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Sample records for jugular vein deformities

  1. Subclavian artery to internal jugular vein fistula following percutaneous internal jugular vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Merino-Angulo, J; Cortazar, J L; Saez-Garmendia, F; Montejo, M

    1984-01-01

    The percutaneous internal jugular vein approach is now a commonly performed procedure for central venous catheterization. Iatrogenic arteriovenous fistulae are a very infrequent complication. We report an asymptomatic subclavian artery to internal jugular vein fistula following two percutaneous internal jugular vein catheterization attempts.

  2. Idiopathic Bilateral External Jugular Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hindi, Zakaria; Fadel, Ehab

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 21 Final Diagnosis: Idiopathic bilateral external jugular vein thrombosis Symptoms: Face engorgement • neck swelling Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Hematology Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: Vein thrombosis is mainly determined by 3 factors, which constitute a triad called Virchow’s triad: hypercoagulability, stasis, and endothelial injury. Venous thrombosis commonly occurs in the lower extremities since most of the blood resides there and flows against gravity. The veins of the lower extremities are dependent on intact valves and fully functional leg muscles. However, in case of valvular incompetency or muscular weakness, thrombosis and blood stasis will occur as a result. In contrast, the veins of the neck, specially the jugulars, have distensible walls which allow flexibility during respiration. In addition, the blood directly flows downward towards the heart. Nevertheless, many case reports mentioned the thrombosis of internal jugular veins and external jugular veins with identified risk factors. Jugular vein thrombosis has previously been associated in the literature with a variety of medical conditions, including malignancy. Case Report: This report is of a case of idiopathic bilateral external jugular vein thrombosis in a 21 year-old male construction worker of Southeast Asian origin with no previous medical history who presented with bilateral facial puffiness of gradual onset over 1 month. Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography were used in the diagnosis. Further work-up showed no evidence of infection or neoplasia. The patient was eventually discharged on warfarin. The patient was assessed after 6 months and his symptoms had resolved completely. Conclusions: Bilateral idiopathic external jugular veins thrombosis is extremely rare and can be an indicator of early malignancy or hidden infection. While previous reports in the literature have associated jugular vein thrombosis with malignancy, the present

  3. Idiopathic Bilateral External Jugular Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Zakaria; Fadhel, Ehab

    2015-08-20

    Vein thrombosis is mainly determined by 3 factors, which constitute a triad called Virchow's triad: hypercoagulability, stasis, and endothelial injury. Venous thrombosis commonly occurs in the lower extremities since most of the blood resides there and flows against gravity. The veins of the lower extremities are dependent on intact valves and fully functional leg muscles. However, in case of valvular incompetency or muscular weakness, thrombosis and blood stasis will occur as a result. In contrast, the veins of the neck, specially the jugulars, have distensible walls which allow flexibility during respiration. In addition, the blood directly flows downward towards the heart. Nevertheless, many case reports mentioned the thrombosis of internal jugular veins and external jugular veins with identified risk factors. Jugular vein thrombosis has previously been associated in the literature with a variety of medical conditions, including malignancy. This report is of a case of idiopathic bilateral external jugular vein thrombosis in a 21 year-old male construction worker of Southeast Asian origin with no previous medical history who presented with bilateral facial puffiness of gradual onset over 1 month. Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography were used in the diagnosis. Further work-up showed no evidence of infection or neoplasia. The patient was eventually discharged on warfarin. The patient was assessed after 6 months and his symptoms had resolved completely. Bilateral idiopathic external jugular veins thrombosis is extremely rare and can be an indicator of early malignancy or hidden infection. While previous reports in the literature have associated jugular vein thrombosis with malignancy, the present case shows that external jugular vein thrombosis can also be found in persons without malignancy.

  4. Complications of internal jugular vein retrograde catheterization.

    PubMed

    Gemma, M; Beretta, L; De Vitis, A; Mattioli, C; Calvi, M R; Antonino, A; Rizzi, B; Crippa, L; D'Angelo, A

    1998-01-01

    We report on the incidence of complications of 172 internal jugular vein retrograde catheterizations (IJVRCs) performed on 126 patients. Standard cannulation and X-ray control of the catheter tip placement were performed. Difficulties encountered during the manouvre were registered. Patients with a jugular catheter in place for more than one day had neck echography on catheter removal and one week later. Carotid artery puncture occurred in 20 (12%) cases and lymphatic vessel puncture in one. In 13 (8%) cases IJVRC failed due to difficulties in advancing the guide. X-ray films documented catheter misplacement in 39 (23%) cases: loop into the internal jugular vein in 11 (6%); paravertebral venous plexus cannulated in one; other extracranial jugular afferent cannulated in 4 (2%); catheter tip into the jugular lumen in 10 (6%); catheter tip beyond the jugular bulb in 13 (8%). First neck echography documented: one perivascular hematoma (absent one week later); 3 (4%) jugular vein thrombosis (2 asymptomatic and absent one week later; one symptomatic and still evident one week later). Positive neck echography was not associated with difficulties, length of catheterization, diameter of the catheter. IJVRC is a simple and safe procedure with a low incidence of serious complications.

  5. Subclavian artery- internal jugular vein fistula and heart failure: complication of internal jugular vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jai; Takhellambam, Brojen; Ghosh, Biplab; Choudhury, Tauhidul Alam; Singh, Shivendra; Sharma, Om Prakash

    2013-02-01

    Hemodialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requires vascular access which can be either temporary or permanent. However, these procedures are not without complications. Arterial puncture is the most common immediate complication and pseudoaneurysm formation is the most common late sequel of internal jugular venous catheterization (IJVC). However, arterio-venous fistula (AVF) formatiorn following IJVC is rare. We are reporting a case of AVF formation between subclavian artery (SCA) and internal jugular vein (IJV) following IJVC which later on leads to the development of cardiac failure.

  6. Primary leiomyosarcoma of the jugular vein in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Pierini, Alessio; Cinti, Filippo; Binanti, Diana; Pisani, Guido

    2017-01-01

    A four-year-old, male, Labrador retriever was referred for removal of a spindle cell sarcoma involving the right jugular vein. A post-contrast CT scan showed a seven-centimeter subcutaneous mass originated from the right external jugular vein, which was partially obstructed and showing contrast stasis, suggested a primary intravascular tumor of the jugular vein. The mass was resected, and histological evaluation was consistent with grade II intravenous spindle cell sarcoma of the jugular vein. Immunohistochemical positivity for vimentin, desmin, and αSMA antibody and negativity for S-100 protein confirmed venous leiomyosarcoma. The dog received five doses of intravenous doxorubicin, and there was no recurrence of the tumor 30 months post treatment. In dogs, primary intravascular sarcomas are rare and primary venous leiomyosarcoma has not been described. A venous tumor may be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs with ventral neck swelling. PMID:28331835

  7. Jugular-axillary vein bypass for salvage of arteriovenous access.

    PubMed

    Fulks, K D; Hyde, G L

    1989-01-01

    Stenosis or occlusion of the subclavian vein can cause incapacitating upper extremity swelling and venous hypertension in the patient with an arteriovenous (AV) access. A case of subclavian vein occlusion is reported that was treated with internal jugular-axillary vein bypass. This procedure resulted in salvage of the access and rapid resolution of the associated upper extremity swelling. It was concluded that jugular-axillary vein bypass should be considered in patients who have massive upper extremity edema resulting from a functioning AV access and ipsilateral subclavian vein occlusion. Patients undergoing creation of an AV access who have had previous temporary subclavian catheters or previous early failure of an AV access should have phlebography before surgery.

  8. Common femoral vein reconstruction using internal jugular vein after blast injury.

    PubMed

    Holt, Andrew M; West, Charles A; Davis, James A; Gilani, Ramyar; Askenasy, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Common femoral vein traumatic injuries are rare. Surgical management is controversial and by nature case specific. In this report, we present an unusual case of an isolated common femoral vein injury from a gunshot blast repaired with an interposition internal jugular vein bypass. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an isolated common femoral vein reconstructed in this manner.

  9. Papilloedema and Increased Intracranial Pressure as a Result of Unilateral Jugular Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Thandra, Abhishek; Jun, Bokkwan; Chuquilin, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intracranial hypertension and papilloedema are known to develop secondary to cerebral sinus or bilateral jugular vein thrombosis. However, in rare cases, unilateral jugular vein thrombosis may lead to increased intracranial pressure and papilloedema with resultant headache and vision changes. We describe a 45-year-old patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx that developed right jugular vein thrombosis after chemoradiation therapy with cetuximab. This was later complicated by intracranial hypertension and papilloedema. The normal cerebral venous drainage, the potential role of chemoradiation therapy on the aetiology of jugular vein thrombosis, and the mechanism of increased intracranial pressure secondary to unilateral jugular vein occlusion are discussed. PMID:27928352

  10. Comparison of internal jugular vein dilation between Valsalva maneuver and proximal internal jugular vein compression

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Hyeonjoo; Kang, Bora; Kim, Giwoon

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Valsalva maneuver is recognized as an effective method to dilate the internal jugular vein (IJV). However, this maneuver cannot be performed in many cases, such as children and unconscious patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of proximal IJV compression, which can easily be performed, regardless of patient cooperation. Methods Healthy adult volunteers were recruited from tertiary hospital employees. Basic anatomic and physiologic data were collected. The subjects lay down as if they were undergoing IJV catheter insertion, in the supine position with their necks turned 30 degrees to the left. The main outcome was the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the distal IJV as measured by ultrasound in four stages. The first stage was sham without any maneuver. The second was Valsalva maneuver, the third was digital IJV compression, and the fourth was digital compression accompanied by simultaneous Valsalva maneuver. Results A total of 41 volunteers were enrolled. Twenty-six (63.41%) were male with an average age of 28.15±2.85 years. Mean height was 170.74±8.66 cm and mean neck circumference was 35.28±3.87 cm. The mean CSA-IJV was 1.06±0.36 cm2 without any maneuver. It increased to 1.34±0.45 cm2 with Valsalva maneuver (P<0.001), to 1.26±0.41 cm2 with digital compression (P<0.001), and to 1.41±0.47 cm2 with the two maneuvers combined (P=0.01). Conclusion Digital proximal IJV compression effectively dilates the distal IJV. When performed simultaneously with the Valsalva maneuver, the effect was enhanced. PMID:28168225

  11. [Thrombosis of the internal jugular vein secondary to acute pharyngotonsillitis].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Lijdens, Yesica; Demarchi, María Victoria; Martínez Corvalán, María Pía; Razetti, Juan; Boccio, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Acute pharyngotonsillitis is one of the most common diseases in children and adolescents. The most frequent etiology is virus, followed by bacteria. The main bacterial agent is beta hemolytic Streptococcus group A. A rare complication of pharyngeal infectious processes is septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. The diagnosis is suspected in the presence of an inflammatory unilateral neck swelling. The diagnosis is confirmed by contrast computed tomography. Treatment consists of prolonged administration of antibiotics, being the use of anticoagulants controversial. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential to prevent persistent vascular occlusion and progression of the thrombus, which can cause pulmonary emboli. In the present study, we present a teenager with thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein secondary to acute streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis. Clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods and treatment of this rare vascular complication are described herein.

  12. Anatomic variations of neck vessels and the course of pediatric internal jugular veins.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai-Ming; Liu, En-Ci; Li, Ping; Shangguan, Wang-Ning; Li, Jun; Lian, Qing-Quan

    2017-10-01

    Landmark-guided internal jugular vein cannulation is difficult for pediatric patients but useful, especially when ultrasound equipment is unavailable. Therefore, it is important to define the adjacent anatomic characteristics of the pediatric internal jugular vein. In 210 children the course of the internal jugular vein, and common carotid and vertebral arteries was measured from the level of the cricoid cartilage to the supraclavicular area using ultrasound. From the level of the cricoid cartilage to the supraclavicular area, vessel diameter increased with internal jugular vein increasing by 12%, and common carotid and vertebral arteries increasing by 5% each. From the level of the cricoid cartilage to the supraclavicular area, the number of patients with a medial common carotid artery position relative to the internal jugular vein increased, whereas those with a lateral position decreased; the number of patients with nonoverlapped common carotid artery-internal jugular vein increased, and those with totally overlapped decreased. In contrast, the overlapping status of vertebral artery-internal jugular vein changes oppositely. More than 97.14% of the vertebral artery lies lateral to the internal jugular vein at these levels. The minimal vertebral artery-internal jugular vein depth decreased from 0.46±0.20 to 0.37±0.19 cm. The angle from the internal jugular vein line to the horizontal line of the body was 83.35±9.04 degrees. The common carotid artery and internal jugular vein are farther apart as one moves down the neck, whereas the vertebral artery and internal jugular vein are getting together. Additionally, the diameter of the internal jugular vein increased. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. External Jugular Vein Thrombosis as a Sign of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yalaza, Metin; Kafadar, Mehmet Tolga; Çıvgın, Esra Yurduseven; Düzgün, Arife Polat

    2017-01-01

    External jugular vein thrombosis is a rare vascular event which may lead fatal complication such as sepsis and pulmonary embolism. Its relation to the visceral solid tumor as an etiologic factor has been established well. Although external jugular vein thrombosis may be seen in malignancy, it is unusual to see as a sign of breast cancer. Most of the external jugular vein thrombosis occurs secondary to compression of the vein. Vascular thrombosis due to hypercoagulability is known as Trousseau syndrome. Herein, we present a case of metastatic breast cancer which presented with external jugular vein thrombosis; Trousseau syndrome. PMID:28331768

  14. A Retrospective Study of Preferable Alternative Route to Right Internal Jugular Vein for Placing Tunneled Dialysis Catheters: Right External Jugular Vein versus Left Internal Jugular Vein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei; Wang, Yufei; Qiao, Yingjin; Zhou, Sijie; Liang, Xianhui; Liu, Zhangsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Right internal jugular vein (IJV) is a preferred access route for tunneled (cuffed) dialysis catheters (TDCs), and both right external jugular vein (EJV) and left IJV are alternative routes for patients in case the right IJV isn’t available for TDC placement. This retrospective study aimed to determine if a disparity exists between the two alternative routes in hemodialysis patients in terms of outcomes of TDCs. Methods 49 hemodialysis patients who required TDCs through right EJV (n = 21) or left IJV (n = 28) as long-term vascular access were included in this study. The primary end point was cumulative catheter patency. Secondary end points include primary catheter patency, proportion of patients that never required urokinase and incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). Results A total of 20,870 catheter-days were evaluated and the median was 384 (interquartile range, 262–605) catheter-days. Fewer catheters were removed in the right EJV group than in the left IJV group (P = 0.007). Mean cumulative catheter patency was higher in the right EJV group compared with the left IJV group (P = 0.031). There was no significant difference between the two groups in the incidence of CRBSI, primary catheter patency or proportion of patients that never required urokinase use. Total indwell time of antecedent catheters was identified as an independent risk factor for cumulative catheter patency by Cox regression hazards test with an HR of 2.212 (95% CI, 1.363–3.588; p = 0.001). Conclusions Right EJV might be superior to left IJV as an alternative insertion route for TDC placement in hemodialysis patients whose right IJVs are unavailable. PMID:26751380

  15. Venous thrombosis in subclavian, axillary, brachial veins with extension to internal jugular vein, right sigmoid sinus and simultaneous pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Tamizifar, Babak; Beigi, Arash; Rismankarzadeh, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare case of Venous Thrombosis in Subclavian, Axillary, Brachial Veins with extension to Internal Jugular vein, right sigmoid sinus and simultaneous Pulmonary embolism during the treatment with low molecular weight heparin. PMID:23901341

  16. Port catheter fracture and migration in Internal Jugular Vein.

    PubMed

    Doley, Rudra Prasad; Brar, Preetinder; Chaudhary, Sanchit; Bedi, Rajeev; Swami, Adarsh Chander; Wig, Jai Dev

    2012-01-01

    Central venous access devices for chemotherapy are being used extensively in patients with cancer. Spontaneous fracture and migration of the catheter is uncommon. We present the uncommon occurrence of a fracture and spontaneous migration of the fragment into the internal jugular vein as a delayed complication of a central venous access catheter implanted for chemotherapy administration. A patient with Ewing's sarcoma of the humerus with metastasis in the lungs underwent placement of a totally implantable venous access device. The port was in place for 1 year. The patient presented with pain in the right side of the neck. A chest X-ray demonstrated complete transection of the catheter and migration of the catheter fragment in the internal jugular vein. Both the migrated catheter fragment and the proximal part of the catheter were retrieved surgically. He had an uneventful recovery. Catheter fracture remains a potential complication, which must be recognized and treated promptly. Periodic chest imaging is recommended for detection and timely removal of the catheter.

  17. An unusual condition during internal jugular vein catheterisation: vertebral artery catheterisation.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Ozge; Göksel, Sabahattin; Söylemez, Burçak; Durmuş, Kasim; Işbir, Ahmet Cemil; Berkan, Öcal

    Vertebral artery cannulation is an unusual complication during internal jugular vein cannulation. We report a case of vertebral artery cannulation, which occurred during an attempt to cannulate the right internal jugular vein, and we discuss the management of such a rare complication.

  18. An ectopic hamartomatous thymoma compressing left jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Zhao, L; Chai, Y

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic hamartomatous thymoma (EHT) is an extremely rare benign neoplasm. It is usually found at the root of the neck (frequently on the left) and does not usually impact adjacent tissues in clinically significant ways. While EHT manifests distinct pathological features, the lesion is either asymptomatic or may show nonspecific clinical features. We report one case of EHT which was assumed to be of low malignant potential since it severely compressed the inlet of left internal jugular vein as seen by computed tomography scan. To the best of our knowledge, this clinical finding of EHT is very rare. After the diagnosis and treatment of this patient, we believe that EHT or suspected EHT should be treated less invasively.

  19. Congenital internal jugular vein aneurysm in an infant: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Awasthy, Neeraj; Khandelwal, Nidhi; Iyer, Krishna S

    2016-05-01

    A 1-month old baby boy presented with a mass at the root of the neck. On investigation, a saccular aneurysm arising from the internal jugular vein was diagnosed. The aneurysm was excised after ligating the patent internal jugular vein above and below the origin of the aneurysm. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a vascular malformation. Vascular malformation of the internal jugular vein, presenting as neck mass, is extremely rare with no case described in neonates. We present one such interesting case. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. A Randomized Parallel Study for Simulated Internal Jugular Vein Cannulation Using Simple Needle Guide Device

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-14

    Doctors Attending a Central Line Insertion Training Courses for New Residents of a University Hospital From March 2017 to June 2017; Physicians Who Had Less Than 10 Ultrasound Guided Internal Jugular Vein Cannulation Participate in This Study

  1. Rare primary leiomyosarcoma of the internal jugular vein with cervical extravascular extension.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sánchez, M; González-García, R; Moreno-García, C; Toro, W; Monje, F

    2017-02-01

    Leiomysarcoma of intravascular origin is a rare malignant tumour of the soft tissue. We present what is, to our knowledge, the first example of one that has arisen from the wall of the internal jugular vein.

  2. Non-cuffed dual lumen catheters in the external jugular veins versus other central veins for hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Moini, Majid; Rasouli, Mohammad R; Kenari, Mohammad Mahmoodzadeh; Mahmoodi, Hamid Reza

    2009-01-01

    To compare prospective between insertion of non-cuffed dual lumen catheter in the external jugular vein and other central veins for hemodialysis (HD), we studied 68 chronic dialysis patients randomly allocated into two groups: one with external jugular vein catheterization as access for HD and another with other central venous catheterization, internal jugular or subclavian vein. Our results showed there were no significant differences regarding successful cannulation, com-plications, total numbers of dialysis, development of pain and infection at the site of cannulation, patency rate of the catheters, and efficacy of hemodialysis between both groups. In addition, the patency of the catheter in the external jugular vein was not affected by previous cannulation of other central veins. In contrast, there was a significant correlation between numbers of attempts for cannulation in both groups and development of hematoma and infection, (p< 0.05). In conclusion, our results showed that the external jugular vein may be an alternative for other central veins for insertion of temporary non-cuffed hemodialysis catheter.

  3. Longitudinal Contraction Venoplasty in Prevention of Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis After Free Flap Vascular Anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhao-Jian; Chen, Yan-Rong; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Sheng; Ren, Zhen-Hu; Wu, Han-Jiang

    2016-06-01

    The vascular anastomosis of free flap with the internal jugular vein stump is susceptible to thrombosis, thus resulting in flap compromise or failure. This study aims to explore the method of longitudinal contraction venoplasty in the prevention of internal jugular vein stump thrombosis after free flap vascular anastomosis and its feasibility. A retrospective review was performed of 16 patients who underwent internal jugular vein resection because of cancer ablation and longitudinal contraction venoplasty to prevent internal jugular vein stump thrombosis after free flap vascular anastomosis from January 2013 through December 2014 at Second Xiangya Hospital. The methods for longitudinal contraction venoplasty and its efficacy are reported. Venous anastomosis of all flaps was performed with the internal jugular vein stump, and single venous anastomosis was made in all cases. Postoperatively, all flaps survived completely, without vascular compromise. All the patients were followed for approximately 9 to 33 months, and they were satisfied with the esthetic and functional results of the donor and recipient sites after reconstruction. Longitudinal contraction venoplasty may be an effective new method for prevention of internal jugular vein thrombosis after free flap vascular anastomosis. Copyright © 2016 The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Characteristics and surgical management of flap compromise caused by thrombosis of the internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Qu, Yi; Su, Ming; Li, Jinzhong; Li, Hua; Xing, Rudong; Han, Zhengxue

    2017-02-01

    A principal reason for flap compromise in oral and maxillofacial head and neck surgery, and failure of a free flap transfer, is thrombosis of a drainage vein such as the internal jugular vein. This study characterized flap compromise caused by internal jugular vein thrombosis after a free flap transfer, and its management. A retrospective clinical study was conducted of 306 consecutive microvascular free flaps performed for 305 patients with head and neck cancer from March 2003 to March 2013 at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Beijing Stomatological Hospital, Capital Medical University. Vascular thrombosis developed postoperatively in 18 of the 306 free flaps (5.9%): 1 arterial and 17 venous. Of the latter, in 10 patients the thrombosis occurred at the anastomosis site; in 7 patients internal jugular vein thrombosis was detected during emergent reexploration (4 radial forearm free flaps, 1 fibular flap, and 2 anterior lateral thigh flaps). The 4 cases involving radial forearm free flaps were salvaged successfully by venous transfer to bridge the reflow vein to the anterior jugular vein, or removal of the thrombosis in the internal jugular vein and re-anastomosis. The remaining 3 cases of internal jugular vein thrombosis were not salvaged: 2 defects were reconstructed with major pectoralis myocutaneous flaps, and the other was closed directly without reconstruction. In oral and maxillofacial head and neck cancer surgery, postoperative thrombosis of the internal jugular vein can result in failure of the free flap transfer. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Internal jugular vein cannulation: A comparison of three techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Bikash R; Mohan, Virender K; Kashyap, Lokesh; Shende, Dilip; Darlong, Vanlal M; Pandey, Ravindra K

    2013-01-01

    Context: Ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein (IJV) cannulation is known for increasing success rate and decreasing rate of complications. The ultrasound image can be used as a real time image during cannulation or to prelocate the IJV before attempting cannulation. Aims: This study compares both the ultrasound-guided technique with the classical anatomical landmark technique (central approach) for right IJV cannulation in terms of success rate, complications, and time for cannulation. Settings and Design: A prospective, randomized, observational study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital. Material and Methods: One hundred twenty patients requiring IJV cannulation were included in this study and were randomly allocated in three groups. Number of attempts, success rate, venous access time, catheterization time, and complications were observed in each group. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using STATA-9 software. Demographic data were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Nonparametric data were compared using the Kruskall–Wallis test, and multiple comparisons were done applying The Mann–Whitney test for individual pairs of groups. Nominal data were compared by applying the Chi-square test and Fisher exact test. Results: Successful cannulation (≤3 attempt) was achieved in 90.83% of patients without any statistical significant difference between the groups. Venous access time and catheterization time was found to be significantly less in both the ultrasound groups than the anatomical land mark group. Number of attempts and success in first attempt was similar between the groups. Conclusions: Both the ultrasound techniques are found to be better than the anatomical landmark technique. Further, ultrasound-guided prelocation was found to be as effective as ultrasound guided real-time imaging technique for right IJV cannulation. PMID:24106363

  6. Long-axis view for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement via the internal jugular vein

    PubMed Central

    Mahan, Angel F.; McEvoy, Matthew D.; Gravenstein, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    Background In modern practice, real-time ultrasound guidance is commonly employed for the placement of internal jugular vein catheters. With a new tool, such as ultrasound, comes the opportunity to refine and further optimize the ultrasound view during jugular vein catheterization. We describe jugular vein access techniques and use the long-axis view as an alternative to the commonly employed short-axis cross-section view for internal jugular vein access and cannulation. Conclusion The long-axis ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein approach for internal jugular vein cannulation is a useful alternative technique that can provide better needle tip and guidewire visualization than the more traditional short-axis ultrasound view. PMID:28913474

  7. [Pharyngeal hemorrhaging due to iatrogenic false aneurysm. Complication after cannulation of the internal jugular vein].

    PubMed

    Kreckel, V; Langwara, H

    2009-03-01

    Catheterization of the internal jugular vein is used for temporary access to the central vein in patients with acute or chronic renal failure. The most frequent problem is the arterial puncture and accidental placement of the large catheter in an artery. This case report describes a rare secondary complication by accidental catheterization of the right common carotid artery after intended dual lumen catheter insertion into the right internal jugular vein. A false aneurysm with pharyngeal hemorrhaging developed 2 weeks after the puncture. The diagnosis was made using colour-Doppler ultrasound and the aneurysm was treated with vascular surgery.

  8. Pediatric jugular vein aneurysm (phlebectasia): report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joe B; Ingraham, Christopher R; Fine, Gabriel C; Iyer, Ramesh S; Monroe, Eric J

    2017-06-01

    Jugular vein aneurysms are rare vascular abnormalities that are most commonly encountered in the pediatric population. We report two separate cases in infants, both of whom presented with enlarging neck masses and were found to have jugular vein aneurysms. Diagnosis was established with duplex ultrasonography, computed tomography angiography, digitally subtracted catheter venography, and magnetic resonance imaging in one case and magnetic resonance imaging with magnetic resonance angiography/magnetic resonance venography, gray scale ultrasonography, and digital subtraction catheter venography in the other case. Both aneurysms were treated by surgical resection.

  9. Position and relative size of the vertebral artery according to age: Implications for internal jugular vein access.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chul-Woo; Jalilov, Gulomjon; Song, In-Kyung; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Soo; Kim, Jin-Tae; Lee, Ji-Hyun

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this retrospective observational study was to investigate the anatomical characteristics of the vertebral artery in pediatric patients using computed tomography images. We evaluated anatomical characteristics of the right and left vertebral artery at the cricoid level and at a lower level, which was mid-level between the cricoid cartilage and the origin of vertebral artery from the subclavian artery. At each level, the cross-sectional areas of the vertebral artery and internal jugular vein, the relative size of vertebral artery to internal jugular vein, the minimum distance between them, and the extent of overlap between them were investigated. According to the chest computed tomography images of 344 patients, the sizes of internal jugular vein and vertebral artery were found to increase with age. On the other hand, the relative size of the vertebral artery to internal jugular vein was found to increase conversely with decreasing age. The distance between the vertebral artery and internal jugular vein increased with age at both sides and levels. The vertebral artery was mostly located at the medial side of the internal jugular vein, and overlapped with the internal jugular vein in at least 54% of the patients at the cricoid level and in 74% at the lower level. The theoretical risk of vertebral artery puncture is higher in younger children during internal jugular vein catheterization. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Comparison of results of placement of cuffed -tunneled hemodialysis catheter in internal jugular vein with subclavian vein for long -term dialysis.

    PubMed

    Zafarghandi, Mohammad-Reza; Nazari, Iraj; Taghavi, Morteza; Salimi, Javad; Moini, Majid; Askarpour, Shahnam

    2013-03-01

    was to comparison between internal jugular vs. subclavian vein cuffed tunnel catheter placement for dialysis. Cases who required central venous catheter for dialysis were included in this study. Forty cases were included in this study and divided to two groups. Catheters were placed randomly in internal jugular vein or subclavian. Patients were followed for 6 months. Early and late complications of catheter's placement were recorded. Analysis was done using Spss ver 13.0 (Chicago, IL, USA). There were no significant differences between subclavian and internal jugular vein regarding occurrence of infection resulted in extraction or treatment. Also there were no significant differences regarding occurrence of thrombosis resulted in extraction or treatment. Failure rate was significantly higher in cases with internal jugular vein catheter compared to cases with subclavian vein catheter (p=0.04). Failure rate was significantly higher in cases with internal jugular vein catheter compared to subclavian cathether. Subclavian catheter is more appropriate route for catheter placement.

  11. Injection into the jugular vein among people who inject drugs in the United Kingdom: Prevalence, associated factors and harms.

    PubMed

    Hope, Vivian D; Iversen, Jenny; Cullen, Katelyn J; Parry, John V; Maher, Lisa; Nucbe, Fortune

    2017-08-01

    While people who inject drugs (PWID) typically use peripheral veins, some inject into their central veins, including the femoral and jugular veins. Injection into the jugular vein can have serious adverse health consequences, including jugular vein thrombosis, deep neck infections, pneumothorax, endocarditis and sepsis. This study examined the prevalence of, and factors associated with, jugular vein injection among a large sample of PWID in the United Kingdom. Unlinked anonymous surveys (2011-14) recruited PWID from agencies providing services to this population. Self-reported demographic and injection-related data were collected from consenting respondents using a brief questionnaire and dried blood spot samples were tested for exposure to HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to examine factors associated with jugular vein injection. Among 5261 PWID, one third had injected into a central vein in the previous 28 days, including 6% (n=339) who had injected into their jugular vein and 1% (n=52) who had used this site exclusively for recent injections. Factors independently associated with recent jugular vein injection in multivariable analysis included female gender, a lifetime history of imprisonment, sharing needles and syringes, poly-drug injection and injection into multiple body sites. Jugular vein injection was also associated with experiencing injection-related injuries, although no associations were identified with respect to exposure to blood borne viral infections. A significant minority of PWID inject into the jugular vein in the United Kingdom. Public health responses should investigate ways to support and promote good injection site management in order to minimise vascular damage and reduce problems with peripheral venous access. Women who inject drugs, PWID with a history of imprisonment and those people who are experiencing early signs of injection-related skin and soft

  12. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of catheter-induced combined subclavian and internal jugular vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Abulafia, O; Sherer, D M; DeEulis, T G

    1995-03-01

    Catheter-induced subclavian and internal jugular vein thrombosis in a patient with unresectable ovarian carcinoma was diagnosed by sonography following subtle clinical symptomatology. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of central vein thrombosis offers applicable, noninvasive bedside diagnosis. The case we describe suggests that a low threshold should be maintained for application of this technique in the diagnosis of this potentially life-threatening complication, especially with the current widespread application of invasive monitoring.

  13. Internal Jugular Vein Cannulation: An Ultrasound-Guided Technique Versus a Landmark-Guided Technique

    PubMed Central

    Turker, Gurkan; Kaya, Fatma Nur; Gurbet, Alp; Aksu, Hale; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Atlas, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare the landmark-guided technique versus the ultrasound-guided technique for internal jugular vein cannulation in spontaneously breathing patients. METHODS A total of 380 patients who required internal jugular vein cannulation were randomly assigned to receive internal jugular vein cannulation using either the landmark- or ultrasound-guided technique in Bursa, Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, between April and November, 2008. Failed catheter placement, risk of complications from placement, risk of failure on first attempt at placement, number of attempts until successful catheterization, time to successful catheterization and the demographics of each patient were recorded. RESULTS The overall complication rate was higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p < 0.01). Carotid puncture rate and hematoma were more frequent in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p < 0.05). The number of attempts for successful placement was significantly higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group, which was accompanied by a significantly increased access time observed in the landmark group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Although there were a higher number of attempts, longer access time, and a more frequent complication rate in the landmark group, the success rate was found to be comparable between the two groups. CONCLUSION The findings of this study indicate that internal jugular vein catheterization guided by real-time ultrasound results in a lower access time and a lower rate of immediate complications. PMID:19841706

  14. Brachial plexus compression due to subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm from internal jugular vein catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Mol, T. N.; Gupta, A.; Narain, U.

    2017-01-01

    Internal jugular vein (IJV) catheterization has become the preferred approach for temporary vascular access for hemodialysis. However, complications such as internal carotid artery puncture, vessel erosion, thrombosis, and infection may occur. We report a case of brachial plexus palsy due to compression by right subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm as a result of IJV catheterization in a patient who was under maintenance hemodialysis. PMID:28356671

  15. Videothoracoscopic management of a perforated central vein and pleura after ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein cannulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Eun; Jeon, Joon-Pyo; Kim, Yongsuk; Jeong, Su Ah

    2014-01-01

    A 23-year-old male underwent a left internal jugular vein catheterization during extended surgery for treatment of multiple fractures due to a traffic accident. Although the catheterization was performed under ultrasound (US) guidance, iatrogenic perforation of the central vein and pleura occurred. The catheter was removed, and the perforated site was addressed under thoracoscopy rather than an open thoracotomy. This case suggests that using US does not completely guarantee a complication-free outcome, and that catheter placement should be carefully confirmed. In addition, this case suggests that thoracoscopy may be an ideal method of resolving a perforation of the central vein and pleura. PMID:24851167

  16. Impact of misplaced subclavian vein catheter into jugular vein on transpulmonary thermodilution measurement variables*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wen-qiao; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Shao-yang; Liang, Zhong-yan; Fu, Shui-qiao; Xu, Jia; Liang, Ting-bo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The subclavian vein (SCV) is usually used to inject the indicator of cold saline for a transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) measurement. The SCV catheter being misplaced into the internal jugular (IJV) vein is a common occurrence. The present study explores the influence of a misplaced SCV catheter on TPTD variables. Methods: Thirteen severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) patients with malposition of the SCV catheter were enrolled in this study. TPTD variables including cardiac index (CI), global end-diastolic volume index (GEDVI), intrathoracic blood volume index (ITBVI), and extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) were obtained after injection of cold saline via the misplaced SCV catheter. Then, the misplaced SCV catheter was removed and IJV access was constructed for a further set of TPTD variables. Comparisons were made between the TPTD results measured through the IJV and misplaced SCV accesses. Results: A total of 104 measurements were made from TPTD curves after injection of cold saline via the IJV and misplaced SCV accesses. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated an overestimation of +111.40 ml/m2 (limits of agreement: 6.13 and 216.70 ml/m2) for GEDVI and ITBVI after a misplaced SCV injection. There were no significant influences on CI and EVLWI. The biases of +0.17 L/(min·m2) for CI and +0.17 ml/kg for EVLWI were revealed by Bland-Altman analysis. Conclusions: The malposition of an SCV catheter does influence the accuracy of TPTD variables, especially GEDVI and ITBVI. The position of the SCV catheter should be confirmed by chest X-ray in order to make good use of the TPTD measurements. PMID:26739527

  17. A Randomized Controlled Comparison of the Internal Jugular Vein and the Subclavian Vein as Access Sites for Central Venous Catheterization in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Camkiran Firat, Aynur; Zeyneloglu, Pinar; Ozkan, Murat; Pirat, Arash

    2016-09-01

    To compare internal jugular vein and subclavian vein access for central venous catheterization in terms of success rate and complications. A 1:1 randomized controlled trial. Baskent University Medical Center. Pediatric patients scheduled for cardiac surgery. Two hundred and eighty children undergoing central venous catheterization were randomly allocated to the internal jugular vein or subclavian vein group during a period of 18 months. The primary outcome was the first-attempt success rate of central venous catheterization through either approach. The secondary outcomes were the rates of infectious and mechanical complications. The central venous catheterization success rate at the first attempt was not significantly different between the subclavian vein (69%) and internal jugular vein (64%) groups (p = 0.448). However, the overall success rate was significantly higher through the subclavian vein (91%) than the internal jugular vein (82%) (p = 0.037). The overall frequency of mechanical complications was not significantly different between the internal jugular vein (25%) and subclavian vein (31%) (p = 0.456). However, the rate of arterial puncture was significantly higher with internal jugular vein (8% vs 2%; p = 0.03) and that of catheter malposition was significantly higher with subclavian vein (17% vs 1%; p < 0.001). The rates per 1,000 catheter days for both positive catheter-tip cultures (26.1% vs 3.6%; p < 0.001) and central-line bloodstream infection (6.9 vs 0; p < 0.001) were significantly higher with internal jugular vein. There were no significant differences between the groups in the length of ICU and hospital stays or in-hospital mortality rates (p > 0.05 for all). Central venous catheterization through the internal jugular vein and subclavian vein was not significantly different in terms of success at the first attempt. Although the types of mechanical complications were different, the overall rate was similar between internal jugular vein and

  18. An outcome study on complications using routine ultrasound assistance for internal jugular vein cannulation.

    PubMed

    Lamperti, M; Cortellazzi, P; D'Onofrio, G; Subert, M; Falcone, C; Filippini, G; Caldiroli, D

    2007-11-01

    Ultrasound guidance for central venous cannulation is advised by recent guidelines, but is not being applied in everyday practice. The purpose of this study was to determine the reduction in complications when applying an ultrasound locating device for internal jugular vein catheterization. An observational study was conducted from November 2004 to October 2005 in a tertiary neurosurgical hospital on 300 patients undergoing internal jugular vein cannulation using an ultrasound technique. Patients were not randomized and operators were trained using theoretical and practical courses. Prior to the study, the investigators, who were consultant anaesthesiologists, had to perform at least 20 successful supervised cannulations. Cannulation was successful in all cases. The incidence of arterial puncture was 2.7%, and multiple venous punctures represented the main minor complication (14%). Bivariate analysis of the overall complications revealed no significant correlation with age group, American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA) classification, body mass index, or position and diameter of the vein. Ultrasound cannulation of the internal jugular vein minimized complications. These could be avoided when new ultrasound probes and specific needles are introduced.

  19. Collet-Sicard syndrome: a rare but important presentation of internal jugular vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Neo, Shermyn; Lee, Kim En

    2017-01-01

    We describe a rare neurological presentation of internal jugular vein thrombosis induced by central venous catheter placement in a patient with cancer. A 71-year-old man gave a 3-week history of dysphagia and dysarthria with left-sided neck pain and headache. He was receiving chemotherapy for appendiceal adenocarcinoma. On examination, he had left 9th-12th cranial neuropathies, manifesting as voice hoarseness, decreased palatal movement, absent gag reflex, weakness of scapular elevation and left-sided tongue wasting. CT scan of neck showed the left subclavian central venous catheter tip was in the left internal jugular vein. Skull base MRI showed thrombus within the left jugular foramen extending intracranially. We diagnosed Collet-Sicard syndrome secondary to thrombosis in the sigmoid-jugular venous complex. His headache and neck pain resolved 2 days after removing the catheter and starting anticoagulation. Collet-Sicard syndrome is an unusual syndrome of lower cranial nerve palsies, often signifying disease at the skull base, including malignancy, trauma or vascular causes.

  20. Diffuse thyroid metastases and bilateral internal jugular vein tumor thrombus from renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Jha, Priyanka; Shekhar, Mallika; Wan, Jennifer; Mari-Aparici, Carina

    2016-12-01

    Renal cell cancer rarely metastasizes to the thyroid gland, and it has been reported to present as a solitary mass. We present a case of diffuse thyroid cancer metastases from renal cell cancer. Bilateral internal jugular vein tumor thrombi were also present. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of diffuse thyroid metastases from renal cell cancer in the English literature. Renal cell cancer metastases should be considered in the differential of thyroid imaging abnormalities arising in the setting of known renal cell carcinoma, particularly late in the course of disease. This is frequently associated with internal jugular vein thrombi, which should be evaluated with an abnormal thyroid. Thyroglobulin levels are usually normal in such patients.

  1. Iliopsoas abscess as a complication of tunneled jugular vein catheterization in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Po-Jen; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Leu, Jyh-Gang; Fang, Yu-Wei

    2015-04-01

    Iliopsoas abscess is a rare complication in hemodialysis patients that is mainly due to adjacent catheterization, local acupuncture, discitis, and bacteremia. Herein, we report a 47-year-old woman undergoing regular hemodialysis via a catheter in the internal jugular vein who presented with low back pain and dyspnea. A heart murmur suggested the presence of catheter-related endocarditis, and this was confirmed by an echocardiogram and a blood culture of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A computed tomography indicated a pulmonary embolism and an incidental finding of iliopsoas abscess. Following surgical intervention and intravenous daptomycin, the patient experienced full recovery and a return to usual activities. This case indicates that an iliopsoas abscess can be related to a jugular vein catheter, which is apparently facilitated by infective endocarditis. The possibility of iliopsoas abscess should be considered when a hemodialysis patient presents with severe low back pain, even when there is no history of adjacent mechanical intervention.

  2. A case of fatal internal jugular vein perforation during nasogastric tube insertion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine A; Fleming, Jeffrey P; Bennett, Robert D; Taitano, Andrew A

    2017-07-01

    Nasogastric tube (NGT) insertion is a routine procedure in the management of surgical patients. We report the second case of internal jugular vein perforation during NGT insertion. A 79-year-old man presented with diffuse abdominal pain secondary to a perforated viscus. Abdominal CT revealed pneumoperitoneum, necessitating emergent exploratory laparotomy. On post-operative Day 7, the patient developed mild abdominal distension and subjective nausea for which NGT placement was ordered for decompression. Tube placement was confirmed by insufflation of air without aspiration of gastric contents. Output from the NGT upon placement revealed frank blood. The patient then developed respiratory distress requiring intubation, followed by a fatal arrhythmia. Post-mortem exam revealed the trajectory of the NGT through the pharyngeal wall into the right internal jugular vein. This case illustrates the importance of systematic evaluation of all procedures, as the outcome resulted from failure to recognize the initial error in tube placement.

  3. A case of fatal internal jugular vein perforation during nasogastric tube insertion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine A.; Fleming, Jeffrey P.; Bennett, Robert D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nasogastric tube (NGT) insertion is a routine procedure in the management of surgical patients. We report the second case of internal jugular vein perforation during NGT insertion. A 79-year-old man presented with diffuse abdominal pain secondary to a perforated viscus. Abdominal CT revealed pneumoperitoneum, necessitating emergent exploratory laparotomy. On post-operative Day 7, the patient developed mild abdominal distension and subjective nausea for which NGT placement was ordered for decompression. Tube placement was confirmed by insufflation of air without aspiration of gastric contents. Output from the NGT upon placement revealed frank blood. The patient then developed respiratory distress requiring intubation, followed by a fatal arrhythmia. Post-mortem exam revealed the trajectory of the NGT through the pharyngeal wall into the right internal jugular vein. This case illustrates the importance of systematic evaluation of all procedures, as the outcome resulted from failure to recognize the initial error in tube placement. PMID:28721190

  4. Percutaneous trans-jugular vein closure of atrial septal defect with steerable introducer under echocardiographic guidance

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jian; Ma, Lunchao; Kuang, Suhua; Lu, Guoliang; Zhang, Yingyuan; Liao, Shengjie

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to discuss a novel surgical approach of percutaneous trans-jugular vein closure of atrial septal defect (ASD) with steerable introducer under echocardiographic guidance. Methods From January 2015 to June 2015, ten ASD patients underwent percutaneous trans-jugular vein ASD closure, the occluder placement could be perpendicular to the plane of ASD using the steerable introducer. Results All cases succeeded. The average procedure time was 27.4±5.6 minutes; and the average intracardiac operation time was 6.7±5.2 minutes. No patient showed the residual shunt after the procedure. There was no clinical death, no arrhythmia, no hemolysis, no infection, no jugular vein damage or occlusion during patients’ hospitalization. The post-operation follow up after one month of the operation showed that there was no residual shunt, no falling off or detachment of occluders or other complications. Conclusions It is a new surgical method with easy operation, mild damage and wider indication. Compared with the traditional percutaneous and transthoracic closure of ASD, it has obvious advantages. PMID:26623109

  5. Hyperhomocysteinemia and left internal jugular vein thrombosis with Ménière's symptom complex.

    PubMed

    Scaramella, John G

    2003-11-01

    The author describes the case of a 68-year-old woman who experienced severe symptoms of Ménière's syndrome. Ultrasonography of the neck detected a clot in the left internal jugular vein. The patient was hospitalized and anticoagulated, and her symptoms soon resolved. The author speculates that the clot-induced hemodynamic changes led to venous insufficiency in the vein of the paravestibular canaliculus and ultimately caused the patient's symptoms. The blood work-up revealed that the patient had an elevated fasting homocysteine level, which is a known risk factor for thrombus formation.

  6. Age-related brain atrophy may be mitigated by internal jugular vein enlargement in male individuals without neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Belov, Pavel; Magnano, Christopher; Krawiecki, Jacqueline; Hagemeier, Jesper; Bergsland, Niels; Beggs, Clive; Zivadinov, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Objectives To assess the relationship between cross-sectional area of internal jugular veins and brain volumes in healthy individuals without neurologic disease. Methods A total of 193 healthy individuals without neurologic disease (63 male and 130 female; age > 20 to < 70 years) received magnetic resonance venography and structural brain magnetic resonance imaging at 3T. The internal jugular vein cross-sectional area was assessed at C2-C3, C4, C5-C6, and C7-T1. Normalized whole brain volume was assessed. Partial correlation analyses were used to determine associations. Results There was an inverse relationship between normalized whole brain volume and total internal jugular vein cross-sectional area (C7-T1: males r = -0.346, p = 0.029; females r = -0.301, p = 0.002). After age adjustment, association of normalized whole brain volume and normalized gray matter volume with internal jugular vein cross-sectional area became positive in males (normalized whole brain volume and right internal jugular vein cross-sectional area (C2-C3) changed from r = -0.163 to r = 0.384, p = 0.002), but not in the females. Conclusion Sex differences exist in the relationship between brain volume and internal jugular vein cross-sectional area in healthy individuals without neurologic disease.

  7. Usefulness of Groshong catheters for central venous access via the external jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Mitsuru; Nagata, Hitoshi; Takagi, Kazutoshi; Horie, Toru; Sawada, Tokihiko; Kubota, Keiichi

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of central venous access via the external jugular vein (EJV) employing Groshong catheters, and to compare the complications with those of conventional internal jugular venous catheterization. Central venous access was achieved by insertion of a single-lumen 4.0 Fr Groshong catheter via the EJV or internal jugular vein (IJV) with a single puncture. Complications associated with insertion and central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection (CVC-RBSI) were evaluated from the database. Two hundred and twenty-five patients received 400 catheters for a total period of 5377 catheter-days. Ninety-six patients underwent 201 internal jugular venous catheter (IJV-C) procedures for 2381 catheter-days, and 129 patients underwent 199 external jugular venous catheter (EJV-C) procedures for 2996 catheter-days. Use of EJV-C was associated with a longer catheter insertion length (p < .01) and period (p < .01), a larger number of operations (p < .01), and more frequent use of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) (p < .01) and less frequent use of chemotherapy (p < .01) than for IJV-C. However, there were no significant differences (NS) in complications associated with insertion and CVC-RBSI between IJV-C and EJV-C. There were no significant differences such complications as malposition, oozing or hematoma formation of insertion site, arterial bleeding, nerve damage, pneumothorax, and phlebitis between IJV-C and EJV-C. Moreover, EJV-C was not associated with morbidities such as pneumothorax, arterial bleeding, and nerve damage. Thus the study concluded that EJV-C using Groshong catheters has no severe complications and has the same rates of CVC-RBSI as conventional IJV-C for central venous access.

  8. A Case Study of Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Right Internal Jugular Vein in a Healthy 21-Year-Old Male

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Geri

    2016-01-01

    We are reporting a case of a healthy 21-year-old male, with no significant past medical history, who was found to have an incidental nonocclusive deep vein thrombosis in the right internal jugular vein detected on a head MRI previously ordered for work-up of headaches. A follow-up upper extremity venous Doppler ultrasound confirmed the presence of a partially occlusive deep vein thrombosis in the right jugular vein. The case presented is unique for the reason that the patient is young and has no prior risk factor, personal or familial, for venous thrombosis except for associated polycythemia on clinical presentation. PMID:27725891

  9. Doppler-guided cannulation of internal jugular vein, subclavian vein and innominate (brachiocephalic) vein--a case-control comparison in patients with reduced and normal intracranial compliance.

    PubMed

    Schummer, Wolfram; Schummer, Claudia; Niesen, Wolf-Dirk; Gerstenberg, Hendrik

    2003-09-01

    A case-control comparison of Doppler guidance on the success rate of central venous cannulation in patients with normal or reduced intracranial compliance. A single operator performed central venous access procedures with continuous wave Doppler guidance. It was used on patients on a ventilator. The position of patients with reduced intracranial compliance (RIC) was not changed for the procedure. Patients with normal intracranial compliance (NIC) were put in the Trendelenburg position. We prospectively evaluated 249 Doppler-guided central venous access procedures performed over a 12-month period at our 10-bed neuro-intensive care unit at a university hospital. The group with RIC included 26 males and 35 females (n=61) aged 16-79 years. In this group 155 Doppler-guided cannulation procedures (62%) were performed. The group with NIC (n=52) comprised 29 males and 23 females aged 34-76 years; 94 Doppler-guided cannulation procedures (38%) were carried out. The veins cannulated in RIC and NIC, respectively, were: right innominate vein: 24/18, left innominate vein 26/12, right subclavian vein 12/7, left subclavian vein 25/14, and right internal jugular vein 33/18 and left internal jugular vein 35/24. The absence of one left internal jugular vein was identified in the NIC group. The success rate of first needle pass in patients with RIC was 92% and in patients with NIC 89%. This study showed that Doppler guidance allows the cannulation of central veins in patients with RIC placed in head-up position. Cannulation can be ensured and first-pass needle placement maximised.

  10. A novel method to estimate oxygen saturation of the internal jugular vein blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Pan, Boan; Gao, Yuan; Ruan, Zhengshang; Li, Ting

    2016-03-01

    This article introduces a novel method to estimate oxygen saturation of the internal jugular vein blood (SjvO2) by using Near Infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The different positions of patients can affect the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the internal jugular vein (IJV), in other words, it causes the sectional change of the IJV blood volume. When lying position of patients, the CSA is larger than that keeping upper body 80 degree, and the CSA can compute quantitatively by the use of ultrasound and digital image processing methods. The entire method consist of constructing different position of patient (upper body rotation 0 and 80 degree), comparing the light absorption changes. SjvO2 has been determined from light absorption measurements in two wavelength, before and after the position changes. The method has been applied to the vertical area over the IJV of 11 patients who were placed a central venous catheter into a large vein in the neck for medical uses, using wavelength of 735 and 850 nm. At last, comparing the SjvO2NIRS which measured by NIRS noninvasively with SjvO2IJVBG which was quantified using a whole blood gas analyzer, we found there were some certain relativity. The results were influenced by vascular depth greatly.

  11. Internal Jugular and Subclavian Vein Thrombosis in a Case of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayama, Nana; Morozumi, Shouko; Nakano, Mika; Nakayama, Akari; Takahata, Yoshiomi; Sakaguchi, Yuusuke; Inoue, Natsuki; Kubota, Toshiki; Takenoya, Akiko; Ishii, Yoshiko; Okubo, Haruka; Yamaguchi, Souta; Ono, Tsuyoshi; Oharaseki, Toshiaki; Yoshikawa, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    Central venous catheter insertion and cancer represent some of the important predisposing factors for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). DVT usually develops in the lower extremities, and venous thrombosis of the upper extremities is uncommon. Early diagnosis and treatment of deep venous thrombosis are of importance, because it is a precursor of complications such as pulmonary embolism and postthrombotic syndrome. A 47-year-old woman visited our department with painful swelling on the left side of her neck. Initial examination revealed swelling of the region extending from the left neck to the shoulder without any redness of the overlying skin. Laboratory tests showed a white blood cell count of 5,800/mm3 and an elevated serum C-reactive protein of 4.51 mg/dL. Computed tomography (CT) of the neck revealed a vascular filling defect in the left internal jugular vein to left subclavian vein region, with the venous lumina completely occluded with dense soft tissue. On the basis of the findings, we made the diagnosis of thrombosis of the left internal jugular and left subclavian veins. The patient was begun on treatment with oral rivaroxaban, but the left shoulder pain worsened. She was then admitted to the hospital and treated by balloon thrombectomy and thrombolytic therapy, which led to improvement of the left subclavian venous occlusion. Histopathologic examination of the removed thrombus revealed adenocarcinoma cells, indicating hematogenous dissemination of malignant cells. PMID:28194291

  12. VENOUS SAMPLING FOR CUSHING DISEASE: COMPARISON OF INTERNAL JUGULAR VEIN AND INFERIOR PETROSAL SINUS SAMPLING.

    PubMed

    Radvany, Martin G; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Gallia, Gary L; Wand, Gary S; Salvatori, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fails to detect many adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas, inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) is considered the gold standard to differentiate Cushing disease (CD) from ectopic ACTH secretion syndrome (EAS). Some authors have suggested internal jugular vein sampling (IJVS) as an alternative to IPSS. We simultaneously compared IJVS to IPSS in 30 consecutive patients referred for ACTH-dependent Cushing syndrome and equivocal MRI exams. Five sites were simultaneously sampled in each patient (right and left IPS, right and left IJV, and femoral vein) before and after the administration of corticotrophin-releasing hormone or desmopressin. The test was considered consistent with CD when the IPS to peripheral ratio was >2 at baseline or >3 after stimulus and the IJV to peripheral ratio was >1.7 at baseline or >2 after stimulus. In 27 of 30 patients, IPSS results were consistent with a central source of ACTH. Two of the other 3 patients had EAS (one lung carcinoid and one occult), and 1 patient had pathology-proven CD. The sensitivity of IPSS was 96.4%. Only 64.2% of these patients had results meeting criteria for a central source of ACTH by IJVS criteria. Twenty patients with centralizing IPPS have undergone pituitary surgery. Of these, the central origin of excessive ACTH was confirmed with certainty in 16 patients. Among these 16 patients, the IPSS sensitivity was 93.8%, whereas 5 patients had false-negative IJVS (68.7% sensitivity). These results do not support the routine use of IJVS in establishing if the pituitary is the source of excessive ACTH. ACTH = adrenocorticotropic hormone CD = Cushing disease CRH = corticotrophin-releasing hormone CS = Cushing syndrome DDAVP = desmopressin EAS = ectopic ACTH secretion IJVS = internal jugular vein sampling IPSS = inferior petrosal sinus sampling JVS = jugular venous sampling MRI = magnetic resonance imaging.

  13. Assessing techniques for disinfecting sites for inserting intravenous catheters into the jugular veins of horses.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, T E; Love, S; Taylor, D J; Heller, J; Mellor, D J; Hughes, K J

    2009-01-10

    The sites of insertion of catheters into the jugular veins of six horses were investigated to determine common isolates and to assess the effectiveness of two disinfection protocols with the hair coat left long, clipped or shaved. Skin commensals (Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Micrococcus species) and environmental contaminants (Bacillus, Enterobacteriaceae, Aspergillus and Mucor species) were the microorganisms most frequently isolated. Chlorhexidine gluconate and povidone-iodine-based skin disinfection protocols resulted in significant reductions in the number of bacterial isolates from clipped sites. With chlorhexidine, there were no significant differences between the reductions observed at sites with the hair coat left long, clipped or shaved.

  14. Is posture-related craniospinal compliance shift caused by jugular vein collapse? A theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Gehlen, Manuel; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Schmid Daners, Marianne

    2017-02-16

    Postural changes are related to changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. While sitting up leads to a decrease in cranial CSF pressure, it also causes shifts in the craniospinal CSF volume and compliance distribution. We hypothesized that jugular vein collapse in upright posture is a major contributor to these shifts in CSF volume and compliance. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a mathematical lumped-parameter model of the CSF system and the relevant parts of the cardiovascular system. In this model, the CSF and the venous system are each divided into a cranial and a spinal part. The pressures in these cranial and spinal portions differ by the posture-dependent hydrostatic pressure columns in the connecting vessels. Jugular collapse is represented by a reduction of the hydrostatic pressure difference between cranial and spinal veins. The CSF pressure-volume relationship is implemented as a function of the local CSF to venous pressure gradient. This implies that an increase in CSF volume leads to a simultaneous displacement of blood from adjacent veins. CSF pulsations driven by the cardiovascular system are introduced through a pulsating cranial arterial volume. In upright posture, the implemented CSF pressure-volume relationship shifts to lower cranial CSF pressures compared to the horizontal position, leading to a decrease in cranial CSF pressure when sitting up. Concurrently, the compliance of the spinal compartment decreases while the one of the cranial compartment increases. With this, in upright posture only 10% of the CSF system's compliance is provided by the spinal compartment compared to 35% in horizontal posture. This reduction in spinal compliance is accompanied by a caudal shift of CSF volume. Also, the ability of the spinal CSF compartment to compensate for cerebral arterial volume pulsations reduces in upright posture, which in turn reduces the calculated craniospinal CSF flow pulsations. The mathematical model enabled us to isolate the

  15. [Prevalence of stenosis and thrombosis of central veins in hemodialysis after a tunneled jugular catheter].

    PubMed

    Jean, G; Vanel, T; Chazot, C; Charra, B; Terrat, J C; Hurot, J M

    2001-01-01

    Central venous stenosis (ST) and thrombosis (TB) related to catheter (KT) had been reported mostly for the subclavian vein. We performed a systematic cavographic study to evaluate the prevalence of these complications in 51 hemodialysis patients with present or previous history of tunneled internal jugular catheter. Each of them had used one or several KT (1.8 +/- 1.4 KT) for a mean 28 +/- 26 month cumulative time (i.e. 43,584 days total exposure time). Fifty percent of the KT were PermCath Quinton and 50% were Twincath (uncuffed) or CS 100 (cuffed) Medcomp. Twenty-seven had no ST (53%, group I), 24 had one or several significant ST (47%, group II) of superior Vena Cava (SVC, n = 4), inferior Vena Cava (IVC, n = 1), Brachio-cephalic Vein (BCV, n = 5) and subclavian vein (SC, n = 10), or a TB of SVC (n = 1), IVC (n = 3), BCV (n = 3), SC (n = 2). This accounts for an incidence of 0.55 ST or TB/1000 patient-days. Five of the twelve subclavian ST and TB had no history of previous subclavian catheter. Comparison between the two groups showed no differences according to age, time on dialysis, diabetes, hematocrit, CRP, cumulative time with catheter, catheter-related infections, type of catheter and anticoagulant treatment. IVC catheter tip's position is an important risk factor for TB and ST (4/6). Twelve group II patients had ST or TB-related symptoms, with a functional AV fistula in 9 cases. Eleven patients underwent repeated percutaneous angioplasty with 4 additional Wallstents and in 2 cases an AV fistula need to be closed. Central venous ST and TB after a jugular KT is extremely frequent, mostly without any symptoms. Consequences on peripheral or central vascular access, cost and poor long-term patency rate of angioplasty are of major importance. These results incite us to further reduce the catheter use in dialysis patients.

  16. Accidental arterial puncture during right internal jugular vein cannulation in cardiac surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Maddali, Madan Mohan; Arun, Venkitaramanan; Wala, Al-Ajmi Ahmed; Al-Bahrani, Maher Jaffer; Jayatilaka, Cheskey Manoj; Nishant, Arora Ram

    2016-01-01

    Background: The primary aim of this study was to compare the incidence of accidental arterial puncture during right internal jugular vein (RIJV) cannulation with and without ultrasound guidance (USG). The secondary end points were to assess if USG improves the chances of successful first pass cannulation and if BMI has an impact on incidence of arterial puncture and the number of attempts that are to be made for successful cannulation. Settings and Design: Prospective observational study performed at a single tertiary cardiac care center. Material and methods: 255 consecutive adult and pediatric cardiac surgical patients were included. In Group I (n = 124) USG was used for the right internal jugular vein cannulation and in Group II (n = 81) it was not used. There were 135 adult patients and 70 pediatric patients. Statistical analysis: Demographic and categorical data were analyzed using Student ‘t’ test and chi- square test was used for qualitative variables. Results: The overall incidence of accidental arterial puncture in the entire study population was significantly higher when ultrasound guidance was not used (P < 0.001). In subgroup analysis, incidence of arterial puncture was significant in both adult (P = 0.03) and pediatric patients (P < 0.001) without USG. First attempt cannulation was more often possible in pediatric patients under USG (P = 0.03). In adult patients USG did not improve first attempt cannulation except in underweight patients. Conclusions: USG helped in the avoidance of inadvertent arterial puncture during RIJV cannulation and simultaneously improved the chances of first attempt cannulation in pediatric and in underweight adult cardiac surgical patients. PMID:27716688

  17. Efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein catheterization in low birth weight newborn.

    PubMed

    Montes-Tapia, Fernando; Rodríguez-Taméz, Antonio; Cura-Esquivel, Idalia; Barreto-Arroyo, Itzel; Hernández-Garduño, Adolfo; Rodríguez-Balderrama, Isaías; Quero, José; de la O-Cavazos, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Central venous catheterization is not the first choice of vascular access in neonates. Success depends on the size of the vessel and the skill of the health professional performing the procedure. The internal jugular vein provides a predictable path for central venous cannulation, although it is more difficult to cannulate infants than adults and even more difficult in smaller newborns. We conducted a prospective study in 100 newborns, in which a 4 Fr ultrasound-guided central venous catheter was placed in the right internal jugular vein (RIJV). The study population was low birth weight (LBW) newborns <2500g, very low birth weight (VLBW) newborns <1500g and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) newborns <1000g. There were 53% female patients, mean gestational age was 31weeks, mean weight 1352g and the CVC was placed at a mean of 12days of extrauterine life. Birth weight distribution was 39% LBW; 33% VLBW and 28% ELBW. A mean of two (1-8) attempts were necessary with a procedure duration of 16.8 (10-40) minutes. Success of RIJV catheterization was 94%. One attempt was necessary in 50% and up to 5 attempts in 95.7%. Success by weight was VLBW, 97.2%; ELBW, 92.9%; LBW, 91.7%. A venous hematoma occurred in 5% of cases. Ultrasound-guided RIJV cannulation with real-time visualization to gain access to the central venous circulation in low birth weight newborns is effective and safe. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Renal vein stenting via the right internal jugular approach with a provocative Valsalva maneuver to reduce the risk of stent migration.

    PubMed

    Syed, Mubin I; Yu, Benjamin; Akhter, Talal; Shaikh, Azim

    2011-12-01

    An adult male with nutcracker syndrome was treated successfully by placement of a self-expanding stent in the left renal vein via a right internal jugular vein approach with a provocative Valsalva maneuver. Previous case reports have described renal vein stenting for this condition via common femoral vein approach. However, this study proposes the right internal jugular vein approach as a safer method for the treatment of nutcracker syndrome since the stent can be easily captured along the guidewire if undersized. This technique is based on the realization that the left renal vein diameter may increase by 50% to 58% during the Valsalva maneuver.

  19. Extraordinary cerebral venous drainage pathway with mastoid emissary and posterior external jugular veins detected by contrast-enhanced neck computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bulbul, Erdogan; Yanik, Bahar; Demirpolat, Gulen; Koksal, Vildan

    2015-12-01

    An extraordinary cerebral venous drainage pathway and dilated vein at the left posterior cervical region were detected with routine contrast-enhanced neck computed tomography exam. The left sigmoid sinus was drained by dilated mastoid emissary vein (MEV). The MEV continued as posterior auricular and posterior external jugular veins (PEJVs). The left PEJV directly drained into subclavian vein. Atretic right transverse sinus, left facial vein forming the external jugular vein, atresia and hypoplasia of upper internal jugular veins at the right and left sides, respectively, were the other uncommon findings in our case. Detecting venous variations may prevent complications during surgical and interventional procedures, so the radiologists should examine the superficial cervical veins closely.

  20. Utility of capillary microsampling for rat pharmacokinetic studies: Comparison of tail-vein bleed to jugular vein cannula sampling.

    PubMed

    Korfmacher, Walter; Luo, Yongyi; Ho, Stacy; Sun, Wei; Shen, Liduo; Wang, Jie; Wu, Zhongtao; Guo, Yang; Snow, Gregory; O'Shea, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Serial sampling methods have been used for rat pharmacokinetic (PK) studies for over 20 years. Currently, it is still common to take 200-250 μL of blood at each timepoint when performing a PK study in rats and using serial sampling. While several techniques have been employed for collecting blood samples from rats, there is only limited published data to compare these methods. Recently, microsampling (≤ 50 μL) techniques have been reported as an alternative process for collecting blood samples from rats. In this report, five compounds were dosed orally into rats. For three proprietary compounds, jugular vein cannula (JVC) sampling was used to collect whole blood and plasma samples and capillary microsampling (CMS) was used to collect blood samples from the tail vein of the same animal. For the two other compounds, marketed drugs fluoxetine and glipizide, JVC sampling was used to collect both whole blood and blood CMS samples while tail-vein sampling from the same rats was also used to collect both whole blood and blood CMS samples. For the three proprietary compounds, the blood AUC as well as the blood concentration-time profile that were obtained from the tail vein were different from those obtained via JVC sampling. For fluoxetine, the blood total exposure (AUC) was not statistically different when comparing tail-vein sampling to JVC sampling, however the blood concentration-time profile that was obtained from the tail vein was different than the one obtained from JVC sampling. For glipizide, the blood AUC and concentration-time profile were not statistically different when comparing the tail-vein sampling to the JVC sampling. For both fluoxetine and glipizide, the blood concentration profiles obtained from CMS were equivalent to the blood concentration profiles obtained from the standard whole blood sampling, collected at the same sampling site. The data in this report provide strong evidence that blood CMS is a valuable small volume blood sampling approach

  1. Internal jugular versus subclavian vein catheterization for central venous catheterization in orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Torgay, A; Pirat, A; Candan, S; Zeyneloglu, P; Arslan, G; Haberal, M

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare incidence rates of mechanical and infectious complications associated with central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein (IJV) versus the subclavian vein (SV) among 45 consecutive patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) between January 2000 and June 2004. The subjects were divided into two groups according to the site of central venous catheterization (IJV or SV). We recorded each patient's physical characteristics, international normalized ratio (INR), partial thromboplastin time, platelet levels, number of puncture attempts, success/failure of central venous catheterization, duration of catheter placement, occurrence of catheter tip misplacement, arterial puncture, incidence of hematoma or pneumothorax, catheter-related infection, or bacterial colonization of the catheter. Senior staff anesthesiologists performed 22 SV and 23 IJV catheterizations for the 45 OLT procedures. The SV and IVJ groups both had minor coagulation abnormalities with slightly increased INR values at the time of catheterization. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to success of central venous catheterization (100% for both), numbers of attempted punctures, duration of catheter placement, and incidence rates of mechanical and infectious complications. Both groups showed high frequencies of catheter tip misplacement, with right atrium as the site of misplacement in all cases. Two patients in the IJV group (8.7%) developed hematomas after accidental carotid artery puncture. The results suggest that, when performed by experienced anesthesiologists, central venous catheterization via the SV is an acceptable alternative to IJV catheterization for patients undergoing OLT.

  2. Real-time ultrasound-guided catheterisation of the internal jugular vein: a prospective comparison with the landmark technique in critical care patients

    PubMed Central

    Karakitsos, Dimitrios; Labropoulos, Nicolaos; De Groot, Eric; Patrianakos, Alexandros P; Kouraklis, Gregorios; Poularas, John; Samonis, George; Tsoutsos, Dimosthenis A; Konstadoulakis, Manousos M; Karabinis, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Central venous cannulation is crucial in the management of the critical care patient. This study was designed to evaluate whether real-time ultrasound-guided cannulation of the internal jugular vein is superior to the standard landmark method. Methods In this randomised study, 450 critical care patients who underwent real-time ultrasound-guided cannulation of the internal jugular vein were prospectively compared with 450 critical care patients in whom the landmark technique was used. Randomisation was performed by means of a computer-generated random-numbers table, and patients were stratified with regard to age, gender, and body mass index. Results There were no significant differences in gender, age, body mass index, or side of cannulation (left or right) or in the presence of risk factors for difficult venous cannulation such as prior catheterisation, limited sites for access attempts, previous difficulties during catheterisation, previous mechanical complication, known vascular abnormality, untreated coagulopathy, skeletal deformity, and cannulation during cardiac arrest between the two groups of patients. Furthermore, the physicians who performed the procedures had comparable experience in the placement of central venous catheters (p = non-significant). Cannulation of the internal jugular vein was achieved in all patients by using ultrasound and in 425 of the patients (94.4%) by using the landmark technique (p < 0.001). Average access time (skin to vein) and number of attempts were significantly reduced in the ultrasound group of patients compared with the landmark group (p < 0.001). In the landmark group, puncture of the carotid artery occurred in 10.6% of patients, haematoma in 8.4%, haemothorax in 1.7%, pneumothorax in 2.4%, and central venous catheter-associated blood stream infection in 16%, which were all significantly increased compared with the ultrasound group (p < 0.001). Conclusion The present data suggest that ultrasound

  3. Ultrasound Identification of the Guidewire in the Brachiocephalic Vein for the Prevention of Inadvertent Arterial Catheterization During Internal Jugular Central Venous Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Bowdle, Andrew; Jelacic, Srdjan; Togashi, Kei; Ferreira, Renata

    2016-10-01

    Imaging the guidewire with ultrasonography in the internal jugular vein during central venous catheterization often is used to verify proper guidewire placement and to aid in prevention of inadvertent arterial catheterization. It is known, however, that inadvertent arterial catheterization can occur despite imaging the guidewire in the internal jugular vein because the guidewire may continue through the far wall of the internal jugular vein and into an adjacent artery. We propose confirmation of the guidewire in the brachiocephalic vein with ultrasonography as a more reliable method of confirming proper guidewire placement. A prospective feasibility study of 200 adult cardiothoracic surgery patients undergoing internal jugular vein catheterization was performed to determine whether the guidewire could be imaged with ultrasonography in the brachiocephalic vein. The guidewire was imaged in the internal jugular vein in a short-axis view, and the transducer was then angled caudally under the clavicle, following the guidewire into the brachiocephalic vein. The right internal jugular vein was catheterized in 193 patients and the left internal jugular in 7 patients. The brachiocephalic vein was successfully imaged in all but 2 patients. In 3 patients, the guidewire could not be clearly identified in the brachiocephalic vein because of interference from the leads of a heart rhythm device (pacemaker or defibrillator) or preexisting catheter. In 2 patients, the guidewire was not seen initially in the brachiocephalic vein because of coiling in the internal jugular vein, and in 1 patient because of the guidewire passing into the right subclavian vein, but all 3 were subsequently imaged in the brachiocephalic vein after repositioning. During internal jugular vein catheterization, the brachiocephalic vein was imaged with ultrasonography in 99% of patients (the lower 1-sided 99% confidence limit is 96%). The guidewire was imaged in the brachiocephalic vein in all cases except

  4. Measurement of Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow Dynamics Using Phase Contrast MR Imaging with Bilateral Jugular Vein Compression: A Feasibility Study in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Shintaro; Motosugi, Utaroh; Okumura, Akihiro; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2017-08-16

    We measured the changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics after compression of the bilateral jugular veins using phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). PC-MRI was performed in 10 healthy male volunteers using a 3T clinical scanner with a two-dimensional gradient echo sequence. We successfully measured the changes in CSF flow velocity using PC-MRI with and without compression of the bilateral jugular veins. The relative velocity range decreased by about 30% when the bilateral jugular veins were compressed.

  5. Catheter venography for the assessment of internal jugular veins and azygous vein: position statement by expert panel of the International Society for Neurovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Simka, Marian; Hubbard, David; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Dake, Michael D; Sclafani, Salvatore J A; Al-Omari, Mamoon; Eisele, Carlos G; Haskal, Ziv J; Ludyga, Tomasz; Miloševič, Zoran V; Sievert, Horst; Stehling, Michael K; Zapf, Stefan; Zorc, Marjeta

    2013-05-01

    This document by an expert panel of the International Society for Neurovascular Disease is aimed at presenting current technique and interpretation of catheter venography of the internal jugular veins, azygous vein and other veins draining the central nervous system. Although interventionalists agree on general rules, significant differences exist in terms of details of venographic technique and interpretations of angiographic pictures. It is also suggested that debatable findings should be investigated using multimodal diagnostics. Finally, the authors recommend that any publication on chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency should include detailed description of venographic technique used, to facilitate a comparison of published results in this area.

  6. Ultrasonographic finding of internal jugular vein during anti-G straining maneuver: is it associated with gravity-induced loss of consciousness?

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Seok; Sul, Jin Gon; Yi, Kyung Sik; Seo, Jeong-Min; Chung, Ki Young

    2010-07-01

    Gravity-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) is caused by loss of cerebral blood flow during high +Gz (head-to-foot inertial forces). The resistance of the jugular vein is a significant factor in decrease in cerebral blood flow. Ultrasonography of thoracic inlet veins, including internal jugular vein, is feasible to visualize the internal jugular vein and hemodynamic information. Anti-gravity straining maneuver (AGSM) was widely recognized as one of the important factors in preventing G-LOC. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the ultrasonographic shape and size of internal jugular vein during AGSM and G-LOC. 47 trainee pilots who participated in human centrifuge education program were enrolled. They were all men, and their mean age was 23.9 +/- 1.38 years. Questionnaire sheets were used to collect information about well-being sensation, smoking, drinking, height, and weight. Using ultrasonography, we monitored shape and size of internal jugular vein during AGSM. After ultrasonographic examination, 47 subjects underwent human centrifuge on the same day. The protocol of human centrifuge training was maximal 6G with sustaining time of 30 s. G-LOC occurred to ten out of 47 subjects in human centrifuge. To find presumptive variable associated with G-LOC, we performed logistic regression analysis. Concave contour and smaller cross-sectional area of internal jugular vein during AGSM were associated with G-LOC.

  7. [Two Cases of Retained Guide Wires after Placement of a Central Venous Catheter via the Internal Jugular Vein].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Masumori, Yasushi; Tanigawa, Saori; Miyakawa, Hidetoshi; Sakamoto, Miki; Tateda, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    We report two cases of a retained guide wire after perioperative placement of a central venous catheter during a six-month period. Case 1: A 73-year-old male was scheduled for an open cholecystectomy and hepatectomy. After induction of anesthesia, a central venous (CV) catheter was inserted via the right internal jugular vein using an ultrasound guide. Chest radiographs showed a retained guide wire in the inferior vena cava immediately after surgery, which was removed by interventional radiologist before the patient emerged from anesthesia. Case 2: A 77-year-old male was scheduled for colostomy closure. The surgeon inserted a CV catheter in the right internal jugular vein 4 days before the colostomy. Chest radiographs revealed a retained guide wire in the inferior vena cava, which was removed by interventional radiologists before the patient emerged from anesthesia. Although a retained guide wire is a rare complication, awareness of this mishap is necessary to prevent it from happening.

  8. The Potentiality for Development of Multiple Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas after Ligation of the Internal Jugular Vein: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fudaba, Hirotaka; Kubo, Takeshi; Goda, Makoto; Sugita, Kenji; Morishige, Masaki; Onishi, Kouhei; Ishii, Keisuke; Anan, Mitsuhiro; Nagai, Yasuyuki; Fujiki, Minoru

    2017-01-01

    A 74-year-old male presented with an intracranial hemorrhage caused by multiple dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) in the left transverse sinus and right sigmoid sinus. Four months previously, the patient underwent tongue cancer removal with lymph node dissection and ligation of the right internal jugular vein. Endovascular embolization (transvenous and transarterial embolization) resulted in the complete disappearance of the fistulas. Follow-up angiography revealed new arteriovenous shunts at the superior sagittal sinus and right transverse sinus, and we treated the patient with staged transarterial embolization. Finally, venous congestion almost completely resolved and the DAVFs disappeared without any sign of recurrence. This case speculates the concept of DAVF as an acquired lesion caused by intravenous hypertension and alerts clinicians to take precautions against ligation of the internal jugular vein during a cervical operation. PMID:28840082

  9. Constitutive modeling of jugular vein-derived venous valve leaflet tissues.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Nayyan; Huang, Hsiao-Ying Shadow

    2017-11-01

    Venous valve tissues, though used in vein reconstruction surgeries and bioprosthetic valves with moderate success, have not been extensively studied with respect to their structure. Their inherent anisotropic, non-linear behavior combined with severe diseases which affect veins, such as chronic venous insufficiency, warrant understanding the structure and material behavior of these tissues. Hence, before any bioprosthetic grafts may be used in place of tissues, it is of the utmost importance to understand the mechanical and structural properties of these tissues as this may lead to higher success rates for valve replacement surgeries. The longevity of the bioprosthetics may also increase if the manufactured grafts behave the same as native valves. Building on the scant information about the uniaxial and biaxial mechanical properties of jugular venous valves and wall tissues from previous studies, the current focus of our investigation lies in understanding the material behavior by establishing a phenomenological strain energy-based constitutive relation for the tissues. We used bovine veins to study the behavior of valve leaflet tissue and adjoining wall tissue (from the proximal and distal ends of the veins) under different biaxial testing protocols. We looked at the behavior of numerical partial derivatives of the strain energy to select a suitable functional form for the strain energy for wall and valve tissues. Using this strain energy descriptor, we determined the Cauchy stress and compared it with experimental results under additional sets of displacement-controlled biaxial testing protocols to find material specific model parameters by the Powell's method algorithm. Results show that whereas wall tissue strain energy can be explained using a polynomial non-linear function, the valve tissue, due to higher non-linearities, requires an exponential function. This study may provide useful information for the primary stages of bioprosthetic designs and replacement

  10. Puncture point-traction method: A novel method applied for right internal jugular vein catheterization

    PubMed Central

    WU, TIANLIANG; ZANG, HONGCHENG

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasound probe and advancement of the needle during real-time ultrasound-assisted guidance of catheterization of the right internal jugular vein (RIJV) tend to collapse the vein, which reduces the success rate of the procedure. We have developed a novel puncture point-traction method (PPTM) to facilitate RIJV cannulation. The present study examined whether this method facilitated the performance of RIJV catheterization in anesthetized patients. In this study, 120 patients were randomly assigned to a group in which PPTM was performed (PPTM group, n=60) or a group in which it was not performed (non-PPTM group, n=60). One patient was excluded because of internal carotid artery puncture and 119 patients remained for analysis. The cross-sectional area (CSA), anteroposterior diameter (AD) and transverse diameter (TD) of the RIJV at the cricoid cartilage level following the induction of anesthesia and during catheterization were measured, and the number with obvious loss of resistance (NOLR), the number with easy aspiration of blood into syringe (NEABS) during advancement of the needle, and the number of first-pass punctures (NFPP) during catheterization were determined. In the non-PPTM group, the CSA was smaller during catheterization compared with that following the induction of anesthesia (P<0.01). In the PPTM group compared with the non-PPTM group during catheterization, the CSA was larger (P<0.01) and the AD (P<0.01) and TD (P<0.05) were wider; NOLR (P<0.01), NEABS (P<0.01) and NFPP (P<0.01) increased significantly. The findings from this study confirmed that the PPTM facilitated catheterization of the RIJV and improved the success rate of RIJV catheterization in anesthetized patients in the supine position. PMID:27347054

  11. Adult Mouse Venous Hypertension Model: Common Carotid Artery to External Jugular Vein Anastomosis.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shun-Tai; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Ana; Walker, Espen J.; Young, William L.; Su, Hua; Lawton, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the pathophysiology of brain arteriovenous malformations and arteriovenous fistulas has improved thanks to animal models. A rat model creating an artificial fistula between the common carotid artery (CCA) and the external jugular vein (EJV) has been widely described and proved technically feasible. This construct provokes a consistent cerebral venous hypertension (CVH), and therefore has helped studying the contribution of venous hypertension to formation, clinical symptoms, and prognosis of brain AVMs and dural AVFs. Equivalent mice models have been only scarcely described and have shown trouble with stenosis of the fistula. An established murine model would allow the study of not only pathophysiology but also potential genetic therapies for these cerebrovascular diseases. We present a model of arteriovenous fistula that produces a durable intracranial venous hypertension in the mouse. Microsurgical anastomosis of the murine CCA and EJV can be difficult due to diminutive anatomy and frequently result in a non-patent fistula. In this step-by-step protocol we address all the important challenges encountered during this procedure. Avoiding excessive retraction of the vein during the exposure, using 11-0 sutures instead of 10-0, and making a carefully planned end-to-side anastomosis are some of the critical steps. Although this method requires advanced microsurgical skills and a longer learning curve that the equivalent in the rat, it can be consistently developed. This novel model has been designed to integrate transgenic mouse techniques with a previously well-established experimental system that has proved useful to study brain AVMs and dural AVFs. By opening the possibility of using transgenic mice, a broader spectrum of valid models can be achieved and genetic treatments can also be tested. The experimental construct could also be further adapted to the study of other cerebrovascular diseases related with venous hypertension such as migraine

  12. Cardiac Variation of Internal Jugular Vein for the Evaluation of Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kensuke; Qian, Kun; Ando, Takehiro; Inokuchi, Ryota; Doi, Kent; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakuma, Ichiro; Nakajima, Susumu; Yahagi, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    Evaluations of intravascular fluid volume are considered to be one of the most important assessments in emergency and intensive care. Focusing on pulse-induced variation of the internal jugular vein (IJV) area, i.e., cardiac variation, we investigated its correlation with various hemodynamic indices using newly developed software. Software that automatically can track and analyze the IJV during ultrasonography was developed. Eleven healthy patients were subjected to an exercise load to increase their stroke volume (SV) and a dehydration load to decrease their central venous pressure (CVP). The cardiac variation in the area of the IJV, CVP, the SV and the respiratory variation in the inferior vena cava (IVC) were evaluated. The exercise protocol increased the patients' mean SV by 14.5 ± 3.7 mL, and the dehydration protocol caused their mean CVP to fall by 3.75 ± 0.33 cm H2O, which resulted in the collapse index (max IJV area - min IJV area/max IJV area) changing from 0.32 ± 0.04 to 0.44 ± 0.06 and 0.49 ± 0.04, respectively (p < 0.05). The SV exhibited a strong positive correlation with the collapse index (r = 0.59, p = 0.006), and CVP showed a strong positive correlation with the body height-adjusted mean area of the IJV (r = 0.72, p < 0.001). Cardiac variation in the area of the great veins is considered to be induced by venous return to the right atrium under negative pressure. It is possible that intravascular dehydration can be detected and hemodynamic indices, such as CVP and SV, can be estimated by evaluating cardiac variation in the area of the IJV.

  13. Plasma-mediated potentiation in prostanoid-induced contractions in isolated canine external jugular veins.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tatsuhiko; Ikomi, Fumitaka; Ohhashi, Toshio

    2002-10-01

    We examined the effects of plasma on contractile responses of isolated dog external jugular veins to a thromboxane A(2) analog, U46619, and noradrenaline. Pretreatment with 1.0% plasma in Krebs-bicarbonate solution, but not 0.1%, caused a significant left and upward shift in the concentration-contractile response curve for U46619. The plasma-mediated potentiation of the response to U46619 was found in the venous segments without intact endothelium. The administration of 2x10(-5) M lysophosphatidylcholine in Krebs-bicarbonate solution with no plasma also produced a significant left and upward shift of the concentration-contractile response curve for U46619, the shift being quite similar to that obtained with 1.0% plasma. In contrast, pretreatment with 1.0% plasma or 2x10(-5) M lysophosphatidylcholine produced no significant effect on the noradrenaline-mediated contractions in the venous segments. Pretreatment with 10(-4) M L-ascorbate or 0.1 mg/ml alpha-tocopherol in the presence of 1.0% plasma caused a significant reduction in the plasma-mediated potentiation of the contractile responses to U46619. These findings suggest that lysophosphatidylcholine, a major phospholipid component of oxidized low-density lipoproteins, may contribute, in part, to the plasma-mediated potentiation of contractile responses of the isolated veins to U46619, and that the antioxidant vitamin, L-ascorbate, or alpha-tocopherol significantly reduces the plasma-mediated potentiation of the contractile responses to U46619, which may be related to inhibiting the production of lysophosphatidylcholine in plasma.

  14. A randomized crossover study comparing a novel needle guidance technology for simulated internal jugular vein cannulation.

    PubMed

    Auyong, David B; Yuan, Stanley C; Rymer, Alyse N; Green, Cynthia L; Hanson, Neil A

    2015-09-01

    Despite ultrasound guidance for central line placement, complications persist, as exact needle location is often difficult to confirm with standard two-dimension ultrasound. A novel real-time needle guidance technology has recently become available (eZono, Germany) that tracks the needle during insertion. This randomized, blinded, crossover study examined whether this needle guidance technology improved cannulation of a simulated internal jugular (IJ) vein in an ultrasound phantom. One hundred physicians were randomized to place a standard needle in an ultrasound neck phantom with or without the needle guidance system. Video cameras were placed externally and within the lumens of the vessels to record needle location in real time. The primary outcome measured was the rate of posterior wall puncture. Secondary outcomes included number of carotid artery punctures, number of needle passes, final needle position, time to cannulation, and comfort level with this new technology. The incidence of posterior vessel wall puncture without and with needle guidance was 49 and 13%, respectively (P < 0.001, odds ratio [OR] = 7.33 [3.44 to 15.61]). The rate of carotid artery puncture was higher without needle navigation technology than with needle navigation 21 versus 2%, respectively (P = 0.001, OR = 12.97 [2.89 to 58.18]). Final needle tip position being located within the lumen of the IJ was 97% accurate with the navigation technology and 76% accurate with standard ultrasound (P < 0.001, OR = 10.42 [2.76 to 40.0]). Average time for successful vessel cannulation was 1.37 times longer without guidance technology. This real-time needle guidance technology (eZono) shows significant improvement in needle accuracy and cannulation time during simulated IJ vein puncture.

  15. Fracture and migration into the coronary sinus of a totally implantable catheter introduced via the right internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Pignataro, Bruno Soriano; Nishinari, Kenji; Wolosker, Nelson; Bomfim, Guilherme Andre Zoteli

    2014-12-01

    There has been an increase in the use of totally implantable devices. Catheter fractures are rare but known complications. This case report presents a rare migration site of the catheter fragment into the coronary sinus. The totally implantable catheter was introduced into the right internal jugular vein to deliver chemotherapy. Although it was an unusual site, the catheter fragment was removed without complications using loop-snare technique. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Covered stents for exclusion of iatrogenic common carotid artery–internal jugular vein fistula and brachiocephalic artery pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kooraki, Soheil; Grohmann, Jochen; Elshikh, Samer; Urbach, Horst; Meckel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Covered stents have rarely been used in neuroendovascular procedures. We report the case of a 74-year-old woman with a complex iatrogenic vascular injury from attempted insertion of a hemodialysis catheter: concurrent brachiocephalic artery pseudoaneurysm and common carotid artery to internal jugular vein fistula. Both lesions were excluded successfully by using two balloon-expandable covered stents with a satisfactory short-term clinical and angiographic outcome. PMID:26106173

  17. Assessment of Internal Jugular Vein Size in Healthy Subjects with Magnetic Resonance and Semiautomatic Processing

    PubMed Central

    Pelizzari, L.; Scaccianoce, E.; Dipasquale, O.; Ricci, C.; Baglio, F.; Cecconi, P.; Baselli, G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The hypothesized link between extracranial venous abnormalities and some neurological disorders awoke interest in the investigation of the internal jugular veins (IJVs). However, different IJV cross-sectional area (CSA) values are currently reported in literature. In this study, we introduced a semiautomatic method to measure and normalize the CSA and the degree of circularity (Circ) of IJVs along their whole length. Methods. Thirty-six healthy subjects (31.22 ± 9.29 years) were recruited and the 2D time-of-flight magnetic resonance venography was acquired with a 1.5 T Siemens scanner. The IJV were segmented on an axial slice, the contours were propagated in 3D. Then, IJV CSA and Circ were computed between the first and the seventh cervical levels (C1–C7) and normalized among subjects. Inter- and intrarater repeatability were assessed. Results. IJV CSA and Circ were significantly different among cervical levels (p < 0.001). A trend for side difference was observed for CSA (larger right IJV, p = 0.06), but not for Circ (p = 0.5). Excellent inter- and intrarater repeatability was obtained for all the measures. Conclusion. This study proposed a reliable semiautomatic method able to measure the IJV area and shape along C1–C7, and suitable for defining the normality thresholds for future clinical studies. PMID:27034585

  18. Assessment of Internal Jugular Vein Size in Healthy Subjects with Magnetic Resonance and Semiautomatic Processing.

    PubMed

    Laganà, M M; Pelizzari, L; Scaccianoce, E; Dipasquale, O; Ricci, C; Baglio, F; Cecconi, P; Baselli, G

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The hypothesized link between extracranial venous abnormalities and some neurological disorders awoke interest in the investigation of the internal jugular veins (IJVs). However, different IJV cross-sectional area (CSA) values are currently reported in literature. In this study, we introduced a semiautomatic method to measure and normalize the CSA and the degree of circularity (Circ) of IJVs along their whole length. Methods. Thirty-six healthy subjects (31.22 ± 9.29 years) were recruited and the 2D time-of-flight magnetic resonance venography was acquired with a 1.5 T Siemens scanner. The IJV were segmented on an axial slice, the contours were propagated in 3D. Then, IJV CSA and Circ were computed between the first and the seventh cervical levels (C1-C7) and normalized among subjects. Inter- and intrarater repeatability were assessed. Results. IJV CSA and Circ were significantly different among cervical levels (p < 0.001). A trend for side difference was observed for CSA (larger right IJV, p = 0.06), but not for Circ (p = 0.5). Excellent inter- and intrarater repeatability was obtained for all the measures. Conclusion. This study proposed a reliable semiautomatic method able to measure the IJV area and shape along C1-C7, and suitable for defining the normality thresholds for future clinical studies.

  19. Physical stress testing of bovine jugular veins using magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography and electrical velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Boethig, Dietmar; Ernst, Franziska; Sarikouch, Samir; Norozi, Kambiz; Lotz, Joachim; Opherk, Jan Patrick; Meister, Maren; Breymann, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Bovine jugular veins (BJVs) (Contegra) are valve-bearing pulmonary artery substitutes. Their valves have higher profiles than human pulmonary valves; this might result in less optimal performance. Therefore, we investigated the impact of stress and undersizing on conduit performance with ergometry, echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Between April 2007 and June 2008, 20 BJV recipients (age 7.9-19.6 years) underwent spiroergometry and subsequent echocardiography; after due rest, ergometry was repeated and followed by MRI during recovery. A year later, exams were repeated. Data was evaluated as follows: comparison of stress related maximal individual valve performance changes (magnetic resonance: exercise induced average stroke volume changes by 61+/-49%; mean insufficiency increased by 2% in patients with <1% rest insufficiency and by 8% after rest insufficiency of >10%; the average rest gradient of 24+/-11 mmHg rose to 40+/-20 mmHg), and stratification of pooled observations by regurgitation fraction, insufficiency grades and z-values (insufficiency rose with increasing heart rate and decreasing stroke volume; undersizing increased gradients during recovery by 7+/-0.7 mmHg/z-value). Contegras high-profile valves tolerate stress without performance drop. Stress induced changes of insufficiency and gradient were clinically not significant, but sufficient to distort examination results; therefore, constant examination conditions are indispensable for a correct follow-up.

  20. Right Internal Jugular Vein Cannulation: Carotid Artery-directed versus Sternocleidomastoid-directed Methods.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhao-Yan; Yuan, Ping; Pan, Yang; Zhang, Zhong-Min

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore a simple and safe method for central venous catheterization (CVC) from the right internal jugular vein (RIJV) by comparing carotid artery (CA) positioning with sternocleidomastoid (SCM) positioning. The medical records of patients who underwent CVC between January 2011 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Central venous catheters were inserted into the RIJV either above the level of the cricoid cartilage using the CA-directed method (419 patients, Group 1) or below the level of the cricoid cartilage using the SCM-directed method (436 patients, Group 2). Success rate and related complications of catheterization were evaluated in the two groups. The total success rate of RIJV cannulation in Group 1 (97.2%) was higher than that in Group 2 (94.5%). Moreover, the success rate at first attempt was significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (92.4% vs 86.9%). The incidence of hematoma was 1.6 per cent in Group 1 and 3.8 per cent in Group 2. The rate of other complications such as pneumothorax, catheter-related infections, and catheter occlusion did not significantly differ between the groups. In conclusions, CA-directed RIJV cannulation is more effective and simple to perform than the SCM-directed method, and should become the preferred CVC technique in the absence of ultrasound guidance.

  1. Acute jugular vein thrombosis during rituximab administration: Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dada, Reyad; Zekri, Jamal; Ramal, Bilal; Ahmad, Kamel

    2016-02-01

    Rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody is licensed for the treatment of CD20 positive lymphomas. Previous studies have found rituximab, in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy, is superior to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone alone in the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and many other B-cell lymphomas. Acute hypersensitivity reactions have been reported in patients receiving rituximab infusion and usually manifesting as headache, fever, chills, sweats, skin rash, dyspnea, mild hypotension, and nausea. Acute major venous thrombosis and seizures have not been reported as manifestation of acute hypersensitivity reaction. We report on a 22-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with stage III B CD20 positive B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. During the first cycle of treatment, she developed grand-mal seizure while receiving rituximab infusion without any other features of acute hypersensitivity reaction. Imaging confirmed new onset jugular vein thrombosis with normal coagulation parameters. These events were managed by anticonvulsants and anticoagulation therapy. The patient completed eight cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone without rituximab and achieved complete remission. No further complications were noted. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature describing grand-mal seizures and acute thrombosis while on rituximab treatment. Clinicians should be aware of this rare side effect, as stopping rituximab can prevent recurrence of these complications.

  2. Placement of long-term hemodialysis catheter (permcath) in patients with end-stage renal disease through external jugular vein

    PubMed Central

    Beigi, Ali Akbar; Sharifi, Ali; Gaheri, Hafez; Abdollahi, Saeed; Esfahani, Morteza Abdar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The number of patients with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) has progressively increased in the population. Kidney transplantation is the specific treatment for such patients; however a majority of patients will require hemodialysis before kidney transplantation. The present study aims to investigate using the external jugular vein (EJV) for Permcath placement in these patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive and analytical study was conducted in Alzahra Medical Center, Isfahan, in 2012. Catheters were inserted by cutting down the right EJV. The patency rate and potential complications were studied. The obtained data was analyzed using SPSS 21.0. Results: Out of 45 live patients, within three months of surgery, 40 patients (81.6%) had no complications and dialysis continued through Permcath. Permcath Thrombosis occurred in two patients (4.4%). Catheter infection led to the removal of it in one patient (2.2%) 1.5 months after surgery. And accidental catheter removal occurred in one patient. Conclusion: Placement of the permcath in the external jugular vein can be a safe, uncomplicated, and reliable method for patients requiring hemodialysis, and can be a life-saving alternative in patients without accessible internal jugular vein. PMID:25590030

  3. Case report: central venous catheterization via internal jugular vein with associated formation of perioperative venous thrombosis during surgery in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Minami, Kimito; Mimami, Kimito; Iida, Miki; Iida, Hiroki

    2012-06-01

    An unusual case of central venous catheter (CVC)-related thrombosis during supine surgery in the prone position is presented. A 76-year-old woman was scheduled for elective surgery to repair a broken lumbar instrument. A single-lumen CVC was inserted via the right internal jugular vein. Surgery was performed in the prone position, with the patient's face directed downward in the standard median position (i.e., no rotation), but with slight forward flexion at the neck. After the surgery, the external jugular vein was dilated, and a postoperative X-ray revealed an infiltrative shadow in the right thoracic cavity. Because cervical echography showed dilated cervical veins with a "moyamoya-type" echo, possibly indicating a thrombus, contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed, revealing a venous thrombus in the right internal jugular vein. An internal jugular venous-velocity measurement suggested that her slightly flexed neck position and her prone position during surgery may have kinked the internal jugular vein, causing engorgement with venous blood. The presence of the internal jugular venous catheter may have created thrombogenic conditions. A patient's position during surgery can reduce deep venous-flow velocity, and venous blood may stagnate, contributing greatly to thrombogenicity. We should consider a patient's position during surgery as a risk factor for thrombus formation, and a careful preoperative evaluation should be made as to which route should be chosen for CVC.

  4. Internal Jugular Vein Cross-Sectional Area Enlargement Is Associated with Aging in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Magnano, Christopher; Belov, Pavel; Krawiecki, Jacqueline; Hagemeier, Jesper; Beggs, Clive; Zivadinov, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Internal jugular vein (IJV) narrowing has been implicated in central nervous system pathologies, however normal physiological age- and gender-related IJV variance in healthy individuals (HIs) has not been adequately assessed. Objectives We assessed the relationship between IJV cross-sectional area (CSA) and aging. Materials and Methods This study involved 193 HIs (63 males and 130 females) who received 2-dimensional magnetic resonance venography at 3T. The minimum CSA of the IJVs at cervical levels C2/C3, C4, C5/C6, and C7/T1 was obtained using a semi-automated contouring-thresholding technique. Subjects were grouped by decade. Pearson and partial correlation (controlled for cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, heart disease, smoking and body mass index) and analysis of variance analyses were used, with paired t-tests comparing side differences. Results Mean right IJV CSA ranges were: in males, 41.6 mm2 (C2/C3) to 82.0 mm2 (C7/T1); in females, 38.0 mm2 (C2/C3) to 62.3 mm2 (C7/T1), while the equivalent left side ranges were: in males, 28.0 mm2 (C2/C3) to 52.2 mm2 (C7/T1); in females, 27.2 mm2 (C2/C3) to 47.8 mm2 (C7/T1). The CSA of the right IJVs was significantly larger (p<0.001) than the left at all cervical levels. Controlling for cardiovascular risk factors, the correlation between age and IJV CSA was more robust in males than in the females for all cervical levels. Conclusions In HIs age, gender, hand side and cervical location all affect IJV CSA. These findings suggest that any definition of IJV stenosis needs to account for these factors. PMID:26895434

  5. Head rotation during internal jugular vein cannulation and the risk of carotid artery puncture.

    PubMed

    Sulek, C A; Gravenstein, N; Blackshear, R H; Weiss, L

    1996-01-01

    We undertook a prospective laboratory study to examine the effect of head position on the relative positions of the carotid artery and the internal jugular vein (IJV). Volunteers (n = 12) from departmental staff, 18-60 yr of age, who had never undergone cannulation of the IJV underwent imaging of their IJV and carotid artery. With the subject in a 15 degrees Trendelenburg position, two-dimensional ultrasound images of the IJV and the carotid artery were obtained on the left and right sides of the neck at 2 and 4 cm from the clavicle along the lateral border of the sternal head of the sternocleidomastoid muscle at 0 degrees, 40 degrees, and 80 degrees of head rotation from the midline. The percent overlap of the carotid artery and IJV increased significantly at 40 degrees and 80 degrees head rotation to both the right and left (P < 0.05). Data from 2 and 4 cm above the clavicle did not differ and were pooled. The percent overlap was larger on the left than the right only with 80 degrees of head rotation (P < 0.05). The increased overlap of carotid artery and IJV with head rotation > 40 degrees increases the risk of inadvertent puncture of the carotid artery associated with the common occurrence of transfixion of the IJV before it is identified during needle withdrawal. The IJV frequently collapses with needle insertion. This may result in puncture of the posterior wall of the vessel, and thus of the carotid artery when the two vessels overlap. To decrease this risk, the head should be kept in as neutral a position as possible, that is < 40 degrees rotation, during IJV cannulation.

  6. Characteristics of the actions by which 5-hydroxytryptamine affects electrical and mechanical activities in rabbit jugular vein graft

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Takashi; Komori, Kimihiro; Kajikuri, Junko; Itoh, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The vasomodulating actions of 5-HT in vein grafts, and the underlying mechanisms, remain to be fully clarified. Here, we characterized the actions by which 5-HT affects electrical and mechanical activities in rabbit autologous jugular vein grafts. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Smooth muscle cell (SMC) membrane potential and isometric tension were measured in vein grafts 4 weeks after implantation into carotid arteries. Changes in the expression of 5-HT receptor subtypes and in myosin heavy chain isoforms (SM1, SM2 and SMemb) were examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. KEY RESULTS The walls of grafted veins displayed massive increases in the number of SM1- and SM2-positive SMCs. 5-HT induced a large depolarization and contraction that were each reduced by both 5-HT2A- and 5-HT1B/1D-receptor antagonists. The 5-HT-induced contraction was not modified by a 5-HT7-receptor antagonist. The 5-HT7-receptor-selective agonist AS 19 did not induce relaxation during the contraction to prostaglandin F2α. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses revealed that immunoreactive responses against 5-HT2A and 5-HT1B/1D receptors were increased in the vein graft. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS 5-HT is able to induce a large contraction in rabbit autologous jugular vein grafts through (i) an increased number of differentiated contractile SMCs; (ii) an increased number of SMCs expressing contractile 5-HT2A- and 5-HT1B/1D receptors; and (iii) a down-regulation of the function of the relaxant SMC 5-HT7 receptors. These changes in the vein graft may help it to resist the higher pressure present on the arterial side of the circulation. PMID:22251164

  7. Effect of the thigh-cuffs on the carotid artery diameter jugular vein section and facial skin edema: HDT study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roumy, Jerome; Diridillou, Stephane; Herault, Stephane; Fomina, Galina; Alferova, Irina; Arbeille, Philippe

    2001-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate the distal arterial, venous and skin changes in a group using thigh cuffs during daytime and in a control group. Method: Cardiac, arterial, venous parameters were measured by echography and Doppler. Skin thickness was measured by high frequency echography. Results & discussion: Head down position induced plasma volume reduction, increased cerebral resistance, reduced lower limb resistance. The jugular vein increased whereas the femoral and popliteal veins decreased. All these changes were already observed in previous HDT. Common carotid diameter decreased, Front head skin thickness increased and Tibial skin thickness decreased. Eight hours with thigh cuffs increased the cardiac and carotid sizes which is in agreement with the plasma volume increase. Conversely they reduced the cerebral vascular resistance, jugular section and front head edema which may explain the sensation of comfort reported by the subjects. At the lower limb level the thigh cuffs restored the skin thickness to pre-HDT level but enlarged markedly the femoral and popliteal veins. HR, BP, CO, TPR did not change.

  8. Bilateral surgical reconstruction for internal jugular veins disease in patients with chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency and associated multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Salvatore; Scalise, Filippo; Barbato, Luciano; Grasso, Maria Antonietta; Tesler, Ugo F

    2014-10-01

    Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a vascular condition characterized by morphologic alterations involving efferent cerebral vascular paths. CCSVI has been implicated as a contributing factor to multiple sclerosis (MS) but this theory is highly controversial. We report 3 cases of CCSVI patients with MS who had undergone internal jugular veins (IJVs) angioplasty to restore vessels patency. All patients reported significant symptomatic improvement after angioplasty until symptoms recurred after restenosis of the treated IJVs. Surgical IJVs reconstruction was performed. Patients' symptoms gradually improved and the benefits were maintained at the 1-year follow-up.

  9. Collapsed Jugular Vein and abnormal cerebral blood flow changes in patients of Panic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Yu-Chien; Chung, Chih-Ping; Hsu, Hung-Yi; Cheng, Chun-Yu; Chao, A-Ching; Sheng, Wen-Yung; Hu, Han-Hwa; Hong, Chen-Jee; Wu, Jaw-Ching

    2014-11-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is characterized by panic attacks accompanied with respiratory symptoms. Internal jugular vein (IJV) alters its hemodynamics in response to respiration and which might cause cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes. In the present study, we compared (1) respiratory-related IJV hemodynamics and (2) CBF changes during Valsalva maneuver (VM) between PD and normal subjects. 42 PD patients and age/gender-matched controls (14 men; 52.3 ± 11.4 years) were recruited. Duplex ultrasonography measured time-averaged mean velocity (TAMV) and lumen in IJV at baseline and deep inspiration. Lumen area <0.10 cm(2) at deep inspiration was defined as IJV collapse. CBF changes during VM were recorded by transcranial Doppler (TCD). Compared with normal group, PD patients had significantly higher frequency of IJV collapse at deep inspiration (Left: 40.0% vs. 7.0%, p = 0.0003, Right: 17.0% vs. 0%, p = 0.0119). IJV collapse was associated with symptoms of respiratory subtype in our PD patients. PD group also had smaller lumen (Left: 0.53 ± 0.29 vs. 0.55 ± 0.26 cm(2), p = 0.8296, Right: 0.63 ± 0.36 vs. 0.93 ± 0.45 cm(2), p = 0.0014) and slower TAMV of IJV at baseline (Left: 11.8 ± 8.43 vs. 20.6 ± 16.5 cm/s, p = 0.0003, Right: 15.9 ± 9.19 vs. 24.1 ± 15.7 cm/s, p = 0.0062). PD patients with inspiration-induced IJV collapse had more decreased CBF during VM compared with the other PD patients and normal individuals respectively. We are the first to show that PD have less IJV flow at baseline and more frequent collapse at deep inspiration. Inspiration-induced IJV collapsed was associated with CBF decrement during VM in PD patients. These results suggest that venous drainage impairment might play a role in the pathophysiology of PD by influencing CBF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lemierre syndrome variant: Staphylococcus aureus associated with thrombosis of both the right internal jugular vein and the splenic vein after the exploration of a river cave.

    PubMed

    Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan; Diri, Banu; Oguzkurt, Levent; Asma, Suheyl; Yeral, Mahmut

    2007-04-01

    Lemierre syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal entity characterized by septic emboli from thrombosis of the internal jugular vein after oropharyngeal infection. The etiologic agent is not always an anaerobic bacterium. We report a patient with a Lemierre syndrome variant who presented with thrombosis of both the right internal jugular vein and the splenic vein as well as septic pulmonary emboli caused by Staphylococcus aureus, which proved resistant to methicillin, amoxicillin, and ciprofloxacin. The patient was thought to have acquired the infection during the exploration of a river cave in Turkey 10 days before his admission to the hospital. Such caves are natural reservoirs of infectious microorganisms. The patient had a physical examination, coagulation screening tests, tests of thrombin generation and fibrinolysis, coagulation inhibitors, activated protein C resistance, early and late serological tests (including autoantibodies), computed tomographic studies of the chest and abdomen, and bacterial examination of peripheral blood. Bacterial investigations were made on samples collected from the river cave. After having undergone a 6 week course of antimicrobial treatment and anticoagulant therapy, the patient recovered from the infection with no residual complications, and the signs and symptoms of Lemierre syndrome resolved. The results probably indicate an exposure of the patient to soil-based Staphylococcus aureus. This observation suggests the action of environmental factors that may contribute to the development of this rare syndrome.

  11. Influence of tracheostomy on the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infection in the catheterization of jugular vein by posterior access.

    PubMed

    Lorente, L; Jiménez, A; Roca, I; Martín, M M; Mora, M L

    2011-09-01

    There are no data about the influence of tracheostomy in the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) on the catheterization of the jugular vein by posterior access and there are no recommendations relating to this circumstance in the guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and of Healthcare Epidemiology of America/Infectious Diseases Society of America (SHEA/IDSA) for the prevention of CRBSI. The novel finding of this observational study was that there was a higher incidence of CRBSI in the catheterization of jugular vein by posterior access in patients with tracheostomy than without it (13.24 vs 0 episodes of CRBSI per 1,000 catheter-day; odds ratio = 23.92; 95% CI = 1.86-infinite; p = 0.008). Thus, the presence of tracheostomy is a risk factor of CRBSI on the catheterization of jugular vein by posterior access.

  12. Venous compression syndrome of internal jugular veins prevalence in patients with multiple sclerosis and chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Mandolesi, Sandro; Niglio, Tarcisio; Orsini, Augusto; De Sio, Simone; d'Alessandro, Alessandro; Mandolesi, Dimitri; Fedele, Francesco; d'Alessandro, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the incidence of Venous Compression Syndrome (VCS) with full block of the flow of the internal jugular veins (IJVs) in patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency. We included 769 patients with MS and CCSVI (299 males, 470 females) and 210 controls without ms and ccsvi (92 males, 118 females). each subject was investigated by echo-color-doppler (ecd). morphological and hemodynamic ecd data were recorded by a computerized mem-net maps of epidemiological national observatory on ccsvi and they were analyzed by mem-net clinical analysis programs. VCS of IJVs occurs in 240 subjects affected by CCSVI and MS (31% of total) and in 12 controls (6% of total). The differences between the two groups are statistical significant (X² = 36.64, p<0.0001). Up to day there are no longitudinal studies that allow us to identify the WC of jugular and/or vertebral veins as etiology of a chronic neurodegenerative disease, but we note that Venous Compression Syndrome of IJVs is strongly associated with MS and CCSVI. Chronic Cerebro-Spinal Venous Insufficiency, Multiple Sclerosis, Venous Compression Syndrome.

  13. Bovine Jugular Veins versus Homografts in the Pulmonary Position: An Analysis across Two Centers and 711 Patients-Conventional Comparisons and Time Status Graphs as a New Approach.

    PubMed

    Sandica, Eugen; Boethig, Dietmar; Blanz, Ute; Goerg, Rainer; Haas, Nikolaus Andreas; Laser, Kai Thorsten; Kececioglu, Deniz; Bertram, Harald; Sarikouch, Samir; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Beerbaum, Philipp; Horke, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Various diseases and diversity in implantation ages, together with evolving diagnostic and therapeutic options, hinder comparative evaluations of long-term outcomes for valved conduits used for reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT). We combined two common evaluation methods to optimally use information obtained by pooling the raw data from two high volume centers, each with very regular follow-up procedures, with the aim of analyzing durability differences between conventional homografts and bovine jugular veins. In the period 1985 to 2012, a total of 444 bovine jugular veins and 267 homografts were implanted, and 6,738 postoperative examinations took place. Evaluations included age-stratified Kaplan-Meier analyses, Cox regression models, and time status graphs, the third showing age-group stratified, time-related frequencies of intact, insufficient, stenotic, both insufficient and stenotic, and postinterventional conduits below the freedom from explantation curve. They take into account interventions, explantations, and the nonterminal character of echocardiographic findings. The durability of intact bovine jugular veins in children and young adults is not inferior to that of homografts. Averaged over the first 12 years after implantation, the age groups < 25 years in fact showed advantages for bovine jugular vein recipients. The average fraction of patients younger than 25 years whose conduits were not explanted, postinterventional, stenotic, insufficient, or stenotic and insufficient was at least 10% higher in recipients of bovine jugular veins than in homograft recipients. According to the time status graphs, the use of bovine jugular veins for RVOT in patients younger than 25 years appears to lead to superior results when compared with cryopreserved homografts. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Internal jugular vein thrombosis presenting as a painful neck mass due to a spontaneous dislocated subclavian port catheter as long-term complication: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Grommes, Jochen; Junge, Karsten; Göbner, Sonja; Schumpelick, Volker; Truong, Son

    2009-01-01

    Central venous access devices are extensively used for long-term chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition. However, there are some possible immediate, early, and late complications related to the implantation technique, care, and maintenance. We present the uncommon occurrence of a thrombosis of the internal jugular vein due to a spontaneous migration of a Port-A-Cath catheter into the ipsilateral internal jugular vein as a delayed complication of a central venous access catheter implanted for chemotherapy delivery. A review of the literature is given, and the factors responsible for this unusual complication will be discussed. PMID:19830037

  15. Central venous catheterization--an anatomical review of a clinical skill. Part 2. Internal jugular vein via the supraclavicular approach.

    PubMed

    Boon, J M; van Schoor, A N; Abrahams, P H; Meiring, J H; Welch, T

    2008-01-01

    The safe and successful performance of a central venous catheterization (CVC) requires a specific knowledge of anatomy in addition to a working knowledge. Misunderstanding the anatomy may result in failure or complications. This review aims to aid understanding of the anatomical framework, pitfalls, and complications of CVC of the internal jugular veins. CVC is common practice amongst surgeons, anesthesiologists, and emergency room physicians during the preparations for major surgical procedures such as open-heart surgery, as well as for intensive care monitoring and rapid restoration of blood volume. Associated with this technique are certain anatomical pitfalls and complications that can be successfully avoided if one possesses a thorough knowledge of the contraindications, regional anatomy, and rationale of the technique.

  16. Venous anastomosis in free flap reconstruction after radical neck dissection: is the external jugular vein a feasible option?

    PubMed

    Reiter, Maximilian; Baumeister, Philipp

    2017-01-13

    Free microvascular tissue transfer has become a reliable and wellestablished technique in reconstructive surgery. Success rates greater than 95% are constantly reported in the literature. End-to-end anastomosis to the external jugular vein (EJ) is supposed to be equally successful as anastomosis to the internal jugular vein (IJ) in patients treated with selective neck dissection. No data has been published so far when the IJ had to be resected during neck dissection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success rate and complications of end-to-end anastomosis to the EJ in cases of (modified) radical neck dissection with resected IJ. A retrospective mono-center cohort study was performed. All patients with end-to-end anastomosis to either the IJ or EJ-system were reviewed. 423 free-tissue transfers performed between 2009 and 2016 were included. The overall success rate was 97.0% with an anastomotic revision rate due to venous thrombosis of 12.3%. In patients when the IJ had to be resected and the venous anastomosis was performed at the ipsilateral side to the EJ (n = 53), overall flap loss was significantly higher (5/53; 9.4%). The revision rate in these cases was 22.6%. Success rate of anastomosis to the EJ when the ipsilateral IJ was still intact was 100% (n = 20). Success rate when the anastomosis was performed at the contralateral side was 100%. End-to-end anastomosis to the EJ in cases with resected IJ is more likely to result in free flap loss. Furthermore, it is associated with a higher revision rate. Therefore, in cases with resected IJ, we suggest to plan the operation beforehand with anastomosis at the contralateral side whenever possible.

  17. Detection of Reflux in Jugular and Vertebral Veins Through Directional Multigate Quality Doppler Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forzoni, Leonardo; Morovic, Sandra; Semplici, Paolo; Corsi, Massino; Ricci, Stefano; Tortoli, Piero

    Chronic Cerebro-Spinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI) is a medical condition where deoxygenated blood flows from the veins surrounding the brain and spine is slowed down or blocked in its return to the heart. The diagnosis and severity of CCSVI can be assessed by investigating the possible presence and the extent of such reflux and/or blockage in neck veins and intracranial veins, with the patient in both sitting and supine positions. During such examinations, B-Mode and Color Doppler ultrasound are not always capable of accurately detect the flow behavior in all subjects.

  18. A rare malposition of the thoracic venous catheter introduced via the left internal jugular vein

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Supradip; Dewan, Himanshu; Bhattacharyya, Sandip

    2008-01-01

    A rare malposition of central venous catheter in the left superior intercostal vein is described. The diagnostic features and the possible ways to prevent this complication are discussed. PMID:19742265

  19. Comparison of Brachial Vein Versus Internal Jugular Vein Approach for Access to the Right Side of the Heart With or Without Myocardial Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Harwani, Neha; Chukwu, Ebere; Alvarez, Manrique; Thohan, Vinay

    2015-09-01

    Right heart catheterization (RHC) and endomyocardial biopsy are mainstay procedures for patients with heart failure and heart transplantation. Approaches are predominantly neck (internal jugular) or leg (femoral vein). We describe a novel arm (brachial/basilica vein) approach. Over 5.5 years, 1,130 right-sided cardiac procedures in 276 patients were analyzed retrospectively and divided into either neck or arm approach. Comparative analyses of procedural success, time, safety, efficacy, and cost were performed. Patient preference was assessed for those who had both neck and arm approaches. In patients receiving RHC (174 neck and 121 arm cases) and in those receiving RHC + biopsy (594 neck and 141 arm cases), mean elapsed and fluoroscopic times (minutes), respectively, were 60 ± 20 versus 62 ± 19 and 3.43 ± 3.8 versus 4.99 ± 5.2 (RHC neck vs arm, respectively), and 55 ± 19 versus 63 ± 17 and 4.14 ± 3.4 versus 5.22 ± 2.6 (RHC + biopsy neck vs arm, respectively). Procedural complications were low (n = 7, 0.6%) and restricted to the neck approach. Patients surveyed preferred the arm approach. In conclusion, RHC and endomyocardial biopsy through the brachial vein can be performed safely, timely, effectively, and at equivalent cost compared with a neck approach. We advocate that an arm approach be the preferred method for these procedures.

  20. Massive hemothorax due to subclavian vein tear during internal jugular vein cannulation in a 15-year-old boy scheduled for mitral valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Paulose, Deepak; Kundra, Pankaj; Parida, Satyen

    2015-01-01

    We present an unusual case of life-threatening hemothorax in a 15-year-old boy following subclavian vein tear during internal jugular vein (IJV) cannulation prior to initiation of surgery (mitral valve replacement). Successful IJV cannulation was done in the third attempt. However, we missed the subclavian tear which occurred during the first two initial attempts as there was no clinical evidence suggestive of it at that point of time. This undiagnosed hemothorax led to hemodynamic decompensation requiring high volume and inotropic support to wean the patient off cardiopulmonary bypass. This unusually high requirement of fluid and inotropes required the surgeon to look for noncardiac causes for the hemodynamic disturbance and he noticed a bulge in the right pleura, which on exploration had approximately 1.5 L of collected blood. It was then retrospectively analyzed that the cause of this hemothorax could have been the undue lateral orientation of the needle during IJV cannulation and the advancement of the dilator to its entire length could have injured the subclavian vein. Here, we also would like to discuss the safety precautions to be taken during the cannulation, like the needle orientation and the length to which the dilator must be advanced for safe central venous cannulation. PMID:26712992

  1. Ipsilateral jugular to distal subclavian vein transposition to relieve central venous hypertension in rescue vascular access surgery: a surgical report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Acri, Ignazioe; Carmignani, Amedeo; Vazzana, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Acri, Edvige; Lentini, Salvatore; Spinelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Central venous thrombosis may often arise following central venous cannulation for temporary haemodialysis access. Venous thrombosis may be clinically asymptomatic due to the presence of collateral circulation. However, if an arteriovenous (AV) fistula is prepared below the obstructed venous segment, then symptoms may occur. Central venous hypertension interferes with dialysis, compromises limb function and threatens its safety. Percutaneous treatment is mostly used. However, in some cases endovascular treatment may not be as easy and long term patency uncertain.We report our experience on 3 patients on chronic hemodialysis treatment presenting with a patent AV fistula and ipsilateral subclavian vein chronic fibrotic obstruction. They were treated by ipsilateral internal jugular to distal subclavian vein transposition. Two separate surgical incisions were performed to expose the subclavian vein distally to the occlusion and the jugular vein that was distally ligated and transposed. There was no mortality nor significant postoperative complications. Resolution of hypertensive symptoms was achieved within 3-4 weeks in all patients. The AV fistula was used for dialysis treatment starting from the first postoperative day. At follow-up (mean 13 months), there was no recurrence of upper limb venous hypertension.In patients with subclavian occlusion and ipsilateral low flow, patent AV fistula, jugular to distal subclavian vein transposition may prove useful in cases when percutaneous angioplasty is technically not feasible or long term patency is not expected.

  2. [A case of a flapping infected thrombus in the internal jugular vein, septic pneumonias and heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia].

    PubMed

    Majdák, P; Kubík, J; Harmátová, L

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of a 54 years old female patient after anterior wall left ventricular myocardial infarction in 2005 who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery requiring cannulation of the right internal jugular vein (IJV). She was admitted to a Department of Pulmonary Diseases with left bronchopneumonia (BPN) following 7 day treatment, with hemoptysis, dyspnoea and fevers. Duplex ultrasound (DUS) was used to diagnose flapping thrombus in the right IJV, severe thrombocytopenia and, in addition, progressing multiple infiltrates on X-ray a few days later. We empirically adjusted the treatment initiated in primary care and observed deterioration of the severe thrombocytopenia during treatment with low molecular weight heparine. We diagnosed heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) and, even though this indication was not included in our drug formulary, we initiated treatment with Arixtra (fondaparinux) 2.5 mg s.c. daily. Intensive conservative treatment was associated with significant clinical and laboratory improvement of the condition, significant regression of the IJV thrombus as well as the finding on X-ray. The final effective antibiotic treatment lasted 20 (amoxicillin + clavulanate) and 10 (clindamycin) days, respectively. Treatment with Arixtra (fondaparinux) continued in primary care and lasted a total of 65 days until normal thrombocyte levels were achieved, with gradual transition to oral anticoagulation treatment. The patient was discharged to primary care on the 23rd day of hospitalization when she was stabilized, a febrile and her cardiopulmonary functions were compensated. We did not identify any case of treatment of jugular thrombosis and concurrent HIT with fondaparin anywhere in the international literature.

  3. The Oscillating Component of the Internal Jugular Vein Flow: The Overlooked Element of Cerebral Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Sisini, Francesco; Toro, Eleuterio; Gambaccini, Mauro; Zamboni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The jugular venous pulse (JVP) provides valuable information about cardiac haemodynamics and filling pressures and is an indirect estimate of the central venous pressure (CVP). Recently it has been proven that JVP can be obtained by measuring the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the IJV on each sonogram of an ultrasound B-mode sonogram sequence. It has also been proven that during its pulsation the IJV is distended and hence that the pressure gradient drives the IJV haemodynamics. If this is true, then it will imply the following: (i) the blood velocity in the IJV is a periodic function of the time with period equal to the cardiac period and (ii) the instantaneous blood velocity is given by a time function that can be derived from a flow-dynamics theory that uses the instantaneous pressure gradient as a parameter. The aim of the present study is to confirm the hypothesis that JVP regulates the IJV blood flow and that pressure waves are transmitted from the heart toward the brain through the IJV wall. PMID:26783380

  4. Using Ultrasonography to Determine Optimal Head-down Tilt Position Angle in Patients before Catheterization of the Internal Jugular Vein

    PubMed Central

    Kasatkin, Anton A.; Urakov, Aleksandr L.; Nigmatullina, Anna R.

    2017-01-01

    Context: It is believed that 15°–25° head-down tilt position increases the internal jugular vein cross-sectional area (IJV CSA). The increase in IJV CSA before puncture reduces the risk of its perforation. This pattern was not observed in all patients. We assumed that the absence of respiratory-based IJV excursion is one of the criteria of head-down tilt position effectiveness. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine the head-down tilt angle, which ensures the absence of the respiratory-based IJV excursion. Subjects and Methods: Prospective study included twenty adult patients. The IJVs scanning was carried out in 1 min after placing the patients in a horizontal position on their back and in 1 min after placing them in the head-down tilt position at 5°, 10°, 15°, and 20° tilt angles. Results: We found that collapsibility index of <9% indicating the absence of respiratory-based IJV excursion was recorded in 25% of patients in the horizontal supine position. In this case, placing the patients in the Trendelenburg position for IJV catheterization may not be indicated. In 65% of the patients, the respiratory-based excursion was not observed at 10° head-down tilt position. Only 35% of the patients required 15° head-down tilt position. Conclusions: In clinical settings, the disappearance of respiratory-based vein excursion on the ultrasound scanner screen can be considered as criteria of the head-down tilt position effectiveness. PMID:28400687

  5. Relationship between intracranial hypertension and ultrasonic patterns of the common carotid artery and the internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Liboni, W; Bertolotto, A; Urciuoli, R

    1983-01-01

    The Doppler technique has only been used in neurological practice to evidence local vessel pathology such as occlusion or stenosis. Both common carotid artery and internal jugular vein flows can change not only because of pathological processes of the vessels but also because of impedance of their distribution territory. In this report we analyze the relationship between flow velocity, one of the parameters of blood flow, and intracranial impedance variations which occur in cerebral concussion, tumors and acute vascular cerebral pathology. During our observations we noticed that the diastolic wave of the velocity curve of the common carotid artery is a very important signal of the flow variations in the internal carotid artery and, in turn, of variations in cerebral flow. We studied the behaviour of the common carotid artery velocity curve in our patients both during clinical disease development and during the action of mannitol in the acute phases of the disease. We found that the ultrasonic patterns during antiedema action were similar to the ones obtained during the recovery period. We were able to note some differences and some similarities of the curve morphology in relation to generalized or focal causes of cerebral edema. This may be very important considering that at present no non-invasive and therefore repeatable technique is available for monitoring cerebral blood flow in intracranial hypertension.

  6. Effects of incrementally increasing tidal volume on the cross-sectional area of the right internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Jo, Youn Yi; Kim, Hong Soon; Lee, Mi Geum; Kim, Dong Young; Kil, Hae Keum

    2013-10-01

    Different tidal volume (TV) settings during mechanical ventilation alter intrathoracic blood volume, and these changes could alter central venous pressure and the cross sectional area (CSA) of the right internal jugular vein (RIJV). The aim of this study was to determine the optimal TV for maximizing the CSA of the RIJV in the supine and Trendelenburg positions in anesthetized patients. Forty patients were randomly allocated to a supine group (Group S, n = 20) or a Trendelenburg group (Group T, n = 20) by computer generated randomization. RIJV CSAs were measured repeatedly after increasing the inspiratory volume in 1 ml/kg increments from a TV of 8 ml/kg to 14 ml/kg using ultrasound images. Peak inspiratory pressure increased significantly on increasing TV from 11 ml/kg to 14 ml/kg and between baseline (TV 8 ml/kg) and 11 ml/kg in both groups (P < 0.05). RIJV CSA was not increased versus baseline even after TV changes in either group and no intergroup difference was found. TV increases do not increase the CSA of the RIJV within the TV range 8 to 14 ml/kg in the supine or 10° Trendelenburg position.

  7. Effects of incrementally increasing tidal volume on the cross-sectional area of the right internal jugular vein

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Youn Yi; Kim, Hong Soon; Lee, Mi Geum; Kim, Dong Young

    2013-01-01

    Background Different tidal volume (TV) settings during mechanical ventilation alter intrathoracic blood volume, and these changes could alter central venous pressure and the cross sectional area (CSA) of the right internal jugular vein (RIJV). The aim of this study was to determine the optimal TV for maximizing the CSA of the RIJV in the supine and Trendelenburg positions in anesthetized patients. Methods Forty patients were randomly allocated to a supine group (Group S, n = 20) or a Trendelenburg group (Group T, n = 20) by computer generated randomization. RIJV CSAs were measured repeatedly after increasing the inspiratory volume in 1 ml/kg increments from a TV of 8 ml/kg to 14 ml/kg using ultrasound images. Results Peak inspiratory pressure increased significantly on increasing TV from 11 ml/kg to 14 ml/kg and between baseline (TV 8 ml/kg) and 11 ml/kg in both groups (P < 0.05). RIJV CSA was not increased versus baseline even after TV changes in either group and no intergroup difference was found. Conclusions TV increases do not increase the CSA of the RIJV within the TV range 8 to 14 ml/kg in the supine or 10° Trendelenburg position. PMID:24228143

  8. [Continuous monitoring of oxygen saturation in the jugular vein bulb in severe head injuries. Management and case reviews].

    PubMed

    Larráyoz Iriarte, J M; Mariñelarena Huárriz, A C; Martínez de Losa Carvajal, S

    1999-01-01

    Since october 1996, the Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital of Navarra has carried out continuous monitoring of oxygen saturation in the bulb of the internal jugular vein (SjO2). This technique, used in patients with severe cranioencephalic trauma (SCET), is designed to facilitate care an ensure the use of adequate therapeutic measures in such patients. The present study has two parts: In the first part, SjO2 monitoring is defined and catheter insertion techniques, technical problems, and nursing care are described. In the second part, a retrospective review is made of patients admitted to the unit from october 1996 to october 1997 who underwent SjO2 monitoring. A total of 11 cases are included, the common features of which were: SCET, intracranial pressure over 20 mmHg, Glasgow score of 8 or less, and abnormal CAT study. This study provides a basis for developing a nursing protocol because familiarity with the technique allows problems to be prevented and/or resolved.

  9. Using Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Catheterization of the Internal Jugular Vein in Patients With Difficult Peripheral Access.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Michael; Abdelghani, Ramsy; Mohamad, Maha; Limsuwat, Chok; Kheir, Fayez

    2015-10-08

    Vascular access is necessary in patients admitted to the intensive care unit and the medical ward. Currently, there are multiple modalities to achieve adequate vascular access, each with their own difficulties and drawbacks. Often, in patients with certain comorbidities, it is difficult to obtain a peripheral intravenous (IV) line, which can lead to multiple failed attempts in achieving access. We describe the feasibility of inserting an ultrasound (US)-guided peripheral IV catheter into the internal jugular vein (IJ) in such populations. This was a prospective observational case series in patients with difficult or failed peripheral IV access. All patients underwent sterile insertion of a peripheral IV catheter (2.5″, 18 gauge) into the IJ under US guidance. Catheter placement was confirmed by ultrasonography. Nineteen consecutive patients were included in this series. A total of 20 US-guided peripheral IJ catheters were placed. The mean patient age was 57. Sixty percent of patients were male and the mean body mass index was 26 (14.1-51.5). The mean time taken to place the peripheral IJ catheter was 5.3 minutes. Eighty-five percent of catheters placed were mostly placed in the right IJ. There were no complications on follow-up. US-guided placement of peripheral IV catheters in the IJ is feasible to achieve short-term IV access in a select patient population who failed traditional peripheral IV placement. Furthermore, larger trials are needed to confirm safety and long-term complications of this method.

  10. Hemodynamics and right-ventricle functional characteristics of a swine carotid artery-jugular vein shunt model of pulmonary arterial hypertension: An 18-month experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaoju; Huang, Yuanyuan; He, Yun; Li, Zhixian

    2015-01-01

    The continuous changes in pulmonary hemodynamic properties and right ventricular (RV) function in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have not been fully characterized in large animal model of PAH induced by a carotid artery–jugular vein shunt. A minipig model of PAH was induced by a surgical anastomosis between the left common carotid artery and the left jugular vein. The model was validated by catheter examination and pathologic analyses, and the hemodynamic features and right-ventricle functional characteristics of the model were continuously observed by Doppler echocardiography. Of the 45 minipigs who received the surgery, 27 survived and were validated as models of PAH, reflected by mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mmHg, and typical pathologic changes of pulmonary arterial remodeling and RV fibrosis. Non-invasive indices of pulmonary hemodynamics (pulmonary artery accelerating time and its ratio to RV ventricular ejection time) were temporarily increased, then reduced later, similar to changes in tricuspid annular displacement. The Tei index of the RV was elevated, indicating a progressive impairment in RV function. Surgical anastomosis between carotid artery and jugular vein in a minipig is effective to establish PAH, and non-invasive hemodynamic and right-ventricle functional indices measured by Doppler echocardiography may be used as early indicators of PAH. PMID:25595189

  11. Isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells from blood samples collected from the jugular and cephalic veins of healthy adult horses.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Ashley N; Seeto, Wen J; Winter, Randolph L; Zhong, Qiao; Lipke, Elizabeth A; Wooldridge, Anne A

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate optimal isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from peripheral blood of horses. SAMPLE Jugular and cephalic venous blood samples from 17 adult horses. PROCEDURES Each blood sample was divided; isolation was performed with whole blood adherence (WBA) and density gradient centrifugation (DGC). Isolated cells were characterized by uptake of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-Ac-LDL), vascular tubule formation, and expression of endothelial (CD34, CD105, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, and von Willebrand factor) and hematopoietic (CD14) cell markers by use of indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and flow cytometry. RESULTS Colonies with cobblestone morphology were isolated from 15 of 17 horses. Blood collected from the cephalic vein yielded colonies significantly more often (14/17 horses) than did blood collected from the jugular vein (8/17 horses). Of 14 cephalic blood samples with colonies, 13 were obtained with DGC and 8 with WBA. Of 8 jugular blood samples with colonies, 8 were obtained with DGC and 4 with WBA. Colony frequency (colonies per milliliter of blood) was significantly higher for cephalic blood samples and samples isolated with DGC. Cells formed vascular tubules, had uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL, and expressed endothelial markers by use of IFA and flow cytometry, which confirmed their identity as ECFCs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Maximum yield of ECFCs was obtained for blood samples collected from both the jugular and cephalic veins and use of DGC to isolate cells. Consistent yield of ECFCs from peripheral blood of horses will enable studies to evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic uses.

  12. Effective use of flow-spoiled FBI and time-SLIP methods in the diagnostic study of an aberrant vessel of the head and neck: "left jugular venous steal by the right jugular vein".

    PubMed

    Kogure, Taroh; Kogure, Kyuya; Iizuka, Mitsumasa; Ino, Azusa; Ishii, Masako

    2010-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) is now commonly used in routine magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) studies of the head and neck. However, there are limits to its diagnostic abilities in the clinical field and, in some instances, a more invasive supplementary examination may be required. We incidentally discovered a patient with an aberrant vessel of the head and neck that ran alongside the left carotid artery and contained a constant, slowly pulsating efferent blood flow. 3D-TOF and carotid ultrasonography could not determine the nature and origin of this vessel. Additional studies using flow-spoiled fresh blood imaging (flow-spoiled FBI) and time spatial labeling inversion pulse (time-SLIP) methods were effective in determining that the vessel was the left jugular vein, and that the continuous venous reflux was a result of a venous steal by the right jugular vein. We show that by combining different MRA techniques we can effectively achieve diagnosis without resorting to more invasive examinations.

  13. Crouzon’s Syndrome with Life-Threatening Ear Bleed: Ruptured Jugular Vein Diverticulum Treated by Endovascular Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Mondel, Prabath Kumar Anand, Sunanda Limaye, Uday S.

    2015-08-15

    Crouzon’s syndrome is the commonest variety of syndromic craniosynostosis. Life-threatening ear bleed due to ruptured jugular venous diverticulum in Crouzon’s syndrome has not been described previously. In patients with syndromic craniosynostosis, definitive repair of jugular diverticulum by open surgery is fraught with high risk of bleeding, poor functional outcomes, and even death. A 24-year-old woman with Crouzon’s syndrome presented with conductive hearing loss and recurrent episodes of torrential bleeding from her left ear. On computed tomography, a defect in the roof of jugular fossa containing jugular venous diverticulum immediately inferior to the bony external auditory canal was seen. The clinical presentation, imaging features, and endovascular management of Crouzon’s syndrome due to a ruptured jugular venous diverticulum is described.

  14. Influence of acute jugular vein compression on the cerebral blood flow velocity, pial artery pulsation and width of subarachnoid space in humans.

    PubMed

    Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Winklewski, Pawel J; Guminski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of acute bilateral jugular vein compression on: (1) pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ); (2) cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV); (3) peripheral blood pressure; and (4) possible relations between mentioned parameters. Experiments were performed on a group of 32 healthy 19-30 years old male subjects. cc-TQ and the subarachnoid width (sas-TQ) were measured using near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS), CBFV in the left anterior cerebral artery using transcranial Doppler, blood pressure was measured using Finapres, while end-tidal CO(2) was measured using medical gas analyser. Bilateral jugular vein compression was achieved with the use of a sphygmomanometer held on the neck of the participant and pumped at the pressure of 40 mmHg, and was performed in the bend-over (BOPT) and swayed to the back (initial) position. In the first group (n = 10) during BOPT, sas-TQ and pulse pressure (PP) decreased (-17.6% and -17.9%, respectively) and CBFV increased (+35.0%), while cc-TQ did not change (+1.91%). In the second group, in the initial position (n = 22) cc-TQ and CBFV increased (106.6% and 20.1%, respectively), while sas-TQ and PP decreases were not statistically significant (-15.5% and -9.0%, respectively). End-tidal CO(2) remained stable during BOPT and venous compression in both groups. Significant interdependence between changes in cc-TQ and PP after bilateral jugular vein compression in the initial position was found (r = -0.74). Acute bilateral jugular venous insufficiency leads to hyperkinetic cerebral circulation characterised by augmented pial artery pulsation and CBFV and direct transmission of PP into the brain microcirculation. The Windkessel effect with impaired jugular outflow and more likely increased intracranial pressure is described. This study clarifies the potential mechanism linking jugular outflow insufficiency with arterial small vessel cerebral disease.

  15. Influence of Acute Jugular Vein Compression on the Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity, Pial Artery Pulsation and Width of Subarachnoid Space in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Frydrychowski, Andrzej F.; Winklewski, Pawel J.; Guminski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the effect of acute bilateral jugular vein compression on: (1) pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ); (2) cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV); (3) peripheral blood pressure; and (4) possible relations between mentioned parameters. Methods Experiments were performed on a group of 32 healthy 19–30 years old male subjects. cc-TQ and the subarachnoid width (sas-TQ) were measured using near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS), CBFV in the left anterior cerebral artery using transcranial Doppler, blood pressure was measured using Finapres, while end-tidal CO2 was measured using medical gas analyser. Bilateral jugular vein compression was achieved with the use of a sphygmomanometer held on the neck of the participant and pumped at the pressure of 40 mmHg, and was performed in the bend-over (BOPT) and swayed to the back (initial) position. Results In the first group (n = 10) during BOPT, sas-TQ and pulse pressure (PP) decreased (−17.6% and −17.9%, respectively) and CBFV increased (+35.0%), while cc-TQ did not change (+1.91%). In the second group, in the initial position (n = 22) cc-TQ and CBFV increased (106.6% and 20.1%, respectively), while sas-TQ and PP decreases were not statistically significant (−15.5% and −9.0%, respectively). End-tidal CO2 remained stable during BOPT and venous compression in both groups. Significant interdependence between changes in cc-TQ and PP after bilateral jugular vein compression in the initial position was found (r = −0.74). Conclusions Acute bilateral jugular venous insufficiency leads to hyperkinetic cerebral circulation characterised by augmented pial artery pulsation and CBFV and direct transmission of PP into the brain microcirculation. The Windkessel effect with impaired jugular outflow and more likely increased intracranial pressure is described. This study clarifies the potential mechanism linking jugular outflow insufficiency with arterial small

  16. A comparative study of magnetic resonance venography techniques for the evaluation of the internal jugular veins in multiple sclerosis patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Tamizur; Sethi, Sean K.; Utriainen, David T.; Hewett, J. Joseph; Haacke, E. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the vascular nature of diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) is a growing field of research. This work reports on the application of MR angiographic (MRA) and venographic (MRV) techniques in assessing the extracranial vasculature in MS patients. Materials and Methods A standardized MRI protocol containing 2D TOF-MRV and dynamic 3D contrast-enhanced (CE) MRAV was run for 170 MS patients and 40 healthy controls (HC). The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the internal jugular veins (IJVs) was measured at three neck levels in all subjects for both MRV techniques to determine the presence of venous stenoses. All data were analyzed retrospectively. Results For the values where both methods showed signal, the 3D method showed larger CSA measurement values compared to 2D methods in both IJVs, in both MS and HC subjects which was confirmed with student paired t-tests. Of the 170 MS patients, 93 (55%) in CE-MRAV and 103 (61%) in TOF-MRV showed stenosis in at least one IJV. The corresponding numbers for the 40 HC subjects were 2 (5%) and 4 (10%), respectively. Carotid ectasias with IJV stenosis were seen in 26 cases (15%) with 3D CE-MRAV and were not observable with 2D TOF-MRV. Carotid ectasias were not seen in the HC group. In the 2D TOF-MRV data, banding of the IJVs related to slow flow was seen in 58 (34%) MS cases and in no HC cases. MS patients showed lower average CSAs than the HC subjects. Conclusion The 3D CE MRAV depicted the vascular anatomy more completely than the 2D TOF-MRV. However, the 3D CE MRAV does not provide any information about the flow characteristics which are indirectly available in the 2D TOF-MRV in those cases where there is slow flow. PMID:23850076

  17. Incidence of posterior wall penetration during internal jugular vein cannulation: A comparison of two techniques using real-time ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Shrikanth; Govil, Deepak; Gupta, Sachin; Patel, Sweta; Jagadeesh, KN; Tomar, Deeksha Singh

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: The true incidence of penetration of the posterior wall (through-and-through puncture) of the internal jugular vein (IJV) during cannulation is unknown. This may have implications if there is hematoma formation, penetration and/or inadvertent cannulation of an underlying carotid artery. This study compared the incidence of posterior wall puncture during IJV cannulation using ultrasound guidance versus traditional landmarks-guided technique. Methods: One hundred and seventy adult patients admitted to a gastro-liver Intensive Care Unit who required central venous lines were randomly divided into Group A: IJV cannulation using anatomical landmark-guided technique and Group B: IJV cannulation using real-time ultrasound guidance. In both groups, a second investigator followed the needle path using real-time ultrasound. The incidence of posterior wall puncture, number of attempts for successful cannulation, incidence of inadvertent arterial punctures and occurrence of complications such as hematoma formation and pneumothorax were recorded. Results: Significantly more (37/80, 46%) patients in Group A had posterior wall puncture compared to 19/90 (21%) in Group B. Incidence of arterial puncture was 8/80 (10%) in Group A, 5/90 (5.5%) in Group B. The number of attempts for venous cannulation and hematoma formation was significantly less in Group B. Conclusion: Real-time ultrasound-guided IJV cannulation significantly reduces but does not wholly eliminate the incidence of posterior venous wall penetrations. It also significantly reduces the incidence of inadvertent arterial punctures and number of attempts for successful cannulation. PMID:28405038

  18. Changes in the relationship between the right internal jugular vein and an anatomical landmark after head rotation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Mun Gyu; Lee, Se Jin; Kim, Sang Ho; Ok, Si Young; Kim, Soon Im

    2011-01-01

    Background This study was performed to ultrasonographically demonstrate the changes in relationship between the right internal jugular vein (IJV) and an anatomical landmark in two different head positions: neutral and rotated. Methods This was a randomized clinical trial. One hundred patients scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation were enrolled in this study. The patients were placed in the supine position with a neutral head position and without a pillow. The apex of the triangle formed by the sternal and clavicular heads of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and clavicle was marked (AL point : anatomical landmark point). Ultrasonography of the neck anatomy was performed and the skin was marked at the central point of the IJV (US point: ultrasonography point). The other investigator measured the distance from the AL point to the US point (AL-US distance). The patient's head was then turned 30° to the left; the same procedure was repeated and the AL-US distance was again measured. The changes in AL-US distance were calculated. Results The AL-US distance increased significantly after 30° head rotation compared with that in a head neutral position. The mean ± SD of the AL-US distance was 0.28 ± 0.78 cm in the neutral head position and 0.83 ± 1.03 cm in the head rotated position. Conclusions The anatomical landmark point becomes more distant from the actual right IJV point and moves more medially after head rotation. We suggest minimizing the angle of head rotation and taking this distance into consideration when using the landmark-guided method. PMID:21927678

  19. Anatomic Relationship of the Internal Jugular Vein and the Common Carotid Artery Applied to Percutaneous Transjugular Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Turba, Ulku C.; Uflacker, Renan Hannegan, Christopher; Selby, J. Bayne

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To demonstrate the anatomic relationship of the internal jugular vein (IJV) with the common carotid artery (CCA) in order to avoid inadvertent puncture of the CCA during percutaneous central venous access or transjugular interventional procedures. Methods. One hundred and eighty-eight consecutive patients requiring either central venous access or interventional procedures via the IJV were included in the analysis. The position of the IJV in relation to the CCA was demonstrated by portable ultrasonography. The IJV location was recorded in a clock-dial system using the carotid as the center of the dial and the angles were measured. Outcomes of the procedure were also recorded. Results. The IJV was lateral to the CCA in 187 of 188 patients and medial to the CCA in one patient. The left IJV was at the 12 o'clock position in 12 patients (6%), the 11 o'clock position in 17 patients (9%), the 10 o'clock position in 142 patients (75%) and at the 9 o'clock position in 17 patients (9%). The right IJV was at the 12 o'clock position in 8 patients (4%), the 1 o'clock position in 31 patients (16%), the 2 o'clock position in 134 patients (71%) and the 3 o'clock position in 17 patients (9%). In one patient the left IJV was located approximately 60 deg. medial to the left CCA; this was recorded as 2 o'clock on the left since it is opposite to the 10 o'clock position. Conclusion. Knowledge of the IJV anatomy and relationship to the CCA is important information for the operator performing an IJV puncture, to potentially reduce the chance of laceration of the CCA and avoid placement of a large catheter within a critical artery, even when ultrasound guidance is used.

  20. The effects of the Trendelenburg position and the Valsalva manoeuvre on internal jugular vein diameter and placement in children

    PubMed Central

    Dincyurek, Gamze Naime; Mogol, Elif Basagan; Turker, Gurkan; Yavascaoglu, Belgin; Gurbet, Alp; Kaya, Fatma Nur; Moustafa, Bachri Ramadan; Yazici, Tolga

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We compared the effects of various surgical positions, with and without the Valsalva manoeuvre, on the diameter of the right internal jugular vein (RIJV). METHODS We recruited 100 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class I patients aged 2–12 years. The patients’ heart rate, blood pressure, peripheral oxygen saturation and end-tidal CO2 pressure were monitored. Induction of anaesthesia was done using 1% propofol 10 mg/mL and fentanyl 2 µg/kg, while maintenance was achieved with 2% sevoflurane in a mixture of 50/50 oxygen and air (administered via a laryngeal mask airway). The RIJV diameter was measured using ultrasonography when the patient was in the supine position. Thereafter, it was measured when the patient was in the supine position + Valsalva, followed by the Trendelenburg, Trendelenburg + Valsalva, reverse Trendelenburg, and reverse Trendelenburg + Valsalva positions. A 15° depression or elevation was applied for the Trendelenburg position, and an airway pressure of 20 cmH2O was applied in the Valsalva manoeuvre. During ultrasonography, the patient’s head was tilted 20° to the left. RESULTS When compared to the mean RIJV diameter in the supine position, the mean RIJV diameter was significantly greater in all positions (p < 0.001) except for the reverse Trendelenburg position. The greatest increase in diameter was observed in the Trendelenburg position with the Valsalva manoeuvre (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION In paediatric patients, the application of the Trendelenburg position with the Valsalva manoeuvre gave the greatest increase in RIJV diameter. The reverse Trendelenburg position had no significant effect on RIJV diameter. PMID:25597750

  1. Reduction in Temporary and Permanent Audiological Injury Through Internal Jugular Vein Compression in a Rodent Blast Injury Model.

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Brian; Shinners, Michael; Sherman, Sydney; Erickson, Kristine; Patel, Vimal; Kubilis, Paul; Finan, John D; Bailes, Julian E

    2017-09-01

    Internal jugular vein (IJV) compression influences not only intracranial but also intracochlear physiology and has demonstrated preclinical effectiveness in reducing acute audiological injury in a rodent blast model. However, the long-term effects in this model are unknown. Blast wave-induced audiological injury from an improvised explosive device is a leading cause of morbidity among service members in theater but there are limitations to the current protective measures. For this study, we exposed 20 Sprague Dawley rats to a 16.8 ± 0.3 PSI (195.3 dB SPL) right-sided shock wave in which 10 had application of a custom IJV compression collar in place at the time of injury. IJV compression at the time of injury was shown acutely to significantly reduce the incidence of tympanic membrane rupture and the initial temporary threshold shift on otoacoustic emissions in both the right and left ears of animals who had collar application immediately after and 7 days post injury. At 28 days from injury, collared animals demonstrated a return to baseline of otoacoustic emission values while the noncollared animals had persistent threshold shifts, signifying the presence of a permanent threshold shift only in those animals without collar application. IJV compression was also found to significantly reduce hair cell loss at the base of the cochlea secondary to mechanical trauma from the blast wind. Previously observed acute protective effects of IJV compression are sustained at chronic time points. IJV compression can potentially be used to reduce long-term permanent morbidity from blast-induced audiological trauma.

  2. Transient global amnesia: cerebral venous outflow impairment-insight from the abnormal flow patterns of the internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chih-Ping; Hsu, Hung-Yi; Chao, A-Ching; Sheng, Wen-Yung; Soong, Bing-Wen; Hu, Han-Hwa

    2007-11-01

    Cerebral venous reflux is found frequently in transient global amnesia (TGA) patients. The cerebral venous reflux mostly results from left brachiocephalic venous obstruction, and the level of reflux depends on different respiratory status. For further understanding of the role of venous outflow impairment in the pathogenesis of TGA, we used color duplex sonography to reveal the flow patterns in the internal jugular vein (IJV) and its branches (JB) under different respiratory conditions. We compared the frequency of abnormal venous flow of IJV and/or JB on color duplex sonography between 17 TGA patients and 17 age- and gender-matched normal individuals both at rest (regular breathing) and at deep inspiration. Further, these venous-flow abnormalities in IJV and JB were well described. Cranial 3-D time-of-flight magnetic resonance arteriography (MRA) were performed in all patients three to seven days after their TGA attacks and in all normal individuals to analyze the abnormal flow signals in the intracranial venous structures. In the result, abnormal flow-patterns in the left IJV and/or left JB during regular breathing were found more frequently in TGA patients than normal individuals (65% vs. 6%; p < 0.001). These abnormalities in TGA patients were (1) isolated reversed flow in the left JB, (2) segmental reversed flow in the left distal IJV and (3) continuous reversed flow in the left IJV and JB. The MRA study revealed that only the most severe reflux in the IJV causes intracranial venous reflux; six were in the group of continuous reversed flow in left IJV and one was in the group of segmental reversed flow in left distal IJV. These findings suggest that TGA might be one of the clinical manifestations of the "cerebral-type intermittent venous claudication," which stems from cerebral venous outflow impairment, insufficient venous collaterals and specific precipitating factors.

  3. The progestin levonorgestrel induces endothelium-independent relaxation of rabbit jugular vein via inhibition of calcium entry and protein kinase C: role of cyclic AMP

    PubMed Central

    Herkert, Olaf; Kuhl, Herbert; Busse, Rudi; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2000-01-01

    The progestin and oestrogen component of oral contraceptives have been involved in the development of venous thromboembolic events in women. In the present study we determined the vasoactive effects of sex steroids used in oral contraceptives in isolated preconstricted rabbit jugular veins in the presence of diclofenac and examined the underlying mechanisms.The natural hormone progesterone, the synthetic progestins levonorgestrel, 3-keto-desogestrel, gestodene and chlormadinone acetate, and the synthetic estrogen 17 α-ethinyloestradiol induced concentration-dependent relaxations of endothelium-intact veins constricted with U46619. Levonorgestrel also inhibited constrictions evoked by either a high potassium (K+) solution or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in the absence and presence of extracellular calcium (Ca2+). In addition, levonorgestrel depressed contractions evoked by Ca2+ and reduced 45Ca2+ influx in depolarized veins.Relaxations to levonorgestrel in U46619-constricted veins were neither affected by the presence of the endothelium nor by the inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, NS2028, but were significantly improved either by the selective cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram or in the absence of diclofenac, and decreased by the protein kinase A inhibitor, Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. Rolipram also potentiated relaxations to levonorgestrel in PMA-constricted veins in the presence, but not in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Levonorgestrel increased levels of cyclic AMP and inhibited PMA-induced activation of protein kinase C in veins.These findings indicate that levonorgestrel caused endothelium-independent relaxations of jugular veins via inhibition of Ca2+ entry and of protein kinase C activation. In addition, the cyclic AMP effector pathway contributes to the levonorgestrel-induced relaxation possibly by depressing Ca2+ entry. PMID:10952682

  4. How to deal with atrial septal defect closure from right internal jugular vein: Role of venous-arterial circuit for sizing and over-the-wire device implantation.

    PubMed

    Butera, Gianfranco; Lovin, Nicusor; Basile, Domenica Paola

    2017-01-01

    Secundum atrial septum defect (ASD) is the most common congenital heart disease. It is usually treated by a transcatheter approach using a femoral venous access. In case of bilateral femoral vein occlusion, the internal jugular venous approach for ASD closure is an option, in particular in cases where ASD balloon occlusion test and sizing is needed. Here, we report on a new technique for ASD closure using a venous-arterial circuit from the right internal jugular vein to the femoral artery. Two patients (females, 4 and 10 years of age) had occlusion of both femoral veins because of a previous history of pulmonary atresia and intact ventricular septum, for which they underwent percutaneous radiofrequency perforation and balloon angioplasty. These subjects needed balloon occlusion test of a residual ASD to size the hole and to check for hemodynamic suitability to ASD closure. After performing a venous-arterial circuit, a 24 mm St Jude ASD sizing balloon catheter was advanced over the circuit and the defect closed for 15 min to check hemodynamics and size the defect. ASD was closed is hemodinamically suitable. This technique was safe and reliable. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Spontaneous fracture and migration of catheter of a totally implantable venous access port via internal jugular vein--a case report.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seung Yeon; Park, Sun Cheol; Hwang, Jeong Kye; Kim, Sang Dong

    2016-04-11

    The totally implantable venous access ports (TIVAPs) are indicated for patients undergoing chemotherapy, total parenteral nutrition and long-term antibiotic treatment. But, among their complications, the fracture and migration of the catheter of a TIVAP via internal jugular vein represents a very rare but potentially severe condition. A 50-year-old woman indentified with a spontaneous fracture and migration of catheter of a TIVAP via right internal jugular vein after adjuvant chemotherapy for ovary cancer. She had been not evaluated and not managed with the heparin lock flush solution during three months after adjuvant chemotherapy. And then, she complained right neck bulging during saline infusion via a TIVAP and a chest radiography showed the fractured and migrated catheter of a TIVAP in right atrium. So, we emergently removed the catheter fragment by a goose neck snare via right femoral vein. After then, there was no problem. If the fractured catheter of a TIVAP is detected, it is desirable to remove a fragment by an endovascular approach if it is possible.

  6. Inhibitory effect of sustained perivascular delivery of paclitaxel on neointimal hyperplasia in the jugular vein after open cutdown central venous catheter placement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongyup; Kim, Younglim; Hwang, Ji Woong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Inhibitory effect of paclitaxel on neointimal hyperplasia after open cutdown has not been elucidated. Methods For the control group (n = 16), silicone 2.7-Fr catheters were placed via the right external jugular vein with the cutdown method. For the treatment group (n = 16), a mixture of 0.65 mg of paclitaxel and 1 mL of fibrin glue was infiltrated around the exposed vein after cutdown. After scheduled intervals (1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks), the vein segment was harvested and morphometric analysis was performed on cross-sections. Results Proliferation of smooth muscle cell (SMC) was strongly suppressed in the treatment group, and the ratio of neointima to vein wall was significantly reduced in the treatment group (8 weeks; 0.63 ± 0.08 vs. 0.2 ± 0.08, P < 0.05). Luminal patency was significantly more preserved in the treatment group, and the luminal area was significantly wider in the paclitaxel-treated group compared to the control group (8 weeks; 1.91 ± 0.43 mm2 vs. 5.1 ± 0.43 mm2, P < 0.05). Mean SMC counts measured at 1 and 2 weeks after cutdown were significantly lower in the treatment group (2 weeks; 115 ± 22 vs. 62 ± 22). Paclitaxel was undetectable in systemic circulation (<10 ng/mL). Conclusion Sustained perivascular delivery of paclitaxel with fibrin glue was effective in inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in rat jugular vein after open cutdown. PMID:28203557

  7. Perforation of the superior vena cava 5 days after insertion of a central venous catheter through the left internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Kurabe, Miyuki; Watanabe, Tatsunori; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2016-06-01

    We describe a very rare case of an indwelling central venous catheter (CVC) through the left internal jugular vein that perforated the superior vena cava (SVC) wall postoperatively, although the CVC was placed in the appropriate position preoperatively. Three days after CVC insertion, a chest radiograph showed that the CVC tip had moved from the lower SVC to the upper SVC. Five days after the insertion, computed tomography showed SVC perforation and the resulting hydrothorax. In cases of CVC insertion through the left side, the CVC tip should not be placed in the upper SVC (zone B). Considering individual clinical factors and the indwelling period for the CVC, the left innominate vein (zone C) may be a suitable site for the left-sided CVC tip to reduce the risk of SVC perforation.

  8. Pulmonary embolism and internal jugular vein thrombosis as evocative clues of Lemierre’s syndrome: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    De Giorgi, Alfredo; Fabbian, Fabio; Molino, Christian; Misurati, Elisa; Tiseo, Ruana; Parisi, Claudia; Boari, Benedetta; Manfredini, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Lemierre’s syndrome (LS) is an uncommon condition with oropharyngeal infections, internal jugular vein thrombosis, and systemic metastatic septic embolization as the main features. Fusobacterium species, a group of strictly anaerobic Gram negative rod shaped bacteria, are advocated to be the main pathogen involved. We report a case of LS complicated by pulmonary embolism and pulmonary septic emboli that mimicked a neoplastic lung condition. A Medline search revealed 173 case reports of LS associated with internal jugular vein thrombosis that documented the type of microorganism. Data confirmed high prevalence in young males with Gram negative infections (83.2%). Pulmonary embolism was reported in 8.7% of cases mainly described in subjects with Gram positive infections (OR = 9.786; 95%CI: 2.577-37.168, P = 0.001), independently of age and gender. Only four fatal cases were reported. LS is an uncommon condition that could be complicated by pulmonary embolism, especially in subjects with Gram positive infections. PMID:28352635

  9. Successful percutaneous transcatheter patent foramen ovale closure through the right internal jugular vein using a steerable catheter.

    PubMed

    Hascoet, Sebastien; Fraisse, Alain; Elbaz, Meyer

    2013-10-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) remains challenging when femoral venous approach is not available. We describe the successful closure of a PFO using the right internal jugular venous approach and a deflectable catheter delivery system in a patient with a PFO, recurrent stroke, and an inferior vena cava filter. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Evaluation of pulsatility index and diameter of the jugular vein and superficial body temperature as physiological indices of temperament in weaned beef calves: relationship with serum cortisol concentrations, rectal temp..

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The relationship between temperament, pulsatility index and diameter of the jugular vein, and body temperature was assessed in Angus crossbred calves (262±24.9 days old). Temperament scores were used to classify calves as calm (n=31), intermediate (n=32), or temperamental (n=28). Blood samples were ...

  11. Ultrasound and fluoroscopy-guided placement of central venous ports via internal jugular vein: retrospective analysis of 1254 port implantations at a single center.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Se Jin; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; An, Sang Bu; Yin, Yong Hu; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-01-01

    To assess the technical success and complication rates of the radiologic placement of central venous ports via the internal jugular vein. We retrospectively reviewed 1254 central venous ports implanted at our institution between August 2002 and October 2009. All procedures were guided by using ultrasound and fluoroscopy. Catheter maintenance days, technical success rates, peri-procedural, as well as early and late complication rates were evaluated based on the interventional radiologic reports and patient medical records. A total of 433386 catheter maintenance days (mean, 350 days; range 0-1165 days) were recorded. The technical success rate was 99.9% and a total of 61 complications occurred (5%), resulting in a post-procedural complication rate of 0.129 of 1000 catheter days. Among them, peri-procedural complications within 24 hours occurred in five patients (0.4%). There were 56 post-procedural complications including 24 (1.9%, 0.055 of 1000 catheter days) early and 32 (2.6%, 0.074 of 1000 catheter days) late complications including, infection (0.6%, 0.018 of 10000 catheter days), thrombotic malfunction (1.4%, 0.040 of 1000 catheter days), nonthrombotic malfunction (0.9%, 0.025 of 1000 catheter days), venous thrombosis (0.5%, 0.014 of 1000 catheter days), as well as wound problems (1.1%, 0.032 of 1000 catheter days). Thirty six CVPs (3%) were removed due to complications. Bloodstream infections and venous thrombosis were the two main adverse events prolonging hospitalization (mean 13 days and 5 days, respectively). Radiologic placement of a central venous port via the internal jugular vein is safe and efficient as evidenced by its high technical success rate and a very low complication rate.

  12. Enhancement of rabbit jugular vein thrombolysis by neutralization of factor XI. In vivo evidence for a role of factor XI as an anti-fibrinolytic factor.

    PubMed

    Minnema, M C; Friederich, P W; Levi, M; von dem Borne, P A; Mosnier, L O; Meijers, J C; Biemond, B J; Hack, C E; Bouma, B N; ten Cate, H

    1998-01-01

    Recent in vitro studies have shown that fibrinolytic activity may be attenuated by a thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), which is activated by thrombin, generated via the intrinsic pathway of coagulation in a factor XI-dependent way. Thus factor XI may play a role in the regulation of endogenous fibrinolysis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of in vivo inhibition of factor XI and TAFI in an experimental thrombosis model in rabbits. Incorporation of anti-factor XI antibodies in jugular vein thrombi resulted in an almost twofold increase in endogenous thrombolysis compared with a control antibody. A similar effect was observed when the anti-factor XI antibody was administered systemically. Inhibition of TAFI activity also resulted in a twofold increase in clot lysis whereas inhibition of both factor XI and TAFI activity had no additional effect. Thus, we provide the first in vivo evidence for enhanced thrombolysis through inhibition of clotting factor XI, demonstrating a novel role for the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. Furthermore we demonstrate that inhibition of TAFI had a similar effect on thrombolysis. We postulate that inhibition of factor XI activity enhances thrombolysis because of diminished indirect activation of TAFI.

  13. Dedolomitization in tectonic veins and stylolites: evidence for rapid fluid migration during deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Budai, J.M.

    1984-04-01

    Jurassic through Tertiary thrust-belt deformation of the Mississippian Madison Group has introduced complex fracturing, stylolitization, and carbonate vein mineralization. Host rocks are dominantly dolostone and dolomitic limestone. Tectonic veins are mineralized first by dolomite and then by multiple calcite phases. Dolomite and some generations of calcite which line veins are highly luminescent, while host-rock dolomite have been corroded and replaced by subsequent generations of calcite mineralization. These textural relationships suggest that fluids associated with thrust-belt deformation were in part extraformational and had not equilibrated with host-rock dolomite. Because thrust-belt deformation moved from west to east with time, the isotopic composition (/sup 18/O, /sup 13/O) of vein and stylolite mineralization can be used to evaluate fluid migration during deformation. In three sections located along an east-west transect in the southern overthrust belt, calcite vein mineralization displays a wide range of isotopic compositions that are distinctly depleted relative to the host-rock composition. These vein-lining exhibit systematic compositional changes with both time of deformation and with geographic position relative to major thrust faults. These isotopic changes in vein mineralization and pressure-solution products, together with the textural evidence for calcitization of host-rock and vein dolomite, suggest that these rocks were open to allochthonous fluid migration during deformation.

  14. Effects of the Trendelenburg Position and Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on the Internal Jugular Vein Cross-Sectional Area in Children With Simple Congenital Heart Defects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Yeong; Choi, Jae Moon; Lee, Yong-Hun; Lee, Sukyung; Yoo, Hwanhee; Gwak, Mijeung

    2016-05-01

    Catheterization of the internal jugular vein (IJV) remains difficult in pediatric populations. Increasing the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the IJV facilitates cannulation and decreases complications. We aimed to evaluate the Trendelenburg position and the levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) at which the maximum increase of CSA of the IJV occurred in children undergoing cardiac surgery.In this prospective study, the CSA of the right IJV was assessed using ultrasound in 47 anesthetized pediatric patients with simple congenital heart defects. The baseline CSA was obtained in response to a supine position with no PEEP and compared with 5 different randomly ordered maneuvers, that is, a PEEP of 5 and 10 cm H2O in a supine position and of 0, 5, and 10 cm H2O in a 10° Trendelenburg position. Hemodynamic variables, including blood pressure and heart rate, maximum and minimum diameters, and CSA, were measured.All maneuvers increased the CSA of the right IJV with respect to the control condition. In the supine position, the CSA was increased by 9.4% with a PEEP of 5 and by 19.5% with a PEEP of 10 cm H2O. The Trendelenburg tilt alone increased the CSA by 19.0%, and combining the 10° Trendelenburg with a 10 cm H2O PEEP resulted in the largest IJV CSA increase (33.3%) compared with the supine position with no PEEP. Meanwhile, vital signs remained relatively steady during the experiment.The application of the Trendelenburg position and a 10 cm H2O PEEP thus significantly increases the CSA of the right IJV, perhaps improving the chances of successful cannulation in pediatric patients with simple congenital heart defects.

  15. Effects of the Trendelenburg Position and Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on the Internal Jugular Vein Cross-Sectional Area in Children With Simple Congenital Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Yeong; Choi, Jae Moon; Lee, Yong-Hun; Lee, Sukyung; Yoo, Hwanhee; Gwak, Mijeung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Catheterization of the internal jugular vein (IJV) remains difficult in pediatric populations. Increasing the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the IJV facilitates cannulation and decreases complications. We aimed to evaluate the Trendelenburg position and the levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) at which the maximum increase of CSA of the IJV occurred in children undergoing cardiac surgery. In this prospective study, the CSA of the right IJV was assessed using ultrasound in 47 anesthetized pediatric patients with simple congenital heart defects. The baseline CSA was obtained in response to a supine position with no PEEP and compared with 5 different randomly ordered maneuvers, that is, a PEEP of 5 and 10 cm H2O in a supine position and of 0, 5, and 10 cm H2O in a 10° Trendelenburg position. Hemodynamic variables, including blood pressure and heart rate, maximum and minimum diameters, and CSA, were measured. All maneuvers increased the CSA of the right IJV with respect to the control condition. In the supine position, the CSA was increased by 9.4% with a PEEP of 5 and by 19.5% with a PEEP of 10 cm H2O. The Trendelenburg tilt alone increased the CSA by 19.0%, and combining the 10° Trendelenburg with a 10 cm H2O PEEP resulted in the largest IJV CSA increase (33.3%) compared with the supine position with no PEEP. Meanwhile, vital signs remained relatively steady during the experiment. The application of the Trendelenburg position and a 10 cm H2O PEEP thus significantly increases the CSA of the right IJV, perhaps improving the chances of successful cannulation in pediatric patients with simple congenital heart defects. PMID:27149455

  16. Neck Collar with Mild Jugular Vein Compression Ameliorates Brain Activation Changes during a Working Memory Task after a Season of High School Football.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Weihong; Leach, James; Maloney, Thomas; Altaye, Mekibib; Smith, David; Gubanich, Paul J; Barber Foss, Kim D; Thomas, Staci; DiCesare, Christopher A; Kiefer, Adam W; Myer, Gregory D

    2017-08-15

    Emerging evidence indicates that repetitive head impacts, even at a sub-concussive level, may result in exacerbated or prolonged neurological deficits in athletes. This study aimed to: 1) quantify the effect of repetitive head impacts on the alteration of neuronal activity based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of working memory after a high school football season; and 2) determine whether a neck collar that applies mild jugular vein compression designed to reduce brain energy absorption in head impact through "slosh" mitigation can ameliorate the altered fMRI activation during a working memory task. Participants were recruited from local high school football teams with 27 and 25 athletes assigned to the non-collar and collar group, respectively. A standard N-Back task was used to engage working memory in the fMRI at both pre- and post-season. The two study groups experienced similar head impact frequency and magnitude during the season (all p > 0.05). fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal response (a reflection of the neuronal activity level) during the working memory task increased significantly from pre- to post-season in the non-collar group (corrected p < 0.05), but not in the collar group. Areas displaying less activation change in the collar group (corrected p < 0.05) included the precuneus, inferior parietal cortex, and dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex. Additionally, BOLD response in the non-collar group increased significantly in direct association with the total number of impacts and total g-force (p < 0.05). Our data provide initial neuroimaging evidence for the effect of repetitive head impacts on the working memory related brain activity, as well as a potential protective effect that resulted from the use of the purported brain slosh reducing neck collar in contact sports.

  17. Analysis of head impact exposure and brain microstructure response in a season-long application of a jugular vein compression collar: a prospective, neuroimaging investigation in American football.

    PubMed

    Myer, Gregory D; Yuan, Weihong; Barber Foss, Kim D; Thomas, Staci; Smith, David; Leach, James; Kiefer, Adam W; Dicesare, Chris; Adams, Janet; Gubanich, Paul J; Kitchen, Katie; Schneider, Daniel K; Braswell, Daniel; Krueger, Darcy; Altaye, Mekibib

    2016-10-01

    Historical approaches to protect the brain from outside the skull (eg, helmets and mouthpieces) have been ineffective in reducing internal injury to the brain that arises from energy absorption during sports-related collisions. We aimed to evaluate the effects of a neck collar, which applies gentle bilateral jugular vein compression, resulting in cerebral venous engorgement to reduce head impact energy absorption during collision. Specifically, we investigated the effect of collar wearing during head impact exposure on brain microstructure integrity following a competitive high school American football season. A prospective longitudinal controlled trial was employed to evaluate the effects of collar wearing (n=32) relative to controls (CTRL; n=30) during one competitive football season (age: 17.04±0.67 years). Impact exposure was collected using helmet sensors and white matter (WM) integrity was quantified based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) serving as the primary outcome. With similar overall g-forces and total head impact exposure experienced in the two study groups during the season (p>0.05), significant preseason to postseason changes in mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity in the WM integrity were noted in the CTRL group (corrected p<0.05) but not in the collar group (p>0.05). The CTRL group demonstrated significantly larger preseason to postseason DTI change in multiple WM regions compared with the collar group (corrected p<0.05). Reduced WM diffusivity alteration was noted in participants wearing a neck collar after a season of competitive football. Collar wearing may have provided a protective effect against brain microstructural changes after repetitive head impacts. NCT02696200. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Analysis of head impact exposure and brain microstructure response in a season-long application of a jugular vein compression collar: a prospective, neuroimaging investigation in American football

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D; Yuan, Weihong; Barber Foss, Kim D; Thomas, Staci; Smith, David; Leach, James; Kiefer, Adam W; Dicesare, Chris; Adams, Janet; Gubanich, Paul J; Kitchen, Katie; Schneider, Daniel K; Braswell, Daniel; Krueger, Darcy; Altaye, Mekibib

    2016-01-01

    Background Historical approaches to protect the brain from outside the skull (eg, helmets and mouthpieces) have been ineffective in reducing internal injury to the brain that arises from energy absorption during sports-related collisions. We aimed to evaluate the effects of a neck collar, which applies gentle bilateral jugular vein compression, resulting in cerebral venous engorgement to reduce head impact energy absorption during collision. Specifically, we investigated the effect of collar wearing during head impact exposure on brain microstructure integrity following a competitive high school American football season. Methods A prospective longitudinal controlled trial was employed to evaluate the effects of collar wearing (n=32) relative to controls (CTRL; n=30) during one competitive football season (age: 17.04±0.67 years). Impact exposure was collected using helmet sensors and white matter (WM) integrity was quantified based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) serving as the primary outcome. Results With similar overall g-forces and total head impact exposure experienced in the two study groups during the season (p>0.05), significant preseason to postseason changes in mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity in the WM integrity were noted in the CTRL group (corrected p<0.05) but not in the collar group (p>0.05). The CTRL group demonstrated significantly larger preseason to postseason DTI change in multiple WM regions compared with the collar group (corrected p<0.05). Discussion Reduced WM diffusivity alteration was noted in participants wearing a neck collar after a season of competitive football. Collar wearing may have provided a protective effect against brain microstructural changes after repetitive head impacts. Trial registration number NCT02696200. PMID:27307271

  19. Aβ levels in the jugular vein and high molecular weight Aβ oligomer levels in CSF can be used as biomarkers to indicate the anti-amyloid effect of IVIg for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Takashi; Kondo, Masaki; Ishii, Ryotaro; Tanaka, Akihiro; Ataka, Suzuka; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Tomiyama, Takami; Mori, Hiroshi; Taylor, Mark; Allsop, David; Nakagawa, Masanori; Mizuno, Toshiki; Tokuda, Takahiko

    2017-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) has been a candidate as a potential anti-amyloid immunotherapy for Alzheimer disease (AD) because it contains anti-amyloid β (Aβ) antibodies. Although several studies with IVIg in AD have been published, changing levels of Aβ efflux from the brain, or disaggregation of Aβ species induced by immunotherapy, have not been properly investigated. Here, we carried out an open label study of therapy with IVIg in five patients with AD. We collected plasma from a peripheral vein (peripheral-plasma) and from the internal jugular vein (jugular-plasma) to estimate directly the efflux of soluble Aβ from the brain. We also measured high molecular weight (HMW) Aβ oligomers in CSF as a marker to detect disaggregated Aβ. IVIg infusions were well tolerated in the majority of cases. However, one study subject had epileptic seizures after IVIg. Levels of HMW CSF Aβ oligomers in all participants were significantly increased after IVIg. Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in jugular-plasma were continuously or temporarily elevated after treatment in three of five patients who showed preserved cognitive function, whereas levels of those in peripheral-plasma did not correlate with reactivity to the treatment. Other conventional biomarkers including 11C-Pittsburgh compound B retention were not altered after the treatment. These findings imply that HMW Aβ oligomer levels could be a better biomarker to reflect the anti-amyloid effects of IVIg than conventional Aβ species; moreover, Aβ in jugular-plasma seems to be a more direct and precise biomarker to estimate clearance of Aβ from the brain rather than Aβ in peripheral-plasma. UMIN000022319.

  20. Strength and deformation behaviors of veined marble specimens after vacuum heat treatment under conventional triaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Haijian; Jing, Hongwen; Yin, Qian; Yu, Liyuan; Wang, Yingchao; Wu, Xingjie

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical behaviors of rocks affected by high temperature and stress are generally believed to be significant for the stability of certain projects involving rocks, such as nuclear waste storage and geothermal resource exploitation. In this paper, veined marble specimens were treated to high temperature treatment and then used in conventional triaxial compression tests to investigate the effect of temperature, confining pressure, and vein angle on strength and deformation behaviors. The results show that the strength and deformation parameters of the veined marble specimens changed with the temperature, presenting a critical temperature of 600°C. The triaxial compression strength of a horizontal vein (β = 90°) is obviously larger than that of a vertical vein (β = 0°). The triaxial compression strength, elasticity modulus, and secant modulus have an approximately linear relation to the confining pressure. Finally, Mohr-Coulomb and Hoek-Brown criteria were respectively used to analyze the effect of confining pressure on triaxial compression strength.

  1. Internal Jugular Vein Cross-Sectional Area and Cerebrospinal Fluid Pulsatility in the Aqueduct of Sylvius: A Comparative Study between Healthy Subjects and Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Clive B.; Magnano, Christopher; Belov, Pavel; Krawiecki, Jacqueline; Ramasamy, Deepa P.; Hagemeier, Jesper; Zivadinov, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Constricted cerebral venous outflow has been linked with increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsatility in the aqueduct of Sylvius in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and healthy individuals. This study investigates the relationship between CSF pulsatility and internal jugular vein (IJV) cross-sectional area (CSA) in these two groups, something previously unknown. Methods 65 relapsing-remitting MS patients (50.8% female; mean age = 43.8 years) and 74 healthy controls (HCs) (54.1% female; mean age = 43.9 years) were investigated. CSF flow quantification was performed on cine phase-contrast MRI, while IJV-CSA was calculated using magnetic resonance venography. Statistical analysis involved correlation, and partial least squares correlation analysis (PLSCA). Results PLSCA revealed a significant difference (p<0.001; effect size = 1.072) between MS patients and HCs in the positive relationship between CSF pulsatility and IJV-CSA at C5-T1, something not detected at C2-C4. Controlling for age and cardiovascular risk factors, statistical trends were identified in HCs between: increased net positive CSF flow (NPF) and increased IJV-CSA at C5-C6 (left: r = 0.374, p = 0.016; right: r = 0.364, p = 0.019) and C4 (left: r = 0.361, p = 0.020); and increased net negative CSF flow and increased left IJV-CSA at C5-C6 (r = -0.348, p = 0.026) and C4 (r = -0.324, p = 0.039), whereas in MS patients a trend was only identified between increased NPF and increased left IJV-CSA at C5-C6 (r = 0.351, p = 0.021). Overall, correlations were weaker in MS patients (p = 0.015). Conclusions In healthy adults, increased CSF pulsatility is associated with increased IJV-CSA in the lower cervix (independent of age and cardiovascular risk factors), suggesting a biomechanical link between the two. This relationship is altered in MS patients. PMID:27135831

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Placement of Central Venous Port Systems via the Right Internal Jugular Vein: Are Chest X-Ray and/or Fluoroscopy Needed to Confirm the Correct Placement of the Device?

    PubMed

    Miccini, Michelangelo; Cassini, Diletta; Gregori, Matteo; Gazzanelli, Sergio; Cassibba, Simone; Biacchi, Daniele

    2016-10-01

    Percutaneous central venous port (CVP) placement using ultrasound-guidance (USG) via right internal jugular vein is described as a safe and effective procedure. The aim of this study is to determine whether intraoperative fluoroscopy (IF) and/or postoperative chest X-ray (CXR) are required to confirm the correct position of the catheter. Between January 2012 and December 2014, 302 adult patients underwent elective CVP system placement under USG. The standard venous access site was the right internal jugular vein. The length of catheter was calculated based on the height of the patient. IF was always performed to confirm US findings. 176 patients were men and 126 were women and average height was 176.2 cm (range 154-193 cm). The average length of the catheter was 16.4 cm (range 14-18). Catheter malposition and pneumothorax were observed in 4 (1.3 %) and 3 (1 %) patients, respectively. IF confirmed the correct position of the catheter in all cases. Catheter misplacement (4 cases) was previously identified and corrected on USG. Our rates of pneumothorax are in accordance with those of the literature (0.5-3 %). Ultrasonography has resulted in improved safety and effectiveness of port system implantation. The routine use of CXR and IF should be considered unnecessary.

  3. Brittle-viscous deformation of vein quartz under fluid-rich low greenschist facies conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjøll, H. J.; Viola, G.; Menegon, L.; Sørensen, B. E.

    2015-01-01

    A coarse grained, statically crystallized quartz vein, embedded in a phyllonitic matrix, was studied by EBSD and optical microscopy to gain insights into the processes of strain localization in quartz deformed under low-grade conditions, broadly coincident with the frictional-viscous transition. The vein is from a high strain zone at the front of the Porsa Imbricate Stack in the Paleoproterozoic Repparfjord Tectonic Window in northern Norway. The vein was deformed under lower greenschist facies conditions during deformation along a large out-of-sequence phyllonitic thrust of Caledonian age. The host phyllonite formed at the expense of metabasalt wherein feldspar broke down to form interconnected layers of fine, synkinematic phyllosilicates. In the mechanically weak framework of the phyllonite, the studied quartz vein acted as a relatively rigid body deforming mainly by coaxial strain. Viscous deformation was initially accommodated by basal ⟨a⟩ slip of quartz during the development of a mesoscopic pervasive extensional crenulation cleavage. Under the prevailing boundary conditions, however, dislocation glide-accommodated deformation of quartz resulted inefficient and led to dislocation tangling and strain hardening of the vein. In response to hardening, to the progressive increase of fluid pressure and the increasing competence contrast between the vein and the weak foliated host phyllonite, quartz crystals began to deform frictionally along specific, optimally oriented lattice planes, creating microgouges along microfractures. These were, however, rapidly sealed by nucleation of new grains as transiently over pressured fluids penetrated the deforming system. The new nucleated grains grew initially by solution-precipitation and later by grain boundary migration. Due to the random initial orientation of the vein crystals, strain was accommodated differently in the individual crystals, leading to the development of remarkably different microstructures. Crystals

  4. Cross-sectional area variations of internal jugular veins during supine head rotation in multiple sclerosis patients with chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency: a prospective diagnostic controlled study with duplex ultrasound investigation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Normally, chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) has been studied using echo-colour Doppler (ECD). Subjects are examined in the supine and sitting positions, in accordance with a static protocol without rotation of the head. A dynamic approach, to assess venous sizes with different degrees of head rotation, has only been performed to improve jugular venous catheterisation. These echographic studies have suggested that head rotation to the contralateral side increases the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the internal jugular veins (IJVs) in supine subjects. Our goal was to evaluate the behaviour of CSA of the IJVs during supine head rotation in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with CCSVI, compared to healthy controls (HCs). Methods The IJVs of 313 MS patients with CCSVI (male 43.8%, male/female 137/176; mean age 45 years old, range 19–77 years) and 298 HCs, matched by gender (male 43.6%, male/female 130/168) and age (mean age 46 years old, range 20–79 years), were compared using ECD. Their CSAs were evaluated with the subjects seated in a tiltable chair, first in the supine position at the level of the cricoid cartilage, with the head in a neutral position, and then after contralateral rotation to 90° from midline. Results Significant differences between the jugular CSAs before and after head rotation were observed only in the MS patients for the IJVs with wall collapse (F[6,1215] = 6414.57, p < 0.001), showing on longitudinal scans a typical “hourglass” aspect that we defined as “miopragic”. No significant difference was found in the distribution of these miopragic veins with regard to MS duration. There was a strong association between the CCSVI scores and the complexity of jugular morphological types (Χ2 [9, N = 313] = 75.183, p < 0.001). Wall miopragia was mainly observed in MS patients with SP (59.3%) and PP (70.0%) clinical forms, compared to RR (48.3%) forms (p = 0.015). Conclusion A dynamic ECD

  5. Central venous infusion port inserted via high versus low jugular venous approaches: retrospective comparison of outcome and complications.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong Suk; Kim, Young Il; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jung Im; Seo, Hyobin; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Youkyung; Lim, Min Kyung; Park, Young Suk

    2009-12-01

    To retrospectively compare immediate and long-term outcome of central venous infusion port inserted via right high versus low jugular vein approaches. The study included 163 patients (125 women patients, 38 men patients; age range, 18-79 years; mean age, 53 years); 142 patients underwent port insertion with low jugular vein approach and 21 patients with high jugular vein approach. The causes of high jugular vein puncture were metastatic lymphadenopathy (n=7), operation scar (n=6), radiation scar (n=5), failure of low jugular vein puncture (n=2), and abnormal course of right subclavian artery (n=1). Medical records and radiologic studies were reviewed retrospectively to determine and compare the outcome and the occurrence of complication related to port. The procedure-related complications were all minor (n=14, 8.6%) in both groups; hematoma (n=4, 2.8% in low jugular puncture group and n=1, 4.8% in high jugular puncture group, p=0.6295), air embolism (n=2, 1.4% in low jugular puncture group and n=0 in high jugular puncture group, p=0.5842) and minor bleeding (n=5, 3.5% in low jugular vein puncture group and n=2, 9.5% in high jugular vein puncture group, p=0.2054). The average length of follow-up was 431 days for low jugular vein puncture group and 284 days for high jugular vein puncture group. The difference between two groups was significant (p=0.0349). The reasons for catheter removal were patients' death (59 in low jugular puncture group and 14 in high jugular puncture group, p=0.0465), suspected infection (11 in low jugular vein puncture group and 2 in high jugular vein puncture group, p=0.8242), catheter occlusion (four in low jugular vein puncture group and one in high jugular vein puncture group, p=0.6583). The catheter tip migrated upward an average of 1.86 cm (range, -0.5 to 5.0 cm) in low jugular vein puncture group and 1.56 cm (range, 0-3.6 cm) in high jugular vein puncture group and there was no significant difference (p=0.4232). Right high jugular vein

  6. Erythrocyte oxidative stress is associated with cell deformability in patients with retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Becatti, M; Marcucci, R; Gori, A M; Mannini, L; Grifoni, E; Alessandrello Liotta, A; Sodi, A; Tartaro, R; Taddei, N; Rizzo, S; Prisco, D; Abbate, R; Fiorillo, C

    2016-11-01

    Essentials Retinal vein occlusion (RVO), characterized by blood hyperviscosity, has an unclear pathogenesis. We aimed to find out if hemorheological profile is altered by oxidative stress in RVO patients. Red blood cell (RBC) oxidative stress is associated to whole blood viscosity and RBC deformability. Reactive oxygen species alter RBC membrane rigidity, playing a key role in RVO pathogenesis.

  7. Successful Percutaneous Transcatheter Patent Foramen Ovale Closure Through The Right Internal Jugular Vein Using Stiff Amplatzer Catheter With A Reshaped Tip

    PubMed Central

    Fanari, Zaher; Hammami, Sumaya; Hopkins, James T.

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) remains challenging when femoral venous approach is not available. We describe the successful closure of a PFO using the right internal jugular venous approach and a catheter delivery system with a reshaped tip in a patient with a PFO, recurrent stroke, recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, bilateral deep venous thrombosis and thrombosed bilateral inferior vena cava filter. PMID:28751787

  8. Brittle-viscous deformation of vein quartz under fluid-rich low greenschist facies conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgen Kjøll, Hans; Viola, Giulio; Menegon, Luca; Sørensen, Bjørn

    2015-04-01

    A coarse grained, statically crystallized quartz vein with a random CPO, embedded in a phyllonitic matrix, was studied by optical microscopy, SEM imaging and EBSD to gain insights into the processes of strain localization in quartz deformed under low greenschist facies conditions at the frictional-viscous transition. The vein is located in a high strain zone at the front of an imbricate stack of Caledonian age along the northwesternmost edge of the Repparfjord Tectonic Window in northern Norway. The vein was deformed within the Nussirjavrri Fault Zone (NFZ), an out-of-sequence thrust with a phyllonitic core characterized by a ramp-flat-ramp geometry, NNW plunging stretching lineations and top-to-the SSE thrusting kinematics. Deformation conditions are typical of the frictional-viscous transition. The phyllonitic core formed at the expense of metabasalt wherein feldspar broke down to form interconnected layers of fine, synkinematic phyllosilicates. In the mechanically weak framework of the phyllonite, the studied quartz vein acted as a relatively rigid body deforming mainly by coaxial strain. Viscous deformation, related to the development of a mesoscopic pervasive extensional crenulation cleavage, was accommodated within the vein initially by basal slip of suitably oriented quartz crystals, which produced e.g. undulose extinction, extinction bands and bulging grain boundaries. In the case of misoriented quartz crystals, however, glide-accommodated dislocation creep resulted soon inefficient and led to localized dislocation tangling and strain hardening. In response to 1) hardening, 2) progressive increase of fluid pressure within the actively deforming vein and 3) increasing competence contrast between the vein and the surrounding weak, foliated phyllonitic fault core, quartz crystals began to deform frictionally along specific lattice planes oriented optimally with respect to the imposed stress field. Microfaulting generated small volumes of gouge along

  9. Jugular fossa meningioma: presentation and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Rutt, Amy L; Chen, Xiaoli; Sataloff, Robert T

    2009-10-01

    Primary jugular fossa meningiomas are among the rarest subtypes of meningioma. They are intimately related to the lower cranial nerves, the jugular bulb and vein, and the temporal bone, and they have a tendency to extend both intra- and extracranially. The most common morbidity associated with jugular fossa lesions is lower cranial nerve deficits. In these cases, the differential diagnosis and preoperative radiographic diagnosis are very important because preoperative management and operative planning for the jugular fossa subtype differ considerably from those of other types of meningioma. Because of the rarity of this condition, our understanding of its treatment, long-term follow-up, and recurrence is limited. As experience with radiosurgical treatment of all meningiomas is accumulating, we may find that radiosurgery of jugular fossa meningiomas is appropriate. In the meantime, cure is still possible with complete surgical resection, and surgical morbidity can be minimized through meticulous planning and surgical technique. We describe a case of primary jugular fossa meningioma in a 45-year-old man who presented with complaints of chronic left aural fullness, hearing loss, and difficulty understanding voices. Imaging revealed the presence of a destructive jugular fossa mass. The patient underwent surgical resection without complication, and he was free of recurrence at 1 year of follow-up.

  10. Deformation and veining processes on the subduction zone; example from the Cretaceous Shimanto accretionary complex in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokiwa, T.; Kageyama, N.; Yoshida, H.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the authors discuss the relationship between deformation and veining stages in the accretionary complex in order to understand the deformation and fluid flow process during the subduction. This study deals with the Miyama Formation in the Cretaceous Shimanto accretionary complex located in the Kii Peninsula of Japan. The deformation can be divided three types with four types of vein. Based on the differences, the process can be divided four stage by their cutting relationship as follow. Stage 1; the deformation (D1) in this stage is characterized by the aspect ratio of the deformed clasts with range from 0.1 to 0.4, and pinch-and-swell structure and budinaged structures of the sandstone are developed. The veins (V1) are recognized only within the sandstone, and the veins are cut by muddy matrix. Stage 2; the deformation (D2) is characterized by the aspect ratio is more than 0.4, and is distributed along the unit boundary. The clasts such as sandstone and chert are strongly sheared, and random fabric is often recognized. The vein (V2) in this stage cut the D1, and the V2 and D2 are cut by each other. Stage 3; outcrop-scale faults (D3) cutting D1 and D2 has been progressed in this stage. The vein (V3) is recognized along D3. Stage 4; the vein (V4) cutting D1 to D3 is developed in this stage. From the above-mentioned occurrence and data shown by previous studies of the Miyama Formation, process of each Stage interpreted as follows; Stage 1 developed underthrusting, Stages 2 and 3 correspond to underplating of subducted sediments. In addition, it is considered that Stage 4 is in later stage of underplating. The main components of the V1 to V3 veins are calcite and/or quartz. On the other hand, the V4 vein consists mainly of siderite and ankerite, and contain an abundance of Fe than the other veins. Morphological feature of V1 and V3 veins also show blocky texture suggesting higher rate growth than fracture opening, and V2 vein indicate syn-taxial growth

  11. Emergent Median Sternotomy for Mediastinal Hematoma: A Rare Complication following Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization for Chemoport Insertion—A Case Report and Review of Relevant Literature

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Saptarshi

    2014-01-01

    Mediastinal hematoma is a rare complication following insertion of a central venous catheter with only few cases reported in the English literature. We report a case of a 71-year-old female who was admitted for elective chemoport placement. USG guided right internal jugular access was attempted using the Seldinger technique. Resistance was met while threading the guidewire. USG showed a chronic clot burden in the RIJ. A microvascular access was established under fluoroscopic guidance. Rest of the procedure was completed without any further issues. Following extubation, the patient complained of right-sided chest pain radiating to the back. Chest X-ray revealed a contained white out in the right upper lung field. She became hemodynamically unstable. Repeated X-ray showed progression of the hematoma. Median Sternotomy showed posterior mediastinal hematoma tracking into right pleural cavity. Active bleeding from the puncture site at RIJ-SCL junction was repaired. Patient had an uneventful recovery. Injury to the central venous system is the result of either penetrating trauma or iatrogenic causes as in our case. A possible explanation of our complication may be attributed to the forced manipulation of the dilator or guidewire against resistance. Clavicle and sternum offer bony protection to the underlying vital venous structures and injuries often need sternotomy with or without neck extension. Division of the clavicle and disarticulation of the sternoclavicular joint may be required for optimum exposure. Meticulous surgical technique, knowledge of the possible complications, and close monitoring in the postprocedural period are of utmost importance. Chest X-ray showed to be routinely done to detect any complication early. PMID:24592335

  12. [A clinical case of young, oral combined contraceptive using women, heterozygous carrier of the Factor V (Leiden) which revealed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein and brain ischemia with cerebral infarction and ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Kovachev, S; Ramshev, K; Ramsheva, Z; Ivanov, A; Ganovska, A

    2013-01-01

    Thrombophilia is associated with increased risks of venous thrombosis in women taking oral contraceptive preparations. Universal thrombophilia screening in women prior to prescribing oral contraceptive preparations is not supported by current evidence. The case is presented of a 23 year-old women with a personal history of interruption and on the same day started with oral contraceptive (0.03 microg ethynil estradiol - 0.075 microg gestodene), which due on a 18 pill/day to acute headache, increasing vomiting and speaking defects. Physical/neurologic/gynecologic examinations observed a normal status. The MRI and CT revealed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein and brain ischemia with cerebral infarction and ischemic stroke. The acute therapy of thrombotic findings was accompanied with many tests. The thrombophilia PCR-Real time - test finds heterozygous carrier of the Factor V (Leiden). This case shows the need of large prospective studies that should be undertaken to refine the risks and establish the associations of thrombophilias with venous thrombosis among contraceptive users. The key to a prompt diagnosis is to know the risk factors. The relative value of a thrombophilia screening programme before contraceptive using needs to be established.

  13. Experimental study of materials for patch graft on right ventricular outflow tract under extracorporeal circulation in dogs--comparison between Denacol EX-313-treated bovine jugular vein graft and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (EPTFE) graft.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, H; Sugiyama, S; Shibazaki, A; Tanaka, R; Takashima, K; Noishiki, Y; Yamane, Y

    2001-09-01

    A comparison between a bovine jugular vein treated with a hydrophilic polyepoxy compound cross-linker (Denacol), and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (EPTFE), an artificial material, as a patch graft for the reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract under extracorporeal circulation in dogs, as if they had pulmonic stenosis, was made. Hemodynamic and histological examinations were conducted two weeks after the transplantation. Hemodynamic problems were not observed in either the Denacol or EPTFE groups. Macroscopically, organization of new tissue on the graft surface was more marked in the EPTFE group than in the Denacol group, and newly-formed tissue was seen surrounding the border of the graft and burying it in the EPTFE group. In the Denacol group, microscopic findings revealed the presence of inflammatory cells and fibroblasts, and an invasion of the graft by collagen fibers and elastic fibers. In the EPTFE group, there was minimal cellular infiltration of the graft and a thick layer consisting of collagen fibers and fibroblasts was observed around the graft. These results indicated that two weeks after transplantation the graft was better assimilated and organized with blood vasculature in the patch graft in the Denacol group than in the EPTFE group.

  14. Congenital atresia of portal vein with portocaval shunt associated with cardiac defects, skeletal deformities, and skin lesions in a boy.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Manphool; Lal, Anupam; Thapa, Babu R; Prakash, Mahesh; Shanbhogue, Krishna P; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2008-08-01

    Congenital absence of portal vein is a rare anomaly that results from aberrant venous development in early embryonic life. The intestinal and splenic venous drainage bypass the liver and may drain directly into inferior vena cava or the left renal vein or the left hepatic vein. This rare anomaly is commonly associated with other congenital malformations and generally limited to females. We describe a rare case of aberrant portal vein development with congenital portocaval shunt (end-to-side) in a 3.5-year male child associated with cardiac defects (atrial and ventricular septal defects), skeletal deformities (flexion deformity and clinodactyly of digits and toes), and lichen planus with café au lait macules of skin.

  15. Safe and easy method with little modification in technique is useful for successful internal jugular vein cannulation on same side even after intra-arterial puncture without using ultrasound guidance in adult cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Thosani, Rajesh; Patel, Jigar; Gandhi, Hemang; Doshi, Chirag; Kothari, Jignesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The modification in technique is useful for successful right-sided internal jugular vein (IJV) cannulation on the same side even after intra-arterial puncture without using ultrasound guidance in adult patients. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in total 160 adult patient from American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade II to III patients male (n = 95) and female (n = 65) who underwent cardiac surgery where cannulation was done on right sided by triple lumen catheter (7 French) using Seldinger technique. Results: Majority of patients were cannulated successfully by Seldinger technique with single or double attempt except for five patients in which arterial puncture occurred. All five patients were cannulated successfully on the same side with this modified technique without any significant major complications. They were managed by application of blocker at the end of arterial needle puncture without removing it. In our routine practice, we were used to removing this needle and applying compression for few minutes to prevent hematoma formation after an arterial puncture. In this study, cannula was used as a marker or guideline for the relocation of IJV on the same side and recannulation was performed by changing the direction of needle on same side lateral to the previous one and without going towards the same direction to prevent the arterial puncture again. Conclusion: Most simple and useful modified technique for institutes where the complications are most common with trainee doctors and in hospitals where there is no advanced facility like ultrasound-guided cannulation available. By this modification, it will be time saving, very comfortable, and user-friendly technique with high success rate. PMID:27052069

  16. Three sets of fine extinction bands in a tectonically deformed vein-quartz single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derez, Tine; Van der Donck, Tom; Pennock, Gill; Drury, Martyn; Sintubin, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Intracrystalline fine extinction bands (FEBs) in quartz, are narrow (less than 5µm thick), planar microstructures with a misorientation up to 5° with respect to the host crystal, occurring in closely spaced sets (spacing of 4-5μm). FEBs have been commonly attributed to a large range of brittle and/or crystal-plastic mechanisms, revealing considerable disagreement on the responsible crystal-plastic slip systems and the ambient conditions. Another question that arises, is whether or not the FEBs rotate from a basal plane orientation to orientations ranging between the basal and prism planes. Usually only one set of FEBs occurs in a single crystal, though two sets are observed, in particular with increasing strain. Tentatively, a maximum of two sets of sub-basal FEBs has been postulated to develop in a single quartz crystal in a tectonic context. However, we identified several crystals in naturally deformed vein-quartz containing three sets of FEBs. The vein-quartz has been deformed under sub-greenschist metamorphic conditions, during the late Palaeozoic Variscan orogeny, in the High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium). The vein-quartz has been subjected to bulging dynamic recrystallisation and shows a high degree of undulatory extinction, abundant subgrains and wide extinction bands sub-parallel to the c-axis. We attempted to characterise these three sets of FEBs by means of light microscopy, EBSD-OIM and universal stage microscopy. In both cases studied the c-axis is inclined less than 8° with respect to the thin-section plane. The different sets of FEBs show a consistent orientation with respect to the c-axis. One set of FEBs deviates maximum 10° from the basal plane. The other two sets deviate between 15 and 35° from a basal plane orientation. Corresponding FEBs, at the same angle with respect to the c-axis, have similar morphologies. In relative EBSD orientation maps FEBs show a maximum misorientation of 3°, and have a lower pattern quality than the host crystal

  17. The origin of mean arterial and jugular venous blood pressures in giraffes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Graham; Maloney, Shane K; Mitchell, Duncan; Keegan, D James

    2006-07-01

    Using a mechanical model of the giraffe neck and head circulation consisting of a rigid, ascending, 'carotid' limb, a 'cranial' circulation that could be rigid or collapsible, and a descending, 'jugular' limb that also could be rigid or collapsible, we have analyzed the origin of the high arterial and venous pressures in giraffe, and whether blood flow is assisted by a siphon. When the tubes were rigid and the 'jugular' limb exit was lower than the 'carotid' limb entrance a siphon operated, 'carotid' hydrostatic pressures became more negative, and flow was 3.3 l min(-1) but ceased when the 'cranial' and 'jugular' limbs were collapsible or when the 'jugular' limb was opened to the atmosphere. Pumping water through the model produced positive pressures in the 'carotid' limb similar to those found in giraffe. Applying an external 'tissue' pressure to the 'jugular' tube during pump flow produced the typical pressures found in the jugular vein in giraffe. Constriction of the lowest, 'jugular cuff', portion of the 'jugular' limb showed that the cuff may augment the orthostatic reflex during head raising. Except when all tubes were rigid, pressures were unaffected by a siphon. We conclude that mean arterial blood pressure in giraffes is a consequence of the hydrostatic pressure generated by the column of blood in the neck, that tissue pressure around the collapsible jugular vein produces the known jugular pressures, and that a siphon does not assist flow through the cranial circulation.

  18. Misplaced central venous catheter in the jugular venous arch exposed during dissection before sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Tae-Eun; Jee, Daelim

    2008-11-01

    Subclavian vein catheterization rarely results in misplacement of the central venous catheter (CVC) into the jugular venous arch (JVA). We present a case of misplacement of the CVC into the JVA during cardiac surgery.

  19. Internal jugular venous thrombosis due to Trousseau's syndrome as the presenting feature of metastatic prostate carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bandara, Asela Rasika; Wimalarathna, Harith; Kalupahana, Ranjith; Gunathilake, Sonali Sihindi Chapa

    2016-04-21

    Internal jugular vein thrombosis is a rare vascular event with a potentially fatal outcome. Of the known etiologies, internal malignancies, either known or occult, are well described. Even though malignancies are known to present with internal jugular vein thrombosis, it rarely occurs due to prostate carcinoma. Many cases of jugular vein and superior vena cava thrombosis secondary to malignancies are due to metastatic compression of veins. Recurrent and unusual vascular thrombosis due to hypercoagulability associated with malignancies is also known as Trousseau's syndrome. Here we report a rare case of a patient with internal jugular vein thrombosis as a presenting feature of metastatic prostate carcinoma, which is a case of Trousseau's syndrome. A 75-year-old Sri Lankan man with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and past history of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage presented with a short history of painless swelling in his left supraclavicular fossa. An examination revealed the swelling was due to a thickened left external jugular vein. A duplex ultrasound scan revealed left-sided internal jugular, external jugular, and brachiocephalic venous thrombosis. Surveillance into underlying malignancies showed an irregular, hard prostate gland suspicious of prostate carcinoma, which was proven with histology, and biochemically. A computed tomography scan found extensive vertebral, pelvic bone, intra-abdominal lymph node metastasis, and a single right-sided lower lung metastatic lesion, with no direct involvement of the jugular vein. Spontaneous thrombosis of the internal jugular vein due to Trousseau's syndrome is rare and unusual. Clinicians should promptly investigate for malignancies as it can be the first presentation of underlying occult malignancies. Although prostate carcinomas are rare to present with internal jugular vein thrombosis, this case illustrates the importance of having a high degree of suspicion in the appropriate clinical setting.

  20. Deformation within the Pisco Basin sedimentary record (southern Peru): Stratabound orthogonal vein sets and their impact on fault development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustichelli, Andrea; Di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele; Bianucci, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    This outcrop-based study reports diffuse joints and veins, normal to strike-slip fault zones and minor folds that developed, from Miocene to Quaternary, within the clastic to siliceous sedimentary record of the forearc Pisco Basin of southern Peru. Patterns, orientations, dimensional parameters and other outcrop-scale characteristics of the various deformation features are illustrated and their genetic mechanisms and timing of development are inferred. These new structural data and interpretations allow a better constraint of the structural style and evolution of the Pisco Basin, and can represent useful guidelines for characterizing the outcrop-scale deformation affecting similar forearc basins along the Peruvian coast. Major results of this study are that the development of the documented deformation features, their patterns, dimensional parameters and kinematics seem influenced by local perturbations of the paleostress field by mechanic processes partly independent of plate tectonics forces. These processes include strain localization on both pre-existing and progressively forming new structural discontinuities, and cyclic switches of the horizontal, principal stress axes σ2 and σ3. In particular, we discuss how different normal fault patterns, from sub-parallel to multidirectional/polygonal, could form in a same deformation phase in response of the local σ2/σ3 magnitude ratio, as an evolution of stratabound, mutually orthogonal vein sets.

  1. From vein precipitates to deformation and fluid rock interaction within a SSZ: Insights from the Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheuz, Peter; Quandt, Dennis; Kurz, Walter

    2017-04-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) expeditions 352 and 351 drilled through oceanic crust of the Philippine Sea plate. The two study areas are located near the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) fore arc and in the Amami Sankaku Basin. The primary objective was to improve our understanding of supra-subduction zones (SSZ) and the process of subduction initiation. The recovered drill cores during IODP expedition 352 represent approximately 50 Ma old fore arc basalts (FAB) and boninites revealing an entire volcanic sequence of a SSZ. Expedition 351 drilled FAB like oceanic crust similar in age to the FABs of expedition 352. In this study we present data on vein microstructures, geochemical data and isotopic signatures of vein precipitates to give new insights into fluid flow and precipitation processes and deformation within the Izu-Bonin fore arc. Veins formed predominantly as a consequence of hydrofracturing resulting in the occurrence of branched vein systems and brecciated samples. Along these hydrofractures the amount of altered host rock fragments varies and locally alters the host rock completely to zeolites and carbonates. Subordinately extensional veins released after the formation of the host rocks. Cross-cutting relationships of different vein types point to multiple fracturing events subsequently filled with minerals originating from a fluid with isotopic seawater signature. Based on vein precipitates, their morphology and their growth patterns four vein types have been defined. Major vein components are (Mg-) calcite and various zeolites determined by Raman spectra and electron microprobe analyses. Zeolites result from alteration of volcanic glass during interaction with a seawaterlike fluid. Type I veins which are characterized by micritic infill represent neptunian dykes. They predominantly occur in the upper levels of drill cores being the result of an initial volume change subsequently to crystallization of the host rocks. Type II veins are

  2. Deformation of a continental margin sequence under a thrust sheet: complex stress history in a high pressure cell revealed by vein systems in the Oman Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgo, Simon; Urai, Janos L.; Grobe, Arne

    2016-04-01

    Seven deformation phases can be mapped in mesozoic carbonates of the Jebel Akhdar mountains in North Oman. These include an early horizontal NE-SW directed extension that produced bedding confined vein sets with evidence for anticlockwise rotation of the stress field over time, interpreted to have developed during the thrust sheet emplacement. It is followed by a phase of top-NE bedding parallel shearing which rotates these veins on the North side of the mountains. The next phase is normal to oblique slip faults followed by at least two phases of strike-slip deformation. A "background" ductile deformation (maximum burial temperatures of 250 °C) is shown bu deformed fossils and diagenetic concretions. Each of these phases is consistently documented by a large number of observations of overprinting in nearly continuous outcrops. Each deformation phase produces vein sets that do not only differ in orientation but also in occurrence and appearance. Early vein sets exhibit a high stratigraphic variability, but are laterally very stable. With the onset of faulting, the stratigraphic variability decreases and the lateral variability becomes more significant. Even though the area offers excellent outcrop conditions with nearly 100% exposure, it is virtually impossible to find two outcrops that exhibit the same vein patterns. This has interesting implications for vein system analysis and is due to two reasons: (1) the stratigraphic and lateral variability of occurrence and orientation of each vein set cause different combination of vein sets do develop in different layers (2) Intersecting vein sets can show very different interaction such as crosscutting and reactivation, depending on the mechanical properties of the host rock and the veins.

  3. The jugular venous pressure revisited

    PubMed Central

    CHIACO, JOHN MICHAEL S. CHUA; PARIKH, NISHA I.; FERGUSSON, DAVID J.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of the jugular venous pressure is often inadequately performed and undervalued. Here, we review the physiologic and anatomic basis for the jugular venous pressure, including the discrepancy between right atrial and central venous pressures. We also describe the correct method of evaluating this clinical finding and review the clinical relevance of the jugular venous pressure, especially its value in assessing the severity and response to treatment of congestive heart failure. Waveforms reflective of specific conditions are also discussed. PMID:24085809

  4. Microstructural analysis and calcite piezometry on hydrothermal veins: Insights into the deformation history of the Cocos Plate at Site U1414 (IODP Expedition 344)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstätter, Jennifer; Kurz, Walter; Rogowitz, Anna

    2017-08-01

    In this study we present microstructural data from hydrothermal veins in the sedimentary cover and the igneous basement recovered from Hole U1414A, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 344 (Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project), to constrain deformation mechanism operating in the subducting Cocos Plate. Cathodoluminescence studies, mechanical e-twin piezometry and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of carbonate veins were used to give insights into the deformation conditions and to help to understand the tectonic deformation history of the Cocos Plate offshore Costa Rica. Analyses of microstructures in the sedimentary rocks and in the basalt of the igneous basement reveal brittle deformation, as well as crystal-plastic deformation of the host rock and the vein material. Cathodoluminescence images showed that in the basalt fluid flow and related precipitation occurred over several episodes. The differential stresses, obtained from two different piezometers using the same parameter (twin density), indicate various mean differential stresses of 49 ± 11 and 69 ± 30 MPa and EBSD mapping of calcite veins reveals low-angle subgrain boundaries. Deformation temperatures are restricted to the range from 170°C to 220°C, due to the characteristics of the existing twins and the lack of high-temperature intracrystalline deformation mechanisms (>220°C). The obtained results suggest that deformation occurred over a period associated with changes of ambient temperatures, occurrence of fluids and hydrofracturing, induced differential stresses due to the bending of the plate at the trench, and related seismic activity.

  5. A survey of the use of ultrasound guidance in internal jugular venous cannulation.

    PubMed

    McGrattan, T; Duffty, J; Green, J S; O'Donnell, N

    2008-11-01

    It has been that suggested the use of two dimensional (2D) ultrasound to facilitate placement of central venous cannulae in the internal jugular vein improves patient safety and reduces complications. Since the introduction of the National Institute for Clinical Excellence Technology Appraisal Guideline Number 49 in 2002, promoting the use of ultrasound in placement of internal jugular venous cannulae, utilisation of ultrasound has increased throughout the United Kingdom. We report the findings of a postal survey of 2000 senior anaesthetists in the United Kingdom which enquired about their use of ultrasound for internal jugular vein cannulae placement. Only 27% use 2D ultrasound as their first choice technique, although 35% use it as their first choice when teaching. There was no significant difference in practice between those working within a sub specialty in anaesthesia. There continues to be discrepancies between the application of the guideline and how senior anaesthetists both site and teach the placement of internal jugular vein central venous cannulae.

  6. The Ikom-Mamfe basin, Nigeria: A study of fracture and mineral vein lineament trends and Cretaceous deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oden, M. I.; Egeh, E. U.; Amah, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    The Ikom-Mamfe basin is approximately a 130 km long, east-west abutment onto the eastern flank of the lower Benue trough of Nigeria and extends westwards into Cameroon. Two hundred and six fracture lineaments were analyzed in the Nigerian sector of this basin. They vary in length from 0.5 to 23.75 km, with the most frequently occurring fracture length being about 2.25 km. The most prominent fracture sets have NE-SW and NW-SE orientations, while less prominent patterns are in the NNE-SSW and ESE-WNW directions. NW-SE and NNE-SSW fracture sets are interpreted as "ac" extension fractures from two different deformation episodes, while NE-SW and ESE-WNW sets are "bc" tensile fractures parallel to the axes of F1 and F2 folds, respectively. This implies two deformation episodes in this basin, with the earlier one producing the NE-SW (F1) fold axes, exactly as in the Benue trough. Two prominent mineral vein trends in the basin are the NW-SE and NNE-SSW sets, in which minerals are loaded in "ac" extension fractures. The orientations, lengths and frequency of these lineaments should help in differentiating their ages. The less prominent veins are in the NE-SW and ESE-WNW directions, which are in the "bc" tensile fractures. Early Cretaceous sediments are characterized by NW-SE major and NE-SW minor sets of veins, while the late Cretaceous sequence is characterized by NNE-SSW major and ESE-WNW minor, mainly barite, veins. More than 70% of the barite samples tested gave specific gravity values of 4.2 and above, which is the range specified by the American Petroleum Institution (API) as drilling mud additive or weighting agent. Other vein-filling minerals in this basin are lead ore (galena), zinc ore (sphalerite), pyrite and amethyst, which are altogether subsidiary to barite mineralization.

  7. Intradural jugular foramen tumors.

    PubMed

    Mattos, João Paulo; Ramina, Ricardo; Borges, Wilson; Ghizoni, Enrico; Fernandes, Yvens B; Paschoal, Jorge R; Honorato, Donizeti C; Borges, Guilherme

    2004-12-01

    Eleven patients with jugular foramen lesions with or without extradural extension were operated at University Hospital of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil, between 1998 and 2001. Neck dissection, mastoidectomy without transposition of the facial nerve and myofascial flap reconstruction of the cranial base with an especially developed technique were carried out in 7 patients. Four patients were operated using retrosigmoid craniectomy. Total excision was accomplished in 9 cases. All patients did not show evidence of disease progression at least after 2 years follow-up. There was no mortality. New lower cranial nerve deficits occurred in 5 patients. Nine maintain or improved their preoperative status based on Karnofsky and Glasgow Outcome Scale. A complex anatomy of this region demand wide exposures for treat those tumors. For this reason, an adequate approach for curative resection of most lesions and an efficient skull base reconstruction decreasing postoperative morbidity are essential.

  8. Raised jugular venous pressure intensifies release of brain injury biomarkers in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, Wojciech; Kotlinska, Edyta; Rzecki, Ziemowit; Czajkowski, Marek; Stadnik, Adam; Olszewski, Krzysztof

    2012-12-01

    Neurologic damage after cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation is multifactorial. Despite several studies, its pathophysiology is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the changes in jugular venous pressure and to analyze their effect on perioperative brain injury measured by biomarkers in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Observational study. Department of cardiac surgery in a medical university hospital. Adult patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting with extracorporeal circulation under general anesthesia. The right jugular vein was cannulated in retrograde fashion. Jugular venous pressure was measured in the jugular vein bulb (JVBP). Concentrations of plasma glial fibrillary acidic protein, tau protein, arteriovenous lactate, and jugular vein saturation were measured as the markers of brain injury during the surgery and early postoperative period. All were analyzed in relation to JVBP. Increased JVBP was noted after extracorporeal circulation and after surgery. A significant increase >12 mmHg for JVBP, increased plasma glial fibrillary acidic protein, tau protein, arteriovenous lactate concentrations, and decreased jugular vein saturation were observed. Cardiac surgery increased JVBP and an increased JVBP > 12 mmHg intensified an increase in brain injury biomarker concentrations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Jugular venous reflux on magnetic resonance angiography and radionuclide venography

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Tomohisa; Okuchi, Sachi; Yamamoto, Akira; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Fujimoto, Koji; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between the signal from retrograde venous flow on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and retrograde upward flow from the left brachiocephalic vein has not been explored. Purpose To reveal the frequency of jugular venous reflux using MRA and nuclear venography in patients being evaluated for cerebral volume and blood flow. Material and Methods A total of 229 patients with cognitive disturbance who had undergone brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on the same day to evaluate cerebral blood flow were evaluated. Jugular venous reflux was measured on MRA and nuclear venography, which was conducted just after injection of N-isopropyl-123I-p-iodoamphetamine for the SPECT study. Results MRA showed jugular reflux in seven patients on the right side, and in 22 on the left. Nuclear venography showed jugular reflux in six patients on the right side, and in 20 on the left. Conclusion Jugular venous reflux was observed mostly on the left side. Retrograde flow was observed on both MRA and nuclear venography in half of the cases, with the rest only on one of the modalities. PMID:27994882

  10. Locating the optimal internal jugular target site for central venous line placement.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Chris R; Murtagh, Kevin R; Mills, Jaime; Deitte, Lori A; Rice, Mark J; Tighe, Patrick J

    2016-09-01

    Historically, the placement of internal jugular central venous lines has been accomplished by using external landmarks to help identify target-rich locations in order to steer clear of dangerous structures. This paradigm is largely being displaced, as ultrasound has become routine practice, raising new considerations regarding target locations and risk mitigation. Most human anatomy texts depict the internal jugular vein as a straight columnar structure that exits the cranial vault the same size that it enters the thoracic cavity. We dispute the notion that the internal jugulars are cylindrical columns that symmetrically descend into the thoracic cavity, and purport that they are asymmetric conical structures. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate 100 consecutive adult chest and neck computed tomography exams that were imaged at an inpatient hospital. We measured the internal jugular on the left and right sides at three different levels to look for differences in size as the internal jugular descends into the thoracic cavity. We revealed that as the internal jugular descends into the thorax, the area of the vessel increases and geometrically resembles a conical structure. We also reconfirmed that the left internal jugular is smaller than the right internal jugular. Understanding that the largest target area for central venous line placement is the lower portion of the right internal jugular vein will help to better target vascular access for central line placement. This is the first study the authors are aware of that depicts the internal jugular as a conical structure as opposed to the commonly depicted symmetrical columnar structure frequently illustrated in anatomy textbooks. This target area does come with additional risk, as the closer you get to the thoracic cavity, the greater the chances for lung injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Water stress deforms tracheids peripheral to the leaf vein of a tropical conifer.

    PubMed

    Brodribb, Tim J; Holbrook, N Michele

    2005-03-01

    Just as a soggy paper straw is prone to yielding under the applied suction of a thirsty drinker, the xylem tracheids in leaves seem prone to collapse as water potential declines, impeding their function. Here we describe the collapse, under tension, of lignified cells peripheral to the leaf vein of a broad-leaved rainforest conifer, Podocarpus grayi de Laub. Leaves of Podocarpus are characterized by an array of cylindrical tracheids aligned perpendicular to the leaf vein, apparently involved in the distribution of water radially through the mesophyll. During leaf desiccation the majority of these tracheids collapsed from circular to flat over the water potential range -1.5 to -2.8 MPa. An increase in the percentage of tracheids collapsed during imposed water stress was mirrored by declining leaf hydraulic conductivity (K(leaf)), implying a direct effect on water transport efficiency. Stomata responded to water stress by closing at -2.0 MPa when 45% of cells were collapsed and K(leaf) had declined by 25%. This was still substantially before the initial indications of cavitation-induced loss of hydraulic conductance in the leaf vein, at -3 MPa. Plants droughted until 49% of tracheids had collapsed were found to fully recover tracheid shape and leaf function 1 week after rewatering. A simple mechanical model of tracheid collapse, derived from the theoretical buckling pressure for pipes, accurately predicted the collapse dynamics observed in P. grayi, substantiating estimates of cell wall elasticity and measured leaf water potential. The possible adaptive advantages of collapsible vascular tissue are discussed.

  12. Water Stress Deforms Tracheids Peripheral to the Leaf Vein of a Tropical Conifer1

    PubMed Central

    Brodribb, Tim J.; Holbrook, N. Michele

    2005-01-01

    Just as a soggy paper straw is prone to yielding under the applied suction of a thirsty drinker, the xylem tracheids in leaves seem prone to collapse as water potential declines, impeding their function. Here we describe the collapse, under tension, of lignified cells peripheral to the leaf vein of a broad-leaved rainforest conifer, Podocarpus grayi de Laub. Leaves of Podocarpus are characterized by an array of cylindrical tracheids aligned perpendicular to the leaf vein, apparently involved in the distribution of water radially through the mesophyll. During leaf desiccation the majority of these tracheids collapsed from circular to flat over the water potential range −1.5 to −2.8 MPa. An increase in the percentage of tracheids collapsed during imposed water stress was mirrored by declining leaf hydraulic conductivity (Kleaf), implying a direct effect on water transport efficiency. Stomata responded to water stress by closing at −2.0 MPa when 45% of cells were collapsed and Kleaf had declined by 25%. This was still substantially before the initial indications of cavitation-induced loss of hydraulic conductance in the leaf vein, at −3 MPa. Plants droughted until 49% of tracheids had collapsed were found to fully recover tracheid shape and leaf function 1 week after rewatering. A simple mechanical model of tracheid collapse, derived from the theoretical buckling pressure for pipes, accurately predicted the collapse dynamics observed in P. grayi, substantiating estimates of cell wall elasticity and measured leaf water potential. The possible adaptive advantages of collapsible vascular tissue are discussed. PMID:15734905

  13. Jugular thrombophlebitis in horses: A review of fibrinolysis, thrombus formation, and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Deborah Penteado Martins; de Lacerda Neto, José Corrêa

    2013-01-01

    Thrombophlebitis of the jugular vein is commonly observed in horses, particularly during intensive care, and leads to local and systemic inflammatory responses as well as head and neck circulatory impairment. Thrombolytic therapy is widely used in human practice with the aim of thrombus dissolution and recanalization of the injured vessels. There are similarities between human and horse coagulation and fibrinolytic processes. This review examines the fibrinolytic system, thrombus formation, and the clinical management of jugular thrombophlebitis, including thrombolytic therapy. There is evidence that early regional thrombolytic therapy for jugular thrombophlebitis in horses may be effective to achieve sustained recanalization. PMID:23814304

  14. Rapid methods for jugular bleeding of dogs requiring one technician.

    PubMed

    Frisk, C S; Richardson, M R

    1979-06-01

    Two methods were used to collect blood from the jugular vein of dogs. In both techniques, only one technician was required. A rope with a slip knot was placed around the base of the neck to assist in restraint and act as a tourniquet for the vein. The technician used one hand to restrain the dog by the muzzle and position the head. The other hand was used for collecting the sample. One of the methods could be accomplished with the dog in its cage. The bleeding techniques were rapid, requiring approximately 1 minute per dog.

  15. Concurrent Angioplasty Balloon Placement for Stent Delivery through Jugular Venous Bulb for Treating Cerebral Venous Sinus Stenosis. Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Khan, Asif A; Capistrant, Rachel; Qureshi, Mushtaq H; Xie, Kevin; Suri, M Fareed K

    2016-10-01

    To report upon technique of concurrent placement of angioplasty balloon at the internal jugular vein and sigmoid venous sinus junction to facilitate stent delivery in two patients in whom stent delivery past the jugular bulb was not possible. A 21-year-old woman and a 41-year-old woman with worsening headaches, visual obscuration or diplopia were treated for pseudotumor cerebri associated with transverse venous stenosis. Both patients had undergone primary angioplasty, which resulted in improvement in clinical symptoms followed by the recurrence of symptoms with restenosis at the site of angioplasty. After multiple attempts at stent delivery through jugular venous bulb were unsuccessful, a second guide catheter was placed in the ipsilateral internal jugular vein through contralateral femoral venous approach. A 6 mm × 20 mm (left) or 5 × 15 mm (right) angioplasty balloon was placed across the internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus junction and partially inflated until the inflation and relative straightening of the junction was observed. In both patients, the internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus junction was successfully traversed by the stent delivery system in a parallel alignment to inflated balloon. Balloon mounted stent was deployed at the site of restenosis with near complete resolution of lumen narrowing delivery and improvement in clinical symptoms. We report a technique for realignment and diameter change with concurrent placement and partial inflation of angioplasty balloon at the jugular venous bulb to facilitate stent delivery into the sigmoid and transverse venous sinuses in circumstances where multiple attempts at stent delivery are unsuccessful.

  16. Noninvasive measurement of internal jugular venous oxygen saturation by photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Erpelding, Todd N.; Ke, Haixin; Reddy, Kavya; Sharma, Anshuman; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The metabolic rate and oxygen consumption of the brain is reflected in jugular venous oxygen saturation. In many clinical conditions, such as head trauma, stroke, and low cardiac output states, the brain is at risk for hypoxic-ischemic injury. The current gold standard for monitoring brain oxygenation is invasive and requires jugular vein catheterization under fluoroscopic guidance; and therefore it is rarely used. Photo-acoustic tomography in combination with ultrasound can be used to estimate oxygen saturation of the internal jugular vein in real-time. This noninvasive method will enable earlier detection and prevention of impending hypoxic brain injury. A wavelength-tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser delivers light through an optical fiber bundle, and a modified commercial ultrasound imaging system (Philips iU22) detects both the pulse-echo ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) signals. A custom-built multichannel data acquisition system renders co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic images at 5 frames per second. After the jugular vein was localized in healthy volunteers, dualwavelength PA images were used to calculate the blood hemoglobin oxygen saturation from the internal jugular vein in vivo. The preliminary results raise confidence that this emerging technology can be used clinically as an accurate, noninvasive indicator of cerebral oxygenation.

  17. Deformation assisted by fluids in quartz veins of shear zones: an example from Iron Formations of Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Paola; Lagoeiro, Leonardo

    2013-04-01

    The evidences of fluid activity in rocks are well recognized. In many cases, the fluid is responsible to remobilize many elements (e.g. Au, Mn, Si) that may be transported over a long distance and precipitated as new minerals in regions of low stress of the rock. In many deformed rocks, the origin of a large number of structures (veins, pressure shadows, dissolved grain boundaries, etc) may be correlated to the fluid activity. However, the fluids are important not only during the crack-and-seal process but also after the sealing ceases. As an example of how the fluids are responsible to rearrange the structure of the rock, we studied many quartz veins of one iron-formation from Brazil. The rocks were collected in Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF), Brazil, that is one of the most important metalogenetic provinces in the world. It is assumed the existence of a deformational and metamorphic gradient in the rocks of QF, increasing the occurrence of penetrative structures from southwest to northeast. However, the effects of the local shear zones in the deformation pattern of QF may not be neglected. Shear zones are generally recognized as structures that accommodate deformation, eventually with intense fluid percolation. It is indubitable that there is a relationship between the fluid activity and the deformation accommodation in shear zones. So, to investigate how the fluid activity can affect the mechanisms of accommodation of deformation in rocks of shear zones from QF, we characterized the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of some quartz vein by EBSD (electron backscattering diffraction). All the samples came from the same outcrop and from the same dextral shear zone, localized in the low-deformation region of QF, under greenschist metamorphic conditions. The samples were oriented according to the XYZ reference system, with X parallel to the foliation and Z normal to the XY plane. The veins are quartz-rich layers parallel to the rock foliation. They do not

  18. Port Placement via the Anterior Jugular Venous System: Case Report, Anatomic Considerations, and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report on a patient who was referred for port implantation with a two-chamber pacemaker aggregate on the right and total occlusion of the central veins on the left side. Venous access for port implantation was performed via left side puncture of the horizontal segment of the anterior jugular vein system (AJVS) and insertion of the port catheter using a crossover technique from the left to the right venous system via the jugular venous arch (JVA). The clinical significance of the AJVS and the JVA for central venous access and port implantation is emphasised and the corresponding literature is reviewed. PMID:28487803

  19. Dehydration reactions, mass transfer and rock deformation relationships during subduction of Alpine metabauxites: insights from LIBS compositional profiles between metamorphic veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlaguet, Anne; Brunet, Fabrice; Goffé, Bruno; Menut, Denis; Findling, Nathaniel; Poinssot, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    In subduction zones, the significant amounts of aqueous fluid released in the course of the successive dehydration reactions occurring during prograde metamorphism are expected to strongly influence the rock rheology, as well as kinetics of metamorphic reactions and mass transfer efficiency. Mineralized veins, ubiquitous in metamorphic rocks, can be seen as preserved witnesses of fluid and mass redistribution that partly accommodate the rock deformation (lateral segregation). However, the driving forces and mechanisms of mass transfer towards fluid-filled open spaces remain somewhat unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the vein-forming processes and the modalities of mass transfer during local fluid-rock interactions, and their links with fluid production and rock deformation, with new insights from Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) profiles. This study focuses on karstic pockets (metre scale) of Triassic metabauxites embedded in thick carbonate units, that have been isolated from large-scale fluid flow during HP-LT Alpine metamorphism (W. Vanoise, French Alps). These rocks display several generations of metamorphic veins containing various Al-bearing minerals, which give particular insights into mass transfer processes. It is proposed that the internally-derived fluid (~13 vol% produced by successive dehydration reactions) has promoted the opening of fluid-filled open spaces (euhedral habits of vein minerals) and served as medium for diffusive mass transfer from rock to vein. Based on mineralogical and textural features, two vein types can be distinguished: (1) some veins are filled with newly formed products of either prograde (chloritoid) or retrograde (chlorite) metamorphic reactions; in this case, fluid-filled open spaces seem to offer energetically favourable nucleation/growth sites; (2) the second vein type is filled with cookeite (Li-Al-rich chlorite) or pyrophyllite, that were present in the host rock prior to the vein formation. In

  20. Jugular venous pooling during lowering of the head affects blood pressure of the anesthetized giraffe.

    PubMed

    Brøndum, E; Hasenkam, J M; Secher, N H; Bertelsen, M F; Grøndahl, C; Petersen, K K; Buhl, R; Aalkjaer, C; Baandrup, U; Nygaard, H; Smerup, M; Stegmann, F; Sloth, E; Ostergaard, K H; Nissen, P; Runge, M; Pitsillides, K; Wang, T

    2009-10-01

    How blood flow and pressure to the giraffe's brain are regulated when drinking remains debated. We measured simultaneous blood flow, pressure, and cross-sectional area in the carotid artery and jugular vein of five anesthetized and spontaneously breathing giraffes. The giraffes were suspended in the upright position so that we could lower the head. In the upright position, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was 193 +/- 11 mmHg (mean +/- SE), carotid flow was 0.7 +/- 0.2 l/min, and carotid cross-sectional area was 0.85 +/- 0.04 cm(2). Central venous pressure (CVP) was 4 +/- 2 mmHg, jugular flow was 0.7 +/- 0.2 l/min, and jugular cross-sectional area was 0.14 +/- 0.04 cm(2) (n = 4). Carotid arterial and jugular venous pressures at head level were 118 +/- 9 and -7 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively. When the head was lowered, MAP decreased to 131 +/- 13 mmHg, while carotid cross-sectional area and flow remained unchanged. Cardiac output was reduced by 30%, CVP decreased to -1 +/- 2 mmHg (P < 0.01), and jugular flow ceased as the jugular cross-sectional area increased to 3.2 +/- 0.6 cm(2) (P < 0.01), corresponding to accumulation of approximately 1.2 l of blood in the veins. When the head was raised, the jugular veins collapsed and blood was returned to the central circulation, and CVP and cardiac output were restored. The results demonstrate that in the upright-positioned, anesthetized giraffe cerebral blood flow is governed by arterial pressure without support of a siphon mechanism and that when the head is lowered, blood accumulates in the vein, affecting MAP.

  1. Dehydration reactions, mass transfer and rock deformation relationships during subduction of Alpine metabauxites: insights from LIBS compositional profiles between metamorphic veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlaguet, A.; Brunet, F.; Goffe, B.; Menut, D.; Findling, N.; Poinssot, C.

    2011-12-01

    In subduction zones, the significant amounts of aqueous fluid released in the course of the successive dehydration reactions occurring during prograde metamorphism are expected to strongly influence the rock rheology, as well as kinetics of metamorphic reactions and mass transfer efficiency. Mineralized veins, ubiquitous in metamorphic rocks, can be seen as preserved witnesses of fluid and mass redistribution that partly accommodate the rock deformation (lateral segregation). However, the driving forces and mechanisms of mass transfer towards fluid-filled open spaces remain somewhat unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the modalities of mass transfer during local fluid-rock interactions, and their links with fluid production and rock deformation. This study focuses on karstic pockets (metre scale) of Triassic metabauxites embedded in thick carbonate units, that have been isolated from large-scale fluid flow during HP-LT Alpine metamorphism (W. Vanoise, French Alps). These rocks display several generations of metamorphic veins containing various Al-bearing minerals, which give particular insights into mass transfer processes. It is proposed that the internally-derived fluid (~13 vol% produced by successive dehydration reactions) has promoted the opening of fluid-filled open spaces (euhedral habits of vein minerals) and served as medium for diffusive mass transfer from rock to vein. Based on mineralogical and textural features, two vein types can be distinguished: (1) some veins are filled with newly formed products of either prograde (chloritoid) or retrograde (chlorite) metamorphic reactions; in this case, fluid-filled open spaces seem to offer energetically favourable nucleation/growth sites; (2) the second vein type is filled with cookeite (Li-Al-rich chlorite) or pyrophyllite, that were present in the host rock prior to the vein formation. In this closed chemical system, mass transfer from rock to vein was achieved through the fluid, in a dissolution

  2. Comparison of cephalic and jugular plasma lactate concentrations in sick cats: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Emily K J; Julius, Tracy M; Claypool, Sean-Paul A; Clare, Monica C

    2017-03-01

    To compare plasma lactate concentration (PLC) in paired cephalic and jugular blood samples from sick cats. An additional objective was to determine whether hypotensive cats (Doppler blood pressure < 90 mm Hg) have a significant difference between cephalic and jugular PLC. Prospective observational pilot study performed from December 2013 to August 2014. Private veterinary referral center. Twenty client-owned cats. Doppler blood pressure measurements were obtained and then blood samples were collected from both a cephalic intravenous catheter at the time of placement and from a jugular vein by direct venipuncture. There was no significant difference between the mean cephalic PLC (2.0 mmol/L, standard deviation [SD]: 1.1, min-max: 0.6-5.3) and the mean jugular PLC (2.1 mmol/L, SD: 1.6, min-max: 0.7-7.8; P = 0.88) in this population of sick cats. Hypotensive cats also had no significant difference between the mean cephalic PLC (2.8 mmol/L, SD: 1.4, min-max: 1.6-5.3) and the mean jugular PLC (3.2 mmol/L, SD: 2.6, min-max: 0.7-7.8; P = 0.77). There was not a significant difference between cephalic and jugular PLC in this population of sick cats. Further studies are needed to confirm whether cephalic and jugular PLCs may be used interchangeably in sick and hypotensive cats. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  3. Percutaneous replacement of a right jugular dialysis catheter via a stenosed superior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Lau, K Y; Chan, J K W; Wong, W W C; Lo, S H K

    2006-06-01

    A female patient with end-stage renal failure, who was maintained on haemodialysis via multiple central dialysis catheters, developed chronic occlusion of the left brachiocephalic vein. Subsequently, the right jugular dual lumen PermCath became dysfunctional because of marked superior vena cava stenosis. Angioplasty of the superior vena cava stenosis was performed but failed to restore adequate catheter function. The patient was referred for possible salvage of her central venous access and re-insertion of a new PermCath. During surgery, the right jugular PermCath was removed, the superior vena cava was stented to establish venous patency, and a new PermCath was re-inserted via the existing right jugular puncture site. The technique helps reduce cost and time, and avoids another jugular puncture. In addition, this procedure saves a central venous access which is important in patients on long-term haemodialysis.

  4. Real-time Needle Steering in Response to Rolling Vein Deformation by a 9-DOF Image-Guided Autonomous Venipuncture Robot.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alvin I; Balter, Max L; Maguire, Timothy J; Yarmush, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    Venipuncture is the most common invasive medical procedure performed in the United States and the number one cause of hospital injury. Failure rates are particularly high in pediatric and elderly patients, whose veins tend to deform, move, or roll as the needle is introduced. To improve venipuncture accuracy in challenging patient populations, we have developed a portable device that autonomously servos a needle into a suitable vein under image guidance. The device operates in real time, combining near-infrared and ultrasound imaging, computer vision software, and a 9 degrees-of-freedom robot that servos the needle. In this paper, we present the kinematic and mechanical design of the latest generation robot. We then investigate in silico and in vitro the mechanics of vessel rolling and deformation in response to needle insertions performed by the robot. Finally, we demonstrate how the robot can make real-time adjustments under ultrasound image guidance to compensate for subtle vessel motions during venipuncture.

  5. Real-time Needle Steering in Response to Rolling Vein Deformation by a 9-DOF Image-Guided Autonomous Venipuncture Robot

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alvin I.; Balter, Max L.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Venipuncture is the most common invasive medical procedure performed in the United States and the number one cause of hospital injury. Failure rates are particularly high in pediatric and elderly patients, whose veins tend to deform, move, or roll as the needle is introduced. To improve venipuncture accuracy in challenging patient populations, we have developed a portable device that autonomously servos a needle into a suitable vein under image guidance. The device operates in real time, combining near-infrared and ultrasound imaging, computer vision software, and a 9 degrees-of-freedom robot that servos the needle. In this paper, we present the kinematic and mechanical design of the latest generation robot. We then investigate in silico and in vitro the mechanics of vessel rolling and deformation in response to needle insertions performed by the robot. Finally, we demonstrate how the robot can make real-time adjustments under ultrasound image guidance to compensate for subtle vessel motions during venipuncture. PMID:26779381

  6. Development of the jugular bulb: a radiologic study.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, David R; Eubig, Jan; McGill, Megan; Babb, James S; Pramanik, Bidyut K; Lalwani, Anil K

    2011-10-01

    Jugular bulb (JB) abnormalities such as JB diverticulum and high-riding JBs of the temporal bone can erode into the inner ear and present with hearing loss, vestibular disturbance, and pulsatile tinnitus. Their cause and potential to progress remain to be studied. This comprehensive radiologic study investigates the postnatal development of the venous system from transverse sinus to internal jugular vein (IJV). Academic medical center. PATIENTS, INTERVENTION, MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Measurements of the transverse and sigmoid sinus, the JB, IJV, and carotid artery were made from computed tomographic scans of the neck with intravenous contrast in infants (n = 5), children (n = 13), adults (n = 35), and the elderly (n = 15). Jugular bulbs were not detected in patients younger than 2 years, enlarged in adulthood, and remained stable in the elderly. The venous system was larger in men than in women. From transverse sinus to IJV, the greatest variation in size was just proximal and distal to the JB with greater symmetry observed as blood returned to the heart. Right-sided venous dominance was most common occurring in 70% to 80% of cases. The JB is a dynamic structure that forms after 2 years, and its size stabilizes in adulthood. The determinants in its exact position and size are multifactorial and may be related to blood flow. Improved understanding of this structure's development may help to better understand the cause of the high-riding JB and JB diverticulum, both of which may cause clinical symptoms.

  7. Perimesencephalic nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by jugular venous occlusion: case report.

    PubMed

    Sangra, Meharpal S; Teasdale, Evelyn; Siddiqui, Mohammed A; Lindsay, Kenneth W

    2008-12-01

    The cause of perimesencephalic nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage remains unknown. We describe a patient in whom jugular venous occlusion preceded the occurrence of perimesencephalic nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. This finding supports the theory that the source of the hemorrhage is venous in origin. A 25-year-old man presented with sudden onset of headache after his head was held in a headlock during a playful fight 48 hours before the ictus. His computed tomographic (CT) scan on admission demonstrated a perimesencephalic pattern of subarachnoid hemorrhage. CT angiography excluded the presence of an underlying aneurysm or vascular malformation but showed bilateral jugular venous obstruction with hematoma surrounding the right internal jugular vein. Magnetic resonance imaging and a 4-vessel cerebral angiogram confirmed the CT angiographic findings. The patient was observed as an inpatient and had no complication of his hemorrhage. Follow-up at 5 months with CT angiography showed resolution of his neck hematoma and reopening of his internal jugular veins. The presence of acute jugular venous occlusion as a cause of perimesencephalic nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage supports a venous origin of hemorrhage.

  8. Cervical osteophyte resulting in compression of the jugular foramen: Case report.

    PubMed

    Le, Andrew Q; Walcott, Brian P; Redjal, Navid; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2014-10-01

    Jugular foramen syndrome is a condition characterized by unilateral paresis of cranial nerves IX, X, and XI in the setting of extrinsic compression. Here, the authors describe the case of a giant cervical osteophyte resulting in compression of the jugular foramen. A 74-year-old man who presented with progressive dysphagia and dysarthria was found to have right-sided tongue deviation, left palatal droop, and hypophonia. His dysphagia had progressed to the point that he had lost 25 kg over a 4-month period, necessitating a gastrostomy to maintain adequate nutrition. He underwent extensive workup for his dysphagia with several normal radiographic studies. Ultimately, CT scanning and postcontrast MRI revealed a posterior osteophyte arising from the C1-2 joint space and projecting into the right jugular foramen. This resulted in a jugular foramen syndrome in addition to delayed filling of the patient's right internal jugular vein distal to the osteophyte. Although rare, a posterior cervical osteophyte should be considered in cases of jugular foramen syndrome.

  9. Genetic links among fluid cycling, vein formation, regional deformation, and plutonism in the Juneau gold belt, southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Lance D.; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Gehrels, George E.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    Gold-bearing quartz vein systems in the Juneau gold belt formed within a 160-km- long by 5- to 8-km-wide zone along the western margin of the Coast Mountains, Alaska. Vein systems are spatially associated with shear zones adjacent to terrane-bounding, mid-Cretaceous thrust faults. Analysis of vein orientations and sense of shear data define a stress configuration with greatest and least principal axes oriented subhorizontally with northeast-southwest trends and subverticaly, respectively. This local stress configuration is compatible with the far-field plate configuration during Eocene time. Isotopic ages of vein formation indicate that fluid cycling occurred between 56.5 and ≥52.8 Ma, and are consistent with a genetic link between veining and a change in plate motion in early Eocene time. Veining was also synchronous with the latter stages of rapid exhumation and voluminous plutonism immediately inboard of the gold belt. We propose a model in which interacting tectonic events facilitated fault-valve action and vein development along now-exhumed shear zones.

  10. Oversized vein grafts develop advanced atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic minipigs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accelerated atherosclerosis is the main cause of late aortocoronary vein graft failure. We aimed to develop a large animal model for the study of pathogenesis and treatment of vein graft atherosclerosis. Methods An autologous reversed jugular vein graft was inserted end-to-end into the transected common carotid artery of ten hypercholesteroemic minipigs. The vein grafts were investigated 12-14 weeks later with ultrasound and angiograpy in vivo and microscopy post mortem. Results One minipig died during follow up (patent vein graft at autopsy), and one vein graft thrombosed early. In the remaining eight patent vein grafts, the mean (standard deviation) intima-media thickness was 712 μm (276 μm) versus 204 μm (74 μm) in the contralateral control internal jugular veins (P < .01). Advanced atherosclerotic plaques were found in three of four oversized vein grafts (diameter of graft > diameter of artery). No plaques were found in four non-oversized vein grafts (P < .05). Conclusions Our model of jugular vein graft in the common carotid artery of hypercholesterolemic minipigs displayed the components of human vein graft disease, i.e. thrombosis, intimal hyperplasia, and atherosclerosis. Advanced atherosclerosis, the main cause of late failure of human aortocoronary vein grafts was only seen in oversized grafts. This finding suggests that oversized vein grafts may have detrimental effects on patient outcome. PMID:22463679

  11. [Internal jugular thrombophlebitis: complications of the cervical oncological surgery. A case report].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Marcos, C A; Noval Menéndez, J; Alfonso Megido, J; Domínguez Iglesias, F; Hevia Llama, R; Ramos Barriga, M A

    1995-01-01

    Internal jugular vein thrombophlebitis is an infrequent complications, associated in the past to pharyngeal and amygdaline infections but related today to the use of catheters and intravenous drugs. The present paper reports the case of a patient who underwent total laryngectomy and functional neck dissection, developing recurrent neumonias and sepsis in the postoperative period which were secondary to an homolateral jugular thrombophlebitis. A physical exploration with no findings and the poor resolution of CT scan and ultrasound due to postsurgical alterations, lead to a late diagnosis and fatal evolution, in spite of the medical and surgical treatment.

  12. Surgery of Glomus Jugulare Tumors.

    PubMed

    Pareschi, Roberto; Righini, Stefano; Destito, Domenico; Raucci, Aldo Falco; Colombo, Stefano

    2003-08-01

    The treatment of choice for glomus jugulare tumors is still controversial. High rates of morbidity, incomplete resection, and the aggressive behavior of these tumors are the main arguments for advocates of primary radiotherapy. However, constant refinements in skull base techniques have made complete resection of these lesions a realistic goal. The high probability of achieving local control of these tumors by surgery has convinced us to support this option strongly. Between 1993 and 2000 we diagnosed 52 glomus tumors of the temporal bone. Of these patients, only 42 had a class C lesion (glomus jugulare) and were included in this study; 37 of these patients underwent surgery, 10 of whom had intracranial extension of the disease. The overall resection rate was 96 %. Facial nerve function at 1 year was House-Brackmann grade I to II in 52 % of patients and grade III or better in 84 % of patients. Hospitalization was shorter than 14 days in 33 patients (89 %). All patients with pharyngolaryngeal palsy had sufficient compensation at discharge. Twelve vocal chord Teflon injections were performed after surgery to reduce hoarseness and aspiration. No patient died. No relapse was observed (mean follow-up, 4.9 years).

  13. Concurrent Angioplasty Balloon Placement for Stent Delivery through Jugular Venous Bulb for Treating Cerebral Venous Sinus Stenosis. Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Khan, Asif A.; Capistrant, Rachel; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Xie, Kevin; Suri, M. Fareed K.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To report upon technique of concurrent placement of angioplasty balloon at the internal jugular vein and sigmoid venous sinus junction to facilitate stent delivery in two patients in whom stent delivery past the jugular bulb was not possible. CLINICAL PRESENTATION A 21-year-old woman and a 41-year-old woman with worsening headaches, visual obscuration or diplopia were treated for pseudotumor cerebri associated with transverse venous stenosis. Both patients had undergone primary angioplasty, which resulted in improvement in clinical symptoms followed by the recurrence of symptoms with restenosis at the site of angioplasty. INTERVENTION After multiple attempts at stent delivery through jugular venous bulb were unsuccessful, a second guide catheter was placed in the ipsilateral internal jugular vein through contralateral femoral venous approach. A 6 mm × 20 mm (left) or 5 × 15 mm (right) angioplasty balloon was placed across the internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus junction and partially inflated until the inflation and relative straightening of the junction was observed. In both patients, the internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus junction was successfully traversed by the stent delivery system in a parallel alignment to inflated balloon. Balloon mounted stent was deployed at the site of restenosis with near complete resolution of lumen narrowing delivery and improvement in clinical symptoms. CONCLUSION We report a technique for realignment and diameter change with concurrent placement and partial inflation of angioplasty balloon at the jugular venous bulb to facilitate stent delivery into the sigmoid and transverse venous sinuses in circumstances where multiple attempts at stent delivery are unsuccessful. PMID:27829971

  14. Oxygen isotope record of fluid-rock-SiO 2 interaction during Variscan progressive deformation and quartz veining in the meta-volcanosediments of Belle-Ile (Southern Brittany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Bernhard; Audren, Claude; Triboulet, Claude

    2002-08-01

    Belle-Ile in the South Armorican Domain is composed of Palaeozoic volcano-detrital sequences with sericite phyllites and porphyroids. Fine-banded and folded meta-tuffites, microquartzites and graphitic quartzites occur in the basal part at Plage de Bordardoué. Phengite compositions constrain that Variscan metamorphism did not exceed 430 °C/4.5 kbar. Four generations (1-4) of centimeter-thick quartz veins were precipitated during Variscan progressive deformation and recorded changing fluid compositions. Values of 26‰ δ18OSMOW in vein 1 quartz exceed high δ18OSMOW in the host rocks. Decrease of quartz δ18OSMOW from margins to centers can be observed from the syntaxial veins. Younger veins 4 have lower δ18O. Their inclusions indicate lower salinities and traces of CH4 in the fluid when compared with veins 1. Veins 1 were overprinted by shearing and fissuring. Subgrain rotation recrystallization occurred along briquette structures and subgrain boundaries. The initial isotope values have been preserved. Larger domains with small-grained quartz can be identified by lower values of δ18O. Homogeneous isotopic compositions are found in hinges of folded veins 2 with grain boundary migration recrystallization. The small-scale oxygen isotope variations and the changing fluid compositions point to a locally hosted fluid system with a limited contribution of meteoric water during multiphase deformation and vein formation.

  15. Ligation of superior mesenteric vein and portal to splenic vein anastomosis after superior mesenteric-portal vein confluence resection during pancreaticoduodenectomy – Case report

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianlin; Abbas, Jihad; Hoetzl, Katherine; Allison, David; Osman, Mahamed; Williams, Mallory; Zelenock, Gerald B.

    2014-01-01

    62 year old Caucasian female with pancreatic head mass abutting the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) presented with fine needle aspiration biopsy confirmed diagnosis of ductal adenocarcinoma. CT scan showed near complete obstruction of portal vein and large SMV collateral development. After 3 months of neoadjuvant therapy, her portal vein flow improved significantly, SMV collateral circulation was diminished. Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and superior mesenteric portal vein (SMPV) confluence resection were performed; A saphenous vein interposition graft thrombosed immediately. The splenic vein remnant was distended and adjacent to the stump of the portal vein. Harvesting an internal jugular vein graft required extra time and using a synthetic graft posed a risk of graft thrombosis or infection. As a result, we chose to perform a direct anastomosis of the portal and splenic vein in a desperate situation. The anastomosis decompressed the mesenteric venous system, so we then ligated the SMV. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, except transient ascites. She redeveloped ascites more than one year later. At that time a PET scan showed bilateral lung and right femur metastatic disease. She expired 15 months after PD. Conclusion The lessons we learned are (1) Before SMPV confluence resection, internal jugular vein graft should be ready for reconstruction. (2) Synthetic graft is an alternative for internal jugular vein graft. (3) Direct portal vein to SMV anastomosis can be achieved by mobilizing liver. (4) It is possible that venous collaterals secondary to SMV tumor obstruction may have allowed this patient's post-operative survival. PMID:25568802

  16. Successful endovascular therapy of a penetrating zone III jugular bulb injury. A case report.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, K; Yamamoto, A; Ishida, K; Matsuzaki, J; Ozaki, T; Ishihara, M; Shimahara, Y; Nakajima, S; Sadamitsu, D; Yamasaki, M

    2012-06-01

    Penetrating venous injuries via Zone III of the neck extended over jugular bulb are rare. The optimal strategies for these venous injuries are currently unknown because many of the vital structures in this region are poorly accessible to the surgeon and therefore it is difficult to control bleeding. A 76-year-old man got drunk and fell down onto a paper door. The wooden framework of the paper door was broken and got stuck deep in the right side of his neck. Enhanced computed tomography showed the wood stick had penetrated through the right jugular foramen and injured the jugular bulb. We successfully performed right sigmoid and jugular vein occlusion via an endovascular approach using Guglielmi detachable coils at first and then to draw out the wood stick in order to avoid venous bleeding. To our best knowledge, these venous injuries have reported in only four cases. Only one case was performed by endovascular approach using n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA). Coil embolization is much better than NBCA in the light of reducing complications due to adhesion to the inserted wood stick and embolization of unintended vessels. Venous occlusion using coil embolization is the best way to treat a penetrating jugular bulb injury via zone III because of reducing the hemorrhage and air embolism.

  17. Calcium micro-depositions in jugular truncular venous malformations revealed by Synchrotron-based XRF imaging.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Lorella; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Rizzardi, Clara; Tisato, Veronica; Salomé, Murielle; Calligaro, Carla; Salvi, Fabrizio; Paterson, David; Zamboni, Paolo

    2014-10-07

    It has been recently demonstrated that the internal jugular vein may exhibit abnormalities classified as truncular venous malformations (TVMs). The investigation of possible morphological and biochemical anomalies at jugular tissue level could help to better understand the link between brain venous drainage and neurodegenerative disorders, recently found associated with jugular TVMs. To this end we performed sequential X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses on jugular tissue samples from two TVM patients and two control subjects, using complementary energies at three different synchrotrons. This investigation, coupled with conventional histological analyses, revealed anomalous micro-formations in the pathological tissues and allowed the determination of their elemental composition. Rapid XRF analyses on large tissue areas at 12.74 keV showed an increased Ca presence in the pathological samples, mainly localized in tunica adventitia microvessels. Investigations at lower energy demonstrated that the high Ca level corresponded to micro-calcifications, also containing P and Mg. We suggest that advanced synchrotron XRF micro-spectroscopy is an important analytical tool in revealing biochemical changes, which cannot be accessed by conventional investigations. Further research on a larger number of samples is needed to understand the pathogenic significance of Ca micro-depositions detected on the intramural vessels of vein walls affected by TVMs.

  18. Calcium micro-depositions in jugular truncular venous malformations revealed by Synchrotron-based XRF imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pascolo, Lorella; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Rizzardi, Clara; Tisato, Veronica; Salomé, Murielle; Calligaro, Carla; Salvi, Fabrizio; Paterson, David; Zamboni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the internal jugular vein may exhibit abnormalities classified as truncular venous malformations (TVMs). The investigation of possible morphological and biochemical anomalies at jugular tissue level could help to better understand the link between brain venous drainage and neurodegenerative disorders, recently found associated with jugular TVMs. To this end we performed sequential X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses on jugular tissue samples from two TVM patients and two control subjects, using complementary energies at three different synchrotrons. This investigation, coupled with conventional histological analyses, revealed anomalous micro-formations in the pathological tissues and allowed the determination of their elemental composition. Rapid XRF analyses on large tissue areas at 12.74 keV showed an increased Ca presence in the pathological samples, mainly localized in tunica adventitia microvessels. Investigations at lower energy demonstrated that the high Ca level corresponded to micro-calcifications, also containing P and Mg. We suggest that advanced synchrotron XRF micro-spectroscopy is an important analytical tool in revealing biochemical changes, which cannot be accessed by conventional investigations. Further research on a larger number of samples is needed to understand the pathogenic significance of Ca micro-depositions detected on the intramural vessels of vein walls affected by TVMs. PMID:25286775

  19. Jugular foramen: anatomic and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of the jugular foramen was examined in detail, and anatomic and CT sections were correlated. The pars nervosa and pars vascularis were identified, and, with intravenous contrast enhancement, a rapid sequence of scans at a gantry angle of +30/sup 0/ to the canthomeatal line demonstrated cranial nerves IX, X, and XI. The osseous margins of the jugular foramen were best shown by CT at planes of sections parallel and positive (0/sup 0/-30/sup 0/) to the canthomeatal line. CT can be used to evaluate osseous anatomy and the jugular foramen with precision sufficient to confidently exclude an intracanalicular mass.

  20. A pilot/introducer needle for central vein cannulation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Kanazawa, M; Kinefuchi, Y; Fukuyama, H; Takiguchi, M; Yamamoto, M; Abe, K; Okuda, Y

    1995-12-01

    A kit for safe and easy insertion of a central vein cannula was devised. A small gauge (22 gauge) metal pilot needle was equipped with a Y-shaped hub which had a side-port to accept a small gauge (0.46 mm) Seldinger guide wire. Once the needle reached the vein, guidewire was threaded in through the side-port. There was no need to remove the pilot needle and no need to repeat vein puncture with a larger-bore needle. Three puncture methods were used with the kit: (1) the central approach via the internal jugular vein, (2) the supraclavicular approach via the junction of the internal jugular vein and subclavian vein, and (3) the infraclavicular approach via the subclavian vein. Each method was used on 20 patients, for total of 60 patients, with a high success rate. Less than 3 minutes were required from puncture to catheter insertion. No serious complications were encountered.

  1. Constraints on Neogene deformation in the southern Terror Rift from calcite twinning analyses of veins within the ANDRILL MIS core, Victoria Land Basin, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, T. S.; Demosthenous, C.; Wilson, T. J.; Millan, C.

    2009-12-01

    The ANDRILL MIS (McMurdo Ice Shelf) Drilling Project obtained over 1200 meters of Neogene sedimentary and volcanic rocks in 2006/2007. Systematic fracture logging of the AND-1B core identified 1,475 natural fractures, i.e. pre-existing fractures in the rock intersected by coring. The most abundant natural fractures are normal faults and calcite veins; reverse faults, brecciated zones, and sedimentary intrusions are also present. In order to better understand Neogene deformation patterns within the southern Terror Rift, we have been conducting strain analyses on mechanically twinned calcite within healed fractures in the drill core. Twinning strains using all of the data from each sample studied to date range from 2% to 10%. The cleaned data (20% of the largest magnitude deviations removed) typically show ≤30% negative expected values, consistent with a single deformation episode or multiple ~coaxial deformation episodes. The majority of the samples record horizontal extension, similar to strain patterns expected in a normal fault regime and/or vertical sedimentary compaction in a continental rift system. The morphology, width, and intensity of twins in the samples suggest that twinning typically occurred at temperatures <170° C. Twinning intensities suggest differential stress magnitudes that caused the twinning ranged from 216 to 295 MPa.

  2. Autogenous vein graft thrombosis following exposure to calcium-free solutions (calcium paradox).

    PubMed

    Nozick, J H; Farnsworth, P; Montefusco, C M; Parsonnet, V; Ruigrok, T J; Zimmerman, A N

    1981-01-01

    The morphological and functional effects of calcium-free and calcium-containing solutions on canine jugular vein intima were examined under conditions which closely resemble those techniques currently employed in peripheral vascular and aortocoronary bypass surgery. Veins that had been exposed only to calcium-containing solutions remained patent for the duration of the experimental period. Vein perfusion with a calcium-free solution, however, resulted in disruption of the jugular vein intima once calcium ions were reintroduced. Autogenous as a femoral arterial graft became thrombosed within 60 minutes. It is therefore suggested that vein grafts of autogenous origin be irrigated with calcium-containing solutions to prevent intimal damage and thrombosis.

  3. Primary leiomyosarcoma of the innominate vein.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Miraldi, Fabio; Mazzesi, Giuseppe; D'urso, Antonio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Bezzi, Marcello

    2007-01-01

    Primary venous leiomyosarcoma is rare. We report the case of a primary leiomyosarcoma of the left innominate vein, with neoplastic thrombus extending into the left jugular and subclavian veins. The tumor was curatively resected en bloc with anterior mediastinal and laterocervical lymphatics, through a median sternotomy prolonged into left cervicotomy. Primary venous sarcomas may be associated with prolonged survival in individual cases, with curative resection recommended as the standard treatment, in the absence of distant spread.

  4. Stenting of the superior vena cava and left brachiocephalic vein with preserving the central venous catheter in situ.

    PubMed

    Isfort, Peter; Penzkofer, Tobias; Goerg, Fabian; Mahnken, Andreas H

    2011-01-01

    Stenting of the central veins is well established for treating localized venous stenosis. The techniques regarding catheter preservation for central venous catheters in the superior vena cava have been described. We describe here a method for stent implantation in the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein, and principally via a single jugular venous puncture, while saving a left sided jugular central venous catheter in a patient suffering from central venous stenosis of the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein.

  5. Infraclavicular access to the axillary vein - new possibilities for the catheterization of the central veins in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Gawda, Ryszard; Czarnik, Tomasz; Łysenko, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Central vein cannulation is one of the most commonly performed procedures in intensive care. Traditionally, the jugular and subclavian vein are recommended as the first choice option. Nevertheless, these attempts are not always obtainable for critically ill patients. For this reason, the axillary vein seems to be a rational alternative approach. In this narrative review, we evaluate the usefulness of the infraclavicular access to the axillary vein. The existing evidence suggests that infraclavicular approach to the axillary vein is a reliable method of central vein catheterization, especially when performed with ultrasound guidance.

  6. Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... has surface (superficial) veins that are connected to deep veins by bridging (perforator) veins. Unlike arteries, which ... the valve leaflets and can develop in the deep, perforator, or superficial veins. View this table: View ...

  7. Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    Varicose veins are swollen, twisted veins that you can see just under the skin. They usually occur in ... of the body. Hemorrhoids are a type of varicose vein. Your veins have one-way valves that help ...

  8. Veins of the thoracic limb of the Van cat.

    PubMed

    Ozüdoğru, Z; Aksoy, G; Soygüder, Z; Ozmen, E

    2003-04-01

    The drainage of the thoracic limb of the Van cat was performed by the superficial and deep vein systems. The superficial system was constituted by the cephalic vein and its branches. The deep vein system was constituted by the axillary vein and its branches. The two vein systems anastomosed with each other at various points along their courses. The cephalic vein emerged from the external jugular vein together with the superficial cervical vein. The axillary vein continued the subclavian vein. It ran caudoventrally and gave off the subscapular vein, at the level of the shoulder joint, then gave off two independent branches, which were the external thoracic veins. Then the rest of the vessel continued as the brachial vein. The thoracodorsal vein was formed by the communicate ramus vein which arose between the subscapular vein and the brachial vein. The cranial circumflex humeral vein arose double from the subscapular vein. One of them anastomosed with the deep brachial vein and the other one drained the biceps and the deep pectoral muscles. The cranial interosseous vein from the caudal aspects of the brachial vein and passed the interosseous space of the antebrachium then ran to the lateral aspect of the forearm. The caudal interosseous vein arose from the ulnar vein (in two specimens) and the median vein together with the ulnar vein (in two specimens) or independently from the median vein (in one specimen). Although many similarities were found in the veins of the thoracic limb of the Van cat as compared with the domestic cat, some significant differences were noted in the origin, course, anastomosing and ramification of veins of the thoracic limb.

  9. The jugular bulb diverticulum. A radioanatomic investigation.

    PubMed

    Wadin, K; Wilbrand, H

    1986-01-01

    Two hundred and forty-five temporal bone specimens were examined radiographically. Subsequently the topographic relationship between the jugular fossa and surrounding structures was evaluated in plastic casts of the specimens. Fifty-eight casts showed a high jugular fossa and in 17 a jugular bulb diverticulum was found. A diverticulum is regarded as an anomaly of the high jugular bulb and presumably has a potential for expansion. Most frequently a diverticulum was directed medially into the space between the internal acoustic meatus, the vestibular aqueduct and the posterior cranial fossa. Seven diverticula reached the level of the internal acoustic meatus. Encroachment upon the vestibular aqueduct was seen in 4 casts and both the internal acoustic meatus and the cochlear aqueduct were very close to the diverticulum. A few diverticula were directed postero-laterally close to the facial canal and the stapedius muscle. The investigation was supplemented with a selected clinical material of radiographs of temporal bones with high fossae. The results corresponded to those of the experimental investigation. The jugular bulb diverticulum is a relatively common feature and should be regarded as an anomaly with a potential to give rise to clinical symptoms consequent to its intrusion upon surrounding structures.

  10. Collet-Sicard Syndrome from Thrombosis of the Sigmoid-Jugular Complex: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Tom P. B.; Miah, Mohammed S.; Majumdar, Samit; Hussain, S. S. Musheer

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Collet-Sicard syndrome is a very rare condition characterised by unilateral palsy of the IX–XII cranial nerves. It is distinguished from Villaret syndrome by lack of presence of sympathetic involvement. Current literature contains only two cases of Collet-Sicard syndrome due to idiopathic internal jugular vein thrombosis. Method and Results. We report the case of Collet-Sicard syndrome in a 30-year-old man who presented with delayed development of XIth nerve dysfunction, due to internal jugular vein-sigmoid sinus thrombosis. A multidisciplinary team approach was employed in the management of this patient. At three-month followup, he had significantly improved swallowing, and repeat computed tomography neck scan showed partial recanalisation of the right internal jugular vein. Conclusion. In suspected Collet-Sicard syndrome, a focal primary lesion or metastasis to the temporal bone must be excluded, and sigmoid-jugular complex thrombosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Early recognition and treatment may result in significant functional recovery. PMID:20706543

  11. [Clinical estimation of the central vein catheterization in phthysiosurgical patients].

    PubMed

    Opanasenko, M S; Levanda, L I; Kononenko, V A; Klymenko, V I; Tereshkovych, O V; Kalenychenko, M I; Konik, B M; Obrems'ka, O K; Demus, R S; Kshanovs'kyĭ, O E

    2013-04-01

    The issue of actuality of the central veins catheterization application was studied in phthysiosurgical patients. The author's view, concerning indications and choosing of the central vein catheterization side, was presented. The data, concerning frequency of the certain veins catheterization, were adduced. General succeeding in performing central veins catheterization have had constituted 96%. While having complications rate of 11.8%, this included mechanical--8.2%, thrombotic--2.3%, infective--1.3%. There was substantiated one of the most optimal and secure procedure among central accesses--the internal jugular vein catheterization.

  12. Delayed Haemothorax Resulting from Indwelling Right Internal Jugular Central Venous Catheter: A Rare Complication.

    PubMed

    Vinod, K V; Nishanth, S; Vidya, M V

    2016-09-01

    Haemothorax is an uncommon and serious complication, occurring most often during or immediately after percutaneous internal jugular and subclavian vein catheterizations. Delayed haemothorax is a rare complication, especially following right-sided catheterization. We report a case of acute yellow phosphorus poisoning with acute liver failure (resulting from rat killer paste ingestion) in a 28-year-old male who developed right-sided haemothorax eight days after placement of right internal jugular central venous catheter. The proposed pathogenesis involves vascular wall erosion by the indwelling catheter tip. Awareness of this complication perhaps avoids unnecessary investigations for other causes of haemothorax such as pulmonary embolism. © Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 2011.

  13. In Vitro MRV-based Hemodynamic Study of Complex Helical Flow in a Patient-specific Jugular Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kefayati, Sarah; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Haraldsson, Henrik; Saloner, David

    2014-11-01

    Neurointerventional Radiologists are frequently requested to evaluate the venous side of the intracranial circulation for a variety of conditions including: Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency thought to play a role in the development of multiple sclerosis; sigmoid sinus diverticulum which has been linked to the presence of pulsatile tinnitus; and jugular vein distension which is related to cardiac dysfunction. Most approaches to evaluating these conditions rely on structural assessment or two dimensional flow analyses. This study was designed to investigate the highly complex jugular flow conditions using magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV). A jugular phantom was fabricated based on the geometry of the dominant jugular in a tinnitus patient. Volumetric three-component time-resolved velocity fields were obtained using 4D PC-MRI -with the protocol enabling turbulence acquisition- and the patient-specific pulsatile waveform. Flow was highly complex exhibiting regions of jet, high swirling strength, and strong helical pattern with the core originating from the focal point of the jugular bulb. Specifically, flow was analyzed for helicity and the level of turbulence kinetic energy elevated in the core of helix and distally, in the post-narrowing region.

  14. Mechanical buckling of veins under internal pressure.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ricky; Fierro, Cesar A; Shireman, Paula K; Han, Hai-Chao

    2010-04-01

    Venous tortuosity is associated with multiple disease states and is often thought to be a consequence of venous hypertension and chronic venous disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of vein tortuosity are unclear. We hypothesized that increased pressure causes vein buckling that leads to a tortuous appearance. The specific aim of this study was to determine the critical buckling pressure of veins. We determined the buckling pressure of porcine jugular veins and measured the mechanical properties of these veins. Our results showed that the veins buckle when the transmural pressure exceeds a critical pressure that is strongly related to the axial stretch ratio in the veins. The critical pressures of the eight veins tested were 14.2 +/- 5.4 and 26.4 +/- 9.0 mmHg at axial stretch ratio 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. In conclusion, veins buckle into a tortuous shape at high lumen pressures or reduced axial stretch ratios. Our results are useful in understanding the development of venous tortuosity associated with varicose veins, venous valvular insufficiency, diabetic retinopathy, and vein grafts.

  15. Meso- and microscale vein structures in fore-arc basalts and boninites related to post-magmatic tectonic deformation in the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc system: preliminary results from IODP Expedition 352

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quandt, Dennis; Micheuz, Peter; Kurz, Walter

    2016-04-01

    The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 352 aimed to drill through the entire volcanic sequence of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc. Two drill sites are situated on the outer fore arc composed of fore arc basalts (FAB) whereas two more sites are located on the upper trench slope penetrating the younger boninites. First results from IODP Expedition 352 and preliminary post-cruise data suggest that FAB were generated by decompression melting during near-trench sea-floor spreading, and that fluids from the subducting slab were not involved in their genesis. Subduction zone fluids involved in boninite genesis appear to have been derived from progressively higher temperatures and pressures over time as the subducting slab thermally matured. Structures within the drill cores combined with borehole and site survey seismic data indicate that tectonic deformation in the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc is mainly post-magmatic associated with the development of syn-tectonic sedimentary basins. Within the magmatic basement deformation was accommodated by shear along cataclastic fault zones and the formation of tension fractures, shear fractures and hybrid (tension and shear) fractures. Veins form by mineral filling of tension or hybrid fractures and show no or limited observable macroscale displacement along the fracture plane. (Low Mg-) Calcite and/or various types of zeolite are the major vein constituents, where the latter are considered to be alteration products of basaltic glass. Micrite contents vary significantly and are related to neptunian dikes. In boninites calcite develops mainly blocky shapes but veins with fibrous and stretched crystals also occur in places indicating antitaxial as well as ataxial growth, respectively. In FAB calcite forms consistently blocky crystals without any microscopic identifiable growth direction suggesting precipitation from a highly supersaturated fluid under dropping fluid pressure conditions. However, fluid pressure

  16. Late-onset congestive heart failure in a patient with a 58-year-old huge traumatic carotid-jugular fistula and pseudoaneurysm: endovascular treatment with a stent-graft.

    PubMed

    Kong, Joon Hyuk; Park, Sang Min; Kim, Tae Hoon; Choi, Dong Hoon; Lee, Do Yun

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of successful stent-graft endovascular treatment of a huge traumatic carotid-jugular fistula with a pseudoaneurysm that had resulted from a bullet injury. A 77-year-old man with a pulsatile neck mass came to our hospital complaining of dyspnea and chest pain at rest; about 58 years ago, a gunshot accident had inflicted a penetrating bullet wound on the right side of his neck. Computerized tomography angiogram had demonstrated a huge vascular mass protruding into the right anterior neck with a pseudoaneurysm. The calcified pseudoaneurysm had an oval-shaped opening in the right common carotid artery, with a large base into the right internal jugular vein. Echocardiography showed deteriorating congestive heart failure, wherein left ventricular (LV) enlargement with a LV end-diastolic diameter of 6.1 cm, severe tricuspid valve regurgitation, and LV ejection fraction of 60% was seen. The surgical approach was considered risky because of the severe deformity of the native vasculature, the severe calcified pseudoaneurysm, and the context of advanced age with congestive heart failure. Thus, we decided to treat this patient with endovascular devices. Fortunately, a stent-graft was delivered successfully across the carotid-jugular fistula and immediate follow-up angiogram demonstrated a small filling defect at the base of stent-graft representing thrombus. The follow-up computerized tomography angiograms obtained 2 weeks and 4 months later further demonstrated a patent stent-graft, no evidence of thrombus progression, and no abnormal shunt flow. The patient did not experience any neurologic complications nor did he show any evidence of pulmonary embolism for 8 months.

  17. Seldinger Technique for Placement of “Peripheral” Internal Jugular Line: Novel Approach for Emergent Vascular Access

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Adam J.; Raio, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report describing the ultrasound-guided placement of a peripheral intravenous catheter into the internal jugular vein of a patient with difficult vascular access. Although this technique has been described in the past, this case is novel in that the Seldinger technique was used to place the catheter. This allows for safer placement of a longer catheter (2.25″) without the need for venous dilation, which is potentially hazardous. PMID:26823937

  18. Posttransplant bilioportal fistula with portal vein thrombosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, M; Sakamoto, S; Fukuda, A; Shigeta, T; Tanaka, H; Mastuno, N; Hashimoto, M; Kondo, Y; Nosaka, S; Nakazawa, A

    2010-11-01

    An 8-year-old female patient, known to have post-Kasai biliary atresia with mild intrapulmonary shunting, underwent living donor liver transplantation because of recurrent cholangitis. After the treatment of postoperative biliary stricture with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, the patient subsequently developed hematochezia with portal vein thrombosis. The intraoperative findings showed portal vein thrombosis with a bilioportal fistula. We performed closure of the bilioportal fistula and reconstruction of the portal vein with a native internal jugular vein interposition graft. A bilioportal fistula due to percutaneous hepatobiliary procedures is a reportedly a rare complication following liver transplantation. The patient is currently doing well after a successful surgical intervention.

  19. Gypsum veins in Triassic Moenkopi mudrocks of southern Utah: Analogs to calcium sulfate veins on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, B. W.; Chan, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Well-exposed gypsum veins in the Triassic Moenkopi formation in southern Utah, USA, are similar to veins at Endeavour and Gale Craters on Mars. Both Moenkopi and Mars veins are hydrated calcium sulfate, have fibrous textures, and crosscut other diagenetic features. Moenkopi veins are stratigraphically localized with strontium and sulfur isotope ratios similar to primary Moenkopi sulfate beds and are thus interpreted to be sourced from within the unit. Endeavour veins seem to be distributed by lithology and may have a local source. Gale veins cut across multiple lithologies and appear to be sourced from another stratigraphic interval. Evaluation of vein network geometries indicates that horizontal Moenkopi veins are longer and thicker than vertical veins. Moenkopi veins are also generally oriented with the modern stress field, so are interpreted to have formed in the latest stages of exhumation. Endeavour veins appear to be generally vertical and oriented parallel to the margins of Cape York and are interpreted to have formed in response to topographic collapse of the crater rim. Gale horizontal veins appear to be slightly more continuous than vertical veins and may have formed during exhumation. Abrupt changes in orientation, complex crosscutting relationships, and fibrous (antitaxial) texture in Moenkopi and Mars veins suggest emplacement via hydraulic fracture at low temperatures. Moenkopi and Mars veins are interpreted as late-stage diagenetic features that have experienced little alteration since emplacement. Moenkopi veins are useful terrestrial analogs for Mars veins because vein geometry, texture, and chemistry record information about crustal deformation and vein emplacement.

  20. The measurement of tissue interface pressures and changes in jugular venous parameters associated with cervical immobilisation devices: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cervical immobilisation is commonly applied following trauma, particularly blunt head injury, but current methods of immobilisation are associated with significant complications. Semi-rigid disposable cervical collars are known to cause pressure ulcers, and impede effective airway management. These collars may also exacerbate a head injury by increasing intracranial pressure as a result of external compression of the jugular veins. There is a clear imperative to find ways of effectively immobilising the cervical spine whilst minimising complications, and any assessment of existing or new devices should include a standardized approach to the measurement of tissue interface pressures and their effect on jugular venous drainage from the brain. This systematic review summarises the research methods and technologies that have been used to measure tissue interface pressure and assess the jugular vein in the context of cervical immobilisation devices. 27 papers were included and assessed for quality. Laboratory investigations and biomechanical studies have gradually given way to methods that more accurately reflect clinical care. There are numerous accounts of skin ulceration associated with cervical collars, but no standardised approach to measuring tissue interface pressure. It is therefore difficult to compare studies and devices, but a pressure of less than 30 mmHg appears desirable. Cervical collars have been shown to have a compressive effect on the jugular veins, but it is not yet certain that this is the cause of the increased intracranial pressure observed in association with cervical collar use. This is the first review of its type. It will help guide further research in this area of trauma care, and the development and testing of new cervical immobilisation devices. PMID:24299024

  1. The measurement of tissue interface pressures and changes in jugular venous parameters associated with cervical immobilisation devices: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sparke, Alison; Voss, Sarah; Benger, Jonathan

    2013-12-03

    Cervical immobilisation is commonly applied following trauma, particularly blunt head injury, but current methods of immobilisation are associated with significant complications. Semi-rigid disposable cervical collars are known to cause pressure ulcers, and impede effective airway management. These collars may also exacerbate a head injury by increasing intracranial pressure as a result of external compression of the jugular veins. There is a clear imperative to find ways of effectively immobilising the cervical spine whilst minimising complications, and any assessment of existing or new devices should include a standardized approach to the measurement of tissue interface pressures and their effect on jugular venous drainage from the brain. This systematic review summarises the research methods and technologies that have been used to measure tissue interface pressure and assess the jugular vein in the context of cervical immobilisation devices. 27 papers were included and assessed for quality. Laboratory investigations and biomechanical studies have gradually given way to methods that more accurately reflect clinical care. There are numerous accounts of skin ulceration associated with cervical collars, but no standardised approach to measuring tissue interface pressure. It is therefore difficult to compare studies and devices, but a pressure of less than 30 mmHg appears desirable. Cervical collars have been shown to have a compressive effect on the jugular veins, but it is not yet certain that this is the cause of the increased intracranial pressure observed in association with cervical collar use. This is the first review of its type. It will help guide further research in this area of trauma care, and the development and testing of new cervical immobilisation devices.

  2. Stenting of vertical vein in an infant with obstructed supracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage

    PubMed Central

    Lim, WK; Leong, MC; Samion, H

    2016-01-01

    A 1.7 kg infant with obstructed supracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage (TAPVD) presented with severe pulmonary hypertension secondary to vertical vein obstruction. The child, in addition, had a large omphalocele that was being managed conservatively. The combination of low weight, unoperated omphalocele, and severe pulmonary hypertension made corrective cardiac surgery very high-risk. Therefore, transcatheter stenting of the stenotic vertical vein, as a bridge to corrective surgery was carried out. The procedure was carried out through the right internal jugular vein (RIJ). The stenotic segment of the vertical vein was stented using a coronary stent. After procedure, the child was discharged well to the referred hospital for weight gain and spontaneous epithelialization of the omphalocele. Stenting of the vertical vein through the internal jugular vein can be considered in very small neonates as a bridge to repair obstructed supracardiac total anomalous venous drainage. PMID:27212859

  3. Unrecognised guide wire migration during internal jugular cannulation and its retrieval--a case report.

    PubMed

    Adenekan, A T; Onakpoya, U U; Faponle, A F; Olateju, S O

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this article is to report a case of unrecognised missed guide wire diagnosed two months after right internal jugular cannulation and which was successfully retrieved from the right femoral vein. The case record of a patient that had retained intravenous guide wire was reviewed with relevant literature. A 40-yr-old female had an emergency left thoracotomy on account of haemorrhagic pleural effusion. A right internal jugular central venous catheter (CVC) insertion was performed for resuscitation and haemodynamic monitoring before induction of anaesthesia. A follow-up thoraco-abdominal Computed tomography (CT) scan taken after 8 weeks showed a pigtail intravascular metallic foreign body traversing the distal superior vena cava, right atrium, inferior vena cava, and ending at the right femoral vein. The guide wire was successfully removed via a right femoral venotomy under local anaesthesia. Intravascular loss of a guide wire is a rare complication of CVC insertion. If basic precautionary measures were taken, the loss of guide wire would have been avoided.

  4. Vein Problems Related to Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... varicose veins include venous lakes, reticular veins, and hemorrhoids. Venous lakes are varicose veins that appear on ... flat blue veins often seen behind the knees. Hemorrhoids are varicose veins in and around the anus. ...

  5. Bed-parallel calcite veins in the core of Wills Mountain anticline: Implications for deformation conditions and fluid flow during the Alleghanian orogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.A.; Battles, D.A. . Dept. of Geology and Geography)

    1994-03-01

    Thick, bed-parallel to sub-bed-parallel calcite veins are found in Upper Ordovician Trenton and Black River Group limestones exposed in the core of Wills Mountain anticline, Pendleton County, West Virginia. The veins range in thickness from less than 5 centimeters to over 2 meters, and contain individual crystals up to 20 centimeters across. The veins have a 1 to 3 mete spacing, and are planar to lensoid. They are also subhorizontal, and can be traced for tens of meters along the outcrop. The calcite is opaque to translucent white, and occasionally colorless and transparent. Tectonic slickenlines are found at the top and bottom margins of the veins, as well as within the veins. These slickenlines indicate transport directed toward 280[degree]--315[degree]. When crushed the calcite emits a strong odor of H[sub 2]S. The calcite contains abundant two-phase aqueous inclusions that have ice melting temperatures (T[sub m]) of [minus]9.0 to [minus]14.1 C. This corresponds to a salinity of 13 to 17 wt.% NaCl equiv. Inclusion homogenization (T[sub b]) values range from 91.8 to 135.1 C, with a medium value of 124 C. Since the calcite veins are bed-parallel and subhorizontal, they must have formed under lithostatic conditions. The calcite veins occur along a fault that is proposed to be a splay from the Ordovician Martinsburg Fm. decollement. This major decollement separates two Cambro-Ordovician carbonate flats east of the Wills Mountain anticline. The splay served as a conduit for the release of massive amounts of H[sub 2]S-saturated brine from the decollement.

  6. To reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections: is the subclavian route better than the jugular route for central venous catheterization?

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Goro; Kikuchi, Toshiki; Tsuyuzaki, Hitomi; Kawano, Rumiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Kazumi; Ugajin, Kazuhisa

    2006-12-01

    The most important targets of hospital-acquired infection control are to reduce the incidence of surgical-site, catheter-related, and ventilator-associated infections. In this report, we address previously presented infection-control strategies for central venous (CV) line catheterization, using a CV catheter-related infection surveillance system. Data concerning CV catheter insertion were collected from all facilities in our 650-bed hospital, excluding the operating and hemodialysis wards. Collected data included the insertion method, purpose, length of catheter inserted, duration of catheterization, infection rate, and complication rate. Catheter-related infection was diagnosed based on bacteriological examinations from blood cultures. The total number of catheterizations was 806 a year, and average duration of catheterization was 9.8 days. The purpose of catheterization was nutritional support in 210 cases, hemodialysis in 96 cases, cardiac support in 174 cases, and other treatments in 260 cases. In 66 cases, the purpose of CV catheter was not specified. The rate of positive cultures was 7.1%, and complications other than infection occurred in 0.5%. The main causative organisms were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in 38.6%, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis (CNS) in 33.3%, and S. aureus in 12.3% of infections. Infection rates were 3.8 per 1000 catheter-days in subclavian, 6.1 in jugular, and 15.7 in femoral vein catheterization. In high-risk departments (intensive care unit [ICU] and emergency departments) the infection rate was 5.4 for subclavian and 10.2 for jugular catheterization, whereas it was 3.6 for subclavian and 4.6 for jugular catheterization in noncritical-care departments. Considering complications such as pneumothorax, CV catheterization of the jugular vein is recommended in certain situations.

  7. Brain Slump Caused by Jugular Venous Stenoses Treated by Stenting: A Hypothesis to Link Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Nicholas; Trivedi, Rikin; Greenwood, Richard; Pickard, John

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension, of which brain slump is an extreme expression, is caused by a cerebrospinal fluid leak. The reason the leak develops in the first place, however, is unknown, and some cases can be very difficult to manage. We describe a patient with severe symptoms of spontaneous intracranial hypotension and brain slump documented by magnetic resonance imaging whose clinical syndrome and structural brain anomaly resolved completely after treatment directed exclusively at improving cranial venous outflow. Diagnostics included computed tomography (CT) venography, catheter venography, and jugular venoplasty. CT venography showed narrowing of both internal jugular veins below the skull base. Catheter venography confirmed that these were associated with pressure gradients. Jugular venoplasty performed on two separate occasions as a clinical test gave temporary respite. Lasting remission (2 years of follow-up) was achieved by stenting the dominant internal jugular vein. These findings and this outcome suggest a mechanism for the development of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that would link it to idiopathic intracranial hypertension and have cranial venous outflow obstruction as the underlying cause.

  8. Sclerotherapy of Varicose Veins and Spider Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Sclerotherapy of Varicose Veins and Spider Veins Sclerotherapy uses injections from a very fine, ... Sclerotherapy? What is Sclerotherapy of Varicose Veins and Spider Veins? Sclerotherapy is a minimally invasive treatment used ...

  9. Surgical Approaches to the Jugular Foramen: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Griessenauer, Christoph J.; McGrew, Benjamin; Matusz, Petru; De Caro, Raffaele; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multiple surgical approaches and combinations thereof have been described to gain access to the jugular foramen. In an area laden with important neurovascular structures, care must be taken in choosing the best surgical approach for treatment of rare pathologies involving this region. Methods This manuscript provides a comprehensive review of the relevant anatomy along with an overview of the various approaches to the jugular foramen. In an attempt to simplify the various concepts, we propose a basic distinction into anterolateral and posterolateral approaches based on the main trajectory targeting the jugular foramen. Conclusion The anatomy surrounding the jugular foramen is exceedingly complex and requires in-depth understanding of skull base and head and neck relationships. PMID:27175322

  10. In vivo monitoring of blood oxygenation in large veins with a triple-wavelength optoacoustic system.

    PubMed

    Brecht, H P; Prough, D S; Petrov, Y Y; Patrikeev, I; Petrova, I Y; Deyo, D J; Cicenaite, I; Esenaliev, R O

    2007-11-26

    A noninvasive optoacoustic technique could be a clinically useful alternative to existing, invasive methods for cerebral oxygenation monitoring. Recently we proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for monitoring cerebral blood oxygenation by probing large cerebral and neck veins including the superior sagittal sinus and the internal jugular vein. In these studies we used a multi-wavelength optoacoustic system with a nanosecond optical parametric oscillator as a light source and a custom-made optoacoustic probe for the measurement of the optoacoustic signals in vivo from the area of the sheep neck overlying the external jugular vein, which is similar in diameter and depth to the human internal jugular vein. Optoacoustic signals induced in venous blood were measured with high resolution despite the presence of a thick layer of tissues (up to 10 mm) between the external jugular vein and the optoacoustic probe. Three wavelengths were chosen to provide accurate and stable measurements of blood oxygenation: signals at 700 nm and 1064 nm demonstrated high correlation with actual oxygenation measured invasively with CO-Oximeter ("gold standard"), while the signal at 800 nm (isosbestic point) was independent of blood oxygenation and was used for calibration.

  11. New treatment of vertigo caused by jugular bulb abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hitier, Martin; Barbier, Charlotte; Marie-Aude, Thenint; Moreau, Sylvain; Courtheoux, Patrick; Patron, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    Jugular bulb abnormalities can induce tinnitus, hearing loss, or vertigo. Vertigo can be very disabling and may need surgical treatments with risk of hearing loss, major bleeding or facial palsy. Hence, we have developed a new treatment for vertigo caused by jugular bulb anomalies, using an endovascular technique. Three patients presented with severe vertigos mostly induced by high venous pressure. One patient showed downbeat vertical nystagmus during the Valsalva maneuver. The temporal-bone computed tomography scan showed a high rising jugular bulb or a jugular bulb diverticulum with dehiscence and compression of the vestibular aqueduct in all cases. We plugged the upper part of the bulb with coils, and we used a stent to maintain the coils and preserving the venous permeability. After 12- to 24-month follow-up, those patients experienced no more vertigo, allowing return to work. The 3-month arteriographs showed good permeability of the sigmoid sinus and jugular bulb through the stent, with complete obstruction of the upper part of the bulb in all cases. Disabling vertigo induced by jugular bulb abnormalities can be effectively treated by an endovascular technique. This technique is minimally invasive with a probable greater benefit/risk ratio compare with surgery. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. Radiosurgery of Glomus Jugulare Tumors: A Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Zachary D.; Batra, Sachin; Limb, Charles J.; Li, Gordon; Sughrue, Michael E.; Redmond, Kristin; Rigamonti, Daniele; Parsa, Andrew T.; Chang, Steven; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Lim, Michael

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: During the past two decades, radiosurgery has arisen as a promising approach to the management of glomus jugulare. In the present study, we report on a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available published data on the radiosurgical management of glomus jugulare tumors. Methods and Materials: To identify eligible studies, systematic searches of all glomus jugulare tumors treated with radiosurgery were conducted in major scientific publication databases. The data search yielded 19 studies, which were included in the meta-analysis. The data from 335 glomus jugulare patients were extracted. The fixed effects pooled proportions were calculated from the data when Cochrane's statistic was statistically insignificant and the inconsistency among studies was <25%. Bias was assessed using the Egger funnel plot test. Results: Across all studies, 97% of patients achieved tumor control, and 95% of patients achieved clinical control. Eight studies reported a mean or median follow-up time of >36 months. In these studies, 95% of patients achieved clinical control and 96% achieved tumor control. The gamma knife, linear accelerator, and CyberKnife technologies all exhibited high rates of tumor and clinical control. Conclusions: The present study reports the results of a meta-analysis for the radiosurgical management of glomus jugulare. Because of its high effectiveness, we suggest considering radiosurgery for the primary management of glomus jugulare tumors.

  13. We still go for the jugular: implications of the 3SITES central venous catheter study for nephrology.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Christina M; Vassalotti, Joseph A

    2016-03-01

    The 3SITES study randomly assigned a nontunneled central venous catheter site in over 3000 adults treated in intensive care units. The subclavian site was associated with a lower rate of short-term complications, including catheter-related bloodstream infection and deep venous thrombosis, compared to the femoral or internal jugular site. Nephrologists should be aware of this study and should continue to advocate for alternatives to subclavian vein catheter placement in patients with chronic kidney disease who are expected to require arteriovenous access for dialysis in the future.

  14. A rapid and non-surgical procedure for jugular catheterization of pigs.

    PubMed

    Matte, J J

    1999-07-01

    A rapid and non-surgical method for jugular catheterization in pigs was set up in 30 piglets of 6.2 kg, 23 pigs of 46 kg and 84 kg and two lactating multiparous sows. The animal was restrained on a V-shaped table (piglets) or with a rope around the mandible (slaughter pigs and sows). The vein was located with the Vacutainer system and a wire guide was inserted into the Vacutainer needle up to the vein lumen. When the needle was removed, the catheter was inserted over the wire guide and advanced until it penetrated the skin and thereafter, the vein wall. The catheter was fixed outside by a large tape and coiled inside a patch just behind the ears. The technique utilizes readily available material and is no more risky for the animal than a single blood sampling. Moreover, it can be performed within 15 to 20 min (including animal restraint) within pens. This new approach might have important implications not only for research purposes by facilitating repeated blood samplings but also for projects which require a rapid and easy method for testing of any kind of pharmaceutical or other type of products under husbandry conditions.

  15. Connexin43 Inhibition Prevents Human Vein Grafts Intimal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Longchamp, Alban; Allagnat, Florent; Alonso, Florian; Kuppler, Christopher; Dubuis, Céline; Ozaki, Charles-Keith; Mitchell, James R; Berceli, Scott; Corpataux, Jean-Marc; Déglise, Sébastien; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Venous bypass grafts often fail following arterial implantation due to excessive smooth muscle cells (VSMC) proliferation and consequent intimal hyperplasia (IH). Intercellular communication mediated by Connexins (Cx) regulates differentiation, growth and proliferation in various cell types. Microarray analysis of vein grafts in a model of bilateral rabbit jugular vein graft revealed Cx43 as an early upregulated gene. Additional experiments conducted using an ex-vivo human saphenous veins perfusion system (EVPS) confirmed that Cx43 was rapidly increased in human veins subjected ex-vivo to arterial hemodynamics. Cx43 knock-down by RNA interference, or adenoviral-mediated overexpression, respectively inhibited or stimulated the proliferation of primary human VSMC in vitro. Furthermore, Cx blockade with carbenoxolone or the specific Cx43 inhibitory peptide 43gap26 prevented the burst in myointimal proliferation and IH formation in human saphenous veins. Our data demonstrated that Cx43 controls proliferation and the formation of IH after arterial engraftment.

  16. Connexin43 Inhibition Prevents Human Vein Grafts Intimal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Longchamp, Alban; Allagnat, Florent; Alonso, Florian; Kuppler, Christopher; Dubuis, Céline; Ozaki, Charles-Keith; Mitchell, James R.; Berceli, Scott; Corpataux, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Venous bypass grafts often fail following arterial implantation due to excessive smooth muscle cells (VSMC) proliferation and consequent intimal hyperplasia (IH). Intercellular communication mediated by Connexins (Cx) regulates differentiation, growth and proliferation in various cell types. Microarray analysis of vein grafts in a model of bilateral rabbit jugular vein graft revealed Cx43 as an early upregulated gene. Additional experiments conducted using an ex-vivo human saphenous veins perfusion system (EVPS) confirmed that Cx43 was rapidly increased in human veins subjected ex-vivo to arterial hemodynamics. Cx43 knock-down by RNA interference, or adenoviral-mediated overexpression, respectively inhibited or stimulated the proliferation of primary human VSMC in vitro. Furthermore, Cx blockade with carbenoxolone or the specific Cx43 inhibitory peptide 43gap26 prevented the burst in myointimal proliferation and IH formation in human saphenous veins. Our data demonstrated that Cx43 controls proliferation and the formation of IH after arterial engraftment. PMID:26398895

  17. Varicose veins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Varicose veins are caused by poorly functioning valves in the veins, and decreased elasticity of the vein wall, allowing pooling of blood within the veins, and their subsequent enlargement. Varicose veins affect up to 40% of adults, and are more common in obese people, and in women who have had more than two pregnancies. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in adults with varicose veins? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 39 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression stockings, endovenous laser, injection sclerotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, self-help (advice, avoidance of tight clothing, diet, elevation of legs, exercise), and surgery (stripping, avulsion, powered phlebectomy). PMID:21477400

  18. External Carotid-Internal Jugular Fistula as a Late Complication After Carotid Endarterectomy: A Rare Case

    SciTech Connect

    Bakar, Bulent; Cekirge, Saruhan; Tekkok, Ismail Hakki

    2011-02-15

    A 66-year-old man presented with mild amnesia, progressive fatigue, ataxia, visual hallucinations, and debility. His past medical history included right-sided carotid endarterectomy performed elsewhere 6 years previously. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed left parieto-occipital arteriovenous malformation-like tortous vessels, venous congestion, and ischemic areas. Cerebral angiography showed right-sided compound external carotid artery-internal jugular vein (IJV) fistula, and distal occlusion of the right IJV. Transvenous embolization via contralateral IJV was performed, and the fistula, together with fistulous portion of the distal IJV, was sealed using coils. Two years later, patient is well with normal neurologic examination findings. The presence of an arteriovenous communication after vascular surgery is a serious complication with potential long-term effects and therefore should be diagnosed and treated as promptly as possible.

  19. Varicose Veins and Spider Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... are sold in medical supply and drugstores. Prescription-strength gradient compression hose, which offer the greatest amount ... the face. Exercise regularly to improve your leg strength, circulation, and vein strength. Focus on exercises that ...

  20. Veno-venous bypass in experimental liver transplantation: portal-jugular versus caval-portal-jugular.

    PubMed

    Falcini, F; Martini, E; Marsili, M; Benassai, C; Fabbri, L P; Tanini, R; Linden, M; Simoncini, R; Filipponi, F; Cataliotti, L

    1990-04-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the changes in physiologic variables caused by the use of two different types of pump-assisted veno-venous bypass during experimental liver transplantation. The experiments, performed on female pigs weighing 30 +/- 2 kg, were divided into two groups depending on the bypass used. During the anhepatic phase a pump-assisted portal-jugular (PJ) bypass was used in Group 1 (n = 8) at a flow rate of 15 ml kg-1-min-1, while a pump-assisted caval-portal-jugular (CPJ) bypass was used in Group 2 (n = 8) at a flow rate of 20 ml kg-1-min-1. Intraoperative haemodynamics, pulmonary gas exchange, haematological and serum biochemical parameters were evaluated. Postoperative animal survival rate and complications associated with the bypass used were evaluated. Mean pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) and pulmonary vascular resistance (Pvr) showed significantly different behaviour in the two groups, whereas the remaining parameters all showed the same trend. Thus an earlier and more substantial increase in Ppa and Pvr values was found in Group 1 when compared to Group 2 during the anhepatic phase. The different behaviour shown by Group 1 may depend on the release of circulating vasoactive substances generated following pelvic venous congestion caused by the temporary clamping of the inferior vena cava. In conclusion, this study indicates that the pump-assisted CPJ bypass is more suitable than the pump-assisted PJ bypass. Furthermore, in order to obtain better results it should be used routinely in porcine liver transplantation.

  1. Prevalence and correlates of jugular injections among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Hoda, Zia; Kerr, Thomas; Li, Kathy; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan

    2008-07-01

    Jugular injection of drugs has been reported, although little is known about the prevalence of and risk factors associated with this behaviour. We evaluated factors associated with jugular injection among a cohort of injection drug users (IDU) in Vancouver, Canada. We used univariate statistics and logistic regression to examine factors associated with jugular injection among participants in the Vancouver Injecting Drug Users Study (VIDUS), a large prospective cohort study of IDU recruited through snowball sampling methods in Vancouver, Canada. Between December 2004 and November 2005, 780 IDU were followed up as part of VIDUS and 198 (25%) reported jugular injection in the previous 6 months. In multivariate analyses, factors associated independently with jugular injection included: being of the female gender [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14-2.59; p = 0.010], daily heroin use (aOR = 2.89, 95% CI: 1.93-4.34; p < 0.001), daily cocaine use (aOR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.12-2.76; p = 0.014], requiring help injecting (aOR = 4.44, 95% CI: 2.64-7.46; p < 0.001), and involvement in the sex-trade (aOR = 2.71, 95% CI: 1.6-4.55; p < 0.001). Reporting a history of jugular injecting was alarmingly high in the cohort and was associated with several identifiable demographic and drug-using characteristics. Given previous reports demonstrating the risk of infection and vascular trauma due to this behaviour, these populations should be considered seriously as a target for safer injecting education.

  2. Varicose vein - noninvasive treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Sclerotherapy; Laser therapy - varicose veins; Radiofrequency vein ablation; Endovenous thermal ablation; Ambulatory phlebectomy; Transilluminated power phlebotomy; Endovenous laser ablation; Varicose ...

  3. Posttransplant Complex Inferior Venacava Balloon Dilatation After Hepatic Vein Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Kohli, Vikas; Wadhawan, Manav; Gupta, Subhash; Roy, Vipul

    2010-02-15

    Orthotopic and living related liver transplantation is an established mode of treatment of end-stage liver disease. One of the major causes of postoperative complications is vascular anastomotic stenosis. One such set of such complications relates to hepatic vein, inferior vena cava (IVC), or portal vein stenosis, with a reported incidence of 1-3%. The incidence of vascular complications is reported to be higher in living donor versus cadaveric liver transplants. We encountered a patient with hepatic venous outflow tract obstruction, where the hepatic vein had been previously stented, but the patient continued to have symptoms due to additional IVC obstruction. The patient required double-balloon dilatation of the IVC simultaneously from the internal jugular vein and IVC.

  4. Management Strategy for Patients With Chronic Subclavian Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Keir, Graham; Marshall, M Blair

    2017-02-01

    We performed a systematic review to determine best practice for the management of patients with chronic or subacute subclavian vein thrombosis. This condition is best managed with surgical excision of the first rib followed by long-term anticoagulation. Interventional techniques aimed at restoring patency are ineffective beyond 2 weeks postthrombosis. Additional therapeutic options should be made based on the severity of symptoms as well as vein status. Patients with milder symptoms are given decompression surgery followed by anticoagulation whereas patients with more severe symptoms are considered for either a jugular vein transposition or saphenous patch based on the vein characteristics. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mesoportal bypass using a constructed saphenous vein graft for extrahepatic portal vein obstruction--technique, feasibility, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Luoto, Topi; Pakarinen, Mikko; Mattila, Ilkka; Rintala, Risto

    2012-04-01

    The internal jugular vein is routinely used as a graft for the Rex shunt. We analyzed results of mesoportal bypass using an alternative autologous graft. Twenty-one children with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction were treated with a Rex shunt constructed using both greater saphenous veins. Follow-up included ultrasound and blood count screening at 3, 6, and 12 months and annually thereafter. Median age was 8.7 years (range, 3.6-14 years), and follow-up time, 5.3 years (range, 0.6-7.1 years). Occlusion or narrowing occurred in 6 patients after a median of 20 months (range, 2.6-52 months). In 2 cases, patency was restored, giving an overall success rate of 81%. During follow-up, no variceal bleeding occurred while hemoglobin, platelet count, and leukocyte levels increased (P ≤ .02 for all) and spleen size decreased (P = .001). Patients with occlusive shunt complications weighed less (P = .01), had higher preoperative platelet levels (P = .02), and tended to have a smaller spleen preoperatively (P = .06) than patients without shunt complications. Cumulative graft patency at 6 months, 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years was 100%, 89%, 82%, and 74%, respectively. Rex shunt constructed using the greater saphenous veins is a valuable alternative to the internal jugular vein graft, allowing long-term reversal of portal hypertension, splenomegaly, and hypersplenism. Low patient weight and high platelet count predicted shunt occlusion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Jugular venous reflux affects ocular venous system in transient monocular blindness.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chih-Ping; Hsu, Hung-Yi; Chao, A-Ching; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Lin, Shing-Jong; Hu, Han-Hwa

    2010-01-01

    The frequency of jugular venous reflux (JVR) is higher in patients with transient monocular blindness (TMB). We hypothesize that JVR influences ocular venous outflow, and resulting disturbances in cerebral and ocular venous circulation might be a cause of TMB. To substantiate this hypothesis, we aimed to demonstrate that: (1) TMB patients have vasculature changes in their retinal venules, and (2) JVR could influence ocular venous outflow, as revealed by dilated retinal venules. This study has 2 parts. The case-control study included 31 TMB patients and 31 age/gender-matched normal individuals, who all received fundus photography for retinal venule diameter comparisons. The Valsalva maneuver (VM) experiment included 30 healthy volunteers who received both color Doppler imaging of the internal jugular vein and fundus photography for retinal venule diameter measurement. In the case-control study, TMB patients had a wider retinal venule diameter (184.5 +/- 17.5 vs. 174.3 +/- 16.2 microm, right eye, p = 0.023; 194.20 +/- 24.6 vs. 176.6 +/- 19.5 microm, left eye, p = 0.017), especially TMB patients with JVR. The VM experiments showed that the presence of JVR was associated with a greater increase in retinal venule diameters during VM in the subjects' right eye (14.27 +/- 11.16 vs. 2.75 +/- 3.51%, JVR vs. non-JVR, p = 0.0002) and left eye (10.06 +/- 6.42 vs. 1.80 +/- 2.03%, p = 0.0003). These findings provide evidence that frequently occurring JVR associated with TMB impedes ocular venous outflow, and the subsequent disturbances in ocular venous circulation may be a cause of TMB. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. A rare case of persistent jugulocephalic vein and its clinical implication

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Prakashchandra; Thangarajan, Rajesh; D'Souza, Melanie Rose

    2016-01-01

    Persistence of jugulocephalic vein is one of the extremely rare variations of the cephalic vein. Knowledge of such a variation is of utmost importance to orthopedic surgeons while treating the fractures of the clavicle, head and neck surgeons, during surgery of the lower part of neck, for cardiothoracic surgeons and radiologists during catheterization and cardiac device placement. We report the persistent jugulocephalic vein in an adult male cadaver, observed during the routine dissection classes. The right cephalic vein ascended upwards, superficial to the lateral part of the clavicle and terminated into the external jugular vein. It also gave a communicating branch to the axillary vein below the clavicle. We discuss the embryological and clinical importance of this rare variation. PMID:27722015

  8. Cerebral infarction due to carotid occlusion and carbon monoxide exposure III. Influence of neck vein occlusion.

    PubMed Central

    Laas, R; Igloffstein, J

    1983-01-01

    Unilateral cerebral infarcts were produced in the rat by ligation of one common carotid artery and a subsequent exposure to carbon monoxide. In animals which had undergone an additional ligation of the external jugular veins leading to a moderate increase of the cephalic venous pressure the outcome of the procedure was ameliorated significantly. Venous pressure elevation was thought to reduce the venous vascular resistance effectively by preventing the leptomeningeal veins from collapsing. Collapse of the leptomeningeal veins probably occurred during the severe carbon monoxide-induced hypotension causing a steep increase of cerebral vascular resistance. Images PMID:6886722

  9. What Causes Varicose Veins?

    MedlinePlus

    ... weak or damaged, blood can back up and pool in your veins. This causes the veins to ... pressure in your veins due to overweight or obesity or pregnancy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: February ...

  10. Spider Vein Removal

    MedlinePlus

    Spider veins: How are they removed? I have spider veins on my legs. What options are available ... M.D. Several options are available to remove spider veins — thin red lines or weblike networks of ...

  11. What Are Varicose Veins?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Varicose Veins? Español Varicose (VAR-i-kos) veins are swollen, ... can form in other parts of the body. Varicose veins are a common condition. They usually cause few ...

  12. Dynamic multiplanar real time ultrasound guided infraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Hamill, Mark; Collier, Bryan; Bradburn, Eric; Ferrara, John

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound guided vascular access has been well-characterized as a safe and effective technique for internal jugular and femoral vein catheterization. However, there is limited experience with the use of ultrasound to access the infraclavicular subclavian vein. Multiple ultrasound techniques do exist to identify the subclavian vein, but real time access is limited by vessel identification in a single planar view. To overcome this limitation, a novel technique of ultrasound guided infraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization using a real time multiplanar approach has been developed. The initial experience with this approach is described. A single surgeon used combined oblique, transverse, and longitudinal views along with Doppler color flow images to both define the infraclavicular anatomy and to obtain subclavian vein access in 42 adult patients (20 M/22 F and 22 L/20 R) with a mean body mass index of 29.2 (range = 18.9-55.4). Chest x-ray was obtained to confirm position and to rule out pneumothorax. Subclavian vein cannulation was achieved in 100 per cent of patients; subsequent catheterization was successful in 92.9 per cent. The number of attempts required for cannulation averaged 1.3 (range = 1-5), and decreased after a five patient learning curve. No patient developed a pneumothorax, hematoma, or cannula malposition. Ultrasound guided multiplanar infraclavicular subclavian vein access appears to be a safe and effective adjunct for central line placement.

  13. A new approach for sclera vein recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N. L.; Du, Yingzi; Zhou, Zhi

    2010-04-01

    The vein structure in the sclera is stable over time, unique to each person, and well suited for human identification. A few researchers have performed sclera vein pattern recognition and reported promising initial results. Sclera recognition poses several challenges: the vein structure moves and deforms with the movement of the eye; images of sclera patterns are often defocused and/or saturated; and, most importantly, the vein structure in the sclera is multi-layered and has complex non-linear deformation. In this paper, we proposed a new method for sclera recognition: First, we developed a color-based sclera region estimation scheme for sclera segmentation. Second, we designed a Gabor wavelet-based sclera pattern enhancement method, and an adaptive thresholding method to emphasize and binarize the sclera vein patterns. Third, we proposed a line descriptor-based feature extraction, registration, and matching method that is illumination-, scale-, orientation-, and deformation-invariant, and can mitigate the multi-layered deformation effects exhibited in the sclera and tolerate segmentation error. It is empirically verified using the UBIRIS database that the proposed method can perform accurate sclera recognition.

  14. Mediastinal approach to the placement of tunneled hemodialysis catheters in patients with central vein occlusion in an outpatient access center.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, John; Dietrich, Anne; Steuben, Stephanie; Ricker, Jaren; Barkema, Karla; Kuhl, Taften

    2011-01-01

    Endovascular therapy for hemodialysis (HD) access is now performed in outpatient centers in a growing number of cities in the US. As patients live longer, we are facing a growing number of patients with central venous occlusion. We report our first three cases of mediastinal tunneled dialysis catheter placement in a clinic setting. Between 15 November 2009 and 1 April 2010, three patients with central vein occlusion required tunneled HD catheter placement. Case #1 was a 60-year-old male with left subclavian and innominate vein occlusion from a defibrillator pacemaker and two previous right internal jugular tunneled dialysis catheters with occlusion of the right internal jugular vein. He lost right arm access after two failed arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) and an occluded upper arm AV graft. His last right external jugular catheter was removed for infection. Case #2 was a 72-year-old female with a thrombosed left upper arm and a right basilic vein AV access. She had a history of left leg deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and a vena cava filter. The left and right internal jugular veins were occluded as well as the left subclavian vein after stent placement. She required a tunneled HD catheter after a failed attempt at endovascular salvage of her right basilic AVF. Case #3 was a 78-year-old female who had been on HD for 4 yr. She refused AVF surgery and had four tunneled HD catheters removed for infection. She presented with bilateral internal jugular vein thrombosis and the removal of an infected right subclavian tunneled HD catheter. THE TECHNIQUE: The dialysis catheters were placed using standard C-arm fluoroscopy. We accessed the right femoral vein to pass a Berenstein catheter (Cordis, Inc, Warren, NJ) into the right innominate-subclavian vein junction. Using the catheter as a fluoroscopic target, a micropuncture needle was guided into the right innominate vein and a standard J-guidewire was used to dilate the mediastinal tract and place a new tunneled dialysis catheter

  15. [Effect of catheter type on the functional survival of jugular access ports in chronic hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Chazot, C; Charra, B; Vanel, T; Jean, G; Laurent, G

    1994-01-01

    Silicone catheter (C) can be used in the hemodialysis setting as an alternative for the blood access. We analysed retrospectively the 3 types of the catheters used in 45 patients. 58 catheters were percutaneously inserted in the internal jugular vein (9 Bard (B)-Hickman; 17 Canaud (CD)-Vygon; 32 Permcath (PC)-Quinton). The indications were thrombosis or dysfunction of an arterio-venous fistula (A-V F) (52%), absence of a A-V F (21%), Thomas' shunt infection (8%), infection or extrusion of a previous catheter (19%). The functional survival curve of the C shows the best results for the PC and the worse with the B (Log-Rank test = 6,602, p < 0.037). The main cause of failure was the catheter's extrusion (3 of the 5 failures for the B; 4 of the 6 for the CD). None of the PC was extruded. Infection and inadequate blood flow were equally found in the 3 groups. In our experience, PC give the best results because of the quality of the cuff making a good attachment in the sub-cutaneous tunnel.

  16. Neurological sequelae from brachiocephalic vein stenosis.

    PubMed

    Herzig, David W; Stemer, Andrew B; Bell, Randy S; Liu, Ai-Hsi; Armonda, Rocco A; Bank, William O

    2013-05-01

    Stenosis of central veins (brachiocephalic vein [BCV] and superior vena cava) occurs in 30% of hemodialysis patients, rarely producing intracranial pathology. The authors present the first cases of BCV stenosis causing perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and myoclonic epilepsy. In the first case, a 73-year-old man on hemodialysis presented with headache and blurry vision, and was admitted with presumed idiopathic intracranial hypertension after negative CT studies and confirmatory lumbar puncture. The patient mildly improved until hospital Day 3, when he experienced a seizure; emergency CT scans showed perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Cerebral angiography failed to find any vascular abnormality, but demonstrated venous congestion. A fistulogram found left BCV occlusion with jugular reflux. The occlusion could not be reopened percutaneously and required open fistula ligation. Postoperatively, symptoms resolved and the patient remained intact at 7-month follow-up. In the second case, a 67-year-old woman on hemodialysis presented with right arm weakness and myoclonic jerks. Admission MRI revealed subcortical edema and a possible dural arteriovenous fistula. Cerebral angiography showed venous engorgement, but no vascular malformation. A fistulogram found left BCV stenosis with jugular reflux, which was immediately reversed with angioplasty and stent placement. Postprocedure the patient was seizure free, and her strength improved. Seven months later the patient presented in myoclonic status epilepticus, and a fistulogram revealed stent occlusion. Angioplasty successfully reopened the stent and she returned to baseline; she was seizure free at 4-month follow-up. Central venous stenosis is common with hemodialysis, but rarely presents with neurological findings. Prompt recognition and endovascular intervention can restore normal venous drainage and resolve symptoms.

  17. Lower limb and portal veins echography for predicting risk of thrombosis during a 90-day bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbeille, P. A.; Kerbeci, P.; Porcher, M.; Audebert, P.; Mohty, D.

    2005-08-01

    The objective was to investigate the main leg, Portal, Jugular veins, and cardiac chambers during a long term head down bedrest (90 days). The population consisted of a control group (Co-gr, n=9) and an exercise Fly wheel counter- measure group (CM-gr, n=9). Method: Internal Saphenous, Common/Superficial Femoral, Popliteal, Posterior Tibial, Gastrocnemian, Portal Jugular veins and Cardiac chambers were investigated by echography. Results: The echographies were performed at HDBR day 28, 60 and 85. All veins and cardiac chambers, on all subjects showed a lumen dark (no structure inside) and were perfectly compressible under the probe pressure except cardiac chambers and Portal vein anatomically not compressible. Conclusion: (a) There was no sign of venous flow stagnation nor venous thrombosis on any subjects at any time during the 90 days in bedrest. (b) There was no difference between the control and the exercise subjects (c) The Cardiac chambers were found normal but the Jugular veins were enlarged at the end of the HDBR.

  18. Technical considerations in continuous jugular venous oxygen saturation measurement.

    PubMed

    Dearden, N M; Midgley, S

    1993-01-01

    Fibreoptic reflection oximetry allows continuous in-vivo estimation of jugular venous oxygen saturation. In combination with pulse oximetry the oxygen extraction ratio SaO2-SjO2/SaO2 can be derived enabling identification of states of global luxury perfusion, normal coupling of global cerebral blood flow with global cerebral metabolism, global cerebral hypoperfusion and global cerebral ischemia. Several technical difficulties may arise affecting the accuracy of SjO2 recordings which must be recognised by the clinician before medical intervention is contemplated.

  19. Moderate hypothermia suppresses jugular venous superoxide anion radical, oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury in forebrain ischemia/reperfusion rats.

    PubMed

    Koda, Yoichi; Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Fujita, Motoki; Miyauchi, Takashi; Kaneda, Kotaro; Todani, Masaki; Aoki, Tetsuya; Shitara, Masaki; Izumi, Tomonori; Kasaoka, Shunji; Yuasa, Makoto; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-22

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of moderate hypothermia (MH) on generation of jugular venous superoxide radical (O2-.), oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury in forebrain ischemia/reperfusion (FBI/R) rats. Twenty-one Wistar rats were allocated to a control group (n=7, 37 degrees C), a pre-MH group (n=7, 32 degrees C before ischemia), and a post-MH group (n=7, 32 degrees C after reperfusion). MH was induced before induction of ischemia in the pre-MH group and just after reperfusion in the post-MH group. Forebrain ischemia was induced by occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries with hemorrhagic hypotension for 10 min, followed by reperfusion. O(2)(-)(.) in the jugular vein was measured from the produced current using a novel O2-. sensor. The O2-. current showed a gradual increase during forebrain ischemia in the control and post-MH groups but was attenuated in the pre-MH group. Following reperfusion, the current showed a marked increase in the control group but was strongly attenuated in the pre- and post-MH groups. Concentrations of malondialdehyde, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the brain and plasma 120 min after reperfusion in the pre- and post-MH groups were significantly lower than those in the control group, except for plasma HMGB1 in the post-MH group. In conclusion, MH suppressed O2-. measured in the jugular vein, oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury in FBI/R rats.

  20. The Jugular Foramen Schwannomas: Review of the Large Surgical Series

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective Jugular foramen schwannomas are uncommon pathological conditions. This article is constituted for screening these tumors in a wide perspective. Materials One-hundred-and-ninty-nine patients published in 19 articles between 1984 to 2007 years was collected from Medline/Index Medicus. Results The series consist of 83 male and 98 female. The mean age of 199 operated patients was 40.4 years. The lesion located on the right side in 32 patients and on the left side in 60 patients. The most common presenting clinical symptoms were hearing loss, tinnitus, disphagia, ataxia, and hoarseness. Complete tumor removal was achieved in 159 patients. In fourteen patients tumor reappeared unexpectedly. The tumor was thought to originate from the glossopharyngeal nerve in forty seven cases; vagal nerve in twenty six cases; and cranial accessory nerve in eleven cases. The most common postoperative complications were lower cranial nerve palsy and facial nerve palsy. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage, meningitis, aspiration pneumonia and mastoiditis were seen as other complications. Conclusion This review shows that jugular foramen schwannomas still have prominently high morbidity and those complications caused by postoperative lower cranial nerve injury are life threat. PMID:19119464

  1. Surgical rehabilitation of voice and swallowing after jugular foramen surgery.

    PubMed

    Oestreicher-Kedem, Yael; Agrawal, Sumit; Jackler, Robert K; Damrose, Edward J

    2010-03-01

    We sought to determine the patient population that will benefit from surgical rehabilitation of voice and swallowing after jugular foramen tumor (JFT) resection. We performed a retrospective case study of patients with a history of JFT resection. The patients' files were reviewed for data on preoperative and postoperative function of cranial nerves VII and IX through XII, voice and swallowing function, and surgical procedures for voice and swallowing rehabilitation and their timing. Twenty-one patients underwent JFT resection. Thirty-eight percent presented with deficits of cranial nerves VII and IX through XII, and 61% developed new postoperative deficits. Three patients recovered glossopharyngeal nerve function, 2 recovered vagus nerve function, and 1 recovered facial nerve function. Surgical rehabilitation procedures were undertaken in 8 patients. Patients who eventually underwent surgical rehabilitation procedures for voice and swallowing tended to have larger tumors, tumors within the nerve bundle in the jugular foramen, and multiple nerve deficits. Most patients with multiple deficits of cranial nerves VII and IX through XII after JFT resection are unlikely to regain spontaneous nerve function, will experience long-term dysphonia and dysphagia, and will elect to undergo corrective surgery to improve voice and swallowing. Preoperative evaluation and close postoperative follow-up can identify patients who would benefit from early surgical rehabilitation.

  2. Anatomy of the inferior petro-occipital vein and its relation to the base of the skull: application to surgical and endovascular procedures of the skull base.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Watanabe, Koichi; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-07-01

    Although the inferior petro-occipital vein has been recently used for vascular access to the cavernous sinus, few detailed descriptions of its anatomy are in the literature. We aimed to investigate the morphology and relationships of this vessel. Twelve latex-injected cadaveric heads (24 sides) were dissected to identify the inferior petro-occipital vein and anatomic details documented. The petro-occipital vein was identified on 83.3% of sides. Generally this vein united the internal carotid venous plexus to the superior jugular bulb. However, on 10% of sides, the anterior part of this vein communicated directly with the cavernous sinus, and on 15%, the posterior vein drained into the inferior petrosal sinus at its termination into the superior jugular bulb. The petro-occipital vein was separated from the overlying inferior petrosal sinus by a thin plate of bone. On 40% of sides, small venous connections were found between these two venous structures. The vein was usually larger if a nondominant transverse sinus was present. The overlying inferior petrosal sinus was smaller in diameter when an underlying inferior petro-occipital vein was present. On 20% of sides, the posterior aspect of the vein communicated with the hypoglossal canal veins. On three sides, diploic veins from the clivus drained into the inferior petro-occipital vein. The inferior petro-occipital vein is present in most humans. This primarily extracranial vessel communicates with intracranial venous sinuses and should be considered an emissary vein. Knowledge of this vessel's exact anatomy may be useful to cranial base surgeons and endovascular specialists.

  3. The clinical anatomy of the cephalic vein in the deltopectoral triangle.

    PubMed

    Loukas, M; Myers, C S; Wartmann, Ch T; Tubbs, R S; Judge, T; Curry, B; Jordan, R

    2008-02-01

    Identification and recognition of the cephalic vein in the deltopectoral triangle is of critical importance when considering emergency catheterization procedures. The aim of our study was to conduct a cadaveric study to access data regarding the topography and the distribution patterns of the cephalic vein as it relates to the deltopectoral triangle. One hundred formalin fixed cadavers were examined. The cephalic vein was found in 95% (190 right and left) specimens, while in the remaining 5% (10) the cephalic vein was absent. In 80% (152) of cases the cephalic vein was found emerging superficially in the lateral portion of the deltopectoral triangle. In 30% (52) of these 152 cases the cephalic vein received one tributary within the deltopectoral triangle, while in 70% (100) of the specimens it received two. In the remaining 20% (38) of cases the cephalic vein was located deep to the deltopectoral fascia and fat and did not emerge through the deltopectoral triangle but was identified medially to the coracobrachialis and inferior to the medial border of the deltoid. In addition, in 4 (0.2%) of the specimens the cephalic vein, after crossing the deltopectoral triangle, ascended anterior and superior to the clavicle to drain into the subclavian vein. In these specimens a collateral branch was observed to communicate between the cephalic and external jugular veins. In 65.2% (124) of the cases the cephalic vein traveled with the deltoid branch of the thoracoacromial trunk. The length of the cephalic vein within the deltopectoral triangle ranged from 3.5 cm to 8.2 cm with a mean of 4.8+/-0.7 cm. The morphometric analysis revealed a mean cephalic vein diameter of 0.8+/-0.1 cm with a range of 0.1 cm to 1.2 cm. The cephalic vein is relatively large and constant, usually allowing for easy cannulation.

  4. Homestake Vein, False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-07

    This false-color view of a mineral vein called Homestake comes from the panoramic camera Pancam on NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The vein is about the width of a thumb and about 18 inches 45 centimeters long.

  5. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000027.htm Deep vein thrombosis - discharge To use the sharing features ... page, please enable JavaScript. You were treated for deep vein thrombosis ( DVT ). This is a condition in ...

  6. Varicose vein stripping

    MedlinePlus

    ... noninvasive treatment Varicose veins Venous insufficiency Patient Instructions Surgical wound care - open Varicose veins - what to ask your doctor Review Date 6/6/2016 ... Interventional Radiology & Surgical Critical Care, Philadelphia, PA. Review provided by VeriMed ...

  7. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Thierry; Soltys, Remigiusz; Loarte, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is the blockage or narrowing of the portal vein by a thrombus. It is relatively rare and has been linked with the presence of an underlying liver disease or prothrombotic disorders. We present a case of a young male who presented with vague abdominal symptoms for approximately one week. Imaging revealed the presence of multiple nonocclusive thrombi involving the right portal vein, the splenic vein, and the left renal vein, as well as complete occlusion of the left portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein. We discuss pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of both acute and chronic thrombosis. The presence of PVT should be considered as a clue for prothrombotic disorders, liver disease, and other local and general factors that must be carefully investigated. It is hoped that this case report will help increase awareness of the complexity associated with portal vein thrombosis among the medical community. PMID:25802795

  8. Focus on Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... veins no longer work. Under the pressure of gravity these veins can continue to expand and, in ... flow from the legs toward the heart against gravity, while preventing reverse flow back down the legs. ...

  9. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem in the lung, called a pulmonary embolism. Sitting still for a long time can make ...

  10. Late onset of clinically apparent central vein stenosis due to previous central venous catheter in a patient with inherited thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Pissas, Georgios; Leivaditis, Konstantinos; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2014-04-01

    We describe a case of a patient with a functional kidney transplant who was admitted to our department with clinically evident central vein stenosis (CVS) 7 years after the removal of a central venous catheter (CVC) from the right internal jugular vein. The catheter was used as a hemodialysis access for a 2-month period. In the interval before his last admission, the patient suffered two episodes of deep vein thrombosis. Investigation revealed heterozygosity for factor V Leiden, the most common inherited thrombophilia encountered in 5% of Caucasians, and anticoagulation treatment was started. Magnetic resonance angiography showed stenosis just after the convergence of the right subclavian vein with the internal jugular vein to the innominate vein. Transluminal angioplasty restored venous patency and right upper arm edema resolved. Coexistence of CVS, accompanied by hemodynamic changes and endothelial dysfunction, with thrombophilia fulfill all the elements of the Virchow's triad. Therefore, the patient was at great risk for central vein thrombosis, from which he was possibly protected by the early administration of anticoagulant treatment. This case indicates that CVS can be asymptomatic for several years after CVC removal and also raises the question if thrombophilia workup and investigation for CVS may be beneficial in every patient with CVC placement in order to avoid any harmful outcomes.

  11. Catheter-related bacteremia from femoral and central internal jugular venous access.

    PubMed

    Lorente, L; Jiménez, A; García, C; Galván, R; Castedo, J; Martín, M M; Mora, M L

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this prospective observational study was to determine the influence of femoral and central internal jugular venous catheters on the incidence of catheter-related bacteremia (CRB). We included patients admitted to a 12-bed polyvalent medico-surgical intensive care unit over 4 years who received one or more femoral or central internal jugular venous catheters. We diagnosed 16 cases of CRB in 208 femoral catheters and 22 in 515 central internal jugular venous catheters. We found a higher incidence of CRB with femoral (9.52 per 1,000 catheter days) than with central internal jugular venous access (4.83 per 1,000 catheter days; risk ratio = 1.93; 95% confidence interval: 1.03-3.73; P = 0.04). Central internal jugular venous access could be considered a safer route of venous access than femoral access in minimizing the risk of central venous catheter-related bacteremia.

  12. Jugular foramen meningiomas: review of the major surgical series.

    PubMed

    Bakar, Bulent

    2010-01-01

    Primary jugular foramen meningiomas are uncommon, with 96 previous cases published between 1992 and 2007. Exact location and extent of tumor were determined on the basis of radiologic and operative findings and used to develop a staging system. The mean age of patients was 39.4 years. The lesion was located on the right in 14 patients and on the left in 11 patients. The series identified 23 males and 58 females. The most common presenting clinical symptoms were hearing loss and tinnitus. Most clinical findings were middle ear mass and neck mass. Most meningiomas were World Health Organization grade I. The most common postoperative complications were lower cranial nerve paresis and facial nerve paresis. Surgical planning should consider that meningiomas usually invade the dura mater, cranial nerves, and surrounding bone. The surgeon should carefully collect detailed data about the tumor, and consult an otolaryngologist preoperatively for lower cranial nerve functions and hearing levels.

  13. Regulation of P-selectin expression by inflammatory mediators in canine jugular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Doré, M; Sirois, J

    1996-11-01

    Canine endothelial cells express the adhesion molecule P-selectin to mediate the initial attachment of leukocytes to the vessel wall. Although it is known that agents like histamine and thrombin stimulate the surface expression of P-selectin, the effect of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) on canine P-selectin expression has not been investigated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to analyze the regulation of P-selectin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein by these cytokines in canine endothelial cells isolated from jugular veins. Analyses of cytoplasmic RNA by Northern blotting showed that stimulation of culture endothelial cells with either LPS (100 ng/ml) or recombinant human TNF-alpha (30 U/ml) for 3 or 6 hours significantly increased (P < 0.05) steady-state levels of mRNA for P-selectin (3.8- +/- 1.0- and 3.0- +/- 0.4-fold increase for LPS at 3 and 6 hours, respectively, and 2.5- +/- 0.8- and 2.7- +/- 0.9-fold increase for TNF-alpha at 3 and 6 hours, respectively). P-selectin mRNA had decreased by 48 hours to levels found in unstimulated cells. In contrast, human IL-1 beta had no effect on P-selectin mRNA. Increased levels of mRNA with LPS stimulation were associated with the synthesis of new protein, as demonstrated by the positive staining in LPS-stimulated cells using immunocytochemistry with a monoclonal antibody against canine P-selectin (MD3). These results reveal that important inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as LPS and TNF-alpha induce the synthesis of new P-selectin and suggest that this process could represent a means of sustaining local leukocyte recruitment for several hours during an acute inflammatory reaction.

  14. Prototype vein contrast enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, Herbert D.; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Vrancken, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    A proof-of-principle prototype Vein Contrast Enhancer (VCE) has been designed and constructed. The VCE is an instrument that makes vein access easier by capturing an infrared image of peripheral veins, enhancing the vein-contrast using software image processing, and projecting the enhanced vein-image back onto the skin using a modified commercial projector. The prototype uses software alignment to achieve alignment accuracy between the captured infrared image and the projected visible image of better than 0.06 mm. Figure 1 shows the prototype demonstrated in our laboratory.

  15. Comparison of jugular and transverse facial venous sinus blood analytes in healthy and critically ill adult horses.

    PubMed

    Lascola, Kara M; Vander Werf, Karie; Freese, Stephanie; Morgera, Alison; Schaeffer, David J; Wilkins, Pamela

    2017-03-01

    To compare blood gas, electrolyte, and metabolic analysis results between blood obtained by jugular and transverse facial venous sinus (TFVS) venipuncture in healthy adult horses and sick adult horses presented for emergency evaluation. Prospective, experimental study, from June 2012 to October 2013. Large animal university teaching hospital. Ten healthy adult University-owned horses and 48 client-owned adult horses (≥2 years old) presenting to the large animal hospital emergency service for medical or surgical evaluation of systemic illness. Venipunctures (jugular vein [JV] and TFVS) were performed using preheparinized syringes and obtained prior to institution of medical therapy. Samples were analyzed in random order within a 10-minute interval using a point-of-care blood gas analyzer (NOVA Critical Care Xpress) that also reports electrolyte and metabolite results. Comparisons between venipuncture sites were analyzed using the Student's paired t-test for normally distributed data and the Wilcoxon paired test for nonnormally distributed data. Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess agreement between venipuncture sites. There were no statistically significant differences found between variables for JV and TFVS in healthy horses. In sick horses, JV measurements were greater than TFVS for ionized calcium (P = 0.002) and glucose (P = 0.001), and less than TFVS for hematocrit (P = 0.015). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated small biases but overall agreement between sites. The TFVS can be used interchangeably with JV for venous blood gas analysis in healthy horses. In sick horses, identified differences were small and likely not clinically important. The reliability of this point-of-care blood gas analyzer for measurement of hematocrit remains to be determined. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  16. Adaptation of the Main Peripheral Artery and Vein to Long Term Confinement (MARS 500)

    PubMed Central

    Arbeille, Philippe; Provost, Romain; Vincent, Nicole; Aubert, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective was to check if 520 days in confinement (MARS 500), may affect the main peripheral arterial diameter and wall thickness and the main vein size. Method Common carotid (CC) femoral artery (FA) portal vein (PV), jugular (JG), femoral vein (FV) and tibial vein were assessed during MARS 500 by echography, performed by the subjects. A hand free volumic echographic capture method and a delayed 3D reconstruction software developed by our lab were used for collecting and measuring the vascular parameters. Results During the MARS 500 experiment the subjects performed 6 sessions among which 80% of the echographic data were of sufficient quality to be processed. No significant change was found for the Common carotid, Jugular vein, femoral artery, femoral vein, portal vein, and tibial vein diameter. CC and FA IMT (intima media thickness) were found significantly increased (14% to 28% P<0.05) in all the 6 subjects, during the confinement period and also at +2 days after the confinement period, but there was no significant difference 6 month later compare to pre MARS 500. Conclusion The experiment confirmed that even untrained to performing echography the subjects were able to capture enough echographic data to reconstruct the vessel image from which the parameters were measured. The increase in both CC and FA IMT should be in relation with the stress generated by the confined environment or absence of solar radiation, as there was no change in gravity, temperature and air in the MARS 500 module, and minor changes in physical exercise and nutrition. PMID:24475025

  17. [Subclavian vein puncture as a primary approach for pacemaker lead implantation].

    PubMed

    Kronski, D; Haas, H

    2001-12-01

    In the beginning of transvenous pacemaker therapy, the external or alternatively internal jugular vein was commonly used for lead implantation. Due to frequent long-term complications both approaches are nowadays obsolete. In most pacemaker centers implantation via the cephalic vein has become standard. As an alternative, in 1975 Sterz et al. introduced puncture of the subclavian vein in the Seldinger technique as an approach for lead implantation. At this time, the commonly used introducers of pacemaker leads had to be cut for removal. No earlier than 1980 "peel away" introducers were commercially available. Since then, we consequently use this technique for implantation of single or dual chamber pacemaker devices. In the course of the last seven years merely 1.5-2% of implantations were performed via the cephalic vein; no jugular vein approach was performed. Due to a routinely performed subclavian vein puncture, we were able to optimize the procedure, proven by an enormous reduction in implantation time (local anesthesia - skin closure), x-ray time and complication rate. In the year 2000 we performed 52 implantations of a single chamber device with an average fluoroscopy time of 1.5 (0.3-9.3) minutes, radiation dose of 4.5 (0.1-47) Gycm(2) and implantation time of 17.6 (8-40) minutes and 144 implantations of a dual chamber device with an average fluoroscopy time of 2.86 (0.7-6.6) minutes, radiation dose of 8.31 (0.7-28) Gycm(2) and implantation time of 21.25 (10-45) minutes. Complications were rare, clinically irrelevant arterial punctures. Neither nerval damage nor pneumothoraces with the necessity for chest tube placement were seen in the above mentioned time frame. No early or late thrombosis of the subclavian vein was encountered.    The primary subclavian vein approach led to an enormous reduction in overall procedure time without significant morbidity.

  18. The mechanics of intersecting echelon veins and pressure solution seams in limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyum, Solomon; Pollard, David D.

    2016-08-01

    Many studies that describe the formation of echelon vein arrays relate the causative stresses implicitly to the deformation, reliant on simple shear kinematics, such that the vein-to-array angle and the array width are the primary physical quantities. In contrast, we identify twelve physical quantities to describe echelon veins in two dimensions, including coeval, vein-intersecting, pressure solution seams. A finite element method is used to reproduce vein shapes in linear elastic and elastic-perfectly plastic model limestone. Model vein geometries are designed using values within the range of geometries measured from echelon veins at Raplee Anticline and Comb Monocline, Utah. Four physical quantities are significant for describing echelon vein shapes: vein spacing, vein-array angle, limestone elastic stiffness, and closing of orthogonal pressure solution seams. Pressure solution seam closing influences the mechanical interaction between adjacent veins, and for a range of conditions, causes a nearly linear vein opening distribution (triangular shapes) and encourages straight vein propagation, both of which approximate field measurements. Model results show that small spacing of veins with seams and large vein-array angles promote straight vein traces in limestone with stiffness typical of laboratory measurements, given the physical geologic conditions inferred from the burial history of the limestone strata.

  19. Veins Improve Fracture Toughness of Insect Wings

    PubMed Central

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Taylor, David

    2012-01-01

    During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect’s flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material’s resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m). However, the cross veins increase the wing’s toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm). This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically ‘optimal’ solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial ‘venous’ wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species. PMID:22927966

  20. Veins improve fracture toughness of insect wings.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Taylor, David

    2012-01-01

    During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect's flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material's resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m). However, the cross veins increase the wing's toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm). This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically 'optimal' solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial 'venous' wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species.

  1. Influence of vein fabric on strain distribution and fold kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torremans, Koen; Muchez, Philippe; Sintubin, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Abundant pre-folding, bedding-parallel fibrous dolomite veins in shale are found associated with the Nkana-Mindola stratiform Cu-Co deposit in the Central African Copperbelt, Zambia. These monomineralic veins extend for several meters along strike, with a fibrous infill orthogonal to low-tortuosity vein walls. Growth morphologies vary from antitaxial with a pronounced median surface to asymmetric syntaxial, always with small but quantifiable growth competition. Subsequently, these veins were folded. In this study, we aim to constrain the kinematic fold mechanism by which strain is accommodated in these veins, estimate paleorheology at time of deformation and investigate the influence of vein fabric on deformation during folding. Finally, the influence of the deformation on known metallogenetic stages is assessed. Various deformation styles are observed, ultimately related to vein attitude across tight to close lower-order, hectometre-scale folds. In fold hinges, at low to average dips, veins are (poly-)harmonically to disharmonically folded as parasitic folds in single or multilayer systems. With increasing distance from the fold hinge, parasitic fold amplitude decreases and asymmetry increases. At high dips in the limbs, low-displacement duplication thrusts of veins at low angles to bedding are abundant. Slickenfibres and slickenlines are sub-perpendicular to fold hinges and shallow-dipping slickenfibre-step lineations are parallel to local fold hinge lines. A dip isogon analysis of reconstructed fold geometries prior to homogeneous shortening reveals type 1B parallel folds for the veins and type 1C for the matrix. Two main deformation mechanisms are identified in folded veins. Firstly, undulatory extinction, subgrains and fluid inclusions planes parallel the fibre long axis, with deformation intensity increasing away from the fold hinges, indicate intracrystalline strain accumulation. Secondly, intergranular deformation through bookshelf rotation of fibres, via

  2. Prevalence of central vein stenosis following catheterization in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Naroienejad, Minoo; Saedi, Dariush; Rezvani, Asieh

    2010-09-01

    To determine prevalence of central vein stenosis following catheterization with double-lumen temporary catheters, we performed color Doppler sonography in 100 consecutive patients. We detected central vein stenosis in 18 cases; 11 patients in subclavian vein (SCV), 4 patients in internal jugular vein (IJV) and SCV, 2 patients in SCV and brachiocephalic vein, and 2 patients in IJV stenosis. There were statistical difference between groups with and without stenosis regarding time from discontinuation of catheters and use of aspirin (ASA). We could not find any statistical difference between these two groups regarding age, sex, duration of having chronic kidney disease (CKD), and duration of catheter remaining in place. We also found that there was a high proportion of stenosis in patients who still had catheter in their veins (15 from 44 patients, 34%) in comparison with patients who had already the catheters removed from their veins (3 from 56 patients, 5%). We conclude that stenosis of central veins can result from long indwelling time of central catheter used for hemodialysis. Aspirin may have a protective role against stenosis.

  3. Inhibitory Effect of TLR4 Gene Silencing on Intimal Hyperplasia of Vein Grafting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhicheng; Xu, Rihao; Zheng, Xiaomei; Wang, Tiance; Li, Dan; Wang, Yong; Liu, Kexiang

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to explore the regulating effect of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on intimal hyperplasia in rat vein grafts. Rat models of external jugular vein carotid artery bypass grafting were established. Afterward, TLR4 small interfering RNA (siRNA) recombinant plasmids were constructed, which were transfected into rat vein graft bypass to study the effect of TLR4 silencing on intimal hyperplasia and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot were used to detect the expression levels of TLR4 and inflammatory factors in TLR4 siRNA-transfected vein graft bypass. The intimal thickness was evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin staining. Compared with the scramble siRNA group, the intimal thickness of vein grafting was decreased significantly, while the inflammatory factors including interleukin (IL) 1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α in grafted vein were dramatically downregulated in the TLR4 siRNA group. These results showed that local silencing of TLR4 in the vein grafts could inhibit intimal hyperplasia by downregulating the expression of inflammatory factors in the vein grafts, suggesting that TLR4 can be used as a new target for therapy of vascular intimal hyperplasia. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Efficient Gene Transfer and Durable Transgene Expression in Grafted Rabbit Veins

    PubMed Central

    Du, Liang; Zhang, Jingwan; Clowes, Alexander W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Venous bypass grafts are useful treatments for obstructive coronary artery disease. However, their usefulness is limited by accelerated atherosclerosis. Genetic engineering of venous bypass grafts that prevented atherosclerosis could improve long-term graft patency and clinical outcomes. We used a rabbit model of jugular vein-to-carotid interposition grafting to develop gene therapy for vein-graft atherosclerosis. Rabbit veins were easily transduced in situ with a first-generation adenoviral vector; however, most transgene expression (∼80%) was lost within 3 days after arterial grafting. This rapid loss of transgene expression was not prevented by transducing veins after grafting or by prolonged ex vivo transduction. However, delaying vein-graft transduction for 28 days (after the vein had adapted to the arterial circulation) prevented this early loss of transgene expression. We used the delayed transduction approach to test the durability of expression of a therapeutic transgene (apolipoprotein A-I) expressed from a helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vector. HDAd DNA and apolipoprotein A-I mRNA were easily detectable in transduced vein grafts. Vector DNA and mRNA declined by 4 weeks, and then persisted stably for at least 6 months. Delaying transduction for 28 days after grafting permitted initiation of vein-graft neointimal growth and medial thickening before gene transfer. However, vein-graft lumen diameter was not compromised, because of gradual outward remodeling of grafted veins. Our data highlight the promise of HDAd-mediated gene therapy, delivered to arterialized vein grafts, for preventing vein-graft atherosclerosis. PMID:25383597

  5. Can tuffisite veins help dictate eruption styles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Heap, M. J.; Lavallee, Y.; Russell, J. K.; Meredith, P. G.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    The ability of magmas to degas during ascent may affect eruption style. The permeability of the magma and/or the conduit wall rocks may therefore dictate whether an eruption will be explosive or effusive. Fractures increase permeability. Fractures filled by veins of autoclastic, cataclastic and tuffisitic glass shards and crystal fragments are common in shallow conduit systems. These veins have the potential to dramatically increase permeability and provide pathways for gas loss. Here we present the first study on the porosity, permeability, strength, P-and S-wave and dynamic elastic moduli of andesite containing tuffisite veins at Volcán de Colima, Mexico. Porosity was measured via pycnometry. The strength and mechanisms of deformation were investigated on tuffisite-bearing and tuffisite-free samples in a uniaxial press at 940°C by loading at 2 MPa/min until failure. The permeability, P- and S-wave velocity, and dynamic elastic moduli were measured in a high-pressure permeameter/pore volumometer up to effective confining pressures of 50 MPa (ca. 2km depth). Measurements were made on cylindrical samples prepared as: (1) without tuffisite veins and with tuffisite veins (2) perpendicular and (3) sub-parallel to flow (i.e., the samples’ axial direction). Petrographic analysis reveals that the tuffisites are comprised almost exclusively of micron-size crystal fragments. Dilatometric measurements of tuffisite (10°C/min up to 1000°C), failed to reveal a Tg, indicating the absence of interstitial glass. In contrast, the dome rocks exhibits viscous relaxation between 770 and 885 °C, indicating glass. The high-temperature (940°C) deformation experiments on samples containing tuffisite veins showed an absence of ductile deformation and a uniaxial strength of 116 MPa; i.e, slightly weaker than tuffisite-free rock (~130 MPa) and stronger than erupted dome lavas (~30 MPa). The presence of tuffisite increases the porosity. Permeability measurements show that tuffisite

  6. Vein of Galen Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Komiyama, M.; Nakajima, H.; Nishikawa, M.; Yamanaka, K.; Iwai, Y.; Yasui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Kitano, S.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, A.

    2001-01-01

    Summary Eleven patients with so-called “vein of Galen aneurysms ” are reported, six of whom presented with vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations (four with choroidal type and two with mural type malformations). The remaining five patients presented with vein of Galen aneurysmal dilatations secondarily due to an arteriovenous malformation in one patient, an arteriovenous fistula in another, dural arteriovenous fistulas in two patients, and a varix in another. Treatments for these patients were individualised with consideration given to the clinical manifestations and the angioarchitecture of their lesions. Endovascular intervention played a critical role in the treatment of these vein of Galen aneurysms. PMID:20663385

  7. Support for varicose veins.

    PubMed Central

    Fentem, P H; Goddard, M; Gooden, B A

    1976-01-01

    A method has been devised to allow reliable comparison of different strengths and constructions of support hosiery. Five garments were evaluated for the compression they exerted on the leg and their ability to limit the distension of a model varicose vein. Stockings and tights which provide modest compression can achieve worthwhile control of vein distension. PMID:1247807

  8. Prepancreatic preduodenal portal vein.

    PubMed

    Lal, N S; Kuruvila, A P; Natesh, P B; Koshy, M M; Anandakumar, M

    1992-10-01

    We report a 17 year old girl with prepancreatic and preduodenal portal vein. She presented with recurrent vomiting. Barium study revealed malrotation of the gut. Laparotomy confirmed malrotation of the gut with a prepancreatic and preduodenal portal vein. The patient is asymptomatic after gastrojejunostomy and vagotomy.

  9. How Are Varicose Veins Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... injected into your veins. The dye outlines your veins on x-ray images. An angiogram can help your doctor confirm whether you have varicose veins or another condition. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: ...

  10. Vein graft failure

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Christopher D.; Gasper, Warren J.; Rahman, Amreen S.; Conte, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Following the creation of an autogenous lower extremity bypass graft, the vein must undergo a series of dynamic structural changes to stabilize the arterial hemodynamic forces. These changes, commonly referred to as remodeling, include an inflammatory response, the development of a neointima, matrix turnover, and cellular proliferation and apoptosis. The sum total of these processes results in dramatic alterations in the physical and biomechanical attributes of the arterialized vein. The most clinically obvious and easily measured of these is lumen remodeling of the graft. However, though somewhat less precise, wall thickness, matrix composition, and endothelial changes can be measured in vivo within the healing vein graft. Recent translational work has demonstrated the clinical relevance of remodeling as it relates to vein graft patency and the systemic factors influencing it. By correlating histologic and molecular changes in the vein, insights into potential therapeutic strategies to prevent bypass failure and areas for future investigation are explored. PMID:24095042

  11. The evolution of crack seal vein and fracture networks in an evolving stress field: Insights from Discrete Element Models of fracture sealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgo, Simon; Abe, Steffen; Urai, Janos L.

    2014-12-01

    Veins are ubiquitous in upper and middle crustal rocks. Due to strength and stiffness contrast to the host rock, veins can influence crack propagation. Here we present Discrete Element Models to investigate crack-vein interactions by simulating cycles of fracturing of a rock mass, sealing the cracks to form veins, and refracturing the rock mass after rotating the stress field. We observe different styles of interaction between new fractures and existing veins, depending on the strength ratio between vein and host rock and on the changes in the stress field between the different deformation stages. If the orientation of stress field does not change between deformation stages, ataxial crack seal veins are produced if the veins are weak and a bundle of subparallel microveins if the veins are strong. If the stress field is rotated between deformation stages, the interactions include reactivation, fracture deflection, and crosscutting. Reactivation of weak veins occurs even if the vein orientation is highly unfavorable relative to the stress field. Relays of fractures between reactivated veins form at a higher angle to the veins than expected. This demonstrates that the orientation of secondary veins does not reflect the regional stress field in a simple manner and that veins can strongly influence fracture connectivity, with implications for paleostress analysis and basin modeling. Simulation results compare well with field examples of multiphase vein networks in carbonates from Jebel Akhdar, Oman.

  12. Misinsertion of central venous catheter into the suspected vertebral vein: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, So-Hee; Jung, Sung-Mee

    2014-01-01

    We experienced a case in which a central venous catheter (CVC) was misplaced into the wrong vein, which was mistaken for the internal jugular vein (IJV), identified by chest x-ray and ultrasound. The vertebral vein passes through the transverse foramina from the atlas to the 6th cervical vertebra. After exiting the transverse foramen of the 6th vertebra, the vein subsequently runs anterolateral to the vertebral artery and posterior to the IJV and drains the innominate vein. In this case, chest x-ray and ultrasound revealed that the inserted CVC had a course very similar to the vertebral vein. The misplacement of a CVC into the vertebral vein might occur from excessive rotation of the patient's head, which leads to alterations in the cervical vascular anatomy, and from deep insertion of the puncture needle. Therefore, it is advised, for safe CVC insertion, to minimize a patient's head rotation and to make use of ultrasound when the anatomical structures cannot be clearly identified. PMID:25473464

  13. Misinsertion of central venous catheter into the suspected vertebral vein: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, So-Hee; Jung, Sung-Mee; Park, Sang-Jin

    2014-11-01

    We experienced a case in which a central venous catheter (CVC) was misplaced into the wrong vein, which was mistaken for the internal jugular vein (IJV), identified by chest x-ray and ultrasound. The vertebral vein passes through the transverse foramina from the atlas to the 6th cervical vertebra. After exiting the transverse foramen of the 6th vertebra, the vein subsequently runs anterolateral to the vertebral artery and posterior to the IJV and drains the innominate vein. In this case, chest x-ray and ultrasound revealed that the inserted CVC had a course very similar to the vertebral vein. The misplacement of a CVC into the vertebral vein might occur from excessive rotation of the patient's head, which leads to alterations in the cervical vascular anatomy, and from deep insertion of the puncture needle. Therefore, it is advised, for safe CVC insertion, to minimize a patient's head rotation and to make use of ultrasound when the anatomical structures cannot be clearly identified.

  14. The innominate vein as alternative venous access for complicated implantable cardioverter defibrillator revisions.

    PubMed

    Aleksic, Ivan; Kottenberg-Assenmacher, Eva; Kienbaum, Peter; Szabo, Andras K; Sommer, Sebastian-Patrick; Wieneke, Heiner; Yildirim, Cagatay; Leyh, Rainer G

    2007-08-01

    Venous complications of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) systems may cause significant problems when the need for system revision or upgrades arises. Such revisions require venous access close to the site of the previous ICD implantation. The internal and external jugular vein have disadvantages due to a long subcutaneous course crossing the clavicle and problems with lead extraction if infection occurs. In seven patients with ICD revisions due to lead dysfunction (n = 4) and upgrade to a biventricular device (n = 2) and status after system removal due to infection with new device implantation (n = 1) conventional venous access could not be obtained. Intraoperative contrast venography demonstrated an occluded left subclavian and/or left innominate vein in all patients. In all patients, we gained venous access through puncture of the right innominate vein and tunneled the new lead subcutaneously to the ICD pocket on the left. No intraoperative complications were observed. All patients are followed in our ICD clinic. Mean follow-up is 16 +/- 4 months now. So far, no clinical or lead complications with this access have been observed. We have demonstrated that ICD lead placement through puncture of the right innominate vein is feasible. We propose the innominate vein as an alternative route for establishing venous access in patients requiring ICD revisions or upgrades who suffer from venous obstruction. ICD implanting physicians should acquaint themselves with the technique of right innominate vein puncture to use this vein as a bail-out strategy in patients with complicated venous access.

  15. Bovine pericardium for portal vein reconstruction in abdominal surgery: a surgical guide and first experiences in a single center.

    PubMed

    Jara, Maximilian; Malinowski, Maciej; Bahra, Marcus; Stockmannn, Martin; Schulz, Antje; Pratschke, Johann; Puhl, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Resection and reconstruction of infiltrated vessels achieve resectability of extended pancreatic tumors. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of bovine pericardium as graft material for the individualised portal vein reconstruction and demonstrate a surgical technique for abdominal vein repair. We performed a MEDLINE search to review the methods for complex abdominal vein reconstruction in the course of extended pancreatectomy. Moreover, clinical data of patients receiving portal vein reconstruction using a bovine pericardial patch at our institution were retrospectively analyzed. Based on the results of a review of the literature, autologous venous grafts using the internal jugular vein represent the most popular option for segmental portal vein reconstruction in case of impossible direct suture. At our center, segmental portal vein reconstruction with bovine pericardial patch in course of pancreatic surgery was performed in 4 patients. No case of vascular complications such as occlusion, segmental stenosis or thrombosis occurred. Our experience suggests a surgical procedure for an individual size-matched portal vein reconstruction using bovine pericardium. Although first results appear promising, prospective studies are required to objectively assess the patency of bovine pericardium compared with autologous and synthetic interposition grafts for portal vein reconstruction. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Ipsilateral jugular access to treat an otherwise inaccessible puncture-related arteriovenous fistula pseudoaneurysm: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Rabellino, Martin; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Peralta, Oscar; Shinzato, Sergio; Crucelegui, Maria Soledad; Serra, Diego; Garcia-Monaco, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The standard approach for the endovascular treatment of a dysfunctional or occluded hemodialysis access in the upper limbs includes a direct intervention through the access itself or alternatively, when not feasible, through the brachial or radial artery access. Nonetheless, there are certain circumstances in which these approaches are not easily achieved. An 89-year-old male with end-stage renal disease developed a pseudoaneurysm after an hemorrhagic complication of a recently transposed native basilic arteriovenous fistula secondary to a needle puncture. Dehiscence of the injured access with spontaneous arterial bleeding evolved as a consequence of the upper limb swelling, rendering therapeutic intervention of the access through a conventional route impossible. A fistulogram through puncture of the common femoral artery was performed to obtain an accurate diagnosis. However, this approach was insufficient to advance the covered stent with the intention of excluding the pseudoaneurysm, as the stent delivery system could not reach the desired site. Given that the covered stent insertion required a 9 Fr introducer, the radial artery approach was ruled out. Therefore, we chose a venous access via the ipsilateral internal jugular vein, which was punctured under ultrasound guidance. This strategy was useful to advance the stent and exclude the pseudoaneurysm successfully. This technique should be considered for those individuals in whom conventional routes of approach for repairing dialysis accesses are not feasible or are extremely risky.

  17. Shock metamorphism of deformed quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Christie, John; Tyburczy, James; Ahrens, Thomas; Pongratz, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The effect produced by shock loading (to peak pressures of 12 and 24) on deformed synthetic quartz containing a dislocation and abundant bubbles and small inclusions was investigated, and the relationships between preexisting dislocation density shock lamellae in the target material were examined. The resultant material was found to be inhomogeneously deformed and extremely fractured. Results of TEM examinations indicate that no change in dislocation density was caused by shock loading except in regions containing shock lamellae, where the dislocation density was lowered. The shock-induced defects tend to nucleate on and be controlled by preexisting stress concentrators; shock lamellae, glassy veins, and most curviplanar defects form in tension, presumably during release. An extremely mobile silica fluid is formed and injected into fractures during release, which forcibly removes crystalline fragments from vein walls. It is concluded that shock deformation in quartz is dominated by fracture and melting.

  18. Shock metamorphism of deformed quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Christie, John; Tyburczy, James; Ahrens, Thomas; Pongratz, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The effect produced by shock loading (to peak pressures of 12 and 24) on deformed synthetic quartz containing a dislocation and abundant bubbles and small inclusions was investigated, and the relationships between preexisting dislocation density shock lamellae in the target material were examined. The resultant material was found to be inhomogeneously deformed and extremely fractured. Results of TEM examinations indicate that no change in dislocation density was caused by shock loading except in regions containing shock lamellae, where the dislocation density was lowered. The shock-induced defects tend to nucleate on and be controlled by preexisting stress concentrators; shock lamellae, glassy veins, and most curviplanar defects form in tension, presumably during release. An extremely mobile silica fluid is formed and injected into fractures during release, which forcibly removes crystalline fragments from vein walls. It is concluded that shock deformation in quartz is dominated by fracture and melting.

  19. Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... helps reduce the chances that your blood will pool and clot. You should wear these stockings during ... Make lifestyle changes. Lose weight and quit smoking. Obesity and smoking increase your risk of deep vein ...

  20. Incidence of cranial nerve palsy after preoperative embolization of glomus jugulare tumors using Onyx.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Brandon G; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Jethanamest, Daniel; Angeli, Simon I; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad A

    2014-02-01

    The resection of glomus jugulare tumors can be challenging because of their inherent vascularity. Preoperative embolization has been advocated as a means of reducing operative times, blood loss, and surgical complications. However, the incidence of cranial neuropathy associated with the embolization of these tumors has not been established. The authors of this study describe their experience with cranial neuropathy following transarterial embolization of glomus jugulare tumors using ethylene vinyl alcohol (Onyx, eV3 Inc.). The authors retrospectively reviewed all cases of glomus jugulare tumors that had been treated with preoperative embolization using Onyx at their institution in the period from 2006 to 2012. Patient demographics, clinical presentation, grade and amount of Onyx used, degree of angiographic devascularization, and procedural complications were recorded. Over a 6-year period, 11 patients with glomus jugulare tumors underwent preoperative embolization with Onyx. All embolization procedures were completed in one session. The overall mean percent of tumor devascularization was 90.7%. No evidence of nontarget embolization was seen on postembolization angiograms. There were 2 cases (18%) of permanent cranial neuropathy attributed to the embolization procedures (facial nerve paralysis and lower cranial nerve dysfunction). Embolizing glomus jugulare tumors with Onyx can produce a dramatic reduction in tumor vascularity. However, the intimate anatomical relationship and overlapping blood supply between these tumors and cranial nerves may contribute to a high incidence of cranial neuropathy following Onyx embolization.

  1. Rifampicin-miconazole-impregnated catheters save cost in jugular venous sites with tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Lorente, L; Lecuona, M; Ramos, M J; Jiménez, A; Mora, M L; Sierra, A

    2012-08-01

    Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters are more expensive than standard catheters (S-C). A higher incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) has been found in jugular venous access with tracheostomy than without tracheostomy. The objective of this study was to determine central venous catheter (CVC)-related costs (considering only the cost of the CVC, diagnosis of CRBSI, and antimicrobial agents used to treat CRBSI) using rifampicin-miconazole-impregnated catheters (RM-C) or S-C in jugular venous access with tracheostomy. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with tracheostomy who received one or more jugular venous catheters. RM-C showed a lower incidence of CRBSI compared with S-C (0 vs. 20.16 CRBSI episodes/1,000 catheter-days; odds ratio=0.05; 95% confidence interval=0.001-0.32; p<0.001) and lower CVC-related costs (including the cost of the CVC, diagnosis, and treatment of CRBSI) (11.46 ± 6.25 vs. 38.11 ± 77.25; p<0.001) in jugular venous access with tracheostomy. The use of RM-C could reduce CVC-related costs in jugular venous access with tracheostomy. The results of our study may contribute to clinical decision-making and selection of those patients who could benefit from the use of antimicrobial-impregnated catheters.

  2. Veining Failure and Hydraulic Fracturing in Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighani, S.; Sondergeld, C. H.; Rai, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    During the hydraulic fracturing, the pressurized fluid creates new fractures and reactivates existing natural fractures forming a highly conductive Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) around the borehole. We extend the previous work on Lyons sandstone and pyrophyllite to anisotropic shale from the Wolfcamp formation. We divide the rock anisotropy into two groups: a) conventional and b) unconventional (shaly) anisotropy. X-ray Computed Tomography (CT), compressional velocity anisotropy, and SEM analysis are used to identify three causes of anisotropy: bedding planes, clay lamination, and calcite veins. Calcite vein is a subsequently filled with calcite bonded weakly to the matrix. Velocity anisotropy and visual observations demonstrate the calcite filled veins to be mostly subparallel to the fabric direction. Brazilian tests are carried out to observe the fracture initiation and propagation under tension. High speed photography (frame rate 300,000 frame/sec) was used to capture the failure. Strain gauges and Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors recorded the deformation leading up to and during failure. SEM imaging and surface profilometry were employed to study the post-failure fracture system and failed surface topology. Fracture permeability was measured as a function of effective stress. Brazilian tests on small disks containing a centered single vein revealed the shear strength of the veins. We interpret the strain data and number, frequency, and amplitude of AE events which are correlated well with the observed fracture process zone, surface roughness, and permeability. The unpropped fracture has enhanced permeability by two orders of magnitude. The observed anisotropic tensile failure seems to have a universal trend with a minimum strength occurring at 15o orientation with respect to the loading axis. The veins at 15o orientation with respect to the loading axis were easily activated at 30% of the original failure load. The measured strength of the vein is as low as 6

  3. A Surgical Procedure for the Chronic Cannulation of the Carotid Artery and the Jugular Vein in Dogs,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    neck incision was closed with 3/0 chromic interrupted suture for the fascia and the subcutaneous layers, and 3/0 Prolene (Ethicon Sutures Limited...Peterborough) subcuticular for the skin. The back incision was closed with 3/0 Prolene subcuticular. Cannulae were wrapped in adhesive tape in a butterfly...fashion (about 2x3 cm) and the wings were anchored to the skin with 3/0 Prolene . The jacket (described below) was put on the dog and the cannulae

  4. Brain tissue fragments in jugular vein blood of cattle stunned by use of penetrating or nonpenetrating captive bolt guns.

    PubMed

    Coore, R R; Love, S; McKinstry, J L; Weaver, H R; Philips, A; Hillman, T; Hiles, M; Helps, C R; Anil, M H

    2005-04-01

    Although the incidence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle continues to decline in the United Kingdom, it remains important to maintain vigilance of all potential routes of transmission of infection to humans. Initial studies have demonstrated a potential risk of carcass contamination with brain tissue following the use of captive bolt gun stunning in cattle. The objective of this study was to further explore these initial findings particularly in regard to captive bolt guns currently in use in the United Kingdom. Brain tissue fragments or elevated levels of a marker protein for brain tissue were detected in venous blood samples from 4% (95% confidence interval, 1.6 to 9.8%) of cattle stunned by penetrating captive bolt gun and from 2% (95% confidence interval, 0.6 to 7%) of those stunned by nonpenetrating captive bolt gun.

  5. Catheter malplacement during central venous cannulation through arm veins in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Arvind; Bithal, Parmod K; Dash, Harihar; Chauhan, Rajendra S; Mohanty, Bibekanand

    2003-07-01

    For successful catheter placement, central venous cannulation (CVC) through internal jugular vein and subclavian vein has been recommended in both adult and pediatric patients. But it carries a risk of serious complications, such as pneumothorax, carotid, or subclavian artery puncture, which can be life-threatening, particularly in critically ill children. So a prospective study was carried out to determine the success rate of correct catheter tip placement during CVC through antecubital veins in pediatric neurosurgical patients. A total of 200 pediatric patients (age 1-15 years) of either sex were studied. Basilic or cephalic veins of either arm were selected. All the patients were cannulated in the operation room under general anesthesia. Single lumen, proper size catheters (with stillete) were used for cannulation. The catheter was inserted in supine position with the arm abducted at right angle to the body and neck turned ipsilaterally. The length of insertion was determined from cubital fossa to the right second intercostal space. The exact position of the tip of the catheter was confirmed radiologically in ICU. Correct catheter tip placement was achieved in 98 (49%) patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of data shows that there was no statistically significant difference among correct and incorrect catheter tip placement in relation to factors including sex, side of cannulation (left or right), and type of vein (basilic or cephalic). The analysis of correct catheter tip placement in relation to age showed that the highest success rate was achieved in children of age group 6 to 10 years (60.2%) followed by 30.6% in the 11 to 15 year group. The lowest success rate of tip placement of only 9.2% was observed in younger children of age 1 to 5 years, which is statistically significant (P = 0.001). Of 102 incorrect placements reported, 37% were in 1 to 5 year age group versus 9.2% correct tip placements. The most common unsatisfactory placements were

  6. Transpulmonary thermodilution using femoral indicator injection: a prospective trial in patients with a femoral and a jugular central venous catheter

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Advanced hemodynamic monitoring using transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) is established for measurement of cardiac index (CI), global end-diastolic volume index (GEDVI) and extra-vascular lung water index (EVLWI). TPTD requires indicator injection via a central venous catheter (usually placed via the jugular or subclavian vein). However, superior vena cava access is often not feasible due to the clinical situation. This study investigates the conformity of TPTD using femoral access. Methods This prospective study involved an 18-month trial at a medical intensive care unit at a university hospital. Twenty-four patients with both a superior and an inferior vena cava catheter at the same time were enrolled in the study. Results TPTD-variables were calculated from TPTD curves after injection of the indicator bolus via jugular access (TPTDjug) and femoral access (TPTDfem). GEDVIfem and GEDVIjug were significantly correlated (rm = 0.88; P < 0.001), but significantly different (1,034 ± 275 vs. 793 ± 180 mL/m2; P < 0.001). Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated a bias of +241 mL/m2 (limits of agreement: -9 and +491 mL/m2). GEDVIfem, CIfem and ideal body weight were independently associated with the bias (GEDVIfem-GEDVIjug). A correction formula of GEDVIjug after femoral TPTD, was calculated. EVLWIfem and EVLWIjug were significantly correlated (rm = 0.93; P < 0.001). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a bias of +0.83 mL/kg (limits of agreement: -2.61 and +4.28 mL/kg). Furthermore, CIfem and CIjug were significantly correlated (rm = 0.95; P < 0.001). Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated a bias of +0.29 L/min/m2 (limits of agreement -0.40 and +0.97 L/min/m2; percentage-error 16%). Conclusions TPTD after femoral injection of the thermo-bolus provides precise data on GEDVI with a high correlation, but a self-evident significant bias related to the augmented TPTD-volume. After correction of GEDVIfem using a correction formula, GEDVIfem shows high predictive capabilities

  7. Overview of Research on the Origin of Syntectonic Veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltschko, D.

    2005-12-01

    The making of a syntectonic vein requires placing the vein components in a mobile form, transporting them to the vein site and then precipitating them accompanying dilation. The commingling in space and time of dissolution features such as pressure solution cleavage and veins suggest a genetic link. Dissolution has received considerable attention in the literature with regard to cleavage formation. Transport is generally held to be by diffusion; the alternative, advection, leads to mass balance problems in that the amount of fluid needed to precipitate observed vein volumes is huge, with little ancillary evidence of large flow. Coupled dilation and precipitation in veins has received relatively little analytical scrutiny. Competing models include the action of elevated fluid pressure to crack and hold open the rock during precipitation, force of crystallization dilating the rock as the vein grows, and a variety of processes having to do with location in a particular larger structure (e.g., outer arc of a fold hinge). All of these may play a role to one extent or another, depending upon the stage of vein growth. Field evidence from syntectonic vein the Benton Uplift, Ouachitas Mtns, for instance, shows that boundinage in the semi-brittle regime resulted in organized, repeated dilation that scales with the thickness of the competent bed. Several orders of boundinage are present, analogous to orders of folding in layered km-scale folds, leading to a spectrum of vein spacings and lengths. Vein width is controlled by the extent to which beds extended after the individual pinched regions were broken and separated by subsequent deformation of the larger structure.

  8. Use of Brilliant Blue FCF during vein graft preparation inhibits intimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Osgood, Michael J; Sexton, Kevin; Voskresensky, Igor; Hocking, Kyle; Song, Jun; Komalavilas, Padmini; Brophy, Colleen; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce

    2016-08-01

    Intimal hyperplasia remains the primary cause of vein graft failure for the 1 million yearly bypass procedures performed using human saphenous vein (HSV) grafts. This response to injury is caused in part by the harvest and preparation of the conduit. The use of Brilliant Blue FCF (FCF) restores injury-induced loss of function in vascular tissues possibly via inhibition of purinergic receptor signaling. This study investigated whether pretreatment of the vein graft with FCF prevents intimal hyperplasia. Cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) were used to determine the effect of FCF on platelet-derived growth factor-mediated migration and proliferation, cellular processes that contribute to intimal hyperplasia. The effectiveness of FCF treatment during the time of explantation on preventing intimal hyperplasia was evaluated in a rabbit jugular-carotid interposition model and in an organ culture model using HSV. FCF inhibited platelet-derived growth factor-induced migration and proliferation of A7r5 cells. Treatment with FCF at the time of vein graft explantation inhibited the subsequent development of intimal thickening in the rabbit model. Pretreatment with FCF also prevented intimal thickening of HSV in organ culture. Incorporation of FCF as a component of vein graft preparation at the time of explantation represents a potential therapeutic approach to mitigate intimal hyperplasia, reduce vein graft failure, and improve outcome of the autologous transplantation of HSV. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Use of Brilliant Blue FCF during vein graft preparation inhibits intimal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Osgood, Michael J.; Sexton, Kevin; Voskresensky, Igor; Hocking, Kyle; Song, Jun; Komalavilas, Padmini; Brophy, Colleen; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    Background Intimal hyperplasia remains the primary cause of vein graft failure for the 1 million yearly bypass procedures performed using human saphenous vein (HSV) grafts. This response to injury is caused in part by the harvest and preparation of the conduit. The use of Brilliant Blue FCF (FCF) restores injury-induced loss of function in vascular tissues possibly via inhibition of purinergic receptor signaling. This study investigated whether pretreatment of the vein graft with FCF prevents intimal hyperplasia. Methods Cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) were used to determine the effect of FCF on platelet-derived growth factor-mediated migration and proliferation, cellular processes that contribute to intimal hyperplasia. The effectiveness of FCF treatment during the time of explantation on preventing intimal hyperplasia was evaluated in a rabbit jugular-carotid interposition model and in an organ culture model using HSV. Results FCF inhibited platelet-derived growth factor-induced migration and proliferation of A7r5 cells. Treatment with FCF at the time of vein graft explantation inhibited the subsequent development of intimal thickening in the rabbit model. Pretreatment with FCF also prevented intimal thickening of HSV in organ culture. Conclusions Incorporation of FCF as a component of vein graft preparation at the time of explantation represents a potential therapeutic approach to mitigate intimal hyperplasia, reduce vein graft failure, and improve outcome of the autologous transplantation of HSV. PMID:27763268

  10. Albumin uptake by renal lymphatics with and without obstruction of the renal vein

    SciTech Connect

    Threefoot, S.A.; Pearson, J.E. Jr.; Georgiardis, A. )

    1989-08-02

    Experiments involving injection of radio-iodinated albumin into the left renal arteries or left ureters of dogs indicate that the renal lymphatics are capable of a major contribution in returning to the circulation albumin (or other large molecules) escaping from renal capillaries. I-131-albumin was injected into the jugular vein of controls or into the left renal artery or in retrograde manner into the left ureter of female dogs. Experimental groups included those with no obstruction, occlusion of left renal veins or left renal lymphatics, or both. Collections were made from the right femoral artery, both renal veins, thoracic duct and both ureters at frequent intervals for 2 to 4 hours. Data analysis included I-131 concentration, specific activity, rate of recovery and selected ratios. After renal arterial injection, the percentage of I131 recovered in thoracic duct lymph of dogs without renal venous obstruction was 5 to 10 times that recovered in those that received injections into the jugular vein. In dogs with renal venous obstruction, recovery from the thoracic duct was 10 to 1,000 times that in control dogs. Most of the differences occurred during the first hour, after which time as recirculation and redistribution occurred the rates of appearance in thoracic duct lymph in each group were similar. The differences in the ratios of concentration in thoracic duct lymph to concentration in femoral arterial blood were also much greater when the renal vein was obstructed than in dogs with no obstruction. The greater return of albumin through the thoracic duct in those with impeded renal venous outflow was probably related to both sequestered concentration and increased intrarenal pressure.

  11. [The effect of zeolite (clinoptilolite) on the post-feeding dynamics of N metabolism in the portal vein, jugular vein and the rumen fluid of bulls].

    PubMed

    Jacobi, U; Vrzgula, L; Blazovský, J; Havassy, I; Ledecký, V; Bartko, P

    1984-04-01

    If easily digestible saccharides are deficient in the feed ration of bulls with the live weight of 300 kg and at simultaneous single application of urea at a rate of 0.2 g per 1 kg live weight, zeolite (with 50.6% clinoptilolite content) administered at a rate of 2.5% per 1 kg dry matter influenced significantly (P less than 0.05) the ammonia concentration in rumen, v. portae and v. jugularis. The rumen contents and blood were sampled at the intervals of 0, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 360 minutes after feeding. Basal feed ration consisted of 1 kg feed mixture and 3 kg meadow hay. After urea administration, zeolite reduced the ammonia concentration in rumen by 20-40% in comparison with the control group and in v. portae by 60-70%. In v. jugularis in the 90th minute after feeding significant hyperammonemia was observed in bulls with no zeolite supplement. Zeolite administration did not influence urea concentration in plasma.

  12. How Vein Sealing Boosts Fracture Opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nüchter, Jens-Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Veins from from cracks. As such, a stage of brittle failure and fracturing is to be set apart from a stage of opening and sealing. The process of fracture opening requires distortion of the host rocks to create space for the evolving vein. To keep a crack arrested and, at the same time, to widen or stabilize the cavity, the stress intensity factor K_I=(P-S3)(πa) must remain below the fracture toughness K_IC of the host rock, and P-S3 >0 (P and S3 denote pore fluid pressure and absolute minimum principal stress, respectively and 'a' refers to the half-length of the fracture). For purely elastic distortion of the host rocks, maximum aperture W0=K_IC (1-ν^2)/(E(π/8)^1/2))(2a)^1/2 depends on on K_IC, Poisson's ratio ν, and Young's modulus E of the host rocks. Owing to the low values for rock K_IC typically ranging between 0.1 and 1 MPa m^1/2, veins formed by purely elastic distortion of the host rocks are restricted to high aspect ratios 2a/W. In metamorphic rocks, veins with low aspect ratios are common; inelastic deformation and viscous creep in the host rocks must have contributed to final vein shapes. In the present study, I use finite element models to simulate fracture opening and cavity formation supported by viscous creep distributed in the host rock. Simulations are carried out on 2D plate models containing elliptical fractures. The walls of the fractures are coated by thin layers simulating incipient sealing; a residual cavity prevails in the centre of the model veins. Constant displacement is applied to the plate boundaries oriented normal to the cracks. I run a series of models with various viscosity contrasts between the rocks and the sealing. The results of these models indicate the following. (1) Fracture opening is most effective when the viscosity of the sealing ηs exceeds the viscosity of the host rocks ηr (2) The rate of fracture opening increases with increasing values for ηs/ηr . (3) An increase in the thickness of the sealing layer causes

  13. Cephalic vein cutdown for totally implantable central venous port in children: a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyu-Hwan; Moon, Suk-Bae

    2014-01-01

    Background The jugular vein cutdown for a totally implantable central venous port (TICVP) has 2 disadvantages: 2 separate incisions are needed and the risk for multiple vein occlusions. We sought to evaluate the feasibility of a cephalic vein (CV) cutdown in children. Methods We prospectively followed patients who underwent a venous cutdown for implantation of a TICVP between Jan. 1, 2002, and Dec. 31, 2006. For patients younger than 8 months, an external jugular vein cutdown was initially tried without attempting a CV cutdown. For patients older than 8 months, a CV cutdown was tried initially. We recorded information on age, weight, outcome of the CV cutdown and complications. Results During the study period, 143 patients underwent a venous cutdown for implantation of a TICVP: 25 younger and 118 older than 8 months. The CV cutdown was successful in 73 of 118 trials. The 25th percentile and median body weight for 73 successful cases were 15.4 kg and 28.3 kg, respectively. There was a significant difference in the success rate using the criterion of 15 kg as the cutoff. The overall complication rate was 8.2%. Conclusion The CV cutdown was an acceptable procedure for TICVP in children. It could be preferentially considered for patients weighing more than 15 kg who require TICVP. PMID:24461222

  14. Cephalic vein cutdown for totally implantable central venous port in children: a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyu-Hwan; Moon, Suk-Bae

    2014-02-01

    The jugular vein cutdown for a totally implantable central venous port (TICVP) has 2 disadvantages: 2 separate incisions are needed and the risk for multiple vein occlusions. We sought to evaluate the feasibility of a cephalic vein (CV) cutdown in children. We prospectively followed patients who underwent a venous cutdown for implantation of a TICVP between Jan. 1, 2002, and Dec. 31, 2006. For patients younger than 8 months, an external jugular vein cutdown was initially tried without attempting a CV cutdown. For patients older than 8 months, a CV cutdown was tried initially. We recorded information on age, weight, outcome of the CV cutdown and complications. During the study period, 143 patients underwent a venous cutdown for implantation of a TICVP: 25 younger and 118 older than 8 months. The CV cutdown was successful in 73 of 118 trials. The 25th percentile and median body weight for 73 successful cases were 15.4 kg and 28.3 kg, respectively. There was a significant difference in the success rate using the criterion of 15 kg as the cutoff. The overall complication rate was 8.2%. The CV cutdown was an acceptable procedure for TICVP in children. It could be preferentially considered for patients weighing more than 15 kg who require TICVP.

  15. Pelvic Vein Embolisation in the Management of Varicose Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnam, Lakshmi A.; Marsh, Petra; Holdstock, Judy M.; Harrison, Charmaine S.; Hussain, Fuad F.; Whiteley, Mark S.; Lopez, Anthony

    2008-11-15

    Pelvic vein incompetence is common in patients with atypical varicose veins, contributing to their recurrence after surgery. Therefore, refluxing pelvic veins should be identified and treated. We present our experience with pelvic vein embolisation in patients presenting with varicose veins. Patients presenting with varicose veins with a duplex-proven contribution from perivulval veins undergo transvaginal duplex sonography (TVUS) to identify refluxing pelvic veins. Those with positive scans undergo embolisation before surgical treatment of their lower limb varicose veins. A total of 218 women (mean age of 46.3 years) were treated. Parity was documented in the first 60 patients, of whom 47 (78.3%) were multiparous, 11 (18.3%) had had one previous pregnancy, and 2 (3.3%) were nulliparous. The left ovarian vein was embolised in 78%, the right internal iliac in 64.7%, the left internal iliac in 56.4%, and the right ovarian vein in 42.2% of patients. At follow-up TVUS, mild reflux only was seen in 16, marked persistent reflux in 6, and new reflux in 3 patients. These 9 women underwent successful repeat embolisation. Two patients experienced pulmonary embolisation of the coils, of whom 1 was asymptomatic and 1 was successfully retrieved; 1 patient had a misplaced coil protruding into the common femoral vein; and 1 patient had perineal thrombophlebitis. The results of our study showed that pelvic venous embolisation by way of a transjugular approach is a safe and effective technique in the treatment of pelvic vein reflux.

  16. Portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Basit, Syed Abdul; Stone, Christian D; Gish, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare event in the general medical setting that commonly complicates cirrhosis with portal hypertension, and can also occur with liver tumors. The diagnosis is often incidental when a thrombus is found in the portal vein on imaging tests. However, PVT may also present with clinical symptoms and can progress to life-threatening complications of ischemic hepatitis, liver failure, and/or small intestinal infarction. This article reviews the pathophysiology of this disorder, with a major focus on PVT in patients with cirrhosis, and presents detailed guidelines on optimal diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Prevalence of High-Riding Jugular Bulb in Patients with Suspected Endolymphatic Hydrops

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Christopher D.; Buch, Karen; Kaufmann, Matthew; Sakai, Osamu; Devaiah, Anand K.

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence of a high-riding jugular bulb (HRJB) in the endolymphatic hydrops population. Methods This was a retrospective chart and radiology review of patients seen at a tertiary care medical center. Patients were identified using the International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition, code 386.xx (Meniere disease–unspecified), and were required to have undergone an imaging study that included views of the jugular bulb that were available for review. A radiologist then evaluated all of the imaging studies for evidence of HRJB or inner ear dehiscence with a jugular bulb abnormality. Results The prevalence of a HRJB in all endolymphatic hydrops patients was 9.0% (7 of 78), and it was 4.5% (7 of 156) in all ears. The prevalence of HRJB ipsilateral to an ear with endolymphatic hydrops was 4.6% (4 of 88 ears); it was 4.4% (3 of 68 ears) in ears without endolymphatic hydrops. The incidence of inner ear dehiscence with a HRJB was 1.3% (1 of 78). Electrocochleography results were not correlated with jugular bulb volume. Discussion The results of this study indicate that a small subset of patients treated for endolymphatic hydrops patients have a HRJB. Overall, these results suggest that HRJB does not play a major role in endolymphatic hydrops, although it may play a role in a few isolated patients. PMID:26682126

  18. The Prevalence of High-Riding Jugular Bulb in Patients with Suspected Endolymphatic Hydrops.

    PubMed

    Brook, Christopher D; Buch, Karen; Kaufmann, Matthew; Sakai, Osamu; Devaiah, Anand K

    2015-12-01

    Background To determine the prevalence of a high-riding jugular bulb (HRJB) in the endolymphatic hydrops population. Methods This was a retrospective chart and radiology review of patients seen at a tertiary care medical center. Patients were identified using the International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition, code 386.xx (Meniere disease-unspecified), and were required to have undergone an imaging study that included views of the jugular bulb that were available for review. A radiologist then evaluated all of the imaging studies for evidence of HRJB or inner ear dehiscence with a jugular bulb abnormality. Results The prevalence of a HRJB in all endolymphatic hydrops patients was 9.0% (7 of 78), and it was 4.5% (7 of 156) in all ears. The prevalence of HRJB ipsilateral to an ear with endolymphatic hydrops was 4.6% (4 of 88 ears); it was 4.4% (3 of 68 ears) in ears without endolymphatic hydrops. The incidence of inner ear dehiscence with a HRJB was 1.3% (1 of 78). Electrocochleography results were not correlated with jugular bulb volume. Discussion The results of this study indicate that a small subset of patients treated for endolymphatic hydrops patients have a HRJB. Overall, these results suggest that HRJB does not play a major role in endolymphatic hydrops, although it may play a role in a few isolated patients.

  19. Accidental subclavian artery catheterization during attempted internal jugular central venous catheter placement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Bharat; Kamal, Manoj; Purohit, Anamika; Rana, Kirti; Chouhan, Dilip Singh

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheter placement has been routinely employed for anesthetic and intensive care management. Despite proper technique used and expertise complications do occur; some of which are related to catheter misplacements. We report a case in which subclavian artery was accidently catheterized during attempted internal jugular venous cannulation.

  20. Surgical management of dural arteriovenous fistulas with transosseous arterial feeders involving the jugular bulb

    PubMed Central

    Benes, L.; Kappus, C.; Sure, U.; Farhoud, A.; Bien, S.; Bertalanffy, H.

    2006-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas located in the vicinity of the jugular foramen are complex vascular malformations and belong to the most challenging skull base lesions to treat. The authors comprehensively analyze multiple features in a series of dural arteriovenous fistulas with transosseous arterial feeders involving the jugular bulb. Four patients who underwent surgery via the transcondylar approach to treat dural arteriovenous fistulas around the jugular foramen were retrospectively reviewed. Previously, endovascular treatment was attempted in all patients. The success of the surgical treatment was examined with postoperative angiography. Complete obliteration of the dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) was achieved in three patients, and significant flow reduction in one individual. All patients had a good postoperative outcome, and only one experienced mild hypoglossal nerve palsy. Despite extensive bone drilling, an occipitocervical fusion was necessary in only one patient with bilateral lesions. The use of an individually tailored transcondylar approach to treat dural arteriovenous fistulas at the region of the jugular foramen is most effective. This approach allows for complete obliteration of the connecting arterial feeders, and removal of bony structures containing pathological vessels. PMID:17109181

  1. The influence of steroids on vascular tension of isolated superficial veins of the nose and face during the estrous cycle of gilts.

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewski, W J; Chłopek, J; Tabecka-Łonczyńska, A; Stefańczyk-Krzymowska, S

    2010-01-15

    The arrangement of the superficial facial veins enables blood flow from the nasal cavity into the peripheral circulation by two pathways: through the frontal vein into the cavernous sinus and through the facial vein into the external jugular vein. The current study was designed to determine whether estradiol and progesterone affect the vascular tone of the superficial veins of the nose and face in cycling gilts (Sus scrofa f. domestica) and to analyze the immunolocalization of progesterone receptors and estradiol receptors in these veins. The influence of hormones on vascular tension differed depending on the type of vessel and the phase of the estrous cycle. Estradiol decreased vascular tension in the nasal vein during the follicular phase (P<0.05) and increased tension in the frontal vein during the luteal phase (P<0.05). Progesterone increased the vascular tension of the frontal vein (P<0.05) and decreased the tension of the other veins (P<0.05) in both phases of the cycle. Expression of estradiol receptor beta but not of progesterone receptor was observed in the superficial veins of the nose and face. In conclusion, the effect of ovarian steroid hormones on the vascular tension of the superficial veins of the nose and face in female pigs as well as the reactivity of these veins to steroid boar pheromones can affect the blood supply from the nasal cavity to the venous cavernous sinus. We propose that the ovarian steroid hormones that modulate the vascular tension of the nasal and facial veins may also influence the action of boar pheromones absorbed into the nasal mucosa in gilts and may reach the brain via local destination transfer.

  2. Evaluation of regional limb perfusion with erythromycin using the saphenous, cephalic, or palmar digital veins in standing horses.

    PubMed

    Kelmer, G; Martin-Jimenez, T; Saxton, A M; Catasus, C; Elliot, S B; Lakritz, J

    2013-10-01

    There are no reported studies evaluating the use of erythromycin for regional limb perfusion (RLP) in horses. Our hypothesis was that using the cephalic and saphenous veins for RLP will enable delivery of therapeutic concentrations of erythromycin to the distal limb. Nineteen healthy horses participated in the study. The cephalic, saphenous or palmar digital (PD) vein was used to perfuse the limb with erythromycin. Synovial samples were collected from the metacarpo/metatarso-phalangeal (MCP/MTP) joint and blood samples were collected from the jugular vein. Maximum concentration (C(max)) of erythromycin in the MCP joint using the cephalic vein was 113 mg/L. The Cmax of erythromycin in the MTP joint using the saphenous vein was 38 mg/L. Erythromycin administered using the PD vein was not detectable in the MCP/MTP joint of four of six horses. Concentrations of erythromycin achieved in the synovial fluid of the MCP/MTP joint were between 152 and 452 times the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Rhodococcus equi (R. equi). In conclusion, the results indicate that when using the saphenous or cephalic veins for RLP, therapeutic concentrations of erythromycin in the MCP/MTP joint can be consistently reached [corrected].

  3. The influence of steroids on the vascular tension of isolated superficial nasal and facial veins in gilts during sexual maturation.

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewski, W J; Muszak, J; Tabecka-Łonczyńska, A; Stefańczyk-Krzymowska, S

    2010-01-01

    The arrangement of the superficial facial veins enables blood flow from the nasal cavity into the peripheral circulation by two pathways: through the facial vein into the external jugular vein and through the frontal vein into the cavernous sinus. The venous cavernous sinus is the site where hormones and pheromones permeate from venous blood into the arterial blood supplying the brain and hypophysis. The present study was designed to: (1) determine whether estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) affect the vascular tone of the superficial veins of the nose and face in maturating prepubertal gilts (PP) and in prepubertal gilts deprived of ovarian hormones (PPov), and (2) to analyze the immunolocalization of progesterone receptors (PR), and estradiol receptors alpha (ER alpha) and beta (ER beta) in these veins. The influence of hormones on the vascular tension differed depending on the type of vessel, the hormonal status and dose of hormone used. Estradiol decreased the vascular tension in the nasal and facial veins of PP gilts (P < 0.01). In PPov gilts, the effect of E2 was opposing, however it caused strong tension in the proximal and distal parts of the facial vein (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively). Progesterone increased the vascular tension in the proximal segment of the nasal vein and in the distal segment of the frontal and facial veins, and decreased the tension in the distal segment of the nasal and facial veins (P < 0.05) of PP gilts. In PPov gilts, P4 produced strong increase in the tension of distal and proximal segments of the nasal vein (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively) and of distal segment of the facial vein (P < 0.01), strong decrease in the tension of the distal part of the nasal vein (P < 0.01) and had limited effect on other veins. Expression of ER beta, but not of PR, was observed in the superficial nasal and facial veins. In conclusion, the ovarian steroid hormones that modulate the vascular tension of the nasal and facial veins in

  4. Elevation of jugular venous superoxide anion radical is associated with early inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial injury in forebrain ischemia-reperfusion rats.

    PubMed

    Aki, Hiromi Shinagawa; Fujita, Motoki; Yamashita, Susumu; Fujimoto, Kenji; Kumagai, Kazumi; Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Kasaoka, Shunji; Aoki, Tetsuya; Nanba, Masahiro; Murata, Hidenori; Yuasa, Makoto; Maruyama, Ikuro; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2009-10-06

    A novel electrochemical sensor was used in this study to determine the correlations between jugular venous O(2)(-) and HMGB1, malondialdehyde (MDA), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in rats with forebrain ischemia/reperfusion (FBI/R). Twenty-one male rats were divided into a Sham group, a hemorrhagic shock/reperfusion (HS/R) group, and a forebrain ischemia/reperfusion (FBI/R) group. The O(2)(-) sensor in the jugular vein detected the current derived from O(2)(-) generation (abbreviated as "O(2)(-) current"), which was integrated as the partial value of quantified electricity during ischemia (Q(I)) and after reperfusion (Q(R)). The plasma O(2)(-) current showed a gradual increase during forebrain ischemia in the HS/R and the FBI/R groups. The current showed a marked increase immediately after reperfusion and continued for more than 60 min in the FBI/R group. In the HS/R group, the current was gradually attenuated to the baseline level. Brain and plasma HMGB1 increased significantly in the FBI/R group compared with those in the Sham and the HS/R groups, and both brain and plasma HMGB1 correlated significantly with the sum of Q(I) and Q(R) (total Q). Brain and plasma MDA and plasma soluble ICAM-1 also correlated significantly with total Q. Here, we report the correlation between O(2)(-) and HMGB1, MDA, and sICAM-1 in rats with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, using a novel electrochemical sensor. These data indicated that excessive production of O(2)(-) after ischemia-reperfusion was associated with early inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial activation in the brain and plasma, which might enhance the ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  5. Homestake Vein in Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-07

    This color view from NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity of a mineral vein called Homestake and is found to be rich in calcium and sulfur. Homestake is near the edge of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.

  6. Portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Yogesh K; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion.

  7. [Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Chagoya, Gloria Alejandra; Laniado-Laborín, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background: despite the proven effectiveness of preventive therapy for deep vein thrombosis, a significant proportion of patients at risk for thromboembolism do not receive prophylaxis during hospitalization. Our objective was to determine the adherence to thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines in a general hospital as a quality control strategy. Methods: a random audit of clinical charts was conducted at the Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico, to determine the degree of adherence to deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines. The instrument used was the Caprini's checklist for thrombosis risk assessment in adult patients. Results: the sample included 300 patient charts; 182 (60.7 %) were surgical patients and 118 were medical patients. Forty six patients (15.3 %) received deep vein thrombosis pharmacologic prophylaxis; 27.1 % of medical patients received deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis versus 8.3 % of surgical patients (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: our results show that adherence to DVT prophylaxis at our hospital is extremely low. Only 15.3 % of our patients at risk received treatment, and even patients with very high risk received treatment in less than 25 % of the cases. We have implemented strategies to increase compliance with clinical guidelines.

  8. Squash vein yellowing virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucurbits are an important crop of temperate, subtropical and tropical regions of the world. Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is a major viral pathogen of cucurbits. This chapter provides an overview of the biology of SqVYV and the disease it causes....

  9. Cucumber vein yellowing virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucurbits are an important crop of temperate, subtropical and tropical regions of the world. Cucumber vein yellowing virus (CVYV) is a major viral pathogen of cucurbits. This chapter provides an overview of the biology of CVYV and the disease it causes....

  10. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Yogesh K.; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion. PMID:25941431

  11. Using tunneled femoral vein catheters for "urgent start" dialysis patients: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Hingwala, Jay; Bhola, Cynthia; Lok, Charmaine E

    2014-01-01

    Multiple benefits of arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) and arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) exist over catheters. As part of a strategy to preserve thoracic venous sites and reduce internal jugular (IJ) vein catheter use, we inserted tunneled femoral vein catheters in incident "urgent start" dialysis patients while facilitating a more appropriate definitive dialysis access. "Urgent start" dialysis patients between January 15, 2013 and January 15, 2014 who required chronic dialysis, and did not have prior modality and vascular access plans, had tunneled femoral vein catheters inserted. We determined the femoral vein catheter associated infections rates, thrombosis, and subsequent dialysis access. Eligible patients were surveyed on their femoral vein catheter experience. Twenty-two femoral vein catheters were inserted without complications. Subsequently, one catheter required intraluminal thrombolytic locking, while all other catheters maintained blood flow greater than 300 ml/min. There were no catheter-related infections (exit site infection or bacteremia). Six patients continued to use their tunneled catheter at report end, one transitioned to peritoneal dialysis, thirteen to an arteriovenous graft, and two to a fistula. One patient received a tunneled IJ vein catheter. Of the patients who completed the vascular access survey, all indicated satisfaction with their access and that they had minimal complaints of bruising, bleeding, or swelling at their access sites. Pain/discomfort at the exit site was the primary complaint, but they did not find it interfered with activities of daily living. Femoral vein tunneled catheters appear to be a safe, well tolerated, and effective temporary access in urgent start dialysis patients while they await more appropriate long-term access.

  12. Evaluation of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of glomus jugulare tumors.

    PubMed

    Sager, Omer; Beyzadeoglu, Murat; Dincoglan, Ferrat; Gamsiz, Hakan; Demiral, Selcuk; Uysal, Bora; Oysul, Kaan; Dirican, Bahar; Sirin, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Although mostly benign and slow-growing, glomus jugulare tumors have a high propensity for local invasion of adjacent vascular structures, lower cranial nerves and the inner ear, which may result in substantial morbidity and even mortality. Treatment strategies for glomus jugulare tumors include surgery, preoperative embolization followed by surgical resection, conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy, radiosurgery in the form of stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy, and combinations of these modalities. In the present study, we evaluate the use of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of glomus jugulare tumors and report our 15-year single center experience. Between May 1998 and May 2013, 21 patients (15 females, 6 males) with glomus jugulare tumors were treated using LINAC-based stereotactic radiosurgery at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy. The indication for stereotactic radiosurgery was the presence of residual or recurrent tumor after surgery for 5 patients, whereas 16 patients having growing tumors with symptoms received stereotactic radiosurgery as the primary treatment. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 3-98). Median age was 55 years (range, 24-77). Of the 21 lesions treated, 13 (61.9%) were left-sided and 8 (38.1%) were right-sided. Median dose was 15 Gy (range, 10-20) prescribed to the 85%-100% isodose line encompassing the target volume. Local control defined as either tumor shrinkage or the absence of tumor growth on periodical follow-up neuroimaging was 100%. LINAC-based stereotactic radiosurgery offers a safe and efficacious management strategy for glomus jugulare tumors by providing excellent tumor growth control with few complications.

  13. Internal vein texture and vein evolution of the epithermal Shila-Paula district, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, Alain; Bailly, Laurent; André, Anne-Sylvie; Monié, Patrick; Cassard, Daniel; Tajada, Fernando Llosa; Vargas, Juan Rosas; Tuduri, Johann

    2006-07-01

    vein formation. Phase 1 corresponds to the assumed development of E-W sinistral shear zones and associated N60°W cleavages under the effects of a NE-SW shortening direction that is recognized at Andean scale. These structures contain the stage 1 ore assemblage that was brecciated during ongoing deformation. Phase 2 is a reactivation of earlier structures under a NW-SE shortening direction that allowed the reopening of the preexisting schistosity and the formation of scarce N50°E-striking S2-cleavage planes filled by the stage 2 pre-bonanza minerals. Phase 3 coincides with the bonanza ore emplacement in the secondary N45-60°W veins and also in open-space in the core of the main E-W veins. Our combined tectonic, textural, mineralogical, fluid-inclusion, and geochronological study presents a complete model of vein formation in which the reactivation of previously formed tectonic structures plays a significant role in ore formation.

  14. Facial vein in the rabbit. Neurogenic vasodilation mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Pegram, B L; Bevan, R D; Bevan, J A

    1976-12-01

    A segment of the facial vein of the rabbit, that opposite the buccal cavity, responds to norepinephrine (NE) and opposite the buccal cavity, responds to norepinephrine (NE) and transmural nerve stimulation (TNS) by a brisk biphasic dilation. The dilation in response to both procedures is reveresed by prior exposure to propranolol (10(-6)M). Pretreatment with phenoxybenzamine (10(-5)M) increases the size of the neurogenic response and displaces the NE dose-relaxation curve to the left. Histamine causes a constrictor response exclusively. Sympathetic stimulation of a segment of the facial vein proximal to this buccal segment, and also of the external jugular vein, results in constriction. Light microscopy showed no fequtres which can account for the dilation, and fluorescence histochemistry using a modified Flack technique showed a dense adrenergic nerve plexus extending throughout the thickness of the media. We found that frequency-response characteristics and neuronal uptake of 3H-NE were consistent with findings for a blood vessel with a heavy medial innervation. Also, monoamine oxidase and catechol O-methyltransferase activities were similar to those found in other rabbit veins. Furthermore, these results are consistent with an adrenergic neuroeffector organization in which there is a predominance of beta- over alpha-adrenergic receptors. In conclusion, the presence of a dilator response in this buccal segment of the facial vein may be related to its location in the wall of the cheek, where it may be subjected to considerable stretch.

  15. The pharmacokinetics of pyridostigmine and 3-hydroxy-N-methylpyridinium in the rat: dose-dependent effects after portal vein administration.

    PubMed Central

    Barber, H E; Bourne, G R; Calvey, T N; Muir, K T

    1975-01-01

    1 The elimination kinectis of [14C]-pyridostigmine iodine and [14-C-methyl]-3-hydroxypyridinium bromide (3-OH NMP) have been studied in the rat. 2 For pyridostigmine, at a given dose level, the fraction of the dose eliminated unchanged was reduced and the metabolite fraction was increased after portal vein administration when compared to jugular vein administration. This indicates that pyridostigmine is subject to metabolism during the first passage through the liver. 3 When doses of pyridostigmine 1.25 mumol/kg and higher were injected via the portal vein, the proportion excreted in urine as unchanged drug remained constant; in contrast, the percentage of the dose eliminated as the metabolite was significantly reduced. This indicates that a dose-dependent process is involved in the urinary excretion of 3-OH NMP. 4 This conclusion was supported by studies involving the portal and systemic venous injection of 3-OH NMP at different dose levels. After 4 h, approximately85% of the lowest dose was eliminated unchanged in ug this period. The proportion of the dose eliminated in urine was not related to the route of administration. 5 After the injection of pyridostigmine into the jugular vein, the initial rate of drug excretion fell rapidly for approximately 10 min; in contrast, after injection into the portal vein, the rate of excretion of the drug rose to a maximum at 30 minutes. This suggests that the hepatoportal system behaves as a distinct region during the distribution of this drug. PMID:173444

  16. Role of descending venography and endovenous embolization in treatment of females with lower extremity varicose veins, vulvar and posterior thigh varices.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Majed A; Soliman, Hisham E T; Khougeer, Ghaith A

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of refluxing pelvic veins among female patients with lower extremity varicose veins and the role of embolization treatment in these cases. Of 158 female patients suffering from primary varicose veins of the lower extremities presented to the Venous Disease Clinic at Dhahran Health Center between January 2002 and December 2004, 25 patients (15.8%) were noted to have vulvar or postero-medial thigh varices or both. Those were referred for trans-jugular descending pelvic venography with or without subsequent embolization of the contributing refluxing veins. Venous reflux contributing to the vulvoperineal or posterior thigh varices was detected in 23 patients (92%) on catheter venography. Left ovarian venous reflux was responsible for 60% of all cases. Embolization, using multiple coils, was successful in 18 patients with positive reflux (78.3%). One patient had primary vulvar venous malformation that required additional percutaneous sclerotherapy using dehydrated ethanol. Four patients had femoro-saphenous reflux contributing to the varices and required subsequent surgical ligation excision. All treated cases showed significant improvement of their symptoms without any procedure related complications. In patients with vulvar or postero-medial thigh varicose veins, radiological study of ovarian and hypogastric venous reflux should be considered. Trans-jugular descending venography and embolization is a feasible, effective and safe diagnostic and therapeutic modality.

  17. Nonsuture closure of arterial defect by vein graft using isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate as a tissue adhesive.

    PubMed

    Celik, H; Caner, H; Tahta, K; Ozcan, O E; Erbengi, A; Onol, B

    1991-01-01

    Nonsuture repair of intracranial blood vessel is still a challenging issue in neurosurgery. In this experimental study isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate was used for nonsuture repairing of carotid artery to observe its histotoxicity. Isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate was dropped over the edge of defect on carotid artery of rat under the surgical microscope and jugular vein was placed to cover the defect. Rats were divided in 6 group according to postoperative survival period (2, 5, 7, 14, 21, 28 days respectively). The carotid arteries were patent of all rats according to angiography and autopsy specimen. Histopathological results showed that: the changes are mainly inflammatory respons +, there was no necrotic tissue at any time the healing progress and no significant differences in the vein graft. Therefore isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate is considered helpful and safe adhesive material for the nonsuture repair of blood vessel.

  18. Vein of Galen Aneurysmal Malformation: Prognostic Markers Depicted on Fetal MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Matthias W; Vaught, Arthur J; Poretti, Andrea; Blakemore, Karin J

    2015-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) serves a dual role in the prenatal diagnostic work up of a vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM). First, it may confirm the prenatal ultrasound findings and secondly it may identify prognostically important secondary complications of the VGAM. Progressive heart failure with development of fetal hydrops and hemispheric white matter injuries are associated with a poor outcome in children with a VGAM. We present the prenatal findings using both ultrasound and MRI of a fetus with VGAM including bilateral injury of the cerebral hemispheres, severe dilatation of the jugular veins, cardiomegaly, and hydrops fetalis. The neonate died within 30 minutes after delivery. Moreover, fetal MRI revealed complete placenta praevia, uterine fibroids, and wrapping of the umbilical cord around the fetal neck. This additional information is unrelated to the fetal pathology, but could have been of importance to plan the delivery. PMID:25924177

  19. [Puncture of the brachiocephalic vein].

    PubMed

    Schlarb, K

    1986-09-01

    A specific central vein catheter for puncture of the brachiocephalic vein has been developed which is provided with a valve by which air-embolism and unwanted bleeding from the catheter are eliminated. Typical and often serious complications, which can develop on insertion of central vein catheter, can nearly be totally avoided by the puncture technique described.

  20. The effects of crystalloid potassium cardioplegic solution on arterialized canine vein grafts. Assessment of chronic prostacyclin production and histopathologic alterations.

    PubMed

    Hoover, E L; Pett, S B; Eldor, A; Alonso, D; Subramanian, V A; Weksler, B; Gay, W A

    1981-08-01

    Efforts to improve myocardial preservation during aortocoronary bypass procedures have led to the perfusion of saphenous vein segments with potassium cardioplegic (KCP) solutions after completion of the distal anastomosis. Recent reports show that the procurement of veins leads to varying degrees of damage, particularly to the endothelial surface, as a result of the dissection itself, the hydrostatic pressure required to distend the veins in obtaining hemostasis and the composition of the solutions used to irrigate the harvested segments. The biologic activity of arterialized vein segments is largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the degree of venous injury inherent in vein harvesting may be compounded by perfusion with a potassium-rich solution, a known vascular irritant. The external jugular vein was removed from 18 dogs. Half of the vein was perfused with 300 ml of a KCP solution at 4 degrees C (40 mEq/l KCl, 10 ml sodium bicarbonate, pH 7.6, osmolarity 340 mosmol) and the other half with lactated Ringer's solution (LR). The treated vein was reversed and interposed into the excluded internal carotid circulation. A sham dissection was done on the opposite jugular vein. The veins were harvested after 6 weeks and assayed for spontaneous and arachidonate-stimulated (AS) prostacyclin activity as well as light microscopic analysis of morphologic changes. Spontaneous and AS production of prostacyclin did not differ significantly in the sham, LR and KCP groups: 1539 +/- 709 and 4166 +/- 1802, 1569 +/- 763 and 3767 +/- 2706, 1860 +/- 1233 and 3947 +/- 3347 pg/ml). Light microscopic analysis revealed an intense adventitial fibrotic reaction in the KCP group and the appearance of fibroblast-like cells in the outer layer of the vein wall. The intima was intact in all three groups. We conclude that intimal damage sustained during harvesting is repaired within 6 weeks, and there is no impairment to surface production of prostacyclin. The intense adventitial fibrotic

  1. Madelung Deformity.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A

    2015-10-01

    Madelung deformity of the wrist is more common in females and is often associated with Leri Weill dyschondrosteosis, a mesomelic form of dwarfism. Patients with Madelung deformity often report wrist deformity resulting from the prominence of the relatively long ulna. The typical Madelung deformity is associated with a Vickers ligament that creates a tether across the volar-ulnar radial physis that restricts growth across this segment. The distal radius deforms in the coronal (increasing radial inclination) and the sagittal (increasing volar tilt) planes. There is lunate subsidence and the proximal carpal row adapts to the deformity by forming an upside-down pyramid shape or triangle. Treatment depends on the age at presentation, degree of deformity, and magnitude of symptoms. Mild asymptomatic deformity warrants a period of nonsurgical management with serial x-ray examinations because the natural history is unpredictable. Many patients never require surgical intervention. Progressive deformity in the young child with considerable growth potential remaining requires release of Vickers ligament and radial physiolysis to prevent ongoing deterioration Concomitant ulnar epiphysiodesis may be necessary. Advanced asymptomatic deformity in older children with an unacceptable-appearing wrist or symptomatic deformity are indications for surgery. A dome osteotomy of the radius allows 3-dimensional correction of the deformity. Positive radiographic and clinical results after dome osteotomy have been reported. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrastructure of dragonfly wing veins: composite structure of fibrous material supplemented by resilin.

    PubMed

    Appel, Esther; Heepe, Lars; Lin, Chung-Ping; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2015-10-01

    Dragonflies count among the most skilful of the flying insects. Their exceptional aerodynamic performance has been the subject of various studies. Morphological and kinematic investigations have showed that dragonfly wings, though being rather stiff, are able to undergo passive deformation during flight, thereby improving the aerodynamic performance. Resilin, a rubber-like protein, has been suggested to be a key component in insect wing flexibility and deformation in response to aerodynamic loads, and has been reported in various arthropod locomotor systems. It has already been found in wing vein joints, connecting longitudinal veins to cross veins, and was shown to endow the dragonfly wing with chordwise flexibility, thereby most likely influencing the dragonfly's flight performance. The present study revealed that resilin is not only present in wing vein joints, but also in the internal cuticle layers of veins in wings of Sympetrum vulgatum (SV) and Matrona basilaris basilaris (MBB). Combined with other structural features of wing veins, such as number and thickness of cuticle layers, material composition, and cross-sectional shape, resilin most probably has an effect on the vein's material properties and the degree of elastic deformations. In order to elucidate the wing vein ultrastructure and the exact localisation of resilin in the internal layers of the vein cuticle, the approaches of bright-field light microscopy, wide-field fluorescence microscopy, confocal laser-scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were combined. Wing veins were shown to consist of up to six different cuticle layers and a single row of underlying epidermal cells. In wing veins of MBB, the latter are densely packed with light-scattering spheres, previously shown to produce structural colours in the form of quasiordered arrays. Longitudinal and cross veins differ significantly in relative thickness of exo- and endocuticle, with cross veins

  3. A technical approach to dissecting and assessing cadaveric veins pertinent to chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Diaconu, Claudiu I; Staugaitis, Susan M; Fox, Robert J; Rae-Grant, Alexander; Schwanger, Cynthia; McBride, Jennifer M

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To establish a detailed technical procedure for studying the anatomical correlates of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency in cadavers of multiple sclerosis and control subjects, and to present our findings of the normal anatomic venous structures, with reference to previous descriptions from the literature. Methods: This study examined the internal jugular veins (IJVs), the brachiocephalic veins, and the azygos vein from 20 cadavers (10 control and 10 multiple sclerosis). These veins were exposed, isolated by clamps from the rest of the venous system, flushed with water, and then injected with fluid silicone from the superior ends of both IJVs. After the silicone cured to its solid state, the venous tree was removed en bloc and dissected longitudinally to expose the luminal surface. All vein segments were analyzed for anatomic variation. Anatomical analysis for this manuscript focused on normal vein architecture and its variants. Results: Thirty-seven of 40 IJVs contained valves: 29 bicuspid, 6 tricuspid, and 2 unicuspid. The average circumferences of the right and left IJVs were 2·2 and 1·8 cm, respectively. Thirteen of 20 azygos veins contained a valve, located on average 3·6 cm away from the superior vena cava junction. Nine of the 13 azygos valves were bicuspid; four were tricuspid. Only one of the 40 brachiocephalic veins contained a valve. Discussion: We detailed a technical approach for harvesting cadaveric neck and thoracic veins with relevance to chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency. The anatomy of the venous system has significant variability, including differing number of valves in different regions and variable characteristics of the valves. Average vein circumference was less than that typically reported in imaging studies of live patients. PMID:22971470

  4. [Subclavian vein catheterization].

    PubMed

    Felsch, G; Richter, G

    1975-08-15

    On the basis of experiences with more than 500 catherizations of the subclavian vein, which were performed partly infraclavicularly, partly supraclavicularly, the two methods were critically estimated and compared with regard to their effectivity and complications. The range of indications is enlarged from the access through the veins for taking blood samples and the infusion therapy over the measurement of the central venous blood pressure to the floating catheterization, temporary external pacemaker stimulation and emergency dialysis. The mastering of the two techniques of puncture provides a high measure of security for the emergency case. On the assumption of an approach secundum artem and knowing and taking into consideration the possibilities of complication, which are particularly referred to, the two ways seem to be approximately of the same value.

  5. Spinal Accessory Neuropathy Associated With the Tumor Located on the Jugular Foramen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soyoung; Lee, Jieun; Kim, Inhwan

    2013-01-01

    Spinal accessory neuropathy is commonly caused by iatrogenic injury or secondary to trauma or infection. Nevertheless, the tumor related palsy is rare. We present a case of an 18-year-old male patient suffering from paralysis of his right trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscle. An electrophysiologic diagnostic study confirmed the spinal accessory neuropathy of the proximal segment. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging showed the location of tumor on the jugular foramen. However, the type of the tumor was not confirmed through biopsy because the patient refused surgical procedure. Based on the study, it is hypothesized that the tumor located on the jugular foramen should be considered as a cause of the spinal accessory nerve of the proximal segment. PMID:23526381

  6. Non-contact hemodynamic imaging reveals the jugular venous pulse waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelard, Robert; Hughson, Richard L.; Greaves, Danielle K.; Pfisterer, Kaylen J.; Leung, Jason; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular monitoring is important to prevent diseases from progressing. The jugular venous pulse (JVP) waveform offers important clinical information about cardiac health, but is not routinely examined due to its invasive catheterisation procedure. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the JVP can be consistently observed in a non-contact manner using a photoplethysmographic imaging system. The observed jugular waveform was strongly negatively correlated to the arterial waveform (r = -0.73 ± 0.17), consistent with ultrasound findings. Pulsatile venous flow was observed over a spatially cohesive region of the neck. Critical inflection points (c, x, v, y waves) of the JVP were observed across all participants. The anatomical locations of the strongest pulsatile venous flow were consistent with major venous pathways identified through ultrasound.

  7. Non-contact hemodynamic imaging reveals the jugular venous pulse waveform

    PubMed Central

    Amelard, Robert; Hughson, Richard L.; Greaves, Danielle K.; Pfisterer, Kaylen J.; Leung, Jason; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular monitoring is important to prevent diseases from progressing. The jugular venous pulse (JVP) waveform offers important clinical information about cardiac health, but is not routinely examined due to its invasive catheterisation procedure. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the JVP can be consistently observed in a non-contact manner using a photoplethysmographic imaging system. The observed jugular waveform was strongly negatively correlated to the arterial waveform (r = −0.73 ± 0.17), consistent with ultrasound findings. Pulsatile venous flow was observed over a spatially cohesive region of the neck. Critical inflection points (c, x, v, y waves) of the JVP were observed across all participants. The anatomical locations of the strongest pulsatile venous flow were consistent with major venous pathways identified through ultrasound. PMID:28065933

  8. γ-Secretase inhibitor DAPT attenuates intimal hyperplasia of vein grafts by inhibition of Notch1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yong Guang; Wang, Wei; Gong, Dan; Mao, Zhi Fu

    2014-06-01

    The proliferation and high plasticity of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) are the major reasons for restenosis of vein grafts. N-[N-(3, 5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT), specific inhibitor of γ-secretase, has been shown to regulate vSMC proliferation and differentiation through the Notch signaling pathway, but the pathophysiological importance of these findings in venous grafts has not yet been determined. A rat vein graft model was employed wherein the left jugular vein was surgically interposed into the left common carotid artery. Daily subcutaneous injections of DAPT or placebo (DMSO) were administered postoperatively (control animals received no treatment). We showed that DAPT can inhibit restenosis of vein grafts by inhibiting vSMC proliferation and increasing apoptosis in vivo. Notch1 signaling was highly active during the development of intima thickening. By blocking the Notch signaling pathway, the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT can significantly attenuated intima thickening. These changes in vein grafts coincided with enhanced binding of myocardin to the smooth muscle-specific protein SM22 and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain at the promoters of vSMC differentiation-specific genes. These studies showed that DAPT can restore the vSMC phenotype and inhibit vSMC proliferation through suppression of the Notch1 signaling pathway, and thus opens a new avenue for the treatment of restenosis in vein grafts.

  9. Effects of multiple vein microjoints on the mechanical behaviour of dragonfly wings: numerical modelling.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, H; Ghoroubi, N; Darvizeh, A; Appel, E; Gorb, S N

    2016-03-01

    Dragonfly wings are known as biological composites with high morphological complexity. They mainly consist of a network of rigid veins and flexible membranes, and enable insects to perform various flight manoeuvres. Although several studies have been done on the aerodynamic performance of Odonata wings and the mechanisms involved in their deformations, little is known about the influence of vein joints on the passive deformability of the wings in flight. In this article, we present the first three-dimensional finite-element models of five different vein joint combinations observed in Odonata wings. The results from the analysis of the models subjected to uniform pressures on their dorsal and ventral surfaces indicate the influence of spike-associated vein joints on the dorsoventral asymmetry of wing deformation. Our study also supports the idea that a single vein joint may result in different angular deformations when it is surrounded by different joint types. The developed numerical models also enabled us to simulate the camber formation and stress distribution in the models. The computational data further provide deeper insights into the functional role of resilin patches and spikes in vein joint structures. This study might help to more realistically model the complex structure of insect wings in order to design more efficient bioinspired micro-air vehicles in future.

  10. Effects of multiple vein microjoints on the mechanical behaviour of dragonfly wings: numerical modelling

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, H.; Ghoroubi, N.; Darvizeh, A.; Appel, E.; Gorb, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Dragonfly wings are known as biological composites with high morphological complexity. They mainly consist of a network of rigid veins and flexible membranes, and enable insects to perform various flight manoeuvres. Although several studies have been done on the aerodynamic performance of Odonata wings and the mechanisms involved in their deformations, little is known about the influence of vein joints on the passive deformability of the wings in flight. In this article, we present the first three-dimensional finite-element models of five different vein joint combinations observed in Odonata wings. The results from the analysis of the models subjected to uniform pressures on their dorsal and ventral surfaces indicate the influence of spike-associated vein joints on the dorsoventral asymmetry of wing deformation. Our study also supports the idea that a single vein joint may result in different angular deformations when it is surrounded by different joint types. The developed numerical models also enabled us to simulate the camber formation and stress distribution in the models. The computational data further provide deeper insights into the functional role of resilin patches and spikes in vein joint structures. This study might help to more realistically model the complex structure of insect wings in order to design more efficient bioinspired micro-air vehicles in future. PMID:27069649

  11. Subtotal resection for management of large jugular paragangliomas with functional lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Wanna, George B; Sweeney, Alex D; Carlson, Matthew L; Latuska, Richard F; Rivas, Alejandro; Bennett, Marc L; Netterville, James L; Haynes, David S

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate tumor control following subtotal resection of advanced jugular paragangliomas in patients with functional lower cranial nerves and to investigate the utility of salvage radiotherapy for residual progressive disease. Case series with planned chart review. Tertiary academic referral center. Patients who presented with advanced jugular paragangliomas and functional lower cranial nerves were analyzed. Primary outcome measures included extent of resection, long-term tumor control, need for additional treatment, and postoperative lower cranial nerve function. Twelve patients (mean age, 46.2 years; 7 women, 58.3%) who met inclusion criteria were evaluated between 1999 and 2013. The mean postoperative residual tumor volume was 27.7% (range, 3.5%-75.0%) of the preoperative volume. When the residual tumor volume was less than 20% of the preoperative volume, no tumor growth occurred over an average of 44.6 months of follow-up (P < .01). Four tumors (33.3%) demonstrated serial growth at a mean of 23.5 months following resection, 2 of which were treated with salvage stereotactic radiotherapy providing control through the last recorded follow-up. No patient experienced permanent postoperative lower cranial neuropathy as a result of surgery. Subtotal resection of jugular paragangliomas with preservation of the lower cranial nerves is a viable management strategy. If more than 80% of the preoperative tumor volume is resected, the residual tumor seems less likely to grow. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  12. Perfusion of veins at arterial pressure increases the expression of KLF5 and cell cycle genes in smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amirak, Emre; Zakkar, Mustafa; Evans, Paul C.; Kemp, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation remains a major cause of veno-arterial graft failure. We hypothesised that exposure of venous SMCs to arterial pressure would increase KLF5 expression and that of cell cycle genes. Porcine jugular veins were perfused at arterial or venous pressure in the absence of growth factors. The KLF5, c-myc, cyclin-D and cyclin-E expression were elevated within 24 h of perfusion at arterial pressure but not at venous pressure. Arterial pressure also reduced the decline in SM-myosin heavy chain expression. These data suggest a role for KLF5 in initiating venous SMCs proliferation in response to arterial pressure.

  13. Influence of ischemic injury on vein graft remodeling: role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate second messenger pathway in enhanced vein graft preservation.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Taichi; Asai, Tomohiro; Belov, Dmitri; Okada, Morihito; Pinsky, David J; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Naka, Yoshifumi

    2005-01-01

    Endothelial injury during the harvest of saphenous vein grafts might play an important role in the development of vein graft disease after coronary artery bypass grafting. Using a murine autologous arterialized vein patch model, we tested whether the initial ischemic insult of vein grafts was linked to the later development of graft neointimal hyperplasia and whether the restoration of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate second messenger pathway would attenuate the development of neointimal hyperplasia. A segment of the external jugular vein of a mouse was grafted onto its abdominal aorta. Three weeks after the operation, the degree of neointimal hyperplasia of the implanted graft was compared among (1) grafts without preservation, (2) grafts with 2 hours of preservation (25 degrees C) in heparinized saline, and (3) grafts with 2 hours of preservation in heparinized saline in the presence of a cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog. In addition, cyclic adenosine monophosphate contents of vein grafts and leukocyte adherence to the graft endothelium were assessed. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate contents were significantly decreased after 2 hours of preservation (212 +/- 8 vs 156 +/- 5 pmol/L, P < .01). The grafts preserved for 2 hours showed greater neointimal hyperplasia compared with the grafts without preservation (neointimal expansion, 68.7% +/- 9.6% vs 46.1% +/- 4.8%; P < .01). The addition of a cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog to the preservation solution significantly suppressed neointimal hyperplasia of grafts preserved for 2 hours (44.3% +/- 5.0%). Inhibiting the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase by adding Rp-cAMPS abrogated the beneficial effects. Furthermore, grafts preserved for 2 hours had significantly more leukocytes adhering to the graft endothelium 24 hours after the operation compared with nonpreserved grafts, which was significantly reduced by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate treatment. Ischemic insult during vein graft

  14. Prevalence and impact of incompetence of internal jugular valve on postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Roh, Go Un; Kim, Won Oak; Rha, Koon Ho; Lee, Byung Ho; Jeong, Hae Won; Na, Sungwon

    2016-01-01

    Internal jugular vein (IJV) is the main pathway of cerebral venous drainage and its valves prevent regurgitation of blood to the brain. IJV valve incompetence (IJVVI) is known to be associated with cerebral dysfunctions. It occurs more often in male over 50 years old, conditions elevating intra-abdominal or intra-thoracic pressure. In robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP), elderly male undergoes surgery in Trendelenburg position with pneumoperitoneum applied. Therefore, we assessed the IJVVI during RALRP and its influence on postoperative cognitive function. 57 patients undergoing RALRP were enrolled. Neurocognitive tests including Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, Color Word Stroop Test, digit span test, and grooved pegboard test were performed the day before and 2 days after surgery. During surgery, IJVVI was assessed with ultrasonography in supine position with and without pneumoperitoneum, and Trendelenburg position with pneumoperitoneum. 50 patients underwent sonographic assessment and 41 patients completed neurocognitive examination. A total of 27 patients presented IJVVI, 19 patients in supine position without pneumoperitoneum, 7 patients in supine position with pneumoperitoneum and 1 patient in Trendelenburg position with pneumoperitoneum. In neurocognitive tests, patients with IJVVI showed statistically significant decline of score in MMSE postoperatively (p<0.05). IJVVI occurred in 38% in supine position but the incidence was increased to 54% after Trendelenburg position and pneumoperitoneum. Patients with IJVVI did not show significant differences in cognitive function tests except MMSE. Clinical and neurological significance of physiologic changes associated RALRP should be studied further.

  15. Deformation-induced dehydration structures in the Nankai accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famin, V.; Byrne, T.; Lewis, J. C.; Kanagawa, K.; Behrmann, J.; Iodp 314/315/316 Scientists, E.

    2008-12-01

    This study investigates the chemical changes caused by deformation in the hanging wall of a major, probably seismogenic thrust fault in the Kumano forearc basin, Nankai Trough. In cores from IODP Expedition 315 (site C0001), the clay sediments display numerous deformation structures including tilted beddings, decimeter scale faults and shear zones with normal or thrust offsets, and clusters of parallel curviplanar veins interpreted as earthquake-induced dewatering structures. Curviplanar veins are often observed to merge into small oblique shear zones with millimeter offsets, or to branch on larger shear zones with a ~30° angle. This suggests that some shear zones may form by the coalescence of veins. Curviplanar veins and shear zones appear darker than the surrounding clay at the macroscopic observation scale, and brighter and therefore denser under CT-scan imaging. At the micro-scale, clay has a preferred crystallographic orientation in the deformation structures and no preferred orientation outside. Electron probe micro-analysis reveals that the dark material has a higher sum of major elements (65-80 wt%), i.e. a lower volatile content (assumed to be mostly water) than the host sediment (50-60 wt%). All the major elements are equally enriched in proportion to the volatile depletion. Mass balance calculation indicates that a 20-30 wt% water loss is required to account for chemical change in the deformation microstructures. The water loss may be due to clay dehydration or to pore collapse. Shear zones are equally dehydrated as the curviplanar veins from the mass balance standpoint. In 1 m3 of sediment, a deformed volume of 1 % should produce about 6.2 L of water. Given the low permeability of the sediment, dehydration may increase the pore pressure and enhance further deformation. Deformation localization would be self-sustained by fluid overpressure, suggesting that dewatering veins may evolve into larger deformation structures after an earthquake.

  16. Hemodialysis catheter implantation in the axillary vein by ultrasound guidance versus palpation or anatomical reference

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Cesar A Restrepo; Villa, Carlos A Buitrago; Cardona, Jose A Chacon

    2013-01-01

    Background We compared the results of four different methods of hemodialysis catheter insertion in the medial segment of the axillary vein: ultrasound guidance, palpation, anatomical reference, and prior transient catheter. Methods All patients that required acute or chronic hemodialysis and for whom it was determined impossible or not recommended either to place a catheter in the internal jugular vein (for instance, those patients with a tracheostomy), or to practice arteriovenous fistula or graft; it was then essential to obtain an alternative vascular access. When the procedure of axillary vein catheter insertion was performed in the Renal Care Facility (RCF), ultrasound guidance was used, but in the intensive care unit (ICU), this resource was unavailable, so the palpation or anatomical reference technique was used. Results Two nephrologists with experience in the technique performed 83 procedures during a period lasting 15 years and 8 months (from January 1997–August 2012): 41 by ultrasound guidance; 19 by anatomical references; 15 by palpation of the contiguous axillary artery; and 8 through a temporary axillary catheter previously placed. The ultrasound-guided patients had fewer punctures than other groups, but the value was not statistically significant. Arterial punctures were infrequent in all techniques. Analyzing all the procedure-related complications, such as hematoma, pneumothorax, brachial-plexus injury, as well as the reasons for catheter removal, no differences were observed among the groups. The functioning time was longer in the ultrasound-guided and previous catheter groups. In 15 years and 8 months of surveillance, no clinical or image evidence for axillary vein stenosis was found. Conclusion The ultrasound guide makes the procedure of inserting catheters in the axillary veins easier, but knowledge of the anatomy of the midaxillary region and the ability to feel the axillary artery pulse (for the palpation method) also allow relatively easy

  17. Percutaneous Vein Occlusion with Small Intestinal Submucosa: An Experimental Pilot Study in Swine and Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Man Deuk; Hoppe, Hanno; Pavcnik, Dusan Kaufman, John A.; Uchida, Barry T.; Correa, Luiz O.; Timmermans, Hans A.; Park, Won Kyu; Corless, Christopher L.; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility, outcomes, and amount of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) material needed for embolization of jugular vein (JV) in a swine and sheep model. Our hypothesis was that SIS would cause vein occlusion. Materials and Methods. The external JVs (EJV) in swine (n = 6) and JVs in sheep (n = 6) were occluded with SIS fan-folded compressed strips. After percutaneous puncture of the peripheral portion of the EJV or JV, a TIPS set was used to exit their lumen centrally through the skin. The SIS strips were delivered into the isolated venous segment with a pull-through technique via a 10-Fr sheath. Follow-up venograms were done immediately after placement and at the time of sacrifice at 1 or 3 months. Gross examinations focused on the EJV or JV and their surrounding structures. Specimens were evaluated by histology. Results. SIS strip(s) placement was successful in all cases, with immediate vein occlusion seen in 23 of 24 veins (95.8%). All EJVs treated with two strips and all JVs treated with three or four strips remained closed on 1- and 3-month follow-up venograms. Two EJVs treated with one strip and one JV treated with two strips were partially patent on venograms at 1 and 3 months. There has been one skin inflammatory reaction. Necropsies revealed excluded EJV or JV segments with SIS incorporation into the vein wall. Histology demonstrated various stages of SIS remodeling with fibrocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, capillaries, and inflammatory cells. Conclusion. We conclude that EJV and JV ablation with SIS strips using percutaneous exit catheterization is feasible and effective in animal models. Further exploration of SIS as vein ablation material is recommended.

  18. Infrared imaging of varicose veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, Herke Jan; de Zeeuw, Raymond; Verdaasdonk, Ruud M.; Wittens, Cees H. A.

    2004-06-01

    It has been established that varicose veins are better visualized with infrared photography. As near-infrared films are nowadays hard to get and to develop in the digital world, we investigated the use of digital photography of varicose veins. Topics that are discussed are illumination setup, photography and digital image enhancement and analysis.

  19. The economics of vein disease.

    PubMed

    Sales, Clifford M; Podnos, Joan; Levison, Jonathan

    2007-09-01

    The management of cosmetic vein problems requires a very different approach than that for the majority of most other vascular disorders that occur in a vascular surgery practice. This article focuses on the business aspects of a cosmetic vein practice, with particular attention to the uniqueness of these issues. Managing patient expectations is critical to the success of a cosmetic vein practice. Maneuvering within the insurance can be difficult and frustrating for both the patient and the practice. Practices should use cost accounting principles to evaluate the success of their vein work. Vein surgery--especially if performed within the office--can undergo an accurate break-even analysis to determine its profitability.

  20. The management of varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Zhang, Shiyi; Sun, Yan; Ren, Shiyan; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to review the current management modalities for varicose veins. There are a variety of management modalities for varicose veins. The outcomes of the treatment of varicose veins are different. The papers on the management of varicose veins were reviewed and the postoperative complications and efficacy were compared. Foam sclerotherapy and radiofrequency ablation were associated with less pain and faster recovery than endovenous laser ablation and surgical stripping. Patients undergoing endovenous laser ablation and radiofrequency ablation are most likely to have a faster recovery time and earlier return to work in comparison with those undergoing conventional high ligation and stripping. A randomized controlled study in multiple centers is warranted to verify which approach is better than others for the treatment of varicose veins.

  1. The Management of Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fan; Zhang, Shiyi; Sun, Yan; Ren, Shiyan; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to review the current management modalities for varicose veins. There are a variety of management modalities for varicose veins. The outcomes of the treatment of varicose veins are different. The papers on the management of varicose veins were reviewed and the postoperative complications and efficacy were compared. Foam sclerotherapy and radiofrequency ablation were associated with less pain and faster recovery than endovenous laser ablation and surgical stripping. Patients undergoing endovenous laser ablation and radiofrequency ablation are most likely to have a faster recovery time and earlier return to work in comparison with those undergoing conventional high ligation and stripping. A randomized controlled study in multiple centers is warranted to verify which approach is better than others for the treatment of varicose veins. PMID:25594661

  2. Pelvic venous reflux in males with varicose veins and recurrent varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Dabbs, Emma B; Dos Santos, Scott J; Shiangoli, Irenie; Holdstock, Judith M; Beckett, David; Whiteley, Mark S

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To report on a male cohort with pelvic vein reflux and associated primary and recurrent lower limb varicose veins. Methods Full lower limb duplex ultrasonography revealed significant pelvic contribution in eight males presenting with bilateral lower limb varicose veins. Testicular and internal iliac veins were examined with either one or a combination of computed tomography, magnetic resonance venography, testicular, transabdominal or transrectal duplex ultrasonography. Subsequently, all patients received pelvic vein embolisation, prior to leg varicose vein treatment. Results Pelvic vein reflux was found in 23 of the 32 truncal pelvic veins and these were treated by pelvic vein embolisation. Four patients have since completed their leg varicose vein treatment and four are undergoing leg varicose vein treatments currently. Conclusion Pelvic vein reflux contributes towards lower limb venous insufficiency in some males with leg varicose veins. Despite the challenges, we suggest that pelvic vein reflux should probably be investigated and pelvic vein embolisation considered in such patients.

  3. Using vein fabric and fluid inclusion characteristics as an integrated proxy to constrain the relative timing of non cross-cutting, syn- to late-orogenic quartz vein generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Dominique; Muchez, Philippe; Sintubin, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Research on ancient fluid systems mainly focuses on veins, because they offer the opportunity to combine macro- and microstructural data with geochemical data to gain insight into the P-T-X conditions present during veining. By applying such an integrated petrographic and microthermometric methodology to syn- to late-orogenic quartz veins in the Palaeozoic High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium), we were able to define the relative timing and related P-T-X conditions of different quartz vein generations, despite of the absence of any mutual cross-cutting relationships in the field (Jacques et al., 2014). The different quartz vein generations represent the meso-scale brittle accommodation during fold initiation, amplification and locking. The presence of free polycrystal growth in cavities at a midcrustal depth, and fluid-assisted brecciation indicate that veining occurred under overpressured fluid conditions during the orogeny. Significant differences in crystal-plastic deformation microstructures and P-T trapping conditions indicate that the different processes accommodating folding occurred in a progressive manner along a retrograde deformation path. While vein quartz in an extrados vein and in the peripheral part of a lenticular, fault-accommodating vein shows moderate crystal-plastic deformation (e.g. bulging recrystallisation, deformation lamellae, shear bands), crystal-plastic deformation is relatively absent in the vein quartz of a saddle reef and the core of the lenticular vein (i.e. no to minor undulose extinction). Successive veining occurred from peak metamorphic conditions (ca. 300 ° C and 190 MPa), measured in the extrados vein, to lower P-T conditions in the periphery of the lenticular vein (ca. 275 ° C and 180 MPa), the late-orogenic saddle reef (ca. 245 ° C and 160 MPa) and the core of the lenticular vein (ca. 220 ° C and 150 MPa). The relative timing and accompanying decrease in P-T conditions of the different quartz vein generations reflect the

  4. Surgical management of jugular foramen meningiomas: a series of 13 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Mario; Bacciu, Andrea; Falcioni, Maurizio; Taibah, Abdelkader; Piazza, Paolo

    2007-10-01

    Primary meningiomas occurring within the jugular foramen are exceedingly rare lesions presumed to originate from arachnoid-lining cells situated within the jugular foramen. The objective of this study is to analyze the management and outcome in a series of 13 primary jugular foramen meningiomas collected at a single center. Retrospective study. Quaternary referral otology and skull base private center. Charts belonging to 13 consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed jugular foramen meningioma surgically treated between September 1991 and May 2005 were examined retrospectively. The follow-up of the series ranged from 12 to 120 (mean, 42.8 +/- 27.5) months. Four (28.5%) patients underwent single-stage tumor removal through the petro-occipital transigmoid (POTS) approach. In two patients with preoperative unserviceable hearing, a combined POTS-translabyrinthine approach was adopted. Two patients underwent a combined POTS-transotic approach because of massive erosion of the carotid canal. A modified transcochlear approach type D with posterior rerouting of the facial nerve and transection of the sigmoid sinus and jugular bulb was performed in two patients with a huge cerebellopontine angle tumor component with extension to the prepontine cistern together with massive involvement of the petrous bone and middle ear and encasement of the vertical and horizontal segments of the intrapetrous carotid artery. In one patient with evidence of a dominant sinus on the site of the tumor, a subtotal tumor removal via an enlarged translabyrinthine approach (ETLA) was planned to resect the intradural component of the tumor. Two patients in our series underwent a planned staged procedure on account of a huge tumor component in the neck. One of these patients underwent a first-stage infratemporal fossa approach type A to remove the tumor component in the neck; the second-stage intradural removal of the tumor was accomplished via an ETLA. The last patient underwent a first

  5. Haglund's Deformity

    MedlinePlus

    ... deformity is often called “pump bump” because the rigid backs of pump-style shoes can create pressure ... when walking. In fact, any shoes with a rigid back, such as ice skates, men’s dress shoes ...

  6. Contracture deformity

    MedlinePlus

    Deformity - contracture ... Contracture can be caused by any of the following: Brain and nervous system disorders, such as cerebral ... Follow your health care provider's instructions for treating contracture at home. Treatments may include: Doing exercises and ...

  7. Inhibition of vein graft intimal hyperplasia by periadventitial application of hyaluronic acid-carboxymethyl cellulose: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bahcivan, Muzaffer; Yucel, Semih; Kefeli, Mehmet; Gol, M Kamil; Can, Bilge; Keceligil, Hasan Tahsin

    2008-04-01

    Placement of an external support has been reported to prevent intimal hyperplasia of vein grafts. In this study, we investigated the effect of HA/CMC on intimal hyperplasia in a rabbit model. Right jugular vein to common carotid artery bypass grafting was performed in 24 female New Zealand white rabbits (2.5-3.0 kg). Animals were divided into two groups: control group (n=12) and HA/CMC group (n=12). Absorbable membrane barrier was wrapped around vein grafts in HA/CMC group. In control group, no material was applied following venous graft bypass. At 1 month, in the vein grafts supported with the HA/CMC membrane neointimal thickening was significantly less (109 microm [IQR, 78-166]) compared to the unsupported control grafts (220 microm [IQR; 101-312]; p<0.001). Medial thickening in the HA/CMC group (128 microm [IQR, 101-181]) compared to unsheathed control grafts (182 microm [IQR, 131-255] p<0.001) was also significantly less. Periadventitial placement of HA/CMC as an absorbable membrane inhibits intimal hyperplasia of vein bypass grafts in a rabbit model.

  8. Regional differences in veins wall viscosity, compliance, energetics and damping: analysis of the pressure-diameter relationship during cyclical overloads.

    PubMed

    Zócalo, Yanina; Bia, Daniel; Lluberas, Sebastián; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2008-01-01

    The characterization of the dynamic process of veins walls is essential to understand venous functioning under normal and pathological conditions. However, little work has been done on dynamic venous properties. To characterize vein compliance (C), viscosity (eta), peak-strain (W St) and dissipated (W(D)) energy, damping (zeta), and their regional differences in order to evaluate their role in venous functioning during volume-pressure overloads. In a mock circulation, pressure (P) and diameter (D) of different veins (anterior cava, jugular and femoral; from 7 sheep), were registered during cyclical volume-pressure pulses. From the P-D relationship, C, W(St) and zeta (at low and high P-D levels), eta and W(D) were calculated. For each vein there were P-dependent differences in biomechanical, energetics, and damping capability. There were regional-differences in C, eta), W(St) and W(D) (p<0.05), but not in zeta. The regional-dependent differences in dynamics and energetics, and regional-similitude in damping could be important to ensure venous functioning during acute overloads. The lower C and higher W(St) and W(D) found in back-limb veins (femoral), commonly submitted to high volume-pressure loads (i.e. during walking), could be considered relevant to ensure adequate venous system functionality and venous wall protection simultaneously.

  9. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis.

  10. An intermediate term benefits and complications of gamma knife surgery in management of glomus jugulare tumor.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Raef F A; Morgan, Magad S; Fahmy, Osama M

    2016-02-15

    Glomus tumors are rare skull base slow-growing, hypervascular neoplasms that frequently involve critical neurovascular structures, and delay in diagnosis is frequent. Surgical removal is rarely radical and is usually associated with morbidity or mortality. Gamma knife surgery (GKS) has gained an increasing dependable role in the management of glomus jugulare tumors, with high rate of tumor growth control, preserving or improving clinical status and with limited complications. This study aims to evaluate intermediate term benefits and complications of gamma knife surgery in management of twenty-two patients bearing growing glomus jugulare tumors at the International Medical Center (IMC), Cairo, Egypt, between 2005 and 2011. The mean follow-up period was 56 months (range 36-108 months); there were 3 males, 19 females; mean age was 43.6 years; 15 patients had GKS as the primary treatment; 2 patients had surgical residuals; 2 had previous radiation therapy; and 3 previously underwent endovascular embolization. The average tumor volume was 7.26 cm3, and the mean marginal dose was 14.7 Gy. Post gamma knife surgery through the follow-up period neurological status was improved in 12 patients, 7 showed stable clinical condition and 3 patients developed new moderate deficits. Tumor volume post GKS was unchanged in 13 patients, decreased in 8, and showed tumor regrowth in 1 patient. Tumor progression-free survival in our studied patients was 95.5% at 5 and 7 years of the follow-up period post GKS. Gamma knife surgery could be used safely and effectively with limited complications as a primary management tool in the treatment of glomus jugulare tumors controlling tumor growth with preserving or improving clinical status especially those who do not have significant cranial or cervical extension, elderly, and surgically unfit patients; moreover, it is safe and highly effective as adjuvant therapy as well.

  11. The safety and efficacy of gamma knife surgery in management of glomus jugulare tumor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glomus jugulare is a slowly growing, locally destructive tumor located in the skull base with difficult surgical access. The operative approach is, complicated by the fact that lesions may be both intra and extradural with engulfment of critical neurovascular structures. The tumor is frequently highly vascular, thus tumor resection entails a great deal of morbidity and not infrequent mortality. At timeslarge residual tumors are left behind. To decrease the morbidity associated with surgical resection of glomus jugulare, gamma knife surgery (GKS) was performed as an alternative in 13 patients to evaluate its safety and efficacy. Methods A retrospective review of 13 residual or unresectable glomus jagulare treated with GKS between 2004 and 2008.. Of these, 11 patients underwent GKS as the primary management and one case each was treated for postoperative residual disease and postembolization. The radiosurgical dose to the tumor margin ranged between 12-15 Gy. Results Post- gamma knife surgery and during the follow-up period twelve patients demonstrated neurological stability while clinical improvement was achieved in 5 patients. One case developed transient partial 7th nerve palsy that responded to medical treatment. In all patients radiographic MRI follow-up was obtained, the tumor size decreased in two cases and remained stable (local tumor control) in eleven patients. Conclusions Gamma knife surgery provids tumor control with a lowering of risk of developing a new cranial nerve injury in early follow-up period. This procedure can be safely used as a primary management tool in patients with glomus jugulare tumors, or in patients with recurrent tumors in this location. If long-term results with GKS are equally effective it will emerge as a good alternative to surgical resection. PMID:20819207

  12. Isolated glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves palsy due to fracture involving the left jugular foramen.

    PubMed

    Alberio, N; Cultrera, F; Antonelli, V; Servadei, F

    2005-07-01

    This report describes a case of delayed post-traumatic glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves palsy (i.e. dysphonia and swallowing dysfunction). A high resolution CT study of the cranial base detected a fracture rim encroaching on the left jugular foramen. Treatment consisted in supportive measures with incomplete recovery during a one-year follow-up period. Lower cranial nerves palsies after head trauma are rare and, should they occur, a thorough investigation in search of posterior cranial base and cranio-cervical lesions is warranted. The presumptive mechanism in our case is a fracture-related oedema and ischemic damage to the nerves leading to the delayed occurrence of the palsy.

  13. Achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino) in association with jugular lymphatic obstruction sequence.

    PubMed

    Wenstrom, K D; Williamson, R A; Hoover, W W; Grant, S S

    1989-07-01

    The prenatal diagnosis of achondrogenesis in association with cystic hygroma is described. Ultrasound findings of severe short-limbed dwarfism, decreased vertebral ossification, and normal ossification of the calvarium were all consistent with achondrogenesis type II. Although the unusual finding of associated cystic hygroma raised the suspicion of a concurrent chromosome abnormality, the karyotype of both fetal lymphocytes and fetal fibroblasts was normal. Autopsy confirmed dilated lymphatic channels in the basal endothelial layer of the skin, cystic hygroma, and coarctation of the aorta. Although previously unreported, we suggest that the features of this case of achondrogenesis indicate an association with lymphatic stasis and jugular lymphatic obstruction sequence in this syndrome.

  14. [Application of far lateral craniocervical approach in the microsurgical treatment of the jugular foramen tumors].

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Liu, Wei-dong; Chen, Long-yi; Huang, Guang-fu

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the administration of far lateral craniocervical approach in the jugular foramen (JF) tumors. A retrospective analysis was performed in 14 cases of JF tumors (9 neurilemmomas, 3 meningiomas, 1 glomus jugulare tumor, and 1 adenoid cystic carcinoma) surgically treated between January 2009 and January 2012, with focus on the surgical approach. Six patients (6/14) showed hydrocephalus. The tumor type was composed of 5 intracranial and intraforamen tumors with patent or occluded jugular bulb, 1 intracranial tumor with extension into the upper cervical canal, 4 extracranial and intra foramen tumors, 4 intra- and extracranial dumbbell-shaped communicating tumors involving the parapharyngeal space above C2 or extending caudally below C3. Far lateral postcondylar approach (FLPC) was carried out in 2 cases, far lateral tansjugular process approach (FLTJP) in 3 cases, combined FLPC + C1-2 semi-laminectomy approach in 1 case, combined FLTJP + trans-C1 transverse process approach in 7 cases, and combined FLTJP + neck approach with dissection of carotid sheath to the skull base in 1 case. Endovascular embolotherapy prior to surgical resection was performed in 1 glomus jugulare tumor. Total tumor removal was achieved in 12 patients and subtotal removal in 2 patients, with no cerebrospinal fluid leakage or operative mortality. New cranial nerve paresis occurred after surgery in 1 case of facial nerve and 1 case of lower cranial nerve. Transient worsening of preoperative lower cranial nerve deficits was noted in 3 patients. Long-term follow-up study ranging from 5 to 32 months (average 13.7 months) showed 7 patients with lower cranial nerve deficits (6 preexisting and 1 new), with exception of one preoperative lower cranial nerve dysfunction due to the infiltration of an adenoid cystic carcinoma, experienced favorable improvement with recovery of adequate swallowing function, but voice disturbance remained in 4 cases. One patient with new facial nerve deficit

  15. Vein matching using artificial neural network in vein authentication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori Hoshyar, Azadeh; Sulaiman, Riza

    2011-10-01

    Personal identification technology as security systems is developing rapidly. Traditional authentication modes like key; password; card are not safe enough because they could be stolen or easily forgotten. Biometric as developed technology has been applied to a wide range of systems. According to different researchers, vein biometric is a good candidate among other biometric traits such as fingerprint, hand geometry, voice, DNA and etc for authentication systems. Vein authentication systems can be designed by different methodologies. All the methodologies consist of matching stage which is too important for final verification of the system. Neural Network is an effective methodology for matching and recognizing individuals in authentication systems. Therefore, this paper explains and implements the Neural Network methodology for finger vein authentication system. Neural Network is trained in Matlab to match the vein features of authentication system. The Network simulation shows the quality of matching as 95% which is a good performance for authentication system matching.

  16. Low incidence of complications after cephalic vein cutdown for pacemaker lead implantation in children weighing less than 10 kilograms: A single-center experience with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kircanski, Bratislav; Vasic, Dragan; Savic, Dragutin; Stojanov, Petar

    2015-08-01

    Only a few studies on the cephalic vein cutdown technique for pacemaker lead implantation in children weighing ≤10 kg have been reported even though the procedure is widely accepted in adults. The purpose of this study was to prove that cephalic vein cutdown for pacemaker lead implantation is a reliable technique with a low incidence of complications in children weighing ≤10 kg. The study included 44 children weighing ≤10 kg with an endocardial pacemaker. Cephalic, subclavian, and axillary vein diameters were measured by ultrasound before implantation. The measured diameters were used to select either an endocardial or epicardial surgical technique. Regular 6-month follow-up visits included pacemaker interrogation and clinical and ultrasound examinations. Two dual-chamber and 42 single-chamber pacemakers were implanted. Mean weight at implantation was 6.24 kg (range 2.25-10.40 kg), and mean age was 11.4 months (range 1 day-47 months). In 40 children (90.1%), the ventricular leads were implanted using the cephalic vein cutdown technique, and implantation was accomplished via the prepared right external jugular vein in 4 of the children (9.9%). The atrial leads were implanted using axillary vein puncture and external jugular vein preparations. Mean follow-up was 8.9 years (range 0-20.9 years). Only 1 pacemaker-related complication was detected (a lead fracture near the connector that was successfully resolved using a lead repair kit). The cephalic vein cutdown technique is feasible and reliable in children weighing ≤10 kg, which justifies the application of additional surgical effort in the treatment of these small patients. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of middle and lower jugular neck dissection on supraclavicular lymph node metastasis from endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Supraclavicular lymph node metastasis from endometrial carcinoma is considerably rarer than metastasis from uterine cervical cancer. To date, there have been no reported cases regarding systematic neck dissection as a salvage treatment. In this report, we describe the neck dissection procedure carried out on a 74-year-old woman with supraclavicular lymph node metastasis. Our objective was to histologically determine the origin of the metastasis while simultaneously providing appropriate treatment. The patient’s past medical history included two prior cases of cancer: rectal cancer 7 years earlier and endometrial adenocarcinoma 4 years earlier. We determined that middle and lower jugular neck dissection was appropriate in treating this case based on the results of our preoperative FDG-PET and tumor markers. This surgery provided histological evidence that metastasis occurred from endometrial carcinoma. Middle and lower jugular neck dissection was expected to improve the patient’s prognosis without impacting the patient’s active daily life. We have continued to monitor the patient closely over an extended period. PMID:22788987

  18. Comparison of Endolymphatic Duct Dimensions and Jugular Bulb Abnormalities Between Meniere Disease and a Normal Population.

    PubMed

    Karatas, Abdullah; Kocak, Ayhan; Cebi, Isil Taylan; Salviz, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    The pathogenesis of Meniere disease (MD) has not been fully understood. According to the widely accepted theory, imbalances due to overproduction and/or impaired absorption of endolymph may cause endolymphatic hydrops, which is the hallmark pathological finding in MD. Some developmental temporal bone abnormalities may impair endolymph circulation and absorption, and these abnormalities could be a part of MD pathophysiology. However, structural features of the temporal bone cannot explain MD pathophysiology definitively. The authors aimed to determine the length and width of the endolymphatic duct (ED) along with jugular bulb (JB) abnormalities in MD patients and normal controls using high-resolution computed tomography, and to discuss the results supporting and opposing endolymphatic hydrops based on the data obtained. Thirty-six ears of 18 patients with unilateral MD and 34 ears of 17 normal subjects were enrolled. Jugular bulb abnormalities and ED dimensions were evaluated in 3 groups: affected and unaffected ears of MD patients, and healthy controls. The ED dimensions and JB abnormalities were evaluated with high-resolution computed tomography. The ED was found to be significantly shorter and narrower in the affected ears of the MD patients than in the healthy control group. In addition, more JB abnormalities were detected in the affected ears of the MD patients than in the healthy control group. However, there was no difference between the affected and unaffected ears of the MD patients. Structural ED abnormalities and JB abnormalities may be predisposing factors for the development of Meniere disease, but cannot fully explain MD pathophysiology.

  19. The effect of jugular bulb-vestibular aqueduct dehiscence on hearing and balance.

    PubMed

    Li, Shufeng; Shen, Na; Cheng, Yushu; Sha, Yan; Wang, Zhengmin

    2015-01-01

    This study suggests that jugular bulb-vestibular aqueduct dehiscence (JBVAD) does not affect the hearing or balance functions of the inner ear. Since JBVAD may cause impairment of the inner ear and induce hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo, this study was to investigate the effect of JBVAD on hearing and balance. Patients undergoing temporal bone computed tomography (TBCT) scans from May 2013 to December 2013 at a tertiary referral hospital were reviewed. The topographic relationship between the jugular bulb (JB) and the vestibular aqueduct was assessed. The findings were classified as normal when there was always a bony structure between the two structures and as dehiscent when the bony coverage separating the two structures was absent. Clinical data were collected via electronic records and clinical follow-up. A total of 1313 out of 8325 patients were diagnosed with a HJB. Forty-six patients showed JBVAD. The prevalence of dehiscence was 0.6% in patients undergoing temporal bone CT scans and 3.5% in patients with HJB. Of the 46 patients with JBVAD, 23 (50%) had sensorineural hearing loss, three (6.5%) had tinnitus, and two (4.3%) had vertigo. The correlation between JBVAD and these clinical symptoms did not achieve statistical significance.

  20. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Ultrasonic guided cannulation of the axillary vein in intensive care patients].

    PubMed

    Schregel, W; Höer, H; Radtke, J; Cunitz, G

    1994-10-01

    attempted CV catheters, 43 were placed successfully. In 2 cases the axillary vein could not be encountered by the puncture needle. Guide-wire placement did not succeed in 4 patients. One catheter was malpositioned in the ipsilateral internal jugular vein. Four inadvertent punctures of the axillary artery remained without sequelae after compression. No further puncture-related complications were observed. With high US intensity score the number of puncture attempts necessary for successful vein cannulation was lower. On the other hand, complications and puncture failure seemed to be more frequent in patients with lower US intensity scores. DISCUSSION. CV access via the axillary vein had a satisfying success rate (43/50) and proved to be a safe procedure in our ICU patients despite higher risk factors compared to a healthy population. Although ethical reasons did not allow a randomised comparison with the standard technique, location of the axillary vein by Doppler US is likely to improve cannulation results and reduce complications induced by "blind" needle probing. With a low US intensity score, the rate of successful punctures is lower and complication rates increase. In some patients, e.g., those with extended tumour operations involving the head and neck, CV access via the axillary vein may be of high clinical value.

  2. What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... deep vein of the leg can break off, travel to the lungs, and block blood flow. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: October 28, 2011 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT ...

  3. c-Jun regulates shear- and injury-inducible Egr-1 expression, vein graft stenosis after autologous end-to-side transplantation in rabbits, and intimal hyperplasia in human saphenous veins.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jun; Waldman, Alla; Khachigian, Levon M

    2010-02-05

    Coronary artery bypass graft failure represents an unsolved problem in interventional cardiology and heart surgery. Late occlusion of autologous saphenous vein bypass grafts is a consequence of neointima formation underpinned by smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration and proliferation. Poor long term patency and the lack of pharmacologic agents that prevent graft failure necessitate effective alternative therapies. Our objective here was to evaluate the effect of targeted inhibition of the bZIP transcription factor c-Jun on intimal hyperplasia in human saphenous veins and vein graft stenosis after autologous end-to-side transplantation. DNAzymes targeting c-Jun attenuated intimal hyperplasia in human saphenous vein explants. Adenovirus-forced c-Jun expression stimulated SMC proliferation, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and MMP-2 expression. c-Jun DNAzymes abrogated Adeno-c-Jun-inducible SMC growth and wound repair and reduced intimal thickening in jugular veins of New Zealand white rabbits 4 weeks after autologous end-to-side transplantation to carotid arteries. Conversely, in a DNAzyme-free setting, Adeno-c-Jun potentiated neointima formation in the veins compared with Adeno-LacZ. Inducible c-Jun expression is ERK1/2- and JNK-dependent but p38-independent. Injury- and shear-inducible c-Jun controls early growth response-1. These data demonstrate that strategies targeting c-Jun may be useful for the prevention of vein graft stenosis. Control of one important shear-responsive transcription factor by another indicates the existence of transcriptional amplification mechanisms that magnify the vascular response to cell injury or stress through inducible transcriptional networks.

  4. c-Jun Regulates Shear- and Injury-inducible Egr-1 Expression, Vein Graft Stenosis after Autologous End-to-Side Transplantation in Rabbits, and Intimal Hyperplasia in Human Saphenous Veins*

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jun; Waldman, Alla; Khachigian, Levon M.

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass graft failure represents an unsolved problem in interventional cardiology and heart surgery. Late occlusion of autologous saphenous vein bypass grafts is a consequence of neointima formation underpinned by smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration and proliferation. Poor long term patency and the lack of pharmacologic agents that prevent graft failure necessitate effective alternative therapies. Our objective here was to evaluate the effect of targeted inhibition of the bZIP transcription factor c-Jun on intimal hyperplasia in human saphenous veins and vein graft stenosis after autologous end-to-side transplantation. DNAzymes targeting c-Jun attenuated intimal hyperplasia in human saphenous vein explants. Adenovirus-forced c-Jun expression stimulated SMC proliferation, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and MMP-2 expression. c-Jun DNAzymes abrogated Adeno-c-Jun-inducible SMC growth and wound repair and reduced intimal thickening in jugular veins of New Zealand white rabbits 4 weeks after autologous end-to-side transplantation to carotid arteries. Conversely, in a DNAzyme-free setting, Adeno-c-Jun potentiated neointima formation in the veins compared with Adeno-LacZ. Inducible c-Jun expression is ERK1/2- and JNK-dependent but p38-independent. Injury- and shear-inducible c-Jun controls early growth response-1. These data demonstrate that strategies targeting c-Jun may be useful for the prevention of vein graft stenosis. Control of one important shear-responsive transcription factor by another indicates the existence of transcriptional amplification mechanisms that magnify the vascular response to cell injury or stress through inducible transcriptional networks. PMID:19940138

  5. Incidence of cannula associated deep vein thrombosis after veno-venous ECMO.

    PubMed

    Menaker, Jay; Tabatabai, Ali; Rector, Raymond; Dolly, Katelyn; Kufera, Joseph; Lee, Eugenia; Kon, Zachary; Sanchez, Pablo; Pham, Si; Herr, Daniel L; Mazzeffi, Michael; Rabinowitz, Ronald P; OʼConnor, James V; Stein, Deborah M; Scalea, Thomas M

    2017-02-13

    Limited literature regarding the incidence of cannula associated deep vein thrombosis (CaDVT) following veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) exists. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of post decannulation CaDVT and identify any associated risk factors. Forty eight patients were admitted between August 2014 and January 2016 to the Lung Rescue Unit were included in the study. Protocolized anticoagulation levels (partial thromboplastin time 45-55 second) and routine post decannulation DVT screening were in place during the study period. Forty-one (85.4%) patients had CaDVT. Of those with CaDVT, 31 (76%) patients were treated with full anti-coagulation therapy. 34 (76%) patients with right internal jugular cannulation had CaDVT at cannula site. Twenty-five (61%) patients had CaDVT in the lower extremity. (18 associated right femoral vein cannulation; 7 left femoral vein cannulation) 18 (44%) patients had both upper and lower extremity CaDVT. Overall, patients with CaDVT tended to be older, have a higher body mass index (BMI) and on ECMO longer (p=NS). Mean PTT during time on ECMO between patients that did and did not have CaDVT did not differ. No clinical evidence of pulmonary embolism was seen.

  6. Quaternary deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Displaced or deformed rock units and landforms record the past 2 m.y. of faulting, folding, uplift, and subsidence in California. Properly interpreted, such evidence provides a quantitative basis for predicting future earthquake activity and for relating many diverse structures and landforms to the 5 cm/yr of horizontal motion at the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. Modern techniques of geologic dating and expanded research on earthquake hazards have greatly improved our knowledge of the San Andreas fault system. Much of this new knowledge has been gained since 1965, and that part which concerns crustal deformation during the past 2 m.y. is briefly summarized here.

  7. [Surgery of essential varicose veins].

    PubMed

    Maraval, M

    1994-03-15

    Idiopathic varicose veins of the lower limbs are a frequent but benign disorder. Surgery is only a moment in the course of the disease. Although not the only treatment of essential varicose veins, surgery by an experienced team performing crossectomy, stripping by intussusception using a stripper, and phlebectomy gives fully satisfactory results, both to patient and to physician, in over 80% of cases. New techniques were recently developed that, at present, have not confirmed early hopes.

  8. Relationship between amorphous silica and precious metal in quartz veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrichhausen, N.; Rowe, C. D.; Board, W. S.; Greig, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Super-saturation of silica is common in fault fluids, due to pressure changes associated with fracture, fault slip, or temperature gradients in hydrothermal systems. These mechanisms lead to precipitation of amorphous silica, which will recrystallize to quartz under typical geologic conditions. These conditions may also promote the saturation of precious metals, such as gold, and the precipitation of nanoparticles. Previous experiments show that charged nanoparticles of gold can attach to the surface of amorphous silica nanoparticles. Thus, gold and silica may be transported as a colloid influencing mineralization textures during amorphous silica recrystallization to quartz. This may enrich quartz vein hosted gold deposits, but the instability of hydrous silica during subsequent deformation means that the microstructural record of precipitation of gold is lost. We investigate a recent, shallow auriferous hydrothermal system at Dixie Valley, Nevada to reveal the nano- to micro-scale relationships between gold and silica in fresh veins. Fault slip surfaces at Dixie Valley exhibit layers of amorphous silica with partial recrystallization to quartz. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) show amorphous silica can contain a few wt. % gold while areas recrystallized to quartz are barren. At the Jurassic Brucejack deposit in British Columbia, Canada we observe the cryptocrystalline quartz textures that may indicate recrystallization from amorphous silica within quartz-carbonate veins containing high grade gold. Comb quartz within syntaxial veins, vugs, and coating breccia clasts indicate structural dilation. Vein geometry is investigated to determine relative importance of fault slip in creating dilational sites. By comparing quartz-carbonate veins from the Dixie Valley to Brucejack, we can determine whether amorphous silica formed in different environments show similar potential to affect precious metal mineralization.

  9. Shock veins in the central uplift of the Manicouagan impact structure: Context and genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biren, Marc B.; Spray, John G.

    2011-03-01

    We describe the development of shock veins that penetrate the anorthositic central uplift of the Manicouagan impact structure. They occur as thin (< 2.5 mm wide), linear micro-fault systems that can be traced for several meters in length, and which predominantly trend radially from the point of impact. The shock veins are distinguished by the development of maskelynite along vein margins and stishovite in vein matrices, which are otherwise absent in non-veined regions. These phases define a shock excursion of up to 30 GPa, in contrast to bulk shock effects of ≤ 12 GPa defined by development of shatter cones, planar fractures and planar deformation features in various minerals. The shock veins at Manicouagan share many similarities with vein systems developed in meteorites. They also provide an in situ context with which to better understand meteoroid source and lofting conditions. In addition to containing high pressure phases, the shock veins exhibit evidence for high temperature partial melting of host silicate clasts, with the generation of flow-textured fragments and glasses. The formation of microcrystallites and dendrites from some melts indicates rapid cooling. We propose a two-stage generation mechanism comprising an initial high-pressure shock excursion (estimated to last < 0.5 s based on projectile size considerations) followed by a longer high-temperature pulse of a few seconds duration. We suggest that the shock excursion is initiated by target heterogeneities that cause distortions in the hemispherically propagating shock front. This results in radially oriented tearing and vein formation with shock amplification occurring via intra-vein shock reverberation. High-speed displacement along the veins is driven by stress release on rarefaction, which results in frictional melting via adiabatic heating.

  10. Controlled Atrial Fibrillation after Pulmonary Vein Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Ah; Seo, Jiwon

    2017-01-01

    When there is no pulmonary vein reconnection after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation, patients can experience recurrence of atrial fibrillation without clear evidence of non-pulmonary vein foci. We describe a patient with significant pulmonary vein stenosis and recurrent atrial fibrillation after four ablation procedures. After successful pulmonary vein stenting, the symptoms were resolved, and sinus rhythm was maintained for 2 years without treatment with antiarrhythmic medication. We believe pulmonary vein stenting potentially controlled atrial fibrillation by providing pulmonary vein pressure relief or by compressing the epicardial triggers occurring at the pulmonary vein ostium. PMID:28765746

  11. Locating difficult veins for venepuncture and cannulation.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Sally Jane

    2017-02-15

    Vein location and assessment are essential to improve the success rates for vascular access. However, problems remain with first attempt success rates for peripheral cannulation and locating difficult veins. Practitioners may not be aware of developments in technology and aids to assist in the location and assessment of veins to achieve vascular access. This article provides an overview of two vein location aids that can be used to locate difficult veins: the IV-eye vein imager and the Vacuderm tourniquet. It discusses the patient factors that can increase the difficulty of vein assessment and location, and emphasises the importance of vessel health and preservation, and vein palpation. Practitioners should be experienced and skilled in the assessment of veins, and they are encouraged to revisit how they locate and assess veins.

  12. Hyperhomocysteinemia-induced upper extremity deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in a patient with methyltetrahydrofolate reductase mutation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin; Kolanuvada, Bangaruraju; Naik, Geetha; Zhang, Yingzhong; Zhao, Min; Sun, Lili; Alaie, Dariush; Petrillo, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    The study highlights pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis by methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency-related hyperhomocysteinemia occurring in rare locations of left veins superior to the heart extensively. A 59-year-old white man with history of leg pain, smoking, weight loss, benign prostatic hyperplasia, lipoma and panic attack presented with shortness of breath and chest pain for 2 days precipitated by not feeling well for months. The diagnostic workup revealed pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis in the left subclavian vein which extended throughout the left brachiocephalic vein to the superior vena cava and left jugular vein. Further workup showed moderate hyperhomocysteinemia with normal levels of vitamin B6, B12 and folic acid. Methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase genetic study found the patient to be homozygous for G677T variant. He was started on low-molecular-weight heparin and was discharged on oral anticoagulant. No recurrent thrombotic episodes were witnessed after 4 months of follow-up after discharge.

  13. Brachiocephalic Vein Stenting and Body-Floss Technique as a Treatment of CVD in Dialysis-Dependent Patient - Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Krycińska, Róża; Trznadel, Agata; Kuchalska, Paulina; Lis, Michał; Dołęga-Kozierowski, Bartosz; Dyś, Krzysztof; Drelichowski, Stanisław; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Given the increasing number of elderly hemodialysis-dependent patients with concomitant chronic diseases the successful creation and maintenance of reliable vascular access become a real challenge. In current literature central vein disease (CVD) is defined as at least 50% narrowing up to total occlusion of central veins of the thorax including superior vena cava (SVC), brachiocephalic (BCV), subclavian (SCV) and internal jugular vein (IJV). The incidence of CVD has been reported to be as high as 23% in the total dialysis population and 41% in those with access related complains. 61-year-old man has been admitted to the local radiology department with symptoms of the superior vena cava syndrome. The venography revealed occlusion of the right brachiocephalic vein. Due to Tortuosity and lack of stamp of right subclavian vein contributed to the decision to perform recanalization by "body floss" technique. In a further step we have performed PTA of obstructed vein segment using 7×40 mm balloon. Due to the presence of residual stenosis it was decided to implant two self - expanding stents 10×40 mm. After the procedure the patient was discharged in good condition and transferred to dialysis center. Main objective was the salvage of a functioning arteriovenous fistula. Performed endovascular intervention is a safe and effective approach to correct CVD for a short term. To ensure long lasting effects the patient will require enhanced follow-up and inevitable reinterventions. For that matter, prevention of CVD remains critical.

  14. Prospective comparison of arm veins and greater saphenous veins as infrageniculate bypass grafts.

    PubMed

    Brochado-Neto, F C; Albers, M; Pereira, C A; Gonzalez, J; Cinelli, M

    2001-08-01

    to compare arm and saphenous veins for infrageniculate bypass grafting. prospective non-randomised study. two hundred patients, of which 197 had ischaemic tissue loss or rest pain. two hundred and eleven infrageniculate vein bypass procedures using 176 greater saphenous veins and 35 arm veins. the cumulative primary graft patency rate at 1-month and 2 years was 80% and 61% for saphenous vein and 89% and 42% for arm vein. The corresponding rates for secondary patency were 84.5% and 68%, and 91% and 57%, respectively. These results corresponded to a relative risk of secondary failure of 1.53 (95% CI 0.71, 3.31) for arm vein grafts. In subgroup analyses, this estimate was 0.93 and 2.1 for primary vs secondary bypasses and 0.38 and 2.06 for single-vein vs spliced-vein bypasses. Among arm veins, cephalic vein grafts performed better than basilic vein grafts. Early mortality was 14% for arm vein and 10% for saphenous vein. in the setting of infrageniculate bypass grafting, arm vein grafts are not equivalent to greater saphenous vein grafts, but contribute importantly to a policy of using autologous veins. The possibility of equivalence remains for the arm vein graft that uses a cephalic vein or is a primary procedure. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Limited.

  15. Clumped-Isotope Thermometry of Carbonate Veins from the SAFOD Borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luetkemeyer, P. B.; Kirschner, D. L.; Huntington, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    We present clumped-isotope and stable-isotope data from carbonate veins obtained from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) borehole. A number of models proposed to explain the apparent weakness of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) require fluids to be present in the fault zone. However, little is known about the presence, source(s), temperature, and migration pathways of these fluids. We investigate spatial trends in isotopic composition of veins within meters of two actively deforming strands of the SAF - the southern deformation zone (SDZ) and central deformation zone (CDZ). Two populations of veins are present based on the isotopic data. The first group of veins with calcite δ18O values < +15 ‰ (VSMOW) and δ 13C values > +1 ‰ (VPDB) are present in foliated siltstone and shale cataclasites from 3186 to 3194 meters MD and in sheared siltstones and sandstones of the CDZ from 3297 to 3301 meters MD. Clumped-isotope analyses for a subset of samples from this vein set indicate temperatures between 72 and 99 °C and calculated pore fluid δ18O values of -3.4 to +0.1‰ (VSMOW). A second group of veins with δ18O values between +17 and +25 ‰ (VSMOW) and δ13C values between +1 and -18 (VPDB) is present in the serpentinite-bearing SDZ from 3196 to 3197 meters MD and in siltstones from 3302 to 3310 meters MD. Veins in the SDZ record temperatures from 80 to 118 °C and calculated pore fluid δ18O values of -0.3 to +3.1‰ (VSMOW). Both vein populations record temperatures less than or within uncertainty of present-day borehole temperature of ca. 120 °C. We propose the first group of veins formed by precipitating from fluids charged with soil CO2 or biogenic methane that flowed along preexisting diagenetic fracture networks or fractures formed early in the evolution of the SAF. The second group of veins precipitated from fluids charged with thermogenic methane near present-day ambient temperatures and localized in a ~50 meter wide zone of damage along the

  16. REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented Puncture for Re-Insertion of Dialysis Catheter in Nonpatent Central Veins (REBORN).

    PubMed

    Too, Chow Wei; Sayani, Raza; Lim, Elvin Yuan Ting; Leong, Sum; Gogna, Apoorva; Teo, Terence K

    2016-08-01

    To describe a technique involving REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented puncture for Re-insertion of dialysis catheter in Nonpatent central veins (REBORN) and to report long-term results. This is a retrospective study of ten subjects in whom dialysis catheters were inserted using the REBORN technique from March 2012 to October 2014 and followed up till April 2016. Data on the duration of catheter usage, complications and reasons for removal were obtained. Seven patients had partially occluded lower internal jugular veins (IJV) recanalised in an antegrade fashion via a more cranial puncture. The balloon was then inflated at usual puncture site with an 18G needle. The collapsed balloon was cannulated with a guide wire, and both balloon and guide wire were advanced together into the superior vena cava. This was followed by tunnelled catheter placement using standard techniques. Two patients had catheters placed in the subclavian vein using a similar antegrade technique, and one patient had catheter placed via the left IJV following retrograde recanalisation from a right femoral puncture. Mean duration of catheter use was 278 days (range 32-503). Three catheters were removed due to matured arteriovenous accesses. Four patients had successful catheter change over the same subcutaneous track due to catheter malfunction. One catheter was removed after 7 months because of sepsis. No complications were reported. The REBORN technique allows for the preservation of central veins for future haemodialysis access, which can be challenging in patients requiring long-term dialysis.

  17. Why Current Doppler Ultrasound Methodology Is Inaccurate in Assessing Cerebral Venous Return: The Alternative of the Ultrasonic Jugular Venous Pulse

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of cerebral venous return is growing interest for potential application in clinical practice. Doppler ultrasound (DUS) was used as a screening tool. However, three meta-analyses of qualitative DUS protocol demonstrate a big heterogeneity among studies. In an attempt to improve accuracy, several authors alternatively measured the flow rate, based on the product of the time average velocity with the cross-sectional area (CSA). However, also the quantification protocols lacked of the necessary accuracy. The reasons are as follows: (a) automatic measurement of the CSA assimilates the jugular to a circle, while it is elliptical; (b) the use of just a single CSA value in a pulsatile vessel is inaccurate; (c) time average velocity assessment can be applied only in laminar flow. Finally, the tutorial describes alternative ultrasound calculation of flow based on the Womersley method, which takes into account the variation of the jugular CSA overtime. In the near future, it will be possible to synchronize the electrocardiogram with the brain inflow (carotid distension wave) and with the outflow (jugular venous pulse) in order to nicely have a noninvasive ultrasound picture of the brain-heart axis. US jugular venous pulse may have potential use in neurovascular, neurocognitive, neurosensorial, and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27006525

  18. Perinatal autopsy findings in three cases of jugular lymphatic obstruction sequence and cardiac polyvalvular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Bendon, Robert; Asamoah, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Three infants with a prenatal diagnosis of Noonan's syndrome suffered fetal hydrops and immediate neonatal death. The infants all had the external appearance of jugular lymphatic obstruction sequence with wide-spaced nipples, redundant posterior nuchal skin, and edema of the dorsa of the feet and hands. All 3 demonstrated thick, redundant leaflets of all 4 cardiac valves, and 2 had a membranous ventricular septal defect. One female infant had a mutation of the PTPN11 gene. Two males had no common mutation of PTPN11. The males demonstrated other abnormalities in common, including small penis, testicular malformation, rosette-like appearance of the pituicytes, and an eosinophil infiltration of the pancreatic islets with islet cell hypertrophy. Detailed anatomy of cases of lymphatic obstruction sequence fetuses can be correlated with an increasing number of genetic mutations associated with Noonan's syndrome and related syndromes in mice and humans.

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery of glomus jugulare tumors: current concepts, recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sager, Omer; Dincoglan, Ferrat; Beyzadeoglu, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), a very highly focused form of therapeutic irradiation, has been widely recognized as a viable treatment option in the management of intracranial pathologies including benign tumors, malign tumors, vascular malformations and functional disorders. The applications of SRS are continuously expanding thanks to the ever-increasing advances and corresponding improvements in neuroimaging, radiation treatment techniques, equipment, treatment planning and delivery systems. In the context of glomus jugulare tumors (GJT), SRS is being more increasingly used both as the upfront management modality or as a complementary or salvage treatment option. As its safety and efficacy is being evident with compiling data from studies with longer follow-up durations, SRS appears to take the lead in the management of most patients with GJT. Herein, we address current concepts, recent advances and future perspectives in SRS of GJT in light of the literature.

  20. Commercialization of vein contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Deshmukh, Harshal; Vrancken, Carlos; Zhang, Yong; Zeman, Herbert D.; Weinberg, Devin

    2003-07-01

    An ongoing clinical study of an experimental infrared (IR) device, the Vein Contrast Enhancer (VCE) that visualizes surface veins for medical access, indicates that a commercial device with the performance of the existing VCE would have significant clinical utility for even a very skilled phlebotomist. A proof-of-principle prototype VCE device has now been designed and constructed that captures IR images of surface veins with a commercial CCD camera, transfers the images to a PC for real-time software image processing to enhance the vein contrast, and projects the enhanced images back onto the skin with a modified commercial LCD projector. The camera and projector are mounted on precision slides allowing for precise mechanical alignment of the two optical axes and for measuring the effects of axes misalignment. Precision alignment of the captured and projected images over the entire field-of-view is accomplished electronically by software adjustments of the translation, scaling, and rotation of the enhanced images before they are projected back onto the skin. This proof-of-principle prototype will be clinically tested and the experience gained will lead to the development of a commercial device, OnTarget!, that is compact, easy to use, and will visualize accessible veins in almost all subjects needing venipuncture.

  1. Modal dynamics in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers with elliptical veins.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Amit; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2005-08-08

    Modal characteristics of hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers with elliptical veins are studied by use of a recently proposed numerical method. The dynamic behavior of bandgap guided modes, as the wavelength and aspect ratio are varied, is shown to include zero-crossings of the birefringence, polarization dependent radiation losses, and deformation of the fundamental mode.

  2. Comparison of time to obtain intraosseous versus jugular venous catheterization on canine cadavers.

    PubMed

    Allukian, Alison R; Abelson, Amanda L; Babyak, Jonathan; Rozanski, Elizabeth A

    2017-09-01

    To compare the time required and the success rate of personnel with 4 different levels of experience to place a humeral intraosseous (IO) catheter versus a jugular venous catheter (IV) in cadaver dogs. Prospective study. Veterinary university teaching hospital. Canine cadavers from recently euthanized dogs were obtained from the cadaver donation program between May and December 2014. Catheter placers (CPs) with varying clinical experience, including a first year emergency and critical care resident, a senior emergency veterinary technician (VTS certified), a final year veterinary student, and an ACVECC diplomate, participated in the study. Each CP catheterized a total of 6 dogs so that there was a total of 6 IO and 6 IV catheters placed, by automatic rotary insertion device (with an EZ-IO gun) and vascular cut-down technique, respectively, for each CP. Time for IO catheterization and IV catheterization was recorded and compared. The success of IO catheterization and IV catheterization was verified by visualization of an injection of iodinated contrast material under fluoroscopy within the medullary cavity or vessel. Twenty-four canine cadavers. Outcomes were analyzed using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance. The median time for all IO catheterization operators was faster at 55.4 seconds (range 15.0-153.0 s) compared to the median time for all IV catherization operators at 217.3 seconds (range 55.6-614 s). The success rate for IO and IV was equal at 87.5%. IO catheterization using an automatic rotary insertion device was performed more rapidly and successfully than jugular venous catheterization using a cut-down technique in canine cadaver. These findings suggest IO catheterization may be more efficient for gaining vascular access in the appropriate emergency clinical situations when preexisting IV access does not exist. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  3. Point-of-Care Ultrasound for Jugular Venous Pressure Assessment: Live and Online Learning Compared.

    PubMed

    Socransky, Steve; Lang, Eddy; Bryce, Rhonda; Betz, Martin

    2017-06-08

    Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is a novel technique for the assessment of jugular venous pressure. Distance education may allow for efficient dissemination of this technique. We compared online learning to a live course for teaching ultrasonography jugular venous pressure (u-JVP) to determine if these teaching methods yielded different levels of comfort with and use of u-JVP. This was an interventional trial of Canadian emergency physicians who had taken a basic POCUS course. The participants were in one of three Groups: online learning (Group OL), live teaching (Group LT), control (Group C). Group LT participants also took an advanced course prior to the study that included instruction in u-JVP. The participants who took the basic course were randomized to Group OL or Group C. Group OL was subject to the intervention, online learning. Group C only received an article citation regarding u-JVP. Questionnaires were completed before and after the intervention. The primary outcome was physician self-reported use and comfort with the technique of u-JVP after online learning compared to live teaching. Of the 287 advanced course participants, 42 completed the questionnaires (Group LT). Of the 3303 basic course participants, 47 who were assigned to Group OL completed the questionnaires and 47 from Group C completed the questionnaires. Use of u-JVP increased significantly in Group OL (from 15% to 55%) and Group C (from 21% to 47%) with the intervention. The comfort with use did not differ between Group LT and Group OL (p=0.14). The frequency of use remained higher in Group LT than Group OL (p=0.07). Online learning increases the use and comfort with performing u-JVP for emergency physicians with prior POCUS experience. Although the comfort with use of u-JVP was similar in Groups LT and OL, online learning appears to yield levels of use that are less than those of a live course.

  4. Crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kristine M.

    1995-07-01

    Geodetic measurements of crustal deformation provide direct tests of geophysical models which are used to describe the dynamics of the Earth. Although geodetic observations have been made throughout history, only in the last several hundred years have they been sufficiently precise for geophysical studies. In the 19th century, these techniques included leveling and triangulation. Approximately 25 years ago, trilateration measurements were initiated by the USGS (United States Geological Survey) to monitor active faults in the United States. Several years later, NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) begin an effort to measure plate tectonic motions on a global scale, using space geodetic techniques, VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) and SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging). The period covered by this report to the IUGG, 1991-1994, was a transition period in the field of crustal deformation. Trilateration measurements (previously the backbone of measurements across plate boundaries in the western United States and Alaska) have been abandoned. This system was labor-intensive, involved highly trained crews to carry out the observations, and only measured the length between sites. In addition, NASA drastically cut the budgets for VLBI and SLR during this period. Fixed site VLBI systems are still operational, but mobile VLBI measurements in North America have ceased. SLR measurements continue on a global scale, but the remaining crustal deformation measurements are now being made with the Global Positioning System (GPS). Nonetheless, because of the time scales involved, older geodetic data (including leveling, triangulation, and trilateration) continue to be important for many geophysical studies.

  5. Laser therapy for leg veins.

    PubMed

    Kunishige, Joy H; Goldberg, Leonard H; Friedman, Paul M

    2007-01-01

    Visible veins on the leg are a common cosmetic concern affecting approximately 80% of women in the United States (Engel A, Johnson MI, Haynes SG. Health effects of sunlight exposure in the United States: results from the first national health and nutrition examination survey, 1971-1974. Arch Dermatol 1988;124:72-9). Without a quick and noninvasive treatment available, leg veins present a therapeutic challenge. This challenge has been tackled by the design of lasers with longer pulse durations, and the use of lasers with longer wavelengths and cooling devices. Recent studies show the efficacy of laser treatment beginning to approach that of sclerotherapy, the gold standard. This review outlines the principles guiding laser treatment, the current available options, and a clinically oriented approach to treating leg veins.

  6. Minimally invasive treatments for perforator vein insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Kuyumcu, Gokhan; Salazar, Gloria Maria; Prabhakar, Anand M; Ganguli, Suvranu

    2016-12-01

    Incompetent superficial veins are the most common cause of lower extremity superficial venous reflux and varicose veins; however, incompetent or insufficient perforator veins are the most common cause of recurrent varicose veins after treatment, often unrecognized. Perforator vein insufficiency can result in pain, skin changes, and skin ulcers, and often merit intervention. Minimally invasive treatments have replaced traditional surgical treatments for incompetent perforator veins. Current minimally invasive treatment options include ultrasound guided sclerotherapy (USGS) and endovascular thermal ablation (EVTA) with either laser or radiofrequency energy sources. Advantages and disadvantages of each modality and knowledge on these treatments are required to adequately address perforator venous disease.

  7. Minimally invasive treatments for perforator vein insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Gloria Maria; Prabhakar, Anand M.; Ganguli, Suvranu

    2016-01-01

    Incompetent superficial veins are the most common cause of lower extremity superficial venous reflux and varicose veins; however, incompetent or insufficient perforator veins are the most common cause of recurrent varicose veins after treatment, often unrecognized. Perforator vein insufficiency can result in pain, skin changes, and skin ulcers, and often merit intervention. Minimally invasive treatments have replaced traditional surgical treatments for incompetent perforator veins. Current minimally invasive treatment options include ultrasound guided sclerotherapy (USGS) and endovascular thermal ablation (EVTA) with either laser or radiofrequency energy sources. Advantages and disadvantages of each modality and knowledge on these treatments are required to adequately address perforator venous disease. PMID:28123979

  8. Compression of the right iliac vein in asymptomatic subjects and patients with iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Deng, Jun; Hu, Xiao M; Zhou, Wei M

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate right iliac vein and left iliac vein compression in asymptomatic subjects, right-sided and left-sided iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis patients. A retrospective analysis of records and computed tomography images was conducted in 200 asymptomatic subjects (male:female, 100:100). A prospective analysis was conducted in 79 consecutive deep vein thrombosis patients (left:right deep vein thrombosis, 47:32) who had undergone contrast-enhanced computed tomography examination. The minor diameter and percentage compression of the iliac vein were evaluated. In asymptomatic subjects, 13.5% had right iliac vein compression >50%, 2.0% had right iliac vein compression >70%, mean compression was 23.48%; 45.0% had left iliac vein compression >50% and 17.0% had left iliac vein compression >70%, mean compression was 47.58%. Right iliac vein sandwiched between the right external iliac artery and the right internal iliac artery was the most common compression pattern (59.26%). Males had higher right iliac vein compression than the females (male:female, 26.29%:20.68%, P < 0.001). Mean percentage compression of the right iliac vein was higher in right deep vein thrombosis patients than in left deep vein thrombosis patients (right:left deep vein thrombosis, 48.54%:22.29%, P < 0.001). Similar to left iliac vein compression, right iliac vein compression was a frequent imaging finding in CT and represented a normal anatomic pattern. Right deep vein thrombosis patients had more serious right iliac vein compression than left deep vein thrombosis patients, and further research is required on the association of right iliac vein compression with right iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Infrared imaging of subcutaneous veins.

    PubMed

    Zharov, Vladimir P; Ferguson, Scott; Eidt, John F; Howard, Paul C; Fink, Louis M; Waner, Milton

    2004-01-01

    Imaging of subcutaneous veins is important in many applications, such as gaining venous access and vascular surgery. Despite a long history of medical infrared (IR) photography and imaging, this technique is not widely used for this purpose. Here we revisited and explored the capability of near-IR imaging to visualize subcutaneous structures, with a focus on diagnostics of superficial veins. An IR device comprising a head-mounted IR LED array (880 nm), a small conventional CCD camera (Toshiba Ik-mui, Tokyo, Japan), virtual-reality optics, polarizers, filters, and diffusers was used in vivo to obtain images of different subcutaneous structures. The same device was used to estimate the IR image quality as a function of wavelength produced by a tunable xenon lamp-based monochrometer in the range of 500-1,000 nm and continuous-wave Nd:YAG (1.06 microm) and diode (805 nm) lasers. The various modes of optical illumination were compared in vivo. Contrast of the IR images in the reflectance mode was measured in the near-IR spectral range of 650-1,060 nm. Using the LED array, various IR images were obtained in vivo, including images of vein structure in a pigmented, fatty forearm, varicose leg veins, and vascular lesions of the tongue. Imaging in the near-IR range (880-930 nm) provides relatively good contrast of subcutaneous veins, underscoring its value for diagnosis. This technique has the potential for the diagnosis of varicose veins with a diameter of 0.5-2 mm at a depth of 1-3 mm, guidance of venous access, podiatry, phlebotomy, injection sclerotherapy, and control of laser interstitial therapy. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Leiomyosarcoma of the splenic vein.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Cristian; Socola, Francisco; Donet, Jean A; Gallastegui, Nicolas; Hernandez, Gabriel A

    2013-01-01

    Leiomyosarcomas arising from the wall of blood vessels are rare and aggressive neoplasm. We report a case of a previously healthy 66-year-old woman who presented with intermittent abdominal pain, progressive constipation, and weight loss. Abdominal computed tomography showed a 12 cm solid heterogeneous tumor in the tail of the pancreas. The patient subsequently underwent surgical resection of the pancreatic mass. Surprisingly, histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed leiomyosarcoma arising from the smooth muscle of the splenic vein. After surgery, she received adjuvant chemotherapy. One year later, there was no evidence of local recurrence. In this paper, we discuss the available information about leiomyosarcomas of splenic vein and its management.

  11. Grain Boundary Structure Control on Fluid Transport, Deformation Mechanisms and Fabrics in Calcite Deformed at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy White, Joseph; Molli, Giancarlo; Kennedy, Lori A.

    2010-05-01

    Limestones from the Tuscan Nappe sequence, northern Apennines, Italy, have been deformed during crustal thickening at temperatures less than 250°C. As part of this deformation, bedding-parallel shear zones have formed within two distinct protoliths: (1) very fine-grained (< 5μm) micritic calcite (with some veins) that comprises the host material and (2) initially coarse-grained vein calcite. Evolution of the shear zones produced extreme grain size reduction in the vein calcite such that at high strains, the grain size distribution and microstructure of host micrite and deformed vein calcite is essentially the same. Although vein calcite in the micrite experiences similar microstructural changes to that of the vein hosted shear zone, indicative of similar deformation conditions, the grain size of the deformed micrite is comparable or slightly larger than the starting material. In terms of the mechanical and microstructural changes, the variation in initial grain size would, at first blush, be the dominating factor. Although, in the end-state, the two initially distinct calcites are microstructurally similar, they none the less exhibit contrasting crystallographic fabrics and chemical signatures. The micrite shear zone, despite a well-developed SPO, exhibits no CPO, while the vein-hosted shear zone has an intense CPO irrespective of SPO development. Likewise, micrite shear zones exhibit extreme Sr depletion relative to adjacent undeformed layers. Throughout the evolution of the shear zones, grain boundaries in each calcite type exhibit, and maintain, contrasting structures. Micrite grain boundaries are heavily decorated with voids and tubules indicative of fluid transport and interaction; this can explain the selective chemical depletion in these shear zones, and inferred activity of grain-size-sensitive flow processes. In contradistinction to the micrite, recrystallized vein calcite has ‘tight', clean grain boundaries effectively bereft of inclusions. The latter

  12. Diagnostic value of color doppler ultrasonography in detecting stenosis and occlusion of central veins in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rad, Masoud Pezeshki; Kazemzadeh, Gholam Hosain; Ziaee, Masood; Azarkar, Ghodsieh

    2015-03-01

    Venography is an invasive diagnostic test that uses contrast material that provides a picture of the condition of the veins. But, complications, including adverse effects on the kidney, do occur. On the other hand, with the current technological development, application of ultrasound in the diagnosis of obstructive diseases of the veins is gaining popularity, being non-invasive, easy to perform and cost-effective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of Doppler sonography in the diagnosis of central vein stenosis. In this descriptive-analytical study, 41 hemodialysis patients who had been referred for 50 upper limb venographies to the radiology department of Imam Reza (AS) were included. Patients with chronic kidney disease with a history of catheterization of the vein, jugular or subclavian, and who had established fistulas or synthetic vascular grafts were targeted. Central venous ultrasound was performed on both sides to evaluate stenosis or occlusion. Venography was performed by the radiologist the next day or the day before hemodialysis. Data on demographic characteristics, findings of clinical examination and findings of ultrasound as well as venography were recorded by using the SPSS software, Chi-square test and Spearman correlation, and Kappa agreement was calculated for sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Twenty-three (56%) patients were male subjects and 18 patients (44%) were female. Twenty-three (56%) patients of the study population were aged <60 years and 18 (43/9%) patients were aged >60 years. The overall sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value and negative predictive value of Doppler sonography in the proximal veins in hemodialysis patients compared with venography were, respectively, 80.9%, 79.3%, 73.9% and 85.1%. Color Doppler sonography, as a non-invasive method, could be a good alternative for venography in the assessment of the upper limb with central vein stenosis and occlusion.

  13. An Anatomical Study of the Middle Temporal Vein and the Drainage Vascular Networks to Assess the Potential Complications and the Preventive Maneuver During Temporal Augmentation Using Both Anterograde and Retrograde Injections.

    PubMed

    Tansatit, Tanvaa; Apinuntrum, Prawit; Phetudom, Thavorn

    2015-10-01

    Non-thrombotic pulmonary embolism has recently been reported as a remote complication of filler injections to correct hollowing in the temporal region. The middle temporal vein (MTV) has been identified as being highly susceptible to accidental injection. The anatomy and tributaries of the MTV were investigated in six soft embalmed cadavers. The MTV was cannulated and injected in both anterograde and retrograde directions in ten additional cadavers using saline and black filler, respectively. The course and tributaries of the MTV were described. Regarding the infusion experiment, manual injection of saline was easily infused into the MTV toward the internal jugular vein, resulting in continuous flow of saline drainage. This revealed a direct channel from the MTV to the internal jugular vein. Assessment of a preventive maneuver during filler injections was effectively performed by pressing at the preauricular venous confluent point against the zygomatic process. Sudden retardation of saline flow from the drainage tube situated in the internal jugular vein was observed when the preauricular confluent point was compressed. Injection of black gel filler into the MTV and the tributaries through the cannulated tube directed toward the eye proved difficult. The mechanism of venous filler emboli in a clinical setting occurs when the MTV is accidentally cannulated. The filler emboli follow the anterograde venous blood stream to the pulmonary artery causing non-thrombotic pulmonary embolism. Pressing of the pretragal confluent point is strongly recommended during temporal injection to help prevent filler complications, but does not totally eliminate complication occurrence. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each submission to which Evidence-Based Medicine rankings are applicable. This excludes Review Articles, Book Reviews, and manuscripts that concern Basic Science, Animal Studies, Cadaver Studies, and Experimental Studies. For a full

  14. Extrahepatic Portal Vein Obstruction and Portal Vein Thrombosis in Special Situations: Need for a New Classification

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Zeeshan A.; Bhat, Riyaz A.; Bhadoria, Ajeet S.; Maiwall, Rakhi

    2015-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction is a vascular disorder of liver, which results in obstruction and cavernomatous transformation of portal vein with or without the involvement of intrahepatic portal vein, splenic vein, or superior mesenteric vein. Portal vein obstruction due to chronic liver disease, neoplasm, or postsurgery is a separate entity and is not the same as extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. Patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction are generally young and belong mostly to Asian countries. It is therefore very important to define portal vein thrombosis as acute or chronic from management point of view. Portal vein thrombosis in certain situations such as liver transplant and postsurgical/liver transplant period is an evolving area and needs extensive research. There is a need for a new classification, which includes all areas of the entity. In the current review, the most recent literature of extrahepatic portal vein obstruction is reviewed and summarized. PMID:26021771

  15. Close-up View of Homestake Vein

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-07

    This close-up view of a mineral vein called Homestake comes from the microscopic imager on NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity; the vein is found to be rich in calcium and sulfur, possibly the calcium-sulfate mineral gypsum.

  16. Varicose veins - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... veins do you perform? Sclerotherapy? Heat ablation or laser ablation? Vein stripping? Questions to ask about different ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  17. Angiosarcoma of common iliac vein

    PubMed Central

    Ibis, Kamuran; Usta, Ufuk; Cosar, Rusen; Ibis, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare malignant tumour of endothelial cells. Primary angiosarcoma of venous origin is extremely rare, and has a very poor prognosis. A 63-year-old woman with retroperitoneal mass underwent en bloc resection on a part of iliac vein followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. No recurrence was detected during 3 years of follow-up. PMID:25596292

  18. Varicose veins and venous insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevent more serious problems. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your provider if: Varicose veins are painful. They get worse or do not improve with self-care, such as by wearing compression stockings or avoiding standing or sitting for too ...

  19. How Are Varicose Veins Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... be given medicine to temporarily put you to sleep so you don't feel any pain during the procedure. Vein stripping and ligation usually is done as an outpatient procedure. The recovery time from the procedure is about 1 to ...

  20. A breakthrough technique for the removal of a hemodialysis catheter stuck in the central vein: endoluminal balloon dilatation of the stuck catheter.

    PubMed

    Hong, Joon Ho

    2011-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) catheters can get stuck in the central vein after long-term use and their removal might become difficult especially in patients with fibrosed or occluded central veins. Herein, a breakthrough technique is reported for the easy removal of a stuck HD catheter from the central vein. Attempts were made to remove a tunneled double-lumen HD catheter from the central vein of a 74-year-old woman, only to find that the catheter was stuck. The patient was transferred to the operating room and a skin incision was made in the neck and the subcutaneous portion of the HD catheter was retrieved from the tunnel. Under fluoroscopy, a guide wire was inserted into one lumen of the HD catheter and advanced into the right atrium beyond the catheter tip. A 5 mm × 4 cm balloon angioplasty catheter was then inserted into the HD catheter lumen over the guide wire and advanced into the jugular vein junction of the HD catheter around the thoracic inlet. The balloon was inflated to its maximum dimension and pressure. This endoluminal dilatation of the HD catheter was continued by deflating the balloon and then pushing the angioplasty catheter 4 cm at a time towards the tip of the HD catheter in the right atrium. After a second balloon angioplasty catheter of 6 mm × 4 cm was used to expand the entire segment of the other lumen, the HD catheter was pulled out easily from the central vein without any resistance. The endoluminal balloon dilatation of the HD catheter not only separates the stuck HD catheter from the adherent vein by breaking the adhesions between them, but also expands the vein simultaneously, thus enabling easy removal of the HD catheter.

  1. One-step reconstruction of the right inferior hepatic veins using auto-venous grafts in living-donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Toru; Shirabe, Ken; Yoshiya, Shohei; Soejima, Yuji; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Toshima, Takeo; Motomura, Takashi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2013-07-01

    Reconstruction of the right inferior hepatic vein (RIHV) presents a major technical challenge in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) using right lobe grafts. We studied 47 right lobe LDLT grafts with RIHV revascularization, comparing one-step reconstruction, performed post-May 2007 (n = 16), with direct anastomosis, performed pre-May 2007 (n = 31). In the one-step reconstruction technique, the internal jugular vein (n = 6), explanted portal vein (n = 5), inferior vena cava (n = 3), and shunt vessels (n = 2) were used as venous patch grafts for unifying the right hepatic vein, RIHVs, and middle hepatic vein tributaries. By 6 months after LDLT, there was no case of occlusion of the reconstructed RIHVs in the one-step reconstruction group, but a cumulative occlusion rate of 18.2 % in the direct anastomosis group. One-step reconstruction required a longer cold ischemic time (182 ± 40 vs. 115 ± 63, p < 0.001) and these patients had higher alanine transaminase values (142 ± 79 vs. 96 ± 46 IU/L, p = 0.024) on postoperative day POD 7. However, the 6-month short-term graft survival rates were 100 % with one-step reconstruction and 83.9 % with direct anastomosis, respectively. One-step reconstruction of the RIHVs using auto-venous grafts is an easy and feasible technique promoting successful right lobe LDLT.

  2. Surgical Access to Jejunal Veins for Local Thrombolysis and Stent Placement in Portal Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, Frank; Esch, Jan Schulte am; Hammerschlag, Sascha; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Fuerst, Guenter

    2008-07-15

    Portal vein thrombosis is an infrequent entity, which may cause high morbidity and mortality. We report a case of portal vein thrombosis due to benign stenosis following partial pancreatoduodenectomy with segmental replacement of the portal vein by a Gore-tex graft. Using a surgical access to jenunal veins, local thrombolysis, mechanical fragmentation of thrombus, and stent placement were successfully performed.

  3. phenoVein-A Tool for Leaf Vein Segmentation and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Jonas; Rishmawi, Louai; Pflugfelder, Daniel; Huber, Gregor; Scharr, Hanno; Hülskamp, Martin; Koornneef, Maarten; Schurr, Ulrich; Jahnke, Siegfried

    2015-12-01

    Precise measurements of leaf vein traits are an important aspect of plant phenotyping for ecological and genetic research. Here, we present a powerful and user-friendly image analysis tool named phenoVein. It is dedicated to automated segmenting and analyzing of leaf veins in images acquired with different imaging modalities (microscope, macrophotography, etc.), including options for comfortable manual correction. Advanced image filtering emphasizes veins from the background and compensates for local brightness inhomogeneities. The most important traits being calculated are total vein length, vein density, piecewise vein lengths and widths, areole area, and skeleton graph statistics, like the number of branching or ending points. For the determination of vein widths, a model-based vein edge estimation approach has been implemented. Validation was performed for the measurement of vein length, vein width, and vein density of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), proving the reliability of phenoVein. We demonstrate the power of phenoVein on a set of previously described vein structure mutants of Arabidopsis (hemivenata, ondulata3, and asymmetric leaves2-101) compared with wild-type accessions Columbia-0 and Landsberg erecta-0. phenoVein is freely available as open-source software.

  4. Jugular venous 'a' wave in dilated cardiomyopathy: sign of abbreviated right ventricular filling time.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C H; Xiao, H B; Gibson, D G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the mechanisms underlying the high venous pressure often seen in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. DESIGN--Retrospective and prospective examination of the pattern of flow in the superior vena cava, cardiac echo-Doppler studies, and recordings of the jugular venous pulse. SETTING--A tertiary referral cardiac centre. PATIENTS PARTICIPANTS--23 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, all with functional mitral and tricuspid regurgitation. RESULTS--Two patterns of venous pulse were seen: a dominant 'a' wave and 'x' descent, with systolic flow in the superior vena cava (group 1, n = 11), and a dominant 'v' wave with 'y' descent and diastolic flow in the superior vena cava (group 2, n = 12). A comparison of group 1 and group 2 showed: age (mean (SD] 58 (12) v 61 (6) years, left ventricular end diastolic dimension 7.0 (0.7) cm in both groups, right ventricular short axis 3.3 (0.6) v 3.6 (0.5) cm and long axis 7.3 (0.5) v 7.1 (0.7) cm, and duration of tricuspid regurgitation 350 (65) v 370 (50) ms. The RR interval (550 (100) v 680 (80) ms) and right ventricular filling time (150 (30) v 290 (50) ms) were significantly shorter in group 1. In all patients in group 2 right ventricular filling time was more than 200 ms with separate E and A waves on the tricuspid Doppler echocardiogram, while in all group 1 patients it was less than 200 ms with a single summation peak. In nine patients in group 1, the right ventricular filling time was limited by prolonged tricuspid regurgitation and in the remaining two by prolonged isovolumic relaxation time (215 (80) ms), so that it was consistently significantly less than that of the left ventricle. CONCLUSION--In patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, right ventricular filling time may be so short that it limits stroke volume. Such patients can be recognised by a dominant 'a' wave on the jugular venous pulse. Patients in whom the right ventricular filling time was longer showed a dominant 'v' wave. Both groups can

  5. Necrotizing Fasciitis on the Right Side of the Neck with Internal Jugular Vein Thrombophlebitis and Septic Emboli: A Case of Lemierre’s-Like Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    NGUYEN, Dang; YAACOB, Yazmin; HAMID, Hamzaini; MUDA, Sobri

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre’s syndrome (LS) is a rare life-threatening infective condition typically starting with an oropharyngeal infection causing thrombophlebitis and metastatic abscesses. The most common aetiology of LS is Fusobacterium necrophorum; however, it can also occur after infection with other organisms. LS mainly affects young healthy adults. The initial infection site can be in the head and neck or in the abdomen. The morbidity rate of this disease is high despite aggressive treatments. In this article, we report a 63-year-old male patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, presenting with Klebsiella pneumoniae infection-induced necrotizing fasciitis on the right side of the neck, leading to LS. PMID:24643401

  6. Crack - seal veins - what we learnt since the seminal work of John Ramsay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Bons, Paul D.

    2017-04-01

    In the nineteen-eighties, John Ramsay and co-workers have laid the basis for much of our current understanding of tectonic veins, by proposing that tectonic veins accrete in many small increments of cracking and sealing, making the link to cyclic stress and fluid pressure cycles and the earthquake cycle, and by proposing that fibrous veins track the opening trajectory, which has created a toolbox to analyse progressive deformation in rocks. They recognised syntaxial and antitaxial veins, which grow depending on the composition of the wall rock and the vein. Following on these seminal contributions, advances in analysing the microstructure and chemical signature in crack-seal veins made a lot of progress, facilitated by the rapid increase in micro analytical tools like cathodeluminescence and EBSD. Initial modelling of crystal growth in crack- seal veins provided an explanation of how crystals become fibrous without being deformed and explained how fibres sometimes do and sometimes don't follow the opening trajectory. This was followed by numerical models of crystal growth to study the development of crystal facets after larger crack increments, and experimental study of the sealing dynamics of syntaxial veins. These models were initially kinematic, using the ELLE microdynamic simulation package, and more recently incorporating the physics of the growing interface using the Phase Field method, which now allows 3D simulation of both syntaxial and antitaxial veins and can simultaneously compute the evolving permeability of the crack using Lattice Boltzmann techniques. Parallel to these developments we developed an understanding of the strength of the vein cement, and, using Discrete Element Techniques, explored the effects of differences of the strength of the vein and its adhesion to the wall rock on fracture patterns in crack-seal systems in changing stress fields. This presentation will review these developments, showing how the ideas of John Ramsay inspired follow

  7. Genesis of Syntectonic Hydrothermal Veins in the Igneous Rock of Teschenite Association (Outer Western Carpathians, Czech Republic): Growth Mechanism and Origin of Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urubek, Tomáš; Dolníček, Zdeněk; Kropáč, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal mineralization hosted by the Lower Cretaceous igneous rock of the teschenite association at Jasenice (Silesian Unit, Flysch Belt, Outer Western Carpathians) occurs in two morphological types - irregular vein filled by granular calcite and regular composite vein formed by both fibrous and granular calcite and minor chlorite, quartz, and pyrite. Crosscutting evidence indicates that the granular veins are younger than the composite vein. The composite vein was formed by two mechanisms at different times. The arrangement of solid inclusions in the marginal fibrous zone suggests an episodic growth by the crack-seal mechanism during syntectonic deformation which was at least partially driven by tectonic suction pump during some stages of the Alpine Orogeny. Both the central part of the composite vein and monomineral veins developed in a brittle regime. In these cases, the textures of vein suggest the flow of fluids along an open fracture. The parent fluids of both types of vein are characterized by low temperatures (Th=66-163 °C), low salinities (0.4 to 3.4 wt. % NaCl eq.), low content of strong REE-complexing ligands, and δ18O and δ13C ranges of + 0.2/+12.5 %. SMOW and -11.8/-14.1 %. PDB, respectively. The parent fluids are interpreted as the results of mixing of residual seawater and diagenetic waters produced by dewatering of clay minerals in the associ-ated flysch sediments. The flow of fluids was controlled by tectonic deformation of the host rock.

  8. Bunionette deformity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bruce E; Nicholson, Christopher W

    2007-05-01

    The bunionette, or tailor's bunion, is a lateral prominence of the fifth metatarsal head. Most commonly, bunionettes are the result of a widened 4-5 intermetatarsal angle with associated varus of the metatarsophalangeal joint. When symptomatic, these deformities often respond to nonsurgical treatment methods, such as wider shoes and padding techniques. When these methods are unsuccessful, surgical treatment is based on preoperative radiographs and associated lesions, such as hyperkeratoses. In rare situations, a simple lateral eminence resection is appropriate; however, the risk of recurrence or overresection is high with this technique. Patients with a lateral bow to the fifth metatarsal are treated with a distal chevron-type osteotomy. A widened 4-5 intermetatarsal angle often requires a diaphyseal osteotomy for correction.

  9. Use of autogenous saphenous vein as a conduit for mesenterico-left portal vein bypass.

    PubMed

    Query, Julie A; Sandler, Anthony D; Sharp, William J

    2007-06-01

    The authors describe a case of extrahepatic portal vein (EHPV) thrombosis and portal hypertension treated with a variant of mesenterico-left portal vein bypass (MLPVB) or Rex shunt. In this case, a segment of autogenous greater saphenous vein was used to bridge the distance between the left gastric vein inflow and the left portal vein. Use of such nontraditional conduit in similar circumstances may expand the application of portal revascularization/decompression procedures in treating these patients.

  10. Fire in the vein: Heroin acidity and its proximal effect on users' health.

    PubMed

    Ciccarone, Daniel; Harris, Magdalena

    2015-11-01

    The loss of functioning veins (venous sclerosis) is a root cause of suffering for long-term heroin injectors. In addition to perpetual frustration and loss of pleasure/esteem, venous sclerosis leads to myriad medical consequences including skin infections, for example, abscess, and possibly elevated HIV/HCV risks due to injection into larger jugular and femoral veins. The etiology of venous sclerosis is unknown and users' perceptions of cause/meaning unexplored. This commentary stems from our hypothesis that venous sclerosis is causally related to heroin acidity, which varies by heroin source-form and preparation. We report pilot study data on first ever in vivo measurements of heroin pH and as well as qualitative data on users' concerns and perceptions regarding the caustic nature of heroin and its effects. Heroin pH testing in natural settings is feasible and a useful tool for further research. Our preliminary findings, for example, that different heroin source-forms and preparations have a two log difference in acidity, have potentially broad, vital and readily implementable harm reduction implications.

  11. Fire in the vein: Heroin acidity and its proximal effect on users’ health

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarone, Daniel; Harris, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The loss of functioning veins (venous sclerosis) is a root cause of suffering for long-term heroin injectors. In addition to perpetual frustration and loss of pleasure/esteem, venous sclerosis leads to myriad medical consequences including skin infections, for example, abscess, and possibly elevated HIV/HCV risks due to injection into larger jugular and femoral veins. The etiology of venous sclerosis is unknown and users’ perceptions of cause/meaning unexplored. This commentary stems from our hypothesis that venous sclerosis is causally related to heroin acidity, which varies by heroin source-form and preparation. We report pilot study data on first ever in vivo measurements of heroin pH and as well as qualitative data on users’ concerns and perceptions regarding the caustic nature of heroin and its effects. Heroin pH testing in natural settings is feasible and a useful tool for further research. Our preliminary findings, for example, that different heroin source-forms and preparations have a two log difference in acidity, have potentially broad, vital and readily implementable harm reduction implications. PMID:26077143

  12. Lemierre Syndrome of the Femoral Vein, Related to Fusobacterium necrophorum Abscess of Vastus Lateralis.

    PubMed

    Yombi, Jean-Cyr; Bogaert, Tom; Tribak, Karim; Danse, Etienne

    2016-04-01

    Lemierre syndrome is an uncommon, potentially lethal disorder combining acute oropharyngeal infection caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, with jugular vein suppurative thrombosis, complicated by anaerobic sepsis with secondary multiple metastatic abscesses. Optimal treatment outcome with reduced or absence of sequelae can be achieved with early diagnosis. We present a clinical case of Fusobacterium necrophorum abscess complicated with femoral vein thrombosis, called atypical localization of Lemierre syndrome. This uncommon disease was diagnosed on the basis of clinical, biological, and imaging tests, with a favorable outcome, after a well-orientated antibiotic and surgical course of therapy. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Since its first description in 1936, Lemierre syndrome has been reported in locations other than its initial oropharyngeal site. Because optimal treatment outcome is dependent on early diagnosis, it is imperative for emergency physicians to be aware of this uncommon disease, because in many instances they are the patient's initial point of contact with medical care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Recurrence of superficial vein thrombosis in patients with varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Karathanos, Christos; Spanos, Konstantinos; Saleptsis, Vassileios; Tsezou, Aspasia; Kyriakou, Despina; Giannoukas, Athanasios D

    2016-08-01

    To investigate which factors other than history of superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) are associated with recurrent spontaneous SVT episodes in patients with varicose veins (VVs). Patients with a history of spontaneous SVT and VVs were followed up for a mean period of 55 months. Demographics, comorbidities, and thrombophilia screening test were analyzed. Patients were grouped according to the clinical-etiology-anatomy-pathophysiology classification. A multiple logistic regression analysis with the forward likelihood ratio method was undertaken. Thirteen patients out of 97 had a recurrence SVT episode during the follow-up period. All those patients were identified to have a thrombophilia defect. Protein C and S, antithrombin, and plasminogen deficiencies were more frequently present in patients without recurrence. Gene mutations were present in 38% in the nonrecurrence group and 77% in the recurrence group. After logistic regression analysis, patients with dislipidemia and mutation in prothrombin G20210A (FII) had an increased risk for recurrence by 5.4-fold and 4.6-fold, respectively. No deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism occurred. Dislipidemia and gene mutations of F II are associated with SVT recurrence in patients with VVs. A selection of patients may benefit from anticoagulation in the short term and from VVs intervention in the long term. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Preduodenal portal vein: surgery and radiographic appearance.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, E T; Burton, E M; Hixson, S D; Hollabaugh, R S

    1990-12-01

    Preduodenal portal vein is rare, with 63 cases reported in the literature. In general, this anomaly occurs in children with associated small bowel obstruction. We report a newborn infant who presented with duodenal stenosis, mongolism, and preduodenal portal vein. Treatment consisted of a duodenoduodenal anastomosis without mobilizing the portal vein. The correlation between imaging techniques and the operative findings is discussed. Because identification of preduodenal portal vein at surgery is important, preoperative sonography may be useful in selected cases to define the position of the vein.

  15. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Masquerading as Jugular Foramen Paraganglioma: A Role for Novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Wiggins, Richard H; Gurgel, Richard K

    2017-08-01

    To describe a case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) masquerading as a jugular foramen paraganglioma (JP). To compare imaging findings between skull base metastatic RCC and histologically proven paraganglioma. A case of unexpected metastatic skull base RCC is reviewed. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared between 3 confirmed cases of JP and our case of metastatic RCC. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) sequences and computed apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were compared between these entities. A 55-year-old man presents with what appears clinically and radiographically to be JP. The tumor was resected, then discovered on postoperative pathology to be metastatic RCC. Imaging was retrospectively compared between 3 histologically confirmed cases of JP and our case of skull base RCC. The RCC metastasis was indistinguishable from JP on CT and traditional MRI but distinct by ADC values calculated from DW-MRI. Metastatic RCC at the skull base may mimic the clinical presentation and radiographic appearance of JP. The MRI finding of flow voids is seen in both paraganglioma and metastatic RCC. Diffusion-weighted MRI is able to distinguish these entities, highlighting its potential utility in distinguishing skull base lesions.

  16. Evaluation of a Jugular Venipuncture Alpaca Model to Teach the Technique of Blood Sampling in Adult Alpacas.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Marjolaine; Beauchamp, Guy; Nichols, Sylvain

    2017-05-23

    The effectiveness of teaching aids in veterinary medical education is not often assessed rigorously. The objective in the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a commercially available jugular venipuncture alpaca model as a complementary tool to teach veterinary students how to perform venipuncture in adult alpacas. We hypothesized that practicing on the model would allow veterinary students to draw blood in alpacas more rapidly with fewer attempts than students without previous practice on the model. Thirty-six third-year veterinary students were enrolled and randomly allocated to the model (group M; n=18) or the control group (group C; n=18). The venipuncture technique was taught to all students on day 0. Students in group M practiced on the model on day 2. On day 5, an evaluator blinded to group allocation evaluated the students' venipuncture skills during a practical examination using live alpacas. Success was defined as the aspiration of a 6-ml sample of blood. Measured outcomes included number of attempts required to achieve success (success score), total procedural time, and overall qualitative score. Success scores, total procedural time, and overall scores did not differ between groups. Use of restless alpacas reduced performance. The jugular venipuncture alpaca model failed to improve jugular venipuncture skills in this student population. Lack of movement represents a significant weakness of this training model.

  17. Importance of preserved periosteum around jugular foramen neurinomas for functional outcome of lower cranial nerves: anatomic and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Sutiono, Agung Budi; Kawase, Takeshi; Tabuse, Masanao; Kitamura, Yohei; Arifin, Muh Zafrullah; Horiguchi, Takashi; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2011-12-01

    Surgical removal of jugular foramen (JF) neurinomas remains controversial because of their radicality in relation to periosteal sheath structures. To clarify the particular meningeal structures of the JF with the aim of helping to eliminate surgical complications of the lower cranial nerves (LCNs). We sectioned 6 JFs and examined histological sections using Masson trichrome stain. A consecutive series of 25 patients with JF neurinomas was also analyzed, and the MIB-1 index of each excised tumor was determined. In the JF, meningeal dura disappeared at the nerve entrance, forming a jugular pocket. JF neurinomas were classified into 4 types: subarachnoid (type A by the Samii classification), foraminal (type B), epidural (type C), and episubdural (type D). After an average follow-up of 9.2 years, tumors recurred in 9 cases (36%). Type A tumors did not show regrowth, unlike type B tumors, in which all recurred. Radical surgery by the modified Fisch approach did not contribute to tumor radicality in type C and D tumors, even in cases in which LCN function was sacrificed. In preserved periosteum, postoperative LCN deterioration was decreased. Bivariate correlation analysis revealed that jugular pocket extension, tumor removal, MIB-1 greater than 3%, and reoperation or gamma knife use were significant recurrence factors. For LCN preservation, the periosteal layer covering the cranial nerves must be left intact except in patients with a subarachnoid tumor. To prevent tumor regrowth, postoperative gamma knife treatment is recommended in tumors with an MIB-1 greater than 3%.

  18. Renal transplantation with iliac vein transposition.

    PubMed

    Molmenti, E P; Varkarakis, I M; Pinto, P; Tiburi, M F; Bluebond-Langner, R; Komotar, R; Montgomery, R A; Jarrett, T; Kavoussi, L R; Ratner, L E

    2004-11-01

    We evaluated a technique for implantation of right kidneys with short renal veins without the need for venous reconstruction. The technique of iliac vein transposition was performed in six recipients who received right kidneys with short renal veins. Two cases were living related donors, two were living unrelated, one was an autotransplant, and one was a cadaver kidney recipient. The common and external iliac veins and arteries of the recipient were thoroughly mobilized, allowing for the lateral transposition of the external iliac vein with respect to the external iliac artery. The renal vessels were subsequently implanted in an end to side fashion onto the corresponding transposed external iliac vessels. After implantation, the iliac vein remained lateral with respect to the iliac artery. The technique described allows for the implantation of right kidneys without the need for venous reconstruction. Such an approach is especially useful in cases of grafts with short veins.

  19. Management of varicose veins and venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Allen

    2012-12-26

    Chronic venous disease, reviewed herein, is manifested by a spectrum of signs and symptoms, including cosmetic spider veins, asymptomatic varicosities, large painful varicose veins, edema, hyperpigmentation and lipodermatosclerosis of skin, and ulceration. However, there is no definitive stepwise progression from spider veins to ulcers and, in fact, severe skin complications of varicose veins, even when extensive, are not guaranteed. Treatment options range from conservative (eg, medications, compression stockings, lifestyle changes) to minimally invasive (eg, sclerotherapy or endoluminal ablation), invasive (surgical techniques), and hybrid (combination of ≥1 therapies). Ms L, a 68-year-old woman with varicose veins, is presented. She has had vein problems over the course of her life. Her varicose veins recurred after initial treatment, and she is now seeking guidance regarding her current treatment options.

  20. Mortality after portal vein embolization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eung Chang; Park, Sang-Jae; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Hyeong Min; Lee, Seung Duk; Kim, Seong Hoon; Lee, In Joon; Kim, Hyun Beom

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Portal vein embolization (PVE) is increasingly performed worldwide to reduce the possibility of liver failure after extended hepatectomy, by inducing future liver remnant (FLR) hypertrophy and atrophy of the liver planned for resection. The procedure is known to be very safe and to have few procedure-related complications. In this study, we described 2 elderly patients with Bismuth–Corlette type IV Klatskin tumor who underwent right trisectional PVE involving the embolization of the right portal vein, the left medial sectional portal branch, and caudate portal vein. Within 1 week after PVE, patients went into sepsis combined with bile leak and died within 1 month. Sepsis can cause acute liver failure in patients with chronic liver disease. In this study, the common patient characteristics other than sepsis, that is, trisectional PVE; chronic alcoholism; aged >65 years; heart-related comorbidity; and elevated serum total bilirubin (TB) level (7.0 mg/dL) at the time of the PVE procedure in 1 patient, and concurrent biliary procedure, that is, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in the other patient might have affected the outcomes of PVE. These cases highlight that PVE is not a safe procedure. Care should be taken to minimize the occurrence of infectious events because sepsis following PVE can cause acute liver failure. Additionally, prior to performing PVE, the extent of PVE, chronic alcohol consumption, age, comorbidity, long-lasting jaundice, concurrent biliary procedure, etc. should be considered for patient safety. PMID:28178122

  1. The importance of fracture-healing on the deformation of fluid-filled layered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vass, Anna; Koehn, Daniel; Toussaint, Renaud; Ghani, Irfan; Piazolo, Sandra

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the fracturing-healing-refracturing cycle is a fundamental part of studying the deformation dynamics and the permeability evolution of rock systems. Previous studies, however, have not examined the influence of healing i.e. fracture-closure through vein formation and the mechanical properties of the "healed" fractures (veins) on the rock deformation. We present results from a two-dimensional coupled hydro-mechanical model which simulates large time and spatial scale dynamic fracturing and healing of a porous medium under the influence of gravity, tectonic stretching and elevated fluid pressures. Our results show that healing decreases the local porosity, and that the veins' strength is more important than their elastic modulus in influencing the deformation and the evolving patterns. Hard veins make the aggregate progressively stronger, results in an overall healing of the system, limited fracturing and thus fluid flow, greater stresses and delayed fracture saturation. Weak veins make the system weaker in which refracturing of the healed bonds is the dominant process that creates more open fractures and thus increases the permeability. These results provide clues for the importance of the veins' mechanical properties and can enhance our understanding of the deformation dynamics and the permeability evolution of the rock systems.

  2. Vein and artery growth after anastomosis with vascular closure staple clips vs interrupted polypropylene suture: application in pediatric vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Calles-Vázquez, M del Carmen; Viguera, Francisco Javier; Sun, Fei; Usón, Jesús M; Usón, Jesús

    2005-09-01

    Alternatives are still being sought in vascular surgery to address the problem of arrested growth after anastomosis in growing vessels, and opinions differ widely regarding the most suitable technique. This study compared vascular growth and permeability after anastomosis using the latest-generation vascular closure staple (VCS) system and the conventional suture technique to ascertain which approach yielded better results. Thirty 55-day-old lambs underwent end-to-end anastomosis of the carotid artery and jugular vein. Serial ultrasonography and angiography were carried out over the ensuing 6-month growth period, after which lambs were euthanized. Both VCS clips and polypropylene suture allowed longitudinal and transverse vessel growth; however, longitudinal growth was significantly greater in clip-closed vessels than in either sutured or untreated vessels. The results obtained for vascular growth and permeability suggest that VCS clips may provide a suitable alternative to conventional suture in pediatric vascular surgery.

  3. Deformation and Fluid Flow in the Etendeka Plateau, NW Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Eric; Koehn, Daniel; Passchier, Cees; Davis, Jennifer; Salvona, Aron; Chung, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We studied deformation bands in sandstone and breccia veins in overlying basalts of the Etendeka Plateau, NW Namibia, regarding their development and history of fluid flow within. The studied deformation bands can be divided into disaggregation bands and cataclastic bands. The former appear to develop in unsorted sandstone, whereas the latter form in well sorted sandstone. We estimated the porosity of the bands and host rock in thin sections using a simple image analysis software (ImageJ). Results show, that no or only a minor decrease in porosity occur in disaggregation bands, while the porosity in cataclastic bands is decreased by up to 82 % with respect to the host rock. These observations are in agreement with results of existing studies (e.g. Fossen et al., 2007). Hence the cataclastic bands form a seal to fluid flow in the host rock, yet it is observed in outcrops that deformation bands can develop into open fractures which in turn increase the permeability of the rock. Breccia veins in the overlying basalts show intense fracturing where the basalt is locally fractured into elongated chips. Mineral precipitation in these breccia veins indicates a hydrothermal origin of the fluids since the precipitates consist of extremely fine-grained quartz aggregates. Secondary mineralization with large crystals indicates that a long-lived fluid circulation through tubular networks was active at a later stage, which eventually sealed the veins completely. We propose that the Etendeka basalts on top of the sandstone formation produced a localized deformation along deformation bands and heated up fluid below the lavas. At a later stage fluid pressures were either high enough to break through the basalt or fracturing due to ongoing extension produced fluid pathways. References Fossen, H., Schultz, R., Shipton, Z. and Mair, K. (2007). Deformation bands in sandstone: a review. J. Geol. Soc., 164, 755-769.

  4. Vein harvesting and techniques for infrainguinal bypass.

    PubMed

    Albäck, Anders; Saarinen, Eva; Venermo, Maarit

    2016-04-01

    In order to achieve good long term results after bypass surgery, alongside with good inflow and outflow arteries, the bypass graft material also has an important role. The best patency and limb salvage rates are achieved with autologous vein. If great saphenous vein is not available, acceptable long-term results can be achieved with arm veins and lesser saphenous vein. The quality and size of the vein are important. A small-caliber vein, increased wall thickness, postphlebitic changes and varicosities are associated with a risk of early failure. Preoperative vein mapping with ultrasound reduces readmissions and postoperative surgical site infections. During the mapping, the vein to be used and its main tributaries are marked with a permanent marker pen. To reduce wound complication rates we recommend bridged incisions in vein harvesting. Endoscopic vein harvesting seems to have no benefit compared to open techniques in lower limb bypasses, and has been associated with higher risk of primary patency loss at one year. With deep tunneling of the graft the problems caused by wound infection can be avoided.

  5. The umbilical and paraumbilical veins of man.

    PubMed

    Martin, B F; Tudor, R G

    1980-03-01

    During its transit through the umbilicus structural changes occur in the thick wall of the extra-abdominal segment of the umbilical vein whereby the components of the intra-abdominal segment acquire an essentially longitudinal direction and become arranged in fibro-elastic and fibro-muscular zones. The vein lumen becomes largely obliterated by asymmetrical proliferation of loose subendothelial conective tissue. The latter forms a new inner zone within which a small segment of the lumen persists in an eccentric position. This residual lumen transmits blood to the portal system from paraumbilical and systemic sources, and is retained in the upper part of the vein, even in old age. A similar process of lumen closure is observed in the ductus venosus. In early childhood the lower third of the vein undergoes breakdown, with fatty infiltration, resulting in its complete division into vascular fibro-elastic strands, and in old age some breakdown occurs in the outermost part of the wall of the upper two thirds. The paraumbilical veins are thick-walled and of similar structure to the umbilical vein. Together they constitute an accessory portal system which is confined between the layers of the falciform ligament and is in communication with the veins of the ventral abdominal wall. The constituents form an ascending series, namely, Burow's veins, the umbilical vein, and Sappey's inferior and superior veins. The main channel of Sappey's inferior veins may be the remnant of the right umbilical vein since it communicates with the right rectus sheath and often communicates directly with the portal system within the right lobe of the liver. The results are of significance in relation to clinical usage of the umbilical vein.

  6. More great saphenous vein valves - less varicose veins?

    PubMed

    Gräub, Anna-Barbara; Naef, Markus; Wagner, Hans E; Mouton, Wolfgang G

    2014-07-01

    In patients with chronic venous disease (CVD) the number of venous valves and the degree of valve deterioration have not been extensively investigated and are poorly understood. The aim of this prospective study was to quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the venous valves in CVD patients in view of their clinical classification. Within two years a consecutive series of 152 patients (223 limbs) undergoing primary surgery for great saphenous vein varicose veins was investigated. In all patients the 'C' class according to the basic CEAP-classification was registered preoperatively (C2 to C6) for each limb. Both the quantity and quality of venous valves were assessed in the GSV's after removal. Qualitative evaluation of the valves was based on macroscopic appearance using a classification from 0 to 5 and described as 'valve disease class'. A negative correlation between age and the number of valves was detected (p = 0.0035). There was an increase of C-class with increasing age. No significant correlation between the average number of valves per meter and the C-class was detected. For all C-classes an average of between four and five valves per meter was counted. Valve disease class was positively correlated with the C-class although the valve disease class was never higher than the C-class (p < 0.05). The valve disease class of the great saphenous vein correlates with the C-class of the CEAP-classification. The number of valves did not correlate with the 'C'-class. With each increase in the CEAP class the age increased as well.

  7. Mixed brittle-plastic deformation behaviour in a slate belt. Examples from the High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintubin, Manuel; van Baelen, Hervé; van Noten, Koen; Muchez, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    In the High-Ardenne slate belt, part of the Rhenohercynian external fold-and-thrust belt at the northern extremity of the Late Palaeozoic Variscan orogen (Belgium, Germany, France), particular quartz vein occurrences can be observed in predominantly fine-grained siliciclastic metasediments. Detailed structural, petrographical and geochemical studies has revealed that these vein occurrences can be related to a mixed brittle-plastic deformation behaviour in a low-grade metamorphic mid-crustal environment. The first type of quartz veins are bedding-perpendicular, lens-shaped extension veins that are confined to the sandstone layers within the multilayer sequence. Fluid inclusion studies demonstrate high fluid pressures suggesting that the individual sandstone bodies acted as isolated high-pressure compartments in an overpressured basin. Hydraulic fracturing occurred during the tectonic inversion (from extension to compression) in the earliest stages of the Variscan orogeny. The vein fill shows a blocky character indicating crystal growth in open cavities. Both the typical lens shape of the veins and the subsequent cuspate-lobate folding of the bed interfaces in between the quartz veins suggest plastic deformation of cohesionless fluid-filled fissures. Metamorphic grade of the host rock and fluid temperature and pressure clearly indicates mid-crustal conditions below the brittle-plastic transition. This first type of quartz veins exemplifies mixed brittle-plastic deformation behaviour, possibly related to a transient deepening of the brittle-plastic transition. This is in contrast with contemporaneous bedding-perpendicular crack-seal veins observed in higher - upper-crustal - structural levels in the slate belt, reflecting pure brittle deformation behaviour. The second type are discordant quartz veins confined to extensional low-angle detachment shear zones. These very irregular veins transect a pre-existing pervasive cleavage fabric. They show no matching walls and

  8. Retrograde femoral vein catheter insertion. A new approach for challenging hemodialysis vascular access.

    PubMed

    Gouda, Zaghloul

    2014-01-01

    Venous catheters provide access for hemodialysis (HD) when patients do not have functioning access device. Obstruction of jugular, femoral or even external iliac vessels further depletes options. Subclavian approach is prohibited. Catheterization of inferior vena cava requires specialized equipment and skills. The purpose is to assess a new lifesaving HD vascular access approach for patients with nonfunctioning access device in the ordinary sites. This entails insertion of a retrograde temporary HD catheter in the superficial femoral vein, directing the catheter distally, toward the foot. We included six end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients retrospectively who are on regular renal replacement therapy and need urgent HD with nonfunctioning access device in the ordinary sites. Successful insertion of six retrograde femoral vein catheters in the superficial femoral vein. The mean catheter days were 2.5±0.5 days with one patient having 26 catheter days. The mean blood pump speed was 230.0±44.7 mL/min. Urea reduction ratio and Kt/V at 3 hours HD session were 47% and 1.5, respectively, which increased with increasing session duration. The ultrafiltration volume was 2-3 L/session which increased up to 6 L/session in case of using slow low-efficiency dialysis. No major complications were observed during insertion or the postinsertion period except thigh pain in one patient and exit site infection in the case of long duration. This is a newly applied lifesaving HD vascular access approach for selected ESRD patients with no available HD vascular access at the ordinary sites with accepted HD adequacy. It needs more evaluation and more studies.

  9. Sinter-vein correlations at Buckskin Mountain, National district, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vikre, P.G.

    2007-01-01

    in veins and sinter. Acid-sulfate fluid of the second fluid regime was derived from oxidation of H2S and other volatiles exsolved from sinter-vein fluid. Acid-sulfate fluid produced (1) a subhorizontal zone of partially leached basinal deposits and rhyolite from the paleosurface to a depth of ???60 m, and (2) laterally pervasive zones, ???100 to 200 m thick, of quartz + alunite ?? hematite and quartz + kaolinite + pyrite in volcaniclastic deposits immediately beneath partially leached rocks, but this fluid did not decompose selenide-sulfide-precious metal phases in sinter. Paragenetically late vein and wall-rock assemblages, including marcasite + pyrite, calcite, and kaolinite-replaced K minerals, record deeper transition of sinter-vein fluid into acid-sulfate fluid in vein conduits. This transition occurred as regional subsidence, manifested by the Goosey Lake depression immediately east of Buckskin Mountain, lowered the pieziometric surface at Buckskin Mountain, terminated sinter deposition, and caused boiling and/or degassing of sinter-vein fluid. The timing of subsidence is recorded by a decrease in alunite ages, from ca. 15.8 to 15.6 Ma, with depth below sinter. Lateral replacement of sinter and partially leached epiclastic deposits and rhyolite by opal-A marks the termination of the two hydrothermal regimes that lasted ???0.5 m.y. and followed rhyolitic volcanism of similar duration. Veins and sinter display textures that attest to plastic deformation, spalling, and gravitational settling, and indicate fluid-flow direction, velocity, and density stratification which, with conduit topology, may have influenced precious metal tenor in the veins. Components of sinter and veins were transported as colloids, formed in supersaturated sinter-vein fluid, that aggregated or coagulated as incompetent gelatinous layers in shallow pools and in underlying, near-vertical conduits in rhyolite and initially crystallized as opal and chalcedony. The low thermal conductivity of

  10. Continuous deformation versus episodic deformation at high stress - the microstructural record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepmann, C. A.; Stöckhert, B.

    2009-04-01

    The microstructural record of continuous high stress deformation is compared to that of episodic high stress deformation on two examples: 1. Folding of quartz veins in metagreywacke from Pacheco Pass, California, undergoing deformation by dissolution precipitation creep at temperatures of 300 ± 50°C. The microfabric of the folded quartz veins indicates deformation by dislocation creep accompanied by subgrain rotation. The small recrystallized grain size of ~8±6 µm in average implies relatively high differential stresses of a few hundred MPa. The stress concentration in the vein is due to a high contrast in effective viscosities between the single phase material and the polyphase fine-grained host metagreywacke deforming by dissolution precipitation creep. Smoothly curved, but generally not sutured, grain boundaries as well as the small size and a relatively high dislocation density of recrystallized grains suggest that strain-induced grain boundary migration was of minor importance. This is suspected to be a consequence of low strain gradients, which are due to the relative rates of dynamic recovery and continuous dislocation production during climb-controlled creep, at high stress and the given low temperature. Subgrain rotation recrystallization is thus proposed to be characteristic for continuous deformation at high differential stress. 2. Episodic deformation in the middle crust at the tip of a seismic active fault zone. The microfabric of mid-crustal rocks exhumed in tectonically active regions can record episodic high stress deformation at the base of the seismogenic layer. The quartz veins from St. Paul la Roche in the Massif Central, France, are very coarse grained. On the scale of a thin section they are basically single crystalline. However, they show a very heterogeneous microstructure with a system of healed microcracks that are decorated by subgrains and more rarely by small recrystallized grains. Undulating deformation lamellae that do not show a

  11. Brittle-viscous deformation, slow slip, and tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, Åke; Hillary, Graeme W. B.; Diener, Johann F. A.

    2014-06-01

    Geophysical observations have illuminated a spectrum of fault slip styles from continuous aseismic sliding to fast earthquake slip. We study exhumed intercalated lenses of oceanic crust and sedimentary rocks, deformed to high shear strains. Deformation was partitioned between fractured, rigid blocks, with lengths of tens to hundreds of meters, and surrounding metapelites characterized by interconnected phyllosilicate networks. Under inferred conditions of low effective stress at temperatures > 500°C, locally and transiently elevated shear strain rate in phyllosilicates deforming by dislocation creep can reach those needed for transient slow slip. Concurrently, increased matrix strain rate likely stimulates brittle failure in rigid lenses. The ubiquitous presence of quartz veins and microfractures within rigid material provides evidence for brittle deformation occurring coincident with viscous shearing flow. We suggest that geophysically observed tremor and slow slip may be a manifestation of strain partitioning, where deformation is accommodated viscously in a matrix enveloping rigid lenses.

  12. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for glomus jugulare tumors: a single-center series of 75 cases.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ramez; Ammori, Mohannad B; Yianni, John; Grainger, Alison; Rowe, Jeremy; Radatz, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Glomus jugulare tumors are rare indolent tumors that frequently involve the lower cranial nerves (CNs). Complete resection can be difficult and associated with lower CN injury. Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has established its role as a noninvasive alternative treatment option for these often formidable lesions. The authors aimed to review their experience at the National Centre for Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Sheffield, United Kingdom, specifically the long-term tumor control rate and complications of GKRS for these lesions. METHODS Clinical and radiological data were retrospectively reviewed for patients treated between March 1994 and December 2010. Data were available for 75 patients harboring 76 tumors. The tumors in 3 patients were treated in 2 stages. Familial and/or hereditary history was noted in 12 patients, 2 of whom had catecholamine-secreting and/or active tumors. Gamma Knife radiosurgery was the primary treatment modality in 47 patients (63%). The median age at the time of treatment was 55 years. The median tumor volume was 7 cm(3), and the median radiosurgical dose to the tumor margin was 18 Gy (range 12-25 Gy). The median duration of radiological follow-up was 51.5 months (range 12-230 months), and the median clinical follow-up was 38.5 months (range 6-223 months). RESULTS The overall tumor control rate was 93.4% with low CN morbidity. Improvement of preexisting deficits was noted in 15 patients (20%). A stationary clinical course and no progression of symptoms were noted in 48 patients (64%). Twelve patients (16%) had new symptoms or progression of their preexisting symptoms. The Kaplan-Meier actuarial tumor control rate was 92.2% at 5 years and 86.3% at 10 years. CONCLUSIONS Gamma Knife radiosurgery offers a risk-versus-benefit treatment option with very low CN morbidity and stable long-term results.

  13. Clinical spectrum of patients with erosion of the inner ear by jugular bulb abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, David R; Le, B Thuy; Pramanik, Bidyut K; Lalwani, Anil K

    2010-02-01

    Anatomic variants of the jugular bulb (JB) are common; however, abnormalities such as large high riding JB and JB diverticulum (JBD) are uncommon. Rarely, the abnormal JB may erode into the inner ear. The goal of our study is to report a large series of patients with symptomatic JB erosion into the inner ear. Retrospective review in an academic medical center. Eleven patients with JB abnormality eroding into the inner ear were identified on computed tomography (CT) scan of the temporal bone. Age at presentation was from 5 years to 82 years with six males and five females. The large JB or JBD eroded into the vestibular aqueduct (n = 9) or the posterior semicircular canal (n = 4). The official radiology report usually identified the JB abnormality; however, erosion into these structures by the JB was not mentioned in all but one case. All patients were symptomatic with five having conductive hearing loss (CHL) and three complaining of pulsatile tinnitus. Those with pulsatile tinnitus and four of five with CHL had erosion into the vestibular aqueduct. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) findings in three of six patients were consistent with dehiscence of the inner ear. High riding large JB or JBD can erode into the inner ear and may be associated with CHL and/or pulsatile tinnitus. CT scan is diagnostic and should be examined specifically for these lesions. As patients with pulsatile tinnitus may initially undergo a magnetic resonance imaging scan, identification of JB abnormality should prompt CT scan or VEMP testing to evaluate for inner ear erosion.

  14. Gold Veins near Great Falls, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, John Calvin; Reed, John C.

    1969-01-01

    Small deposits of native gold are present along an anastomosing system of quartz veins and shear zones just east of Great Falls, Montgomery County, Md. The deposits were discovered in 1861 and were worked sporadically until 1951, yielding more than 5,000 ounces of gold. The vein system and the principal veins within it strike a few degrees west of north, at an appreciable angle to foliation and fold axial planes in enclosing rocks of the Wissahickon Formation of late Precambrian (?) age. The veins cut granitic rocks of Devonian or pre-Devonian age and may be as young as Triassic. Further development of the deposits is unlikely under present economic conditions because of their generally low gold content and because much of the vein system lies on park property, but study of the Great Falls vein system may be useful in the search for similar deposits elsewhere in the Appalachian Piedmont.

  15. Preduodenal portal vein: its surgical significance.

    PubMed

    Makey, D A; Bowen, J C

    1978-11-01

    Preduodenal portal vein is a rare anatomical variant which may be one of many anomalies in the neonate with duodenal "atresia." Preduodenal portal vein also may be an occasional finding in an adult undergoing biliary, gastric, or pancreatic surgery. Awareness and recognition of the anomaly are essential for the avoidance of injury during such operations. We report here a symptomless patient whose preduodenal portal vein was discovered at cholecystectomy.

  16. Tension vein arrays in progressive strain: complex but predictable architecture, and major hosts of ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, W. P.

    2004-06-01

    Most en échelon vein arrays are extensional and can be termed tension vein arrays (TVAs). TVAs in major fault and shear zones (FSZs) are subject to progressive deformation. This deforms the initial TVA (whose geometry is well documented in the literature), via discrete stages; first into progressively more complex architecture, involving folding of the tension veins, then into progressively more simple architecture, ultimately forming pipes. During this progression the TVA axis (new definition) rotates within the shear plane from normal, to parallel, to the displacement vector. The deforming TVA axis has simpler geometry than the complex tension veins, and it can be employed to precisely track the deformation state of the FSZ, its displacement vector, and shear sense, through all the strain stages. Five structural-metasomatic stages are defined by discrete steps in the strain evolution. TVAs are difficult to recognise, and are under-recognised, in ore systems for a number of inherent geological reasons. Orebodies founded on dilation form parallel to the TVA axis, which is also parallel to dilational jogs in the parent FSZ. Orebodies formed early in the FSZ history are normal to the displacement vector, and in progressive shear rotate with the TVA axis toward the displacement vector; orebodies formed late in the FSZ history overprint apparently complex to 'chaotic' vein stockwork, which nevertheless has analysable geometry. TVA-hosted orebodies are not necessarily parallel to the displacement vector of the host FSZ, but occupy elongate orientations over a 90° range within the FSZ. Large orebodies are favourably developed in TVAs in unfoliated FSZs (type 1 shear zones), which may form fluid 'superhighways'. Type 1 shear zones form in predictable circumstances involving particularly host rocktype and crustal position. Strike-slip FSZs possess a downdip TVA axis and are especially able to tap deep crustal fluid. TVA-hosted orebodies form a major deposit style

  17. The small saphenous vein and other 'neglected' veins of the popliteal fossa: a review.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, T F; Iafrati, M D

    2007-01-01

    The small saphenous vein (SSV) and other veins in the popliteal fossa merit little discussion in the literature or in didactic programmes regarding their role in chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and, in this sense, they are neglected. The purpose of this review is to present both duplex ultrasound findings and the associated clinical characteristics of patients with SSV reflux, from several large series. Both the anatomic variations and the epidemiology of the SSV, as well as other veins of the popliteal fossa, the gastrocnemius veins, Gocamini vein, popliteal area veins and popliteal vein, will be discussed. Findings from our review of the current available literature will demonstrate the important role that these veins play in association with CVI. The implications for open and endovenous surgery will be underlined.

  18. Tissue remodeling investigation in varicose veins

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderian, Sayyed Mohammad Hossein; Khodaii, Zohreh

    2012-01-01

    Although the etiology of varicose veins remains unknown, recent studies have focused on endothelial cell integrity and function because the endothelium regulates vessel tone and synthesizes many pro- and anti-inflammatory factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the evidence involving the endothelium in the development of varicose vein disease. In addition, tissue remodeling was investigated in varicose veins to determine the expression of different types of collagen. Tissue specimens of superficial varicose veins and control saphenous vein were used for immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscope (TEM). α-smooth muscle actin, and collagen I, III, IV antibodies were applied for immunohistochemical investigation. Findings of this study showed alterations of the intima, such as focal intimal discontinuity and denudation of endothelium; and the media, such as irregular arrangements of smooth muscle cells and collagen fibres in varicose veins. Our findings showed some changes in terms of distribution of types I, III and IV collagen in the intima and media of varicose vein walls compared with controls. These alterations to the media suggest that the pathological abnormality in varicose veins may be due to the loss of muscle tone as a result of the breakup of its regular structure by the collagen fibres. These findings only described some changes in terms of distribution of these types of collagen in the intima and media of varicose vein walls which may result in venous wall dysfunction in varicosis. PMID:24551759

  19. Small hepatic veins Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riggio, Oliviero; Marzano, Chiara; Papa, Alessia; Pasquale, Chiara; Gasperini, Maria Ludovica; Gigante, Antonietta; Valla, Dominique Charles; Plessier, Aurélie; Amoroso, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by hepatic venous outflow obstruction at any level from the small hepatic veins to the atrio-caval junction, in the absence of heart failure or constrictive pericarditis. Various imaging modalities are available for investigating the gross hepatic vascular anatomy but there are rare forms of this disease where the obstruction is limited to the small intrahepatic veins, with normal appearance of the large hepatic veins at imaging. In this cases only a liver biopsy can demonstrate the presence of a small vessels outflow block. We report two cases of small hepatic veins Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  20. Microstructural observations on hydrothermal veins of Site U1414, IODP Expedition 344 (CRISP 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstätter, Jennifer; Kurz, Walter; Rogowitz, Anna

    2017-04-01

    The erosive active margin offshore Osa Peninsula (Costa Rica) is characterized by the subducting Cocos Plate with its topographic height, the aseismic Cocos Ridge, which has lifted the seismogenic zone in the reach of scientific drilling. To understand the processes occurring in the subducting Cocos Plate in the vicinity to the Middle America Trench, we investigated microstructures in hydrothermal veins, transecting the lithified sediments and the igneous basement of IODP Hole U-1414A. Mechanical e-twinning occurred mainly in the blocky calcite veins in the lithified sediments, rather than in the fibrous calcite veins within the Cocos Ridge basalt. The differential stress, obtained from two different piezometers, indicate mean differential stresses of approximately 53 and 82 MPa. The majority of the twins show a significant thickness (up to 120 µm), straight twin boundaries and are indicative for deformation temperatures between 150 to 300°C. The presence of additional deformation structures, such as undulose extinction and subgrain boundaries, indicates intracrystalline-plastic deformation by dislocation creep. The comparison of the EBSD data from two samples within the lithified sedimentary unit indicates diverse deformation temperatures. Variation in subgrain size observed for the different samples can be related to local variations in differential stress. The results of different microstructural observations showed, that the deformational history of Site 344-U1414 is characterized by distinct tectonic phases, occurring during the movement of the Cocos Ridge from its location of origin (the Galapagos hotspot) to the convergent margin offshore Costa Rica. The causes for these changes in deformation mechanisms in the studied rocks are ascribed to magmatic advection resulting in an increase of temperature and decrease of critical resolved shear stresses, as well as the bending of the Cocos plate adjacent to the Middle American trench.

  1. Remodelling of the Superior Caval Vein After Angioplasty in an Infant with Superior Caval Vein Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Mert, Murat Saltik, Levent; Gunay, Ilhan

    2004-08-15

    An 8-month old girl was presented with superior caval vein syndrome early after cardiac surgery. Angiography showed severe stenosis of the superior caval vein with 50 mmHg pressure gradient. Following balloon angioplasty, the pressure gradient was reduced to 7 mmHg with some residual stenosis of the superior caval vein. When the patient was reevaluated 5 months after the procedure, angiography revealed a normal diameter of the superior caval vein without a pressure gradient.

  2. Clinically silent deep vein thrombosis in patients with superficial thrombophlebitis and varicose veins at legs.

    PubMed

    Jerkic, Zoran; Karic, Alen; Karic, Amela

    2009-01-01

    Although superficial thrombophlebitis is a common disorder until recently it was considered as benign disorder. Also it is associated with varicose vein at legs and it was treated effectively with conservative methods, walking and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs. Aims of our investigation were: determine frequency of clinically silent deep vein thrombosis at legs in patient with and without superficial thrombophlebitis, determine correlation between superficial thrombophlebitis and deep vein thrombosis regardless of localization of superficial thrombophlebitis in superficial veins of legs and determine adequacy and safety vein phlebography in early diagnosis clinically silent deep vein thrombosis in patients with superficial thrombophlebitis. Using flebography in prospective study was evaluated incidence of clinically silent deep vein thrombosis in 92 patients with varicose veins at legs. By phlebograpy in patients with varicose veins at legs and superficial thrombophlebitis at legs and without clinical signs of DVT at legs of the 49 patients we detected DVT in 12 patients (24, 48%), in three male and nine female. We detected localization of DVT in ilijacofemoral junction in 4,08% patients, although localization of DVT in femoropopliteal region was observed in 6, 12% patients and localization in crural region was in 14.28% patients. Localization of DVT at legs was detected in iliac vein in 16.66% patients, in femoral vein in 25% patients, popliteal vein 8.33% patients, anterior tibial vein 16.66%, posterior tibial vein in 25% and crural veins 8.33% patients. Also we deduced significant difference between two group of patients (chi2 = 10, 76). Such result proves thesis that in most patients with superficial thrombophlebitis and varicose veins is possibility of developing of DVT.

  3. FDG-PET/CT Enables the Detection of Recurrent Same-Site Deep Vein Thrombosis by Illuminating Recently Formed, Neutrophil-Rich Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Tetsuya; Truelove, Jessica; Tawakol, Ahmed; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Hucker, William J.; MacNabb, Megan H.; Brownell, Anna-Liisa; Jokivarsi, Kimmo; Kessinger, Chase W.; Jaff, Michael R.; Henke, Peter K.; Weissleder, Ralph; Jaffer, Farouc A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate detection of recurrent same-site deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a challenging clinical problem. As DVT formation and resolution are associated with a preponderance of inflammatory cells, we investigated whether noninvasive 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET imaging could identify inflamed, recently formed thrombi and thereby improve the diagnosis of recurrent DVT. Methods and Results We established a stasis-induced DVT model in murine jugular veins and also a novel model of recurrent stasis DVT in mice. C57BL/6 mice (n=35) underwent ligation of the jugular vein to induce stasis DVT. FDG-PET/CT was performed at DVT timepoints of day 2, 4, 7, 14, or 2+16 (same-site recurrent DVT at day 2 overlying a primary DVT at day 16). Antibody-based neutrophil depletion was performed in a subset of mice prior to DVT formation and FDG-PET/CT. In a clinical study, 38 patients with lower extremity DVT or controls undergoing FDG-PET were analyzed. Stasis DVT demonstrated that the highest FDG signal occurred at day 2, followed by a time-dependent decrease (p<0.05). Histological analyses demonstrated that thrombus neutrophils (p<0.01), but not macrophages, correlated with thrombus PET signal intensity. Neutrophil depletion decreased FDG signals in day 2 DVT compared to controls (p=0.03). Recurrent DVT demonstrated significantly higher FDG uptake than organized day 14 DVT (p=0.03). The FDG DVT signal in patients also exhibited a time-dependent decrease (p<0.01). Conclusions Noninvasive FDG-PET/CT identifies neutrophil-dependent thrombus inflammation in murine DVT, and demonstrates a time-dependent signal decrease in both murine and clinical DVT. FDG-PET/CT may offer a molecular imaging strategy to accurately diagnose recurrent DVT. PMID:25070665

  4. Delphi Method Validation of a Procedural Performance Checklist for Insertion of an Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Central Line.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Nicholas; Wittler, Mary; Askew, Kim; Manthey, David

    2016-01-01

    Placement of ultrasound-guided central lines is a critical skill for physicians in several specialties. Improving the quality of care delivered surrounding this procedure demands rigorous measurement of competency, and validated tools to assess performance are essential. Using the iterative, modified Delphi technique and experts in multiple disciplines across the United States, the study team created a 30-item checklist designed to assess competency in the placement of ultrasound-guided internal jugular central lines. Cronbach α was .94, indicating an excellent degree of internal consistency. Further validation of this checklist will require its implementation in simulated and clinical environments.

  5. Ultrasound strain elastography in assessment of cortical mechanical behavior in acute renal vein occlusion: in vivo animal model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; He, Wen; Cheng, Ling-Gang; Li, Xiao-Ya; Zhang, Xiou-Ru; Juluru, Krishna; Al Khori, Noor; Coya, Adrienne; Min, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To assess the correlation of quantitative ultrasound strain parameters with the severity of cortical edema in renal vein occlusion, we prospectively performed ultrasound strain elastography on a canine acute renal vein occlusion model prior to and following 10, 20, and 40min of renal vein ligation. Strain and strain relaxation time representing the deformation and relaxation of the renal cortices and reference soft tissue were produced by the external compression with the ultrasound transducer and estimated using commercially available 2-D speckle tracking software. Cortical thickness was additionally measured. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the difference in cortical thickness, strain ratio (mean cortical strain divided by mean reference tissue strain), and strain relaxation time ratio (cortical relaxation time divided by reference tissue relaxation time) prior to and after renal vein ligation. Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied to test the relationship between strain parameters and the time of the renal vein ligation. There was a strong positive correlation between the duration of renal vein ligation and strain (R(2)=0.97) and strain relaxation time (R(2)=0.98) ratios. Significant differences in strain and strain relaxation time ratios were found at all measured timepoints (all P≪.001). Cortical thickness, however, showed no significant difference between timepoints (P=.065). Our result suggest that strain and strain relaxation time ratios may be used as quantitative markers for the assessment of the renal cortical mechanical behavior in subclinical acute renal vein occlusion.

  6. Jugular venous `a' wave in pulmonary hypertension: new insights from a Doppler echocardiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Stojnic, Bojan B; Brecker, Stephen J D; Xiao, Han B; Gibson, Derek G

    1992-01-01

    Objective—To study the mechanisms underlying the dominant `a' wave seen in patients with primary pulmonary hypertension. Design—Retrospective and prospective examination of the jugular venous pulse recording, flow in the superior vena cava, and Doppler echocardiographic studies. Setting—A tertiary referral centre for both cardiac and pulmonary disease, with facilities for invasive and noninvasive investigation, and assessment for heart and heart-lung transplantation. Patients—12 patients with primary pulmonary hypertension, most being considered for heart-lung transplantation. Results—Two distinct patterns of venous pulse and superior vena caval flow were identified: a dominant `a' wave with no `v' wave, an absent or poorly developed `y' descent, and exclusively systolic downward flow in the superior vena cava (group 1, n = 8), and a dominant `v' wave, deep `y' descent and exclusively diastolic downward flow in the superior vena cava (group 2, n = 4). A comparison between the two groups showed age (mean (SD)) 42 (18) ν 36 (7) years, RR interval 700 (65) ν 740 (240) ms, left ventricular end diastolic dimension 3·6 (0·8) ν 3·2 (1·0) cm and end systolic dimension 2·1 (0·5) ν 2·3 (0·3) cm, right ventricular end diastolic dimension 2·6 (0·5) ν 2·8 (0·6) cm, and pressure drop between right ventricle and right atrium 60 (8) ν 70 (34) mm Hg to be similar. Duration of tricuspid regurgitation 520 (30) ν 420 (130) ms and the time interval of pulmonary closure to the end of the tricuspid regurgitant signal 140 (30) ν 110 (40) ms were longer in group 1 compared with group 2, whereas right ventricular filling time was much shorter 180 (70) ν 350 (130) ms. In seven patients from group 1, a single peak of forward tricuspid flow was present, but this pattern was seen in only one patient from group 2. Conclusions—In patients with primary pulmonary hypertension, the apparent `a' wave seen in the venous pulse is, in fact, a summation wave. It is

  7. Gamma Knife surgery for patients with jugular foramen schwannomas: a multiinstitutional retrospective study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Toshinori; Kato, Takenori; Kida, Yoshihisa; Sasaki, Ayaka; Iwai, Yoshiyasu; Kondoh, Takeshi; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Sato, Manabu; Sato, Mitsuya; Nagano, Osamu; Nakaya, Kotaro; Nakazaki, Kiyoshi; Kano, Tadashige; Hasui, Koichi; Nagatomo, Yasushi; Yasuda, Soichiro; Moriki, Akihito; Serizawa, Toru; Osano, Seiki; Inoue, Akira

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to explore the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery in patients with jugular foramen schwannomas (JFSs). METHODS This study was a multiinstitutional retrospective analysis of 117 patients with JFSs who were treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) at 18 medical centers of the Japan Leksell Gamma Knife Society. The median age of the patients was 53 years. Fifty-six patients underwent GKS as their initial treatment, while 61 patients had previously undergone resection. At the time of GKS, 46 patients (39%) had hoarseness, 45 (38%) had hearing disturbances, and 43 (36%) had swallowing disturbances. Eighty-five tumors (73%) were solid, and 32 (27%) had cystic components. The median tumor volume was 4.9 cm(3), and the median prescription dose administered to the tumor margin was 12 Gy. Five patients were treated with fractionated GKS and maximum and marginal doses of 42 and 21 Gy, respectively, using a 3-fraction schedule. RESULTS The median follow-up period was 52 months. The last follow-up images showed partial remission in 62 patients (53%), stable tumors in 42 patients (36%), and tumor progression in 13 patients (11%). The actuarial 3- and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 91% and 89%, respectively. The multivariate analysis showed that pre-GKS brainstem edema and dumbbell-shaped tumors significantly affected PFS. During the follow-up period, 20 patients (17%) developed some degree of symptomatic deterioration. This condition was transient in 12 (10%) of these patients and persistent in 8 patients (7%). The cause of the persistent deterioration was tumor progression in 4 patients (3%) and adverse radiation effects in 4 patients (3%), including 2 patients with hearing deterioration, 1 patient with swallowing disturbance, and 1 patient with hearing deterioration and hypoglossal nerve palsy. However, the preexisting hoarseness and swallowing disturbances improved in 66% and 63% of the patients, respectively

  8. [Comparison of 2 systems for continuous intraoperative monitoring of oxygen saturation in the jugular bulb].

    PubMed

    García del Valle, S; Bartolomé, A; Menéndez, B; Azofra, J; Requejo, M D

    1996-02-01

    To compare accuracy, precision and stability of two jugular venous blood catheters for continuous monitoring of oxygen saturation during surgery, in a nonrandom, prospective sample. We studied 47 patients requiring continuous monitoring of SjvO2 during a variety of neurosurgical procedures. Swan-Ganz pediatric 5.5F catheters (Opticath P575-EH) were used in 27 patients; neonatal umbilical artery 4F catheters (Opticath U425C) were used in 20. Both catheters were equipped with a fiberoptic system for continuous monitoring of hemoglobin oxygen saturation. After checking correct placement, readings transmitted were compared with co-oximetry readings for a sample taken from the distal end of the catheter. We also compared time spent placing the catheters and stability of SjvO2 reading during surgery. Insertion time (+/- SD) was 10.3 +/- 2.5 minutes for the 4F catheter and 15.9 +/- 5.5 minutes for the 5.5F model (p < 0.01). Although both systems tended to overestimate, the 5.5F catheters were more accurate: the mean differences were -6.8% for the 4F catheter and -1.2% for the 5.5F. These results made it necessary to calibrate the 4F catheters after placement and before use, a procedure not needed if the 5.5F catheters are used. Stability of SjvO2 readings during surgery was significantly greater (p < 0.01) for the 5.5F catheters, such that only 25.9% were considered clinically useful based on this parameter. However, 70% of the 5.5F catheters provided acceptable SjvO2 readings. Intracranial pressure during insertion and removal of the SjvO2 catheters was measured in only 5 patients; there were no changes greater than 1 mmHg. Although the 5.5F pediatric catheters take longer to put into position, their greater accuracy, precision and stability makes them preferable to the 4F catheters for continuous monitoring of SjvO2. Long-term vascular effects must be studied further.

  9. Morphological and positional relationships between the sigmoid sinus and the jugular bulb.

    PubMed

    Dai, Pei-Dong; Zhang, Hong-Qi; Wang, Zheng-Min; Sha, Yan; Wang, Ke-Qiang; Zhang, Tian-Yu

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the quantitative relationships between the positions of the sigmoid sinus (SS) and jugular bulb (JB) and the influence of mastoid pneumatization upon these structures. The investigations were carried out on 116 healthy adult ears based on the axial images of computed tomography (CT). The reference system locating the displacements of the SS and JB was established and the shape and position of the SS and JB were measured. The volume of pneumatization was quantitatively measured based on the serial digital images of CT. The method of partial correlation analysis was used to find the real relationship of two variables from the complicated dependence relationships. There was a tendency for the SS in the males to be situated more laterally and more backwardly, and the JB in the males was situated more laterally with thicker lateral bone wall when compared to the females. When compared to the left side, the SS on the right side tended to protrude more deeply and was situated more laterally and with less thickness of the lateral bone wall. In male, the right SS was situated more anteriorly than the left SS. In female, the right JB was situated more posteriorly than the left JB. There was a tendency for the SS to be situated more medially, to have a thicker lateral bone wall, and to protrude more superficially in the well-pneumatized bones. When the pneumatization was well, the JB tended to be situated more backwards and have a thicker lateral bone wall. However, there was no significant difference of pneumatization between the high JB group and the low JB group. The SS position and JB position changed synchronously in forward-backward or medial-lateral directions. The results suggest that the factors that influence the shape and position of the SS and JB are multiple. The results suggest that the morphological and positional relationships between the SS and the JB are complicated but could be grasped. The development of the

  10. Early growth response gene-1 decoy oligonucleotides inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia of autogenous vein graft in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xisheng; Mei, Yunqing; Ji, Qiang; Feng, Jing; Cai, Jianzhi; Xie, Shiliang

    2015-07-01

    The excess proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the development of intimal hyperplasia is a hallmark of vein graft failure. This study aimed to verify that a single intraoperative transfection of early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) decoy oligonucleotide (ODN) can suppress vein graft proliferation of VSMCs and intimal hyperplasia. In a rabbit model, jugular veins were treated with Egr-1 decoy ODN, scrambled decoy ODN, Fugene6, or were left untreated, then grafted to the carotid artery. The vein graft samples were obtained 48 h, 1, 2 or 3 weeks after surgery. The thickness of the intima and intima/media ratio in the grafts was analysed by haematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. The expression of the Egr-1 decoy ODN transfected in the vein was analysed using fluorescent microscopy. Egr-1 mRNA was measured using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The expression of Egr-1 protein was analysed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Transfection efficiency of the ODN was confirmed by 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining. In the grafts treated with Egr-1 decoy ODN, our study achieved statistically significant inhibition of intimal hyperplasia by ∼58% at 3 weeks. Transfection of Egr-1 decoy ODNs decreased the protein expression of Egr-1 and Egr-1 mRNA. We confirmed that gene therapy using in vivo transfection of an Egr-1 decoy ODN significantly inhibits proliferation of VSMC and intimal hyperplasia of vein grafts in a rabbit model. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  11. Nanoparticle-Mediated Local Delivery of an Antisense TGF-β1 Construct Inhibits Intimal Hyperplasia in Autogenous Vein Grafts in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Da-Xin; Liu, Zhen; Tan, Xiao-Dong; Cui, Dong-Xu; Wang, Bao-Sheng; Dai, Xian-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Intimal hyperplasia is one of the most important causes of vascular graft failure. Numerous studies have correlated transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) with extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, a hallmark of intimal thickening. Principal Findings In the present study, we performed immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and Western blot to examine the dynamic expression of TGF-β1, TGF-β1 receptor type I (TGF-β RI), matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) during intimal hyperplasia in grafted veins of a rat model generated by grafting a portion of the right internal jugular vein to the ipisiliary caroid artery. Additionally, we determined whether nanoparticle-mediated delivery of a TGF-β1 antisense-expressing construct prevented TGF-β1 expression and intimal hyperplasia in grafted veins. In grafted veins, the expression of TGF-β1 significantly increased on day 3 after transplantation, peaked on day 7, slightly decreased on day 14, and returned to baseline levels on day 28. The positive expression of TGF-β RI in grafted veins remarkably increased on day 7, peaked on day 14, and decreased thereafter. MMP-1 expression decreased significantly, while TIMP-1 expression increased, significantly on days 14 and 28. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of a TGF-β1 antisense-expressing construct down-regulated TGF-β1 expression and inhibited intimal hyperplasia in grafted veins. Conclusions Our findings provide further evidence that TGF-β1 plays an integral role in the development of intimal hyperplasia after vascular injury. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of a TGF-β1 antisense-expressing construct is a feasible strategy to target TGF-β1-induced intimal thickening. PMID:22860019

  12. Apoptosis, cell proliferation and modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(cip1) in vascular remodelling during vein arterialization in the rat.

    PubMed

    Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Miyakawa, Ayumi Aurea; Cardoso, Leandro; de Figueiredo Borges, Luciano; Gonçalves, Giovana Aparecida; Krieger, Jose Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    Neo-intima development and atherosclerosis limit long-term vein