 0.47 mmol L(-1)). Symptoms of Cu toxicity were observed in both leaves and roots of plants cultivated from 0.16 mmol Cu L(-1). In the leaves, Cu clearly induced alterations in the thickness of the epidermis, mesophyll, palisade parenchyma, and intercellular space of the lacunose parenchyma. Also, this metal induced disorganization in thylakoid membranes, internal and external membrane rupture in chloroplasts, mitochondrial alterations, and electrodense material deposition in vacuoles of the parenchyma and cell walls. The starch grains disappeared; however, an increase of plastoglobule numbers was observed according to Cu toxicity. In the roots, destruction of the epidermis, reduction of the intercellular space, and modifications in the format of initial cells of the external cortex were evident. Cell walls and endoderm had been broken, invaginations of tonoplast and vacuole retractions were found, and, again, electrodense material was observed in these sites. Mineral nutrient analysis revealed higher Cu accumulation in the roots and greater macro- and micronutrients accumulation into shoots. Thus, root morphological and ultrastructural changes induced differential nutrients uptake and their translocations from root toward shoots, and this was related to membrane and endoderm ruptures caused by Cu toxicity.

  6. A nonhydrostatic version of the Penn State-NCAR Mesoscale Model - Validation tests and simulation of an Atlantic cyclone and cold front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudhia, Jimy

    1993-01-01

    A nonhydrostatic extension to the Pennsylvania State University-NCAR Mesoscale Model is presented, which employs reference pressure as the basis for a terrain-following vertical coordinate, and the fully compressible system of equations. It is shown that this model, combined with the existing initialization techniques and the physics of the current hydrostatic model, is capable of real-data simulations on any scale, limited only by data quality and resolution and by computer resources. An example of an explosive cyclone simulation is presented, demonstrating the capability of the nonhydrostatic model to reproduce the hydrostatic model results at large scales.

  7. A resolution congratulating the Penn State University women's volleyball team for winning the 2013 National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Volleyball Championship.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Toomey, Pat [R-PA

    2014-02-04

    02/04/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Public Health Potential of Farmers’ Markets on Medical Center Campuses: A Case Study From Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Rovniak, Liza S.

    2011-01-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers’ markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces. PMID:22021298

  9. Aboriginal Identity in Education Settings: Privileging Our Stories as a Way of Deconstructing the Past and Re-Imagining the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shay, Marnee; Wickes, Judi

    2017-01-01

    From Aboriginal Australian perspectives and experiences, Aunty Judi Wickes and Marnee Shay bring a cross-generational, critical race analysis of Aboriginal identities and how they are implicated in the schooling experiences of Aboriginal young people. Using autoethnography, Aunty Judi and Marnee discuss their educational experiences in the…

  10. Communicator, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bortolussi, Vicki, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The CAG "Communicator" focus is on serving gifted students in California. This document consists of the four issues of "communicator" issued during 1997. Featured articles include: (1) "The Gifted Student At Risk. It Can't Be True" (Judy Roseberry); (2) "Tech Net-Technology and At-Risk Students" (Judy Lieb); (3) "Reviving Ophelia: Saving the…

  11. The Employment Context. The Impact of the Law on the Lives of Women. Gender and American Law Series, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maschke, Karen J., Ed.

    This book contains the following 14 articles on the effects of law on women in the United States: "Protection of Women Workers and the Courts: A Legal Case History" (Ann Corinne Hill); "Sexual Harassment and Race: A Legal Analysis of Discrimination" (Judy Trent Ellis); "Comparable Worth: Is This a Theory for Black Workers?" (Judy Scales-Trent);…

  12. 76 FR 70348 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Mystic River, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... District, has issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Route 1... facilitate a major bridge rehabilitation project. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed... rule, call or email Ms. Judy Leung-Yee, Project Officer, First Coast Guard District, judy.k.leung-yee...

  13. Simulation Learning PC Screen-Based vs. High Fidelity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Post-test questions Attachment D. Data Collection Sheet Tripler Army Medical Center Judy Carlson, EdD, FNP -BC, Kristine Qureshi, RN, CEN, DNSc, and...INFORMATION: For questions about the study, contact the principal investigator: Dr. Judy Carlson, EdD, FNP -BC Nursing Research, Pacific Regional

  14. The Employment Context. The Impact of the Law on the Lives of Women. Gender and American Law Series, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maschke, Karen J., Ed.

    This book contains the following 14 articles on the effects of law on women in the United States: "Protection of Women Workers and the Courts: A Legal Case History" (Ann Corinne Hill); "Sexual Harassment and Race: A Legal Analysis of Discrimination" (Judy Trent Ellis); "Comparable Worth: Is This a Theory for Black Workers?" (Judy Scales-Trent);…

  15. Aboriginal Identity in Education Settings: Privileging Our Stories as a Way of Deconstructing the Past and Re-Imagining the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shay, Marnee; Wickes, Judi

    2017-01-01

    From Aboriginal Australian perspectives and experiences, Aunty Judi Wickes and Marnee Shay bring a cross-generational, critical race analysis of Aboriginal identities and how they are implicated in the schooling experiences of Aboriginal young people. Using autoethnography, Aunty Judi and Marnee discuss their educational experiences in the…

  16. Fundamental Investigations into the Infrared Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-23

    Judy Wu. Development of Nanopatterned Fluorine-Doped Tin Oxide Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Improved Light Trapping, ACS Applied...heterojunction solar cell photocurrent enhancement, Nanoscale, (06 2012): 0. doi: 10.1039/c2nr30735a 08/30/2011 1.00 Rongtao Lu, Rayyan Kamal, Judy Z Wu...Jun Li, Judy Wu. The effect of annealing on the photoconductivity of carbon nanofiber/TiO2core-shell nanowires for use in dye-sensitized solar cells

  17. Human rights and the challenges of science and technology: Commentary on Meier et al. "Translating the human right to water and sanitation into public policy reform" and Hall et al. "The human right to water: the importance of domestic and productive water rights".

    PubMed

    Marks, Stephen P

    2014-12-01

    The expansion of the corpus of international human rights to include the right to water and sanitation has implications both for the process of recognizing human rights and for future developments in the relationships between technology, engineering and human rights. Concerns with threats to human rights resulting from developments in science and technology were expressed in the early days of the United Nations (UN), along with the recognition of the ambitious human right of everyone "to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications." This comment explores the hypothesis that the emerging concepts most likely to follow recognition of the human right to water primarily involve issues of science and technology, such as access to medicines or clean and healthy environment. Many threats to human rights from advances in science, which were identified in the past as potential, have become real today, such as invasion of privacy from electronic recording, deprivation of health and livelihood as a result of climate change, or control over individual autonomy through advances in genetics and neuroscience. This comment concludes by urging greater engagement of scientists and engineers, in partnership with human rights specialists, in translating normative pronouncements into defining policy and planning interventions.

  18. Someone You Know Has MS: A Book for Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ba rba ra LaRoche, and Patr ici a Dick Illustr ations by: Cl aude Martinot Martha King ... Chuck, John, and Nancy Delgreco; Jennifer and John Dick; Judy and Pamela DiPalma; Mary Hooley; Nicole Klabunde; ...

  19. Creativity: The Human Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses an exhibition entitled "Creativity--The Human Resource." The exhibition examines the work of 15 Americans, such as designer Buckminster Fuller and artist Judy Chicago, who have contributed in special ways to the arts and sciences. (PHR)

  20. Current Perspectives on Pronunciation. Practices Anchored in Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Joan, Ed.

    A collection of essays on pronunciation instruction theory and practice includes: "Teaching Pronunciation as Communication" (Marianne Celce-Murcia); "Learner Variables and Prepronunciation Considerations in Teaching Pronunciation" (Rita Wong); "Pronunciation and Listening Comprehension" (Judy B. Gilbert); "Pronunciation Tutorials for Nonnative…

  1. E3 Success Story -Reducing Rework With the Lean and Green Advantage: Metal Finishing Technologies, Inc

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Green Suppliers Network representatives Judy Wlodarczyk and Bill Caplan, of CONNSTEP, Inc., trained the MFT review team, and together they completed current and future state value stream maps for the zinc plating line.

  2. Current Perspectives on Pronunciation. Practices Anchored in Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Joan, Ed.

    A collection of essays on pronunciation instruction theory and practice includes: "Teaching Pronunciation as Communication" (Marianne Celce-Murcia); "Learner Variables and Prepronunciation Considerations in Teaching Pronunciation" (Rita Wong); "Pronunciation and Listening Comprehension" (Judy B. Gilbert); "Pronunciation Tutorials for Nonnative…

  3. Creativity: The Human Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses an exhibition entitled "Creativity--The Human Resource." The exhibition examines the work of 15 Americans, such as designer Buckminster Fuller and artist Judy Chicago, who have contributed in special ways to the arts and sciences. (PHR)

  4. National Dam Inspection Program. Montour Number 4 Refuse Bank (NDI number PA 00865, PENN DER Number 63-92), Ohio River Basin, Tributary to Chartiers Creek, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    recommended improvement efforts. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Embankment Improvements: The owner should immediately develop and implement a plan for improving surface...designed so as to require little or no maintenance. 2. Emergency Operation and Warning Plan : The owner should develop an Emergency Qperation and warning... Plan including: ii ........................................ - +’SYNOPSIS OF ASSESSMENT AND RECOMMENDATIONS (CONT’D) Montour No. 4 Refuse Bank a

  5. National Dam Inspection Program. Butler’s Lake Dam (NDI Number PA-01067, PennDER Number 2-29) Ohio River Basin, Drennen Branch, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    from the downstream slope and regrading of the slope to a uniform condition. 2. Emergency Operation and Warning Plan : The owner should develop an...Emergency Operation and Warning Plan including: a. Guidelines for evaluating inflow during periods of heavy precipitation or runoff. b. Procedures for...Weir Plan , Elevation and Spillway Profile A13 APPENDIX B - ENGINEERING DATA CHECKLIST APPENDIX C - PHOTOGRAPHS Photo Key Map

  6. National Dam Inspection Program. Robena Slurry Pond 6 (NDI Number PA 00197, Penn DER Number 30-26), Ohio River Basin, Tributary to Whiteley Creek, Greene County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    excess of 100 percent of the PMF. No emergency operation and warning plan was found for the facility. The field inspection indicated very minor...deficiencies which can be corrected or improved as a part of normal maintenance efforts.,,/.. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Emergency Operation and Warning Plan : The owner...should develop an Emergency Operation and Warning Plan including: a. Guidelines for evaluating inflow during periods of heavy precipitation or runoff

  7. Generalizing the OpenURL Framework beyond References to Scholarly Works: The Bison-Fute Model; Digital Libraries and Education: Trends and Opportunities; E-Books and Their Future in Academic Libraries: An Overview; Penn State Visual Image User Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van de Sompel, Herbert; Beit-Arie, Oren; Roes, Hans; Snowhill, Lucia; Pisciotta, Henry; Brisson, Roger; Ferrin, Eric; Dooris, Michael; Spink, Amanda

    2001-01-01

    Includes four articles that discuss a conceptual framework for open and context-sensitive reference linking for Web-based scholarly information; issues for academic libraries due to increased use of information and communication technologies; the future of electronic books in academic libraries; and an academic library user study on the needs for…

  8. National Dam Inspection Program. Comet Lake Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA-00796, PennDER I.D. Number 28-103), Potomac River Basin, Spring Run, Franklin County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Cambrian age. The Harpers Formation is composed of a thick sequence of graywacke , siltstone, phyllite, and the conspicuous Montalto quartzite member. This...very resistant quartzite forms the upper slopes and crests of the ridges, while the less resistant siltstones, phyllites, and graywackes underlie

  9. Modelling the impact of blood flow on the temperature distribution in the human eye and the orbit: fixed heat transfer coefficients versus the Pennes bioheat model versus discrete blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flyckt, V. M. M.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2006-10-01

    Prediction of the temperature distribution in the eye depends on how the impact of the blood flow is taken into account. Three methods will be compared: a simplified eye anatomy that applies a single heat transfer coefficient to describe all heat transport mechanisms between the sclera and the body core, a detailed eye anatomy in which the blood flow is accounted for either by the bioheat approach, or by including the discrete vasculature in the eye and the orbit. The comparison is done both for rabbit and human anatomies, normo-thermally and when exposed to homogeneous power densities. The first simplified model predicts much higher temperatures than the latter two. It was shown that the eye is very hard to heat when taking physiological perfusion correctly into account. It was concluded that the heat transfer coefficient describing the heat transport from the sclera to the body core reported in the literature for the first simplified model is too low. The bioheat approach is appropriate for a first-order approximation of the temperature distribution in the eye when exposed to a homogeneous power density, but the discrete vasculature down to 0.2 mm in diameter needs to be taken into account when the heterogeneity of the temperature distribution at a mm scale is of interest.

  10. National Dam Inspection Program. Totem Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA-00042, PennDER I.D. Number 8-8), Susquehanna River Basin, Camps Creek, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    surveillance of the facility during periods of unusually heavy precipitation. b. Have the facility evaluated by a registered pro- fessional engineer...be provisions for around-the-clock surveillance of the facility during periods of unusually heavy precipitation. 10 SECTION 5 HYDROLOG IC/HYDRAULIC...be provi- sions for around-the-clock surveillance of the facility during periods of unusually heavy precipitation. b. Have the facility evaluated by a

  11. National Dam Inspection Program. Rose Valley Lake Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA-01127, PennDER I.D. Number 41-97), Susquehanna River Basin, Mill Creek, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    Group of Devonian age. Soils, generally on the north, northeast and south shores are derived from glacial till whereas the soils underlying the site of... period of continental glaciation. The Catskill member is poorly represented in outcrop throughout the area; however, outcrops in the Mill Creek gorge just

  12. Modelling the impact of blood flow on the temperature distribution in the human eye and the orbit: fixed heat transfer coefficients versus the Pennes bioheat model versus discrete blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Flyckt, V M M; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

    2006-10-07

    Prediction of the temperature distribution in the eye depends on how the impact of the blood flow is taken into account. Three methods will be compared: a simplified eye anatomy that applies a single heat transfer coefficient to describe all heat transport mechanisms between the sclera and the body core, a detailed eye anatomy in which the blood flow is accounted for either by the bioheat approach, or by including the discrete vasculature in the eye and the orbit. The comparison is done both for rabbit and human anatomies, normo-thermally and when exposed to homogeneous power densities. The first simplified model predicts much higher temperatures than the latter two. It was shown that the eye is very hard to heat when taking physiological perfusion correctly into account. It was concluded that the heat transfer coefficient describing the heat transport from the sclera to the body core reported in the literature for the first simplified model is too low. The bioheat approach is appropriate for a first-order approximation of the temperature distribution in the eye when exposed to a homogeneous power density, but the discrete vasculature down to 0.2 mm in diameter needs to be taken into account when the heterogeneity of the temperature distribution at a mm scale is of interest.

  13. National Dam Inspection Program. Mine No. 60-Pond 6 (NDI Number PA 01145, PENN DER Number 63-89). Ohio River Basin, Tributary to Center Branch - Pigeon Creek, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    CORPORATION NO CAT NAMEMINE NO. 60 SLURRY IMPOUNDMENT -~DRAINAGE DETA ILS SumZ 10 or 1? 5.0. 13709-01-ARA SCALK AS SHOWN DATE MAY, 1960 MIC44AKL SAKEN...note, to, 3 Peg T E 27. STEADY STATE SEEPAGE RAD4IS- 152 31’ STATIC FS - 2 124 DYNAMIC FS 5 18?0 1220 NOTE THE FAILURE CIRCLE REMAINED THE SAME FOR

  14. National Dam Inspection Program. Colonial Dam Number 3, (NDI Number PA-00209, PennDER Number 26-22) Ohio River Basin, Fayette County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    erosion of soil and rock has occurred in and just downstream of the breach described earlier. Normal inflow to the reservoir now passes into the breach...noted. No major structural cracks were observed. b. Right Abutment: The right abutment is con- sidered to be in poor conditon because of significant...erosion due to water flowing in the breach. The base of the breach channel is on bedrock, but the sides consisted of barren, steep soil slopes

  15. National Dam Inspection Program. Baggaley Dam. (NDI Number PA-00454, PennDER Number-65-10) Ohio River Basin, Indian Camp Run, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    high, steep soil face was visible in the area to the left of the spillway chute. With the exception of the soil face, the left abutment area was heavily...However, there was no indication of movement of soil fines and the flow was not large. b. Abutments: (1) ’Right: No major indication of reservoir related...information on structural and operating conditons of the reported water supply pipeline is assessed to be a deficiency. d. Principal Spillway: (1

  16. A resolution congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon ("THON") on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2011-03-29

    Senate - 03/30/2011 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. A resolution congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon ("THON") on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2014-03-11

    Senate - 03/11/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. A resolution congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon ("THON") on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2011-03-29

    03/30/2011 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. A resolution congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon ("THON") on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2014-03-11

    03/11/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. National Dam Inspection Program. Trax Farm Dam (NDI Number PA 00131, PennDer Number 63-96) Ohio River Basin, Tributary to Peters Creek. Washington County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    groins to remove vehicle ruts and standing water and to provide adequate drainage and erosion protection. (2) Constructing and installing a larger trash ...cage on the principal spillway to permit unrestricted flow to the drop inlet even if the cage is partially blocked by debris. Anti- vortex devices...protected by a steel bar trash cage. (3) Outlet Works: The outlet works or pond drain facility reportedly consists of a low level inlet to the prin- cipal

  1. National Dam Safety Program. Martindale Dam (NDI Number PA-00444, PennDER Number 11-17), Ohio River Basin, Trout Run, Cambria County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    AD-A91 699 BAKER ( MICHAEL ) JR INC BEAVER PA F/6 13/13 NATIONAL DAM SAFETY PROBRAM. MARTINDALE DAM (NDI NUMBER PA.OGRR-ETCCU) 9 AUG Bo OACW3-80-C...Q- Baltimore, Maryland 21203 preparod by a- C.o / MICHAEL BAKER, JR., INC. , Consulting Engineers - $’ 9 cm: 4301 Dutch Ridge Road Beaver...Prepared for: DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Baltimore District, Corps of Engineers Baltimore, Maryland 21203. b1 (1:’ w I Prepared by: MICHAEL BAKER, JRI

  2. National Dam Inspection Program. Moose Creek Reservoir Dam, (NDS I.D. Number PA-00423, PennDer I.D. Number 17-6), Susquehanna River Basin, Moose Creek, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    31 feet Top Width = 20 feet Side Slopes - upstream: 2H:IV downstream: I-I/2H:lV 3 Zoning - Earth. "Select" material placed upstream of the concrete...selected material on the upstream side of the core wall and coarser material on the downstream side with all stones over 6 inches removed. The embankment...removed from the earth fill were placed on the slopes for riprap to a depth of 2 or 3 feet, and upon completion the stone on the downstream side was

  3. National Dam Inspection Program. Mosquito Run Dam (NDI Number PA01012, PennDER Number 41-2), Susquehanna River Basin, Mosquito Creek, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    operational measures are recommended to be undertaken by the owner: 1) Develop a detailed emergency operation and warning system. 2) During periods of unusually...system. 2) During periods of unusually heavy rainfai!, provide around-the-clock surveillance of the dam. 3) When warning of a storm of major...Approximately Four Miles Pho Soo Legend, Next Pav -Ar AL GEOLOGY MAP LEGEND SILURIAN Tunu’t-owiiy "I"l~ l L . Wills C~reetk F~ormation - h.1, , S’d A

  4. A resolution congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon (THON) on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Specter, Arlen [D-PA

    2010-04-19

    04/19/2010 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S2427) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. A resolution congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon ("THON") on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2011-03-29

    03/30/2011 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (text: CR S2000) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. A resolution congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon ("THON") on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2014-03-11

    03/11/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S1527-1528; text as passed Senate: CR S1521-1522) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. A resolution congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2012-03-29

    03/29/2012 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S2257) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. National Dam Inspection Program. Ligonier Dam (NDI Number PA-00477, PennDER Number 65-117), Ohio River Basin, South Fort of Mill Creek, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    sluice gate for the outlet pipe is non-functional because of block- age by a steel plate shoring the bottom portion of the intake tower. A 12 inch...i. 3t Ln - 02-4w- M .o -’ 0 S -4). 04 0 4 0-1 041r 0j -2 4 N 4 0>F4c4 04 0M2 )E-4- "t 44 J 4 )0 P4 ~ 0 0 4 w94 0 09 04o l3a > 1. 4P4to" )40a a ) 4)00a

  9. National Dam Inspection Program. Star Junction Number 1 Dam (NDI Number PA-00198, PennDER Number 26-30) Ohio River Basin, Washington Run, Fayette County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    end and erosion K of the training dike has occurred. g. Instrumentation : No instrumentation was observed during the inspection. h. Downstream...DATE: 19 MAR 80 RN TDZ: 10.30.40 NATIONAL PROGR FOR TEM INSPEC ION OF NON-FEERAL DM HXDROLOMC AND MRAILIC ANALISIS OF STAR JUNCTION NamR 1 DAm PROBABLE

  10. National Dam Inspection Program. Long Ridge Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA- 01022, PennDER I.D. Number 52-185), Delaware River Basin, Branch of Hornbecks Creek, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    Erosbionobsre blong thuies usreamdem- attention. The deficiency is the result of inadequate slope pro- tection along portions of the upstream embankment...8217iftitift i~iIit tin’i. Hm’i inati 30f’? Vb~f 01,’,tlti’ ilA%9i~iittt Nnlint i~ LAUFRAnu Io PICK$fuumtpnntINdi.ig’iy anyttf’i r iud h~i.~.lIi i .u* i

  11. National Dam Inspection Program. Upper Dam (NDI Number PA-00445, PennDER Number 14-25), Susquehanna River Basin, Cold Stream, Centre County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    valve control is located upstream of the embank- ment centerline, in the gate house. W !Jli -17 ! (3) Water SUpply Pipeline : The water supply pipeline ...Damn is owned by the Keystone Water Company. Correspondence should be addressed to: Keystone Water Company Moshannon District 323 North Front Street...the principal spill- way. A water supply pipeline through the dam provides water and pressure head for the Philipsburg water supply system. The

  12. National Dam Safety program. Unnamed Tributary to Harmon Creek, NDI Number PA-01123 PennDER Number 63-81. SCS Number PA-485. Ohio River Basin. Washington County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    2. b: 9 ___ 0 0 j i3 lei ’:-g I-.5! Ś L, :, 𔃿 24 //-g / - 82 -a rpT2 eF’ 1 t -6 1e! ’ -6 1711 1RR1. 29 0 &- i__? 165-0 3 - 6 1 et 1-6 I-ol R?2! 5...CONSERVATION SERVICE D P FAERSER 4 .75 /PA,465-P AW: Losp W . /’.0 J0 "Vcdto he L - - -~ - A I MeE erOWN Al ##*/a DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION SECTIO 1 2ൈ,. Pipe t

  13. National Dam Inspection Program. Greenville Dam Number 3 (NDI Number PA 01081 PENN DER Number 431) Ohio River Basin. Little Shenango River, Mercer County, Pennsylvania. Greenville Municipal Authority. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    fractured shale bedrock and under, or around, the cutoff trench. In 1928, 2 feet thick concrete cutoff walls were constructed at both upstream abutment...of the right ab;tent, the seeps are assumed to originate from the fractured shale rock, and are not considered to rppresent a siqnficant hdzard to the...Location c. Records MAXIMUM NON-DAMAGING DISCHARGE Est, 1177 cfs (existing conditions) 0-3 HEC-1-DAM SAFETY VERSION HYDROLOGY AND HYDAULIC ANALYSIS DATA

  14. National Dam Inspection Program. Lake Timberline Dam (NDI Number PA 00977, PennDER Number 58-125), Susquehanna River Basin, Tributary of Choconut Creek, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    group has been subdivided in other sections of the state into the Marine Beds, the Catskill Formation, and the Oswayo Formation. The rocks underlying...the dam are most likely of the Catskill Formation. This formadion is composed chiefly of red to brownish shales and sandstones; including gray and...greenish sandstone tongues named Elk Mountain , Honesdale, Shohola, and Delaware River in the east. II WUNTY 401 Chocfjný ory Gro" no’ok " it Lanes dot

  15. National Dam Inspection Program. Pecks Pond Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA-00754, PennDER I.D. Number 52-15), Delaware River Basin, Bush Kill Creek, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    northeast over the Catskill Mountains and from the north over the Appalachian Plateau. The terminal moraine resulting from the southern most advance of the...see Geology Map). The sedimentological changes observed in the Catskill Formation indicate that the rate of sedimentation exceeded the rate of basin

  16. National Dam Inspection Program. Fawn Lake Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA-00822, PennDER I.D. Number 52-182). Delaware River basin, Branch of Hornbecks Creek, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Catskill Mountains and from the north over the Appalachian Plateau. The terminal moraine resulting from the southern most advance of the Wisconsin ice...The sedimentological changes observed in the Catskill Formation indicate that the rate of sedimentation exceeded the rate of basin subsidence...a -a MONROE CO. u NOE HEHBEDROCK SURFACE IS COVERED 4 AND SILTY CLAyS 3F VARIABLE BIusNILI THICKNESS REVISION 12-17-80 LEGEND Catskill Formation

  17. National Dam Inspection Program. Westcolang Lake Dam, NDI I.D. Number PA-00396 PennDER I.D. Number 52-4. Delaware River Basin. Westcolang Creek, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    over the Catskill Mountains and from the north over ’he Appalachian Plateau. The terminal moraine resulting from the southern most advance of the...Geology Map). The sedimentological changes observed in the Catskill Formation indicate that the rate of sedi- mentation exceeded the rate of basin

  18. National Dam Inspection Program. Lake Florence Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA- 01092, PennDER I.D. Number 64-207), Delaware River Basin, Red Shale Brook, Wayne County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    sand and some small boulders. The direction of the Wisconsin ice advance was from the northeast over the Catskill Mountains and from the north over the...probably of Upper Devonian age (see Geology Map). The sedimentological changes observed in the Catskill Formation *Upper Devonian Age) indicate that the

  19. National Dam Inspection Program. Warner Dam (NDI Number PA 00975, PennDER Number 58-71), Susquehanna River Basin, Tributary of Snake Creek, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    the state, into the Marine Beds, the Catskill Formation and the Oswayo Formation. The rocks underlying the dam most likely belong to the Catskill Forma...tion. This formation is composed chiefly of red to brownish shales and sandstones, including gray and greenish sandstone tongues named Elk Mountain

  20. National Dam Inspection Program. Lake Greeley Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA- 00752, PennDER I.D. Number 52-20), Delaware River Basin, Taylortown Creek, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    gravel than sand and some small boulders. The direction of the Wisconsin ice advance was from the northeast over the Catskill Mountains and from the north...observed in the Catskill Formation indicate that the rate of sedi- mentation exceeded the rate of basin subsidence resulting in a facies change from marine

  1. National Dam Inspection Program. Beaver Lake Lodge Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA-00300, PennDER I.D. Number 52-93), Delaware River Basin, Raymondskill Creek, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    the northeast over the Catskill Mountains and from the north over the Appalachian Plateau. The terminal moraine resulting from the southern most advance...Devonian age (see Geology Map). The sedimentological changes observed in the Catskill Formation indicate that the rate of sedimentation exceeded the rate of

  2. National Dam Inspection Program. North Lake Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA-00268, PennDER I.D. Number 52-180), Delaware River Basin, Branch of Hornbecks Creek, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    gravel than sand and some small boulders. The direction of the Wisconsin ice advance, was from the northeast over the Catskill Mountains and from the...observed in the Catskill Formation indicate that the rate of sedimentation exceeded the rate of basin subsidence resulting in a facies change from

  3. National Dam Inspection Program. Silt Pond B, (NDI Number PA 00824 PENN DER Number 63-77) Ohio River Basin, Pigeon Creek, Washington County, Pennsylvania. United States Steel Corporation, Raw Materials Division. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Classification: Silt Pond B is classified as a "high" hazard dam. In the event of a dam failure , at least seven inhabited dwellings could be subjected to...emergency pro- cedure to alert or evacuate downstream residents upon threat of a dam failure . 4.5 EVALUATION The maintenance program should be continued...i 4-4 4-) 4-.) .1 -4 C3C -4 0OC 0L b3 L. >- LC o L 0) 4)-) 4. C -)Q)V 10 cO C 30 &.CV0 .- ) a 0.,I ) .0 L u C.-li CL .4L0 &.( tO a) 0 C) 0. mLcC 4z3

  4. National Dam Inspection Program. Canonsburg Dam Number 2 (Johnsons Run Dam) (NDI Number PA 00506, PennDER Number 63-41), Ohio River Basin, Johnsons Run, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    performed by Burgess and Niple, Limited, and supplemented by Michael Baker, Jr., Inc., in accordance with procedures established by the Baltimore...Discharge at Dam Site (c.f.s.) - Maximum Flood - Unknown Spillway Capacity (at Pool El. 1035.0 ft. from Burgess and Niple, Limited "Synopsis of Flood...Crest Elevation 1030.8 feet used by Burgess and Niple, Limited. The original design drawings show the crest Elevation is 1024.5 feet. The conversion of

  5. National Dam Inspection Program. Royal Reservoir Dam (NDI Number PA 00220, PennDER Number 26-41), Ohio River Basin, Rowes Run, Fayette County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    r23 0) C v0 ( EI*CL.4 e0 a -- 44C2 4.-1 Es) >2 ). H 0r4-i4)c c43 )- 2) 2) c )-* W 4 C . C ) . t4 4- . f .c oc 2 =. 2* - C0ZLL0 =Ř 0 0-0 .-0 -- L 6...MA j COSULTNG ESINERSd OWO.NO. LAT I PTFSURGH PA, CHRLETONW. A. SALTMO1200D @PI*L *UUU LB SUIYN O..P .,P* .qI 1 - 4 1. - - - - - 00D Laa- . oil .. ~mo

  6. National Dam Inspection Program. Page’s Lake Dam NDI Number PA 00062 PennDER Number 58-5) Susquehanna River Basin, Salt Lick Creek, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    Upstream - 1.5H:lV Downstream - Vertical (stone wall) Zoning - The upstream slope is earth and rockfill . A concrete core wall is located upstream of...feet high, with a trapezoidal earth spillway. d. Overtopping Potential - Page’s Lake Dam is an "Intermediate" size - "Significant" hazard dam ...34Evalua- tion and Repair of Stonewall- earth Dams ," by Kent A. Healy, Proceedings of "Safety of Small Dams " conference, New England College, Henniker, New

  7. National Dam Inspection Program. Hathaway Pond Dam (NDI ID Number PA 00050, PennDER Number 58-06), Susquehanna River Basin, West Branch of Lackawanna River, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    34 ’" ’ , :J.. SECTION 3 - VISUAL INSPECTION 3.1 FINDINGS a. General - The dam was found to be in poor overall condition at the time of inspection on...outlet to basin divide. L = Length of water course from outlet to point opposite the centroid of drainage area. ca 1P MIC. AEI. BAKER, JR., INC. Subject...Pr.0 5V1A~ps- -s-zey -] V7 (/f.a 4 27. 4 tP.4,/)-7.4 o)) V= -z- 3 ~-/ A𔄃ZF f’- tje � 5V? 17,tt 7W,9 LV V10,xI: 0.30 -. . 7-,e r 4 7 ’i gesw’./7’ LV

  8. National Dam Inspection Program. Polk Dam (NDI Number PA-00253, PennDER Number 61-7), Ohio River Basin, Piffer Run of Little Sandy Creek, Venango County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    measures to reduce the overtopping potential of the dam. 2) Fill the two depressions on the downstream slope of the dam and monitor these areas in future...structure should be repaired. It is recommended that the slope be partially cut back in this area so as to decrease or stop the sloughing and erosion. ii...slope should be removed and the excavated area regraded and compacted. In addition, the following operational measures are recommended to be

  9. National Dam Inspection Program. Upper Pigeon Hill Dam. (NDI I.D. Number PA-00340, PennDER I.D. Number 67-5) Susquehanna River Basin, Gitts Run, York County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    the- clock surveillance of the facility during periods of un- usually heavy precipitation. b. Have the facility studied by a registered profes- sional...reduce its design discharge capacity and could possibly have an adverse effect on the embankment structure during periods of high discharge. 5.4 Method...should be provisions for around-the-clock surveillance of the facility during periods of unusually heavy precipitation. b. Have the facility studied

  10. National Dam Inspection Program. Laurel Hill Lake Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA-267, Penn.DER Number 56-66) Ohio River Basin. Laurel Hill Creek, Somerset County, Pennsylvania Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    AD-A GOG 1 73 ACKENH’EIL AND I ASSOCIATES INC BALTIMORE MO F /6 13/13NATIONAL DAM INSPECTION PROGRAM. LAUREL HILL LAKE DAM (NI I.D.--ETC(U) MAR...E2 APPENDIX F - REGIONAL GEOLOGY Regional Geology ...... ................ Fl Geologic Map.. ...... ................. F2 vi 4...Department of Environmental Resources, P. 0. Box 1467, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17120. F . PURPOSE OF DAM: The dam was constructed for use as a

  11. National Dam Inspection Program, Big Beaver Dam (Pa No Name Number 14, NDI Number PA 00258, PennDER Number 4-11), Ohio River Basin, Tributary of Clark’s Run, Beaver County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    the Allegheny Group , Pennsylvanian System. These members consist of cyclic sequences of shale, sandstone, limestone, and coal. It is estimated that the...4, GEOLOGIC MAP Blg Beaver Dom NDI No. PA 00258 Beaver County c Reproduced from Greater Pittsburgh Region Geologic Map. -A% 0 4 Compiled by W. R...Wagner and others, 1975 N Scale: One Inch Equals Approximately Two Miles See Legend, Next Page GEOLOGY MAP LEGEND GROUP FORMATION DESCRIPTION Alluvium

  12. Generalizing the OpenURL Framework beyond References to Scholarly Works: The Bison-Fute Model; Digital Libraries and Education: Trends and Opportunities; E-Books and Their Future in Academic Libraries: An Overview; Penn State Visual Image User Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van de Sompel, Herbert; Beit-Arie, Oren; Roes, Hans; Snowhill, Lucia; Pisciotta, Henry; Brisson, Roger; Ferrin, Eric; Dooris, Michael; Spink, Amanda

    2001-01-01

    Includes four articles that discuss a conceptual framework for open and context-sensitive reference linking for Web-based scholarly information; issues for academic libraries due to increased use of information and communication technologies; the future of electronic books in academic libraries; and an academic library user study on the needs for…

  13. The Operational Leadership of General Douglas MacArthur in OPERATION CHROMITE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NAVAL WAR COLLEGE Newport, R.I. The Operational Leadership of General Douglas MacArthur in OPERATION CHROMITE by Judie A. Heineman Commander, United...Operations. The contents of this paper reflect my own personal views and are not necessarily endorsed by the Naval War College or the Department of...MacArthur in Operation Chromite 9. Personal Author: Judie Ann Heineman, Commander, United States Navy 10.Type of Report: FINAL 11. Date of Report: 13

  14. Proceedings of the Portable Common Interface Set (PCIS) Workshop: Interface Technology Analyses (ITA2) (2nd) Held in Redondo Beach, California on 3-7 June 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    lego interfaces -- Dr. Vic Stenning, Anshar Role-based Requirements Analysis John Leary , Martin Marietta Needs for PCIS Administrative Services -- Judy...June 7, 1991 617 Participants: Tim Lindquist ASU Chair Vic Stenning Anshar Co-Chair Kevin Hackett SofTech Recorder Dave Robinson SD-Scicon John Leary ...Presentations: Vic Stenning : Process driven requirements, evolution and lego interfaces John Leary : Role-based requirements analysis Judy Kerner

  15. 78 FR 52560 - Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force-Rebuild-by-Design; Announcement of Selection of Design Teams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Landscapes. PennDesign/OLIN with PennPraxis, Buro Happold, HR&A Advisors, and E-Design Dynamics. WXY... Blumberg, Stevens Institute, Kate John Alder, Rutgers University; Maxine Griffith; William Morrish,...

  16. 78 FR 70944 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... of Franks v. Emerald Coal Resources, LP, Docket No. PENN 2012-250-D; and United Mine Workers of America on behalf of Hoy v. Emerald Coal Resources, LP, Docket No. PENN 2012-251-D (Issues include whether...

  17. 78 FR 70944 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    .... Emerald Coal Resources, LP, Docket No. PENN 2012-250-D; and United Mine Workers of America on behalf of Hoy v. Emerald Coal Resources, LP, Docket No. PENN 2012-251-D (Issues include whether the...

  18. Can Sharing Your Bedroom with Baby Come with Risks?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the room affects sleep for parents. Dr. Fern Hauck is a professor of family medicine and ... sciences, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Penn.; Fern Hauck, M.D., professor, family medicine and public ...

  19. 77 FR 26522 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    .... Name of Committee: Inland Waterways Users Board (Board). Date: June 6, 2012. Location: The OMNI William Penn Hotel, 530 William Penn Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 at 412-281-7100 or 1-800-843-6664 or www.omnihotels.com/FindAHotel/PittsburghWilliamPenn.aspx . Time: Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m. and...

  20. The Pennsylvania State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlingame, Philip J.; Dowhower, Andrea L.

    2009-01-01

    Founded in 1855 as the Farmer's High School, the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) began as a small college in Centre County providing agricultural education to young men from regional farm families. Penn State became a land-grant university in 1863 following passage of the Morrill Act. Today, Penn State enrolls more than 83,000 students…

  1. Statistical Analysis of Geomorphic, Petrographic and Structural Characteristics of the Dartmoor Tors, Southwest England

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    AD-A268 770 Statistical Analysis of Geomorphic, Petrographic and Structural Characteristics of the Dartmoor Tors, Southwest England j3 Judy Ehlen E...Characteristics of the Dartmoor Tors, Southwest England 6. AUTHOR(S) Judy Ehlen 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING...DA Project 4AI61102B52C, Task FO, Work Unit 201, "Image Analysis Research," in the autumn of 1992, under the supervision of Dr. J.N. Rinker, Senior

  2. KSC-99pp0882

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Singer Judy Collins (left) shares a laugh with First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton in the Apollo/Saturn V Facility. Both women are at KSC to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93 scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. Judy Collins has honored the commander with a song, "Beyond the Sky," which was commissioned by NASA through the NASA Art Program

  3. KSC-99pp0883

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Singer Judy Collins (left) and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton await the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93 in the Apollo/Saturn V Facility. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. Judy Collins has honored the commander with a song, "Beyond the Sky," which was commissioned by NASA through the NASA Art Program

  4. Real Property Survey, Federal Prison Camp Nellis, Las Vegas, Nevada

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-26

    the transportation category including some oil, but primarily gas pipeltnes. Electric Power Transmission Line Data Source: PennWell Corporation ...Telephone: (800) 823-6277 This map includes information copyrighled by PennWell Corporation . This information is provided on a best effort basis and...Penn Well Corporation does not guarantee its accuracy nor warrant its fitness for any particular purpose. Such information has been reprinted with the

  5. 78 FR 54647 - Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... than September 30, 2013. A. Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia (William Lang, Senior Vice President... thereby indirectly acquire Penn Security Bank and Trust Company, Scranton, Pennsylvania. Board...

  6. HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA: VI. DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA:
    VI. DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS

    Richard K. Kwok, M.S.P.H., Judy L. Mumford, Ph.D., Pauline Mendola, Ph.D. Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, NHEERL, US Environmental Protection Agency; Yajua...

  7. Creating Community-Responsive Physicians: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Medical Education. AAHE's Series on Service-Learning in the Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seifer, Sarena D., Ed.; Hermanns, Kris, Ed.; Lewis, Judy, Ed.

    This volume is part of a series of 18 monographs on service learning and the academic disciplines. Essays in this volume focus on understanding how service-learning in medical education differs from traditional clinical medical education. After an Introduction by Sarena D. Seifer, Kris Hermanns, and Judy Lewis, essays in Part 1, "The Broader…

  8. More French, s'il vous plait!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGillivray, W. Russ, Ed.

    The collection of essays on French second language instruction in Canada, directed to parents, includes: "Our Brave New World" (Andrew Kniewasser); "French in Your School: Identifying and Achieving the Right Program" (Carolyn Hodych, Jos Scott); "So, You're Worried About Becoming an Immersion Parent" (Judy Gibson);…

  9. Reading Stories: Responding to Literature and Making Connections across the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Renate

    1992-01-01

    Judy Harapiak is a teacher who provides her middle years students with many opportunities to respond to stories in different ways, to reflect on their responses, and to link their reading to their own experiences as well as to other areas of the curriculum. She teaches a grade four-five-six class in the Elementary Alternative Education Program…

  10. Young Adult Books: "Watch Out for #1."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Jack

    1985-01-01

    Attacks the trend in recent young adult novels to focus on individual adolescents and their self-centered concerns without having these characters confront the consequences of their actions and their effects on other people. Specifically examines the novels of Judy Blume and Alice Bach. (RBW)

  11. HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA: II. VIBROTACTILE AND VISUAL MEASURES FINAL DOCUMENT TITLE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA: II. VIBROTACTILE AND VISUAL MEASURES.

    David Otto, Ph.D., Judy Mumford, Ph.D., Richard Kwok, M.S.P.H., Ken Hudnell, Ph.D.,
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Yanhong Li, M.D., Yajuan ...

  12. Teacher Induction. NEA Aspects of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhartz, Judy, Ed.

    The following articles are included in this publication on beginning teacher induction: (1) "The Teacher Induction Process: Preserving the Old and Welcoming the New. An Introduction" (Judy Reinhartz); (2) "A Synthesis of Research on Teacher Induction Programs and Practices" (Leslie Huling-Austin); (3)…

  13. Addressing Barriers to Learning. Volume 15, Number 3. Summer 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In May, Congresswoman Judy Chu issued a report entitled: "Strengthening Our Schools: A New Framework and Principles for Revising School Improvement Grants." Rather than the usual limited two-component blueprint framework that focuses only on instruction and management/governance, Representative Chu's report adopts a three-component framework. This…

  14. Closing the Achievement Gap in Suburban and Urban School Communities. Policy Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Ronald F.; Clark, Reginald; Stewart, Judy

    This edition focuses on the topic of closing the achievement gap from the perspectives of urban and suburban school districts. After an introduction by Judy Stewart, the first article, "Addressing Racial Disparities in High-Achieving Suburban Schools" (Ronald F. Ferguson), shares findings from a recent survey of more than 34,000 students…

  15. The impact of television commercials on food preferences of preschoolers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective is to determine if fruit and vegetable (FV) commercials have an impact on preschool children's preferences for specific FV. A year of extensive formative assessment was conducted to develop two 30-second commercials; Judy Fruity promoted apples and bananas and Reggie Veggie promoted br...

  16. Impact of Commercials on Food Preferences of Low-Income, Minority Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicklas, Theresa A.; Goh, Eugenia Tsuei; Goodell, L. Suzanne; Acuff, Daniel S.; Reiher, Robert; Buday, Richard; Ottenbacher, Allison

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether fruit and vegetable (FV) commercials have an impact on preschool children's preferences for specific FV. Design: A year of extensive formative assessment was conducted to develop 2 30-second commercials: "Judy Fruity" promoted apples and bananas and "Reggie Veggie" promoted broccoli and carrots.…

  17. Impact of commercials on food preferences of low-income, minority preschoolers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The study was conducted to determine whether fruit and vegetable (FV) commercials have an impact on preschool children’s preferences for specific FV. A year of extensive formative assessment was conducted to develop 2- 30 second commercials, "Judy Fruity" promoted apples, bananas, and "Reggie Veggie...

  18. 76 FR 41826 - Sunshine Act Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... DISABILITY Sunshine Act Meetings TIME AND DATES: The Members of the National Council on Disability (NCD) will... Accessibility Act, and by Judy Heumann, State Department Special Advisor for International Disability Rights, regarding the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. A public comment session...

  19. Inspiring Middle School Minds: Gifted, Creative, and Challenging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Teaching adolescents can be quite challenging. Dr. Judy Willis, a neurologist and teacher, explains the inner workings of the adolescent brain. She uses the findings of brain research in her classroom to explain how parents and teachers can trigger untapped inspiration in students. Middle school education has often been a "black hole" for gifted…

  20. Voyage on the SS "School Library Leadership": Collaboration in Teaching and Learning at the University of Vermont

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Judith L.; Ballard, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the SS "School Library Leadership" maiden voyage, which departed from the University of Vermont (UVM) during the 2010 fall semester. Twelve intrepid sailors followed their sense of adventure into uncharted waters with cocaptains Judy Kaplan and Susan Ballard in an online collaboration that provided a powerful…

  1. Healing the Spirit of the Little Girl Inside.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Lara; Gobert, Judy

    1995-01-01

    Judy Gobert (Blackfeet/Salish) struggled with racism and sexual abuse in childhood and with substance abuse and family violence in adulthood. Traditional spirituality, belief in education, and support groups have helped her to heal herself and create a better life for her children and herself. Describes her doctoral research on drug-resistant…

  2. Building a Culinary Arts Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    When Judy Karen Brown (the 2004 Alabama Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher of the Year) arrived at Bob Jones High School (BJHS) in Madison, Alabama, in the summer of 1999, she immediately identified a need to build both student and community interests in family and consumer sciences (FACS). She noticed the student and faculty interest in the…

  3. IN VITRO CARDIAC CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE CONSTITUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Vitro Cardiac Cellular and Molecular Effects of Air Pollution Particle Constituents
    Travis L. Knuckles1, Richard Jaskot2, Judy Richards2, and Kevin L. Dreher2. 1North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC 27606, 2USEPA, Research Triangle Pa...

  4. TEMPORAL ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PULMONARY AND SYSTEMIC EFFECTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER IN HEALTHY AND CARDIOVASCULAR COMPROMISED RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Temporal association between pulmonary and systemic effects of particulate matter in healthy and cardiovascular compromised rats

    Urmila P. Kodavanti, Mette C. Schladweiler, Allen D. Ledbetter, Russ Hauser*, David C. Christiani*, John McGee, Judy R. Richards, Daniel L. Co...

  5. Building a Culinary Arts Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    When Judy Karen Brown (the 2004 Alabama Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher of the Year) arrived at Bob Jones High School (BJHS) in Madison, Alabama, in the summer of 1999, she immediately identified a need to build both student and community interests in family and consumer sciences (FACS). She noticed the student and faculty interest in the…

  6. TESL Reporter, Vol. 11, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pack, Alice C., Ed.

    This issue contains the following articles: "Progressive Decontrol through Deletion," by Robert C. Weissberg; "The Scrutable Chinese," by Jason B. Alter; "Gadgets: Some Non-Verbal Tools for Teaching Pronunciation," by Judy Gilbert; "ELI and English Skills in JFS Library-Media Complex," by Curtis Fawson; and "Aural Comprehension: Mini Lessons in…

  7. IN VITRO CARDIAC CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE CONSTITUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Vitro Cardiac Cellular and Molecular Effects of Air Pollution Particle Constituents
    Travis L. Knuckles1, Richard Jaskot2, Judy Richards2, and Kevin L. Dreher2. 1North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC 27606, 2USEPA, Research Triangle Pa...

  8. DETECTION OF K-RAS AND P53 MUTATIONS IN SPUTUM SAMPLES OF LUNG CANCER PATIENTS USING LASER CAPTURE MICRODISSECTION MICROSCOPE AND MUTATION ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection of K-ras and p53 Mutations in Sputum Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Using Laser Capture Microdissection Microscope and Mutation Analysis

    Phouthone Keohavong a,*, Wei-Min Gao a, Kui-Cheng Zheng a, Hussam Mady b, Qing Lan c, Mona Melhem b, and Judy Mumford d.
    <...

  9. Empowering Children to Cope with Teasing

    MedlinePlus

    ... child cope with name-calling, ridicule, and verbal bullying by Judy S. Freedman • Bullies are a Pain in the Brain by Trevor ... vol. 1 by Erin McCoy • How to Handle Bullies, Teasers and other Meanies: A book that takes ...

  10. Young Adult Books: "Watch Out for #1."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Jack

    1985-01-01

    Attacks the trend in recent young adult novels to focus on individual adolescents and their self-centered concerns without having these characters confront the consequences of their actions and their effects on other people. Specifically examines the novels of Judy Blume and Alice Bach. (RBW)

  11. HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA: II. VIBROTACTILE AND VISUAL MEASURES FINAL DOCUMENT TITLE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA: II. VIBROTACTILE AND VISUAL MEASURES.

    David Otto, Ph.D., Judy Mumford, Ph.D., Richard Kwok, M.S.P.H., Ken Hudnell, Ph.D.,
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Yanhong Li, M.D., Yajuan ...

  12. Conversations with Today's Montessorians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montessori Life: A Publication of the American Montessori Society, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Montessorians, namely Judi Bauerlein, Jack Blessington, Dr. John Chattin-McNichols, Dr. Betsy Coe, Amy Henderson, Dr. Michele Monson, Anna P. Perry, and Bretta Weiss Wolff. In an interview, these Montessorians discuss their personal Montessori journeys and their insights on Montessori as a movement over the…

  13. Web-Based Communications, the Internet, and Distance Education. Readings in Distance Education, Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Michael G., Ed.; Cozine, Geoffrey T., Ed.

    This book brings together a selection of articles published in "The American Journal of Distance Education" that are related to Web-based delivery of distance education. Articles include: "Performance and Perceptions of Distance Learners in Cyberspace" (Peter Navarro and Judy Shoemaker); "Distance Education for Dentists: Improving the Quality of…

  14. NCPSE News, 1996-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crutchfield, Margie, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of the first two issues of a new newsletter of the National Clearinghouse for Profession in Special Education (NCPSE). The following articles are featured: "Diversity in the Special Education Teaching Force" (Judy L. Wald), which discusses reasons for the lack of teachers in special and general education from diverse…

  15. Arts, Education and Society: The Role of the Arts in Promoting the Emotional Well-being and Social Inclusion of Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karkou, Vassiliki; Glasman, Judy

    2004-01-01

    In our second article, Vassiliki Karkou and Judy Glasman provide an illuminating overview of current debates about the place of the arts within education. They explore the emotional and social role of the arts in school, illustrating their discussion with insights gained from the Labyrinth Project, an arts-based prevention programme developed in…

  16. LACK OF EXPRESSION OF EGF AND TGF-ALPHA IN THE FETAL MOUSE ALTERS FORMATION OF PROSTATIC EPITHELIAL BUDS AND INFLUENCES THE RESPONSE TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lack of Expression of EGF and TGF in the Fetal Mouse Alters Formation of Prostatic Epithelial Buds and Responsiveness to TCDD-Induced Impairment of Prostatic Bud Formation.

    Barbara D. Abbott, Tien-Min Lin, Nathan T. Rasmussen, Robert W. Moore,
    Ralph M. Albrecht, Judi...

  17. STS-38 crewmembers participate in photography training and camera briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-03-01

    STS-38 crewmembers listen as RSOC-JSC crew trainer M. Judy Alexander explains the camera equipment they will be using on their upcoming Department of Defense (DOD) mission. Left to right are Pilot Frank L. Culbertson, Mission Specialist (MS) Carl J. Meade, and MS Charles D. Gemar. Alexander is holding a training version of the 70mm handheld HASSELBLAD camera.

  18. LACK OF EXPRESSION OF EGF AND TGF-ALPHA IN THE FETAL MOUSE ALTERS FORMATION OF PROSTATIC EPITHELIAL BUDS AND INFLUENCES THE RESPONSE TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lack of Expression of EGF and TGF in the Fetal Mouse Alters Formation of Prostatic Epithelial Buds and Responsiveness to TCDD-Induced Impairment of Prostatic Bud Formation.

    Barbara D. Abbott, Tien-Min Lin, Nathan T. Rasmussen, Robert W. Moore,
    Ralph M. Albrecht, Judi...

  19. DLA Pre-Award Contracting System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    Gulley DPSSO Bldg 33 Standards Cheryl Haines DISC-RMO Bldg 36 Lead Time Jeff Hammer DGSC-P Bldg 32 DPACS WorkloadjersonnedALT Judy Harroson DLA-Z...33 DPACS Functionality Lou JuIg DISC-RM Bldg 36 Resource Data Sandra King DLA-ZSM 3A675 Project Oversight Scotie Knott DGSC-P Bldg 33 Post Award Dave

  20. The Multi-Disciplinary Graduate Program in Educational Research. Final Report, Part VI; Essays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarsfeld, Paul F., Ed.

    This document, the sixth of a final report on the Multi-Disciplinary Graduate Program in Educational Research, is a collection of three essays. The first--Notes on the History of Interdisciplinarity--by Judy Rosen, brings together and outlines the general points and findings of the literature that has been generated in an attempt to evaluate the…

  1. Phrase-based Multimedia Information Extraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    names with periods — J. K. Ramirez, T. Grant Smith, Lita S. Jones; names with commas — Hector Jones, Jr.; and conjoined names, such as Sherlock and Judy... Holmes . Using both the type and token metrics (described above), we tested these extensions and improvements to the name identification module on

  2. STS-38 crewmembers participate in photography training and camera briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 crewmembers listen as RSOC-JSC crew trainer M. Judy Alexander explains the camera equipment they will be using on their upcoming Department of Defense (DOD) mission. Left to right are Pilot Frank L. Culbertson, Mission Specialist (MS) Carl J. Meade, and MS Charles D. Gemar. Alexander is holding a training version of the 70mm handheld HASSELBLAD camera.

  3. Voyage on the SS "School Library Leadership": Collaboration in Teaching and Learning at the University of Vermont

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Judith L.; Ballard, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the SS "School Library Leadership" maiden voyage, which departed from the University of Vermont (UVM) during the 2010 fall semester. Twelve intrepid sailors followed their sense of adventure into uncharted waters with cocaptains Judy Kaplan and Susan Ballard in an online collaboration that provided a powerful…

  4. Socially Concerned Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birns, Marlanda

    2008-01-01

    Judy Chicago's "The Dinner Party," an important icon of 1970s feminist art and a milestone in twentieth century art, consists of an enormous ceremonial banquet arranged on a triangular table with a total of thirty-nine place settings, each commemorating an important woman from history. Inspired by this piece of art, the author devised a lesson for…

  5. Language, Gesture, and Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmorey, Karen, Ed.; Reilly, Judy S., Ed.

    A collection of papers addresses a variety of issues regarding the nature and structure of sign language, gesture, and gesture systems. Articles include: "Theoretical Issues Relating Language, Gesture, and Space: An Overview" (Karen Emmorey, Judy S. Reilly); "Real, Surrogate, and Token Space: Grammatical Consequences in ASL American…

  6. TECFORS, A Newsletter for Instructors of Writing and Reading to ESL and Bi-Lingual Adult Students. Volume 6, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TECFORS, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Numbers 1 through 5 of the 1983 TECFORS newsletter include these articles: "Topic Schemas (LL): In the Classroom" (David A. Ross); "Using Diagrams to Teach Reading Comprehension" (Tia Johnson, Judy Sheetz-Brunetti); "Correcting ESL Compositions" (Nancy Hooper); "A Schema Theory Bibliography" (Ann M. Johns);…

  7. Web-Based Communications, the Internet, and Distance Education. Readings in Distance Education, Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Michael G., Ed.; Cozine, Geoffrey T., Ed.

    This book brings together a selection of articles published in "The American Journal of Distance Education" that are related to Web-based delivery of distance education. Articles include: "Performance and Perceptions of Distance Learners in Cyberspace" (Peter Navarro and Judy Shoemaker); "Distance Education for Dentists: Improving the Quality of…

  8. An Invitation to Social Change: Fifteen Principles for Teaching Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordlund, Carrie; Speirs, Peg; Stewart, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    Thirty years after its completion, "The Dinner Party" found a permanent home at the Brooklyn Museum in the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. At the request of artist Judy Chicago, the authors developed a curriculum guide for educators to include this significant artwork in K-12 programs. Chicago's hope was that by engaging in serious…

  9. Close to Home: Library-Based Family Literacy. An Instructional Video for Library-Based Family Literacy Programs. [Videotape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Library Association Video/Library Video Network, Towson, MD.

    This videtape is a guide hosted by Judy Woodruff to starting and enhancing a library-based family literacy project. Librarians and literacy providers learn: how to do a needs assessment, how to build a team within the library; how to develop a community coalition; how business partners contribute to family literacy programs; and how to recruit…

  10. OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) INDUCED LUNG INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative stress participates in particulate matter (PM) induced acute lung injury.
    Elizabeth S. Roberts1, Judy L. Richards2, Kevin L. Dreher2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC, 2US Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, RTP, NC.
    Epidemiol...

  11. Official portrait of the STS 51-L crewmembers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Official portrait of the STS 51-L crewmembers. In the back row (l.-r.) Mission specialist Ellison S. Onizuka, Teacher in Space Participant Sharon Christa McAuliffe, Payload Specialist Greg Jarvis and Mission specialist Judy Resnik. In the front row (l.-r.) Pilot Mike Smith, Commander Dick Scobee, and Mission specialist Ron McNair.

  12. 76 FR 46898 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... ELIZABETH CRITTENDEN FRANCES JANE CRUIKSHANK SUSAN SHATTO DAHAN ELISABETH DE PATER DAHAN RENEE DAIGLE A... XIAOQING WETRHUS ALLAN WHITE ANITA WHITE WILLARD W WHITEHEAD FRANCES WHITTAKER CATHERINE ANN WIDMANN JASMIN... JOYCE MARY WORCESTER ROBERT MILTON WU ENOCH YI-NONG WU FRANCES YAO ANDREW E YEUNG CHARMAGNE ] YEUNG JUDY...

  13. OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) INDUCED LUNG INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative stress participates in particulate matter (PM) induced acute lung injury.
    Elizabeth S. Roberts1, Judy L. Richards2, Kevin L. Dreher2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC, 2US Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, RTP, NC.
    Epidemiol...

  14. Christian Fiction for Almost Any Teen Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makowski, Sylvia

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the Christian fiction series, "Cedar River Daydreams," by Judy Baer and recommended for grades 7-10. The main character is a girl who has moved to a new town, and struggles with socializing in school, peer pressure, popularity, acceptance of her Down's Syndrome afflicted brother, and being herself. Includes an annotated list of…

  15. How and Why Stories for Readers Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfman, Judy

    2004-01-01

    How did the bee get his bumble? How do birds get their feathers? Why is the bluebird blue? Curious first through fifth graders want to know how and why things happen! Judy Wolfman has created 40 Readers Theatre scripts based on imaginative and creative porquoi stories that stem from multicultural folktales as well as Native American Indian legends…

  16. TESL Reporter, Vol. 11, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pack, Alice C., Ed.

    This issue contains the following articles: "Progressive Decontrol through Deletion," by Robert C. Weissberg; "The Scrutable Chinese," by Jason B. Alter; "Gadgets: Some Non-Verbal Tools for Teaching Pronunciation," by Judy Gilbert; "ELI and English Skills in JFS Library-Media Complex," by Curtis Fawson; and "Aural Comprehension: Mini Lessons in…

  17. Puppets, Music, Movement, Drama, and Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molloy, Shivaun

    Classroom activity ideas for Japanese English as a second language students include a Punch and Judy puppet show (script included); a Halloween puppet trick-or-treat game to learn vocabulary and an American custom; a mime game using verbs; hangman; games of prediction, chance, and sorting or grouping; a Japanese card game similar to "slap"; a…

  18. Teaching of Psychology: Ideas and Innovations. Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Undergraduate Teaching of Psychology (10th, Ellenville, New York, March 20-22, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Judith, Ed.; Indenbaum, Gene, Ed.

    The 18 papers in this proceedings describe strategies and practices used in undergraduate psychology courses at two- and four-year colleges. The following presentations are included: "The Costs and Benefits of Critical Thinking," (Randall E. Osborne, Judy Laws, Ken Weadick, and Vicki Mantooth); "What's a Developmentalist To Do?" (Judith Luis);…

  19. Individual Learning Issues. Symposium 44. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on individual learning issues that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Communication in the Workplace: Using Myers-Briggs To Build Communication Effectiveness" (Patrice M. Scanlon, Judy K. Schmitz, Tracey Murray, Lisa M. Hooper) reports on a…

  20. RESIDENTIAL EXPOSURE TO DRINKING WATER ARSENIC IN INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residential exposure to drinking water arsenic in Inner Mongolia, China
    Zhixiong Ning1, Richard K. Kwok2, Zhiyi Liu1, Shiying Zhang1, Chenglong Ma1, Danelle T. Lobdell2, Michael Riediker3 and Judy L. Mumford2
    1) Institute of Endemic Disease for Prevention and Treatment in I...

  1. ESTIMATING RESIDENTIAL EXPOSURE TO DRINKING WATER ARSENIC IN INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA FOR EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ESTIMATING RESIDENTIAL EXPOSURE TO DRINKING WATER ARSENIC IN INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA FOR EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES

    Richard Kwok1, Pauline Mendola1 Zhixiong Ning2, Zhiyi Liu2 and Judy Mumford1

    1) Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, NHEERL, US EPA, R...

  2. PREGNANCY AND PERINATAL OUTCOMES IN RELATION TO DRINKING WATER ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN BAMEN, INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes in Relation to Drinking Water Arsenic Exposure in BaMen, Inner Mongolia, China
    Danelle T. Lobdell, Zhixiong Ning, Richard K. Kwok, Judy Mumford, Zhi Yi Liu, Pauline Mendola

    Introduction: Close to 40 million people worldwide are exposed t...

  3. United States Air Force (USAF) Experience in Aircraft Accident Survivability,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-06

    poor crashworthy air- craft design, seat or personal restraint failure, improper cargo restraint, or deth -non-use of available restraints. iZ...excessive weight penalty and are also within the framework of present technology. These solutions must be analyzed judi- - ciously, and then prioritized

  4. Inclusive Education: A Casebook and Readings for Prospective and Practicing Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Suzanne E., Ed.

    This book presents readings and teaching cases designed to prepare teachers for inclusive education. Part 1, "Readings," provides an overview of issues related to inclusive education and describes approaches for creating inclusive classrooms and schools, including: (1) "Creating Inclusive Classrooms: An Overview" (Suzanne E. Wade and Judy Zone);…

  5. A Study of Selected Adolescent Problems as Presented in Contemporary Realistic Fiction for Middle School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Mary F.; Skelton, Juanita

    1982-01-01

    Analyzed 15 popular fiction books in terms of problem-concerns of young adolescents. Five were by author Judy Blume. The books reflected personal, family, and interpersonal problems and a trend toward realism. Fiction can be helpful in counseling and in developmental programs. (JAC)

  6. Innovative Discipline. NEA Teacher-to-Teacher Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalski, Marina, Ed.

    This book presents stories from teachers nationwide who tackled specific discipline challenges. Chapter 1, "Taking the Total Quality Road" (Judi Call, Beth Ziecheck, Janice Wright, and Kenneth Rigsby), discusses the use of Total Quality Management (TQM) in developing classroom management systems, explaining how Florida elementary…

  7. The experience of critiquing published research: learning from the student and researcher perspective.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Judie M; Gray, Morag A

    2011-11-01

    This paper commences with affirmation of the importance of research critique within academic programmes of study, and the context of this skill within the nursing profession. Judie (student) shares an experience from a Professional Doctorate in Education (EdD) assignment that involved selecting and critiquing a piece of published research. "The qualities of an effective mentor" (Gray and Smith, 2000) was critiqued using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP, 2006) framework. Morag was the researcher and co-author (Gray and Smith, 2000) and was subsequently contacted by Judie for the purposes of validating her critique assignment. On the tenth anniversary since publication of her PhD research findings Morag reflects on the original article in the light of Judie's critique and shares evaluative comments. Some of the assignment critique is validated by Morag, whilst some of the evaluation demonstrates unreliability of critique shown by Judie. Discussion surrounding sufficiency of research critique through systematic examination of a published article, versus an original research report such as a thesis ensues. The student and researcher/author reveal their learning from this collaborative experience and conclude with recommendations for; setting critique assignments; authors publishing their research findings; and students undertaking critique assignments.

  8. EFFECTS OF INGESTED ARSENIC ON DNA AND CHROMOSOME IN HUMAN EXFOLIATED EPITHELIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Ingested Arsenic on DNA and Chromosome in Human Exfoliated Epithelia

    Judy L. Mumford, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    Arsenic...

  9. How and Why Stories for Readers Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfman, Judy

    2004-01-01

    How did the bee get his bumble? How do birds get their feathers? Why is the bluebird blue? Curious first through fifth graders want to know how and why things happen! Judy Wolfman has created 40 Readers Theatre scripts based on imaginative and creative porquoi stories that stem from multicultural folktales as well as Native American Indian legends…

  10. DETECTION OF K-RAS AND P53 MUTATIONS IN SPUTUM SAMPLES OF LUNG CANCER PATIENTS USING LASER CAPTURE MICRODISSECTION MICROSCOPE AND MUTATION ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection of K-ras and p53 Mutations in Sputum Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Using Laser Capture Microdissection Microscope and Mutation Analysis

    Phouthone Keohavong a,*, Wei-Min Gao a, Kui-Cheng Zheng a, Hussam Mady b, Qing Lan c, Mona Melhem b, and Judy Mumford d.
    <...

  11. Providing Culturally Competent Care in Early Childhood Services in New Zealand. Part 1: Considering Culture [and] Part 2: Developing Dialog [and] Part 3: Parents' Experiences of Different Early Childhood Pedagogies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terreni, Lisa; McCallum, Judi

    Focusing on early childhood issues specific to New Zealand, this document is comprised of three papers exploring provision of culturally competent care in early childhood services. The first paper, "Considering Culture" (Lisa Terreni with Judi McCallum), addresses some current theories that attempt to understand "culture" and…

  12. Windows - 97 on the New Standards. Monograph of Collected Papers from the Annual Conference of the Association of College Educators--Deaf and Hard of Hearing (23rd, Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 7-10, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egelston-Dodd, Judy, Ed.

    This collection of 19 papers focuses on implications of the professional standards recently developed jointly by the Council for Exceptional Children and Council on Education of the Deaf (CEC/CED). The following papers are included: (1) "Introduction: Helping the Professorate Implement the Standards" (Judy Egelston-Dodd); (2) "CED…

  13. Parents' Role in Teenage Health Problems: Allies or Adversaries?. Meeting Highlights and Background Briefing Report. Report of a Family Impact Seminar (Washington, D.C., September 21, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooms, Theodora; Owen, Todd

    This report contains highlights from a seminar on the role of parents in helping adolescents with their health problems. Comments by these panelists is summarized: Judy Areen, dean, Georgetown University Law Center; Barbara Popper, founder and board member of Children in Hospitals, Inc. and resource specialist at the Federation for Children with…

  14. Inclusive Education: A Casebook and Readings for Prospective and Practicing Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Suzanne E., Ed.

    This book presents readings and teaching cases designed to prepare teachers for inclusive education. Part 1, "Readings," provides an overview of issues related to inclusive education and describes approaches for creating inclusive classrooms and schools, including: (1) "Creating Inclusive Classrooms: An Overview" (Suzanne E. Wade and Judy Zone);…

  15. From the Field: Speech Therapy Outcome Measures--Interview with Dr. Pam Enderby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Judy K.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an interview with Dr. Pam Enderby--a speech language therapist and professor at the Institute of General Practice and Primary Care at the University of Sheffield, Community Sciences Centre, Northern General Hospital, in the United Kingdom--conducted by Judy Montgomery, Editor in Chief, of "Communication Disorders…

  16. Lecture Alternatives in Teaching English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judy, Stephen, Ed.

    The five sections of the document are: General Discussion; Classroom Experiences; Evaluation and Non-Lecture Teaching; A Closing Note; and Appendix. The ten papers presented are as follows: "Lecture Alternatives and the English Class" by Stephen Judy; "Let's See How it Goes: A View of the Teacher as Manager of Student-Initiated Activities" by…

  17. Authors, Authors, Authors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Carl A., II; Kaplan, Allison G.

    2007-01-01

    This article features some of the programs offered in the Reno conference. Two of the preconferences at Reno will focus on children's literature. Judy Freeman will talk about some of the current and future trends for books for younger readers. She will share a plethora of some of the best picture books and chapter books. Ruth Cox Clark will take…

  18. HRD: Past, Present and Future. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on the past, present, and future of human resource development (HRD). "Revisiting the New Deal: A Longitudinal Case Study" (Judy Pate, Graeme Martin, Jim McGoldrick) draws upon data from a longitudinal case study of the links between job security and HRD to examine the new…

  19. Puppets, Music, Movement, Drama, and Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molloy, Shivaun

    Classroom activity ideas for Japanese English as a second language students include a Punch and Judy puppet show (script included); a Halloween puppet trick-or-treat game to learn vocabulary and an American custom; a mime game using verbs; hangman; games of prediction, chance, and sorting or grouping; a Japanese card game similar to "slap"; a…

  20. Socially Concerned Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birns, Marlanda

    2008-01-01

    Judy Chicago's "The Dinner Party," an important icon of 1970s feminist art and a milestone in twentieth century art, consists of an enormous ceremonial banquet arranged on a triangular table with a total of thirty-nine place settings, each commemorating an important woman from history. Inspired by this piece of art, the author devised a lesson for…

  1. An Invitation to Social Change: Fifteen Principles for Teaching Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordlund, Carrie; Speirs, Peg; Stewart, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    Thirty years after its completion, "The Dinner Party" found a permanent home at the Brooklyn Museum in the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. At the request of artist Judy Chicago, the authors developed a curriculum guide for educators to include this significant artwork in K-12 programs. Chicago's hope was that by engaging in serious…

  2. Supporting Lower-Achieving Seven- and Eight-Year-Old Children with Place Value Understandings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Children can sometimes appear to understand a concept such as place value without really having a deep understanding. Judy Bailey stresses the importance of listening carefully to children to identify their current understandings and then building on them systematically, using a range of materials, to promote a deep conceptual understanding. This…

  3. The Flipped Classroom in World History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaughan, Judy E.

    2014-01-01

    The flipped Classroom is one in which lectures are presented as homework outside of class in online videos so that class time is reserved for engaging directly with the materials. This technique offers more personalized guidance and interaction with students, instead of lecturing. In this article, Judy Gaughan details her journey through choosing…

  4. TEMPORAL ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PULMONARY AND SYSTEMIC EFFECTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER IN HEALTHY AND CARDIOVASCULAR COMPROMISED RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Temporal association between pulmonary and systemic effects of particulate matter in healthy and cardiovascular compromised rats

    Urmila P. Kodavanti, Mette C. Schladweiler, Allen D. Ledbetter, Russ Hauser*, David C. Christiani*, John McGee, Judy R. Richards, Daniel L. Co...

  5. HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA: VI. DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA:
    VI. DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS

    Richard K. Kwok, M.S.P.H., Judy L. Mumford, Ph.D., Pauline Mendola, Ph.D. Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, NHEERL, US Environmental Protection Agency; Yajua...

  6. 51-L Flight Crew Emergency Egress Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The STS-51L Challenger flight crew emergency egress training in the slide wire baskets. From left to right they are: Mission Specialist, Ronald McNair, Payload Specialist, Gregory Jarvis, Teacher in Space Participant, Christa McAuliffe. Directly behind them: Mission Specialist Judy Resnik and Mission Specialist, Ellison Onizuka.

  7. The STS 51-L Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The STS-51L crewmembers are: in the back row from left to right: Mission Specialist, Ellison S. Onizuka, Teacher in Space Participant Sharon Christa McAuliffe, Payload Specialist, Greg Jarvis and Mission Specialist, Judy Resnik. In the front row from left to right: Pilot Mike Smith, Commander, Dick Scobee and Mission Specialist, Ron McNair.

  8. Official portrait of the STS 51-L crewmembers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Official portrait of the STS 51-L crewmembers. In the back row (l.-r.) Mission specialist Ellison S. Onizuka, Teacher in Space Participant Sharon Christa McAuliffe, Payload Specialist Greg Jarvis and Mission specialist Judy Resnik. In the front row (l.-r.) Pilot Mike Smith, Commander Dick Scobee, and Mission specialist Ron McNair.

  9. Teaching the Brain to Read: Strategies for Improving Fluency, Vocabulary, and Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Judy

    2008-01-01

    Neurologist and middle school teacher Judy Willis connects what you do in the classroom to what happens in the brain when students learn how to read, including: (1) Why a classroom has to be safe and supportive in order to overcome barriers to reading fluency; (2) How to jumpstart students who are not well prepared for reading with activities that…

  10. HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA: I. BIOMARKERS FOR ASSESSING EXPOSURE AND EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Health Effects of Chronic Exposure to Arsenic via Drinking Water in Inner Mongolia: I. Biomarkers for Assessing Exposure and Effects

    Judy L. Mumford, Ph.D., Mike Schmitt, M.S.P.H., Richard K. Kwok, M.S.P.H., Rebecca Calderon, Ph.D., National Health and Environmental Effect...

  11. Parents' Role in Teenage Health Problems: Allies or Adversaries?. Meeting Highlights and Background Briefing Report. Report of a Family Impact Seminar (Washington, D.C., September 21, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooms, Theodora; Owen, Todd

    This report contains highlights from a seminar on the role of parents in helping adolescents with their health problems. Comments by these panelists is summarized: Judy Areen, dean, Georgetown University Law Center; Barbara Popper, founder and board member of Children in Hospitals, Inc. and resource specialist at the Federation for Children with…

  12. Self-Help and Community Education. Courier No. 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1983

    1983-01-01

    This journal consists of eight articles dealing with self-help and community education. Included in the volume are the following articles: "An Uphill Struggle--Self-Help in Bangladesh," by S. Harrison and Judy Saul; "How Not to Help a Local Community: A Case from South India," by Nora Sammut and Maria Theresa; "The High…

  13. Changing the World One Life at a Time: A Teacher-Educator Promotes Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Ella

    2006-01-01

    This article profiles Judy Bowers, a teacher-educator and part of the choral music education program at Florida State University (FSU) in Tallahassee. Bowers also directs one of FSU's oldest ensembles, the one-hundred-voice Women's Glee Club, which she helped expand from twenty-two members. Bowers' Adopt-a-Choir, Study-Buddy, and Partnership…

  14. RESIDENTIAL EXPOSURE TO DRINKING WATER ARSENIC IN INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residential exposure to drinking water arsenic in Inner Mongolia, China
    Zhixiong Ning1, Richard K. Kwok2, Zhiyi Liu1, Shiying Zhang1, Chenglong Ma1, Danelle T. Lobdell2, Michael Riediker3 and Judy L. Mumford2
    1) Institute of Endemic Disease for Prevention and Treatment in I...

  15. Windows - 97 on the New Standards. Monograph of Collected Papers from the Annual Conference of the Association of College Educators--Deaf and Hard of Hearing (23rd, Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 7-10, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egelston-Dodd, Judy, Ed.

    This collection of 19 papers focuses on implications of the professional standards recently developed jointly by the Council for Exceptional Children and Council on Education of the Deaf (CEC/CED). The following papers are included: (1) "Introduction: Helping the Professorate Implement the Standards" (Judy Egelston-Dodd); (2) "CED…

  16. Impact of Commercials on Food Preferences of Low-Income, Minority Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicklas, Theresa A.; Goh, Eugenia Tsuei; Goodell, L. Suzanne; Acuff, Daniel S.; Reiher, Robert; Buday, Richard; Ottenbacher, Allison

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether fruit and vegetable (FV) commercials have an impact on preschool children's preferences for specific FV. Design: A year of extensive formative assessment was conducted to develop 2 30-second commercials: "Judy Fruity" promoted apples and bananas and "Reggie Veggie" promoted broccoli and carrots.…

  17. From the Field: Speech Therapy Outcome Measures--Interview with Dr. Pam Enderby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Judy K.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an interview with Dr. Pam Enderby--a speech language therapist and professor at the Institute of General Practice and Primary Care at the University of Sheffield, Community Sciences Centre, Northern General Hospital, in the United Kingdom--conducted by Judy Montgomery, Editor in Chief, of "Communication Disorders…

  18. HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA: V. BIOMARKER STUDIES - A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Health Effects of Chronic Exposure to Arsenic via Drinking Water in Inner Mongolia: V. Biomarker Studies - a Pilot Study

    Michael T. Schmitt, M.S.P.H., Judy S. Mumford, Ph.D., National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agenc...

  19. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (80th, Chicago, Illinois, July 30-August 2, 1997): Commission on the Status of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Commission on the Status of Women section of the Proceedings contains the following five papers: "Women as Sources: Gender Patterns in Framing the News" (Lynn M. Zoch and Judy VanSlyke Turk); "Gender Bias in Newspaper Coverage of the 1996 Olympic Games: A Content Analysis of Five Major Dailies" (Katherine N. Kinnick);…

  20. ESTIMATING RESIDENTIAL EXPOSURE TO DRINKING WATER ARSENIC IN INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA FOR EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ESTIMATING RESIDENTIAL EXPOSURE TO DRINKING WATER ARSENIC IN INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA FOR EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES

    Richard Kwok1, Pauline Mendola1 Zhixiong Ning2, Zhiyi Liu2 and Judy Mumford1

    1) Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, NHEERL, US EPA, R...